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Sample records for cs-induced pulmonary inflammation

  1. Inflammation and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rajamma

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious disorder with high morbidity and mortality rate. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that inflammation plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of PH. Endothelial cells play an important role in inflammation and immune reactions, and inflammatory cytokines cause endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of PH, consisting of reduced availability of vasodilators and antiproliferative factors and increased production of vasoconstrictors and vascular proliferative factors. Up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration have been detected in the lungs of patients with idiopathic PH. Prevalence of PH in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases is well documented. Interestingly, a significant loss of endothelial caveolin-1, a potent immunomodulator and an inhibitor of cell proliferation, has been reported in human and experimental forms of PH. Reduction in the expression of caveolin-1 is known to result in the removal of antiproliferative activities, thus, leading to deregulated vascular cell proliferation. This article summarizes the roles of inflammation and endothelial caveolin-1 and their possible interrelationship in PH.

  2. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue

  3. Cigarette smoke-induced disruption of pulmonary barrier and bacterial translocation drive tumor-associated inflammation and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungnickel, C; Wonnenberg, B; Karabiber, O; Wolf, A; Voss, M; Wolf, L; Honecker, A; Kamyschnikow, A; Herr, C; Bals, R; Beisswenger, C

    2015-09-15

    Microorganisms have an important role in tumorgenesis by the induction of inflammation and by a direct impact on tumor cells. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with an increased risk for lung cancer and microbial colonization. We asked whether bacterial pathogens act as tumor promoters during CS-induced pulmonary inflammation. In a metastatic lung cancer (LC) model, Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells were injected in mice to initiate the growth of tumors in the lung. Exposure to the combination of cigarette smoke (CS) and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) synergistically increased metastatic growth. Lung levels of albumin and LDH, translocation of bacterial factors into tumor tissue, tumor inflammation, and tumor proliferation were significantly increased in mice exposed to CS in combination with NTHi. Bacterial pathogens increased the proliferation of cultured LLC cells and human cancer cell lines. Metastatic growth induced by the exposure to CS in combination with NTHi was reduced in mice deficient for IL-17. Our data provide evidence that CS-induced loss of pulmonary barrier integrity allows bacterial factors to translocate into tumor tissue and to regulate tumor-associated inflammation and tumor proliferation. Translocation of bacterial factors in tumor tissue links CS-induced inflammation with tumor proliferation.

  4. Characteristics of pulmonary inflammation in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying; CUI Ai; WANG Feng; WANG Xiao-juan; CHEN Xing; JIN Mu-lan; HUANG Ke-wu

    2012-01-01

    Background The condition of concomitant upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe fibrosis as identified by computer tomography is known as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE).CPFE has distinct clinical characteristics compared with emphysema alone (EA) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) without emphysema.However,the pulmonary inflammation characteristics of CPFE are not well known,and the differences between CPFE and the other two diseases with regards to pulmonary inflammation need to be explored.The pulmonary inflammatory characteristics were investigated in CPFE patients and compared with EA and IPF.Methods Fraction exhaled nitric oxide (Fe,NO) and differential cell counts,the concentrations of monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG/CXCL9),interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10),and interferon-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC/CXCL11) were measured in induced sputum obtained from subjects with CPFE (n=22),EA (n=22),IPF (n=14),and healthy volunteers (HV,n=12).In addition,immunohistochemistry was used to quantify the expression of nitric oxide synthases in alveolar macrophages in 23 lung tissues from patients and control subjects.Results The CPFE group had higher alveolar NO than subjects in the EA and HV groups (P=0.009,P=0.001,respectively) but not than the IPF group (P >0.05).Numbers of sputum eosinophils were significantly elevated in CPFE and IPF groups compared with the HV group (P=0.001,P=-0.008).In contrast,eosinophil counts in EA group did not differ from those in the HV group.Compared with the EA and HV groups,the CPFE group had a lower concentration of Ⅰ-TAC/CXCL11 in sputum supernatants (P=-0.003,P=0.004).Immunoreactivity for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)was higher in the CPFE group than in the EA group (P=-0.018,P=0.006,respectively).Conclusions The pulmonary inflammation of CPFE group is more similar to IPF group,while the distal airway inflammation is more significant in CPFE and IPF groups than in EA

  5. Thioredoxin-1 protects against neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

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    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are characterized by acute enhancement of airway neutrophilic inflammation under oxidative stress and can be involved in emphysema progression. However, pharmacotherapy against the neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression associated with exacerbation has not been established. Thioredoxin-1 has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and it can ameliorate neutrophilic inflammation through anti-chemotactic effects and prevent cigarette smoke (CS-induced emphysema. We aimed to determine whether thioredoxin-1 can suppress neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of COPD exacerbation and if so, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to CS and then challenged with polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C], an agonist for virus-induced innate immunity. Airway neutrophilic inflammation, oxidative stress and lung apoptosis were enhanced in smoke-sensitive C57Bl/6, but not in smoke-resistant NZW mice. Exposure to CS and poly(I:C challenge accelerated emphysema progression in C57Bl/6 mice. Thioredoxin-1 suppressed neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression. Poly(I:C caused early neutrophilic inflammation through keratinocyte-derived chemokine and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF release in the lung exposed to CS. Late neutrophilic inflammation was caused by persistent GM-CSF release, which thioredoxin-1 ameliorated. Thioredoxin-1 enhanced pulmonary mRNA expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, and the suppressive effects of thioredoxin-1 on prolonged GM-CSF release and late neutrophilic inflammation disappeared by inhibiting MKP-1. CONCLUSION: Using a mouse model of COPD exacerbation, we demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 ameliorated neutrophilic inflammation by suppressing GM-CSF release, which prevented emphysema progression. Our findings deepen understanding of the mechanisms

  6. [Measurement of pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayon, M; Chiron, R; Abely, M

    2008-06-01

    Lung inflammation is a pivotal phenomenon in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis. Inflammation can be measured and quantified within a research perspective, as well as in daily clinical practice. In this review paper, the "Inflammation Task Force" of the "Société Française de Mucoviscidose" has reviewed the literature regarding the various techniques currently available (bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum analysis, nasal wash and brushing, exhaled breath condensates, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide, and systemic measurements (plasma and urine)). The interpretation of all these determinations in children and adults is also discussed.

  7. Tight junctions in pulmonary epithelia during lung inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Wittekindt, Oliver H.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory lung diseases like asthma bronchiale, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and allergic airway inflammation are widespread public diseases that constitute an enormous burden to the health systems. Mainly classified as inflammatory diseases, the treatment focuses on strategies interfering with local inflammatory responses by the immune system. Inflammatory lung diseases predispose patients to severe lung failures like alveolar oedema, respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung ...

  8. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in

  9. Effects of Schisandra chinensis extracts on cough and pulmonary inflammation in a cough hypersensitivity guinea pig model induced by cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shan; Nie, Yi-chu; Gan, Zhen-yong; Liu, Xiao-dong; Fang, Zhang-fu; Zhong, Bo-nian; Tian, Jin; Huang, Chu-qin; Lai, Ke-fang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2015-05-13

    Schisandra chinensis (S. chinensis) is a traditional Chinese medicine commonly used in prescription medications for the treatment of chronic cough. However, the material basis of S. chinensis in relieving cough has not been completely elucidated yet. This study established a guinea pig model of cough hypersensitivity induced by 14 days of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, to evaluate the antitussive, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects of three S. chinensis extracts. And then the function of four lignans in reducing expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was examined using A549 cells induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The results demonstrated that both ethanol extract (EE) and ethanol-water extract (EWE) of S. chinensis, but not water extract (WE), significantly reduced the cough frequency enhanced by 0.4M citric acid solution in these cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Meanwhile, pretreatment with EE and EWE both significantly attenuated the CS-induced increase in infiltration of pulmonary neutrophils and total inflammatory cells, as well as pulmonary MDA, TNF-α, and IL-8, while remarkably increased activities of pulmonary SOD and GSH. According to H&E and immunofluorescence staining assays, airway epithelium hyperplasia, smooth muscle thickening, inflammatory cells infiltration, as well as expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1, were significantly attenuated in animals pretreatment with 1g/kg EE. Moreover, four lignans of EE, including schizandrin, schisantherin A, deoxyschizandrin and γ-schisandrin, significantly inhibited CSE-induced expression of TRPV1, TRPA1 and NOS3, as well as NO release in A549 cells. In conclusion, S. chinensis reduces cough frequency and pulmonary inflammation in the CS-induced cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Lignans may be the active components.

  10. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined.

  11. Inflammation and airway microbiota during cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations.

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    Edith T Zemanick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary exacerbations (PEx, frequently associated with airway infection and inflammation, are the leading cause of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF. Molecular microbiologic approaches detect complex microbiota from CF airway samples taken during PEx. The relationship between airway microbiota, inflammation, and lung function during CF PEx is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationships between airway microbiota, inflammation, and lung function in CF subjects treated for PEx. METHODS: Expectorated sputum and blood were collected and lung function testing performed in CF subjects during early (0-3d. and late treatment (>7d. for PEx. Sputum was analyzed by culture, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons, and quantitative PCR for total and specific bacteria. Sputum IL-8 and neutrophil elastase (NE; and circulating C-reactive protein (CRP were measured. RESULTS: Thirty-seven sputum samples were collected from 21 CF subjects. At early treatment, lower diversity was associated with high relative abundance (RA of Pseudomonas (r = -0.67, p<0.001, decreased FEV(1% predicted (r = 0.49, p = 0.03 and increased CRP (r = -0.58, p = 0.01. In contrast to Pseudomonas, obligate and facultative anaerobic genera were associated with less inflammation and higher FEV₁. With treatment, Pseudomonas RA and P. aeruginosa by qPCR decreased while anaerobic genera showed marked variability in response. Change in RA of Prevotella was associated with more variability in FEV₁ response to treatment than Pseudomonas or Staphylococcus. CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobes identified from sputum by sequencing are associated with less inflammation and higher lung function compared to Pseudomonas at early exacerbation. CF PEx treatment results in variable changes of anaerobic genera suggesting the need for larger studies particularly of patients without traditional CF pathogens.

  12. Hfe deficiency impairs pulmonary neutrophil recruitment in response to inflammation.

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    Karolina Benesova

    Full Text Available Regulation of iron homeostasis and the inflammatory response are tightly linked to protect the host from infection. Here we investigate how imbalanced systemic iron homeostasis in a murine disease model of hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe(-/- mice affects the inflammatory responses of the lung. We induced acute pulmonary inflammation in Hfe(-/- and wild-type mice by intratracheal instillation of 20 µg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS and analyzed local and systemic inflammatory responses and iron-related parameters. We show that in Hfe(-/- mice neutrophil recruitment to the bronchoalveolar space is attenuated compared to wild-type mice although circulating neutrophil numbers in the bloodstream were elevated to similar levels in Hfe(-/- and wild-type mice. The underlying molecular mechanisms are likely multifactorial and include elevated systemic iron levels, alveolar macrophage iron deficiency and/or hitherto unexplored functions of Hfe in resident pulmonary cell types. As a consequence, pulmonary cytokine expression is out of balance and neutrophils fail to be recruited efficiently to the bronchoalveolar compartment, a process required to protect the host from infections. In conclusion, our findings suggest a novel role for Hfe and/or imbalanced iron homeostasis in the regulation of the inflammatory response in the lung and hereditary hemochromatosis.

  13. Association of current smoking with airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asymptomatic smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, BWM; ten Hacken, NHT; Rutgers, B; Postma, DS; Timens, W

    2005-01-01

    Background: Inflammation in the airways and lung parenchyma underlies fixed airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The exact role of smoking as promoting factor of inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is not clear, partly because studies often do not distinguis

  14. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

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    Elisabetta Balestro

    Full Text Available The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC change/year (< or ≥10% predicted was used to define "slow" or "rapid" disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48 showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25. Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005. In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression.

  15. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

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    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo; Cosio, Manuel G; Saetta, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (slow" or "rapid" disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression.

  16. Balance impairment and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Tudorache E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Tudorache,1 Cristian Oancea,1 Claudiu Avram,2 Ovidiu Fira-Mladinescu,1 Lucian Petrescu,3 Bogdan Timar4 1Department of Pulmonology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Victor Babes”, 2Physical Education and Sport Faculty, West University of Timisoara, 3Department of Cardiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Victor Babes”, 4Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Victor Babes”, Timisoara, Romania Background/purpose: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with systemic inflammation and balance impairment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact on equilibrium of stable and exacerbation (acute exacerbation of COPD [AECOPD] phases of COPD and to investigate if there is a connection between lower extremity muscle weakness and systemic inflammation.Methods: We enrolled 41 patients with COPD (22 stable and 19 in AECOPD and 20 healthy subjects (control group, having no significant differences regarding the anthropometric data. We analyzed the differences in balance tests scores: Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I questionnaire, Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Timed Up and Go (TUG test, Single Leg Stance (SLS, 6-minute walking distance (6MWD, isometric knee extension (IKE between these groups, and also the correlation between these scores and inflammatory biomarkers.Results: The presence and severity of COPD was associated with significantly decreased score in IKE (P<0.001, 6MWD (P<0.001, SLS (P<0.001, and BBS (P<0.001, at the same time noting a significant increase in median TUG score across the studied groups (P<0.001. The AECOPD group vs stable group presented a significant increase in high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP levels (10.60 vs 4.01; P=0.003 and decrease in PaO2 (70.1 vs 59.1; P<0.001. We observed that both IKE scores were significantly and positive correlated with all the respiratory volumes

  17. Protective role of interleukin-10 in Ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation**

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    Background: The mechanisms underlying ozone (03)-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is known to inhibit inflammatory mediators. Objectives: We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying interleuken-10...

  18. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

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    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  19. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

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    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  20. Balance impairment and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Tudorache, Emanuela; Oancea, Cristian; Avram, Claudiu; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Petrescu, Lucian; Timar, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background/purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with systemic inflammation and balance impairment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact on equilibrium of stable and exacerbation (acute exacerbation of COPD [AECOPD]) phases of COPD and to investigate if there is a connection between lower extremity muscle weakness and systemic inflammation. Methods We enrolled 41 patients with COPD (22 stable and 19 in AECOPD) and 20 healthy subjects (control group), having no significant differences regarding the anthropometric data. We analyzed the differences in balance tests scores: Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) questionnaire, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, Single Leg Stance (SLS), 6-minute walking distance (6MWD), isometric knee extension (IKE) between these groups, and also the correlation between these scores and inflammatory biomarkers. Results The presence and severity of COPD was associated with significantly decreased score in IKE (P<0.001), 6MWD (P<0.001), SLS (P<0.001), and BBS (P<0.001), at the same time noting a significant increase in median TUG score across the studied groups (P<0.001). The AECOPD group vs stable group presented a significant increase in high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels (10.60 vs 4.01; P=0.003) and decrease in PaO2 (70.1 vs 59.1; P<0.001). We observed that both IKE scores were significantly and positive correlated with all the respiratory volumes. In both COPD groups, we observed that fibrinogen reversely and significantly correlated with the 6MWD, and FES-I questionnaire is correlated positively with TUG test. Hs-CRP correlated reversely with the walking test and SLS test, while correlating positively with TUG test and FES-I questionnaire. Conclusion According to this study, COPD in advanced and acute stages is associated with an increased history of falls, systemic inflammation, balance impairment, and lower extremity

  1. Dynamic hyperinflation and pulmonary inflammation: a potentially relevant relationship?

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    A. Agusti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, end-expiratory lung volume increases under conditions of greater minute ventilation (e.g. exercise. This abnormal response is termed dynamic hyperinflation (DH and has now been recognised as a key determinant of symptomatology and exercise intolerance in COPD. Reduced elastic recoil, loss of alveolar attachments and increased airway resistance are the mechanical factors traditionally invoked to explain the occurrence of DH in COPD. An abnormal inflammatory response to, most frequently, tobacco smoking is a key pathophysiological component of COPD, but its potential relationship with DH has not been directly investigated and is poorly understood. The present article discusses, first, the mechanisms by which DH can enhance inflammation in COPD (including cellular stretching, tissue damage and danger signals, hyperventilation and hypoxia. It then reviews how the abnormal inflammatory response that characterises the disease can augment DH (oedema and increased airway resistance, increased mucus production and alveolar destruction. Finally, it speculates that if these relationships eventually prove to be real, then the use of long-acting bronchodilators may help reduce the inflammatory load of these patients and, conversely, the use of anti-inflammatory therapy can contribute to the reduction of DH.

  2. H2S inhibits pulmonary arterial endothelial cell inflammation in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

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    Feng, Shasha; Chen, Siyao; Yu, Wen; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to determine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits pulmonary arterial endothelial inflammation in rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension and its possible mechanisms. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided randomly into control, MCT, and MCT+H2S treatment groups. Human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAEC) were cultured and divided into four groups: control, MCT, MCT+H2S, and H2S. Pulmonary artery pressure was determined using a right cardiac catheterization procedure 3 weeks after MCT administration. Pulmonary vascular morphological changes and inflammatory infiltration were measured. Endogenous H2S levels, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) expression, and inflammatory cytokines were determined both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα was detected by western blotting, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, as well as its DNA-binding activity, was determined. Pulmonary hypertension and vascular remolding developed 3 wks after MCT administration, with elevated lung tissue inflammatory infiltration and cytokine level associated with activation of the NF-κB pathway, both in vivo and in vitro. However, the endogenous H2S/CSE pathway was downregulated in MCT rats. By contrast, an H2S donor markedly reduced pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular structural remolding, and increased lung inflammatory infiltration and cytokine levels of MCT-treated rats. Meanwhile, H2S reversed the activation of the NF-κB pathway successfully. The downregulated pulmonary arterial endothelial H2S/CSE pathway is involved in the pulmonary inflammatory response in MCT-treated pulmonary hypertensive rats. H2S attenuated endothelial inflammation by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  3. [TLR-4 involvement in pyroptosis of mice with pulmonary inflammation infected by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

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    Hu, Peipei; Huang, Fushen; Niu, Junchao; Tang, Zhaoshan

    2015-05-04

    Pyroptosis is a caspase-1 dependent programmed cell death and involves pathogenesis of infectious diseases by releasing many pro-inflammatory cytokines to induced inflammation. TLR-4 plays an important role in mediating pathogenesis of some infectious diseases. In this study, we detected the expression of TLR-4 and some molecules (e. g caspase-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 ) related with pyroptosis to determine its involvement and mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation in mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. Mice were intranasally infected by A. pleuropneumoniae and killed 48 hours post infection. Pulmonary gross lesion and histological pathology by H-E were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1 , caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, and TLR-4 in lung of mice were detected by RT-PCR and qPCR. Serious pulmonary hemorrhage and inflammation in infected mice were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1, caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and TLR-4 increased, and expression levels of caspase-3 were not changed in lung of infected mice. TLR-4 might be involved in pulmonary inflammation of mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. After induced by activated TLR-4 some cells in this lesion expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines would induce pulmonary inflammation. This lesion might involve pyroptosis with caspase-1 expression.

  4. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

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    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  5. The role of inflammation and autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

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    Kherbeck, Nada; Tamby, Mathieu C; Bussone, Guillaume; Dib, Hanadi; Perros, Frederic; Humbert, Marc; Mouthon, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by a remodeling of pulmonary arteries with endothelial cell, fibroblast, and vascular smooth muscle cell activation and proliferation. Since pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs frequently in autoimmune conditions such as systemic sclerosis, inflammation and autoimmunity have been suspected to play a critical role in both idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension. High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and interleukin-6, platelet-derived growth factor, or macrophage inflammatory protein 1 have been found in lung samples of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, along with inflammatory cell infiltrates mainly composed of macrophages and dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes. In addition, circulating autoantibodies are found in the peripheral blood of patients. Thus, autoimmunity and inflammation probably play a role in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this setting, it would be important to set-up new experimental models of pulmonary arterial hypertension, in order to define novel therapeutics that specifically target immune disturbances in this devastating condition.

  6. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

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    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients.

  7. Systemic and pulmonary inflammation is independent of skeletal muscle changes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Bethan L; McKenna, Susan; Mistry, Vijay; Pancholi, Mitesh; Patel, Hemu; Haldar, Koirobi; Barer, Michael R; Pavord, Ian D; Steiner, Michael C; Brightling, Christopher E; Bafadhel, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional depletion is an important manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which has been related to systemic inflammation. It remains unclear to what degree airway inflammation contributes to the presence or progression of nutritional depletion. To determine whether airway inflammation and lung bacterial colonization are related to nutritional status or predict progressive weight loss and muscle atrophy in patients with COPD. Body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, indices of airway inflammation, and bacterial colonization were measured in 234 COPD patients. Systemic inflammation was assessed from serum C reactive protein (CRP) and circulating total and differential leukocyte counts. Nutritional depletion was defined as a body mass index (BMI) less than 21 kg/m(2) and/or fat-free mass index (FFMI) less than 15 or 17 kg/m(2) in women and men, respectively. FFMI was calculated as the fat-free mass (FFM) corrected for body surface area. Measurements were repeated in 94 patients after a median 16-month follow-up. Regression analysis was used to assess the relationships of weight change and FFM change with indices of bacterial colonization and airway and systemic inflammation. Nutritional depletion occurred in 37% of patients. Lung function was worsened in patients with nutritional depletion compared to those without (forced expiratory volume in 1 second 1.17 L versus 1.41 L, mean difference 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.10 to 0.38, Pnutritional depletion. At baseline, BMI correlated positively with serum CRP (rs=0.14, P=0.04). Change in weight and change in FFM over time could not be predicted from baseline patient characteristics. Nutritional depletion and progressive muscle atrophy are not related to airway inflammation or bacterial colonization. Overspill of pulmonary inflammation is not a key driver of muscle atrophy in COPD.

  8. Effect of salbutamol on pulmonary responsiveness in chronic pulmonary allergic inflammation in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasahara D.I.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-2-agonists have been widely used by asthmatic subjects to relieve their obstructive symptoms. However, there are reports that continuous use could lead to loss of bronchial protection and exacerbation of asthma symptoms. We evaluated the effect of two regimens of salbutamol administration (twice and five times a week in a model of chronic airway inflammation in male Hartley guinea pigs (protocol starting weight: 286 ± 30 g induced by repeated exposures to aerosols of ovalbumin (OVA. After sensitization, guinea pigs were exposed to aerosols of 0.1 mg/ml salbutamol solution twice a week (OVA + S2x, N = 7 or five times a week (OVA + S5x, N = 8. We studied allergen-specific (OVA inhalation time and -nonspecific (response to methacholine respiratory system responsiveness. Seventy-two hours after the last OVA challenge, guinea pigs were anesthetized and tracheostomized, respiratory system resistance and elastance were measured and a dose-response curve to inhaled methacholine chloride was obtained. Specific IgG1 was also quantified by the passive cutaneous anaphylactic technique. OVA-sensitized guinea pigs (N = 8 showed reduction of the time of OVA exposure before the onset of respiratory distress, at the 5th, 6th and 7th exposures (P < 0.001. The OVA + S2x group (but not the OVA + S5x group showed a significant increase in OVA inhalation time. There were no significant differences in pulmonary responsiveness to methacholine among the experimental groups. OVA + S2x (but not OVA + S5x animals showed a decrease in the levels of IgG1-specific anaphylactic antibodies compared to the OVA group (P < 0.05. Our results suggest that, in this experimental model, frequent administration of ß2-agonists results in a loss of some of their protective effects against the allergen.

  9. Effect of infliximab on local and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentener, Mieke A.; Creutzberg, Eva C.; Pennings, Herman-Jan; Rijkers, Ger T.; Mercken, Evi; Wouters, Emiel F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( COPD) with cachexia is characterized by inflammation reflected by increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Objectives: In this study, infliximab, an anti-TNF-alpha antibody, was evaluated for its effects on systemic ( plasma) an

  10. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in a guinea pig model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation : II. Effects on skeletal muscle atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, Koen J P; Pansters, Nicholas A M; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Remels, Alexander H V; Haegens, Astrid; de Theije, Chiel C; Schols, Annemie M W J; Gosens, Reinoud; Langen, Ramon C J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is accompanied by pulmonary inflammation and associated with extra-pulmonary manifestations, including skeletal muscle atrophy. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the regulation of muscle protein- and myonuclear turnover

  12. Sesame Oil Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Pulmonary Edema and Bronchial Neutrophilic Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dur-Zong Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allergic asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases of airways. Severe asthma may lead to hospitalization and death. Sesame oil is a natural product with anti-inflammatory property. However, the effect of sesame oil on allergic asthma has never been studied. Objective. We investigate the effect of sesame oil on pulmonary inflammation in allergic asthma model. Methods. Allergic airway inflammation was induced by sensitizing with two doses of 10 mg ovalbumin (OVA and then challenged with 1% OVA nebulizer exposure (1 h/day for 3 days. Sesame oil (0.25, 0.5, or 1 mL/kg/day was given orally 30 min before each challenge. Samples were collected 24 h after the last challenge. Results. Data showed that sesame oil inhibited pulmonary edema and decreased interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in OVA-treated mice. Sesame oil also decreased pulmonary nitrite level, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and neutrophil infiltration induced by OVA. Further, sesame oil decreased serum IgE level in OVA-treated mice. Conclusion. Sesame oil may attenuate pulmonary edema and bronchial neutrophilic inflammation by inhibiting systemic IgE level in allergic asthma.

  13. Airborne fine particulate matter induced pulmonary inflammation as well as oxidative stress in neonate rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Li-ren; WANG Kai; Baher Fahmy; SHEN Hua-hao; Cormier Stephania

    2010-01-01

    Background Airborne fine particulate matter (PM) can induce pulmonary inflammation which may adversely affect human health, but very few reports about its effect on the neonate rats are available. This study aimed to observe the potential impact and toxicity of fine PMs on the airway in neonate rats.Methods Pulmonary inflammation, cytotoxicity, histopathology, and antioxidants as well as oxidant products were assessed 24 hours after intratracheal instillation of fine PM consecutively for 3 days. Cytotoxicity of fine PM was measured in Hep-2 cells.Results Rats treated with high dose fine PM developed significant pulmonary inflammation characterized by neutrophiland macrophage infiltration. The inflammatory process was related to elevated level of TNF-α and prooxidant/antioxidant imbalance in the lung. Cytotoxicity studies performed in human epithelial cells indicated that high dose fine PM significantly reduced cell viability.Conclusion The study demonstrated acute exposure to fine PM induced airway inflammation as well as increased oxidative stress in addition to its direct toxic effect on airway epithelium cells.

  14. IL-18 induces airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary inflammation via CD4+ T cell and IL-13.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Sawada

    Full Text Available IL-18 plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary inflammatory diseases including pulmonary infection, pulmonary fibrosis, lung injury and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, it is unknown whether IL-18 plays any role in the pathogenesis of asthma. We hypothesized that overexpression of mature IL-18 protein in the lungs may exacerbate disease activities of asthma. We established lung-specific IL-18 transgenic mice on a Balb/c genetic background. Female mice sensitized- and challenged- with antigen (ovalbumin were used as a mouse asthma model. Pulmonary inflammation and emphysema were not observed in the lungs of naïve transgenic mice. However, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammatory cells accompanied with CD4(+ T cells, CD8(+ T cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and macrophages were significantly increased in ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged transgenic mice, as compared to wild type Balb/c mice. We also demonstrate that IL-18 induces IFN-γ, IL-13, and eotaxin in the lungs of ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged transgenic mice along with an increase in IL-13 producing CD4(+ T cells. Treatment with anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody or deletion of the IL-13 gene improves ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and reduces airway inflammatory cells in transgenic mice. Overexpressing the IL-18 protein in the lungs induces type 1 and type 2 cytokines and airway inflammation, and results in increasing airway hyperresponsiveness via CD4(+ T cells and IL-13 in asthma.

  15. Vanadium pentoxide induces pulmonary inflammation and tumor promotion in a strain-dependent manner

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    Bauer Alison K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated levels of air pollution are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Particulate matter (PM contains transition metals that may potentiate neoplastic development through the induction of oxidative stress and inflammation, a lung cancer risk factor. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5 is a component of PM derived from fuel combustion as well as a source of occupational exposure in humans. In the current investigation we examined the influence of genetic background on susceptibility to V2O5-induced inflammation and evaluated whether V2O5 functions as a tumor promoter using a 2-stage (initiation-promotion model of pulmonary neoplasia in mice. Results A/J, BALB/cJ (BALB, and C57BL/6J (B6 mice were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA; 10 μg/g; i.p. or corn oil followed by 5 weekly aspirations of V2O5 or PBS and pulmonary tumors were enumerated 20 weeks following MCA treatment. Susceptibility to V2O5-induced pulmonary inflammation was assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and chemokines, transcription factor activity, and MAPK signaling were quantified in lung homogenates. We found that treatment of animals with MCA followed by V2O5 promoted lung tumors in both A/J (10.3 ± 0.9 tumors/mouse and BALB (2.2 ± 0.36 mice significantly above that observed with MCA/PBS or V2O5 alone (P 2O5 were also found to be more susceptible to V2O5-induced pulmonary inflammation and hyperpermeability (A/J>BALB>B6. Differential strain responses in inflammation were positively associated with elevated levels of the chemokines KC and MCP-1, higher NFκB and c-Fos binding activity, as well as sustained ERK1/2 activation in lung tissue. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that V2O5, an occupational and environmentally relevant metal oxide, functions as an in vivo lung tumor promoter among different inbred strains of mice. Further, we identified a positive relationship between tumor promotion and susceptibility

  16. Microbiota Promotes Chronic Pulmonary Inflammation by Enhancing IL-17A and Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Koshika; Pattaroni, Céline; Sichelstiel, Anke K; Trompette, Aurélien; Gollwitzer, Eva S; Salami, Olawale; von Garnier, Christophe; Nicod, Laurent P; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2016-05-01

    Changes in the pulmonary microbiota are associated with progressive respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Whether there is a causal relationship between these changes and disease progression remains unknown. To investigate the link between an altered microbiota and disease, we used a murine model of chronic lung inflammation that is characterized by key pathological features found in COPD and compared responses in specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice and mice depleted of microbiota by antibiotic treatment or devoid of a microbiota (axenic). Mice were challenged with LPS/elastase intranasally over 4 weeks, resulting in a chronically inflamed and damaged lung. The ensuing cellular infiltration, histological damage, and decline in lung function were quantified. Similar to human disease, the composition of the pulmonary microbiota was altered in diseased animals. We found that the microbiota richness and diversity were decreased in LPS/elastase-treated mice, with an increased representation of the genera Pseudomonas and Lactobacillus and a reduction in Prevotella. Moreover, the microbiota was implicated in disease development as mice depleted, or devoid, of microbiota exhibited an improvement in lung function, reduced inflammation, and lymphoid neogenesis. The absence of microbial cues markedly decreased the production of IL-17A, whereas intranasal transfer of fluid enriched with the pulmonary microbiota isolated from diseased mice enhanced IL-17A production in the lungs of antibiotic-treated or axenic recipients. Finally, in mice harboring a microbiota, neutralizing IL-17A dampened inflammation and restored lung function. Collectively, our data indicate that host-microbial cross-talk promotes inflammation and could underlie the chronicity of inflammatory lung diseases.

  17. Protection against fine particle-induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Lei; Liu, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chih-Yu; Pai, Victor J; Kang, Jing X

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter, such as through air pollution, has been linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases. However, few measures have been taken to reduce the health risks associated with fine particle exposure. The identification of safe and effective methods to protect against fine particle exposure-related damage is urgently needed. We used synthetic, non-toxic, fluorescent fine particles to investigate the physical distribution of inhaled fine particles and their effects on pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice. Tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids were elevated via dietary supplementation or the fat-1 transgenic mouse model. Markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed. We discovered that fine particulate matter not only accumulates in the lungs but can also penetrate the pulmonary barrier and travel into other organs, including the brain, liver, spleen, kidney, and testis. These particles induced both pulmonary and systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress. We also show that elevating tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids was effective in reducing fine particle-induced inflammation, whether as a preventive method (prior to exposure) or as an intervention (after exposure). These results advance our understanding of how fine particles contribute to disease development and suggest that increasing tissue omega-3 levels may be a promising nutritional means for reducing the risk of diseases induced by particle exposure. Our findings demonstrate that elevating tissue omega-3 levels can prevent and treat fine particle-induced health problems and thereby present an immediate, practical solution for reducing the disease burden of air pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of interleukin-6 on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and lung inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izziki Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of various forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH. Recent studies in patients with idiopathic PH or PH associated with underlying diseases suggest a role for interleukin-6 (IL-6. Methods To determine whether endogenous IL-6 contributes to mediate hypoxic PH and lung inflammation, we studied IL-6-deficient (IL-6-/- and wild-type (IL-6+/+ mice exposed to hypoxia for 2 weeks. Results Right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and the number and media thickness of muscular pulmonary vessels were decreased in IL-6-/- mice compared to wild-type controls after 2 weeks' hypoxia, although the pressure response to acute hypoxia was similar in IL-6+/+ and IL-6-/- mice. Hypoxia exposure of IL-6+/+ mice led to marked increases in IL-6 mRNA and protein levels within the first week, with positive IL-6 immunostaining in the pulmonary vessel walls. Lung IL-6 receptor and gp 130 (the IL-6 signal transducer mRNA levels increased after 1 and 2 weeks' hypoxia. In vitro studies of cultured human pulmonary-artery smooth-muscle-cells (PA-SMCs and microvascular endothelial cells revealed prominent synthesis of IL-6 by PA-SMCs, with further stimulation by hypoxia. IL-6 also markedly stimulated PA-SMC migration without affecting proliferation. Hypoxic IL-6-/- mice showed less inflammatory cell recruitment in the lungs, compared to hypoxic wild-type mice, as assessed by lung protein levels and immunostaining for the specific macrophage marker F4/80, with no difference in lung expression of adhesion molecules or cytokines. Conclusion These data suggest that IL-6 may be actively involved in hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice.

  19. Human C-C chemokine receptor 3 monoclonal antibody inhibits pulmonary inflammation in allergic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Wen LI; Hua-qiong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of C-C chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) blockade on pulmonary inflammation and mucus production in allergic mice. Methods:We used the synthetic peptide of the CCR3 NH2-terminal as the immunizing antigen and generated murine monoclonal antibody against the human CCR3. In addition,the generated antibody was administered to mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. The inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage,cytokine levels,pulmonary histopathology,and mucus secretion were examined. Results:The Western blotting analysis indicated that the generated antibody bound to CCR3 specifically. The allergic mice treated with the antihuman CCR3 antibody exhibited a significant reduction of pulmonary inflammation accompanied with the alteration of cytokine. Conclusion:The antibody we generated was specific to CCR3. The inhibition of airway inflammation and mucus overproduction by the antibody suggested that the blockade of CCR3 is an appealing therapeutical target for asthma. The present research may provide an experimental basis for the further study of this agent.

  20. Bufei Huoxue Capsule Attenuates PM2.5-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

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    Yue Jing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5 may carry many toxic substances on its surface and this may pose a public health threat. Epidemiological research indicates that cumulative ambient PM2.5 is correlated to morbidity and mortality due to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Mitigating the toxic effects of PM2.5 is therefore highly desired. Bufei Huoxue (BFHX capsules have been used in China to treat pulmonary heart disease (cor pulmonale. Thus, we assessed the effects of BFHX capsules on PM2.5-induced pulmonary inflammation and the underlying mechanisms of action. Using Polysearch and Cytoscape 3.2.1 software, pharmacological targets of BFHX capsules in atmospheric PM2.5-related respiratory disorders were predicted and found to be related to biological pathways of inflammation and immune function. In a mouse model of PM2.5-induced inflammation established with intranasal instillation of PM2.5 suspension, BFHX significantly reduced pathological response and inflammatory mediators including IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-1β. BFHX also reduced keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA, and collagen fibers deposition in lung and improved lung function. Thus, BFHX reduced pathological responses induced by PM2.5, possibly via regulation of inflammatory mediators in mouse lungs.

  1. Bufei Huoxue Capsule Attenuates PM2.5-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yue; Cai, Zhe; Zhao, Yukun; Wu, Ye; Zheng, Xuan; Liu, Ying; Qin, Yuying; Gu, Mingjie; Jin, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5) may carry many toxic substances on its surface and this may pose a public health threat. Epidemiological research indicates that cumulative ambient PM2.5 is correlated to morbidity and mortality due to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Mitigating the toxic effects of PM2.5 is therefore highly desired. Bufei Huoxue (BFHX) capsules have been used in China to treat pulmonary heart disease (cor pulmonale). Thus, we assessed the effects of BFHX capsules on PM2.5-induced pulmonary inflammation and the underlying mechanisms of action. Using Polysearch and Cytoscape 3.2.1 software, pharmacological targets of BFHX capsules in atmospheric PM2.5-related respiratory disorders were predicted and found to be related to biological pathways of inflammation and immune function. In a mouse model of PM2.5-induced inflammation established with intranasal instillation of PM2.5 suspension, BFHX significantly reduced pathological response and inflammatory mediators including IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-1β. BFHX also reduced keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), and collagen fibers deposition in lung and improved lung function. Thus, BFHX reduced pathological responses induced by PM2.5, possibly via regulation of inflammatory mediators in mouse lungs.

  2. Diabetic Microvascular Disease and Pulmonary Fibrosis: The Contribution of Platelets and Systemic Inflammation

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    Rekha Jagadapillai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is strongly associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, but its effect on pulmonary vascular disease and lung function has often been disregarded. Several studies identified restrictive lung disease and fibrotic changes in diabetic patients and in animal models of diabetes. While microvascular dysfunction is a well-known complication of diabetes, the mechanisms leading to diabetes-induced lung injury have largely been disregarded. We described the potential involvement of diabetes-induced platelet-endothelial interactions in perpetuating vascular inflammation and oxidative injury leading to fibrotic changes in the lung. Changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS activation and decreased NO bioavailability in the diabetic lung increase platelet activation and vascular injury and may account for platelet hyperreactivity reported in diabetic patients. Additionally, the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT pathway has been reported to mediate pancreatic islet damage, and is implicated in the onset of diabetes, inflammation and vascular injury. Many growth factors and diabetes-induced agonists act via the JAK/STAT pathway. Other studies reported the contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway to the regulation of the pulmonary fibrotic process but the role of this pathway in the development of diabetic lung fibrosis has not been considered. These observations may open new therapeutic perspectives for modulating multiple pathways to mitigate diabetes onset or its pulmonary consequences.

  3. Inflammation in pulmonary hypertension: what we know and what we could logically and safely target first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Hautefort, Aurélie; Price, Laura; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in most of the animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and therapeutic targeting of inflammation in these models blocks PAH development. In humans, pulmonary vascular lesions of PAH are the source of cytokine and chemokine production, related to inflammatory cell recruitment and lymphoid neogenesis. Circulating autoantibodies to endothelial cells and to fibroblasts have been reported in 10-40% of patients with idiopathic PAH, suggesting a possible role for autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular lesions. Current specific PAH treatments have immunomodulatory properties, and some studies have demonstrated a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patient survival. New immunopathological approaches to PAH should enable the development of innovative treatments for this severe condition.

  4. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity following pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles in ApoE-/- mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun Jacobsen, Nicklas; Møller, Peter; Alstrup Jensen, Keld

    2009-01-01

    Background: The toxic and inflammatory potential of 5 different types of nanoparticles were studied in a sensitive model for pulmonary effects in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE(-/-)). We studied the effects instillation or inhalation Printex 90 of carbon black ( CB) and compared CB instilla......Background: The toxic and inflammatory potential of 5 different types of nanoparticles were studied in a sensitive model for pulmonary effects in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE(-/-)). We studied the effects instillation or inhalation Printex 90 of carbon black ( CB) and compared CB...... instillation in ApoE-/- and C57 mice. Three and 24 h after pulmonary exposure, inflammation was assessed by mRNA levels of cytokines in lung tissue, cell composition, genotoxicity, protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Results: Firstly, we found that intratracheal...... instillation of CB caused far more pulmonary toxicity in ApoE-/- mice than in C57 mice. Secondly, we showed that instillation of CB was more toxic than inhalation of a presumed similar dose with respect to inflammation in the lungs of ApoE(-/-) mice. Thirdly, we compared effects of instillation in ApoE-/- mice...

  5. Macrophage CD74 contributes to MIF-induced pulmonary inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Abed Yousef

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MIF is a critical mediator of the host defense, and is involved in both acute and chronic responses in the lung. Neutralization of MIF reduces neutrophil accumulation into the lung in animal models. We hypothesized that MIF, in the alveolar space, promotes neutrophil accumulation via activation of the CD74 receptor on macrophages. Methods To determine whether macrophage CD74 surface expression contributes MIF-induced neutrophil accumulation, we instilled recombinant MIF (r-MIF into the trachea of mice in the presence or absence of anti-CD74 antibody or the MIF specific inhibitor, ISO-1. Using macrophage culture, we examined the downstream pathways of MIF-induced activation that lead to neutrophil accumulation. Results Intratracheal instillation of r-MIF increased the number of neutrophils as well as the concentration of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC in BAL fluids. CD74 was found to be expressed on the surface of alveolar macrophages, and MIF-induced MIP-2 accumulation was dependent on p44/p42 MAPK in macrophages. Anti-CD74 antibody inhibited MIF-induced p44/p42 MAPK phosphorylation and MIP-2 release by macrophages. Furthermore, we show that anti-CD74 antibody inhibits MIF-induced alveolar accumulation of MIP-2 (control IgG vs. CD74 Ab; 477.1 ± 136.7 vs. 242.2 ± 102.2 pg/ml, p 4 vs. 1.90 ± 0.61 × 104, p Conclusion MIF-induced neutrophil accumulation in the alveolar space results from interaction with CD74 expressed on the surface of alveolar macrophage cells. This interaction induces p44/p42 MAPK activation and chemokine release. The data suggest that MIF and its receptor, CD74, may be useful targets to reduce neutrophilic lung inflammation, and acute lung injury.

  6. Sequential exposure to carbon nanotubes and bacteria enhances pulmonary inflammation and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedova, Anna A; Fabisiak, James P; Kisin, Elena R; Murray, Ashley R; Roberts, Jenny R; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Antonini, James M; Feng, Wei Hong; Kommineni, Choudari; Reynolds, Jeffrey; Barchowsky, Aaron; Castranova, Vince; Kagan, Valerian E

    2008-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT), with their applications in industry and medicine, may lead to new risks to human health. CNT induce a robust pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in rodents. Realistic exposures to CNT may occur in conjunction with other pathogenic impacts (microbial infections) and trigger enhanced responses. We evaluated interactions between pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and bacterial pulmonary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Listeria monocytogenes (LM). Mice were given SWCNT (0, 10, and 40 mug/mouse) and 3 days later were exposed to LM (10(3) bacteria/mouse). Sequential exposure to SWCNT/LM amplified lung inflammation and collagen formation. Despite this robust inflammatory response, SWCNT pre-exposure significantly decreased the pulmonary clearance of LM-exposed mice measured 3 to 7 days after microbial infection versus PBS/LM-treated mice. Decreased bacterial clearance in SWCNT-pre-exposed mice was associated with decreased phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and a decrease in nitric oxide production by these phagocytes. Pre-incubation of naïve alveolar macrophages with SWCNT in vitro also resulted in decreased nitric oxide generation and suppressed phagocytizing activity toward LM. Failure of SWCNT-exposed mice to clear LM led to a continued elevation in nearly all major chemokines and acute phase cytokines into the later course of infection. In SWCNT/LM-exposed mice, bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils, alveolar macrophages, and lymphocytes, as well as lactate dehydrogenase level, were increased compared with mice exposed to SWCNT or LM alone. In conclusion, enhanced acute inflammation and pulmonary injury with delayed bacterial clearance after SWCNT exposure may lead to increased susceptibility to lung infection in exposed populations.

  7. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W., E-mail: Gary.Hoyle@louisville.edu

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  8. P2Y6 Receptor Activation Promotes Inflammation and Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Müller

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a disease with a poor prognosis and very few available treatment options. The involvement of the purinergic receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2X7 in fibrotic lung disease has been demonstrated recently. In this study, we investigated the role of P2Y6 receptors in the pathogenesis of IPF in humans and in the animal model of bleomycin-induced lung injury. P2Y6R expression was upregulated in lung structural cells but not in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells derived from IPF patients as well as in animals following bleomycin administration. Furthermore, BAL fluid levels of the P2Y6R agonist uridine-5′-diphosphate were elevated in animals with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Inflammation and fibrosis following bleomycin administration were reduced in P2Y6R-deficient compared to wild-type animals confirming the pathophysiological relevance of P2Y6R subtypes for fibrotic lung diseases. Experiments with bone marrow chimeras revealed the importance of P2Y6R expression on lung structural cells for pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Similar effects were obtained when animals were treated with the P2Y6R antagonist MRS2578. In vitro studies demonstrated that proliferation and secretion of the pro-inflammatory/pro-fibrotic cytokine IL-6 by lung fibroblasts are P2Y6R-mediated processes. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate the involvement of P2Y6R subtypes in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, blocking pulmonary P2Y6 receptors might be a new target for the treatment of IPF.

  9. Impact of agglomeration state of nano- and submicron sized gold particles on pulmonary inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassee Flemming R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticle (NP toxicity testing comes with many challenges. Characterization of the test substance is of crucial importance and in the case of NPs, agglomeration/aggregation state in physiological media needs to be considered. In this study, we have addressed the effect of agglomerated versus single particle suspensions of nano- and submicron sized gold on the inflammatory response in the lung. Rats were exposed to a single dose of 1.6 mg/kg body weight (bw of spherical gold particles with geometric diameters of 50 nm or 250 nm diluted either by ultrapure water or by adding phosphate buffered saline (PBS. A single dose of 1.6 mg/kg bw DQ12 quartz was used as a positive control for pulmonary inflammation. Extensive characterization of the particle suspensions has been performed by determining the zetapotential, pH, gold concentration and particle size distribution. Primary particle size and particle purity has been verified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques. Pulmonary inflammation (total cell number, differential cell count and pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell damage (total protein and albumin and cytotoxicity (alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and acute systemic effects in blood (total cell number, differential cell counts, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein 3 and 24 hours post exposure. Uptake of gold particles in alveolar macrophages has been determined by TEM. Results Particles diluted in ultrapure water are well dispersed, while agglomerates are formed when diluting in PBS. The particle size of the 50 nm particles was confirmed, while the 250 nm particles appear to be 200 nm using tracking analysis and 210 nm using TEM. No major differences in pulmonary and systemic toxicity markers were observed after instillation of agglomerated versus single gold particles of different sizes. Both agglomerated as well as single nanoparticles were

  10. Effect of Naturally Occurring Ozone Air Pollution Episodes on Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

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    Cheryl Pirozzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx, 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate (EBC, spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5 vs. 28.6 (±17.6 μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01 and control participants (7.6 (±16.5 vs. 28.5 (±15.6 μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02. There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes.

  11. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity in mice lungs after pulmonary exposure to candle light combustion particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Damiao Gouveia, Ana Cecilia; Koponen, Ismo Kalevi; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen; Roursgaard, Martin

    2017-07-05

    Candle burning produces a large amount of particles that contribute substantially to the exposure to indoor particulate matter. The exposures to various types of combustion particles, such as diesel exhaust particles, have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer by mechanisms that involve oxidative stress, inflammation and genotoxicity. The aim of this study was to compare pulmonary effects of candle light combustion particles (CP) with two benchmark diesel exhaust particles (A-DEP and SRM2975). Intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of CP (5mg/kg bodyweight) in C57BL/6n mice produced a significant influx of alveolar macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes and increased concentrations of proteins and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar fluid. Lower levels of these markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity were observed after i.t. instillation of the same dose of A-DEP or SRM2975. The i.t. instillation of CP did not generate oxidative damage to DNA in lung tissue, measured as DNA strand breaks and human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-sensitive sites by the comet assay. The lack of genotoxic response was confirmed in lung epithelial (A549) cells, although the exposure to CP increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, pulmonary exposure to particles from burning candles is associated with inflammation and cytotoxicity in the lungs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) induction of pulmonary inflammation: a role in tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A K; Dwyer-Nield, L D; Keil, K; Koski, K; Malkinson, A M

    2001-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases predispose towards lung cancer by unknown mechanisms. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) administration to mice causes lung injury and a subsequent inflammatory response, and when administered chronically to certain inbred strains following carcinogen treatment, increases lung tumor multiplicity. We hypothesize that inflammation promotes lung tumor growth in this model system and have begun to examine this hypothesis by assessing inflammatory parameters in inbred strains that vary in their susceptibility to promotion. Positive correlations were found between susceptibilities to tumor promotion and BHT induction of alveolar macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration into alveolar airspaces, and increased vascular permeability (P BHT, along with decreased tumorigenesis after macrophage depletion, are consistent with a role of inflammation in promotion. Inflammatory mediators may provide targets for early diagnosis and chemoprevention.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea: overlaps in pathophysiology, systemic inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders in clinical practice, and cardiovascular diseases represent a major comorbidity in each disorder. The two disorders coexist (overlap syndrome) in approximately 1% of adults but asymptomatic lower airway obstruction together with sleep-disordered breathing is more prevalent. Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has similar prevalence in COPD as the general population, and vice versa, factors such as body mass index and smoking influence relationships. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation develops in COPD, independent of apnea\\/hypopnea, and is more severe in the overlap syndrome, thus predisposing to pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, upper airway flow limitation contributes to nocturnal desaturation in COPD without apnea\\/hypopnea. Evidence of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, involving C-reactive protein and IL-6, in addition to nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent pathways involving tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8, provides insight into potential basic interactions between both disorders. Furthermore, oxidative stress develops in each disorder, in addition to activation and\\/or dysfunction of circulating leukocytes. These findings are clinically relevant because systemic inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and the cell\\/molecular pathways involved are similar to those identified in COPD and sleep apnea. However, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea is not proven, and thus, studies of patients with the overlap syndrome should provide insight into the mechanisms of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  14. Trace Levels of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Bioactivity Are Concealed in a Mucosal Niche during Pulmonary Inflammation.

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    Antoine Ménoret

    Full Text Available Pathogen and cellular by-products released during infection or trauma are critical for initiating mucosal inflammation. The localization of these factors, their bioactivity and natural countermeasures remain unclear. This concept was studied in mice undergoing pulmonary inflammation after Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA inhalation. Highly purified bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF fractions obtained by sequential chromatography were screened for bioactivity and subjected to mass spectrometry. The Inflammatory and inhibitory potentials of the identified proteins were measured using T cells assays. A potent pro-inflammatory factor was detected in BALF, and we hypothesized SEA could be recovered with its biological activity. Highly purified BALF fractions with bioactivity were subjected to mass spectrometry. SEA was the only identified protein with known inflammatory potential, and unexpectedly, it co-purified with immunosuppressive proteins. Among them was lactoferrin, which inhibited SEA and anti-CD3/-CD28 stimulation by promoting T cell death and reducing TNF synthesis. Higher doses of lactoferrin were required to inhibit effector compared to resting T cells. Inhibition relied on the continual presence of lactoferrin rather than a programming event. The data show a fraction of bioactive SEA resided in a mucosal niche within BALF even after the initiation of inflammation. These results may have clinical value in human diagnostic since traces levels of SEA can be detected using a sensitive bioassay, and may help pinpoint potential mediators of lung inflammation when molecular approaches fail.

  15. Decreased pulmonary inflammation after ethanol exposure and burn injury in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 knockout mice.

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    Bird, Melanie D; Morgan, Michelle O; Ramirez, Luis; Yong, Sherri; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2010-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that alcohol consumption dysregulates immune function. Burn patients who consume alcohol before their injuries demonstrate higher rates of morbidity and mortality, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, than patients without alcohol at the time of injury. Our laboratory observed higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte infiltration in the lungs of mice after ethanol exposure and burn injury than with either insult alone. To understand the mechanism of the increased pulmonary inflammatory response in mice treated with ethanol and burn injury, we investigated the role of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Wild-type and ICAM-1 knockout (KO) mice were treated with vehicle or ethanol and subsequently given a sham or burn injury. Twenty-four hours postinjury, lungs were harvested and analyzed for indices of inflammation. Higher numbers of neutrophils were observed in the lungs of wild-type mice after burn and burn with ethanol treatment. This increase in pulmonary inflammatory cell accumulation was significantly lower in the KO mice. In addition, levels of KC, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6 in the lung were decreased in the ICAM-1 KO mice after ethanol exposure and burn injury. Interestingly, no differences were observed in serum or lung tissue content of soluble ICAM-1 24 hours postinjury. These data suggest that upregulation of adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 on the vascular endothelium may play a critical role in the excessive inflammation seen after ethanol exposure and burn injury.

  16. Acute effect of glucan-spiked office dust on nasal and pulmonary inflammation in guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straszek, Sune; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Nervana, Metwali

    2007-01-01

     office dust and glucan on nasal and pulmonary inflammation. This is relevant for humans with occupational exposure in waste handling and farming and buildings with mold problems.  Office dust collected from Danish offices was spiked with 1% (1-3)-β-glucan (curdlan). Guinea pig nasal cavity volume was measured...... by acoustic rhinometry (AR) and animals were exposed by inhalation for 4 hr to curdlan spiked dust, unspiked dust, purified air (negative controls) or LPS (positive controls). After exposure (+5 hr) or the following day (+18 hr) measurements were repeated by AR and followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL...... cells or IL-8 except in LPS-exposed controls. The delayed decrease of nasal cavity volume after exposure to glucan spiked dust suggests a slow effect on the upper airways for curdlan and office dust together, though no pulmonary response or direct signs of inflammation were observed. Glucan spiked...

  17. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  18. Monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with eosinophilic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, John; Newbold, Paul; Mustelin, Tomas; Anderson, Gary P; Kolbeck, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils have been linked with asthma for more than a century, but their role has been unclear. This review discusses the roles of eosinophils in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and describes therapeutic antibodies that affect eosinophilia. The aims of pharmacologic treatments for pulmonary conditions are to reduce symptoms, slow decline or improve lung function, and reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are important in managing symptoms and exacerbations in asthma and COPD. However, control with these agents is often suboptimal, especially for patients with severe disease. Recently, new biologics that target eosinophilic inflammation, used as adjunctive therapy to corticosteroids, have proven beneficial and support a pivotal role for eosinophils in the pathology of asthma. Nucala® (mepolizumab; anti-interleukin [IL]-5) and Cinquair® (reslizumab; anti-IL-5), the second and third biologics approved, respectively, for the treatment of asthma, exemplifies these new treatment options. Emerging evidence suggests that eosinophils may contribute to exacerbations and possibly to lung function decline for a subset of patients with COPD. Here we describe the pharmacology of therapeutic antibodies inhibiting IL-5 or targeting the IL-5 receptor, as well as other cytokines contributing to eosinophilic inflammation. We discuss their roles as adjuncts to conventional therapeutic approaches, especially ICS therapy, when disease is suboptimally controlled. These agents have achieved a place in the therapeutic armamentarium for asthma and COPD and will deepen our understanding of the pathogenic role of eosinophils.

  19. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambrecht Bart N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  20. Immune modulatory effects of IL-22 on allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation.

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    Ping Fang

    Full Text Available IL-22 is a Th17/Th22 cytokine that is increased in asthma. However, recent animal studies showed controversial findings in the effects of IL-22 in allergic asthma. To determine the role of IL-22 in ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation we generated inducible lung-specific IL-22 transgenic mice. Transgenic IL-22 expression and signaling activity in the lung were determined. Ovalbumin (OVA-induced pulmonary inflammation, immune responses, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR were examined and compared between IL-22 transgenic mice and wild type controls. Following doxycycline (Dox induction, IL-22 protein was readily detected in the large (CC10 promoter and small (SPC promoter airway epithelial cells. IL-22 signaling was evidenced by phosphorylated STAT3. After OVA sensitization and challenge, compared to wild type littermates, IL-22 transgenic mice showed decreased eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, and in lung tissue, decreased mucus metaplasia in the airways, and reduced AHR. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, IL-13 levels were reduced in the BAL fluid as well as in lymphocytes from local draining lymph nodes of IL-22 transgenic mice. No effect was seen on the levels of serum total or OVA-specific IgE or IgG. These findings indicate that IL-22 has immune modulatory effects on pulmonary inflammatory responses in allergen-induced asthma.

  1. Pulmonary inflammation after ethanol exposure and burn injury is attenuated in the absence of IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael M; Bird, Melanie D; Zahs, Anita; Deburghgraeve, Cory; Posnik, Bartlomiej; Davis, Christopher S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol consumption leads to an exaggerated inflammatory response after burn injury. Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality after injury, and high systemic and pulmonary levels of IL-6 have been observed after the combined insult of ethanol exposure and burn injury. To further investigate the role of IL-6 in the pulmonary inflammatory response, we examined leukocyte infiltration and cytokine and chemokine production in the lungs of wild-type and IL-6 knockout mice given vehicle or ethanol (1.11 g/kg) and subjected to a sham or 15% total body surface area burn injury. Levels of neutrophil infiltration and neutrophil chemoattractants were increased to a similar extent in wild-type and IL-6 knockout mice 24 h after burn injury. When ethanol exposure preceded the burn injury, however, a further increase of these inflammatory markers was seen only in the wild-type mice. Additionally, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) phosphorylation did not increase in response to ethanol exposure in the IL-6 knockout mice, in contrast to their wild-type counterparts. Visual and imaging analysis of alveolar wall thickness supported these findings and similar results were obtained by blocking IL-6 with antibody. Taken together, our data suggest a causal relationship between IL-6 and the excessive pulmonary inflammation observed after the combined insult of ethanol and burn injury.

  2. Proteoglycans: key regulators of pulmonary inflammation and the innate immune response to lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sean; Wight, Thomas N; Frevert, Charles W

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to viruses and bacteria results in lung infections and places a significant burden on public health. The innate immune system is an early warning system that recognizes viruses and bacteria, which results in the rapid production of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines and the pulmonary recruitment of leukocytes. When leukocytes emigrate from the systemic circulation through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to lung infection they encounter proteoglycans, which consist of a core protein and their associated glycosaminoglycans. In this review, we discuss how proteoglycans serve to modify the pulmonary inflammatory response and leukocyte migration through a number of different mechanisms including: (1) The ability of soluble proteoglycans or fragments of glycosaminoglycans to activate Toll-like receptor (TLRs) signaling pathways; (2) The binding and sequestration of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors by proteoglycans; (3) the ability of proteoglycans and hyaluronan to facilitate leukocyte adhesion and sequestration; and (4) The interactions between proteoglycans and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) that alter the function of these proteases. In conclusion, proteoglycans fine-tune tissue inflammation through a number of different mechanisms. Clarification of the mechanisms whereby proteoglycans modulate the pulmonary inflammatory response will most likely lead to new therapeutic approaches to inflammatory lung disease and lung infection.

  3. Clarithromycin ameliorates pulmonary inflammation induced by short term cigarette smoke exposure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masuo; Wada, Hiroo; Honda, Kojiro; Nakamoto, Keitaro; Inui, Toshiya; Sada, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Masato; Takata, Saori; Yokoyama, Takuma; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Ishii, Haruyuki; Goto, Hajime; Kamma, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is considered to be one of major causes of acute worsening of asthma as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Macrolide antibiotics have been reported to reduce the risk of exacerbations of COPD, and possibly neutrophilic asthma. However, the effect of clarithromycin (CAM) on pulmonary inflammation caused by short term exposure to cigarette smoke still remains to be investigated. C57BL/6J female mice were daily exposed to tobacco smoke using a tobacco smoke exposure system, or clean air for 8 days, while simultaneously treated with either oral CAM or vehicles. Twenty four hours after the last exposure, mice were anaesthetized and sacrificed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids were collected. Cellular responses in BAL fluids were evaluated. Levels of cytokine mRNA in the lung tissues were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Paraffin-embedded lung tissues were evaluated to quantitate degree of neutrophil infiltration. The numbers of total cells, macrophages and neutrophils in the BAL fluid of smoke-exposed mice were significantly increased as compared to clean air group. These changes were significantly ameliorated in CAM-treated mice. The lung morphological analysis confirmed decrease of neutrophils by CAM treatment. Studies by quantitative PCR demonstrated CAM treatment significantly reduced lung expression levels of IL-17A, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and MMP-9 induced by cigarette smoke. We demonstrate that CAM administration resolves enhanced pulmonary inflammation induced by short term cigarette smoke exposure in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation is aggravated in angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Giselle S; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria Glória; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A; Barcelos, Lucíola S; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José

    2016-12-01

    The angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)]/Mas receptor pathway is currently recognized as a counterbalancing mechanism of the renin-angiotensin system in different pathophysiological conditions. We have previously described that treatment with ANG-(1-7) attenuates lung inflammation and remodeling in an experimental model of asthma. In the present study, we investigated whether lack of the Mas receptor could alter the inflammatory response in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Mas receptor wild-type (MasWT) and knockout (MasKO) mice were subjected to four doses of OVA (20 μg/mice ip) with a 14-day interval. At the 21st day, nebulization with OVA (1%) was started, three times per week until the 46th day. Control groups received saline (0.9% ip) and were nebulized with saline (0.9%). MasWT-OVA developed a modest inflammatory response and minor pulmonary remodeling to OVA challenge. Strikingly, MasKO-OVA presented a significant increase in inflammatory cell infiltrate, increase in extracellular matrix deposition, increase in thickening of the alveolar parenchyma, increase in thickening of the smooth muscle layer of the pulmonary arterioles, increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in the lungs, characteristic of chronic asthma. Additionally, MasKO-OVA presented an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation compared with MasWT-OVA. Furthermore, MasKO-OVA showed a worse performance in a test of maximum physical exercise compared with MasWT-OVA. Our study shows that effects triggered by the Mas receptor are important to attenuate the inflammatory and remodeling processes in a model of allergic lung inflammation in mice. Our data indicate that impairment of the ANG-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway may lead to worsening of the pathophysiological changes of asthma. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Resolvin D1 Dampens Pulmonary Inflammation and Promotes Clearance of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croasdell, Amanda; Lacy, Shannon H; Thatcher, Thomas H; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2016-03-15

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, and exacerbations in patients with underlying inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In mice, NTHi is rapidly cleared, but a strong inflammatory response persists, underscoring the concept that NTHi induces dysregulation of normal inflammatory responses and causes a failure to resolve. Lipid-derived specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) play a critical role in the active resolution of inflammation by both suppressing proinflammatory actions and promoting resolution pathways. Importantly, SPMs lack the immunosuppressive properties of classical anti-inflammatory therapies. On the basis of these characteristics, we hypothesized that aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) would dampen NTHi-induced inflammation while still enhancing bacterial clearance. C57BL/6 mice were treated with AT-RvD1 and infected with live NTHi. AT-RvD1-treated mice had lower total cell counts and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and had earlier influx of macrophages. In addition, AT-RvD1-treated mice showed changes in temporal regulation of inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, with decreased KC at 6 h and decreased IL-6, TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 expression at 24 h post infection. Despite reduced inflammation, AT-RvD1-treated mice had reduced NTHi bacterial load, mediated by enhanced clearance by macrophages and a skewing toward an M2 phenotype. Finally, AT-RvD1 protected NTHi-infected mice from weight loss, hypothermia, hypoxemia, and respiratory compromise. This research highlights the beneficial role of SPMs in pulmonary bacterial infections and provides the groundwork for further investigation into SPMs as alternatives to immunosuppressive therapies like steroids.

  6. (--Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Reduces Cigarette Smoke-Induced Airway Neutrophilic Inflammation and Mucin Hypersecretion in Rats

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    Yingmin Liang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (--Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the major catechins in Chinese green tea, has been studied for its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties in cell and animal models. In this study, we aimed to analyze the effects of EGCG on cigarette smoke (CS-induced airway inflammation and mucus secretion in the CS-exposed rat model.Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into either sham air (SA or CS exposure. EGCG (50 mg/kg b.wt. was given by oral gavage every other day in both SA and CS-exposed animals. Oxidative stress and inflammatory markers were determined in serum and/or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by biochemical assays or ELISA. Lung morphological changes were examined by Periodic Acid-Schiff, Masson’s Trichrome staining and immunohistochemical analysis. Western blot analysis was performed to explore the effects of EGCG on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mediated signaling pathway.Results: (--Epigallocatechin-3-gallate treatment attenuated CS-induced oxidative stress, lung cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 release and neutrophil recruitment. CS exposure caused an increase in the number of goblet cells in line with MUC5AC upregulation, and increased lung collagen deposition, which were alleviated in the presence of EGCG. In addition, CS-induced phosphorylation of EGFR in rat lung was abrogated by EGCG treatment.Conclusion: (--Epigallocatechin-3-gallate treatment ameliorated CS-induced oxidative stress and neutrophilic inflammation, as well as airway mucus production and collagen deposition in rats. The present findings suggest that EGCG has a therapeutic effect on chronic airway inflammation and abnormal airway mucus production probably via inhibition of EGFR signaling pathway.

  7. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation and vagotomy on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model in rats.

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    Matthijs Kox

    Full Text Available Pulmonary inflammation contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury. Sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammation (first hit may be potentiated by mechanical ventilation (MV, second hit. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various animal models through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. We determined the effects of vagotomy (VGX and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were i.v. administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently underwent VGX, VNS or a sham operation. 1 hour following LPS, MV with low (8 mL/kg or moderate (15 mL/kg tidal volumes was initiated, or animals were left breathing spontaneously (SP. After 4 hours of MV or SP, rats were sacrificed. Cytokine and blood gas analysis was performed. MV with 15, but not 8 mL/kg, potentiated the LPS-induced pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokine response (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to LPS-SP, but did not affect systemic inflammation or impair oxygenation. VGX enhanced the LPS-induced pulmonary, but not systemic pro-inflammatory cytokine response in spontaneously breathing, but not in MV animals (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to SHAM, and resulted in decreased pO(2 (p<0.05 compared to sham-operated animals. VNS did not affect any of the studied parameters in both SP and MV animals. In conclusion, MV with moderate tidal volumes potentiates the pulmonary inflammatory response elicited by systemic LPS administration. No beneficial effects of vagus nerve stimulation performed following LPS administration were found. These results questions the clinical applicability of stimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in systemically inflamed patients admitted to the ICU where MV is initiated.

  8. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity following pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles in ApoE-/- mice

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    Ladefoged Ole

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The toxic and inflammatory potential of 5 different types of nanoparticles were studied in a sensitive model for pulmonary effects in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE-/-. We studied the effects instillation or inhalation Printex 90 of carbon black (CB and compared CB instillation in ApoE-/- and C57 mice. Three and 24 h after pulmonary exposure, inflammation was assessed by mRNA levels of cytokines in lung tissue, cell composition, genotoxicity, protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Results Firstly, we found that intratracheal instillation of CB caused far more pulmonary toxicity in ApoE-/- mice than in C57 mice. Secondly, we showed that instillation of CB was more toxic than inhalation of a presumed similar dose with respect to inflammation in the lungs of ApoE-/- mice. Thirdly, we compared effects of instillation in ApoE-/- mice of three carbonaceous particles; CB, fullerenes C60 (C60 and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT as well as gold particles and quantum dots (QDs. Characterization of the instillation media revealed that all particles were delivered as agglomerates and aggregates. Significant increases in Il-6, Mip-2 and Mcp-1 mRNA were detected in lung tissue, 3 h and 24 h following instillation of SWCNT, CB and QDs. DNA damage in BAL cells, the fraction of neutrophils in BAL cells and protein in BAL fluid increased statistically significantly. Gold and C60 particles caused much weaker inflammatory responses. Conclusion Our data suggest that ApoE-/- model is sensitive for evaluating particle induced inflammation. Overall QDs had greatest effects followed by CB and SWCNT with C60 and gold being least inflammatory and DNA-damaging. However the gold was used at a much lower mass dose than the other particles. The strong effects of QDs were likely due to Cd release. The surface area of the instilled dose correlated well the inflammatory response for low toxicity particles.

  9. Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cells Prevent Autoimmunity, but Induce Pulmonary Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanna Siegmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation is a major and critical component of the lung pathology in the hereditary disease cystic fibrosis. The molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation in cystic fibrosis require definition. Methods: We used several genetic mouse models to test a role of iNKT cells and ceramide in pulmonary inflammation of cystic fibrosis mice. Inflammation was determined by the pulmonary cytokine profil and the abundance of inflammatory cells in the lung. Results: Here we provide a new concept how inflammation in the lung of individuals with cystic fibrosis is initiated. We show that in cystic fibrosis mice the mutation in the Cftr gene provokes a significant up-regulation of iNKT cells in the lung. Accumulation of iNKT cells serves to control autoimmune disease, which is triggered by a ceramide-mediated induction of cell death in CF organs. Autoimmunity becomes in particular overt in cystic fibrosis mice lacking iNKT cells and although suppression of the autoimmune response by iNKT cells is beneficial, IL-17+ iNKT cells attract macrophages and neutrophils to CF lungs resulting in chronic inflammation. Genetic deletion of iNKT cells in cystic fibrosis mice prevents inflammation in CF lungs. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate an important function of iNKT cells in the chronic inflammation affecting cystic fibrosis lungs. iNKT cells suppress the auto-immune response induced by ceramide-mediated death of epithelial cells in CF lungs, but also induce a chronic pulmonary inflammation.

  10. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in a guinea pig model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation : II. Effects on skeletal muscle atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, Koen J. P.; Pansters, Nicholas A. M.; Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Remels, Alexander H. V.; Haegens, Astrid; de Theije, Chiel C.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Gosens, Reinoud; Langen, Ramon C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is accompanied by pulmonary inflammation and associated with extra-pulmonary manifestations, including skeletal muscle atrophy. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the regulation of muscle protein-and myonuclear turnover;

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in a guinea pig model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation : II. Effects on skeletal muscle atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, Koen J. P.; Pansters, Nicholas A. M.; Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Remels, Alexander H. V.; Haegens, Astrid; de Theije, Chiel C.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Gosens, Reinoud; Langen, Ramon C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is accompanied by pulmonary inflammation and associated with extra-pulmonary manifestations, including skeletal muscle atrophy. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the regulation of muscle protein-and myonuclear turnover;

  12. Systemic Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: May Adipose Tissue Play a Role? Review of the Literature and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzena Tkacova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Low-grade systemic inflammation is considered a hallmark of COPD that potentially links COPD to increased rate of systemic manifestations of the disease. Obesity with/without the metabolic syndrome and cachexia represent two poles of metabolic abnormalities that may relate to systemic inflammation. On one hand systemic inflammatory syndrome likely reflects inflammation in the lungs, i.e. results from lung-to plasma spillover of inflammatory mediators. On the other hand, obesity-related hypoxia results in local inflammatory response within adipose tissue per se, and may contribute to elevations in circulatory mediators by spillover from the adipose tissue to the systemic compartment. The extent to which systemic hypoxia contributes to the adipose tissue inflammation remains unknown. We assume that in patients with COPD and concurrent obesity at least three factors play a role in the systemic inflammatory syndrome: the severity of pulmonary impairment, the degree of obesity-related adipose tissue hypoxia, and the severity of systemic hypoxia due to reduced pulmonary functions. The present review summarizes the epidemiological and clinical evidence linking COPD to obesity, the role of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ, and the role of hypoxia in adipose tissue inflammation.

  13. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  14. Pulmonary inflammation and crystalline silica in respirable coal mine dust: dose-response

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E D Kuempel; M D Attfield; V Vallyathan; N L Lapp; J M Hale; R J Smith; V Castranova

    2003-02-01

    This study describes the quantitative relationships between early pulmonary responses and the estimated lungburden or cumulative exposure of respirable-quartz or coal mine dust. Data from a previous bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) study in coal miners ( = 20) and nonminers ( = 16) were used including cell counts of alveolar macrophages (AMs) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), and the antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Miners’ individual working lifetime particulate exposures were estimated from work histories and mine air sampling data, and quartz lung-burdens were estimated using a lung dosimetry model. Results show that quartz, as either cumulative exposure or estimated lung-burden, was a highly statistically significant predictor of PMN response ( < 0.0001); however cumulative coal dust exposure did not significantly add to the prediction of PMNs ( = 0.2) above that predicted by cumulative quartz exposure ( < 0.0001). Despite the small study size, radiographic category was also significantly related to increasing levels of both PMNs and quartz lung burden (-values < 0.04). SOD in BAL fluid rose linearly with quartz lung burden ( < 0.01), but AM count in BAL fluid did not ( > 0.4). This study demonstrates dose-response relationships between respirable crystalline silica in coal mine dust and pulmonary inflammation, antioxidant production, and radiographic small opacities.

  15. Role of pulmonary artery reactivity and nitric oxide in injury and inflammation following lung contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Knight, Paul R; Gugino, Sylvia F; Davidson, Bruce A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Nielsen, Lori C; Russell, James A; Yu, Bi; Zeng, Lixia; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms contributing to hypoxia in lung contusion (LC) remain unclear and not temporally associated with the peak onset of acute inflammation. We investigated the role of oxidative stress in alteration of pulmonary arterial (PA) reactivity following LC. In addition, the role of antioxidants in reversing this process was examined. PaO2 and PA reactivity were measured in rats subjected to bilateral LC. Rings were pretreated with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-nitro arginine (10(-3) M), or PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase (CAT), or both (L-nitro arginine + SOD/CAT). Rings were constricted with norepinephrine and relaxed with an NOS agonist (A23187) or NO donor (SNAP [S-nitrosyl amino penicillamine]). Immunochemical and mass spectrometric quantification for nitrotyrosine was performed. Rats were hypoxemic at 4 h after contusion compared with controls, but recovered by 24 h (PaO(2)/FIO(2) ratio: baseline, 443 ± 28; 4 h, 288 ± 46; and 24 h, 417 ± 23). Pulmonary arterial constriction to NOS inhibition and relaxation to A23187 were impaired 4 h after LC. Pulmonary arterial relaxation to SNAP was decreased at 4 and 24 h after LC. These alterations in PA reactivity were reversed by SOD/CAT pretreatment. SOD1 and 2 mRNA were upregulated, and soluble guanylyl cyclase mRNA was downregulated 24 h after LC. Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry revealed that levels of 3-nitrotyrosine were increased markedly at 4 h following LC consistent with superoxide generation and formation of peroxynitrite. Collectively, these data suggest that consumption of NO due to excess superoxide resulting in peroxynitrite formation leads to diminished vascular reactivity following LC.

  16. Coincident helminth infection modulates systemic inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parakkal Jovvian George

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB. However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity in TB is not known.We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB with or without Ss infection.Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection.Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease.

  17. Is airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) a risk factor for cardiovascular events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calverley, Peter M A; Scott, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a very common cause of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking is a well-described risk factor for both COPD and CVD, but CVD in patients with COPD is likely to be due to other factors in addition to smoking. Inflammation may be an important common etiological link between COPD and CVD, being well described in both diseases. It is hypothesized that in COPD a "spill-over" of local airway inflammation into the systemic circulation could contribute to increased CVD in these patients. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) have well-documented anti-inflammatory effects and are commonly used for the treatment of COPD, but their effects on cardiovascular endpoints and all-cause mortality have only just started to be examined. A recent meta-analysis has suggested that ICS may reduce all-cause mortality in COPD by around 25%. A case-controlled study specifically examined the effects of ICS on myocardial infarction and suggested that ICS may decrease the incidence of MI by as much as 32%. A large multicenter prospective randomized trial (Towards a Revolution in COPD Health [TORCH]) is now ongoing and will examine the effect of fluticasone propionate in combination with salmeterol on all-cause mortality.

  18. Mechanisms of particle-induced pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model: exposure to wood dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Juha; Lehto, Maili; Leino, Marina; Tillander, Sari; Haapakoski, Rita; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Wolff, Henrik; Rautio, Sari; Welling, Irma; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai; Alenius, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Repeated airway exposure to wood dust has long been known to cause adverse respiratory effects such as asthma and chronic bronchitis and impairment of lung function. However, the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory responses of the airways after wood dust exposure are poorly known. We used a mouse model to elucidate the mechanisms of particle-induced inflammatory responses to fine wood dust particles. BALB/c mice were exposed to intranasally administered fine (more than 99% of the particles had a particle size of dusts twice a week for 3 weeks. PBS, LPS, and titanium dioxide were used as controls. Intranasal instillation of birch or oak dusts elicited influx of inflammatory cells to the lungs in mice. Enhancement of lymphocytes and neutrophils was seen after oak dust exposure, whereas eosinophil infiltration was higher after birch dust exposure. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in lung tissue. Oak dust appeared to be a more potent inducer of these inflammatory mediators than birch dust. The results from our in vivo mouse model show that repeated airway exposure to wood dust can elicit lung inflammation, which is accompanied by induction of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Oak and birch dusts exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences in the elicitation of pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that the inflammatory responses induced by the wood species may rise via different cellular mechanisms.

  19. Lack of Correlation Between Pulmonary and Systemic Inflammation Markers in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Simultaneous, Two-Compartmental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Belen; Sauleda, Jaume; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Noguera, Aina; Monsó, Eduard; Gómez, Federico; Barreiro, Esther; Marín, Alicia; Antó, Josep Maria; Agusti, Alvar

    2016-07-01

    The origin of systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients remains to be defined, but one of the most widely accepted hypothesis is the 'spill over' of inflammatory mediators from the lung to the circulation. To evaluate the relationship between pulmonary and systemic inflammation in COPD quantifying several inflammatory markers in sputum and serum determined simultaneously. Correlations between various inflammatory variables (TNF-α, IL6, IL8) in sputum and serum were evaluated in 133 patients from the PAC-COPD cohort study. A secondary objective was the evaluation of relationships between inflammatory variables and lung function. Inflammatory markers were clearly higher in sputum than in serum. No significant correlation was found (absolute value, r=0.03-0.24) between inflammatory markers in blood and in sputum. There were no significant associations identified between those markers and lung function variables, such as FEV1, DLCO and PaO2 neither. We found no correlation between pulmonary and systemic inflammation in patients with stable COPD, suggesting different pathogenic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic reprogramming and inflammation act in concert to control vascular remodeling in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Kurt R; Tuder, Rubin M; El Kasmi, Karim C

    2015-11-15

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex, multifactorial syndrome that remains poorly understood despite decades of research. PH is characterized by profound pulmonary artery (PA) remodeling that includes significant fibro-proliferative and inflammatory changes of the PA adventitia. In line with the emerging concept that PH shares key features with cancer, recent work centers on the idea that PH results from a multistep process driven by reprogramming of gene-expression patterns that govern changes in cell metabolism, inflammation, and proliferation. Data demonstrate that in addition to PA endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, adventitial fibroblasts from animals with experimental hypoxic PH and from humans with PH (hereafter, termed PH-Fibs) exhibit proinflammatory activation, increased proliferation, and apoptosis resistance, all in the context of metabolic reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis. PH-Fibs can also recruit, retain, and activate naïve macrophages (Mϕ) toward a proinflammatory/proremodeling phenotype through secretion of chemokines, cytokines, and glycolytic metabolites, among which IL-6 and lactate play key roles. Furthermore, these fibroblast-activated Mϕ (hereafter, termed FAMϕ) exhibit aerobic glycolysis together with high expression of arginase 1, Vegfa, and I1lb, all of which require hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and STAT3 signaling. Strikingly, in situ, the adventitial Mϕ phenotype in the remodeled PA closely resembles the Mϕ phenotype induced by fibroblasts in vitro (FAMϕ), suggesting that FAMϕ crosstalk involving metabolic and inflammatory signals is a critical, pathogenetic component of vascular remodeling. This review discusses metabolic and inflammatory changes in fibroblasts and Mϕ in PH with the goal of raising ideas about new interventions to abrogate remodeling in hypoxic forms of PH.

  1. IL-6/Stat3-driven pulmonary inflammation, but not emphysema, is dependent on interleukin-17A in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwanpura, Saleela M; McLeod, Louise; Brooks, Gavin D; Bozinovski, Steven; Vlahos, Ross; Longano, Anthony; Bardin, Philip G; Anderson, Gary P; Jenkins, Brendan J

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is linked to T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation, although the pathogenic role of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines remains unclear. The Th17 type response, characterized by the production of the cytokine interleukin (IL)-17A, is modulated in part by the IL-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 signalling axis and is associated with numerous autoimmune diseases. We therefore evaluated a causal role for IL-17A in the IL-6-driven gp130(F/F) mouse model for spontaneous pulmonary inflammation and emphysema. The expression of Th17-related factors was quantified in the lungs of gp130(F/F) mice and emphysematous patients, and the degree of pulmonary inflammation and emphysema was measured in gp130(F/F)  : Il17a-/- mice by immunohistochemistry, stereology and respiratory mechanics. In gp130(F/F) mice, lung gene expression of Il17a and other Th17-related factors was augmented compared with gp130+/+ (wild-type), gp130(F/F)  : Il6-/- and gp130(F/F)  : Stat3-/+ mice displaying normalized Stat3 activity and no lung inflammation. Importantly, genetic ablation of Il17a in gp130(F/F)  : Il17a-/- mice prevented lung inflammation; however, emphysema still developed. Additionally, messenger RNA expression of inflammatory genes Cxcl1, Cxcl2, Ccl2 and Tnfα; as well as Il6 and the Stat3-target gene, Socs3, were upregulated in the lungs of gp130(F/F) mice compared with gp130(F/F)  : Il17a-/- and gp130+/+ mice. Consistent with these findings, augmented IL17A expression was observed in emphysema patients presenting with inflammation compared with inflammation-free individuals. Collectively, our data suggest that the integration of IL-17A into the IL-6/Stat3 signalling axis mediates lung inflammation, but not emphysema, and that discrete targeting of IL-17A may alleviate pulmonary inflammatory-related diseases. © 2014 The Authors. Respirology © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Hansen, Thomas

    Inflammation is an intricate response relying on the activation and response of both the innate immune system and the infected tissue to remove a threat. The pro-inflammatory NF-kappaB pathway has been studied extensively, among others because of its key role in regulation of inflammation. However...

  3. Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Hansen, Thomas

    Inflammation is an intricate response relying on the activation and response of both the innate immune system and the infected tissue to remove a threat. The pro-inflammatory NF-kappaB pathway has been studied extensively, among others because of its key role in regulation of inflammation. However...

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma as modulator of inflammation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejčić Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR includes the family of ligand-activated transcription factors which belong to the group of nuclear hormone receptors and are connected to retinoid, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. There are three subtypes of PPARs: PPARα (also known as NR1C3, PPARγ (known as NR1C1 and PPARδ (known as PPARβ or NR1C2. All of them take part in the metabolism, cell proliferation and immune response. PPARγ and PPARα are identified as important immunomodulators and potentially represent an anti-inflammatory target for respiratory diseases. PPARγ deficiency in the lungs has been observed in the inflammatory diseases such as asthma, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, fibrosis and sarcoidosis, as well as in the animal models of the lung inflammation. A small number of papers concerned with PPARγ in sarcoidosis point to the lowered activity of this factor in the alveolar macrophages and a lowered gene expression for the PPARγ, while the activity is preserved in healthy individuals. At the same time, an increased activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB in the bronchoalveolar lavage has been recorded in patients with sarcoidosis. The reason for the decrease in the production of PPARγ in sarcoidosis remains unknown. Several possible mechanisms are mentioned: genetic defect with lowered production, down-regulation due to the increased values of IFN-γ or an increased decomposition of PPARγ. Further investigation will explain the mechanisms regarding the decreased production of PPARγ in sarcoidosis.

  5. Acrolein induced both pulmonary inflammation and the death of lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Ito, Sachiko; Nishio, Naomi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Chen, Nana; Isobe, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-02

    Acrolein, a compound found in cigarette smoke, is a major risk factor for respiratory diseases. Previous research determined that both acrolein and cigarette smoke produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). As many types of pulmonary injuries are associated with inflammation, this study sought to ascertain the extent to which exposure to acrolein advanced inflammatory state in the lungs. Our results showed that intranasal exposure of mice to acrolein increased CD11c(+)F4/80(high) macrophages in the lungs and increased ROS formation via induction of NF-κB signaling. Treatment with acrolein activated macrophages and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. In in vitro studies, acrolein treatment of bone marrow-derived GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages (GM-IMs), activated the cells and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acrolein treatment of macrophages induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Inclusion of an inhibitor of ROS formation markedly decreased acrolein-mediated macrophage activation and reduced the extent of epithelial cell death. These results indicate that acrolein can cause lung damage, in great part by mediating the increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/factors by macrophages.

  6. A Plant Proteinase Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum Attenuates Pulmonary Mechanics, Inflammation and Remodeling Induced by Elastase in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Martins-Oliveira, Bruno Tadeu; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Prado, Carla Máximo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Lobo, Yara Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2017-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and may represent a potential therapeutic treatment for emphysema. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a plant Kunitz proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on several aspects of experimental elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. C57/Bl6 mice were intratracheally administered elastase (ELA) or saline (SAL) and were treated intraperitoneally with EcTI (ELA-EcTI, SAL-EcTI) on days 1, 14 and 21. On day 28, pulmonary mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and number leucocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. Subsequently, lung immunohistochemical staining was submitted to morphometry. EcTI treatment reduced responses of the mechanical respiratory system, number of cells in the BALF, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells and volume proportion of isoprostane, collagen and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. EcTI treatment reduced elastase induced pulmonary inflammation, remodeling, oxidative stress and mechanical alterations, suggesting that this inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. PMID:28216579

  7. A Plant Proteinase Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum Attenuates Pulmonary Mechanics, Inflammation and Remodeling Induced by Elastase in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Martins-Oliveira, Bruno Tadeu; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Prado, Carla Máximo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Lobo, Yara Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2017-02-14

    Proteinase inhibitors have been associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and may represent a potential therapeutic treatment for emphysema. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a plant Kunitz proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on several aspects of experimental elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. C57/Bl6 mice were intratracheally administered elastase (ELA) or saline (SAL) and were treated intraperitoneally with EcTI (ELA-EcTI, SAL-EcTI) on days 1, 14 and 21. On day 28, pulmonary mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and number leucocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. Subsequently, lung immunohistochemical staining was submitted to morphometry. EcTI treatment reduced responses of the mechanical respiratory system, number of cells in the BALF, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells and volume proportion of isoprostane, collagen and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. EcTI treatment reduced elastase induced pulmonary inflammation, remodeling, oxidative stress and mechanical alterations, suggesting that this inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management.

  8. Chronic allergic inflammation causes vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 hypomorph and wild-type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Mushaben

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2 gene have been identified in patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; however, disease penetrance is low, suggesting additional factors play a role. Inflammation is associated with PAH and vascular remodeling, but whether allergic inflammation triggers vascular remodeling in individuals with BMPR2 mutations is unknown. Our goal was to determine if chronic allergic inflammation would induce more severe vascular remodeling and PAH in mice with reduced BMPR-II signaling. Groups of Bmpr2 hypomorph and wild-type (WT Balb/c/Byj mice were exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen, intranasally for 7 or 20 weeks to generate a model of chronic inflammation. HDM exposure induced similar inflammatory cell counts in all groups compared to controls. Muscularization of pulmonary arterioles and arterial wall thickness were increased after 7 weeks HDM, more severe at 20 weeks, but similar in both groups. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP was measured by direct cardiac catheterization to assess PAH. RVSP was similarly increased in both HDM exposed groups after 20 weeks compared to controls, but not after 7 weeks. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR to methacholine was also assessed and interestingly, at 20 weeks, was more severe in HDM exposed Bmpr2 hypomorph mice versus WT. We conclude that chronic allergic inflammation caused PAH and while the severity was mild and similar between WT and Bmpr2 hypomorph mice, AHR was enhanced with reduced BMPR-II signaling. These data suggest that vascular remodeling and PAH resulting from chronic allergic inflammation occurs independently of BMPR-II pathway alterations.

  9. Reducing LPS content in cockroach allergens increases pulmonary cytokine production without increasing inflammation: A randomized laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruikshank William

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endotoxins are ubiquitously present in the environment and constitute a significant component of ambient air. These substances have been shown to modulate the allergic response, however a consensus has yet to be reached whether they attenuate or exacerbate asthmatic responses. The current investigation examined whether reducing the concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in a house dust extract (HDE containing high concentrations of both cockroach allergens 1 and LPS would attenuate asthma-like pulmonary inflammation. Methods Mice were sensitized with CRA and challenged with the intact HDE, containing 182 ng of LPS, or an LPS-reduced HDE containing 3 ng LPS, but an equivalent amount of CRA. Multiple parameters of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation were measured. Results Compared to HDE challenged mice, the LPS-reduced HDE challenged mice had significantly reduced TNFα levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Plasma levels of IgE and IgG1 were significantly reduced, however no change in CRA-specific IgE was detected. In HDE mice, plasma IgG2a levels were similar to naïve mice, while LPS-reduced HDE mice had significantly greater concentrations. Reduced levels of LPS in the HDE did not decrease eosinophil or neutrophil recruitment into the alveolar space. Equivalent inflammatory cell recruitment occurred despite having generally higher pulmonary concentrations of eotaxins and CXC chemokines in the LPS-reduced HDE group. LPS-reduced HDE challenge induced significantly higher concentrations of IFNγ, and IL-5 and IL-13 in the BAL fluid, but did not decrease airways hyperresponsiveness or airway resistance to methacholine challenge. Conclusion: These data show that reduction of LPS levels in the HDE does not significantly protect against the severity of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation.

  10. Variability in ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation in healthy and cardiovascular-compromised rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen D; Thomas, Ronald F; Richards, Judy E; Ward, William O; Schladweiler, Mette C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure dependent on the type and severity of disease. Healthy male 12-14-week-old Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WS) and Sprague Dawley (SD); and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHSP), obese spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) and obese JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h; pulmonary injury and inflammation were analyzed immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein was higher in CVD strains except for FHH when compared to healthy. Ozone-induced increases in protein and inflammation were concentration-dependent within each strain but the degree of response varied from strain to strain and with time. Among healthy rats, SD were least affected. Among CVD strains, lean rats were more susceptible to protein leakage from ozone than obese rats. Ozone caused least neutrophilic inflammation in SH and SHHF while SHSP and FHH were most affected. BALF neutrophils and protein were poorly correlated when considering the entire dataset (r = 0.55). The baseline and ozone-induced increases in cytokine mRNA varied markedly between strains and did not correlate with inflammation. These data illustrate that the degree of ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation response is likely influenced by both genetic and physiological factors that govern the nature of cardiovascular compromise in CVD models.

  11. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  12. Antibody/doxycycline combined therapy for pulmonary ricinosis: Attenuation of inflammation improves survival of ricin-intoxicated mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Gal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ricin, a highly toxic plant-derived toxin, is considered a potential weapon in biological warfare due to its high availability and ease of preparation. Pulmonary exposure to ricin results in the generation of an acute edematous inflammation followed by respiratory insufficiency and death. Passive immunization with polyclonal anti-ricin antibodies conferred protection against pulmonary ricinosis, however, at clinically-relevant time points for treatment, survival rates were limited. In this study, intranasal instillation of a lethal dose of ricin to mice, served as a lung challenge model for the evaluation and comparison of different therapeutic modalities against pulmonary ricinosis. We show that treatment with doxycycline resulted in a significant reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, markers of oxidative stress and capillary permeability in the lungs of the mice. Moreover, survival rates of mice intoxicated with ricin and treated 24 h later with anti-ricin antibody were significantly improved by co-administration of doxycycline. In contrast, co-administration of the steroid drug dexamethasone with anti-ricin antibodies did not increase survival rates when administered at late hours after intoxication, however dexamethasone did exert a positive effect on survival when applied in conjunction with the doxycycline treatment. These studies strongly suggest that combined therapy, comprised of neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies and an appropriate anti-inflammatory agent, can promote high-level protection against pulmonary ricinosis at clinically-relevant time points post-exposure.

  13. Multi-walled carbon nanotube physicochemical properties predict pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Lung deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) induces pulmonary toxicity. Commercial MWCNT vary greatly in physicochemical properties and consequently in biological effects. To identify determinants of MWCNT-induced toxicity, we analyzed the effects of pulmonary exposure to 10 commerci...

  14. Multi-walled carbon nanotube physicochemical properties predict pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten;

    2016-01-01

    Lung deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) induces pulmonary toxicity. Commercial MWCNT vary greatly in physicochemical properties and consequently in biological effects. To identify determinants of MWCNT-induced toxicity, we analyzed the effects of pulmonary exposure to 10 commercial...

  15. Klotho Reduction in Alveolar Macrophages Contributes to Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingling; Wang, Yujie; Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Sini; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal inflammation and accelerated decline in lung function occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Klotho, an anti-aging protein, has an anti-inflammatory function. However, the role of Klotho has never been investigated in COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Klotho by alveolar macrophages in airway inflammation in COPD. Klotho levels were assessed in the lung samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. The regulation of Klotho expression by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was studied in vitro, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) and recombinant Klotho were employed to investigate the role of Klotho on CSE-induced inflammation. Klotho expression was reduced in alveolar macrophages in the lungs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COPD patients. CSE decreased Klotho expression and release from MH-S cells. Knockdown of endogenous Klotho augmented the expression of the inflammatory mediators, such as MMP-9, IL-6, and TNF-α, by MH-S cells. Exogenous Klotho inhibited the expression of CSE-induced inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, we showed that Klotho interacts with IκBα of the NF-κB pathway. Dexamethasone treatment increased the expression and release level of Klotho in MH-S cells. Our findings suggest that Klotho plays a role in sustained inflammation of the lungs, which in turn may have therapeutic implications in COPD.

  16. Sildenafil attenuates pulmonary inflammation and fibrin deposition, mortality and right ventricular hypertrophy in neonatal hyperoxic lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boersma Hester

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition with sildenafil has been used to treat severe pulmonary hypertension and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, a chronic lung disease in very preterm infants who were mechanically ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Sildenafil treatment was investigated in 2 models of experimental BPD: a lethal neonatal model, in which rat pups were continuously exposed to hyperoxia and treated daily with sildenafil (50–150 mg/kg body weight/day; injected subcutaneously and a neonatal lung injury-recovery model in which rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by 9 days of recovery in room air and started sildenafil treatment on day 6 of hyperoxia exposure. Parameters investigated include survival, histopathology, fibrin deposition, alveolar vascular leakage, right ventricular hypertrophy, and differential mRNA expression in lung and heart tissue. Results Prophylactic treatment with an optimal dose of sildenafil (2 × 50 mg/kg/day significantly increased lung cGMP levels, prolonged median survival, reduced fibrin deposition, total protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, inflammation and septum thickness. Treatment with sildenafil partially corrected the differential mRNA expression of amphiregulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in the lung and of brain and c-type natriuretic peptides and the natriuretic peptide receptors NPR-A, -B, and -C in the right ventricle. In the lethal and injury-recovery model we demonstrated improved alveolarization and angiogenesis by attenuating mean linear intercept and arteriolar wall thickness and increasing pulmonary blood vessel density, and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH. Conclusion Sildenafil treatment, started simultaneously with exposure to hyperoxia after birth, prolongs survival, increases pulmonary cGMP levels, reduces the pulmonary

  17. Differences in inflammation and acute phase response but similar genotoxicity in mice following pulmonary exposure to graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtson, Stefan; Knudsen, KB; Kyjovska, ZO

    2017-01-01

    the lowest dose was evaluated. GO induced a strong acute inflammatory response together with a pulmonary (Serum-Amyloid A, Saa3) and hepatic (Saa1) acute phase response. rGO induced less acute, but a constant and prolonged inflammation up to day 90. Lung histopathology showed particle agglomerates at day 90...... without signs of fibrosis. In addition, DNA damage in BAL cells was observed across time points and doses for both GO and rGO. In conclusion, pulmonary exposure to GO and rGO induced inflammation, acute phase response and genotoxicity but no fibrosis.......We investigated toxicity of 2-3 layered >1 μm sized graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in mice following single intratracheal exposure with respect to pulmonary inflammation, acute phase response (biomarker for risk of cardiovascular disease) and genotoxicity. In addition, we...

  18. Association of air pollution sources and aldehydes with biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary inflammation, and systemic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemose, Brent; Robson, Mark G; Kipen, Howard M; Ohman Strickland, Pamela; Meng, Qingyu; Gong, Jicheng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangfa; Rich, David Q; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Junfeng

    2016-07-20

    Using data collected before, during, and after the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing, this study examines associations between biomarkers of blood coagulation (vWF, sCD62P and sCD40L), pulmonary inflammation (EBC pH, EBC nitrite, and eNO), and systemic oxidative stress (urinary 8-OHdG) with sources of air pollution identified utilizing principal component analysis and with concentrations of three aldehydes of health concern. Associations between the biomarkers and the air pollution source types and aldehydes were examined using a linear mixed effects model, regressing through seven lag days and controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, gender, and day of week for the biomarker measurements. The biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation, particularly EBC pH and eNO, were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The biomarkers for blood coagulation, particularly vWF and sCD62p, were most consistently associated with oil combustion. Systemic oxidative stress biomarker (8-OHdG) was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. The associations of the biomarkers were generally not significant or consistent with secondary formation of pollutants and with the aldehydes. The findings support policies to control anthropogenic pollution sources rather than natural soil or road dust from a cardio-respiratory health standpoint.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 20 July 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.38.

  19. Donor smoking is associated with pulmonary edema, inflammation and epithelial dysfunction in ex vivo human donor lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae W.; Wickersham, Nancy; Nguyen, John; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Although recipients of donor lungs from smokers have worse clinical outcomes, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We tested the association between donor smoking and the degree of pulmonary edema (as estimated by lung weight), the rate of alveolar fluid clearance (measured by airspace instillation of 5% albumin) and biomarkers of lung epithelial injury and inflammation (bronchoalveolar lavage surfactant protein-D and IL-8) in ex vivo lungs recovered from 298 organ donors. The extent of pulmonary edema was higher in current smokers (n=127) compared to non-smokers (median 408g, IQR 364-500 vs. 385g, IQR 340 - 460, p=0.009). Oxygenation at study enrollment was worse in current smokers versus non-smokers (median PaO2/FiO2 214 mmHg, IQR 126-323 vs. 266 mmHg, IQR 154-370, p=0.02). Current smokers with the highest exposure (≥20 pack-years) had significantly lower rates of alveolar fluid clearance, suggesting that the effects of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial fluid transport function may be dose related. BAL IL-8 was significantly higher in smokers while surfactant protein-D was lower. These findings indicate that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke has important effects on inflammation, gas exchange, lung epithelial function and lung fluid balance in the organ donor that could influence lung function in the lung transplant recipient. PMID:25146497

  20. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  1. Resveratrol alleviate hypoxic pulmonary hypertension via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidant pathways in rats

    OpenAIRE

    XU, DUNQUAN; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yanxia; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Dong, Mingqing; Liu, Manling; Dong, Haiying; Zhao, Pengtao; Li, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant-derived polyphenolic compound and a phytoestrogen, was shown to possess multiple protective effects including anti-inflammatory response and anti-oxidative stress. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a progressive disease characterized by sustained vascular resistance and marked pulmonary vascular remodeling. The exact mechanisms of HPH are still unclear, but inflammatory response and oxidative stress was demonstrated to participate in the progression of HPH. The pres...

  2. P2X7 receptor and caspase 1 activation are central to airway inflammation observed after exposure to tobacco smoke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suffwan Eltom

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is a cigarette smoke (CS-driven inflammatory airway disease with an increasing global prevalence. Currently there is no effective medication to stop the relentless progression of this disease. It has recently been shown that an activator of the P2X7/inflammasome pathway, ATP, and the resultant products (IL-1β/IL-18 are increased in COPD patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of the P2X7/caspase 1 pathway has a functional role in CS-induced airway inflammation. Mice were exposed to CS twice a day to induce COPD-like inflammation and the role of the P2X7 receptor was investigated. We have demonstrated that CS-induced neutrophilia in a pre-clinical model is temporally associated with markers of inflammasome activation, (increased caspase 1 activity and release of IL-1β/IL-18 in the lungs. A selective P2X7 receptor antagonist and mice genetically modified so that the P2X7 receptors were non-functional attenuated caspase 1 activation, IL-1β release and airway neutrophilia. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the role of this pathway was not restricted to early stages of disease development by showing increased caspase 1 activation in lungs from a more chronic exposure to CS and from patients with COPD. This translational data suggests the P2X7/Inflammasome pathway plays an ongoing role in disease pathogenesis. These results advocate the critical role of the P2X7/caspase 1 axis in CS-induced inflammation, highlighting this as a possible therapeutic target in combating COPD.

  3. ROLE OF TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 IN AIRWAY INFLAMMA-TION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Min; RONG Xia-jun; WAN Huan-ying; HUANG Shao-guang; LI Biao; LI Min

    2008-01-01

    Objective To confirm if pulmonary epithelial cells express Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and investigate the role of TLR4 in airway inflammation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods The expressions of TLR4, IL-8 mRNA and NF-κB activation stimulated by differen factors [lipopolysacharides (LPS), interleukin-1β, cigarette smoking extract (CSE)] in pulmonary epithelial cells were investigated. Results LPS, CSE and IL-1β induced the production of IL-8 and activation of NF-κB. The levels of IL-8 mRNA and NF-κB protein in ElA+ cell were markedly higher than ElA-cell and A549 cell (P<0.05). The TLR4 mRNA of all the cells increased along with the increase of LPS' stimulated time. There was significant difference among different LPS' doses (12 h: P=0.039; 24 h: P=0.013). The TLR4 mRNA of ElA+ cell was higher than the other two groups (P<0.05). IL-1β induced all the cells expressing TLR4 mRNA. CSE had no effect on the expression of TLR4 mRNA. Conclusion Pulmonary epithelial cells express TLR4. LPS and IL-1β up-regulate IL-8 mediated via the activation of NF-κB induced by TLR4. But CSE up-regulates IL-8 mediated via the activation of NF-κB, which has no relation to TLR4 and may have another signal transduction pathway.

  4. Mechanisms of carbon nanotube-induced toxicity: focus on pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Andón, Fernando Torres; El-Sayed, Ramy; Fadeel, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have gained tremendous interest in a wide range of applications due to their unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties. Needless to say, close attention to the potential toxicity of carbon nanotubes is of paramount importance. Numerous studies have linked exposure of carbon nanotubes to the induction of inflammation, a complex protective response to harmful stimuli including pathogens, damaged or dying cells, and other irritants. However, inflammation is a double-edged sword as chronic inflammation can lead to destruction of tissues thus compromising the homeostasis of the organism. Here, we provide an overview of the process of inflammation, the key cells and the soluble mediators involved, and discuss research on carbon nanotubes and inflammation, including recent studies on the activation of the so-called inflammasome complex in macrophages resulting in secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, recent work has shown that inflammatory cells i.e. neutrophils and eosinophils are capable of enzymatic degradation of carbon nanotubes, with mitigation of the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic effects of nanotubes thus underscoring that inflammation is both good and bad.

  5. Ginsenoside Rg1 Attenuates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Pulmonary Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition via Inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibin Guan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a process associated with airway remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which leads to progressive pulmonary destruction. Panax ginseng is a traditional herbal medicine that has been shown to improve pulmonary function and exercise capacity in patients with COPD. Ginsenoside Rg1 is one of the main active components and was shown to inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation. The present study investigated the hypothesis that ginsenoside Rg1 attenuates EMT in COPD rats induced by cigarette smoke (CS and human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE. Our data showed that CS or CSE exposure increased expression of the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and decreased expression of the epithelial marker epithelial cadherin (E-cad in both lung tissues and HBE cells, which was markedly suppressed by ginsenoside Rg1. Importantly, CS-induced upregulation of TGF-β1/Smad pathway components, including TGF-β1, TGF-βR1, phospho-Smad2, and phospho-Smad3, was also inhibited by ginsenoside Rg1. Additionally, ginsenoside Rg1 mimicked the effect of SB525334, a TGF-βR1-Smad2/3 inhibitor, on suppression of EMT in CSE-induced HBE cells. Collectively, we concluded that ginsenoside Rg1 alleviates CS-induced pulmonary EMT, in both COPD rats and HBE cells, via inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad pathway.

  6. Effects of inhaled corticosteroids on airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Jen,1 Stephen,1 Rennard,2 Don D Sin1,31Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Internal Medicine Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 3Institute of Heart and Lung Health and the UBC James Hogg Research Center, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, CanadaBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic inflammation in the small airways. The effect of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS on lung inflammation in COPD remains uncertain. We sought to determine the effects of ICS on inflammatory indices in bronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with COPD.Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane database for randomized, controlled clinical trials that used bronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage to evaluate the effects of ICS in stable COPD. For each chosen study, we calculated the mean differences in the concentrations of inflammatory cells before and after treatment in both intervention and control groups. These values were then converted into standardized mean differences (SMD to accommodate the differences in patient selection, clinical treatment, and biochemical procedures that were employed across the original studies. If significant heterogeneity was present (P < 0.1, then a random effects model was used to pool the original data; otherwise, a fixed effects model was used.Results: We identified eight original studies that met the inclusion criteria. Four studies used bronchial biopsies (n = 102 participants and showed that ICS were effective in reducing CD4 and CD8 cell counts (SMD, −0.52 units and −0.66 units, 95% confidence interval. The five studies used bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (n = 309, which together showed that ICS reduced neutrophil and lymphocyte counts (SMD, −0.64 units and −0.64 units, 95% confidence interval. ICS on the other hand

  7. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  8. Alveolar recruitment of ficolin-3 in response to acute pulmonary inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G; Munthe-Fog, Lea;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ficolins serve as soluble recognition molecules in the lectin pathway of complement. They are known to participate in the systemic host-response to infection but their role in local pulmonary defence is still incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether...

  9. The many faces of airway inflammation - Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Byrne, PM; Postma, DS

    1999-01-01

    Airway diseases, predominantly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are among the world's most prevalent diseases. The prevalence of asthma has been incasing over the past 20 yr in most countries where this has been studied, and it affects up to 10% of the populations of most dev

  10. Effect and its clinical significance of different dose of glucocorticoids on inflammation mediators in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟佰强

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect and its clinical significance of different dose of glucocorticoids on inflammation mediators in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.Methods 45 patients admitted to our hospitals from March 2007 to March 2011were randomly divided into 3 groups:methylprednisolone40 mg group(methylprednisolone 40mg,iv,qd),meth-

  11. Secretoglobin Superfamily Protein SCGB3A2 Deficiency Potentiates Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketomo Kido

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretoglobin (SCGB 3A2, a cytokine-like secretory protein of small molecular weight, which may play a role in lung inflammation, is predominantly expressed in airway epithelial cells. In order to understand the physiological role of SCGB3A2, Scgb3a2−/− mice were generated and characterized. Scgb3a2−/− mice did not exhibit any overt phenotypes. In ovalbumin- (OVA- induced airway allergy inflammation model, Scgb3a2−/− mice in mixed background showed a decreased OVA-induced airway inflammation, while six times C57BL/6NCr backcrossed congenic Scgb3a2−/− mice showed a slight exacerbation of OVA-induced airway inflammation as compared to wild-type littermates. These results indicate that the loss of SCGB3A2 function was influenced by a modifier gene(s in mixed genetic background and suggest that SCGB3A2 has anti-inflammatory property. The results further suggest the possible use of recombinant human SCGB3A2 as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  12. Depletion of Neutrophils Promotes the Resolution of Pulmonary Inflammation and Fibrosis in Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Julián Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stages of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) are characterized by granulomatous lesions which promote the development of pulmonary fibrosis leading to the loss of respiratory function in 50% of patients; in addition, it has been observed that neutrophils predominate during these chronic stages of P. brasiliensis infection. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of the neutrophil during the chronic stages of experimental pulmonary PCM and during the fibrosis development and tissue repair using a monoclonal specific to this phagocytic cell. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5x106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. A monoclonal antibody specific to neutrophils was administered at 4 weeks post-inoculation followed by doses every 48h during two weeks. Mice were sacrificed at 8 and 12 weeks post-inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, histopathological analysis, collagen and expression of genes related to fibrosis development. Depletion of neutrophils was associated with a significant decrease in the number of eosinophils, dendritic cells, B cells, CD4-T cells, MDSCs and Treg cells, fungal load and levels of most of the pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines evaluated, including IL-17, TNF-α and TGF-β1. Recovery of lung architecture was also associated with reduced levels of collagen, high expression of TGF-β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 and -14, and decreased expression of tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2, and MMP-8. Depletion of neutrophils might attenuate lung fibrosis and inflammation through down-regulating TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-17, MMP-8 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that neutrophil could be considered as a therapeutic target in pulmonary fibrosis induced by P. brasiliensis. PMID:27690127

  13. Evolving role of systemic inflammation in comorbidities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng-li

    2010-01-01

    @@ The number of individuals affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been increasing in the last decades. As a consequence, COPD is expected to become the third most frequent cause of death worldwide by 2020.1 Exacerbations of COPD is a major cause of morbidity. In particular, they greatly contribute to decline of health-related quality of life,increase in symptoms and breathlessness, Progression of the disease, and increased risk of mortality.2

  14. Pneumocystis colonization, airway inflammation, and pulmonary function decline in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Karen A; Morris, Alison; Patil, Sangita; Fernandes, Eustace

    2006-01-01

    As a result of improved diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care for HIV-infected patients, AIDS in developed countries has now become a chronic infection with prolonged survival time, but longterm complications are increasing contributors to morbidity and mortality. HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for the development of pulmonary complications, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the mechanisms associated with this increased susceptibility have not been defined. Infectious agents may contribute to the development of COPD by upregulating inflammatory mediators in the lung that act in concert with cigarette smoke to promote lung pathology. Studies in human subjects and non-human primate models of AIDS suggest that the inflammatory response to asymptomatic carriage or colonization by the opportunistic pathogen, Pneumocystis sp. (Pc), is similar to that of COPD, which is characterized by influx of CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages into the lungs. We have shown a high frequency of Pc colonization among asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects and in non-HIV infected subjects with COPD. To investigate the role of Pc in the progression of obstructive lung disease in HIV infections, we developed a non-human primate model of Pc colonizatoin and infection in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques. These animals develop a prolonged colonization state characterized by a persistent influx of CD8+ T cells and neutrophils, and local increases in IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha. SIV-infected Pc-colonized monkeys show progressive decline in pulmonary function compared to SIV-infected monkeys. We hypothesize that in the context of AIDS-immune dysfunction, Pc colonization induces inflammatory responses leading to changes in pulmonary function and architecture similar to that seen in emphysema. Information gained from these studies will lead to the development of interventions to prevent lung injury associated with Pc

  15. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C; Sellati, Timothy J; Harton, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  16. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  17. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Periasamy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  18. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanamala, Naveena, E-mail: wqu1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hatfield, Meghan K., E-mail: wla4@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Farcas, Mariana T., E-mail: woe7@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hummer, Jon A., E-mail: qzh3@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shurin, Michael R., E-mail: shurinmr@upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Birch, M. Eileen, E-mail: mib2@cdc.gov [NIOSH/CDC, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226 (United States); Gutkin, Dmitriy W., E-mail: dwgutkin@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kisin, Elena, E-mail: edk8@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bugarski, Aleksandar D., E-mail: zjl1@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Department Physiology and Pharmacology, WVU, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

  19. Autocrine regulation of pulmonary inflammation by effector T-cell derived IL-10 during infection with respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Sun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection is the leading viral cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants. Clinical studies have documented that certain polymorphisms in the gene encoding the regulatory cytokine IL-10 are associated with the development of severe bronchiolitis in RSV infected infants. Here, we examined the role of IL-10 in a murine model of primary RSV infection and found that high levels of IL-10 are produced in the respiratory tract by anti-viral effector T cells at the onset of the adaptive immune response. We demonstrated that the function of the effector T cell -derived IL-10 in vivo is to limit the excess pulmonary inflammation and thereby to maintain critical lung function. We further identify a novel mechanism by which effector T cell-derived IL-10 controls excess inflammation by feedback inhibition through engagement of the IL-10 receptor on the antiviral effector T cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of effector T cell-derived IL-10 in controlling disease severity in clinical RSV infection.

  20. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events.

  1. Taraxasterol inhibits cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-induced TLR4 trafficking to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xueshibojie, Liu; Duo, Yu; Tiejun, Wang

    2016-10-15

    Taraxasterol, a pentacyclic-triterpene isolated from Taraxacum officinale, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effects of taraxasterol against cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung inflammation have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of taraxasterol on CS-induced lung inflammation in mice. CS-induced mouse lung inflammation model was used to investigate the protective effects of taraxasterol in vivo. Human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) were used to investigate the protective mechanism of taraxasterol in vitro. The results showed that taraxasterol attenuated CS-induced lung pathological changes, inflammatory cells infiltration, inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. Taraxasterol also up-regulated CS-induced glutathione (GSH) production. In vitro, taraxasterol was found to inhibit CS-induced reactive oxygen species production, recruitment of TLR4 into lipid rafts, NF-κB activation, and IL-8 production. Furthermore, our results showed that antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited CS-induced recruitment of TLR4 into lipid rafts as well as IL-8 production. In conclusion, our results suggested that taraxasterol had protective effects of CS-induced lung inflammation.

  2. Pulmonary inflammation is regulated by the levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia M Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh plays a crucial role in physiological responses of both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Moreover, ACh was described as an anti-inflammatory mediator involved in the suppression of exacerbated innate response and cytokine release in various organs. However, the specific contributions of endogenous release ACh for inflammatory responses in the lung are not well understood. To address this question we have used mice with reduced levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT, a protein required for ACh storage in secretory vesicles. VAChT deficiency induced airway inflammation with enhanced TNF-α and IL-4 content, but not IL-6, IL-13 and IL-10 quantified by ELISA. Mice with decreased levels of VAChT presented increased collagen and elastic fibers deposition in airway walls which was consistent with an increase in inflammatory cells positive to MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in the lung. In vivo lung function evaluation showed airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in mutant mice. The expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (p65-NF-kB in lung of VAChT-deficient mice were higher than in wild-type mice, whereas a decreased expression of janus-kinase 2 (JAK2 was observed in the lung of mutant animals. Our findings show the first evidence that cholinergic deficiency impaired lung function and produce local inflammation. Our data supports the notion that cholinergic system modulates airway inflammation by modulation of JAK2 and NF-kB pathway. We proposed that intact cholinergic pathway is necessary to maintain the lung homeostasis.

  3. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Christopher B; Groves, Angela M; Jaggernauth, Smita U; Laskin, Debra L; Gow, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd) develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs), however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group). An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical alteration at

  4. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Massa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs, however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group. An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical

  5. The Effect of Cigarette Smoke Exposure on the Development of Inflammation in Lungs, Gut and Joints of TNFΔARE Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Allais

    Full Text Available The inflammatory cytokine TNF-α is a central mediator in many immune-mediated diseases, such as Crohn's disease (CD, spondyloarthritis (SpA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Epidemiologic studies have shown that cigarette smoking (CS is a prominent common risk factor in these TNF-dependent diseases. We exposed TNFΔARE mice; in which a systemic TNF-α overexpression leads to the development of inflammation; to 2 or 4 weeks of air or CS. We investigated the effect of deregulated TNF expression on CS-induced pulmonary inflammation and the effect of CS exposure on the initiation and progression of gut and joint inflammation. Upon 2 weeks of CS exposure, inflammation in lungs of TNFΔARE mice was significantly aggravated. However, upon 4 weeks of CS-exposure, this aggravation was no longer observed. TNFΔARE mice have no increases in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a diminished neutrophil response in the lungs after 4 weeks of CS exposure. In the gut and joints of TNFΔARE mice, 2 or 4 weeks of CS exposure did not modulate the development of inflammation. In conclusion, CS exposure does not modulate gut and joint inflammation in TNFΔARE mice. The lung responses towards CS in TNFΔARE mice however depend on the duration of CS exposure.

  6. Effect of early treatment with transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS on pulmonary inflammation induced by bleomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laisa A. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Bleomycin (B is an antineoplastic drug that has pulmonary fibrosis as a side effect. There are few experimental studies about the effects of physical therapy treatment in this case. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study rat lungs treated with B and precocious intervention by transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS. METHOD : Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n=5: a control group (C; a stimulated group (TEDS; a group treated with a single dose of B (intratracheally, 2.5 mg/kg (B; and a group treated with B and electric stimulation (B + TEDS. After the B instillation, the electrical stimulation was applied for 7 days, for a duration of 20 minutes. Lung fragments were histologically processed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE and 8-isoprostane-PGF2α (8-iso-PGF2α. The density of the alveolar area was determined by planimetry, the inflammatory profile was defined by the number of cells, and the level of oxidative stress in the pulmonary tissue was evaluated by 8-iso-PGF2α. For statistical analysis of the data, the Shapiro-Wilk test was used, followed by a one-way ANOVA with the post-hoc Bonferroni test (p≤0.05. RESULTS : The B group exhibited a significant reduction in the area density, and the acute treatment with B + TEDS prevented this reduction. There were increased numbers of fibroblasts, leukocytes, and macrophages in the B group, as well as increased lipid peroxidation, which was observed only in this group. CONCLUSION : B promoted a reduction in the alveolar density area, thereby inducing the inflammatory process and increasing the production of free radicals. These effects were minimized by the application of TEDS at the initial treatment stage.

  7. 慢性阻塞性肺疾病与慢性炎症%Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何馨; 王浩彦

    2011-01-01

    慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)患病率高、病程长、病死率高,已成为严重的社会负担.小气道炎症是COPD的主要病变及导致肺功能进行性损害的主要原因,同时大量研究证明COPD患者存在系统性炎症,但目前对于COPD气道炎症与系统性炎症的关系尚不十分明确.%With an increased prevalence,chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),which is characterized by airflow obstruction, has represented an increasing burden throughout the world.Inflammation of small airway is the primary lesions of COPD. It has been confirmed that airwayinflammation is the major reason which caused the damage of lung function in COPD. And lots of studies has proved that patients with COPD had systemic inflammation. However, the reason of systemic inflammation in COPD and the relationship between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation in COPD are still unclear.

  8. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity in mice lungs after pulmonary exposure to candle light combustion particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Damiao Gouveia, Ana Cecilia; Koponen, Ismo Kalevi

    2017-01-01

    Candle burning produces a large amount of particles that contribute substantially to the exposure to indoor particulate matter. The exposures to various types of combustion particles, such as diesel exhaust particles, have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer by mechanisms that invo......Candle burning produces a large amount of particles that contribute substantially to the exposure to indoor particulate matter. The exposures to various types of combustion particles, such as diesel exhaust particles, have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer by mechanisms...... a significant influx of alveolar macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes and increased concentrations of proteins and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar fluid. Lower levels of these markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity were observed after i.t. instillation of the same dose of A...

  9. IKKi: a novel regulator of Act1, IL-17 signaling and pulmonary inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noula Shembade; Edward W Harhaj

    2011-01-01

    TH17 inflammatory helper cells constitute an important subset of T lymphocytes that secrete the cytokine interleukin 17(IL-17) and thereby drive inflammation in response to microbial antigens.Dysregulation of TH 17 cells,characterized by increased IL-17 production,is a hallmark of many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as asthma,multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.1 The adaptor molecule and E3 ubiquitin ligase Actl is a key signaling molecule downstream of the IL-17 receptor (IL-17R)that triggers activation of the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)signaling pathways,which in turn coordinate the induction of cytokine and chemokine genes that are central to the inflammatory response.

  10. Functional characterization of recombinant rat macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha and mRNA expression in pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, M M; Chong, I W; Long, N C; Love, J A; Godleski, J J; Paulauskis, J D

    1998-02-01

    macrophages and BAL cells in response to inflammatory stimuli suggests a fundamental role in acute pulmonary inflammation.

  11. Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cancer: Respirable Particulate Matter, Fibrous Dusts and Ozone as Major Causes of Lung Carcinogenesis through Reactive Oxygen Species Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Loridas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS and oxidative stress in the respiratory system increase the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and initiate or promote mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The lungs are exposed daily to oxidants generated either endogenously or exogenously (air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.. Cells in aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative damage by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Recent epidemiologic investigations have shown associations between increased incidence of respiratory diseases and lung cancer from exposure to low levels of various forms of respirable fibers and particulate matter (PM, at occupational or urban air polluting environments. Lung cancer increases substantially for tobacco smokers due to the synergistic effects in the generation of ROS, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation with high DNA damage potential. Physical and chemical characteristics of particles (size, transition metal content, speciation, stable free radicals, etc. play an important role in oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress initiates the synthesis of mediators of pulmonary inflammation in lung epithelial cells and initiation of carcinogenic mechanisms. Inhalable quartz, metal powders, mineral asbestos fibers, ozone, soot from gasoline and diesel engines, tobacco smoke and PM from ambient air pollution (PM10 and PM2.5 are involved in various oxidative stress mechanisms. Pulmonary cancer initiation and promotion has been linked to a series of biochemical pathways of oxidative stress, DNA oxidative damage, macrophage stimulation, telomere shortening, modulation of gene expression and activation of transcription factors with important role in carcinogenesis. In this review we are presenting the role of ROS and oxidative stress in the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

  12. Pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles induces airway inflammation and cytokine expression in NC/Nga mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Yanagisawa, Rie [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Inhalation Toxicology and Pathophysiology Research Team, Tsukuba (Japan); Takano, Hirohisa [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Inhalation Toxicology and Pathophysiology Research Team, Tsukuba (Japan); Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Inflammation and Immunology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi [Oita University of Nursing and Health Science, Department of Health Science, Oita (Japan); Shimada, Akinori [Tottori University, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori (Japan); Yoshikawa, Toshikazu [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Inflammation and Immunology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    Although several studies have reported that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) affect cardiorespiratory health in animals and humans, the effect of DEP on animal models with spontaneous allergic disorders has been far less intensively studied. The Nc/Nga mouse is known to be a typical animal model for human atopic dermatitis (AD). In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated pulmonary exposure to DEP on airway inflammation and cytokine expression in NC/Nga mice. The animals were randomized into two experimental groups that received vehicle or DEP by intratracheal instillation weekly for six weeks. Cellular profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and expressions of cytokines and chemokines in both the BAL fluid and lung tissues were evaluated 24 h after the last instillation. The DEP challenge produced an increase in the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in BAL fluid as compared to the vehicle challenge (P<0.01). DEP exposure significantly induced the lung expressions of interleukin (IL)-4, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1{alpha} when compared to the vehicle challenge. These results indicate that intratracheal exposure to DEP induces the recruitment of inflammatory cells, at least partially, through the local expression of IL-4 and chemokines in NC/Nga mice. (orig.)

  13. Use of silver nanowires to determine thresholds for fibre length-dependent pulmonary inflammation and inhibition of macrophage migration in vitro

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    Schinwald Anja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to examine the threshold fibre length for the onset of pulmonary inflammation after aspiration exposure in mice to four different lengths of silver nanowires (AgNW. We further examined the effect of fibre length on macrophage locomotion in an in vitro wound healing assay. We hypothesised that exposure to longer fibres causes both increased inflammation and restricted mobility leading to impaired clearance of long fibres from the lower respiratory tract to the mucociliary escalator in vivo. Methods Nine week old female C57BL/6 strain mice were exposed to AgNW and controls via pharyngeal aspiration. The dose used in this study was equalised to fibre number and based on 50 μg/ mouse for AgNW14. To examine macrophage migration in vitro a wound healing assay was used. An artificial wound was created in a confluent layer of bone marrow derived macrophages by scraping with a pipette tip and the number of cells migrating into the wound was monitored microscopically. The dose was equalised for fibre number and based on 2.5 μg/cm2 for AgNW14. Results Aspiration of AgNW resulted in a length dependent inflammatory response in the lungs with threshold at a fibre length of 14 μm. Shorter fibres including 3, 5 and 10 μm elicited no significant inflammation. Macrophage locomotion was also restricted in a length dependent manner whereby AgNW in the length of ≥5 μm resulted in impaired motility in the wound closure assay. Conclusion We demonstrated a 14 μm cut-off length for fibre-induced pulmonary inflammation after aspiration exposure and an in vitro threshold for inhibition of macrophage locomotion of 5 μm. We previously reported a threshold length of 5 μm for fibre-induced pleural inflammation. This difference in pulmonary and pleural fibre- induced inflammation may be explained by differences in clearance mechanism of deposited fibres from the airspaces compared to the pleural space. Inhibition of

  14. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise

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    O. F. Araneda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted.

  15. [Effects of erdosteine on inflammation and fibrosis in rats with pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Ersin Sükrü; Kirkil, Gamze; Deveci, Figen; Ilhan, Nevin; Cobanoğlu, Bengü; Turgut, Teyfik; Muz, Mehmet Hamdi

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the levels of some chemokines, inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, histopathological changes in lung tissue, to determine the effect of erdosteine on acute inflammatory changes and fibrosis in a rat fibrosis model induced by bleomycine (BLM). Forty-five Wistar male rats were taken into the study. On day 0, intratracheal saline to control group (group 1, n= 15), intratracheal BLM 7.5 U/kg to BLM (group 2, n= 15) and erdosteine group (group 3, n= 15) was administered. In group 3, oral erdosteine (10 mg/kg/day) was applied two days before BLM. On day 0, 14, and 29th five rats in each groups were sacrificed, BAL fluid was performed. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-2 levels in BAL fluid, hydroxyproline levels in lung tissue were measured. Histopathological examination was performed. When BLM group compared to erdosteine group, the levels of MDA, MIP-1alpha, MIP-2, and neutrophil counts, the hydroxyproline (OH-P) level of lung tissue were decreased in erdosteine group on acute inflammatory phase (day 14) (perdosteine group than BLM group on day 29 (p= 0.01). We conclude that erdosteine may prevent the acute lung inflammation and fibrosis by suppressing the accumulation of neutrophils, inhibition of lipid peroxydation, chemokine production, and release.

  16. Pentraxin 3 as a novel biomarker of inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Ozlem Kar; Tosun, Mehmet; Kurt, Emine Bahar; Talay, Fahrettin

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs in which inflammatory markers are involved with significant extrapulmonary effects that may contribute to its severity and complications. Moreover, some of the inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with COPD. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is the member of long pentraxins. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of PTX3 in patients with COPD. Fifty-four COPD patients and 31 controls were enrolled in this study. Demographical data such as age, sex, cigarette smoking status, comorbidities, drugs, habits, and modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea scores were recorded. All patients were asked for COPD Assessment Test™ (CAT). The mean age was 65.7 ± 9.8 years, 92 % male. Plasma levels of PTX3 were found to be markedly higher in COPD patients [1.65 (0.32-12.72) ng/ml] than in controls [1.05 (0.43-3.26) ng/ml; p = 0.005]. On the other hand, PTX3 values did not differ between COPD stages [A, 1.73 (0.69-11.03); B, 1.49 (0.84-12.52); C, 0.79 (0.52-1.06); and D, 2.09 (0.32-12.72); p = 0.27]. The plasma PTX3 levels were positively correlated with MMRC scores. We conclude that circulating PTX3 levels are elevated in COPD patients. Plasma levels of PTX3 were correlated with dyspnea (MMRC scores). But PTX3 levels were not correlated with the severity of COPD.

  17. Peripheral blood neutrophilia as a biomarker of ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny A Bosson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ozone concentrations are predicted to increase over the next 50 years due to global warming and the increased release of precursor chemicals. It is therefore urgent that good, reliable biomarkers are available to quantify the toxicity of this pollutant gas at the population level. Such a biomarker would need to be easily performed, reproducible, economically viable, and reflective of ongoing pathological processes occurring within the lung. METHODOLOGY: We examined whether blood neutrophilia occurred following a controlled ozone challenge and addressed whether this could serve as a biomarker for ozone-induced airway inflammation. Three separate groups of healthy subjects were exposed to ozone (0.2 ppm, 2h and filtered air (FA on two separate occasions. Peripheral blood samples were collected and bronchoscopy with biopsy sampling and lavages was performed at 1.5h post exposures in group 1 (n=13, at 6h in group 2 (n=15 and at 18h in group 3 (n=15. Total and differential cell counts were assessed in blood, bronchial tissue and airway lavages. RESULTS: In peripheral blood, we observed fewer neutrophils 1.5h after ozone compared with the parallel air exposure (-1.1±1.0x10(9 cells/L, p<0.01, at 6h neutrophil numbers were increased compared to FA (+1.2±1.3x10(9 cells/L, p<0.01, and at 18h this response had fully attenuated. Ozone induced a peak in neutrophil numbers at 6h post exposure in all compartments examined, with a positive correlation between the response in blood and bronchial biopsies. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate a systemic neutrophilia in healthy subjects following an acute ozone exposure, which mirrors the inflammatory response in the lung mucosa and lumen. This relationship suggests that blood neutrophilia could be used as a relatively simple functional biomarker for the effect of ozone on the lung.

  18. Tracheobronchoscopic Assessment of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage and Airway Inflammation in Barrel Racing Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillette, R; Steinmann, M; Bond, S L; Stanton, B

    2016-07-01

    Poor performance is often suspected to be associated with EIPH in barrel racing horses; however, there are no published reports of EIPH for this discipline. The prevalence of EIPH in barrel racing horses is also unknown. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of EIPH and signs of airway inflammation in barrel racing horses under normal racing conditions in Alberta. About 170 barrel racing horses. Observational cross-sectional study. Tracheobronchoscopic examinations were performed at least 30 minutes postrace. Video recordings were scored off-site independently by two observers for EIPH and tracheal mucus accumulation (TMA). Horses with an EIPH score ≥2 were not assessed for TMA. Interobserver agreement was calculated by weighted κ statistics. Run times, environmental variables, and clinical information were also recorded for analysis. 77/170 (45.3%) of horses examined showed evidence of EIPH (grade ≥ 1). Interobserver agreement was 0.94. 140/141 (99.3%) of horses assessed for TMA showed evidence of tracheal mucus accumulation (grade ≥ 1) with 104/141 (73.8%) having a TMA score ≥ 2. Interobserver agreement was 0.73. A weak positive association was found between EIPH scores and average run speed, the presence of cough at rest reported by the riders, increased recovery time, exercise intolerance, and outdoor pattern. The high prevalence of EIPH observed in the sampled population indicates that barrel racing induces substantial stress on the lungs. The presence of EIPH did not impact negatively on performance. Factors such as environmental dust and frequent traveling might have contributed to the high prevalence of TMA observed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Acute Meteorite Dust Exposure and Pulmonary Inflammation - Implications for Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Kaur, J.; Smirnov, A.; Galdanes, K.; Schoonen, M. A. A.; Chen, L. C.; Tsirka, S. E.; Gordon, T.

    2017-01-01

    The previous manned missions to the Moon represent milestones of human ingenuity, perseverance, and intellectual curiosity. However, one of the major ongoing concerns is the array of hazards associated with lunar surface dust. Not only did the dust cause mechanical and structural integrity issues with the suits, the dust 'storm' generated upon reentrance into the crew cabin caused "lunar hay fever" and "almost blindness [1-3]" (Figure 1). It was further reported that the allergic response to the dust worsened with each exposure [4]. The lack of gravity exacerbated the exposure, requiring the astronauts to wear their helmet within the module in order to avoid breathing the irritating particles [1]. Due to the prevalence of these high exposures, the Human Research Roadmap developed by NASA identifies the Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure as an area of concern [5]. Extended human exploration will further increase the probability of inadvertent and repeated exposures to celestial dusts. Going forward, hazard assessments of celestial dusts will be determined through sample return efforts prior to astronaut deployment. Studies on the lunar highland regolith indicate that the dust is not only respirable but also reactive [2, 6-9], and previous studies concluded that it is moderately toxic; generating a greater response than titanium oxide but a lower response than quartz [6]. The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the surface of the dust has been implicated. However, there is actually little data related to physicochemical characteristics of particulates and pulmonary toxicity, especially as it relates to celestial dust exposure. As a direct response to this deficit, the present study evaluates the role of a particulate's innate geochemical features (e.g., bulk chemistry, internal composition, morphology, size, and reactivity) in generating adverse toxicological responses in vitro and in vivo. This highly interdisciplinary

  20. Disruption of Sirtuin 1-Mediated Control of Circadian Molecular Clock and Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K; Huang, Yadi; Gerloff, Janice; Sellix, Michael T; Sime, Patricia J; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth most common cause of death, and it is characterized by abnormal inflammation and lung function decline. Although the circadian molecular clock regulates inflammatory responses, there is no information available regarding the impact of COPD on lung molecular clock function and its regulation by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). We hypothesize that the molecular clock in the lungs is disrupted, leading to increased inflammatory responses in smokers and patients with COPD and its regulation by SIRT1. Lung tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and sputum cells were obtained from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD for measurement of core molecular clock proteins (BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, and CRY1), clock-associated nuclear receptors (REV-ERBα, REV-ERBβ, and RORα), and SIRT1 by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot. PBMCs were treated with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 followed by LPS treatment, and supernatant was collected at 6-hour intervals. Levels of IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α released from PBMCs were determined by ELISA. Expression of BMAL1, PER2, CRY1, and REV-ERBα was reduced in PBMCs, sputum cells, and lung tissues from smokers and patients with COPD when compared with nonsmokers. SRT1720 treatment attenuated LPS-mediated reduction of BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in PBMCs from nonsmokers. Additionally, LPS differentially affected the timing and amplitude of cytokine (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) release from PBMCs in nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. Moreover, SRT1720 was able to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from cultured PBMCs. In conclusion, disruption of the molecular clock due to SIRT1 reduction contributes to abnormal inflammatory response in smokers and patients with COPD.

  1. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats

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    Xiaofan Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD risk window (RW have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS, moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS, TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG, MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA and C-reactive protein (CRP, pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO, polymorphonuclear (PMN elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14–18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4–10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines.

  2. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Ya; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohuan; Li, Hangjie; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) risk window (RW) have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS), moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS), TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG), MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s) in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP), pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14–18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4–10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:27563333

  3. Transforming growth factor-β plays divergent roles in modulating vascular remodeling, inflammation, and pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model of scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Kazuyuki; Reed, Nilgun Isik; Atakilit, Amha; Ren, Xin; Sheppard, Dean

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy and feasibility of targeting transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pulmonary fibrosis and lung vascular remodeling in systemic sclerosis (SSc) have not been well elucidated. In this study we analyzed how blocking TGFβ signaling affects pulmonary abnormalities in Fos-related antigen 2 (Fra-2) transgenic (Tg) mice, a murine model that manifests three important lung pathological features of SSc: fibrosis, inflammation, and vascular remodeling. To interrupt TGFβ signaling in the Fra-2 Tg mice, we used a pan-TGFβ-blocking antibody, 1D11, and Tg mice in which TGFβ receptor type 2 (Tgfbr2) is deleted from smooth muscle cells and myofibroblasts (α-SMA-Cre(ER);Tgfbr2(flox/flox)). Global inhibition of TGFβ by 1D11 did not ameliorate lung fibrosis histologically or biochemically, whereas it resulted in a significant increase in the number of immune cells infiltrating the lungs. In contrast, 1D11 treatment ameliorated the severity of pulmonary vascular remodeling in Fra-2 Tg mice. Similarly, genetic deletion of Tgfbr2 from smooth muscle cells resulted in improvement of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the Fra-2 Tg mice, as well as a decrease in the number of Ki67-positive vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting that TGFβ signaling contributes to development of pulmonary vascular remodeling by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Deletion of Tgfbr2 from α-smooth muscle actin-expressing cells had no effect on fibrosis or inflammation in this model. These results suggest that efforts to target TGFβ in SSc will likely require more precision than simply global inhibition of TGFβ function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Pulmonary vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Lindsay; Spiera, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary vasculitis encompasses inflammation in the pulmonary vasculature with involved vessels varying in caliber from large elastic arteries to capillaries. Small pulmonary capillaries are the vessels most commonly involved in vasculitis affecting the lung. The antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides, which include granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Churg-Strauss syndrome), are the small vessel vasculitides in which pulmonary vasculitis is most frequently observed and are the major focus of this review. Vasculitic involvement of the large pulmonary vessels as may occur in Behçet syndrome and Takayasu arteritis is also discussed.

  5. Role of Chitinase 3-Like-1 in Interleukin-18-Induced Pulmonary Type 1, Type 2, and Type 17 Inflammation; Alveolar Destruction; and Airway Fibrosis in the Murine Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Jong; Yoon, Chang Min; Nam, Milang; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Je-Min; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1), which is also called YKL-40 in humans and BRP-39 in mice, is the prototypic chitinase-like protein. Recent studies have highlighted its impressive ability to regulate the nature of tissue inflammation and the magnitude of tissue injury and fibroproliferative repair. This can be appreciated in studies that highlight its induction after cigarette smoke exposure, during which it inhibits alveolar destruction and the genesis of pulmonary emphysema. IL-18 is also known to be induced and activated by cigarette smoke, and, in murine models, the IL-18 pathway has been shown to be necessary and sufficient to generate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-like inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue destruction. However, the relationship between Chi3l1 and IL-18 has not been defined. To address this issue we characterized the expression of Chi3l1/BRP-39 in control and lung-targeted IL-18 transgenic mice. We also characterized the effects of transgenic IL-18 in mice with wild-type and null Chi3l1 loci. The former studies demonstrated that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1/BRP-39 and that this stimulation is mediated via IFN-γ-, IL-13-, and IL-17A-dependent mechanisms. The latter studies demonstrated that, in the absence of Chi3l1/BRP-39, IL-18 induced type 2 and type 17 inflammation and fibrotic airway remodeling were significantly ameliorated, whereas type 1 inflammation, emphysematous alveolar destruction, and the expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte perforin, granzyme, and retinoic acid early transcript 1 expression were enhanced. These studies demonstrate that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1 and that Chi3l1 is an important mediator of IL-18-induced inflammatory, fibrotic, alveolar remodeling, and cytotoxic responses.

  6. Prolonged B cell depletion with rituximab is effective in treating refractory pulmonary granulomatous inflammation in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Scott R; Copley, Susan J; Pusey, Charles D; Ind, Philip W; Salama, Alan D

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary nodule formation is a frequent feature of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Traditional induction therapy includes methotrexate or cyclophosphamide, however, pulmonary nodules generally respond slower than vasculitic components of disease. Efficacy of rituximab (RTX) solely for the treatment of pulmonary nodules has not been assessed. In this observational cohort study, we report patient outcomes with RTX in GPA patients with pulmonary nodules who failed to achieve remission following conventional immunosuppression. Patients (n = 5) with persistent pulmonary nodules were identified from our clinic database and retrospectively evaluated. Systemic manifestations, inflammatory markers, disease activity, concurrent immunosuppression, and absolute B cell numbers were recorded pre-RTX and at 6 monthly intervals following treatment. Chest radiographs at each time point were scored by an experienced radiologist, blinded to clinical details. Five patients with GPA and PR3-ANCA were evaluated (2 male, 3 female), mean age 34 (22-52) years. Pulmonary nodules (median 4, range 2-6), with or without cavitation were present in all patients. RTX induced initial B cell depletion (GPA following prolonged B cell depletion.

  7. CD28/B7 Deficiency Attenuates Systolic Overload-Induced Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial and Pulmonary Inflammation, and Activated T Cell Accumulation in the Heart and Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Kwak, Dongmin; Fassett, John; Hou, Lei; Xu, Xin; Burbach, Brandon J; Thenappan, Thenappan; Xu, Yawei; Ge, Jun-Bo; Shimizu, Yoji; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory response regulates congestive heart failure (CHF) development. T cell activation plays an important role in tissue inflammation. We postulate that CD28 or B7 deficiency inhibits T cell activation and attenuates CHF development by reducing systemic, cardiac, and pulmonary inflammation. We demonstrated that chronic pressure overload-induced end-stage CHF in mice is characterized by profound accumulation of activated effector T cells (CD3(+)CD44(high) cells) in the lungs and a mild but significant increase of these cells in the heart. In knockout mice lacking either CD28 or B7, there was a dramatic reduction in the accumulation of activated effector T cells in both hearts and lungs of mice under control conditions and after transverse aortic constriction. CD28 or B7 knockout significantly attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced CHF development, as indicated by less increase of heart and lung weight and less reduction of left ventricle contractility. CD28 or B7 knockout also significantly reduced transverse aortic constriction-induced CD45(+) leukocyte, T cell, and macrophage infiltration in hearts and lungs, lowered proinflammatory cytokine expression (such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in lungs. Furthermore, CD28/B7 blockade by CTLA4-Ig treatment (250 μg/mouse every 3 days) attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced T cell activation, left ventricle hypertrophy, and left ventricle dysfunction. Our data indicate that CD28/B7 deficiency inhibits activated effector T cell accumulation, reduces myocardial and pulmonary inflammation, and attenuates the development of CHF. Our findings suggest that strategies targeting T cell activation may be useful in treating CHF.

  8. Hypogonadism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with airflow limitation, muscle weakness and systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Galal Daabis

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Hypogonadism is highly prevalent in clinically stable COPD patients and is particularly related to the severity of the airway obstruction. Systemic inflammation is present in stable COPD patients and its intensity is related to the severity of the underlying disease and it predisposes to skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. However, we failed to find a significant association between hypogonadism and muscle weakness or systemic inflammation.

  9. The administration of a high refined carbohydrate diet promoted an increase in pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in mice exposed to cigarette smoke

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    Pena KB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Karina Braga Pena,1 Camila de Oliveira Ramos,1 Nícia Pedreira Soares,1 Pamela Félix da Silva,1 Ana Carla Balthar Bandeira,2 Guilherme de Paula Costa,3 Sílvia Dantas Cangussú,1 André Talvani,3 Frank Silva Bezerra1 1Laboratory of Experimental Pathophysiology (LAFEx, 2Laboratory of Metabolic Biochemistry (LBM, 3Laboratory of Immunobiology of Inflammation (LABIIN, Department of Biological Sciences (DECBI, Center of Research in Biological Sciences (NUPEB, Federal University of Ouro Preto (UFOP, Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a high refined carbohydrate diet and pulmonary inflammatory response in C57BL/6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS. Twenty-four male mice were divided into four groups: control group (CG, which received a standard diet; cigarette smoke group (CSG, which was exposed to CS; a high refined carbohydrate diet group (RG, which received a high refined carbohydrate diet; and a high refined carbohydrates diet and cigarette smoke group (RCSG, which received a high refined carbohydrate diet and was exposed to CS. The animals were monitored for food intake and body weight gain for 12 weeks. After this period, the CSG and RCSG were exposed to CS for five consecutive days. At the end of the experimental protocol, all animals were euthanized for subsequent analyses. There was an increase of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of CSG compared to CG and RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG. In addition, in the BALF, there was an increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG; interferon gamma increase in RCSG compared to the CSG; and increase in interleukin-10 in RCSG compared to CG and RG. Lipid peroxidation increased in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG. Furthermore, the oxidation of proteins increased in CSG compared to CG. The analysis of oxidative stress showed an increase in superoxide dismutase in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG and an

  10. Pulmonary biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnes, Peter J.; Chowdhury, Badrul; Kharitonov, Sergei A.; Magnussen, Helgo; Page, Clive P.; Postma, Dirkje; Saetta, Marina

    2006-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in using pulmonary biomarkers to understand and monitor the inflammation in the respiratory tract of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this Pulmonary Perspective we discuss the merits of the various approaches by reviewing the current l

  11. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Mainul, E-mail: mainul.husain@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Saber, Anne T., E-mail: ats@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Guo, Charles, E-mail: charles.guo@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Jacobsen, Nicklas R., E-mail: nrj@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Jensen, Keld A., E-mail: kaj@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: carole.yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Williams, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.williams@hc-sc.gc.ca [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Vogel, Ulla, E-mail: ubv@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Wallin, Hakan, E-mail: hwa@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen DK-1014 (Denmark); Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO{sub 2} via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p < 0.1). Several inflammatory mediators changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein level. Although no influx of neutrophils was detected at the low dose, changes in the expression of several genes and proteins associated with inflammation were observed. Resolving inflammation at the medium dose, and lack of neutrophil influx in the lung fluid at the low dose, were associated with down-regulation of genes involved in ion homeostasis and muscle regulation. Our gene expression results imply that retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of pathways regulated by toll-like receptor 4 in a murine model of chronic pulmonary inflammation and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grissom Sherry F

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic strategies exist for human pulmonary neoplasia, however due to the heterogeneity of the disease, most are not very effective. The innate immunity gene, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, protects against chronic pulmonary inflammation and tumorigenesis in mice, but the mechanism is unclear. This study was designed to identify TLR4-mediated gene expression pathways that may be used as prognostic indicators of susceptibility to lung tumorigenesis in mice and provide insight into the mechanism. Methods Whole lung mRNA was isolated from C.C3H-Tlr4Lps-d (BALBLps-d; Tlr4 mutant and BALB/c (Tlr4 normal mice following butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT-treatment (four weekly ip. injections; 150-200 mg/kg/each; "promotion". mRNA from micro-dissected tumors (adenomas and adjacent uninvolved tissue from both strains were also compared 27 wks after a single carcinogen injection (3-methylcholanthrene (MCA, 10 μg/g; "control" or followed by BHT (6 weekly ip. injections; 125-200 mg/kg/each; "progression". Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for inflammatory cell content and total protein determination, a marker of lung hyperpermeability; inflammation was also assessed using immunohistochemical staining for macrophages (F4/80 and lymphocytes (CD3 in mice bearing tumors (progression. Results During promotion, the majority of genes identified in the BALBLps-d compared to BALB/c mice (P Ereg, secreted phosphoprotein 1(Spp1, which can lead to cell growth and eventual tumor development. Inflammation was significantly higher in BALBLps-d compared to BALB/c mice during progression, similar to the observed response during tumor promotion in these strains. Increases in genes involved in signaling through the EGFR pathway (e.g. Ereg, Spp1 were also observed during progression in addition to continued inflammation, chemotactic, and immune response gene expression in the BALBLps-d versus BALB/c mice (P Conclusion This transcriptomic study

  13. Effect of ageing and pulmonary inflammation on the incidence and number of cross-bridging structures in pneumothorax patients

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    Sasaki, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Koji; Aburano, Tamio (Dept. of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical Univ., Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan)), email: tomoaki3est@gmail.com

    2011-12-15

    Background. There is an improved prognosis for T4 non-small-cell lung cancer in patients who show particular patterns of direct mediastinal invasion. The particular patterns suggest the presence of direct pathways other than the pulmonary hilum between each of the lungs and the mediastinum/chest wall. Purpose. To determine the incidence and number of such direct pathways in pneumothorax patients as well as the factors that affect the development of these pathways. Material and Methods. Two radiologists independently analyzed multidetector computed tomographic images of 81 patients with pneumothorax to assess the incidence and distribution pattern of the cross-bridging structures in the pleural cavity. Results. Cross-bridging structures were observed in the right pneumothorax in 34/54 (63%) patients and in the left pneumothorax in 19/32 (59%) patients. The number of cross-bridging structures was found to be positively correlated with ageing and pulmonary disease. The distribution patterns of cross-bridging structures were found to be specific in formation and often in repeated locations, regardless of the presence of pulmonary disease or the age of the patient. Conclusion. Cross-bridging structures in pneumothoraces were found more frequently in older patients and in patients with pulmonary disease. However, some of the cross-bridging structures may have been congenital because of their specific formations and repeated locations

  14. Identification of the appropriate dose metric for pulmonary inflammation of silver nanoparticles in an inhalation toxicity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Cassee, Flemming R; Fokkens, Paul H B; de la Fonteyne, Liset J J; Oomen, Agnes G; Krystek, Petra; de Jong, Wim H; van Loveren, Henk; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A number of studies have shown that induction of pulmonary toxicity by nanoparticles of the same chemical composition depends on particle size, which is likely in part due to differences in lung deposition. Particle size mostly determines whether nanoparticles reach the alveoli, and where

  15. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hao Wang,1,2,* Ting Yang,1,2,* Diandian Li,1,2 Yanqiu Wu,1,2 Xue Zhang,1,2 Caishuang Pang,1,2 Junlong Zhang,3 Binwu Ying,3 Tao Wang,1,2 Fuqiang Wen1,2 1Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 2Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Laboratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR participate in inflammation and tissue remolding in various diseases, but their roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate if PAI-1 and suPAR were involved in systemic inflammation and small airway obstruction (SAO in COPD. Methods: Demographic and clinical characteristics, spirometry examination, and blood samples were obtained from 84 COPD patients and 51 healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of PAI-1, suPAR, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1, Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and C-reactive protein (CRP were detected with Magnetic Luminex Screening Assay. Differences between groups were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance or chi-square test. Pearson’s partial correlation test (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, cigarette status, and passive smoke exposure and multivariable linear analysis were used to explore the relationships between circulating PAI-1 and indicators of COPD. Results: First, we found that serum PAI-1 levels but not suPAR levels were significantly increased in COPD patients compared with healthy volunteers (125.56±51.74 ng/mL versus 102.98±36.62 ng/mL, P=0.007. Then, the

  16. Inhalation therapy with the synthetic TIP-like peptide AP318 attenuates pulmonary inflammation in a porcine sepsis model

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Erik K; Ziebart, Alexander; Thomas, Rainer; Liu, Tanghua; Schad, Arno; Tews, Martha; Moosmann, Bernd; Kamuf, Jens; Duenges, Bastian; Thal, Serge C.; David, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The lectin-like domain of TNF-α can be mimicked by synthetic TIP peptides and represents an innovative pharmacologic option to treat edematous respiratory failure. TIP inhalation was shown to reduce pulmonary edema and improve gas exchange. In addition to its edema resolution effect, TIP peptides may exert some anti-inflammatory properties. The present study therefore investigates the influence of the inhaled TIP peptide AP318 on intrapulmonary inflammatory response in a porcine mo...

  17. p53- and PAI-1-mediated induction of C-X-C chemokines and CXCR2: importance in pulmonary inflammation due to cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Nivedita; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Fu, Jian; Shetty, Sreerama

    2016-03-15

    We previously demonstrated that tumor suppressor protein p53 augments plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) during chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure-induced lung injury. Chronic lung inflammation with elevated p53 and PAI-1 expression in AECs and increased susceptibility to and exacerbation of respiratory infections are all associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We recently demonstrated that preventing p53 from binding to the endogenous PAI-1 mRNA in AECs by either suppressing p53 expression or blockading p53 interactions with the PAI-1 mRNA mitigates apoptosis and lung injury. Within this context, we now show increased expression of the C-X-C chemokines (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and their receptor CXCR2, and the intercellular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), in the lung tissues of patients with COPD. We also found a similar increase in lung tissues and AECs from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to passive CS for 20 wk and in primary AECs treated with CS extract in vitro. Interestingly, passive CS exposure of mice lacking either p53 or PAI-1 expression resisted an increase in CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCR2, and ICAM-1. Furthermore, inhibition of p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression by treatment of WT mice exposed to passive CS with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide reduced CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2 levels and lung inflammation. Our study reveals that p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression due to chronic CS exposure exacerbates lung inflammation through elaboration of CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2. We further provide evidence that targeting this pathway mitigates lung injury associated with chronic CS exposure.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of potato extract on a rat model of cigarette smoke–induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Gui Hua Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of potato extract (PE on cigarette smoke (CS–induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods: PE was first prepared by frozen centrifugation, and its amino acid composition was detected. Toxicity of PE was analyzed by changes in morphology, behavior, routine blood indexes, and biochemical criteria of mice. Then, the COPD rat model was established by CS exposure, and PE, doxofylline, and prednisolone acetate were used to treat these rats. After 45 days of treatment, the morphology and behavior of rats were recorded. In addition, the histopathology of lung tissue was evaluated by chest x-ray and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of interleukine-10 (IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF was detected in serum and lung tissue by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Various amino acids were identified in PE, and no toxicity was exhibited in mice. The CS-induced COPD rat model was successfully established, which exhibited significant thickened and disordered lung markings on 90% of the rats. After administering doxofylline and prednisolone acetate, inflammation symptoms were improved. However, side effects such as emaciation, weakness, and loosening of teeth appeared. In the PE group, obviously improved histopathology was observed in lung tissues. Meanwhile, it was revealed that PE could increase the expression of IL-10 and reduce the expression of TNF-α and G-CSF in COPD rats, and doxofylline and prednisolone acetate also elicited similar results. Conclusion: Our study suggests PE might be effective in the treatment of CS-induced COPD by inhibiting inflammation.

  19. The EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-pt-PGE2 acts as an EP4 receptor agonist on endothelial barrier function and in a model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation.

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    Theiler, Anna; Konya, Viktoria; Pasterk, Lisa; Maric, Jovana; Bärnthaler, Thomas; Lanz, Ilse; Platzer, Wolfgang; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of inflammatory conditions. We recently demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG)E2 enhances the resistance of pulmonary endothelium in vitro and counteracts lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo via EP4 receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-phenyl-trinor-(pt)-PGE2 on acute lung inflammation in a mouse model. In LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice, 17-pt-PGE2 reduced neutrophil infiltration and inhibited vascular leakage. These effects were unaltered by an EP1 antagonist, but reversed by EP4 receptor antagonists. 17-pt-PGE2 increased the resistance of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and prevented thrombin-induced disruption of endothelial junctions. Again, these effects were not mediated via EP1 or EP3 but through activation of the EP4 receptor, as demonstrated by the lack of effect of more selective EP1 and EP3 receptor agonists, prevention of these effects by EP4 antagonists and EP4 receptor knock-down by siRNA. In contrast, the aggregation enhancing effect of 17-pt-PGE2 in human platelets was mediated via EP3 receptors. Our results demonstrate that 17-pt-PGE2 enhances the endothelial barrier in vitro on pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, and accordingly ameliorates the recruitment of neutrophils, via EP4 receptors in vivo. This suggests a beneficial effect of 17-pt-PGE2 on pulmonary inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of P2X7 Receptors in Release of IL-1β: A Possible Mediator of Pulmonary Inflammation.

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    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Adcock, Ian M; Shafei, Hamed; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Folkerts, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP is a signaling molecule which plays an important role in alerting the immune system in case of any tissue damage. Recent studies show that binding of ATP to the ionotropic P2X7 receptor of inflammatory cells (macrophages and monocytes) will induce caspase 1 activation. Stimulation of caspase 1 activity results in maturation and release of IL-1β in the inflammasome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. COPD is an inflammatory disease characterized by emphysema and/or chronic bronchitis and is mostly associated with cigarette smoking. It is one of the leading causes of death in humans and there is currently no medication to stop the progression of disease. A deeper understanding of the mechanism by which the P2X7 receptor triggers IL-1β maturation and release, may open new opportunities for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as COPD.

  1. IL-10 is necessary for the expression of airway hyperresponsiveness but not pulmonary inflammation after allergic sensitization

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    Mäkelä, M. J.; Kanehiro, A.; Borish, L.; Dakhama, A.; Loader, J.; Joetham, A.; Xing, Z.; Jordana, M.; Larsen, G. L.; Gelfand, E. W.

    2000-05-01

    Cytokines play an important role in modulating inflammatory responses and, as a result, airway tone. IL-10 is a regulatory cytokine that has been suggested for treatment of asthma because of its immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to these suggestions, we demonstrate in a model of allergic sensitization that mice deficient in IL-10 (IL-10/) develop a pulmonary inflammatory response but fail to exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of lung function. Reconstitution of these deficient mice with the IL-10 gene fully restores development of airway hyperresponsiveness comparable to control mice. These results identify an important role of IL-10, downstream of the inflammatory cascade, in regulating the tone of the airways after allergic sensitization and challenge.

  2. Role of pulmonary intravascular macrophages in endotoxin-induced lung inflammation and mortality in a rat model

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    Duke Tanya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bile-duct ligated (BDL rats recruit pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs and are highly susceptible to endotoxin-induced mortality. The mechanisms of this enhanced susceptibility and mortality in BDL rats, which are used as a model of hepato-pulmonary syndrome, remain unknown. We tested a hypothesis that recruited PIMs promote endotoxin-induced mortality in a rat model. Methods Rats were subjected to BDL to induce PIM recruitment followed by treatment with gadolinium chloride (GC to deplete PIMs. Normal and BDL rats were treated intravenously with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS with or without GC pre-treatment followed by collection and analyses of lungs for histopathology, electron microscopy and cytokine quantification. Results BDL rats recruited PIMs without any change in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10. GC caused reduction in PIMs at 48 hours post-treatment (P E. coli LPS died within 3 hours of the challenge while the normal LPS-treated rats were euthanized at 6 hours after the LPS treatment. GC treatment of rats 6 hours or 48 hours before LPS challenge resulted in 80% (1/5 and 100% (0/5 survival, respectively, at 6 hours post-LPS treatment. Lungs from BDL+LPS rats showed large areas of perivascular hemorrhages compared to those pre-treated with GC. Concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10 were increased in lungs of BDL+LPS rats compared to BDL rats treated with GC 48 hours but not 6 hours before LPS (P Conclusion We conclude that PIMs increase susceptibility for LPS-induced lung injury and mortality in this model, which is blocked by a reduction in their numbers or their inactivation.

  3. Budesonide suppresses pulmonary antibacterial host defense by down-regulating cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide in allergic inflammation mice and in lung epithelial cells

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    Wang Peng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids are widely regarded as the most effective treatment for asthma. However, the direct impact of glucocorticoids on the innate immune system and antibacterial host defense during asthma remain unclear. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this process is critical to the clinical application of glucocorticoids for asthma therapy. After sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA, BALB/c mice were treated with inhaled budesonide and infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. The number of viable bacteria in enflamed lungs was evaluated, and levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ in serum were measured. A lung epithelial cell line was pretreated with budesonide. Levels of cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP were measured by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Intracellular bacteria were observed in lung epithelial cells. Results Inhaled budesonide enhanced lung infection in allergic mice exposed to P. aeruginosa and increased the number of viable bacteria in lung tissue. Higher levels of IL-4 and lower levels of IFN-γ were observed in the serum. Budesonide decreased the expression of CRAMP, increased the number of internalized P. aeruginosa in OVA-challenged mice and in lung epithelial cell lines. These data indicate that inhaled budesonide can suppress pulmonary antibacterial host defense by down-regulating CRAMP in allergic inflammation mice and in cells in vitro. Conclusions Inhaled budesonide suppressed pulmonary antibacterial host defense in an asthmatic mouse model and in lung epithelium cells in vitro. This effect was dependent on the down-regulation of CRAMP.

  4. Comparison of particle-exposure triggered pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice fed with three different diets

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    Hrabě de Angelis Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity can be linked to disease risks such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders, but recently, the adipose tissue (AT macrophage also emerges as actively participating in inflammation and immune function, producing pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. Connections between the AT and chronic lung diseases, like emphysema and asthma and a protective role of adipocyte-derived proteins against acute lung injury were suggested. In this study we addressed the question, whether a diet challenge increases the inflammatory response in the alveolar and the blood compartment in response to carbon nanoparticles (CNP, as a surrogate for ambient/urban particulate air pollutants. Methods Mice were fed a high caloric carbohydrate-rich (CA or a fat-rich (HF diet for six weeks and were compared to mice kept on a purified low fat (LF diet, respectively. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and blood samples were taken 24 h after intratracheal CNP instillation and checked for cellular and molecular markers of inflammation. Results and discussion The high caloric diets resulted in distinct effects when compared with LF mice, respectively: CA resulted in increased body and fat mass without affecting blood cellular immunity. Conversely, HF activated the blood system, increasing lymphocyte and neutrophil counts, and resulted in slightly increased body fat content. In contrast to higher pro-inflammatory BAL Leptin in CA and HF mice, on a cellular level, both diets did not lead to an increased pro-inflammatory basal status in the alveolar compartment per se, nor did result in differences in the particle-triggered response. However both diets resulted in a disturbance of the alveolar capillary barrier as indicated by enhanced BAL protein and lactate-dehydrogenase concentrations. Systemically, reduced serum Adiponectin in HF mice might be related to the observed white blood cell increase. Conclusion The increase in BAL pro-inflammatory factors in high caloric

  5. γδ T Cells Are Required for M2 Macrophage Polarization and Resolution of Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice.

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    Joel A Mathews

    Full Text Available We examined the role of γδ T cells in the induction of alternatively activated M2 macrophages and the resolution of inflammation after ozone exposure. Wildtype (WT mice and mice deficient in γδ T cells (TCRδ-/- mice were exposed to air or to ozone (0.3 ppm for up to 72h and euthanized immediately or 1, 3, or 5 days after cessation of exposure. In WT mice, M2 macrophages accumulated in the lungs over the course of ozone exposure. Pulmonary mRNA abundance of the M2 genes, Arg1, Retnla, and Clec10a, also increased after ozone. In contrast, no evidence of M2 polarization was observed in TCRδ-/- mice. WT but not TCRδ-/- mice expressed the M2c polarizing cytokine, IL-17A, after ozone exposure and WT mice treated with an IL-17A neutralizing antibody exhibited attenuated ozone-induced M2 gene expression. In WT mice, ozone-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils and macrophages resolved quickly after cessation of ozone exposure returning to air exposed levels within 3 days. However, lack of M2 macrophages in TCRδ-/- mice was associated with delayed clearance of inflammatory cells after cessation of ozone and increased accumulation of apoptotic macrophages in the lungs. Delayed restoration of normal lung architecture was also observed in TCRδ-/- mice. In summary, our data indicate that γδ T cells are required for the resolution of ozone-induced inflammation, likely because γδ T cells, through their secretion of IL-17A, contribute to changes in macrophage polarization that promote clearance of apoptotic cells.

  6. [Effect of basic therapy on clinical symptoms, quality of life and systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

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    Baranova, I I; Leshchenko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The study included 38 men with moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (mean age 60.6 ± 10.2 yr) and 42 ones with severe COPD (mean age 61.2 ± 7.2 yr). They were treated with tiotropium bromide, formoterol and beclomethasone dipropionate for 24 weeks (stage 1), TB alone for 12 weeks (stage 2) and TB+formoterol (long-acting bronchodilators, LABD) for another 12 weeks. Each stage was followed by evaluation of COPD symptoms using the St-George's Hospital questionnaire, daily requirements for short-acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), heart rate (HR), forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (FEV-1) before and after SABA test, hemoglobin saturation with oxygen in arterial blood during pulse oxymetry before and after 6 min walking test, blood surfactant protein D level (SP-D). The control group was comprised of 34 healthy men (mean age 62.3 ± 5.8 yr). Patients with moderately severe COPD experienced worsening of clinical symptoms (p COPD symptoms and HR was observed at stage 3. Alteration in the extent of basal therapy in patients with stage III COPD did not result in dynamics of clinical and laboratory characteristics. The data obtained suggest the necessity of combined therapy with LABD or triple basal therapy of moderately severe COPD and the possibility of therapy with one or two LABD having different sites of action in the patients with clinically stable stage II COPD.

  7. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

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    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L. [University Extremo Catarinense, Criciuma (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  8. sTREM-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, effect of smoking and inflammation.

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    Suchankova, M; Bucova, M; E, Tibenska; Demian, J; Majer, I; Novosadova, H; Tedlova, E; Durmanova, V; Paulovicova, E

    2013-01-01

    Soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1; Triggering receptor expressed on myelocytes) is a new inflammatory marker indicating the intensity of myeloid cells activation and the presence of infection caused by extracellular bacteria and mould.The aim of our work was to detect and compare the levels of sTREM-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS) and other ILD of non-infectious origin. The sTREM-1 levels were assessed by ELISA in 46 patients suffering from ILD, out of them 22 with PS. The levels of BALF sTREM-1 in PS patients were higher than in control group of ILD patients of non-infectious origin, however, the difference was not statistically significant. Since all PS patients except one were non-smokers we compared non-smokers PS with non-smokers ILD patients and found four times higher levels of BALF sTREM-1 in PS patients (P = 0.001). We also recorded the effect of smoking, ILD smokers had higher sTREM-1 levels than non-smokers (P = 0.0019). Higher concentrations of sTREM-1 were detected in BALF of patients with lymphadenopathy and with elevated inflammatory markers in BALF. Our results show that BALF sTREM-1 could be a good inflammatory marker and could help in diagnosis and PS monitoring. Detection of sTREM-1 in BALF indirectly points to myeloid cells activation in the lungs and helps to complete the information about the number of myeloid cells commonly determined in BALF with additional information concerning the intensity of their activation. This is the first study that analyses BALF sTREM-1 levels in patients with PS (Tab. 8, Ref. 28). Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  9. Salvianolic acid B attenuates lung inflammation induced by cigarette smoke in mice.

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    Zhang, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Jin; Li, Ran

    2015-08-15

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a bioactive compound isolated from the Chinese herb Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidantive effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of Sal B on cigarette smoke (CS)-induced acute lung inflammation. Sal B was given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to mice 1h before CS exposure daily for four consecutive days. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected to assess the levels of inflammatory cytokines and cell counts. Lung tissues were used to analysis pathological changes, total glutathione (GSH), nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) expression. The results showed that Sal B inhibited CS-induced lung pathological changes, the infiltration of inflammatory cells, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) productions. Sal B also up-regulated CS-induced total glutathione (GSH) production. Furthermore, Sal B was found to up-regulate Nrf-2, hemeoxygenase1 (HO1) expression and suppress CS-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Sal B exhibited a protective effect on CS-induced lung injury and the possible mechanism was involved in activating Nrf-2 and inhibiting NF-κB activation.

  10. Prolonged Pulmonary Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles Exacerbates Renal Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and DNA Damage in Mice with Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure

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    Abderrahim Nemmar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Epidemiological evidence indicates that patients with chronic kidney diseases have increased susceptibility to adverse outcomes related to long-term exposure to particulate air pollution. However, mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. Methods: Presently, we assessed the effect of prolonged exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP on chronic renal failure induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 4 weeks, which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. DEP (0.5m/kg was intratracheally (i.t. instilled every 4th day for 4 weeks (7 i.t. instillation. Four days following the last exposure to either DEP or saline (control, various renal endpoints were measured. Results: While body weight was decreased, kidney weight increased in DEP+adenine versus saline+adenine or DEP. Water intake, urine volume, relative kidney weight were significantly increased in adenine+DEP versus DEP and adenine+saline versus saline. Plasma creatinine and urea increased and creatinine clearance decreased in adenine+DEP versus DEP and adenine+saline versus saline. Tumor necrosis factor α, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species were significantly increased in adenine+DEP compared with either DEP or adenine+saline. The antioxidant calase was significantly decreased in adenine+DEP compared with either adenine+saline or DEP. Notably, renal DNA damage was significantly potentiated in adenine+DEP compared with either adenine+saline or DEP. Similarly, systolic blood pressure was increased in adenine+DEP versus adenine+saline or DEP, and in DEP versus saline. Histological evaluation revealed more collagen deposition, higher number of necrotic cell counts and dilated tubules, cast formation and collapsing glomeruli in adenine+DEP versus adenine+saline or DEP. Conclusion: Prolonged pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles worsen renal oxidative stress, inflammation and DNA damage in mice with adenine-induced chronic

  11. Neutralization of both IL-1α/IL-1β plays a major role in suppressing combined cigarette smoke/virus-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice.

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    Bucher, Hannes; Mang, Samuel; Keck, Martina; Przibilla, Michèl; Lamb, David; Schiele, Felix; Wittenbrink, Mareike; Fuchs, Klaus; Jung, Birgit; Erb, Klaus J; Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-15

    Smoking is an important risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and viral infections are believed to be major triggers of exacerbations, which periodically lead to a worsening of symptoms. The pro-inflammatory IL-1 family members IL-1α and IL-1β are increased in COPD patients and might contribute to disease pathology. We investigated whether individual or combined inhibition of these cytokines reduced lung inflammation in cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed and H1N1-infected BALB/c mice. Animals were treated with individual or combined antibodies (Abs) directed against IL-1α, IL-1β or IL-1R1. Cells in BAL fluid and cytokines/chemokines in lung homogenate were determined. The viral load was investigated. Blocking IL-1α had significant suppressive effects on total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Furthermore, it reduced KC levels significantly. Blocking of IL-1β did not provide significant activity. In line with the in vivo findings, IL-1α Abs but not IL-1β Abs reduced levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in H1N1 infected primary human bronchial epithelial air-liquid-interface cell culture. Concomitant usage of Abs against IL-1α/IL-1β revealed strong effects in vivo and reduced total cells, neutrophils and macrophages. Additionally, levels of KC, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1α and MIP-1β were significantly reduced and ICAM-1 and MUC5 A/C mRNA expression was attenuated. The viral load decreased significantly upon combined IL-1α/IL-1β Ab treatment. Blocking the IL-1R1 provided significant effects on total cells, neutrophils and macrophages but was inferior compared to inhibiting both its soluble ligands IL-1α/IL-1β. Our results suggest that combined inhibition of IL-1α/IL-1β might be beneficial to reduce CS/H1N1-induced airway inflammation. Moreover, combined targeting of both IL-1α/IL-1β might be more efficient compared to individual neutralization IL-1α or IL-1β or inhibition of the IL-1R1.

  12. Short-term exposure to high ambient air pollution increases airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in Beijing, China.

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    Wu, Shaowei; Ni, Yang; Li, Hongyu; Pan, Lu; Yang, Di; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Deng, Furong; Chen, Yahong; Shima, Masayuki; Guo, Xinbiao

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have investigated the short-term respiratory effects of ambient air pollution in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients in the context of high pollution levels in Asian cities. A panel of 23 stable COPD patients was repeatedly measured for biomarkers of airway inflammation including exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and exhaled hydrogen sulfide (FeH2S) (215 measurements) and recorded for daily respiratory symptoms (794person-days) in two study periods in Beijing, China in January-September 2014. Daily ambient air pollution data were obtained from nearby central air-monitoring stations. Mixed-effects models were used to estimate the associations between exposures and health measurements with adjustment for potential confounders including temperature and relative humidity. Increasing levels of air pollutants were associated with significant increases in both FeNO and FeH2S. Interquartile range (IQR) increases in PM2.5 (76.5μg/m(3), 5-day), PM10 (75.0μg/m(3), 5-day) and SO2 (45.7μg/m(3), 6-day) were associated with maximum increases in FeNO of 13.6% (95% CI: 4.8%, 23.2%), 9.2% (95% CI: 2.1%, 16.8%) and 34.2% (95% CI: 17.3%, 53.4%), respectively; and the same IQR increases in PM2.5 (6-day), PM10 (6-day) and SO2 (7-day) were associated with maximum increases in FeH2S of 11.4% (95% CI: 4.6%, 18.6%), 7.8% (95% CI: 2.3%, 13.7%) and 18.1% (95% CI: 5.5%, 32.2%), respectively. Increasing levels of air pollutants were also associated with increased odds ratios of sore throat, cough, sputum, wheeze and dyspnea. FeH2S may serve as a novel biomarker to detect adverse respiratory effects of air pollution. Our results provide potential important public health implications that ambient air pollution may pose risk to respiratory health in the context of high pollution levels in densely-populated cities in the developing world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of Dietary Tomato Juice on Changes in Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Structure Induced by Neonatal Hyperoxia in Mice (Mus musculus.

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    Sheena Bouch

    Full Text Available Many preterm infants require hyperoxic gas for survival, although it can contribute to lung injury. Experimentally, neonatal hyperoxia leads to persistent alterations in lung structure and increases leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. These effects of hyperoxia on the lungs are considered to be caused, at least in part, by increased oxidative stress. Our objective was to determine if dietary supplementation with a known source of antioxidants (tomato juice, TJ could protect the developing lung from injury caused by breathing hyperoxic gas. Neonatal mice (C57BL6/J breathed either 65% O2 (hyperoxia or room air from birth until postnatal day 7 (P7d; some underwent necropsy at P7d and others were raised in room air until adulthood (P56d. In subsets of both groups, drinking water was replaced with TJ (diluted 50:50 in water from late gestation to necropsy. At P7d and P56d, we analyzed total antioxidant capacity (TAC, markers of oxidative stress (nitrotyrosine and heme oxygenase-1 expression, inflammation (interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α expression, collagen (COL and smooth muscle in the lungs; we also assessed lung structure. We quantified macrophages in lung tissue (at P7d and leukocytes in BALF (at P56d. At P7d, TJ increased pulmonary TAC and COL1α1 expression and attenuated the hyperoxia-induced increase in nitrotyrosine and macrophage influx; however, changes in lung structure were not affected. At P56d, TJ increased TAC, decreased oxidative stress and reversed the hyperoxia-induced increase in bronchiolar smooth muscle. Additionally, TJ alone decreased IL-1β expression, but following hyperoxia TJ increased TNF-α expression and did not alter the hyperoxia-induced increase in leukocyte number. We conclude that TJ supplementation during and after neonatal exposure to hyperoxia protects the lung from some but not all aspects of hyperoxia-induced injury, but may also have adverse side-effects. The effects

  14. Chronic Internal Exposure to Low Dose 137Cs Induces Positive Impact on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Reducing Inflammation in ApoE-/- Mice.

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    Clélia Le Gallic

    Full Text Available After Chernobyl and Fukushima Daï Chi, two major nuclear accidents, large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment, mostly caesium 137 (137Cs. Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. However, questions still remain regarding the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic internal exposure to 137Cs on atherosclerosis in predisposed ApoE-/- mice. Mice were exposed daily to 0, 4, 20 or 100 kBq/l 137Cs in drinking water, corresponding to range of concentrations found in contaminated territories, for 6 or 9 months. We evaluated plaque size and phenotype, inflammatory profile, and oxidative stress status in different experimental groups. Results did not show any differences in atherosclerosis progression between mice exposed to 137Cs and unexposed controls. However, 137Cs exposed mice developed more stable plaques with decreased macrophage content, associated with reduced aortic expression of pro-inflammatory factors (CRP, TNFα, MCP-1, IFNγ and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin. Lesions of mice exposed to 137Cs were also characterized by enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cell content, concurrent with reduced matrix metalloproteinase MMP8 and MMP13 expression. These results suggest that low dose chronic exposure of 137Cs in ApoE-/- mice enhances atherosclerotic lesion stability by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP production, resulting in collagen-rich plaques with greater smooth muscle cell and less macrophage content.

  15. Chronic Internal Exposure to Low Dose 137Cs Induces Positive Impact on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Reducing Inflammation in ApoE-/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gallic, Clélia; Phalente, Yohann; Manens, Line; Dublineau, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Gueguen, Yann; Lehoux, Stephanie; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2015-01-01

    After Chernobyl and Fukushima Daï Chi, two major nuclear accidents, large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment, mostly caesium 137 (137Cs). Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. However, questions still remain regarding the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic internal exposure to 137Cs on atherosclerosis in predisposed ApoE-/- mice. Mice were exposed daily to 0, 4, 20 or 100 kBq/l 137Cs in drinking water, corresponding to range of concentrations found in contaminated territories, for 6 or 9 months. We evaluated plaque size and phenotype, inflammatory profile, and oxidative stress status in different experimental groups. Results did not show any differences in atherosclerosis progression between mice exposed to 137Cs and unexposed controls. However, 137Cs exposed mice developed more stable plaques with decreased macrophage content, associated with reduced aortic expression of pro-inflammatory factors (CRP, TNFα, MCP-1, IFNγ) and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin). Lesions of mice exposed to 137Cs were also characterized by enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cell content, concurrent with reduced matrix metalloproteinase MMP8 and MMP13 expression. These results suggest that low dose chronic exposure of 137Cs in ApoE-/- mice enhances atherosclerotic lesion stability by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP production, resulting in collagen-rich plaques with greater smooth muscle cell and less macrophage content.

  16. Chronic Internal Exposure to Low Dose 137Cs Induces Positive Impact on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Reducing Inflammation in ApoE-/- Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gallic, Clélia; Phalente, Yohann; Manens, Line; Dublineau, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Gueguen, Yann; Lehoux, Stephanie; Ebrahimian, Teni G.

    2015-01-01

    After Chernobyl and Fukushima Daï Chi, two major nuclear accidents, large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment, mostly caesium 137 (137Cs). Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. However, questions still remain regarding the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic internal exposure to 137Cs on atherosclerosis in predisposed ApoE-/- mice. Mice were exposed daily to 0, 4, 20 or 100 kBq/l 137Cs in drinking water, corresponding to range of concentrations found in contaminated territories, for 6 or 9 months. We evaluated plaque size and phenotype, inflammatory profile, and oxidative stress status in different experimental groups. Results did not show any differences in atherosclerosis progression between mice exposed to 137Cs and unexposed controls. However, 137Cs exposed mice developed more stable plaques with decreased macrophage content, associated with reduced aortic expression of pro-inflammatory factors (CRP, TNFα, MCP-1, IFNγ) and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin). Lesions of mice exposed to 137Cs were also characterized by enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cell content, concurrent with reduced matrix metalloproteinase MMP8 and MMP13 expression. These results suggest that low dose chronic exposure of 137Cs in ApoE-/- mice enhances atherosclerotic lesion stability by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP production, resulting in collagen-rich plaques with greater smooth muscle cell and less macrophage content. PMID:26046630

  17. Osteoporosis and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Lacativa,Paulo Gustavo Sampaio; Farias,Maria Lucia Fleiuss

    2010-01-01

    Several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have been associated to bone resorption. The link between osteoclast, macrophage colony stimulating factor and pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 explain the association between inflammation and osteoporosis. These diseases are related to osteoporosis an...

  18. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflamm...

  19. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflamm...

  20. Role of oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide and transforming growth factor-beta in the protective effect of diosgenin in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Obaid, Al Arqam Z; Zaki, Hala F; Agha, Azza M

    2014-10-05

    Pulmonary hypertension is a progressive disease of various origins that is associated with right ventricular dysfunction. In the present study, the protective effect of diosgenin was investigated in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Diosgenin (100 mg/kg) was given by oral administration once daily for 3 weeks. At the end of the experiment, mean arterial blood pressure, electrocardiography and echocardiography were recorded. Rats were then sacrificed and serum was separated for determination of total nitrate/nitrite level. Right ventricles and lungs were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, total nitrate/nitrite and transforming growth factor-beta contents. Myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activities in addition to endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression were also determined. Moreover, histological analysis of pulmonary arteries and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was performed. Diosgenin treatment provided a significant improvement toward preserving hemodynamic changes and alleviating oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers induced by monocrotaline in rats. Furthermore, diosgenin therapy prevented monocrotaline-induced changes in nitric oxide production, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as histological analysis. These findings support the beneficial effect of diosgenin in pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The association between pulmonary function impairment and colon inflammation in ulcerative colitis patients: A scientific basis for exterior-interior correlation between lung and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Yun; Wang, Xin-Yue; Wu, Hua-Yang; Sun, Hui-Yi; Liu, Da-Ming; Zhang, Wen; Jin, Chen-Xi; Wang, Shuo-Ren

    2016-12-01

    To investigated the involvement of pulmonary function impairment in ulcerative colitis (UC), to explore a scientific basis for the Chinese medicine (CM) theory of exterior-interior correlation between Lung (Fei) and Large intestine (Dachang). Totally 120 patients with a diagnosis of UC were recruited and the demographics, clinical data, and blood samples were collected. C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) concentrations were measured. Every patient accepted pulmonary function test and took chest radiograph (CXR).> RESULTS: Pulmonary function abnormalities were present in 72 of 120 patients. The median (interquartile range) vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) of lung, total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual volume (FRV) were decreased in distal UC and pancolitis compared with ulcerative prochitis (P lung/alveolar ventilation (P Lung and Large intestine.

  2. CCL3 and Viral Chemokine-Binding Protein gG Modulate Pulmonary Inflammation and Virus Replication during Equine Herpesvirus 1 Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    CCL3 is a proinflammatory chemokine that mediates many of the cellular changes occurring in pulmonary disease. Here, CCL3−/− mice were used to investigate the role of this chemokine during respiratory herpesvirus infection. Compared to wild-type mice, CCL3−/− mice infected with the alphaherpesvirus equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) displayed reduced body weight loss but had higher pulmonary viral loads. Lungs from infected CCL3−/− mice suffered a milder interstitial pneumonia, and fewer immune cel...

  3. DNA strand breaks, acute phase response and inflammation following pulmonary exposure by instillation to the diesel exhaust particle NIST1650b in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.

    2015-01-01

    by the alkaline comet assay as DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung and liver tissue. The pulmonary acute phase response was analysed by Saa3 mRNA levels by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Instillation of DEP induced a strong neutrophil influx 1 and 3 days, but not 28 days post-exposure. Saa3 m...

  4. Efficacy and Pharmacology of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitor CP-456,773 (CRID3) in Murine Models of Dermal and Pulmonary Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiano, Michael J; Lefker, Bruce A; Bowman, Michael R; Bree, Andrea G; Hubeau, Cedric; Bonin, Paul D; Mangan, Matthew; Dower, Ken; Monks, Brian G; Cushing, Leah; Wang, Stephen; Guzova, Julia; Jiao, Aiping; Lin, Lih-Ling; Latz, Eicke; Hepworth, David; Hall, J Perry

    2016-09-15

    A critical component of innate immune response to infection and tissue damage is the NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and this pathway and its activation products have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome activation leads to the cleavage of pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18, as well as the subsequent release of biologically active IL-1β, IL-18, and other soluble mediators of inflammation. In this study, we further define the pharmacology of the previously reported NLRP3 inflammasome-selective, IL-1β processing inhibitor CP-456,773 (also known as MCC950), and we demonstrate its efficacy in two in vivo models of inflammation. Specifically, we show that in human and mouse innate immune cells CP-456,773 is an inhibitor of the cellular release of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-18, that CP-456,773 prevents inflammasome activation induced by disease-relevant soluble and crystalline NLRP3 stimuli, and that CP-456,773 inhibits R848- and imiquimod-induced IL-1β release. In mice, CP-456,773 demonstrates potent inhibition of the release of proinflammatory cytokines following acute i.p. challenge with LPS plus ATP in a manner that is proportional to the free/unbound concentrations of the drug, thereby establishing an in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CP-456,773. Furthermore, CP-456,773 reduces ear swelling in an imiquimod cream-induced mouse model of skin inflammation, and it reduces airway inflammation in mice following acute challenge with house dust mite extract. These data implicate the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of dermal and airway inflammation, and they highlight the utility of CP-456,773 for interrogating the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its outputs in preclinical models of inflammation and disease.

  5. Sinonasal inflammation in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Konge, Lars; Thomsen, Sf

    2013-01-01

    In this review we demonstrate that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently report sinonasal symptoms. Furthermore, we present evidence that smoking on its own can cause nasal disease, and that in COPD patients, nasal inflammation mimics that of the bronchi. All...... this evidence suggests that COPD related sinonasal disease does exist and that smoking on its own rather than systemic inflammation triggers the condition. However, COPD related sinonasal disease remains to be characterized in terms of symptoms and endoscopic findings. In addition, more studies are needed...... to quantify the negative impact of sinonasal symptoms on the quality of life in COPD patients....

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune......-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P.nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung...... pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P.nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable...

  7. Pulmonary edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  8. Diminished peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR regulation as a potential mechanism for the persistent inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Drost

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent inflammation is the main pathological process that underlies COPD. Understanding this inflammatory response is a key focus of COPD research with the aim of discovering new therapeutic targets. The nuclear hormone receptor, PPAR is now a recognised modulator of inflammation in various chronic inflammatory conditions, but its role in the persistent airways inflammation in COPD has not been examined. Control of the inflammatory response by PPAR has been shown by antagonising inflammatory signalling pathways, such as NF-kappa B and AP-1. PPAR-alpha protein levels in lung tissue from patients with COPD were assessed by Western blot. In vitro assays using the human type II alveolar epithelial cell line were performed to assess the effect of PPAR-alpha agonist treatment on inflammatory cytokine generation. An increase in PPAR-alpha protein levels was seen for healthy smokers compared with non-smokers (Ratio to beta-actin loading control, non-smokers 0.61±0.1, n = 10; healthy smokers 0.97±0.3, n = 11, p>0.05. No increase was seen for current smoker or ex-smoker COPD patients (0.36±0.08, n = 12; 0.49±0.1, n = 8 respectively. In vitro experiments with a human type II alveolar epithelial cell line demonstrated a diminished inflammatory response to TNF-alpha, as measured by the generation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8, following pre-treatment with the PPAR-alpha agonist, WY-14643 (IL-8 generation, control 823±22 pg·ml–1, TNF-alpha 7491±530 pg·ml–1 p<0.001, WY-14643 2559±46 pg·ml–1 p<0.05, n = 3. We propose PPAR agonists as a potential therapy for reducing the NF-B-regulated inflammation in COPD airways.

  9. Chlamydial heat shock protein 60 induces acute pulmonary inflammation in mice via the Toll-like receptor 4- and MyD88-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Yonca; Shimada, Kenichi; Wong, Michelle H; Chen, Shuang; Gray, Pearl; Alsabeh, Randa; Doherty, Terence M; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-07-01

    Heat shock protein 60 derived from Chlamydia pneumoniae (cHSP60) activates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling through the MyD88 pathway in vitro, but it is not known how cHSP60 contributes to C. pneumoniae-induced lung inflammation. We treated wild-type (WT), TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), or MyD88(-/-) mice intratracheally (i.t.) with recombinant cHSP60 (50 microg), UV-killed C. pneumoniae (UVCP; 5 x 10(6) inclusion-forming units/mouse), lipopolysaccharide (2 microg), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and sacrificed mice 24 h later. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained to measure cell counts and cytokine levels, lungs were analyzed for histopathology, and lung homogenate chemokine concentrations were determined. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDDCs) were generated and stimulated with live C. pneumoniae (multiplicity of infection [MOI], 5), UVCP (MOI, 5), or cHSP60 for 24 h, and the expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86) was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. cHSP60 induced acute lung inflammation with the same intensity as that of UVCP-induced inflammation in WT mice but not in TLR4(-/-) or MyD88(-/-) mice. cHSP60- and UVCP-induced lung inflammation was associated with increased numbers of cells in BAL, increased neutrophil recruitment, and elevated BAL interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Both cHSP60 and UVCP induced IL-6 release and CD80 and CD86 expression in WT cells but not in MyD88(-/-) BMDDCs. cHSP60 stimulated DC activation in a TLR4- and MyD88-dependent manner with an intensity similar to that induced by UVCP. These data suggest that cHSP60 promotes lung inflammation and DC activation via TLR4 and MyD88 and therefore may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae-induced chronic inflammatory lung diseases.

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood;

    2015-01-01

    response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae...... B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H.influenzae induced severe Toll...

  11. Pathogenesis of pulmonary vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, P; Schreiber, A; Falk, RJ; Jennette, JC

    2004-01-01

    Vasculitis is inflammation of blood vessels and can affect any type of vessel in any organ. Pulmonary vasculitis usually is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis. Three major forms of small vessel vasculitis that often affect the lungs are Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiit

  12. Pathogenesis of pulmonary vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, P; Schreiber, A; Falk, RJ; Jennette, JC

    2004-01-01

    Vasculitis is inflammation of blood vessels and can affect any type of vessel in any organ. Pulmonary vasculitis usually is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis. Three major forms of small vessel vasculitis that often affect the lungs are Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic

  13. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Salil; Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pul...

  14. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retroperitoneal inflammation is swelling that occurs in the retroperitoneal space. ...

  15. Baicalein inhibits pulmonary carcinogenesis-associated inflammation and interferes with COX-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions in-vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrashekar, Naveenkumar; Selvamani, Asokkumar; Subramanian, Raghunandhakumar; Pandi, Anandakumar; Thiruvengadam, Devaki, E-mail: devakit@yahoo.co.uk

    2012-05-15

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) on inflammatory cytokines, which is in line with tumor invasion factors and antioxidant defensive system during benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] (50 mg/kg body weight) induced pulmonary carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. After experimental period, increased levels of total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were observed. Accompanied by marked increase in immature mast cell by toluidine blue staining and mature mast cell by safranin–alcian blue staining in B(a)P-induced lung cancer bearing animals. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase were also found to be significantly increased in lung cancer bearing animals. B(a)P-exposed mice lung exhibits activated expression of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B as confirmed by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis. Administration of BE (12 mg/kg body weight) significantly counteracted all the above deleterious changes. Moreover, assessment of tumor invasion factors on protein levels by immunoblot and mRNA expression levels by RT-PCR revealed that BE treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cyclo-oxygenase-2. Further analysis of lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydro-peroxides and antioxidants such as glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione in lung tissue was carried out to substantiate the antioxidant effect of BE. The chemotherapeutic effect observed in the present study is attributed to the potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential by BE against pulmonary carcinogenesis. -- Highlights: ► BE treatment protects from inflammatory cells and mast-cells accumulation in lungs. ► BE altered the expressions of TNF

  16. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling.

  17. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  18. Aloe vera affects changes induced in pulmonary tissue of mice caused by cigarette smoke inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Ashwani; Bala, Shashi; Yasmeen; Arora, Neha

    2015-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influence of Aloe vera (AV) on changes induced in pulmonary tissue of cigarette smoke (CS) inhaling mice. CS inhalation for 4 weeks caused pulmonary damage as evident by histoarchitectural alterations and enhanced serum and tissue lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities. CS inhalation also led to increased mucin production as revealed by mucicarmine and Alcian Blue-Periodic Acid Schiff (AB-PAS) staining. Studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (balf) of CS exposed animals revealed structural changes in phospholipids and increase in surface tension when compared with control counterparts. These changes were accompanied by enhanced nitric oxide (NO) levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and differential modulation of antioxidant defense system. AV administration (seven weeks, 500 mg/kg b.w. daily) to CS inhaling mice led to modulation of CS induced pulmonary changes as revealed by lesser degree of histoarchitectural alterations, lesser mucin production, decreased NO levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and serum LDH activity. AV treatment to CS inhaling mice was associated with varying response to antioxidant defense system, however balf of CS + AV treated animals did not exhibit appreciable changes when compared with that of CS exposed animals. These observations suggest that AV has the potential to modulate CS induced changes in the pulmonary tissue which could have implications in management of CS associated pulmonary diseases, however, further investigations are required to explore its complete mechanism of action.

  19. The Src family tyrosine kinases src and yes have differential effects on inflammation-induced apoptosis in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelin, Leif D; White, Hilary A; Jin, Yi; Trittmann, Jennifer K; Chen, Bernadette; Liu, Yusen

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial cells are essential for normal lung function: they sense and respond to circulating factors and hemodynamic alterations. In inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, endothelial cell apoptosis is an inciting event in pathogenesis and a prominent pathological feature. Endothelial cell apoptosis is mediated by circulating inflammatory factors, which bind to receptors on the cell surface, activating signal transduction pathways, leading to caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. We hypothesized that yes and src have differential effects on caspase-3 activation in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC) due to differential downstream signaling effects. To test this hypothesis, hPMVEC were treated with siRNA against src (siRNAsrc), siRNA against yes (siRNAyes), or their respective scramble controls. After recovery, the hPMVEC were treated with cytomix (LPS, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ). Treatment with cytomix induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with siRNAsrc blunted cytomix-induced ERK activation and enhanced cleaved caspase-3 levels, while treatment with siRNAyes enhanced cytomix-induced ERK activation and attenuated levels of cleaved caspase-3. Inhibition of the ERK pathway using U0126 enhanced cytomix-induced caspase-3 activity. Treatment of hPMVEC with cytomix induced Akt activation, which was inhibited by siRNAsrc. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway using LY294002 prevented cytomix-induced ERK activation and augmented cytomix-induced caspase-3 cleavage. Together, our data demonstrate that, in hPMVEC, yes activation blunts the ERK cascade in response to cytomix, resulting in greater apoptosis, while cytomix-induced src activation induces the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, which leads to activation of Akt and ERK and attenuation of apoptosis.

  20. Aged red garlic extract reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and acute pulmonary inflammation through haeme oxygenase-1 induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-J; Jeon, B T; Kim, H C; Roh, G S; Shin, J-H; Sung, N-J; Han, J; Kang, D

    2012-05-01

    It is known that garlic has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Aged red garlic (ARG), a novel aged garlic formulation, has higher antioxidant effects than fresh raw garlic. This study was performed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of ARG extract (ARGE). The anti-inflammatory effects of ARGE were evaluated in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated Raw 264.7 macrophages and acute lung inflammatory mice. NO production was determined by the Griess method, and iNOS, HO-1 and COX-2 expressions were measured using Western blot analysis. Histology and inflammation extent of lung were analysed using haematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. ARGE treatment markedly reduced LPS-induced nitrite production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Treatment of cells with ARGE led to a significant increase in haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, which was mediated by stimulating the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Treatment with zinc protoporphyrin, a selective inhibitor of HO-1, significantly reversed the ARGE-mediated inhibition of nitrite production (P < 0.05). In LPS-induced inflammatory mice, ARGE treatment down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expressions, while it up-regulated HO-1 expression. These results show that ARGE reduces LPS-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages through HO-1 induction and suggest that ARGE may have potential effects on prevention and treatment of acute inflammatory lung injury. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  1. Pulmonary embolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... area). This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) . The blood clot breaks off and travels ...

  2. Air pollution source apportionment before, during, and after the 2008 Beijing Olympics and association of sources to aldehydes and biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress in healthy young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemose, Brent A.

    Based on principal component analysis (PCA) of air pollution data collected during the Summer Olympic Games held in Beijing, China during 2008, the five source types of air pollution identified -- natural soil/road dust, vehicle and industrial combustion, vegetative burning, oil combustion, and secondary formation, were all distinctly lower during the Olympics. This was particularly true for vehicle and industrial combustion and oil combustion, and during the main games period between the opening and closing ceremonies. The reduction in secondary formation was reflective of a reduction in nitrogen oxides, but this also contributed to increased ozone concentrations during the Olympic period. Among three toxic aldehydes measured in Beijing during the same time period, only acetaldehyde had a reduction in mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Accordingly, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with primary emission sources including vegetative burning and oil combustion, and with several pollutants emitted mainly from primary sources. In contrast, formaldehyde and acrolein increased during the Olympic air pollution control period; accordingly both were significantly correlated with ozone and with the secondary formation source type. These findings indicate primary sources may dominate for acetaldehyde while secondary sources may dominate for formaldehyde and acrolein. Biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation (exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, exhaled nitric oxide, and EBC nitrite) and hemostasis and blood coagulation (vWF and sCD62p) were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The systemic inflammation biomarker 8-OHdG was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. In contrast, the associations between the biomarkers and the aldehydes were generally not significant or in the hypothesized direction, although

  3. Relation Between Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Anemia and Inflammation%慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并贫血与炎症相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄洁; 李承红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the relation between the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD )with anemia and inflammation. Methods According to the anemia standard,the 273 cas⁃es of AECOPD were enrolled. 40 cases of anemia in COPD(anemia group)and 40 cases of non-ane⁃mic in COPD(non-anemia group) were selected. Lung function(FEV1%),and interleukin-6 (IL-6),interleukin-8(IL-8),and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)were determined,and the count of CD4+and CD8+T cell were measured with flow cytometry. The correlation was studied. Re⁃sults The level of interleukin-6(IL-6),interleukin-8(IL-8),and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)were significantly higher in anemia group than in non-anemic group(P< 0.05). The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ in anemia group were significantly lower than non-anemic group(P< 0.05). Conclu⁃sion COPD with anemic may be related inflammation.%目的:研究慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)合并贫血患者与炎症的关系。方法根据贫血标准对273例慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重期(AECOPD)患者进行调查,对其中合并贫血的COPD患者(贫血组)40例和非贫血的COPD患者(非贫血组)40例为研究对象。常规行肺功能(FEV1%)检查,测定血清细胞因子白细胞介质IL-6、IL-8与肿瘤坏死因子-α(TNF-α)及流式细胞仪检测CD4+、CD8+T细胞,并计算其相关性。结果贫血组患者的炎症指标IL-6、IL-8、TNF-α水平高于非贫血组(P<0.05),CD4+/CD8+T细胞比例低于非贫血组(P<0.05),差异均有统计学意义。结论 COPD患者合并贫血可能与炎症相关。

  4. Inflammatory biomarkers and comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette; Dahl, Morten; Lange, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have evidence of systemic inflammation that may be implicated in the development of comorbidities.......Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have evidence of systemic inflammation that may be implicated in the development of comorbidities....

  5. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suri Harpreet S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH is a relatively uncommon lung disease that generally, but not invariably, occurs in cigarette smokers. The pathologic hallmark of PLCH is the accumulation of Langerhans and other inflammatory cells in small airways, resulting in the formation of nodular inflammatory lesions. While the overwhelming majority of patients are smokers, mechanisms by which smoking induces this disease are not known, but likely involve a combination of events resulting in enhanced recruitment and activation of Langerhans cells in small airways. Bronchiolar inflammation may be accompanied by variable lung interstitial and vascular involvement. While cellular inflammation is prominent in early disease, more advanced stages are characterized by cystic lung destruction, cicatricial scarring of airways, and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Pulmonary function is frequently abnormal at presentation. Imaging of the chest with high resolution chest CT scanning may show characteristic nodular and cystic abnormalities. Lung biopsy is necessary for a definitive diagnosis, although may not be required in instances were imaging findings are highly characteristic. There is no general consensus regarding the role of immunosuppressive therapy in smokers with PLCH. All smokers must be counseled on the importance of smoking cessation, which may result in regression of disease and obviate the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. The prognosis for most patients is relatively good, particularly if longitudinal lung function testing shows stability. Complications like pneumothoraces and secondary pulmonary hypertension may shorten life expectancy. Patients with progressive disease may require lung transplantation.

  6. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  7. Fatal dissection of the pulmonary artery in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Degano

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 41-yr-old patient with chronic stable idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH presented with sudden chest pain and unusual dyspnoea during physical exertion. The patient had been diagnosed with PAH at the age of 12 yrs and was in New York Heart Association functional class I/II. The patient was being treated with an anticoagulant regimen, low-dose diuretics and continuous intravenous epoprostenol therapy. A computed tomography scan showed ancient massive thrombi in dilated central pulmonary arteries, which were not haemodynamically significant (perfusion lung scans did not demonstrate segmental or larger defects, and extensive dissection of the right pulmonary artery starting from the intermediate branch. Due to the extensiveness of the dissection, the patient was immediately considered for heart–lung transplantation, but died 72 h after the onset of symptoms. Permission for post mortem examination was denied. Pulmonary artery dissection should be suspected in PAH patients presenting with chest pain and worsening dyspnoea. In the current case, the factors possibly associated with increased risk for dissection may include dilatation of the pulmonary artery, local inflammation favoured by in situ thrombosis, and acute increase of pulmonary pressure secondary to physical exertion. Extensive pulmonary artery dissection is a life-threatening complication of PAH, and urgent heart/lung transplantation might be the treatment of choice in eligible patients. In addition, better identification of the risk factors for pulmonary artery dissection may help in considering transplantation for selected patients at risk.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clots in the lung ( pulmonary embolism ) Heart failure Heart valve disease HIV infection Low oxygen levels in the blood for a long time (chronic) Lung disease, such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis Medicines (for example, certain diet drugs) Obstructive sleep ...

  9. Pulmonary Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed March 13, 2014. Pinto DS, et al. Pathophysiology of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. http://www.uptodate.com/ ... hvd/. Accessed March 10, 2014. What is pulmonary hypertension? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www. ...

  10. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This ... blood may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  11. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shortness of breath and increase your ability to exercise. You may have heard that pulmonary rehabilitation is only for people with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). We now know that ...

  12. A dual role for the immune response in a mouse model of inflammation-associated lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, Michael; Li, Danan; Neuberg, Donna; Mihm, Martin; Googe, Paul; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Dranoff, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Both principal factors known to cause lung cancer, cigarette smoke and asbestos, induce pulmonary inflammation, and pulmonary inflammation has recently been implicated in several murine models of lung cancer. To further investigate the role of inflammation in the development of lung cancer, we generated mice with combined loss of IFN-γ and the β-common cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3. These immunodeficient mice develop chronic pulmonary in...

  13. Characterization of inflammation in COPD : clinical and experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooy, J.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is an important feature of COPD. This inflammatory response is not restricted to the local compartment - including airways, lung parenchyma, and pulmonary vasculature - but is also present in the circulation. However, the origin of the systemic inflammation present in COPD patie

  14. Glucosamine attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuh-Lin; Lin, An-Hsuan; Chen, Chao-Hung; Huang, Wen-Chien; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Meng-Han; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Ru Kou, Yu

    2014-04-01

    Cigarette smoking causes persistent lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. We have reported that cigarette smoke (CS) activates a NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway leading to induction of lung inflammation. Glucosamine, a dietary supplement used to treat osteoarthritis, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether glucosamine has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model we show that chronic CS exposure for 4 weeks increased lung levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (an oxidative stress biomarker), phospho-AMPK, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and induced lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by chronic treatment with glucosamine. Using human bronchial epithelial cells, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke extract (CSE) sequentially activated NADPH oxidase; increased intracellular levels of ROS; activated AMPK, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins 3 (STAT3); and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8). Additionally, using a ROS scavenger, a siRNA that targets AMPK, and various pharmacological inhibitors, we identified the signaling cascade that leads to induction of IL-8 by CSE. All these CSE-induced events were inhibited by glucosamine pretreatment. Our findings suggest a novel role for glucosamine in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by chronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing the CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro by inhibiting both the ROS-sensitive NADPH oxidase/AMPK/MAPK signaling pathway and the downstream transcriptional factors NF-κB and STAT3.

  15. Unraveling the Complex Relationship Triad between Lipids, Obesity, and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Shahida A. Khan; Ashraf Ali; Khan, Sarah A.; Zahran, Solafa A.; Ghazi Damanhouri; Esam Azhar; Ishtiaq Qadri

    2014-01-01

    Obesity today stands at the intersection between inflammation and metabolic disorders causing an aberration of immune activity, and resulting in increased risk for diabetes, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and pulmonary inflammation to name a few. Increases in mortality and morbidity in obesity related inflammation have initiated studies to explore different lipid mediated molecular pathways of attempting resolution that uncover newer therapeutic opportunities of anti-inflammatory components. M...

  16. Pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Martins Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is a pathological condition associated with various diseases, which must be remembered by the physicians, since early diagnosis may anticipate and avoid dangerous complications and even death if appropriate measures were not taken. The relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, important pathological process that is in increasing prevalence in developing countries, and leading position as cause of death, emphasizes its importance. Here are presented the classifications, pathophysiology, and general rules of treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  17. Plasma-derived human antithrombin attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy but not inflammation in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslami, H.; Haitsma, J.J.; Hofstra, J.J.; Florquin, S.; Santos, C. dos; Streutker, C.; Zhang, H.; Levi, M.; Slutsky, A.S.; Schultz, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation exaggerates pneumonia-associated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. We hypothesized that the administration of plasma-derived human antithrombin (AT), one of the natural inhibitors of coagulation, prevents ventilator-induced pulmonary coagulopathy,

  18. Plasma-derived human antithrombin attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy but not inflammation in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslami, H.; Haitsma, J.J.; Hofstra, J.J.; Florquin, S.; Santos, C. dos; Streutker, C.; Zhang, H.; Levi, M.; Slutsky, A.S.; Schultz, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation exaggerates pneumonia-associated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. We hypothesized that the administration of plasma-derived human antithrombin (AT), one of the natural inhibitors of coagulation, prevents ventilator-induced pulmonary coagulopathy, inflammati

  19. Pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmadakis, George; Aguilera, Didier; Carceles, Odette; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Boletis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients is relatively high and varies in different studies from 17% to 49.53% depending on the mode of dialysis and other selection factors, such as the presence of other cardiovascular comorbidities. The etiopathogenic mechanisms that have been studied in relatively small studies mainly include arteriovenous fistula-induced increased cardiac output, which cannot be accomodated by, the spacious under normal conditions pulmonary circulation. Additionally, pulmonary vessels show signs of endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of vascular tone due to an imbalance in vasoactive substances, and local as well as systemic inflammation. It is also believed that microbubbles escaping from the dialysis circuit can trigger vasoconstriction and vascular sclerosis. The non-specific therapeutic options that proved to be beneficial in pulmonary artery pressure reduction are endothelin inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, and vasodilatory prostaglandins in various forms. The specific modes of treatment are renal transplantation, size reduction or closure of high-flow arteriovenous fistulas, and transfer from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis-a modality that is associated with a lesser prevalence of pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Radioiodine uptake in inactive pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakheet, S.M.; Powe, J.; Al Suhaibani, H. [Department of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hammami, M.M.; Bazarbashi, M. [Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1999-06-01

    Radioiodine may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection. We have seen such accumulation in six thyroid cancer patients with a history of previously treated pulmonary tuberculosis. We also review the causes of false-positive radioiodine uptake in lung infection/inflammation. Eight foci of radioiodine uptake were seen on six iodine-123 diagnostic scans. In three foci, the uptake was focal and indistinguishable from thyroid cancer pulmonary metastases from thyroid cancer. In the remaining foci, the uptake appeared nonsegmental, linear or lobar, suggesting a false-positive finding. The uptake was unchanged, variable in appearance or non-persistent on follow-up scans and less extensive than the fibrocystic changes seen on chest radiographs. In the two patients studied, thyroid hormone level did not affect the radioiodine lung uptake and there was congruent gallium-67 uptake. None of the patients had any evidence of thyroid cancer recurrence or of reactivation of tuberculosis and only two patients had chronic intermittent chest symptoms. Severe bronchiectasis, active tuberculosis, acute bronchitis, respiratory bronchiolitis, rheumatoid arthritis-associated lung disease and fungal infection such as Allescheria boydii and aspergillosis can lead to different patterns of radioiodine chest uptake mimicking pulmonary metastases. Pulmonary scarring secondary to tuberculosis may predispose to localized radioiodine accumulation even in the absence of clinically evident active infection. False-positive radioiodine uptake due to pulmonary infection/inflammation should be considered in thyroid cancer patients prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary metastases. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 9 refs.

  1. The effects of atorvastatin in ameliorating monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats through reduction of inflammation%阿托伐他汀对野百合碱诱导的大鼠肺动脉高压及肺组织炎症的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢西迁; 吴绪伟; 吴尚洁; 李艳丽; 张红艳; 李志东; 魏星; 肖谊

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of atorvastatin on monocrotaline (MCT) -induced pulmonary hypertension in rats and the inflammation in lung. METHODS Twenty-four male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups including control group, MCT group and atorvastatin group (AS group). There were eight rats in each group. The rats in MCT and AS group were given a single subcutaneously injection of MCT (60mg/kg). Atorvastatin (10mg/kg/d) were given orally for 21 days to the rats in AS groups since the day when rats were injected MCT. At 22 days. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and right ventricular hypertrophy index ( RVHI) were measured. Perivascular inflammation was observed. The index of wall thickness of pulmonary arteriole was measured by a computerized image analyzer. RESULTS The mPAP and RVHI increased significantly in MCT group than that in control group (P< 0.01). This increase in mPAP and RVHI was partially prevented by atorvastatin (P< 0.01). Atorvastatin treatment was associated with a significant reduction of MCT-induced number of inflammatory cells. This increase in WT% and WA% was partially prevented by atorvastatin (P < 0.01). The percentage of inflammatory cells was positively correlated with mPAP and WT% and WA% of pulmonary medial arteries and arteriole (P < 0.01, respectively). CONCLUSION Atorvastatin could prevent MCT-induced inflammatory response, pulmonary vascular remodeling and the development of pulmonary hypertension.%目的 观察阿托伐他汀对野百合碱(monocrotaline,MCT)诱导的大鼠肺动脉压及肺部炎症的影响.方法将24只SD大鼠随机分为正常对照组(对照组),MCT诱导的肺动脉高压组(PH模型组),阿托伐他汀干预组(治疗组),每组8只.PH模型组和治疗组分别一次性腹部皮下注射MCT (60 mg/kg),治疗组自注射MCT之日起以阿托伐他汀(10mg/kg)灌胃,每日1次.3周后达实验终点,测定大鼠平均肺动脉压、计算右心室肥大指数.肺组织切片进行HE

  2. Inflammation induced loss of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londhe, Priya; Guttridge, Denis C

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an important contributor to the pathology of diseases implicated in skeletal muscle dysfunction. A number of diseases and disorders including inflammatory myopathies and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) are characterized by chronic inflammation or elevation of the inflammatory mediators. While these disease states exhibit different pathologies, all have in common the loss of skeletal muscle mass and a deregulated skeletal muscle physiology. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are key contributors to chronic inflammation found in many of these diseases. This section of the review focuses on some of the known inflammatory disorders like COPD, Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and inflammatory myopathies that display skeletal muscle atrophy and also provides the reader an overview of the mediators of inflammation, their signaling pathways, and mechanisms of action. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions".

  3. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Halilbasic; Fahrija Skokic; Nesad Hotic; Edin Husaric; Gordana Radoja; Selma Muratovic; Nermina Dedic; Meliha Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  4. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  5. The Impact of Immunosenescence on Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A. Murray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The global population is aging with significant gains in life expectancy particularly in the developed world. Consequently, greater focus on understanding the processes that underlie physiological aging has occurred. Key facets of advancing age include genomic instability, telomere shortening, epigenetic changes, and declines in immune function termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence and its associated chronic low grade systemic “inflamm-aging” contribute to the development and progression of pulmonary disease in older individuals. These physiological processes predispose to pulmonary infection and confer specific and unique clinical phenotypes observed in chronic respiratory disease including late-onset asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. Emerging concepts of the gut and airway microbiome further complicate the interrelationship between host and microorganism particularly from an immunological perspective and especially so in the setting of immunosenescence. This review focuses on our current understanding of the aging process, immunosenescence, and how it can potentially impact on various pulmonary diseases and the human microbiome.

  6. The Impact of Immunosenescence on Pulmonary Disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Michelle A

    2015-08-01

    The global population is aging with significant gains in life expectancy particularly in the developed world. Consequently, greater focus on understanding the processes that underlie physiological aging has occurred. Key facets of advancing age include genomic instability, telomere shortening, epigenetic changes, and declines in immune function termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence and its associated chronic low grade systemic "inflamm-aging" contribute to the development and progression of pulmonary disease in older individuals. These physiological processes predispose to pulmonary infection and confer specific and unique clinical phenotypes observed in chronic respiratory disease including late-onset asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. Emerging concepts of the gut and airway microbiome further complicate the interrelationship between host and microorganism particularly from an immunological perspective and especially so in the setting of immunosenescence. This review focuses on our current understanding of the aging process, immunosenescence, and how it can potentially impact on various pulmonary diseases and the human microbiome.

  7. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grows on dead leaves, stored grain, bird droppings, compost piles, and other decaying vegetation. Cavities in the ... Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Review Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin M. ...

  8. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Miliary tuberculosis Tuberculosis of the lungs Erythema nodosum associated with sarcoidosis Respiratory system Tuberculin skin test References Fitzgerald DW, Sterling TR, Haas DW. ...

  9. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  10. Pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, more than 800 papers were published in the field of pulmonary hypertension. A Clinical Year in Review article cannot possibly incorporate all this work and needs to be selective. The recently published European guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension contain an inclusive summary of all published clinical studies conducted until very recently. Here, we provide an overview of papers published after the finalisation of the guideline. In addition, we summaris...

  11. Pulmonary Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini; Chawla, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral opaque lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in newborn which can be found on simple radiograph of the chest. Pulmonary agenesis is a rare cause of unilateral opaque lung in the newborn. Nearly 50% cases of pulmonary agenesis are associated with other congenital defects including cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal or genitourinary systems. We report an infant with agenesis of the right lung associated with other congenital anomalies.

  12. Pulmonary Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1981-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients.

  13. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  14. Cancer incidence in pulmonary vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zycinska, Katarzyna; Kostrzewa-Janicka, Jolanta; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Wardyn, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculitis is a potentially lethal autoimmune disease characterized by granulomatous inflammation of respiratory tract, necrotizing vasculitis affecting small-to medium-size vessels and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies elevation. Typical therapy involves high-dose glucocorticosteroids combined with cyclophosphamide in a dose 1-2 mg/kg/per day. A high relapse rate in pulmonary vasculitis means prolonged courses of cyclophosphamide in some patients. Carcinogenic effects of cyclophosphamide, especially its toxic metabolite acrolein that is excreted into the urine, are responsible for the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and bladder cancer. These and other malignancies are cyclophosphamide dose-depended. The aim of the present study was to assess the incidence of cancer in patients with pulmonary vasculitis in comparison with the incidence of cancer in the general population. Analyses were done according to the cumulative dose of cyclophosphamide, subdivided into low (≤35 g) and high (>35 g). During the observation period 15 cancers occurred. A significantly increased standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was observed for non-melanoma skin cancers (SIR 5.2; 95 % Cl 2.3-8.7), AML (SIR 4.3; 95 % Cl 2.1-11.2), and bladder cancer (SIR 3.4; 95 % Cl 1.6-5.2). Induction remission treatment and relapse treatment with cyclophosphamide involves a substantial risk of late appearing malignances in patients with pulmonary vasculitis. Monitoring and prophylactic management in pulmonary vasculitis after cessation of cyclophosphamide therapy is crucial.

  15. Role of recently migrated monocytes in cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation in different strain of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pérez-Rial

    Full Text Available This study investigates the role of proinflammatory monocytes recruited from blood circulation and recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid in mediating the lung damage in a model of acute cigarette smoke (CS-induced lung inflammation in two strains of mice with different susceptibility to develop emphysema (susceptible -C57BL/6J and non susceptible -129S2/SvHsd. Exposure to whole-body CS for 3 consecutive research cigarettes in one single day induced acute inflammation in the lung of mice. Analysis of BAL fluid showed more influx of recently migrated monocytes at 72 h after CS-exposition in susceptible compared to non susceptible mice. It correlated with an increase in MMP-12 and TNF-α protein levels in the lung tissue, and with an increment of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay in C57BL/6J mice. To determine the functional role of these proinflammatory monocytes in mediating CS-induced airway inflammation, alveolar macrophages and blood monocytes were transiently removed by pretreatment with intratracheal and intravenous liposome-encapsulated CL2MDP, given 2 and 4 days prior to CS exposure and their repopulation was studied. Monocytes/macrophages were maximally depleted 48 h after last liposome application and subsequently recently migrated monocytes reappeared in BAL fluid of susceptible mice at 72 h after CS exposure. Recently migrated monocytes influx to the lung correlated with an increase in the MMP-12 protein level in the lung tissue, indicating that the increase in proinflammatory monocytes is associated with a major tissue damaging. Therefore our data confirm that the recruitment of proinflammatory recently migrated monocytes from the blood are responsible for the increase in MMP-12 and has an important role in the pathogenesis of lung disease induced by acute lung inflammation. These results could contribute to understanding the different susceptibility to CS of these strains of

  16. Protective Effects of Diallyl Sulfide on Ovalbumin-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation of Allergic Asthma Mice by MicroRNA-144, -34a, and -34b/c-Modulated Nrf2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Weng, Chia-Jui; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2016-01-13

    Allergic airway disorder is characterized by an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The induction of inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by an allergen was ameliorated by antioxidants in vivo. This study investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanism of diallyl sulfide (DAS) on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma of BALB/c mice. The animals were intraperitoneally sensitized by inhaling OVA to induce chronic airway inflammation. By administering DAS, a decrease of the infiltrated inflammatory cell counts and the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in sera were observed. DAS also effectively inhibited OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion in lung tissue. Several OVA-induced inflammatory factors (ROS, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, and NF-κB) were inhibited by DAS. In addition, DAS increased OVA inhalation-reduced levels of Nrf2 activation by regulating microRNA-144, -34a and -34b/c. Together, the pathogenesis of OVA-induced asthma is highly associated with oxidative stress, and DAS may be an effective supplement to alleviate this disease.

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines recommend influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations.

  19. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  20. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  1. Hematological disorders and pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rajamma; Huang, Jing; Wu, Joseph M; Fallon, John T; Gewitz, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a serious disorder with a high morbidity and mortality rate, is known to occur in a number of unrelated systemic diseases. Several hematological disorders such as sickle cell disease, thalassemia and myeloproliferative diseases develop PH which worsens the prognosis. Associated oxidant injury and vascular inflammation cause endothelial damage and dysfunction. Pulmonary vascular endothelial damage/dysfunction is an early event in PH resulting in the loss of vascular reactivity, activation of proliferative and antiapoptotic pathways leading to vascular remodeling, elevated pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and premature death. Hemolysis observed in hematological disorders leads to free hemoglobin which rapidly scavenges nitric oxide (NO), limiting its bioavailability, and leading to endothelial dysfunction. In addition, hemolysis releases arginase into the circulation which converts L-arginine to ornithine, thus bypassing NO production. Furthermore, treatments for hematological disorders such as immunosuppressive therapy, splenectomy, bone marrow transplantation, and radiation have been shown to contribute to the development of PH. Recent studies have shown deregulated iron homeostasis in patients with cardiopulmonary diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Several studies have reported low iron levels in patients with idiopathic PAH, and iron deficiency is an important risk factor. This article reviews PH associated with hematological disorders and its mechanism; and iron homeostasis and its relevance to PH. PMID:28070238

  2. Acupuncture as an adjunct to pulmonary rehabilitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deering, Brenda M

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation and by both systemic and airway inflammation. In COPD, acupuncture has been shown to improve quality-of-life scores and decrease breathlessness; similar findings have also been reported after pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). The hypothesis of this study was that acupuncture in conjunction with pulmonary rehabilitation would improve COPD outcome measures compared to pulmonary rehabilitation alone. METHODS: The design was a randomized prospective study; all subjects had COPD. There were 19 controls, 25 who underwent PR, and 16 who had both acupuncture and PR. The primary outcome measure was a change in measures of systemic inflammation at the end of PR and at 3 month followup. Lung function, including maximum inspiratory pressure (PiMax), quality-of-life scores, functional capacity including steps taken, dyspnea scores, and exercise capacity, were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: After PR, both groups had significantly improved quality-of-life scores, reduced dyspnea scores, improved exercise capacity, and PiMax, but no change in measures of systemic inflammation compared with the controls. There were no differences in most of the outcome measures between the 2 treatment groups except that subjects who had both acupuncture and PR remained less breathless for a longer period. CONCLUSION: The addition of acupuncture to PR did not add significant benefit in most of the outcomes measured.

  3. Inflammation of the Penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Beyond Other Animals: Study Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Penis (Balanitis; Posthitis; Balanoposthitis) By Patrick ... Penile and Testicular Disorders Epididymitis and Epididymo-orchitis Inflammation of the Penis Orchitis Peyronie Disease Phimosis and ...

  4. Inflammation of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Exams, Study Finds Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Orbit (Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor) By James ... Introduction to Eye Socket Disorders Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors ...

  5. Anti-inflammation of MgSO4 on acute pulmonary hypertension%硫酸镁抗急性肺动脉高压的炎症机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢宏志; 高国芹; 李昨飞; 单冰竹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) on acute pulmonary hypertension.Methods 30 mongrel dogs were randomly divided into five groups:control group,surgical group,MgSO4 7.0 group,MgSO4 8.0 group,and MgSO4 9.0 group.The control group was not given any treatment,and the surgical group was operated to induce acute pulmonary hypertension,and the three MgSO4 groups were given MgSO4 to maintain intravenous concentration with 7.0 mmol/L,8.0 mmol/L,and 9.0 mmol/L respectively after acute pulmonary hypertension.The mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) and circulation mean arterial pressure (MAP) were detected.Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay,monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in the lung tissue was determined by western blot.Results ①MPAP,TNF-α,IL-6,and MCP 1 protein expression were significantly higher in surgical group than those in control group,and were decreased significantly in MgSO4 7.0 group,MgSO4 8.0 group,and MgSO4 9.0 group with dose dependence.②MAP was significantly lower in surgical group than that in control group.MAP in MgSO4 7.0 group,MgSO4 8.0 group,and MgSO4 9.0 group was significantly increased compared with surgical group and MAP in MgSO4 9.0 group was the highest.Conclusions MgSO4 significantly reduces pulmonary hypertension,which is probably associated with reduction of the inflammatory response by inhibition of MCP-1 expression in lung tissue and decrease of TNF-α and IL-6 in serum.%目的 探讨硫酸镁(MgSO4)对急性肺栓塞肺动脉高压的影响及其抗炎机制.方法 30只雄性杂种犬,体质量(15±2.1) kg,随机分为5组:空白组、对照组以及MgSO47.0组、MgSO48.0组、MgSO4 9.0组,每组6只,其中空白组不给予任何处理;对照组造成急性肺动脉高压;其余三组造成急性肺动脉高压后给予MgSO4静滴,稳定30

  6. 白藜芦醇对呼吸道合胞病毒感染小鼠肺部病毒滴度及其气道炎症的影响%Effect of resveratrol on pulmonary vurus titer and airway inflammation in mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧娜; 谢晓虹; 邓昱; 李思敏; 倪科; 罗艳; 王莉佳; 刘恩梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of resveratrol (RES) on pulmonary virus titer and airway inflammation in mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Methods Twenty-four female BALB/c mice at the age of 6 -8 weeks, treated with intra-abdominal cyclophosphamide (CYP) at the dose of 100 mg/kg, were randomly divided into control group, RSV infection group, and RES treatment group (8 in each group). Five days after CYP treatment, a RES infection model was induced by intranasal drip of RES. One hour after RES infection, the mice received intraperitoneal injection of RES or inhaled it at the dose of 30mg/(kg ? D). Five days later, airway hyper-response (AHR) in lucid mice was detected. The mice were then killed to detect the pulmonary RSV titers in the lung, the number of cells in bronchoalevolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammation in lung tissue and its score. Results The pulmonary RSV titer, the number of cells in BALF, the score of inflammation in lung tissue, and the airway AHR were significantly lower in RES treatment group than in RSV infection group (P <0. 01). However, no significant difference was observed between RES treatment group and control group. Conclusion Differenly administrated RES can relieve RSV-induced inflammation and AHR by reducing pulmonary titer and inhibiting RSV replication in vivo.%目的 研究白藜芦醇(resveratrol,RES)对呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial virus,RSV)感染小鼠肺部病毒滴度及其所致气道炎症的影响。方法6~8周龄雌性BALB/c小鼠,环磷酰胺100 mg/kg腹腔注射后,随机分为对照组、RSV感染组、白藜芦醇腹腔注射组、白藜芦醇雾化组,每组8只。环磷酰胺处理5d后,给予RSV滴鼻建立RSV感染模型,并在RSV感染1h后给予白藜芦醇30 mg/(kg·d)腹腔注射和雾化吸入。5d后检测小鼠清醒状态下气道阻力,处死小鼠研究肺部RSV病毒滴度、肺泡灌洗液(BALF)中细胞计数、肺部病理组织炎症及评分。

  7. FGF23 and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf El Din, Usama A A; Salem, Mona M; Abdulazim, Dina O

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a recognized feature in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The role of systemic inflammation in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification was recently settled. FGF23 was recently accused as a direct stimulus of systemic inflammation. This finding explains the strong association of FGF23 to vascular calcification and increased mortality among CKD. PMID:28101453

  8. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout your body. While the heart is one organ, it ...

  9. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no cure. However, ... Types of Pulmonary Hypertension." ) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) includes PH ...

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance

  11. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... A rare complication of simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  12. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie

    2016-01-01

    -and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE-/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 mu g nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 mu g...... mediators in plasma of exposed ApoE-/- mice was assessed in aorta rings isolated from naive C57BL/6 mice. Pulmonary exposure to CB and/or LPS resulted in pulmonary inflammation with a robust influx of neutrophils. The CB exposure did not promote plaque progression in aorta or BCA. Incubation with 0.......5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naive mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without...

  13. [Pulmonary strongyloidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada, Heiler; Daza, Jorge E

    2016-10-01

    Strongyloidiasis is an infection caused by the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, which can be asymptomatic and means a high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts, severe malnutrition and coinfection with HTLV-1 virus. The parasite has the potential to produce and multiply internal autoinfection in humans, thus an hyperinfection can be developed. A case of pulmonary infection by this parasite is presented in this study, infection which advanced into a respiratory failure and required mechanical ventilation and hemodynamic support in an intensive care unit. The standard treatment combined with ivermectin and albendazole was provided, achieving an appropriate response.

  14. Etanercept-related extensive pulmonary nodulosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ede, A.E. van; Broeder, A. den; Wagenaar, M.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Creemers, M.C.W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although nodulosis is a common extraarticular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis, accelerated pulmonary nodulosis is a rare event. The etiology of rheumatoid nodules is still unknown. Nodulosis is not necessarily associated with active joint inflammation, suggesting different pathogeni

  15. Pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Chul; Moon, Jin Chang; Gang, Su Jin; Park, Seung Yong; Kim, So Ri

    2015-04-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) can be manifested in a variety of disorders including neoplasms, infection, inflammation, and vascular or congenital abnormalities. In addition, they are often accompanied with other pulmonary pathologic lesions such as consolidations and several pulmonary disorders present as similar pulmonary nodular lesions simultaneously. Diagnostic workup is important for these SPNs; however, many physicians often miss the second diagnosis for multiple pulmonary lesions with SPNs due to lack of clinical suspicion that each pulmonary nodule or pathologic lesion can have each other's diagnosis. Herein, we report 2 cases of coexistence of pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection presenting as pulmonary nodules and multiple consolidative lesions. A 60-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of multifocal pulmonary lesions including SPN with chronic exertional dyspnea. Multiple lung tissues were obtained from each lesion through percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB). At the same time, bacteriologic examination was performed using respiratory samples obtained by bronchoscopy. Based on pathologic and microbiologic results, the patient diagnosed as pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with pulmonary NTM infectious disease. In addition, a 56-year-old woman visited for the evaluation of a small SPN. The SPN was resected surgically for the pathologic examination and turned out to be pulmonary chondroid hamartoma. Interestingly, the diagnostic workup revealed that the patient had Lady Windermere syndrome which is one of features for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease. Both patients were treated with the standard antibiotics against MAC as recommended by the ATS/IDSA guideline. This is the first report of 2 patients, as far as we know, that chondroid hamartoma and NTM disease develop simultaneously in the lung. This report emphasizes that physicians should endeavor to confirm the individual

  16. [Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis with dendriform pulmonary ossification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Ana Madeleine; Vargas, Leslie

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary ossification is a rare and usually asymptomatic finding reported as incidental in lung biopsies. Similarly, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare cause of pulmonary infiltrates. We report the case of a 64-year old man with chronic respiratory symptoms in whom these two histopathological findings converged.

  17. Surgical repair of an idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Yuichi; Ushijima, Tomoki; Oishi, Yasuhisa; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2011-02-01

    We report a rare case of idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) in a 56-year-old woman without any causative conditions, such as congenital heart disease, inflammation, pulmonary artery hypertension, or systemic vasculitis. She presented with sudden back pain, and examination revealed the PAA. She electively underwent resection of the aneurysm and graft replacement. Pathology examination revealed cystic medial necrosis, which was considered the underlying pathology of the aneurysm.

  18. 高原肺水肿的发病机制炎症并非致病因素%Pathogenesis of High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema Inflammation Is Not an Etiologic Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erik R. Swenson; Marco Maggiorini; Stephen Mongovin

    2003-01-01

    背景:一般认为高原肺水肿(high-altitude pulmonary edema,HAPE)的发生为肺泡-毛细血管屏障通透性改变所致,后者继发于强烈的肺血管收缩和高毛细血管压,但是既往在明确诊断的HAPE,支气管肺泡灌洗(bronchoalveolarlavage,BAL)所见亦与炎性致病特征相一致.目的:确定炎症是否为HAPE的主要病变,并明确HEPA病变的时间顺序.设计、地点和参试者:1999年7月~8月进行的病例研究.10例为HAPE易感者,6例为HAPE抵抗者.16例均为非职业登山运动员,既往登山高度在3 000 m以上.主要观察指标:在低海拔高度(490 m)和4 559 m海拔高度,HAPE发病时或发病前不久的肺动脉压测定值和支气管肺泡灌洗所见.结果:与HAPE抵抗者相比,HAPE易感者于4 559 m高度时的肺动脉收缩压平均值(SD)更高(37 mm Hg比66 mm Hg;P=0.004).尽管大多数HAPE易感者都会发生HAPE,但是支气管肺泡灌洗液的白细胞总计数在HAPE抵抗者与易感者无差异,在低海拔与高海拔处进行计数也无差异.发生HAPE者的支气管肺泡灌洗液的血浆源性蛋白质浓度和红细胞增加,但是血浆中表面活性蛋白A和Clara细胞蛋白的浓度无增加.3例HAPE易感者在行支气管肺泡灌洗之前即发生了HAPE,其X线胸片评分为12.7;这3例病例在3~5小时内进行了灌洗.HAPE易感组的其余参试者在X线胸片出现明显水肿之前进行了灌洗.然而,HAPE易感组中6例参试者在随后一天发生了HAPE,其支气管镜检评分为1.5,该评分又增加到4.6,说明出现了轻度肺水肿.在HAPE病例,各种前炎症细胞因子和二十烷类(eicosanoid)以及一氧化氮代谢产物均无增加.结论:早期HAPE的特征表现为肺动脉压升高,它导致富含蛋白质并有轻度出血的水肿,但是白细胞、细胞因子和二十烷类水平正常.HAPE是一种流体静力学肺水肿,伴有肺泡-毛细血管通透性的改变.

  19. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölzel, B E; Snijder, R J; Mager, J J; van Es, H W; Plokker, H W M; Reesink, H J; Morshuis, W J; Post, M C

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease is an important cause of severe pulmonary hypertension, and as such is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of this condition reflects the degree of associated right ventricular dysfunction, with predictable mortality related to the severity of the underlying pulmonary hypertension. Left untreated, the prognosis is poor. Pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice to relieve pulmonary artery obstruction in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and has been remarkably successful. Advances in surgical techniques along with the introduction of pulmonary hypertension-specific medication provide therapeutic options for the majority of patients afflicted with the disease. However, a substantial number of patients are not candidates for pulmonary endarterectomy due to either distal pulmonary vascular obstruction or significant comorbidities. Therefore, careful selection of surgical candidates in expert centres is paramount. The current review focuses on the diagnostic approach to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the available surgical and medical therapeutic options.

  20. Pharmacotherapy in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Acharya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis is a form of chronic, progressive interstitial lung disease causing scarring of lung tissue and usually affect adults. Treatment is usually aimed at controlling inflammation and thus slowing the process of fibrosis. With only few patients responding to treatment and the disease being ultimately fatal with poor progression, the underlying lesion was considered to be fibrotic rather than inflammatory. Fibrotic foci, deposition of collagen, and lack of inflammatory cells are a predominant finding. Pirfenidone and N-acetyl cysteine are the only effective pharmacotherapy available till date. Interim results of PANTHER Trial clearly indicate more risk with triple therapy. However, in Indian patients, trial of steroid therapy may be tried when there is doubt of chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. BIBF 1120 has also shown positive results in Phase II clinical trial and shows a positive response in deteriorating lung function. Supplemental oxygen, education of patient, pulmonary rehabilitation, and Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza vaccine are the most important supportive care. Pulmonary rehabilitation should be used as a treatment in the majority of patients. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 761-763

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Nevins W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM and remodeling of the lung architecture. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is considered the most common and severe form of the disease, with a median survival of approximately three years and no proven effective therapy. Despite the fact that effective treatments are absent and the precise mechanisms that drive fibrosis in most patients remain incompletely understood, an extensive body of scientific literature regarding pulmonary fibrosis has accumulated over the past 35 years. In this review, we discuss three broad areas which have been explored that may be responsible for the combination of altered lung fibroblasts, loss of alveolar epithelial cells, and excessive accumulation of ECM: inflammation and immune mechanisms, oxidative stress and oxidative signaling, and procoagulant mechanisms. We discuss each of these processes separately to facilitate clarity, but certainly significant interplay will occur amongst these pathways in patients with this disease.

  2. [Novel immunopathological approaches to pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frédéric; Montani, David; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in the most commun animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and its therapeutical targeting blocks PH development in these models. In human, pulmonary vascular lesions of PH are also the source of an intense chemokine production, linked to inflammatory cell recruitment. However, arteritis is uncommon in PH patients. Of note, current PH treatments have immunomodulatory properties. In addition, some studies have shown a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patients' survival. The study of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension is becoming an area of intense investigation. New immunopathological approaches to PH should allow the development of innovative treatments for this very severe condition.

  3. Apelin and pulmonary hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Uggerhøj; Hilberg, Ole; Mellemkjær, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease characterized by pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary arterial remodeling, abnormal angiogenesis and impaired right ventricular function. Despite progress in pharmacological therapy, there is still no cure for PAH. The peptide apelin...... vasoconstriction, and has positive inotropic and cardioprotective effects. Apelin attenuates vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries, and chronic treatment with apelin attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The existing literature thus renders APLNR an interesting...

  4. Stress and inflammation: a biobehavioral approach for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Duck-Hee; Rice, Marti; Park, Na-Jin; Turner-Henson, Anne; Downs, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Despite known advantages, the use of biobehavioral approaches in nursing research remains limited. The purposes of this article are to (1) present applications of stress and inflammation in various health conditions as examples of biobehavioral concepts and (2) stimulate similar applications of biobehavioral concepts in future nursing research. Under a biobehavioral conceptual framework, studies on stress and selective inflammatory biomarkers in cardiovascular, cancer, and pulmonary health are reviewed and summarized. Inflammation underlies many diseases, and stress is a significant source of increased inflammation. Biobehavioral concepts of stress and inflammation are highly relevant to nursing research concerned with health-related issues. Diverse biobehavioral concepts are readily applicable and should be utilized in nursing research with children and adults. To stimulate further biobehavioral research, more training and resources for nurse scientists, more unified conceptual definitions and biobehavioral conceptual frameworks, rigorous and expanded methodologies, and more collaboration are essential.

  5. Giant infantile pulmonary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Rajul; Tummala, Venkat [Hurley Medical Center One Hurley Plaza, Department of Radiology, Flint, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present a very unusual case of giant infantile pulmonary hemangioma presenting as a large solitary pulmonary mass. This was successfully managed with surgical resection. Histological examination revealed that the mass was positive for GLUT-1 receptor, a marker for infantile hemangioma. To our knowledge only a few cases of pulmonary hemangioma have been described previously in the literature. Pulmonary hemangiomas are very rare lesions, most of them presenting as a pulmonary mass. This case emphasizes the fact that this rare lesion should be considered in the differential of an enhancing pulmonary mass in an infant. (orig.)

  6. Pulmonary manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaude Gajanan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD may cause, trigger or exacerbate many pulmonary diseases. The physiological link between GERD and pulmonary disease has been extensively studied in chronic cough and asthma. A primary care physician often encounters patients with extra esophageal manifestations of GERD in the absence of heartburn. Patients may present with symptoms involving the pulmonary system; noncardiac chest pain; and ear, nose and throat disorders. Local irritation in the esophagus can cause symptoms that vary from indigestion, like chest discomfort and abdominal pain, to coughing and wheezing. If the gastric acid reaches the back of the throat, it may cause a bitter taste in the mouth and/or aspiration of the gastric acid into the lungs. The acid can cause throat irritation, postnasal drip and hoarseness, as well as recurrent cough, chest congestion and lung inflammation leading to asthma and/or bronchitis/ pneumonia. This clinical review examines the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary manifestations of GERD. It also reviews relevant clinical information concerning GERD-related chronic cough and asthma. Finally, a potential management strategy for GERD in pulmonary patients is discussed.

  7. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  8. Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Cryoglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Kirkpatrick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary manifestations of cryoglobulinemia are uncommon and their clinical behaviour is unpredictable, ranging from mild dyspnea to life-threatening presentations. A patient with cryoglobulinemia who presented with hypoxic respiratory failure attributed to pulmonary hemorrhage is reported.

  9. Pregnancy and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Lameijer, Heleen; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    Pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy is associated with considerable risks of maternal mortality and morbidity. Our systematic review of the literature on the use of targeted treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy indicates a considerable decrease of mortality since a

  10. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  11. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Kelly

    2014-10-01

    Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation.

  12. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001090.htm Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and ...

  13. Histoplasmosis - acute (primary) pulmonary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000098.htm Histoplasmosis - acute (primary) pulmonary To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis is a respiratory infection that is caused by ...

  14. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  15. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest X-ray, a breathing test called a pulmonary function test and an echocardiogram (sometimes called an “echo”). Your doctor may also need to do other tests to find out whether another medical condition is causing your pulmonary hypertension. TreatmentHow is pulmonary hypertension treated?If the ...

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at www.AHeartCures.org . Help Kickoff November’s Pulmonary Hypertension Awareness Month Want to help raise awareness for ... Heart2CurePH | Help promote Awareness Month Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) Awareness Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is ...

  18. Carbon nanotubes degraded by neutrophil myeloperoxidase induce less pulmonary inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Valerian E.; Konduru, Nagarjun V.; Feng, Weihong; Allen, Brett L.; Conroy, Jennifer; Volkov, Yuri; Vlasova, Irina I.; Belikova, Natalia A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Shi, Jingwen; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, Donna; Gou, Pingping; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2010-05-01

    We have shown previously that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be catalytically biodegraded over several weeks by the plant-derived enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. However, whether peroxidase intermediates generated inside human cells or biofluids are involved in the biodegradation of carbon nanotubes has not been explored. Here, we show that hypochlorite and reactive radical intermediates of the human neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyse the biodegradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes in vitro, in neutrophils and to a lesser degree in macrophages. Molecular modelling suggests that interactions of basic amino acids of the enzyme with the carboxyls on the carbon nanotubes position the nanotubes near the catalytic site. Importantly, the biodegraded nanotubes do not generate an inflammatory response when aspirated into the lungs of mice. Our findings suggest that the extent to which carbon nanotubes are biodegraded may be a major determinant of the scale and severity of the associated inflammatory responses in exposed individuals.

  19. Different regulation of cigarette smoke induced inflammation in upper versus lower airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracke Ken R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke (CS is known to initiate a cascade of mediator release and accumulation of immune and inflammatory cells in the lower airways. We investigated and compared the effects of CS on upper and lower airways, in a mouse model of subacute and chronic CS exposure. Methods C57BL/6 mice were whole-body exposed to mainstream CS or air, for 2, 4 and 24 weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL was obtained and tissue cryosections from nasal turbinates were stained for neutrophils and T cells. Furthermore, we evaluated GCP-2, KC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RORc, IL-17, FoxP3, and TGF-β1 in nasal turbinates and lungs by RT-PCR. Results In both upper and lower airways, subacute CS-exposure induced the expression of GCP-2, MCP-1, MIP-3α and resulted in a neutrophilic influx. However, after chronic CS-exposure, there was a significant downregulation of inflammation in the upper airways, while on the contrary, lower airway inflammation remained present. Whereas nasal FoxP3 mRNA levels already increased after 2 weeks, lung FoxP3 mRNA increased only after 4 weeks, suggesting that mechanisms to suppress inflammation occur earlier and are more efficient in nose than in lungs. Conclusions Altogether, these data demonstrate that CS induced inflammation may be differently regulated in the upper versus lower airways in mice. Furthermore, these data may help to identify new therapeutic targets in this disease model.

  20. Febrile-range hyperthermia augments pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and amplifies pulmonary oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasday, Jeffrey D; Garrison, Allen; Singh, Ishwar S; Standiford, Theodore; Ellis, Garrettson S; Rao, Srinivas; He, Ju-Ren; Rice, Penny; Frank, Mariah; Goldblum, Simeon E; Viscardi, Rose M

    2003-06-01

    Febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) improves survival in experimental infections by accelerating pathogen clearance, but may also increase collateral tissue injury. We hypothesized that FRH would worsen the outcome of inflammation stimulated by a non-replicating agonist and tested this hypothesis in a murine model of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Using a conscious, temperature-controlled mouse model, we showed that maintaining a core temperature at FRH (39 degrees C to 40 degrees C) rather than at euthermic levels (36.5 degrees C to 37 degrees C) during hyperoxia exposure accelerated lethal pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, reduced the inspired oxygen threshold for lethality, induced expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and expanded the circulating neutrophil pool. In these same mice, FRH augmented pulmonary expression of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines, KC and LPS-induced CXC chemokine, enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, and changed the histological pattern of lung injury to a neutrophilic interstitial pneumonitis. Immunoblockade of CXC receptor-2 abrogated neutrophil recruitment, reduced pulmonary vascular injury, and delayed death. These combined data demonstrate that FRH may enlist distinct mediators and effector cells to profoundly shift the host response to a defined injurious stimulus, in part by augmenting delivery of neutrophils to sites of inflammation, such as may occur in infections. In certain conditions, such as in the hyperoxic lung, this process may be deleterious.

  1. Agmatine attenuates silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Agamy, D S; Sharawy, M H; Ammar, E M

    2014-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence that nitric oxide (NO) formation is implicated in mediating silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. As a reactive free radical, NO may not only contribute to lung parenchymal tissue injury but also has the ability to combine with superoxide and form a highly reactive toxic species peroxynitrite that can induce extensive cellular toxicity in the lung tissues. This study aimed to explore the effect of agmatine, a known NO synthase inhibitor, on silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with agmatine for 60 days following a single intranasal instillation of silica suspension (50 mg in 0.1 ml saline/rat). The results revealed that agmatine attenuated silica-induced lung inflammation as it decreased the lung wet/dry weight ratio, protein concentration, and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Agmatine showed antifibrotic activity as it decreased total hydroxyproline content of the lung and reduced silica-mediated lung inflammation and fibrosis in lung histopathological specimen. In addition, agmatine significantly increased superoxide dismutase (p pulmonary nitrite/nitrate as well as tumor necrosis factor α. Collectively, these results demonstrate the protective effects of agmatine against the silica-induced lung fibrosis that may be attributed to its ability to counteract the NO production, lipid peroxidation, and regulate cytokine effects.

  2. PULMONARY INVOLVEMENT IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease with erosive and destructive polyarthritis and systemic manifestations. Pulmonary involvement (PI is common in RA. With high-resolution computed tomography, the detection rate of PI in RA is as high as 50%. PI is a direct cause of death in 10–20% of patients with RA. Autoimmune mechanisms play a leading part in the development of PI in RA. Under the hypothesis advanced by M. Selman et al., that impaired alveolocyte regeneration processes after injury rather inflammation underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. The pathological process is triggered by damaged alveolocytes and characterized by the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, the suppressed apoptosis of the latter, and the enhanced activity of pneumofibrosis-stimulating cytokines. This gives rise to remodeling of the extracellular matrix, including destruction of the basement membrane, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. The paper considers the types of lung injury in RA and main methods for diagnosis and therapy.

  3. [Connective tissue and inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Lajos

    2014-03-23

    The author summarizes the structure of the connective tissues, the increasing motion of the constituents, which determine the role in establishing the structure and function of that. The structure and function of the connective tissue are related to each other in the resting as well as inflammatory states. It is emphasized that cellular events in the connective tissue are part of the defence of the organism, the localisation of the damage and, if possible, the maintenance of restitutio ad integrum. The organism responds to damage with inflammation, the non specific immune response, as well as specific, adaptive immunity. These processes are located in the connective tissue. Sterile and pathogenic inflammation are relatively similar processes, but inevitable differences are present, too. Sialic acids and glycoproteins containing sialic acids have important roles, and the role of Siglecs is also highlighted. Also, similarities and differences in damages caused by pathogens and sterile agents are briefly summarized. In addition, the roles of adhesion molecules linked to each other, and the whole event of inflammatory processes are presented. When considering practical consequences it is stressed that the structure (building up) of the organism and the defending function of inflammation both have fundamental importance. Inflammation has a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and the unimpaired somato-psychological state of the organism. Thus, inflammation serves as a tool of organism identical with the natural immune response, inseparably connected with the specific, adaptive immune response. The main events of the inflammatory processes take place in the connective tissue.

  4. Multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography in childhood acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Chowdhury, Shahryar M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Fox, Mary A. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition affecting people of all ages. Multidetector row CT pulmonary angiography has improved the imaging of pulmonary embolism in both adults and children and is now regarded as the routine modality for detection of pulmonary embolism. Advanced CT pulmonary angiography techniques developed in recent years, such as dual-energy CT, have been applied as a one-stop modality for pulmonary embolism diagnosis in children, as they can simultaneously provide anatomical and functional information. We discuss CT pulmonary angiography techniques, common and uncommon findings of pulmonary embolism in both conventional and dual-energy CT pulmonary angiography, and radiation dose considerations. (orig.)

  5. The danger signal plus DNA damage two-hit hypothesis for chronic inflammation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshiba, Kazutetsu; Tsuji, Takao; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is thought to originate from the activation of innate immunity by a danger signal (first hit), although this mechanism does not readily explain why the inflammation becomes chronic. Here, we propose a two-hit hypothesis explaining why inflammation becomes chronic in patients with COPD. A more severe degree of inflammation exists in the lungs of patients who develop COPD than in the lungs of healthy smokers, and the large amounts of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species released from inflammatory cells are likely to induce DNA double-strand breaks (second hit) in the airways and pulmonary alveolar cells, causing apoptosis and cell senescence. The DNA damage response and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) are also likely to be activated, resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These pro-inflammatory cytokines further stimulate inflammatory cell infiltration, intensifying cell senescence and SASP through a positive-feedback mechanism. This vicious cycle, characterised by mutually reinforcing inflammation and DNA damage, may cause the inflammation in COPD patients to become chronic. Our hypothesis helps explain why COPD tends to occur in the elderly, why the inflammation worsens progressively, why inflammation continues even after smoking cessation, and why COPD is associated with lung cancer.

  6. Rethinking chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonello, Antonella; Poli, Giovanni

    2011-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex polygenic disease characterized by an abnormal inflammatory response to smoke, and results in a progressive and debilitating condition with declining lung function. The reasons why some smokers get COPD are not known. We suggest that corticosteroid resistance, which derives from oxidative stress, might actually be the cause of COPD and represent the starting point of the pathology. The absence of response to corticosteroids would let the disease develop, impairing the organism capacity to suppress any kind of inflammatory process. Corticosteroid resistance may derive from smoke induced oxidative stress and plausibly impairs the organism capacity to suppress inflammation. Many factors may contribute to the development and persistence of corticosteroid resistance: inefficient antioxidant defences, a corticosteroid response less efficient or more sensitive to oxidative conditions, and also any other concomitant factor, environmental, genetic or intercurrent, which would contribute to amplify inflammation and hence oxidative stress. One or more of these factors might represent the variable component of the disease, which gives origin to COPD heterogeneity. This hypotheses may also explain why the disease persists after quitting smoking, as an inflammatory process severe enough to generate a strong oxidative stress may support itself by maintenance of corticosteroid resistance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inflammation and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzić, Janos; Grivennikov, Sergei; Karin, Eliad; Karin, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established and in the last decade has received a great deal of supporting evidence from genetic, pharmacological, and epidemiological data. Inflammatory bowel disease is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Inflammation is also likely to be involved with other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which inflammation promotes cancer development are still being uncovered and could differ between colitis-associated and other forms of colorectal cancer. Recent work has elucidated the role of distinct immune cells, cytokines, and other immune mediators in virtually all steps of colon tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. These mechanisms, as well as new approaches to prevention and therapy, are discussed in this review.

  8. Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  9. Curcumin, inflammation, and chronic diseases: how are they linked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Yue, Yuan; Zheng, Xi; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Shaohua; Du, Zhiyun

    2015-05-20

    It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  10. Natural resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Marcelo O; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation is a protective response essential for maintaining human health and for fighting disease. As an active innate immune reaction to challenge, inflammation gives rise to clinical cardinal signs: rubor, calor, dolor, tumor and functio laesa. Termination of acute inflammation was previously recognized as a passive process; a natural decay of pro-inflammatory signals. We now understand that the natural resolution of inflammation involves well-integrated, active, biochemical programs that return tissues to homeostasis. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of endogenous lipid mediators that modulate cellular fate and inflammation. Biosynthesis of eicosanoids and other lipids in exudates coincides with changes in the types of inflammatory cells. Resolution of inflammation is initiated by an active class switch in lipid mediators, such as classic prostaglandins and leukotrienes, to the production of proresolution mediators. Endogenous pro-resolving lipid mediators, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins, aspirin-triggered lipoxins, ω3-eicosapentaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the E-series, docosahexaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the D-series, protectins and maresins, are biosynthesized during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. Depending on the type of injury and the type of tissue, the initial cells that respond are polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes/macrophages, epithelial cells or endothelial cells. The selective interaction of specific lipid mediators with G protein-coupled receptors expressed on innate immune cells (e.g. G protein-coupled receptor 32, lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor2, chemokine-like receptor 1, leukotriene B4 receptor type 1 and cabannoid receptor 2) induces cessation of leukocyte infiltration; vascular permeability/edema returns to normal with polymorphonuclear neutrophil death (mostly via apoptosis), the nonphlogistic infiltration of monocyte/macrophages and the removal

  11. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-15

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity.

  12. Effects of simvastatin on airway inflammation and airway mucus hypersecretion in rats with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease%辛伐他汀对慢性阻塞性肺疾病模型大鼠气道炎症和气道黏液高分泌的防治作用及其机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王胜; 熊玲玲; 邓雪; 任薇; 朱春冬; 李春颖; 周群

    2015-01-01

    ,减轻气道炎症和气道黏液高分泌.%Objective To explore the preventive and therapeutic effects of simvastatin on rats with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and examine the mechanism of airway inflammation and airway mucus hypersecretion.Methods The rat model of COPD was established by cigarette smoking and an intratracheal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS).A total of 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control,COPD and simvastatin groups (n =6 each).The control and COPD groups received normal saline once daily via intragastric administration (i.g.) while the simvastatin group had simvastatin (0.5 g/L) 1 ml/100 g once daily via i.g.Pulmonary function was tested and pathological changes in bronchus and lung were observed.The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8),interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).The protein expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1),nuclear factor κB (NF-κB),mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in rat airway were detected by immunohistochemical staining.The mRNA and protein expressions of TLR4 and MUC5AC in bronchi and lung tissue were detected by fluorescent real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot.Results The changes of bronchi and lung tissues in COPD group were consistent with typical pathological manifestations of COPD.As compared with the COPD group,the degree of pulmonary pathological damage and the decline of pulmonary function in the simvastatin group were significantly lessened,but still remarkable as compared with the control group.The BALF levels of IL-8,IL-17 and TNF-α in the smvastatin group [(484.4 ± 11.1),(78.9 ± 2.0),(192.7 ± 2.0) ng/L] were significantly lower than those in the COPD group [(605 ±48.7),(89.9 ±6.9),(212.6 ± 10.7) ng/L],but still higher than those in the control group [(341.2 ± 21.4),(56.0 ± 2

  13. Mechanisms responsible for pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Pulmonary hypertension is a pathophysiologic process characterized by progressive elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart failure, which is a common complication of many diseases. Pulmonary hypertension with no apparent causes (unknown etiology) is termed primary pulmonary hypertension or, more recently, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH).

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance a

  15. Pulmonary cryptococcosis induces chitinase in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casadevall Arturo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that chronic pulmonary infection with Cryptococcus neoformans results in enhanced allergic inflammation and airway hyperreactivity in a rat model. Because the cell wall of C. neoformans consists of chitin, and since acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase has recently been implicated as a novel mediator of asthma, we sought to determine whether such infection induces chitinase activity and expression of AMCase in the rat. Methods We utilized a previously-established model of chronic C. neoformans pulmonary infection in the rat to analyze the activity, expression and localization of AMCase. Results Our studies indicate that intratracheal inoculation of C. neoformans induces chitinase activity within the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of infected rats. Chitinase activity is also elicited by pulmonary infection with other fungi (e.g. C. albicans, but not by the inoculation of dead organisms. Enhanced chitinase activity reflects increased AMCase expression by airway epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Systemic cryptococcosis is not associated with increased pulmonary chitinase activity or AMCase expression. Conclusion Our findings indicate a possible link between respiratory fungal infections, including C. neoformans, and asthma through the induction of AMCase.

  16. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Treatment and Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hajime; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Azuma, Arata

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive lung disease with a prognosis that can be worse than for many cancers. The initial stages of the condition were thought to mainly involve chronic inflammation; therefore, corticosteroids and other drugs that have anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive actions were used. However, recently, agents targeting persistent fibrosis resulting from aberrant repair of alveolar epithelial injury have been in the spotlight. There has also been an increase in the number of available antifibrotic treatment options, starting with pirfenidone and nintedanib. These drugs prevent deterioration but do not improve IPF. Therefore, nonpharmacologic approaches such as long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplantation must be considered as additional treatment modalities. PMID:27980445

  17. Glycyrrhizic acid alleviates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili eGao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal form of interstitial lung disease that lacks effective therapies at present. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a natural compound extracted from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Glycyrrhiza glabra, was recently reported to benefit lung injury and liver fibrosis in animal models, yet whether GA has a therapeutic effect on pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of GA on pulmonary fibrosis in a rat model with bleomycin (BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The results indicated that GA treatment remarkably ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and attenuated BLM-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and activation of tansforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lungs. Further, we demonstrated that GA treatment inhibited proliferation of 3T6 fibroblast cells, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted apoptosis in vitro, implying that GA-mediated suppression of fibroproliferation may contribute to the anti-fibrotic effect against BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In summary, our study suggests a therapeutic potential of GA in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  18. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute inflammation decreases the expression of connexin 40 in mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rignault, Stéphanie; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Waeber, Bernard; Liaudet, Lucas; Feihl, François

    2007-07-01

    Transmigration of neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes through the microvascular endothelium is a cardinal event of acute inflammation. In vitro, this process can be restricted by gap junctional intercellular communication, but whether it also occurs in vivo is unknown. Connexin 40 (Cx40) is a gap junctional protein abundantly present in the lung, notably in vascular endothelium. We hypothesized that acute lung inflammation would be aggravated in knockout mice genetically deficient in Cx40. This hypothesis was tested in two different models: 1) intranasal instillation of LPS at either supramaximal (50 microg/mouse) or inframaximal dose (0.01 microg/mouse) and 2) pulmonary inflammation as a distant consequence of an abdominal infection caused by cecal ligation and perforation. Pulmonary transmigration of neutrophils was assessed by counting these cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (LPS model) or with the myeloperoxidase assay in homogenates of blood-free tissue (cecal ligation and perforation model). Pulmonary content in Cx40 and Cx43 was evaluated with immunoblots. In wild-type mice, there was a time-dependent decrease of Cx40 expression in both models. The time points for studies with the knockout mice were chosen in such a manner that inflammation was clearly present and Cx40 still largely expressed in wild-type animals. In either model, the development of lung inflammation did not differ between wild-type and Cx40-deficient mice. In conclusion, the pulmonary expression of the Cx40 protein is progressively and markedly decreased in two different murine models of acute lung inflammation, but there is no causal relationship between this process and the pulmonary transmigration of neutrophils.

  20. Periostin in Allergic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Izuhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Periostin, an extracellular matrix protein belonging to the fasciclin family, has been shown to play a critical role in the process of remodeling during tissue/organ development or repair. Periostin functions as a matricellular protein in cell activation by binding to their receptors on cell surface, thereby exerting its biological activities. After we found that periostin is a downstream molecule of interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13, signature cytokines of type 2 immune responses, we showed that periostin is a component of subepithelial fibrosis in bronchial asthma, the first formal proof that periostin is involved in allergic inflammation. Subsequently, a great deal of evidence has accumulated demonstrating the significance of periostin in allergic inflammation. It is of note that in skin tissues, periostin is critical for amplification and persistence of allergic inflammation by communicating between fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Furthermore, periostin has been applied to development of novel diagnostics or therapeutic agents for allergic diseases. Serum periostin can reflect local production of periostin in inflamed lesions induced by Th2-type immune responses and also can predict the efficacy of Th2 antagonists against bronchial asthma. Blocking the interaction between periostin and its receptor, αv integrin, or down-regulating the periostin expression shows improvement of periostin-induced inflammation in mouse models or in in vitro systems. It is hoped that diagnostics or therapeutic agents targeting periostin will be of practical use in the near future.

  1. Obesity, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Lyon, Christopher J; Bergin, Stephen; Caligiuri, Michael A; Hsueh, Willa A

    2016-05-23

    Obesity, a worldwide epidemic, confers increased risk for multiple serious conditions, including cancer, and is increasingly recognized as a growing cause of preventable cancer risk. Chronic inflammation, a well-known mediator of cancer, is a central characteristic of obesity, leading to many of its complications, and obesity-induced inflammation confers additional cancer risk beyond obesity itself. Multiple mechanisms facilitate this strong association between cancer and obesity. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ, secreting several hormones, including leptin and adiponectin, and chemokines that can regulate tumor behavior, inflammation, and the tumor microenvironment. Excessive adipose expansion during obesity causes adipose dysfunction and inflammation to increase systemic levels of proinflammatory factors. Cells from adipose tissue, such as cancer-associated adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells, enter the cancer microenvironment to enhance protumoral effects. Dysregulated metabolism that stems from obesity, including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia, can further impact tumor growth and development. This review describes how adipose tissue becomes inflamed in obesity, summarizes ways these mechanisms impact cancer development, and discusses their role in four adipose-associated cancers that demonstrate elevated incidence or mortality in obesity.

  2. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  3. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisya Agita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  4. Ion channels in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhut, Michael; Wallace, Helen

    2011-04-01

    Most physical illness in vertebrates involves inflammation. Inflammation causes disease by fluid shifts across cell membranes and cell layers, changes in muscle function and generation of pain. These disease processes can be explained by changes in numbers or function of ion channels. Changes in ion channels have been detected in diarrhoeal illnesses, pyelonephritis, allergy, acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndromes involving septic shock. The key role played by changes in ion transport is directly evident in inflammation-induced pain. Expression or function of all major categories of ion channels like sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, transient receptor potential, purinergic receptor and acid-sensing ion channels can be influenced by cyto- and chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, histamine, ATP, reactive oxygen species and protons released in inflammation. Key pathways in this interaction are cyclic nucleotide, phosphoinositide and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signalling, direct modification by reactive oxygen species like nitric oxide, ATP or protons and disruption of the cytoskeleton. Therapeutic interventions to modulate the adverse and overlapping effects of the numerous different inflammatory mediators on each ion transport system need to target adversely affected ion transport systems directly and locally.

  5. Immunsystemet ved kronisk inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved as a defence against infections and as an important repair mechanism after physical injury. If elimination of microbes and healing is not achieved, or if the immune system is dysregulated, chronic inflammation ensues. Immune cells become engaged in prolonged...

  6. Pulmonary manifestations of the collagen vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, H P; Matthay, R A

    1989-12-01

    The collagen vascular diseases are a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders. The organs and tissues that compose the respiratory system are frequently affected by these diseases. Potential targets of the inflammation and injury include the lung parenchyma, tracheobronchial tree, pulmonary vasculature, pleura, larynx, and respiratory muscles. In this article, the spectrum of respiratory disease caused by systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, and Sjögren's syndrome is reviewed. Where appropriate, therapeutic options are discussed.

  7. Handbook of pulmonary emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaquolo, S.V.; Medinger, A

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: clinical assessment of the patient with pulmonary disease; interpretation of arterial blood gases in the emergency patient; life-threatening pneumonia; extrapulmonic ventilatory failure; acute inhalation lung disease; pulmonary edema; near drowning; chest trauma; upper airway emergencies; chronic lung disease with acute respiratory decompensation; acute respiratory failure in the patient with chronic airflow obstruction; asthma; hemoptysis; embolic pulmonary disease; superior vena cava syndrome; catastrophic pleural disease; ventilatory assistance and its complications; and ventilator emergencies.

  8. inflammation and iron metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dzedzej

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Following acute physical activity, blood hepcidin concentration appears to increase in response to exercise-induced inflammation, but the long-term impact of exercise on hepcidin remains unclear. Here we investigated changes in hepcidin and the inflammation marker interleukin-6 to evaluate professional basketball players’ response to a season of training and games. The analysis also included vitamin D (25(OHD3 assessment, owing to its anti-inflammatory effects. Blood samples were collected for 14 players and 10 control non-athletes prior to and after the 8-month competitive season. Athletes’ performance was assessed with the NBA efficiency score. At the baseline hepcidin correlated with blood ferritin (r=0.61; 90% CL ±0.31, but at the end of the season this correlation was absent. Compared with the control subjects, athletes experienced clear large increases in hepcidin (50%; 90% CI 15-96% and interleukin-6 (77%; 90% CI 35-131% and a clear small decrease in vitamin D (-12%; 90% CI -20 to -3% at the season completion. Correlations between change scores of these variables were unclear (r = -0.21 to 0.24, 90% CL ±0.5, but their uncertainty generally excluded strong relationships. Athletes were hence concluded to have experienced acute inflammation at the beginning but chronic inflammation at the end of the competitive season. At the same time, the moderate correlation between changes in vitamin D and players’ performance (r=0.43 was suggestive of its beneficial influence. Maintaining the appropriative concentration of vitamin D is thus necessary for basketball players’ performance and efficiency. The assessment of hepcidin has proven to be useful in diagnosing inflammation in response to chronic exercise.

  9. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  10. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Shane; Marriott, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old HIV positive male presents with fevers and a non-productive cough. Initial X-ray and subsequent computerised tomography of the chest shows a bilateral miliary pattern of pulmonary infiltration highly suggestive of disseminated tuberculosis. However subsequent results were consistent with disseminated cryptococcosis, including pulmonary involvement, with cryptococcus identified on transbronchial tissue biopsy, and on blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation. PMID:25379393

  11. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  12. NFATc3 and VIP in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szema, Anthony M.; Forsyth, Edward; Ying, Benjamin; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Chen, John J.; Hwang, Sonya; Li, Jonathan C.; Sabatini Dwyer, Debra; Ramiro-Diaz, Juan M.; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both debilitating lung diseases which can lead to hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor implicated in the etiology of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ability to generate Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) develop spontaneous PH, pulmonary arterial remodeling and lung inflammation. Inhibition of NFAT attenuated PH in these mice suggesting a connection between NFAT and VIP. To test the hypotheses that: 1) VIP inhibits NFAT isoform c3 (NFATc3) activity in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells; 2) lung NFATc3 activation is associated with disease severity in IPF and COPD patients, and 3) VIP and NFATc3 expression correlate in lung tissue from IPF and COPD patients. NFAT activity was determined in isolated pulmonary arteries from NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. The % of nuclei with NFAT nuclear accumulation was determined in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) cultures; in lung airway epithelia and smooth muscle and pulmonary endothelia and smooth muscle from IPF and COPD patients; and in PASMC from mouse lung sections by fluorescence microscopy. Both NFAT and VIP mRNA levels were measured in lungs from IPF and COPD patients. Empirical strategies applied to test hypotheses regarding VIP, NFATc3 expression and activity, and disease type and severity. This study shows a significant negative correlation between NFAT isoform c3 protein expression levels in PASMC, activity of NFATc3 in pulmonary endothelial cells, expression and activity of NFATc3 in bronchial epithelial cells and lung function in IPF patients, supporting the concept that NFATc3 is activated in the early stages of IPF. We further show that there is a significant positive correlation between NFATc3 mRNA expression and VIP RNA expression only in lungs from IPF patients. In

  13. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Prostate Prostate Enlargement (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate What is prostatitis? Prostatitis is a frequently painful condition that involves inflammation of the prostate and sometimes the areas around ...

  14. Therapeutic potential of growth factors in pulmonary emphysematous condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyal, Jai Prakash; Muyal, Vandana; Kotnala, Sudhir; Kumar, Dhananjay; Bhardwaj, Harsh

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a major manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is characterized by progressive destruction of alveolar parenchyma with persistent inflammation of the small airways. Such destruction in the distal respiratory tract is irreversible and irreparable. All-trans-retinoic acid was suggested as a novel therapy for regeneration of lost alveoli in emphysema. However, profound discrepancies were evident between studies. At present, no effective therapeutic options are available that allow for the regeneration of lost alveoli in emphysematous human lungs. Recently, some reports on rodent's models have suggested the beneficial effects of various growth factors toward alveolar maintenance and repair processes.

  15. [Heterogeneity of pulmonary fibroblasts in tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, E A; Sekamova, S M; Bogadel'nikova, I V; Vitukhnovskaia, L A; Fipps, R; Perel'man, M I; Serov, V V

    1997-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and pneumofibrosis are the central events in tuberculosis morphogenesis. It was suggested that a certain type of fibroblasts may play a role in chronization of the inflammation and development of sclerosis in tuberculosis. Fibrous tissue from the foci of secondary tuberculosis (fibrous-cavernous tuberculosis and tuberculomas) of 35 patients were studied light- and electron-microscopically and immunohistochemically. (THY 1-)fibroblasts non-containing lipids and producing insulin-like growth factor 2 (ILGF 2), binding proteins 2 and 4 and epidermal growth factor receptors were found in the foci of secondary tuberculosis close to the granulomatous inflammation and in the new and scarrous fibrous connective tissue of the tuberculoma capsule and caverna walls. These fibroblasts are able for auto- and paracrine regulation of the proliferation of fibroblasts, epithelium and other cells in the inflammatory foci. (THY 1+) fibroblasts containing lipids were observed in the foci of old sclerotic changes among the rough collagen fibres. Thus, (THY 1-) fibroblasts probably play a key role in chronization of inflammation, proliferation and pretumorous dysplasia of pulmonary epithelium in secondary tuberculosis. (THY 1+) fibroblasts containing lipids may show more pronounced collagenesis and may persist under hypoxia condition in the collagenous scars for a long time.

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Običan, Sarah G; Cleary, Kirsten L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a medical condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right heart failure. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a subset of pulmonary hypertension, which is characterized by an underlying disorder of the pulmonary arterial vasculature. Pulmonary hypertension can also occur secondarily to structural cardiac disease, autoimmune disorders, and toxic exposures. Although pregnancies affected by pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension are rare, the pathophysiology exacerbated by pregnancy confers both high maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. In light of new treatment modalities and the use of a multidisciplinary approach to care, maternal outcomes may be improving.

  17. 香烟烟雾对支气管哮喘患者气道炎性反应及肺功能的影响%Influence of the cigarette smoke in the airway inflammation and pulmonary function of the asthmatic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彩苹; 杜永成; 许建英

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of the cigarette smoke in the airway inflammation and pulmonary function of the asthmatic patients. Methods Twenty-five cases of asthmatic patients with cigarette smoke exposure, 22 cases of asthmatic patients without cigarette smoke exposure and 20 cases of normal control persons were involved in this study. The proportion of various inflammatory cells in the induced sputum, the levels of serum interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-4 and lung function (FEV1% expected value,FEV1/FVC% ) were detected. Results The infiltrating of neutrophils was primarily found in sputum of the asthmatic patients with cigarette smoke exposure, but the infiltrating of eosinophils was mainly in sputum of the asthmatic patients without cigarette smoke exposure. The levels of serum IL-8 and IL-4 of peripheral blood of asthmatic patients with cigarette smoke exposure [(277.02 ±71.37), (171.69 ±31.01) ng/L] were significantly higher than those in asthmatic patients without cigarette smoke exposure [(158.88 ± 21.95 ),( 111.42 ± 21.69 ) ng/L] and normal control persons [( 116.78 ± 71.37 ), (73.94 ± 15.72 ) ng/L] (P < 0.01 ).The FEV1% expected value and FEV1/FVC% of the asthmatic patients with cigarette smoke exposure [(51.12 ± 13.30) %, ( 49.16 ± 11.09 )%] was lower than those of asthmatic patients without cigarette smokeexposure [(81.81 ± 5.82)%, (79.00 ± 3.86)%] and normal control persona [(95.50 ± 10.11 )%, (83.18 ±6.04)%] (P < 0.01 ). The level of serum IL-8 was positively correlated to the neutrophils percentage in the induced sputum (r =0.742,P< 0.01 ) ,while negatively correlated to the FEV1% expected value(r =-0.739,P < 0.01 ). Conclusion Cigarette smoke may influence the airway inflammation of the asthmatic patients and accelerate the deterioration of their lung function by promoting the producing of IL-8.%目的 探讨香烟烟雾对支气管哮喘(简称哮喘)患者气道炎性反应

  18. Chronic bronchitis sub-phenotype within COPD : inflammation in sputum and biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck-Stroband, J B; Lapperre, T S; Gosman, M M E; Boezen, H M; Timens, W; ten Hacken, N H T; Sont, J K; Sterk, P J; Hiemstra, P S

    The presence of chronic bronchitis predicts a more rapid decline of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The hallmark of COPD is airway inflammation. It was hypothesised that COPD patients with chronic bronchitis are

  19. Persistent systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustí, Alvar; Edwards, Lisa D; Rennard, Stephen I

    2012-01-01

    Because chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous condition, the identification of specific clinical phenotypes is key to developing more effective therapies. To explore if the persistence of systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD we assessed...

  20. Pim1 kinase protects airway epithelial cells from cigarette smoke-induced damage and airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, M.; Heijink, Hilde; Gras, R.; den Boef, L. E.; Reinders-Luinge, M.; Pouwels, S. D.; Hylkema, Machteld; van der Toorn, Marco; Brouwer, U.; van Oosterhout, A. J. M.; Nawijn, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is the main risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and can induce airway epithelial cell damage, innate immune responses, and airway inflammation. We hypothesized that cell survival factors might decrease the sensitivity of airway epithelial

  1. Chronic bronchitis sub-phenotype within COPD : inflammation in sputum and biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck-Stroband, J B; Lapperre, T S; Gosman, M M E; Boezen, H M; Timens, W; ten Hacken, N H T; Sont, J K; Sterk, P J; Hiemstra, P S

    2008-01-01

    The presence of chronic bronchitis predicts a more rapid decline of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The hallmark of COPD is airway inflammation. It was hypothesised that COPD patients with chronic bronchitis are character

  2. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Collagen Destruction; Key to Chronic Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, Saskia A.; Braber, Saskia; Koelink, Pim J.; Henricks, Paul A. J.; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Loi, Adele T. LoTam; Jackson, Patricia L.; Garssen, Johan; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.; Timens, Wim; Koenderman, Leo; Blalock, J. Edwin; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Folkerts, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoking induces inflammatory responses in all smokers and is the major risk factor for lung disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this progressive disease, chronic inflammation in the lung contributes to lung tissue destruction leading to the formatio

  3. Airway inflammation in COPD after long-term withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, Lisette I Z; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; Lapperre, Thérèse S; Timens, Wim; Kerstjens, Huib A M; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; Vonk, Judith M; Sont, Jacob K; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Postma, Dirkje S; Sterk, Peter J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2017-01-01

    Long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) might attenuate lung function decline and decrease airway inflammation in a subset of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and discontinuing ICS treatment could result in further lung function decline. We hypothesised that

  4. Limonene and its ozone-initiated reaction products attenuate allergic lung inflammation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jitka S; Nørgaard, Asger W; Koponen, Ismo K;

    2016-01-01

    , and to neurogenic inflammation. The terpene, d-limonene, is used as a fragrance in numerous consumer products. When limonene reacts with the pulmonary irritant ozone, a complex mixture of gas and particle phase products is formed, which causes sensory irritation. This study investigated whether limonene, ozone...

  5. COPD exacerbations, inflammation and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bathoorn, Derk

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations into the inflammation in COPD, and its treatment. Inflammation in COPD is a central factor in the onset of the disease and its progression. During acute deteriorations of the disease, exacerbations, the inflammation is more severe, and depending on the cause of t

  6. Beyond corticosteroids: future prospects in the management of inflammation in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Roche

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a central role in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Exposure to cigarette smoke induces the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the airways and stimulates innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Airway inflammation is involved in increased bronchial wall thickness, increased bronchial smooth muscle tone, mucus hypersecretion and loss of parenchymal elastic structures. Oxidative stress impairs tissue integrity, accelerates lung ageing and reduces the efficacy of corticosteroids by decreasing levels of histone deacetylase-2. Protease–antiprotease imbalance impairs tissues and is involved in inflammatory processes. Inflammation is also present in the pulmonary artery wall and at the systemic level in COPD patients, and may be involved in COPD-associated comorbidities. Proximal airways inflammation contributes to symptoms of chronic bronchitis while distal and parenchymal inflammation relates to airflow obstruction, emphysema and hyperinflation. Basal levels of airways and systemic inflammation are increased in frequent exacerbators. Inhaled corticosteroids are much less effective in COPD than in asthma, which relates to the intrinsically poor reversibility of COPD-related airflow obstruction and to molecular mechanisms of resistance relating to oxidative stress. Ongoing research aims at developing new drugs targeting more intimately COPD-specific mechanisms of inflammation, hypersecretion and tissue destruction and repair. Among new anti-inflammatory agents, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors have been the first to emerge.

  7. Inflammatory Response Mechanisms Exacerbating Hypoxemia in Coexistent Pulmonary Fibrosis and Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Adegunsoye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediators of inflammation, oxidative stress, and chemoattractants drive the hypoxemic mechanisms that accompany pulmonary fibrosis. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis commonly have obstructive sleep apnea, which potentiates the hypoxic stimuli for oxidative stress, culminating in systemic inflammation and generalized vascular endothelial damage. Comorbidities like pulmonary hypertension, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction contribute to chronic hypoxemia leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines that may propagate clinical deterioration and alter the pulmonary fibrotic pathway. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, interleukin- (IL- 1α, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-1, CINC-2α/β, lipopolysaccharide induced CXC chemokine (LIX, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG-1, macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP- 1α, MIP-3α, and nuclear factor- (NF- κB appear to mediate disease progression. Adipocytes may induce hypoxia inducible factor (HIF 1α production; GERD is associated with increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α; pulmonary artery myocytes often exhibit increased cytosolic free Ca2+. Protein kinase C (PKC mediated upregulation of TNF-α and IL-1β also occurs in the pulmonary arteries. Increased understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms driving hypoxemia in pulmonary fibrosis and obstructive sleep apnea may potentiate the identification of appropriate therapeutic targets for developing effective therapies.

  8. Gut Microbiota and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Molin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local inflammation in relation to the resident microbiota of the human gastro-intestinal (GI tract and administration of probiotics are the main themes of the present review. The dominating taxa of the human GI tract and their potential for aggravating or suppressing inflammation are described. The review focuses on human trials with probiotics and does not include in vitro studies and animal experimental models. The applications of probiotics considered are systemic immune-modulation, the metabolic syndrome, liver injury, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and radiation-induced enteritis. When the major genomic differences between different types of probiotics are taken into account, it is to be expected that the human body can respond differently to the different species and strains of probiotics. This fact is often neglected in discussions of the outcome of clinical trials with probiotics.

  9. Nanoparticles and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Stevenson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nanoscale molecular probes capable of diagnosis, characterization, and clinical treatment of disease is leading to a new generation of imaging technologies. Such probes are particularly relevant to inflammation, where the detection of subclinical, early disease states could facilitate speedier detection that could yield enhanced, tailored therapies. Nanoparticles offer robust platforms capable of sensitive detection, and early research has indicated their suitability for the detection of vascular activation and cellular recruitment at subclinical levels. This suggests that nanoparticle techniques may provide excellent biomarkers for the diagnosis and progression of inflammatory diseases with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, fluorescent quantum dots (QDs, and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS probes being just some of the new methodologies employed. Development of these techniques could lead to a range of sensitive probes capable of ultrasensitive, localized detection of inflammation. This article will discuss the merits of each approach, with a general overview to their applicability in inflammatory diseases.

  10. Inflammation and Incretins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh Hatwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient excess results in systemic inflammation in diabetes contributing to insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and increased cardiovascular risk. GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors, which are now well accepted therapies for diabetes may play a unique role in modulating this inflammatory process. Incretin based therapies have shown beneficial anti-inflammatory effects on surrogate markers but cardiovascular outcome data is still lacking.

  11. Peritoneal dialysis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velloso, Marina Souza Silva; Otoni, Alba; de Paula Sabino, Adriano; de Castro, Whocely Victor; Pinto, Sérgio Wyton Lima; Marinho, Maria Aparecida Silva; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2014-03-20

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a kidney replacement therapy for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Despite being a lifesaving treatment, the rate of mortality in patients under PD is elevated, mainly due to the chronic peritoneal dysfunction which is characterized by inflammation, peritoneal fibrosis and neoangiogenesis. The inflammatory process is trigged and modulated by the type of the peritoneal dialysis solutions (PDSs) used during PD. Currently, different PDSs are commercially available: (i) the conventional solutions; (ii) solutions of neutral pH containing low concentration of glucose degradation products (GDPs); (iii) solutions with icodextrin; and (iv) solutions containing taurine. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the different types of peritoneal dialysis solutions used during PD and their relationship with systemic and intraperitoneal inflammation. Some studies suggested that solutions of neutral pH containing low concentration of GDPs, icodextrin and taurine have better biocompatibility and lower influence on the inflammatory process compared to the conventional one. On the other hand, the studies, in general, were performed with a small population and for a short period of time. Therefore, further well-designed and -controlled clinical trials with larger number of individuals are required in order to better understand the role of different peritoneal dialysis solution types in the development of inflammation in patients with chronic peritoneal dialysis. Accordingly, studies that are more well-designed, well-controlled and with a larger number of patients are needed to explain and define the role of different types of PDS in the inflammation development in patients with chronic peritoneal dialysis.

  12. Myeloperoxidase Promoter Polymorphism −463G Is Associated With More Severe Clinical Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda F. Reynolds

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The severity of cystic fibrosis (CF pulmonary disease is not directly related to CFTR genotype but depends upon several parameters, including neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Identification of agents modulating inflammation constitutes a relevant goal. Myeloperoxidase (MPO is involved in both microbicidal and proinflammatory neutrophil activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the −463GA MPO promoter polymorphism is linked to clinical severity of CF-associated pulmonary inflammation. This polymorphism significantly affects the level of MPO gene expression in leukocytes and the G allele is more expressing than the A allele. We show that MPO genotype significantly influences the severity of pulmonary disease in early stages, prior to the development of chronic lung infections, with GG genotype being associated with more severe CF disease. Our findings indicate that the level of MPO gene expression influences the CF pathogenesis, presumably reflecting cellular damage by MPO-generated oxidants or other activity of MPO in airway inflammation.

  13. Prophylactic proopiomelanocortin expression alleviates capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammation in rat trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guei-Sheung; Huang, Hung-Tu; Lin, Che-Jen; Shi, Jhih-Yin; Liu, Li-Feng; Tseng, Rue-Tseng; Weng, Wen-Tsan; Lam, Hing-Chung; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Hsu, Kuei-Sen; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2009-12-01

    Neurogenic inflammation frequently causes acute plasma leakage in airways and life-threatening pulmonary edema. However, limited strategies are available to alleviate neurogenic inflammation. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is the precursor of anti-inflammatory melanocortins, which have been proposed of therapeutic potential for various inflammatory diseases. The present study aimed to evaluate whether peripheral POMC expression ameliorated capsaicin-induced acute neurogenic inflammation in rat trachea. Prophylactic POMC expression was achieved by intravenous injection of adenovirus encoding POMC (Ad-POMC), which led to POMC expression in livers and elevated plasma adrenocorticotropin levels for approximately 60 days. After gene delivery for 7 days, neurogenic inflammation was induced in rats by capsaicin injection. The extent of capsaicin-evoked plasma leakage in trachea was alleviated in Ad-POMC-treated rats compared with animals of control groups (P neurogenic inflammation.

  14. Unilateral pulmonary hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albay S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypoplasia represents a broad range of malformations characterized by incomplete development of lung tissue. The severity of the lesion depends on the appearance time of the malformation during the timeline of lung development, and the presence of further anatomic anomalies. In this report, we present a case of pulmonary hypoplasia in a 27-year old woman.

  15. Pregnancy and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Lameijer, Heleen; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy is associated with considerable risks of maternal mortality and morbidity. Our systematic review of the literature on the use of targeted treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy indicates a considerable decrease of mortality since a pre

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a reduced diffusing capacity (DL CO ) on pulmonary function tests (PFTs). The DL CO measures the ability of ... catheterization to measure the actual pressure in the pulmonary ... the PH; to assess the function of the left side of the heart; and ...

  17. Pulmonary Function Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Ranu, H; Wilde, M.; Madden, B

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications.

  18. [Mediastino-pulmonary sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaval, P; Desrues, B; Quinquenel, M L; Lineau, C; Lena, H

    1993-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is diffuse granulomatosis disease. The aetiology and pathogenesis are unknown. Many different localizations have been described together with immunological disturbances. Generally, the prognosis is favourable. Here we describe the pulmonary manifestations and their staging. Extra-pulmonary manifestations are then presented. Finally, the principle elements of the diagnosis and the treatment of sarcoidosis are discussed.

  19. A new direction in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolb Martin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent review article suggested that idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a disease that is associated more with abnormal wound healing than with inflammation. Data derived from transgenic and gene transfer rodent models suggest that lung inflammation may be a necessary but insufficient component of IPF, and that at some point in the natural history of the disease IPF becomes no longer dependent on the inflammatory response for propagation. Altered microenvironment and involvement of epithelial cell/mesenchymal cell interaction are the most likely contributors to the pathogenesis of this chronic progressive disorder.

  20. Inflammation and metabolic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2017-03-15

    Excessive feeding is associated with an increase in the incidence of chronic metabolic diseases, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic disturbance induces chronic low-grade inflammation in metabolically-important organs, such as the liver and adipose tissue. Many of the inflammatory signalling pathways are directly triggered by nutrients. The pro-inflammatory mediators in adipocytes and macrophages infiltrating adipose tissue promote both local and systemic pro-inflammatory status. Metabolic cardiomyopathy is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by structural and functional alterations and interstitial fibrosis without coronary artery disease or hypertension. In the early stage of metabolic cardiomyopathy, metabolic disturbance is not accompanied by substantial changes in myocardial structure and cardiac function. However, metabolic disturbance induces subcellular low-grade inflammation in the heart, and in turn, subcellular component abnormalities, such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and impaired calcium handling, leading to impaired myocardial relaxation. In the advanced stage, the vicious cycle of subcellular component abnormalities, inflammatory cell infiltration, and neurohumoral activation induces cardiomyocyte injury and death, and cardiac fibrosis, resulting in impairment of both diastolic and systolic functions. This review discusses some recent advances in understanding involvement of inflammation in metabolic cardiomyopathy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Stress increases periodontal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SUAZO, IVÁN; BECERRA, JAVIERA

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of chronic restraint stress (RS) on the severity of experimental periodontal disease in rats. A total of 32 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: i) Rats receiving two treatment regimens, chronic stress induced by movement restriction in acrylic cylinders for 1–1.5 h daily and induction of experimental periodontal disease, using a nylon ligature which was placed around the first left mandibular molars (n=8); ii) induction of periodontal disease, without RS (n=8); iii) RS (n=8) and iv) control (n=8). After 15 days, blood samples were obtained, and blood glucose levels and the corticosterone concentration were measured as stress markers. The severity of periodontal disease was analyzed according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation, leading to compromise of the teeth involved. Chronic stress was induced with movement restriction (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) and increased the severity (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) of experimental perio dontal disease in rats, according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation around the first left mandibular molars. The results of the present study showed that RS modulates periodontal inflammation and that the rat model described herein is suitable for investigating the association between stress and periodontal disease. PMID:23226743

  2. TWEAK Promotes Peritoneal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ana Belen; Aroeira, Luiz Stark; Bellon, Teresa; del Peso, Gloria; Jimenez-Heffernan, Jose; Santamaria, Beatriz; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Lopez-Cabrera, Manuel; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Selgas, Rafael; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is complicated by peritonitis episodes that cause loss of mesothelium and eventually sclerosing peritonitis. An improved understanding of the molecular contributors to peritoneal injury and defense may increase the therapeutic armamentarium to optimize peritoneal defenses while minimizing peritoneal injury. There is no information on the expression and function of the cytokine TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 during peritoneal injury. Fn14 expression and soluble TWEAK levels were measured in human PD peritoneal effluent cells or fluids with or without peritonitis. Fn14 expression was also analyzed in peritoneal biopsies from PD patients. Actions of intraperitoneal TWEAK were studied in mice in vivo. sTWEAK levels were increased in peritoneal effluent in PD peritonitis. Effluent sTWEAK levels correlated with the number of peritoneal macrophages (r = 0.491, p = 0.002). Potential TWEAK targets that express the receptor Fn14 include mesothelial cells and macrophages, as demonstrated by flow cytometry of peritoneal effluents and by analysis of peritoneal biopsies. Peritoneal biopsy Fn14 correlated with mesothelial injury, fibrosis and inflammation, suggesting a potential deleterious effect of TWEAK/Fn14. In this regard, intraperitoneal TWEAK administration to mice promoted peritoneal inflammation characterized by increased peritoneal effluent MCP-1, Fn14 and Gr1+ macrophages, increased mesothelial Fn14, MCP-1 and CCL21 expression and submesothelial tissue macrophage recruitment. Taken together these data suggest that the TWEAK/Fn14 system may promote inflammation and tissue injury during peritonitis and PD. PMID:24599047

  3. Unraveling the Complex Relationship Triad between Lipids, Obesity, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida A. Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity today stands at the intersection between inflammation and metabolic disorders causing an aberration of immune activity, and resulting in increased risk for diabetes, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and pulmonary inflammation to name a few. Increases in mortality and morbidity in obesity related inflammation have initiated studies to explore different lipid mediated molecular pathways of attempting resolution that uncover newer therapeutic opportunities of anti-inflammatory components. Majorly the thromboxanes, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, and so forth form the group of lipid mediators influencing inflammation. Of special mention are the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids that regulate inflammatory mediators of interest in hepatocytes and adipocytes via the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. They also exhibit profound effects on eicosanoid production. The inflammatory cyclooxygenase pathway arising from arachidonic acid is a critical step in the progression of inflammatory responses. New oxygenated products of omega-3 metabolism, namely, resolvins and protectins, behave as endogenous mediators exhibiting powerful anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory actions via the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. In this review we attempt to discuss the complex pathways and links between obesity and inflammation particularly in relation to different lipid mediators.

  4. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension and Assessment of Right Ventricular Function in the Piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noly, Pierre-Emmanuel; Guihaire, Julien; Coblence, Matthieu; Dorfmüller, Peter; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf

    2015-11-04

    An original piglet model of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) associated with chronic Right Ventricular (RV) dysfunction is described. Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) was induced in 3-week-old piglets by a progressive obstruction of the pulmonary vascular bed. A ligation of the left Pulmonary Artery (PA) was performed first through a mini-thoracotomy. Second, weekly embolizations of the right lower pulmonary lobe were done under fluoroscopic guidance with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate during 5 weeks. Mean Pulmonary Arterial Pressure (mPAP) measured by ritght heart catheterism, increased progressively, as well as Right Atrial pressure and Pulmonary Vascular Resistances (PVR) after 5 weeks compared to sham animals. Right Ventricular (RV) structural and functional remodeling were assessed by transthoracic echocardiography (RV diameters, RV wall thickness, RV systolic function). RV elastance and RV-pulmonary coupling were assessed by Pressure-Volume Loops (PVL) analysis with conductance method. Histologic study of the lung and the right ventricle were also performed. Molecular analyses on RV fresh tissues could be performed through repeated transcutaneous endomyocardial biopsies. Pulmonary microvascular disease in obstructed and unobstructed territories was studied from lung biopsies using molecular analyses and pathology. Furthermore, the reliability and the reproducibility was associated with a range of PH severity in animals. Most aspects of the human CTEPH disease were reproduced in this model, which allows new perspectives for the understanding of the underlying mechanisms (mitochondria, inflammation) and new therapeutic approaches (targeted, cellular or gene therapies) of the overloaded right ventricle but also pulmonary microvascular disease.

  5. Protective Effects of Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Treatment in 1,3-β-glucan-modulated Allergic Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakih, Dalia; Pilecki, Bartosz; Schlosser, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    SP-D treatment. 1,3-β-glucan-treatment did, however, induce pulmonary neutrophilic infiltration and increased TNF-α levels in BAL, independently of OVA-induced allergy. This infiltration was also reversed by treatment with rfhSP-D. 1,3-β-glucan reduced OVA-induced mucous cell metaplasia, Th2 cytokines and IFN......-γ production. rfhSP-D treatment further reduced mucous metaplasia and Th2 cytokine secretion to background levels. In summary, rfhSP-D treatment resulted in attenuation of both allergic inflammation and 1,3-β-glucan mediated neutrophilic inflammation. Our data suggest that treatment with high dose SP......SP-D is a pulmonary collectin important in lung immunity. SP-D-deficient mice (Sftpd(-/-)) are reported to be susceptible to ovalbumin (OVA)- and fungal allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation, while treatment with exogenous SP-D has therapeutic effects in such disease models. β...

  6. Increased Eicosanoid Levels in the Sugen/Chronic Hypoxia Model of Severe Pulmonary Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Aysar Al-Husseini; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Laszlo Farkas; Donatas Kraskauskas; Drake, Jennifer I.; Ben Van Tassel; Antonio Abbate; Chalfant, Charles E.; Norbert F Voelkel

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and altered immunity are recognized components of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension in human patients and in animal models of PAH. While eicosanoid metabolites of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways have been identified in the lungs from pulmonary hypertensive animals their role in the pathogenesis of severe angioobliterative PAH has not been examined. Here we investigated whether a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor or diethylcarbamazine (DEC), that is known for its 5-...

  7. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie;

    2016-01-01

    .5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naïve mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without......Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered the main drivers of vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis after inhalation of particulate matter. In addition, new studies have shown that particle exposure can induce the level of bioactive mediators in serum, driving vascular......- and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE -/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 μg nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 μg...

  8. A Mitochondrial Perspective of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadel, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) encompasses several clinical syndromes, most notably emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Most of the current treatments fail to attenuate severity and progression of the disease, thereby requiring better mechanistic understandings of pathogenesis to develop disease-modifying therapeutics. A number of theories on COPD pathogenesis have been promulgated wherein an increase in protease burden from chronic inflammation, exaggerated production of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidant injury, or superfluous cell death responses caused by enhanced cellular injury/damage were proposed as the culprit. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive and together likely represent the multifaceted biological processes involved in COPD pathogenesis. Recent studies demonstrate that mitochondria are involved in innate immune signaling that plays important roles in cigarette smoke-induced inflammasome activation, pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodeling responses. These responses are reviewed herein and synthesized into a view of COPD pathogenesis whereby mitochondria play a central role.

  9. Thrown off balance: the effect of antenatal inflammation on the developing lung and immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Steffen; Collins, Jennifer J P; Kuypers, Elke; Kramer, Boris W

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, translational research with various animal models has been helpful to answer basic questions about the effect of antenatal inflammation on maturation and development of the fetal lung and immune system. The fetal lung and immune systems are very plastic and their development can be conditioned and influenced by both endogenous and/or exogenous factors. Antenatal inflammation can induce pulmonary inflammation, leading to lung injury and remodeling in the fetal lung. Exposure to antenatal inflammation can induce interleukin-1α production, which enhances surfactant protein and lipid synthesis thereby promoting lung maturation. Interleukin-1α is therefore a candidate for the link between lung inflammation and lung maturation, preventing respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants. Antenatal inflammation can, however, cause structural changes in the fetal lung and affect the expression of growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta, connective tissue growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-10, or bone morphogenetic protein-4, which are essential for branching morphogenesis. These alterations cause alveolar and microvascular simplification resembling the histology of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Antenatal inflammation may also affect neonatal outcome by modulating the responsiveness of the immune system. Lipopolysaccharide-tolerance (endotoxin hyporesponsiveness/immunoparalysis), induced by exposure to inflammation in utero, may prevent fetal lung damage, but increases susceptibility to postnatal infections. Moreover, prenatal exposure to inflammation appears to be a predisposition for the development of adverse neonatal outcomes, like bronchopulmonary dysplasia, if the preterm infant is exposed to a second postnatal hit, such as mechanical ventilation oxygen exposure, infections, or steroids.

  10. Different approaches in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Eva Rahman; Morshed, Nabila

    2015-10-05

    Advances in drug formulation, inhalation device design and disease management are generating new opportunities for patients suffering from obstructive pulmonary diseases. This article provides a comprehensive review of the different promising pulmonary drug delivery technologies in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, particularly with regard to the treatment of asthma and chronic pulmonary diseases (COPD), which are increasing day by day due to increasing environmental pollution and its harmful and toxic contaminants. In the recent years, a better knowledge has been gained regarding the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids and how they suppress the chronic inflammation. New etiology has been brought into light regarding the inactivity of glucocorticoids in some patients having asthma and COPDs even though the inflammatory genes are triggered by similar molecules in both the diseases. This new knowledge has given a new platform to improve glucocorticoids and their resistance also how other combination therapy can be used for these diseases. It has also led to the quest for improving and developing other alternatives such as anti-leukotriene agents, muscarinic inhibitors, combination therapy, as well as biologic immune-modulators in the treatment of the different pulmonary diseases. Several new combinations of glucocorticoids are available in the global market for the use in pulmonary diseases especially asthma although their availability fluctuates between continents. There has been several studies done regarding the variation of effectiveness of the different inhaled glucocorticoids and hence it is important to take into consideration the different delivery systems and the methods which are used to treat the patients.

  11. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE. PMID:27798647

  12. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xudong; Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie; Ni, Songshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE.

  13. Pulmonary mycoses among the clinically suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tshering Ongmu Bhutia; Luna Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried with the main objectives: (1) to find out the occurrence of pulmonary mycoses in clinically suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases at central referral hospital, Tadong, Sikkim. (2) To find out the various fungi causing pulmonary mycoses in clinically suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Methods: 200 clinically suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases who visited the department of microbiology for the diagnostic microscopic examination of sputum sample f...

  14. Eicosanoids in skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Eicosanoids play an integral part in homeostatic mechanisms related to skin health and structural integrity. They also mediate inflammatory events developed in response to environmental factors, such as exposure to ultraviolet radiation, and inflammatory and allergic disorders, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. This review article discusses biochemical aspects related to cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism, the contribution of these potent autacoids to skin inflammation and related conditions, and considers the importance of nutritional supplementation with bioactives such as omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and plant-derived antioxidants as means of addressing skin health issues.

  15. Inflammation in Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Helena; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jackson, Christopher; Xue, Meilang

    2016-12-11

    Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research.

  16. Immunsystemet ved kronisk inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved as a defence against infections and as an important repair mechanism after physical injury. If elimination of microbes and healing is not achieved, or if the immune system is dysregulated, chronic inflammation ensues. Immune cells become engaged in prolonged...... reactions with other cell types in vessels and organs, frequently with superimposed autoreactive T-cells and autoantibody-producing B-cells/plasma cells. The processes are distinguished on the basis of clinical manifestations in organ-specific and systemic inflammatory diseases. The underlying factors...

  17. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  18. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  19. Isolated pulmonary Goodpasture syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrity, P; Gilbert-Barness, E; Cabalka, A; Hong, R; Zimmerman, J

    1991-01-01

    The case of a 13-year-old girl with Goodpasture syndrome is reported. The presentation at this age with only pulmonary hemorrhage is unusual among Goodpasture syndrome patients. The case illustrates well the diagnostic difficulties in Goodpasture syndrome. The choices of treatment modalities available for this disease and the results and risks of such treatment options are reviewed. A discussion and classification of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage is presented. The case emphasizes that Goodpasture syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage in spite of a lack of renal abnormalities and that serum anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody testing can be of great help in confirming the diagnosis.

  20. A Rare Cause of Pulmonary Nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tsuyoshi Chew

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease is a chronic, idiopathic autoimmune disorder that primarily targets the gastrointestinal (GI system. It is characterized by transmural inflammation of the GI tract that can occur anywhere from the mouth to the anus. Not infrequently, the disease may also have extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs that can affect almost any organ system. It is estimated that EIMs affect up to 36% of patients with Crohn’s disease, but the incidence and prevalence of pulmonary involvement are variable in the literature and may be as low as 0.4%. There are few case reports documenting pulmonary manifestations, as they are often overlooked, especially if respiratory symptoms are present before the diagnosis of GI manifestations, as in the present case. A 44-year-old otherwise healthy woman presented with nonspecific respiratory complaints, recurrent pneumonias, and multiple computed tomography images showing diffuse, migratory, nodular, and consolidative parenchymal lung disease, with a largely unremarkable infectious and rheumatologic evaluation. Lung biopsy revealed necrotizing and nonnecrotizing granulomas, raising concern for sarcoidosis. Subsequent imaging revealed an incidental mass in the cecum. Biopsy of the cecum lesion revealed acute cryptitis, crypt abscess, and a single poorly formed granuloma, suggesting the possibility of Crohn’s disease. In this report, we present a patient whose pulmonary manifestations ultimately led to the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease.

  1. Common lung conditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzell, John E

    2013-06-01

    The etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is chronic lung inflammation. In the United States, this inflammation most commonly is caused by smoking. COPD is diagnosed when an at-risk patient presents with respiratory symptoms and has irreversible airway obstruction indicated by a forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio of less than 0.7. Management goals for COPD include smoking cessation, symptom reduction, exacerbation reduction, hospitalization avoidance, and improvement of quality of life. Stable patients with COPD who remain symptomatic despite using short-acting bronchodilators should start inhaled maintenance drugs to reduce symptoms and exacerbations, avoid hospitalizations, and improve quality of life. A long-acting anticholinergic or a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) can be used for initial therapy; these drugs have fewer adverse effects than inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). If patients remain symptomatic despite monotherapy, dual therapy with a long-acting anticholinergic and a LABA, or a LABA and an ICS, may be beneficial. Triple therapy (ie, a long-acting anticholinergic, a LABA, and an ICS) also is used, but it is unclear if triple therapy is superior to dual therapy. Roflumilast, an oral selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, is used to manage moderate to severe COPD. Continuous oxygen therapy is indicated for patients with COPD who have severe hypoxemia (ie, PaO2 less than 55 mm Hg or an oxygen saturation less than 88% on room air). Nonpharmacologic strategies also are useful to improve patient outcomes. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves dyspnea and quality of life. Pulmonary rehabilitation after an acute exacerbation reduces hospitalizations and mortality, and improves quality of life and exercise capacity. Smoking cessation is the most effective management strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with COPD. Lung volume reduction surgery, bullectomy, and lung transplantation are

  2. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, S; Guttmann, C; Bals, R

    2011-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a complex disease triggered mostly by exposure to cigarette smoke, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, leading not only to pulmonary damage but also to systemic impairment. There is growing awareness of systemic inflammation and cardiovascular, neurologic, psychiatric, and endocrine comorbidities associated with COPD. The diagnosis of CODP is based upon the clinical presentation, measurement of the pulmonary function, investigation of comorbidities and exclusion of differential diagnoses. COPD is a heterogeneous disease including various phenotypes. A number of drugs reduce or alleviate symptoms, increase exercise capacity, or reduce the number and severity of exacerbations. Non-pharmacologic measures such as smoking cessation, nutritional support, long term oxygen therapy, physiotherapy, rehabilitation, lung volume reduction and lung transplantation may be available for appropriate patients and can improve health status. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Possible role of l-selectin in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseda, M; Kadota, J; Mukae, H; Kawamoto, S; Shukuwa, T; Iwashita, T; Matsubara, Y; Ishimatsu, Y; Yoshinaga, M; Abe, K; Kohno, S

    2000-01-01

    A number of adhesion molecules participate in the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site of inflammation, and selectins together with their ligands are important in the early transient adhesion phase. In this study, we evaluated the role of l-selectin in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis. We measured serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) concentrations of soluble (s)l-selectin using an ELISA. Serum and BALF concentrations of sl-selectin were significantly elevated in patients with sarcoidosis compared with control healthy subjects and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients (P alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis. PMID:10886252

  4. Investigation on novel pharmacological target against pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huai-liang; ZHANG Xin-hua; WANG Han-ming; ZHAI Feng-guo; HUANG Liang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigation on novel pharmacological target against pulmonary hypertension. It was recognized in the recent years that pulmonary hypertension (PHT) compromised of four components, i. e. vasoconstriction, hyperplasia, micro thrombosis and inflammation of pulmonary vasculature. Pulmonary vascular hyperplasia is a hallmark pathologic feature of pulmonary hypertension. Hyperplasia of rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) was significantly increased, and PASMCs from rats or human beings with PHT grow faster than those from control subjects when stimulated by serotonin or serum. Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is the major cause of right ventricular hypertrophy and eventually right heart failure. 5-hydroxytraptarnine (5-HT) as mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells plays an important role in the development of PHT. It is known that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) restrain 5-HT internalization. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate if SSRIs may have protective effect against monocrotaline (MCT)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy. Methods induced chronic pulmonary hypertension in Wistar rats was established; fluoxetine and sertraline (2, 10 mg·kg-1·d-1 were administered by gavages. 3 w after MCT injection, right ventricular index (RVI), pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), heart and lung morphology were measured or investigated. 5-HT transporter (SERT) assayed by RT-PCR or Western blot. Results MCT-Results RVI was significantly increased in MCT group (P<0.01 vs control) and reduced to by fluoxetine (10 mg·kg-1·d-1) and 0.42±0.04 by Sertraline (10 mg·kg-1·d-1) (both P<0.05 vs MCT). PAP increased significantly by MCT(P<0.01 vs control). Fluoxetine ( 10 mg·kg-1·d-1), or sertraline (10 mg·kg-1·d-1) attenuated MCT-induced increase of PAP, respectively ( both P< 0.05 vs MCT). MCT raised significantly Pulmonary artery muscularization (P<0.01 vs control), and attenuated by fluoxetine or sertraline (P<0.01 vs MCT). MCT

  5. Current views on the mechanisms of pulmonary oedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, J V

    1978-06-01

    Understanding of the causes of pulmonary oedema must be based on knowledge of the mechanism responsible for fluid exchange between the several compartments of the normal lung. Recent physiological studies have clarified the main features of these mechanisms. However in three areas knowledge is still incomplete--the magnitude of the hydrostatic and oncotic forces responsible for fluid movement within the lung, the means by which protein leaks across the wall of small pulmonary vessels and the routes by which fluid and protein pass between the interstitial tissues of the lung and the alveolar space. Further work is needed in these areas. On the basis of this physiological knowledge the mode of development of hydrostatic oedema, the role of lymphatics in pulmonary oedema, and the several stages of pulmonary oedema development that may culminate in alveolar flooding are now clearly understood. Knowledge is less complete about oedema due to increased vascular permeability. In some experimental models, such as alloxan, leakage is due to irreversible injury to the alveolar wall; in other models, including ANTU, oedema formation has been shown to depend upon minor and reversible changes in pulmonary vascular endothelium similar to those that cause exudate formation in areas of acute inflammation. In no instance is detailed information available of both the rate and magnitude of protein leakage and of the morphological basis of increased vascular permeability. Further work is required in this area. Present knowledge allows an adequate explanation of the changes that occur in many clinically important types of pulmonary oedema, including cardiac failure and neurogenic pulmonary oedema. Other types of oedema, notably that which may complicate traumatic shock or extrapulmonary sepsis and high altitude pulmonary oedema, are more complex and the details of their pathogenesis are still obscure.

  6. Reactive oxygen species as therapeutic targets in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund-Michel, Véronique; Guibert, Christelle; Dubois, Mathilde; Courtois, Arnaud; Marthan, Roger; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Muller, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by a progressive elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure due to alterations of both pulmonary vascular structure and function. This disease is rare but life-threatening, leading to the development of right heart failure. Current PH treatments, designed to target altered pulmonary vascular reactivity, include vasodilating prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and endothelin-1 receptor antagonists. Although managing to slow the progression of the disease, these molecules still do not cure PH. More effective treatments need to be developed, and novel therapeutic strategies, targeting in particular vascular remodelling, are currently under investigation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important physiological messengers in vascular cells. In addition to atherosclerosis and other systemic vascular diseases, emerging evidence also support a role of ROS in PH pathogenesis. ROS production is increased in animal models of PH, associated with NADPH oxidases increased expression, in particular of several Nox enzymes thought to be the major source of ROS in the pulmonary vasculature. These increases have also been observed in vitro and in vivo in humans. Moreover, several studies have shown either the deleterious effect of agents promoting ROS generation on pulmonary vasculature or, conversely, the beneficial effect of antioxidant agents in animal models of PH. In these studies, ROS production has been directly linked to pulmonary vascular remodelling, endothelial dysfunction, altered vasoconstrictive responses, inflammation and modifications of the extracellular matrix, all important features of PH pathophysiology. Altogether, these findings indicate that ROS are interesting therapeutic targets in PH. Blockade of ROS-dependent signalling pathways, or disruption of sources of ROS in the pulmonary vasculature, targeting in particular Nox enzymes, represent promising new therapeutic strategies in this disease.

  7. The Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula mKG Suppresses Pulmonary Fibrosis of Mice Induced by Bleomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis (PF is a serious progressive lung disease and it originates from inflammation-induced parenchymal injury with excessive extracellular matrix deposition to result in the destruction of the normal lung architecture. Modified Kushen Gancao Formula (mKG, derived from traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a prominent anti-inflammatory effect. The present study is to explore the inhibitory effects of mKG on bleomycin (BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. mKG significantly decreased pulmonary alveolitis, fibrosis scores, and interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-17 (IL-17, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β and hydroxyproline (HYP levels in lung tissue of mice compared with BLM treatment. It markedly alleviated the increase of HYP content in the lung tissues and pathologic changes of pulmonary fibrosis caused by BLM instillation. In conclusion, mKG has an anti-fibrotic effect and might be employed as a therapeutic candidate agent for attenuating pulmonary fibrosis.

  8. Management of pulmonary aspiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janda, Matthias; Scheeren, Thomas W L; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele F E

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents in the perioperative phase is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. For the management of aspiration, differentiation between acid-associated aspiration pneumonitis and aspiration pneumonia as a consequence of a secondary bacterial

  9. Pulmonary neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caplin, M E; Baudin, E; Ferolla, P

    2015-01-01

    carried out in PubMed for the terms 'pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial carcinoid tumors', 'pulmonary carcinoid', 'pulmonary typical/atypical carcinoid', and 'pulmonary carcinoid and diagnosis/treatment/epidemiology/prognosis'. A systematic review...... of the relevant literature was carried out, followed by expert review. RESULTS: PCs are well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors and include low- and intermediate-grade malignant tumors, i.e. typical (TC) and atypical carcinoid (AC), respectively. Contrast CT scan is the diagnostic gold standard for PCs......, particularly of low-grade TC and AC. Locoregional or radiotargeted therapies should be considered for metastatic disease. Systemic chemotherapy is used for progressive PCs, although cytotoxic regimens have demonstrated limited effects with etoposide and platinum combination the most commonly used, however...

  10. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valvuloplasty - pulmonary Images Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... Saunders; 2016:chap 69. Otto CM, Bownow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ...

  11. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease with a high prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). The first symptom of HHT may be stroke or fatal hemoptysis associated with the presence of PAVM....

  12. Neonatal pulmonary artery thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangesh Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery thrombosis in neonates is a rare entity. We describe two neonates with this diagnosis; their presentation, evaluation, and management. These cases highlight the importance of this differential diagnosis when evaluating the cyanotic neonate.

  13. Pulmonary Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growths called carcinoid tumors in the digestive system. Rheumatic fever. This complication of an infection caused by streptococcus ... valve stenosis later in life, including: Carcinoid syndrome Rheumatic fever Noonan's syndrome Mild to moderate pulmonary valve stenosis ...

  14. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Reperfusion pulmonary edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klausner, J.M.; Paterson, I.S.; Mannick, J.A.; Valeri, C.R.; Shepro, D.; Hechtman, H.B. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-02-17

    Reperfusion following lower-torso ischemia in humans leads to respiratory failure manifest by pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury has been studied in the sheep lung lymph preparation, where it has been demonstrated that the reperfusion resulting in pulmonary edema is due to an increase in microvascular permeability of the lung to protein. This respiratory failure caused by reperfusion appears to be an inflammatory reaction associated with intravascular release of the chemoattractants leukotriene B{sub 4} and thromboxane. Histological studies of the lung in experimental animals revealed significant accumulation of neutrophils but not platelets in alveolar capillaries. The authors conclude that thromboxane generated and released from the ischemic tissue is responsible for the transient pulmonary hypertension. Second, it is likely that the chemoattractants are responsible for leukosequestration, and third, neutrophils, oxygen-derived free radicals, and thromboxane moderate the altered lung permeability.

  16. Pulmonary mycosis in AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busi Rizzi, Elisa; Schinina, Vincenzo; Bellussi, Angelo; De Santis, Andrea; Mazzuoli, Giovanna; Giosue, Sandro; Bibbolino, Corrado

    2001-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed our series of 35 pulmonary mycosis in patients with AIDS, observed from 1987 to 1999, to correlate the imaging and pathologic findings. We further evaluated the frequency of fungal pneumonia before and after the use of a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Early recognition of pulmonary mycosis is imperative in these patients and improved survival can be achieved with early CT detection and prompt institution of high-dose antifungal therapy.

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008430 Effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. WANG Haoyan(王浩彦), et al. Dept Respir Dis, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med Sci Univ, Beijing 100050. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2008;31(6):414-416. Objective To investigate the effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  18. Reexpansion pulmonary edema

    OpenAIRE

    Genofre Eduardo Henrique; Vargas Francisco S.; Teixeira Lisete R.; Vaz Marcelo Alexandre Costa; Marchi Evaldo

    2003-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is a rare, but frequently lethal, clinical condition. The precise pathophysiologic abnormalities associated with this disorder are still unknown, though decreased pulmonary surfactant levels and a pro-inflammatory status are putative mechanisms. Early diagnosis is crucial, since prognosis depends on early recognition and prompt treatment. Considering the high mortality rates related to RPE, preventive measures are still the best available strategy for patient...

  19. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neeraj; George, Jacob; Gupta, Rakesh C; Dixit, Ramakant

    2013-04-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma manifests in various ways, depending on the structures injured and type of injury. Commonly manifested as parenchymal contusion, at times, pseudacavitation may also been seen on the chest X ray. They are to be differentiated from other causes of pulmonary cavitations which are often done based on history. The so called pulmonary pseudo cysts usually have a benign course and needs only observation.

  20. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Neeraj; George, Jacob; Gupta, Rakesh C; Dixit, Ramakant

    2013-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma manifests in various ways, depending on the structures injured and type of injury. Commonly manifested as parenchymal contusion, at times, pseudacavitation may also been seen on the chest X ray. They are to be differentiated from other causes of pulmonary cavitations which are often done based on history. The so called pulmonary pseudo cysts usually have a benign course and needs only observation.

  1. Pleurotus eryngii Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Kawai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleurotus eryngii (P. eryngii is consumed as a fresh cultivated mushroom worldwide and demonstrated to have multiple beneficial effects. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of P. eryngii in mice with acute lung injury (ALI. Intranasal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS (10 μg/site/mouse induced marked lung inflammation (increase in the number of inflammatory cells, protein leakage, and production of nitric oxide in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as histopathological damage in the lung, 6 h after treatment. Mice administered heat-treated P. eryngii (0.3–1 g/kg, p.o. (HTPE 1 h before LPS challenge showed decreased pulmonary inflammation and ameliorated histopathological damage. These results suggest that HTPE has anti-inflammatory effects against ALI. Thus, P. eryngii itself may also have anti-inflammatory effects and could be a beneficial food for the prevention of ALI induced by bacterial infection.

  2. The Role of Catalase in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takigawa Tomoko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catalase is preferentially expressed in bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, and acts as an endogenous antioxidant enzyme in normal lungs. We thus postulated epithelial damage would be associated with a functional deficiency of catalase during the development of lung fibrosis. Methods The present study evaluates the expression of catalase mRNA and protein in human interstitial pneumonias and in mouse bleomycin-induced lung injury. We examined the degree of bleomycin-induced inflammation and fibrosis in the mice with lowered catalase activity. Results In humans, catalase was decreased at the levels of activity, protein content and mRNA expression in fibrotic lungs (n = 12 compared to control lungs (n = 10. Immunohistochemistry revealed a decrease in catalase in bronchiolar epithelium and abnormal re-epithelialization in fibrotic areas. In C57BL/6J mice, catalase activity was suppressed along with downregulation of catalase mRNA in whole lung homogenates after bleomycin administration. In acatalasemic mice, neutrophilic inflammation was prolonged until 14 days, and there was a higher degree of lung fibrosis in association with a higher level of transforming growth factor-β expression and total collagen content following bleomycin treatment compared to wild-type mice. Conclusions Taken together, these findings demonstrate diminished catalase expression and activity in human pulmonary fibrosis and suggest the protective role of catalase against bleomycin-induced inflammation and subsequent fibrosis.

  3. Current treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉惠

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined by fixed airflow limitation associated with an abnormal pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response of the lungs to cigarette smoke. COPD represents an increasing burden worldwide, reported to be the sixth leading cause of death in 1990 and the fourth in 2000. Discouragingly, it is projected to jump to third place by the year 2020.There is increasing evidence that COPD is a more complex systemic disease than an airway and lung disease. In particular, cachexia, skeletal muscle abnormalities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cancer and pulmonary vascular disease are the most common comorbidities. It is associated with a wide variety of systemic consequences, most notably systemic inflammation. Because COPD patients have in general ahigher cardiovascular risk than the average population, cardiovascular safety in a COPD medication is of critical importance.SINGH et al performed a systematic review and recta-analysis of 17 clinical trials enrolling 14 783 patients treated with inhaled anticholinergic drugs used for the treatment of COPD. Inhaled anticholinergics significantly increased the risk of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke ( 1.8 % vs 1.2 % for control; RR, 1.58 (95 % CI,1.21 - 2.06); P < 0.001 ). However, UPLIIFT (Understanding the Potential Long-Term Impacts on Function with Tiotropium) , a large, 4-year, placebo controlled clinical trial with tiotropium in approximately 6 000 patients with COPD. The preliminary results of UPLIFT showed that there was no increased risk of stroke with tiotropium bromide compared to placebo.A meta-analysis is always considered less convincing than a large prospective trial designed to assess the outcome of interest. However, COPD is a systemic disease. COPD management needs to focus on four major areas: smoking cessation, pharmacologic therapy, exercise training, and pulmonary rehabilitation. Clinicians and patients should always carefully consider any

  4. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Pathology of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a well-known toxic gas that is synthesized in the human body from the amino acids cystathionine, homocysteine, and cysteine by the action of at least two distinct enzymes: cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase. In the past few years, H2S has emerged as a novel and increasingly important biological mediator. Imbalances in H2S have also been shown to be associated with various disease conditions. However, defining the precise pathophysiology of H2S is proving to be a complex challenge. Recent research in our laboratory has shown H2S as a novel mediator of inflammation and work in several groups worldwide is currently focused on determining the role of H2S in inflammation. H2S has been implicated in different inflammatory conditions, such as acute pancreatitis, sepsis, joint inflammation, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Active research on the role of H2S in inflammation will unravel the pathophysiology of its actions in inflammatory conditions and may help develop novel therapeutic approaches for several, as yet incurable, disease conditions.

  5. Obesity, Inflammation, and Lung Injury (OILI: The Good

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity becomes pandemic, predisposing these individuals to great risk for lung injury. In this review, we focused on the anti-inflammatories and addressed the following aspects: adipocytokines and obesity, inflammation and other mechanisms, adipocytokines and lung injury in obesity bridged by inflammation, and potential therapeutic targets. To sum up, the majority of evidence supported that adiponectin, omentin, and secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (SFRP5 were reduced significantly in obesity, which is associated with increased inflammation, indicated by increase of TNFα and IL-6, through activation of toll-like receptor (TLR4 and nuclear factor light chain κB (NF-κB signaling pathways. Administration of these adipocytokines promotes weight loss and reduces inflammation. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG, vaspin, IL-10, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1, and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15 are also regarded as anti-inflammatories. There were controversial reports. Furthermore, there is a huge lack of studies for obesity related lung injury. The effects of adiponectin on lung transplantation, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD, and pneumonia were anti-inflammatory and protective in lung injury. Administration of IL-10 agonist reduces mortality of acute lung injury in rabbits with acute necrotizing pancreatitis, possibly through inhibiting proinflammation and strengthening host immunity. Very limited information is available for other adipocytokines.

  6. SOCS, inflammation and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko eYoshimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play essential roles in innate and adaptive immunity. However, excess cytokines or dysregulation of cytokine signaling can cause a variety of diseases, including allergies, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, and cancer. Most cytokines utilize the so-called Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT pathway. This pathway is negatively regulated by various mechanisms including suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins. SOCS proteins bind to JAK or cytokine receptors, thereby suppressing further signaling events. Especially, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are strong inhibitors of JAK, because these two contain kinase inhibitory region (KIR at the N-terminus. Studies using conditional knockout mice have shown that SOCS proteins are key physiological as well as pathological regulators of immune homeostasis. Recent studies have also demonstrated that SOCS1 and SOCS3 are important regulators of helper T cell differentiation and functions.

  7. The effects of electronic cigarette aerosol exposure on inflammation and lung function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Alexander N; Janka, Maxine A; Mullins, Benjamin J; Berry, Luke J; Bredin, Arne; Franklin, Peter J

    2017-07-01

    Electronic cigarette usage is increasing worldwide, yet there is a paucity of information on the respiratory health effects of electronic cigarette aerosol exposure. This study aimed to assess whether exposure to electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) aerosol would alter lung function and pulmonary inflammation in mice and to compare the severity of any alterations with mice exposed to mainstream tobacco smoke. Female BALB/c mice were exposed for 8 wk to tobacco smoke, medical air (control), or one of four different types of e-cigarette aerosol. E-cigarette aerosols varied depending on nicotine content (0 or 12 mg/ml) and the main excipient (propylene glycol or glycerin). Twenty-four hours after the final exposure, we measured pulmonary inflammation, lung volume, lung mechanics, and responsiveness to methacholine. Mice exposed to tobacco cigarette smoke had increased pulmonary inflammation and responsiveness to methacholine compared with air controls. Mice exposed to e-cigarette aerosol did not have increased inflammation but did display decrements in parenchymal lung function at both functional residual capacity and high transrespiratory pressures. Mice exposed to glycerin-based e-cigarette aerosols were also hyperresponsive to methacholine regardless of the presence or absence of nicotine. This study shows, for the first time, that exposure to e-cigarette aerosol during adolescence and early adulthood is not harmless to the lungs and can result in significant impairments in lung function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jung Eun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    The fungus aspergillus can cause a variety of pulmonary disorders. Aspergilloma is a noninvasive aspergillus colonization of virtually any type of preexisting pulmonary cavity or cystic space. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is serious, usually fatal infection in patients being treated with immunosuppressants or who have chronic debilitating disease. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is characterized clinically by asthma, blood and sputum eosinophilia and positive immunologic reaction to aspergillus antigen. Awareness of the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis is important in making the diagnosis of aspergillus-caused pulmonary disorders. In this pictorial essay, we illustrated various radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis focused on CT findings correlated with gross pathologic specimens.

  9. Pulmonary inflammation and imbalance of oxidation/antioxidation caused by exposure to serrago and hull fumes in guinea pigs%木材锯末与谷壳烟雾致豚鼠肺部炎性反应和氧化-抗氧化失衡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石喆; 胡国平; 李冰; 冉丕鑫

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨木材锯末和谷壳烟雾致豚鼠肺部的异常炎性反应及氧化损伤作用.方法 20只白化豚鼠随机分为两组,每组10只.实验组每天暴露于木材锯末和谷壳燃烧所产生的烟雾中两次,每次30 min,共21 d;对照组暴露于新鲜空气.3周后进行肺组织病理检测,并检测肺组织匀浆中的谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶(GSH-PX)、还原型谷胱甘肽(GSH)、丙二醛(MDA)、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化氢酶(CAT)、总抗氧化能力及肺泡灌洗液(BALF)中的MDA、SOD、总抗氧化能力、白细胞介素8(IL-8)、IL-6、细胞问黏附分子1(ICAM-1)的活力或含量.结果 与对照组豚鼠比较,实验组肺实质、小动脉及支气管炎性细胞浸润明显增多;肺泡面积比例及平均肺泡面积明显增大;单位而积肺泡数明显减少[(134.11±18.22)个/视野比(178.76±21.72)个/视野,P<0.01];肺小动脉及支气管平滑肌层显著增厚.肺组织匀浆中SOD、GSH-PX、GSH、CAT、总抗氧化能力的活力或含量降低[(225.55±12.52)U/mg比(296.57±13.46)U/mg,(23.60±1.85)mg/g比(34.38±1.85)mg/g,(119.67±9.61)mg/g比(134.73±8.07)mg/g,(7.10±0.21)U/mg比(9.20±0.24)U/mg,(0.89±0.10)U/mg比(1.27±0.15)U/mg,P均<0.01];MDA的含苗显著升高[(3.05±0.38)U/mg比(2.09±0.17)U/mg,P<0.01].BALF中,SOD、总抗氧化能力的活力显著降低;MDA的含量显著升高;BALF中IL-6、IL-8、ICAM-1浓度增高.结论 木材锯末与谷壳烟雾可导敛豚鼠肺组织及气道氧化-抗氧化失衡,引起氧化损伤.%Objective To explore the abnormal inflammation and oxidative damage of lung tissues in guinea pigs exposed to serrago and hull fumes. Methods Twenty albino guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups. The experiment group (n=10) was exposed to serrago and hull fumes for 30 minutes twice per day for 21 days and the control group (n=10)exposed to fresh air. At the end of 3 weeks, animals were sacrificed and lung tissues were examined histopathologically

  10. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular failure. The complex molecular mechanisms involved in the pathobiology of PAH are the limiting factors in the development of potential therapeutic interventions for PAH. Over the years, our group and others have demonstrated the critical implication of lipids in the pathogenesis of PAH. This review specifically focuses on the current understanding of the role of oxidized lipids, lipid metabolism, peroxidation, and oxidative stress in the progression of PAH. This review also discusses the relevance of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides and microRNA-193, which are known to regulate the levels of oxidized lipids, as potential therapeutics in PAH. PMID:27683603

  11. Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: Morbidly Obese Patients with Pulmonary Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a well-known major risk factor of cardiovascular disease and is associated with various comorbidities. The impact of obesity on pulmonary function remains unclear. Reductions in chest wall compliance and respiratory muscle strength due to a high percent body fat and localized fat distribution contributes to impaired pulmonary function and the occurrence of adverse respiratory symptoms. Dietary modifications and pharmaceutical agents are not effective in the long-term treatment of obesity. Treatment of morbidly obese patients using bariatric surgery has increased each year, especially after the introduction of video laparoscopic techniques. Effective weight loss after bariatric surgery may improve cardiovascular disease risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Bariatric surgery has also been associated with significantly improved respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function. We currently present a review of principal studies that evaluated the effects of obesity on pulmonary function and the identification of anthropometric factors of obesity that correspond to the reversal of respiratory symptoms and impaired pulmonary function after bariatric surgery.

  12. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, lung function and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Lange, Peter; Bojesen, Stig Egil

    2014-01-01

    25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) may be associated with lung function through modulation of pulmonary protease-antiprotease imbalance, airway inflammation, lung remodelling and oxidative stress. We examined the association of plasma 25(OH)D levels with lung function, lung function decline and risk o...

  13. Involvement of mast cells in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.K. Dahal (Bhola); D. Kosanovic (Djuro); C. Kaulen (Christina); T. Cornitescu (Teodora); R. Savai (Rajkumar); J. Hoffmann (Julia); I.K.M. Reiss (Irwin); H.A. Ghofrani; N. Weissmann; W.M. Kuebler (Wolfgang); W. Seeger (Werner); F. Grimminger; R.T. Schermuly (Ralph Theo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mast cells (MCs) are implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling. Accumulation of lung MCs is described in pulmonary hypertension (PH); however, whether MC degranulation and c-kit, a tyrosine kinase receptor critically involved in MC biology, contribute to the pathogenes

  14. PULMONARY AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION FOLLOWING ACUTE ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE INHALATION IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles (ufCP) causes cardiac physiological changes without marked pulmonary injury or inflammation. We hypothesized that acute ufCP exposure of 13 months old Spontaneously Hypertensive (SH) rats will cause differential effects on the lung and hea...

  15. Increased YKL-40 and Chitotriosidase in Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Anna J; Reinius, Lovisa E; Verhoek, Marri; Gomes, Anna; Kupczyk, Maciej; Hammar, Ulf; Ono, Junya; Ohta, Shoichiro; Izuhara, Kenji; Bel, Elisabeth; Kere, Juha; Söderhäll, Cilla; Dahlén, Barbro; Boot, Rolf G; Dahlén, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Serum chitinases may be novel biomarkers of airway inflammation and remodeling, but less is known about factors regulating their levels. OBJECTIVES: To examine serum chitotriosidase activity and YKL-40 levels in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and eva

  16. Plasma YKL-40 and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, Dennis Back; Mygind, Lone H; Titlestad, Ingrid L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is hallmarked by inflammatory processes and a progressive decline of lung function. YKL-40 is a potential biomarker of inflammation and mortality in patients suffering from inflammatory lung disease, but its prognostic value in patients with COPD remains...... unknown. We investigated whether high plasma YKL-40 was associated with increased mortality in patients with moderate to very severe COPD....

  17. Systemic inflammatory response to exhaustive exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Pol, M.H.J. van de; Heijdra, Y.F.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2005-01-01

    Systemic inflammation may be present in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exercise is known to elicit an inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the systemic inflammatory response to exercise might be exaggerated in COPD patients compared to healthy subjects. Sixteen CO

  18. First study of infliximab treatment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, H; Koeter, GH; Postma, DS; Kauffman, HF; ten Hacken, NHT

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is believed to be important in the induction and maintenance of airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the effect of the anti-tumor necrosis factor-a drug infliximab in patients with chronic obstructive pu

  19. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshtkar Jahromi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is the most common cause of infection-related death worldwide. Children represent 5 to 15% of all TB cases around the world and are more frequently infected and more easily affected by the most severe forms of the disease such as meningitis and disseminated form .Here, we reviewed TB in children with impact on the routes of transmission, clinical manifestations, treatment, control, and prophylaxis. Electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus were searched from June1995 to May 2014 by using key words (pulmonaryTB,epidemiology,transmission,clinical manifestations,treatment,control, and prophylaxis . Pulmonary tuberculosis may manifest in several forms, including endobronchial TB with focal lymphadenopathy, progressive pulmonary disease, pleural involvement, and reactivated pulmonary disease . Symptoms of primary pulmonary disease in the pediatric population are often insignificant. Gastric aspirates are used instead of sputum in children younger than 6 years. BCG vaccination is used in many parts of the world and the major role of vaccination is the prevention of life-threatening illness such as disseminated TB and meningitis in children.Treatment is the same as for adults. Most people infected with M .tuberculosis do not develop active disease. In healthy individuals, the lifetime risk of developing infection to disease is 5-10%. Reactivation of TB often occurs in older children and adolescent and is more common in patients who acquire TB at age 7 years and older.

  20. Pulmonary thromboembolism in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Pediatric Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Massicotte, Patricia [Stollery Children' s Hospital and University of Alberta, Departments of Pediatric Hematology and Cardiology, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-03-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is uncommonly diagnosed in the pediatric patient, and indeed often only discovered on autopsy. The incidence of pediatric PTE depends upon the associated underlying disease, diagnostic tests used, and index of suspicion. Multiple risk factors can be found including: peripartum asphyxia, dyspnea, haemoptysis, chest pain, dehydration, septicemia, central venous lines (CVLs), trauma, surgery, ongoing hemolysis, vascular lesions, malignancy, renal disease, foreign bodies or, uncommonly, intracranial venous sinus thrombosis, burns, or nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. Other types of embolism can occur uncommonly in childhood and need to be recognized, as the required treatment will vary. These include pulmonary cytolytic thrombi, foreign bodies, tumor and septic emboli, and post-traumatic fat emboli. No single noninvasive test for pulmonary embolism is both sensitive and specific. A combination of diagnostic procedures must be used to identify suspect or confirmed cases of PTE. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical presentation and treatment of pulmonary embolism in children. It also highlights the current diagnostic tools and protocols used to evaluate pulmonary embolism in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  1. Icodextrin and intraperitoneal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriishi, Misaki; Kawanishi, Hideki

    2008-06-01

    The peritoneum is impaired by exposure to biocompatible dialysis solutions. Because icodextrin peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) is made from cornstarch, a possibility that it induces intraperitoneal inflammation has been reported. In the present study, patients on glucose PDF were switched to icodextrin PDF and then switched back to glucose PDF. Icodextrin PDF-induced intraperitoneal inflammation was investigated based on changes in peritoneal permeability and inflammatory reactions. The subjects were 7 stable peritoneal dialysis patients (4 men, 3 women), with a mean age of 59.1 +/- 3.8 years (range: 55.2 - 64.6 years). The mean duration of peritoneal dialysis was 58.3 +/- 27.4 months (range: 34.3 - 97.7 months), and the cause of end-stage renal disease was chronic glomerulonephritis in all patients. For the overnight dwell, glucose PDF was changed to icodextrin PDF, and the patients returned to glucose PDF 30 months later. To evaluate peritoneal permeability, a peritoneal equilibrium test (PET) was performed, and dialysate-to-plasma (D/P) ratios of creatinine (Cr), beta(2)-microglobulin (beta2M), albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG), and alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha2M) were measured in the overnight dialysate and serum. As markers of inflammation and fibrinolysis or coagulation, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) were measured in overnight effluent. The evaluations were made every 6 months for 36 months. A significant elevation in FDP levels was detected in overnight effluent 6 months after the switch to icodextrin PDF, and IL-6 levels tended to increase. The D/P ratios of Cr, beta2M, and albumin were also significantly increased, and the D/P ratios of IgG and alpha2M tended to increase. The D/P ratio of Cr as measured by PET was slightly increased, but the elevation was not significant. In 5 patients, after icodextrin PDF was switched back to glucose PDF at 30 months, the D/P ratios of Cr, beta2M, albumin, IgG, and alpha2M in overnight

  2. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghobadi, G.; Bartelds, B.; van der Veen, S. J.; Dickinson, M. G.; Brandenburg, S.; Berger, R. M. F.; Langendijk, J. A.; Coppes, R. P.; van Luijk, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a commonly fatal pulmonary vascular disease that is often diagnosed late and is characterised by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from typical vascular remodelling. Recent data suggest that vascular damage plays an impo

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension: Diagnosis and Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunlap, Beth; Weyer, George

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common, complex group of disorders that result from different pathophysiologic mechanisms but are all defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 mm Hg or greater...

  4. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  5. Lung Transplantation for Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the page. Answers about Lung Transplantation for PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Part One: Overview From the development of epoprostenol ... decades, expansion of medical treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has improved survival and quality of life ...

  6. Pulmonary embolism; Lungenarterienembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarski, Sonja; Henzler, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ., Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2016-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) requires a quick diagnostic algorithm, as the untreated disease has a high mortality and morbidity. Crucial for the diagnostic assessment chosen is the initial clinical likelihood of PE and the individual risk profile of the patient. The overall goal is to diagnose or rule out PE as quickly and safely as possible or to initiate timely treatment if necessary. CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries (CTPA) with multi-slice CT scanner systems presents the actual diagnostic reference standard. With CTPA further important diagnoses can be made, like presence of right ventricular dysfunction. There are different scan and contrast application protocols that can be applied in order to gain diagnostic examinations with sufficient contrast material enhancement in the pulmonary arteries while avoiding all kinds of artifacts. This review article is meant to be a practical guide to examine patients with suspected PE according to the actual guidelines.

  7. Pulmonary manifestations of heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, C A; Rawlings, C A

    1985-09-01

    The clinical signs associated with heartworm disease are the result of changes in the pulmonary arterial system. These clinical signs are the result of either pulmonary hypertension or lung parenchymal disease associated with vascular changes. An increase in pulmonary arterial pressure produces an increase in right ventricular afterload, which may lead to exercise intolerance, syncope, and right-sided congestive heart failure. Coughing, dyspnea, and hemoptysis are the results of pulmonary parenchymal disease.

  8. Pulmonary artery sling: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Gil Hyun; Lee, Sun Wha; Cha, Sung Ho [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    Aberrant left-sided pulmonary artery(pulmonary artery sling) is an uncommon anomaly,which may cause significant respiratory abnormality. We report a case of pulmonary artery sling which is combined with persistent left superior vena cava and dextrocardia. This case were identified by esophagogram and CT and confirmed by MRI and angiography. We consider that MRI is a valuable new method for the diagnosis of aberrant left-sided pulmonary artery.

  9. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  10. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush A Kawali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620 was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis. Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated "ocular thermographic" camera is today′s need of the hour.

  11. Perinatal programming by inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sarah J; Meyer, Urs

    2017-07-01

    Since Levine and then Barker's seminal work mid to late last century demonstrating the importance of early life environment, intensive research has revealed the plasticity, vulnerability and resilience of the developing brain to environmental challenges. In particular, early exposure to infectious pathogens and inflammatory stimuli has a lasting impact on brain and behavior. These data establish clear effects on vulnerability to later disease and neuroinflammatory injury, cognitive function and emotionality, and even responses to pain and susceptibility to metabolic disorders. They also highlight the issues with defining rodent models of complex diseases like autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, as well as the complexity of experimental design, for instance when deciding the appropriate allocation of subjects to experimental groups when dealing with whole-litter manipulations in rodents. The studies presented in this special issue of Brain Behavior and Immunity are a collection of the very latest advances in the science of perinatal inflammation and its implications for perinatal programming of brain and behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Leptospira and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an important zoonosis and has a worldwide impact on public health. This paper will discuss both the role of immunogenic and pathogenic molecules during leptospirosis infection and possible new targets for immunotherapy against leptospira components. Leptospira, possess a wide variety of mechanisms that allow them to evade the host immune system and cause infection. Many molecules contribute to the ability of Leptospira to adhere, invade, and colonize. The recent sequencing of the Leptospira genome has increased our knowledge about this pathogen. Although the virulence factors, molecular targets, mechanisms of inflammation, and signaling pathways triggered by leptospiral antigens have been studied, some questions are still unanswered. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are the primary sensors of invading pathogens. TLRs recognize conserved microbial pattern molecules and activate signaling pathways that are pivotal to innate and adaptive immune responses. Recently, a new molecular target has emerged—the Na/K-ATPase—which may contribute to inflammatory and metabolic alteration in this syndrome. Na/K-ATPase is a target for specific fatty acids of host origin and for bacterial components such as the glycolipoprotein fraction (GLP that may lead to inflammasome activation. We propose that in addition to TLRs, Na/K-ATPase may play a role in the innate response to leptospirosis infection.

  13. Lung inflammation caused by inhaled toxicants: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available John Wong, Bruce E Magun, Lisa J Wood School of Nursing, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Exposure of the lungs to airborne toxicants from different sources in the environment may lead to acute and chronic pulmonary or even systemic inflammation. Cigarette smoke is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although wood smoke in urban areas of underdeveloped countries is now recognized as a leading cause of respiratory disease. Mycotoxins from fungal spores pose an occupational risk for respiratory illness and also present a health hazard to those living in damp buildings. Microscopic airborne particulates of asbestos and silica (from building materials and those of heavy metals (from paint are additional sources of indoor air pollution that contributes to respiratory illness and is known to cause respiratory illness in experimental animals. Ricin in aerosolized form is a potential bioweapon that is extremely toxic yet relatively easy to produce. Although the aforementioned agents belong to different classes of toxic chemicals, their pathogenicity is similar. They induce the recruitment and activation of macrophages, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, inhibition of protein synthesis, and production of interleukin-1 beta. Targeting either macrophages (using nanoparticles or the production of interleukin-1 beta (using inhibitors against protein kinases, NOD-like receptor protein-3, or P2X7 may potentially be employed to treat these types of lung inflammation without affecting the natural immune response to bacterial infections. Keywords: cigarette, mycotoxin, trichothecene, ricin, inflammasome, macrophage, inhibitors

  14. Caffeine Mitigates Lung Inflammation Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion of Lower Limbs in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chi Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reperfusion of ischemic limbs can induce inflammation and subsequently cause acute lung injury. Caffeine, a widely used psychostimulant, possesses potent anti-inflammatory capacity. We elucidated whether caffeine can mitigate lung inflammation caused by ischemia-reperfusion (IR of the lower limbs. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to receive IR, IR plus caffeine (IR + Caf group, sham-operation (Sham, or sham plus caffeine (n=12 in each group. To induce IR, lower limbs were bilaterally tied by rubber bands high around each thigh for 3 hours followed by reperfusion for 3 hours. Caffeine (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection was administered immediately after reperfusion. Our histological assay data revealed characteristics of severe lung inflammation in the IR group and mild to moderate characteristic of lung inflammation in the IR + Caf group. Total cells number and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the IR group were significantly higher than those of the IR + Caf group (P<0.001 and P=0.008, resp.. Similarly, pulmonary concentrations of inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity of the IR group were significantly higher than those of the IR + Caf group (all P<0.05. These data clearly demonstrate that caffeine could mitigate lung inflammation induced by ischemia-reperfusion of the lower limbs.

  15. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  16. Muscarinic M3 receptors on structural cells regulate cigarette smoke-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E.M.; van Os, Ronald P.; Dethmers-Ausema, Albertina; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Hylkema, Machteld N.; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Wess, Jürgen; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A.M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Anticholinergics, blocking the muscarinic M-3 receptor, are effective bronchodilators for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Recent evidence from M-3 receptor-deficient mice (M3R-/-) indicates that M-3 receptors also regulate neutrophilic inflammation in response to cigarette smoke

  17. Methamphetamine Use and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other problems, diagnosing a case of pulmonary hyper- tension can be difficult and may require a specialist. Once pulmonary hyperten- sion is diagnosed, however, treatment can begin immediately. One form of PH is called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In PAH, the blood vessels that ...

  18. Ultrastructural observation on pulmonary fibrosis in E9 rats treated with compoundCarapax trionycis formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Ren; Li-Xuan Wang; Xue-Cheng Ji; Jia-Ying Zhou; Man-Ying Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate ultrastructural changes in pulmonary tissue of a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis following treatment with compoundCarapax trionycis(C. trionycis;Biejia inChinese) formula.Methods:Sixty maleSprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups(n=15): compoundC. trionycis formula high-, middle-, and low-dose groups as well as model group. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by bleomycin.Five rats from each group weresacrificed on day 7,14 and28 of the drug treatment, respectively.The pulmonary tissue was harvested followed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and subsequent transmission electron microscopy.TheSzapiel’s method was used to assess the degree of alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis.Results:Compared with the model group, the compoundC. trionycis formula groups had slighter pulmonary alveolitis after the7-day treatment and also had alleviated alveolar inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis after the14-day treatment.After the28-day treatment, the compoundC. trionycis formula groups showed deposition of a small amount of fibrous tissue and lesions occupying less than21% of the whole lung area, while the model group showed focal or diffuse fibrous deposition, narrow alveolar cavity, disordered lung structure, and lesions in larger than51% of the whole lung area. Conclusions:The compoundC. trionycis formula can inhibit the proliferation of collagen fibers and resist pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Pulmonary Artery Dissection: A Fatal Complication of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare but it is a really life-threatening condition when it happens. Most patients die suddenly from major bleeding or tamponade caused by direct rupture into mediastinum or retrograde into the pericardial sac. What we are reporting is a rare case of a 46-year-old female patient whose pulmonary artery dissection involves both the pulmonary valve and right pulmonary artery. The patient had acute chest pain and severe dyspnea, and the diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection was confirmed by ultrasonography and CT angiography. Moreover, its etiology, clinical manifestations, and management are also discussed in this article.

  20. Leukotriene C4 synthase and ischemic cardiovascular disease and obstructive pulmonary disease in 13,000 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, Jacob J; Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Ischemic cardiovascular disease and obstructive pulmonary disease involve inflammation. Leukotrienes may be important pro-inflammatory mediators. We tested the hypothesis that the (-1072)G > A and (-444)A > C promoter polymorphisms of leukotriene C4 synthase confer risk of transient ischemic attack...... (TIA), ischemic stroke, ischemic heart disease (IHD), asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We genotyped individuals from the Danish general population, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, and Danish patients with IHD/coronary atherosclerosis, the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease...

  1. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Jackson, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction...... epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk...

  2. [Triple therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloira, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important respiratory diseases, characterized by its multicomponent complexity, with chronic inflammation, increased airway resistance and exacerbations. Several drugs are currently available for its treatment, which act on distinct targets. Bronchodilators, especially prolonged-action bronchodilators, are the most potent and there are two groups: beta-2 mimetics and anticholinergics. Inhaled corticosteroids are the main anti-inflammatory drugs but have modest efficacy and their use is reserved for patients with severe disease and frequent exacerbations and/or asthma traits. Associating these three drugs can improve symptom control, improve quality of life and reduce the number of exacerbations. The present article reviews the evidence supporting this triple combination, as well as published studies.

  3. Differential pulmonary and cardiac effects of pulmonary exposure to a panel of particulate matter-associated metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenborn, J Grace; Schladweiler, Mette J; Richards, Judy H; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2009-11-15

    Biological mechanisms underlying the association between particulate matter (PM) exposure and increased cardiovascular health effects are under investigation. Water-soluble metals reaching systemic circulation following pulmonary exposure are likely exerting a direct effect. However, it is unclear whether specific PM-associated metals may be driving this. We hypothesized that exposure to equimolar amounts of five individual PM-associated metals would cause differential pulmonary and cardiac effects. We exposed male WKY rats (14 weeks old) via a single intratracheal instillation (IT) to saline or 1 micromol/kg body weight of zinc, nickel, vanadium, copper, or iron in sulfate form. Responses were analyzed 4, 24, 48, or 96 h after exposure. Pulmonary effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of total cells, macrophages, neutrophils, protein, albumin, and activities of lactate dehydrogenase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and n-acetyl glucosaminidase. Copper induced earlier pulmonary injury/inflammation, while zinc and nickel produced later effects. Vanadium or iron exposure induced minimal pulmonary injury/inflammation. Zinc, nickel, or copper increased serum cholesterol, red blood cells, and white blood cells at different time points. IT of nickel and copper increased expression of metallothionein-1 (MT-1) in the lung. Zinc, nickel, vanadium, and iron increased hepatic MT-1 expression. No significant changes in zinc transporter-1 (ZnT-1) expression were noted in the lung or liver; however, zinc increased cardiac ZnT-1 at 24 h, indicating a possible zinc-specific cardiac effect. Nickel exposure induced an increase in cardiac ferritin 96 h after IT. This data set demonstrating metal-specific cardiotoxicity is important in linking metal-enriched anthropogenic PM sources with adverse health effects.

  4. Apoptosis and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haanen

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades it has been recognized that cell death is not the consequence of accidental injury, but is the expression of a cell suicide programme. Kerr et al. (1972 introduced the term apoptosis. This form of cell death is under the influence of hormones, growth factors and cytokines, which depending upon the receptors present on the target cells, may activate a genetically controlled cell elimination process. During apoptosis the cell membrane remains intact and the cell breaks into apoptotic bodies, which are phagocytosed. Apoptosis, in contrast to necrosis, is not harmful to the host and does not induce any inflammatory reaction. The principal event that leads to inflammatory disease is cell damage, induced by chemical/physical injury, anoxia or starvation. Cell damage means leakage of cell contents into the adjacent tissues, resulting in the capillary transmigration of granulocytes to the injured tissue. The accumulation of neutrophils and release of enzymes and oxygen radicals enhances the inflammatory reaction. Until now there has been little research into the factors controlling the accumulation and the tissue load of granulocytes and their histotoxic products in inflammatory processes. Neutrophil apoptosis may represent an important event in the control of intlamtnation. It has been assumed that granulocytes disintegrate to apoptotic bodies before their fragments are removed by local macrophages. Removal of neutrophils from the inflammatory site without release of granule contents is of paramount importance for cessation of inflammation. In conclusion, apoptotic cell death plays an important role in inflammatory processes and in the resolution of inflammatory reactions. The facts known at present should stimulate further research into the role of neutrophil, eosinophil and macrophage apoptosis in inflammatory diseases.

  5. [Inflammation of the parathyroid glands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S; Synoracki, S; Sheu, S-Y; Schmid, K W

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation of the parathyroid glands is rare when compared to other endocrine organs. This leads to the use of descriptive terms as well as the lack of a generally accepted classification for inflammatory disorders of the parathyroid glands. This review article proposes that parathyroid inflammation be subdivided morphologically into (a) non-specific lymphocytic infiltration, which is more an expression of damage to small vessels, due to e. g. severe systemic inflammation or myocardial infarction, (b) autoimmunogenic lymphocytic parathyroiditis, (c) nonimmunogenic inflammation caused by granulomatous diseases or infections and (d) invasive sclerosing (peri) parathyroiditis. As only parathyroid glands removed due to hyperparathyroidism and normal parathyroid glands incidentally removed during thyroid surgery are seen almost exclusively in routine histopathology, virtually no information about the morphological correlate of hypoparathyroidism is available.

  6. Pulmonary vaccination as a novel treatment for lung fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L Collins

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis is an untreatable, uniformly fatal disease of unclear etiology that is the result of unremitting chronic inflammation. Recent studies have implicated bone marrow derived fibrocytes and M2 macrophages as playing key roles in propagating fibrosis. While the disease process is characterized by the accumulation of lymphocytes in the lung parenchyma and alveolar space, their role remains unclear. In this report we definitively demonstrate the ability of T cells to regulate lung inflammation leading to fibrosis. Specifically we demonstrate the ability of intranasal vaccinia vaccination to inhibit M2 macrophage generation and fibrocyte recruitment and hence the accumulation of collagen and death due to pulmonary failure. Mechanistically, we demonstrate the ability of lung Th1 cells to prevent fibrosis as vaccinia failed to prevent disease in Rag-/- mice or in mice in which the T cells lacked IFN-γ. Furthermore, vaccination 3 months prior to the initiation of fibrosis was able to mitigate the disease. Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of T cells in regulating pulmonary fibrosis as well as suggest that vaccinia-induced immunotherapy in the lung may prove to be a novel treatment approach to this otherwise fatal disease.

  7. Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Jørgen; Willesen, Jakob Lundgren

    2009-01-01

    Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis is an emerging snail-borne disease causing verminous pnemonia and coagulopathy in dogs. The parasite is fund in Europe, North and South America and Africa, covering tropical, subtropical and temperate regions. Its distribution has been characterised by isolated ...

  8. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Shumaila Tanveer; Ahmed El Damati; Ayman El Baz; Ahmed Alsayyah; Tarek ElSharkawy; Mohamed Regal

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of sus- picion for this rare entity.

  9. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest x-ray Granulomatosis with polyangiitis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Skin nodules Valley fever Review Date 8/1/2015 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, ... Cancer Lung Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  10. An unexpected pulmonary bystander

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Vorm, van der P. A.; Koning, K. J.; van der Werf, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old man from Eritrea was admitted with a pulmonary bacterial abscess. Unexpectedly, histopathology of the resected lobe also revealed an infection with Schistosoma mansoni with surrounding granulomatous tissue and fibrosis. Patients from endemic areas are often asymptomatic with blood eosi

  11. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pulmonary Hypertension - High Blood Pressure in the Heart-to-Lung System Updated:Sep ... Pressure" This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  12. Pulmonary function tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or lung disease. Some lung diseases (such as emphysema, asthma, chronic bronchitis, and infections) can make the lungs ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Asthma Breathing Problems COPD Emphysema Interstitial Lung Diseases Lung Diseases Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis ...

  13. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Adam MacNeil, epidemiologist with Viral Special Pathogens Branch at CDC, discusses hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  14. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulmonary lobectomy - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/presentations/100094.htm Pulmonary lobectomy - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 3 Go to slide 2 out of 3 Go to slide 3 out of 3 Overview The lungs are comprised of lobes. The right lung has ...

  16. [Pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmichi, M; Hiraga, Y; Hirasawa, M

    1990-01-01

    We reported about intrathoracic changes and prognosis of 686 patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed in our hospital between 1963 and 1988. We evaluated CT findings in 135 patients with sarcoidosis and found pulmonary involvements in 81. We analyzed CT findings according to the classification by Tuengerthal which classified radiographic findings combining ILO classification of pneumoconiosis and characteristic findings of bronchovascular sheath with sarcoidosis. The CT findings were as follows: small opacities (44 out of 81 cases, 54.3%), large opacities (37 cases, 46.7%). Additional findings were as follows: peribronchial marking (42 cases, 51.9%), contraction (17 cases, 21.0%), pleural involvement (9 cases, 11.1%), bulla (5 cases, 6.2%). The characteristic CT findings of serious sarcoidosis were extasis of bronchus, thickening of the bronchial wall, unclearness of vascular shadow, atelectasis and thickening of pleura. Concerning the prognosis of pulmonary involvement, according to age, patients younger than 30 years old at initial diagnosis were better than those of 30 years and over in terms of disappearance of pulmonary involvements. According to stage, patients of stage I and stage II were better than those of stage III. Among the patients we were able to observe chest X-ray findings during five years according to the character of shadow, ill-defined shadow of small opacities and rounded shadows of large opacities had a higher disappearance rate of pulmonary involvements than irregular shadows of large opacities, atelectasis and contraction.

  17. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ray High-resolution CT scan of the chest Pulmonary function tests Open lung biopsy (surgical biopsy) Treatment Treatment involves washing out the protein substance from the lung (whole-lung lavage) from time to time. Some persons may need a lung ... References Levine SM. ...

  18. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcon, Maura Cavada; Malcon, Claudio Mattar; Cavada, Marina Neves; Caruso, Paulo Eduardo Macedo; Real, Lara Flório

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly. We report the case of an 8-year-old boy with left lung agenesis, without any other congenital malformations. When the patient presented symptoms, including cough, wheezing, and dyspnea, with no clinical improvement after a period of 30 days, imaging studies were conducted and the diagnosis was made.

  19. Primary pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, A; Lehrman, S; Romano, P; Frishman, W; Dobkin, J; Reichel, J

    2000-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a condition characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) without demonstrable cause. The most common symptom at presentation is dyspnea. Other complaints include fatigue, chest pain, syncope, leg edema, and palpitations. Right heart catheterization is diagnostic, showing a mean PAP >25 mmHg at rest and >30 mmHg during exercise, with a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In the National Institutes of Health-PPH registry, the median survival period was 2.8 years. Treatment is aimed at lowering PAP, increasing cardiac output, and decreasing in situ thrombosis. Vasodilators have been used with some success in the treatment of PPH. They include prostacyclin, calcium-channel blockers, nitric oxide and adenosine. Anticoagulation has also been advised for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and in situ thromboses of the lungs. New drug treatments under investigation include L-arginine, plasma endothelin-I, and bosentan. Use of oxygen, digoxin, and diuretics for symptomatic relief have also been recommended. Patients with severe PPH refractory to medical management should be considered for surgery.

  20. Alveolar inflammation in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Martina; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Viglio, Simona

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In infected lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, opportunistic pathogens and mutated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) contribute to chronic airway inflammation that is characterized by neutrophil/macrophage infiltration, cytokine release...... accumulated in type II alveolar epithelial cells, lacking CFTR. P. aeruginosa organisms were rarely present in inflamed alveoli. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic inflammation and remodeling is present in alveolar tissues of the CF lung and needs to be addressed by anti-inflammatory therapies....

  1. Three cases of pulmonary varix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takishima, Teruo; Sakuma, Hajime; Tajima, Tsunemi; Okimoto, Takao; Yamamoto, Keiichiro; Dohi, Yutaka (Saitama Medical School (Japan))

    1982-06-01

    Three cases of pulmonary varix associated with valvular heart disease were reported. Round shadows were clearer on first oblique or lateral films of chest x-ray in all 3 cases. On chest tomograms, the shadows were substantial and round-elliptical. RI angiography with sup(99m)Tc-RBC demonstrated these shadows in agreement with the site of influx of the pulmonary vein into the left atrium in Cases 1 and 3 and with the pulmonary vein slightly apart from the left atrium in Case 2. On CT scans in Cases 1 and 3, enhancement with a contrast medium visualized dilatation of the pulmonary vein close to, and in continuation with, the shadow of the left atrium. The diagnosis of pulmonary varix in agreement with the venous phase of pulmonary angiography was made for all 3 cases. Non-surgical examinations (especially CT scan) proved highly useful for the diagnosis of pulmonary varix.

  2. [Management of patients with pulmonary fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestaev, D V; Karateev, D E; Nasonov, E L

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune systemic disease. Its systemic manifestations include interstitial lung lesions (ILL). According to morphological studies and X-ray computed tomography, the incidence of RA-associated ILL is 60-70% which gives reason to consider pulmonary fibrosis (PF) to be the main form of lung pathology in this disease. PF is a pathological process in the lungs characterized by high mortality rate and refractoriness to therapy. It is a heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive and irreversible destruction of lung architectonics due to scarification that in the end results in organ dysfunction, disturbed gaseous exchange and respiratory distress. Changes in the interstitial lung tissue resulting from local autoimmune rheumatoid inflammation develop by the same mechanisms that underlie idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis used as a model for classification, pathogenesis and treatment of RA-associated ILL. This review is focused on the therapeutic strategy for the management of PF in the context of consensus of the American Thoracic Society (ATS), European Respiratory Society (ERS), Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) and Latin American Thoracic Association (ALAT, 2010/2011).

  3. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions.

  5. Lymphatics in lymphangioleiomyomatosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souheil El-Chemaly

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary function of the lymphatic system is absorbing and transporting macromolecules and immune cells to the general circulation, thereby regulating fluid, nutrient absorption and immune cell trafficking. Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in tissue inflammation and tumour cell dissemination. Lymphatic involvement is seen in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. LAM, a disease primarily affecting females, involves the lung (cystic destruction, kidney (angiomyolipoma and axial lymphatics (adenopathy and lymphangioleiomyoma. LAM occurs sporadically or in association with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC. Cystic lung destruction results from proliferation of LAM cells, which are abnormal smooth muscle-like cells with mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene. Lymphatic abnormalities arise from infiltration of LAM cells into the lymphatic wall, leading to damage or obstruction of lymphatic vessels. Benign appearing LAM cells possess metastatic properties and are found in the blood and other body fluids. IPF is a progressive lung disease resulting from fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition. Lymphangiogenesis is associated with pulmonary destruction and disease severity. A macrophage subset isolated from IPF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF express lymphatic endothelial cell markers in vitro, in contrast to the same macrophage subset from normal BALF. Herein, we review lymphatic involvement in LAM and IPF.

  6. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)1 is a complex disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality and is clinically characterized by an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. The histopathology is marked by vascular proliferation/fibrosis, remodeling, and vessel obstruction. Development of PAH involves the complex interaction of multiple vascular effectors at all anatomic levels of the arterial wall. Subsequent vasoconstriction, thrombosis, and inflammation ensue, leading to vessel wall remodeling and cellular hyperproliferation as the hallmarks of severe disease. These processes are influenced by genetic predisposition as well as diverse endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Recent studies have provided a glimpse at certain molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis; these have led to the identification of attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. We will review our current understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of the genetic and exogenous/acquired triggers of PAH. The resulting imbalance of vascular effectors provoking pathogenic vascular changes will also be discussed, with an emphasis on common and overarching regulatory pathways that may relate to the primary triggers of disease. The current conceptual framework should allow for future studies to refine our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of PAH and improve the therapeutic regimen for this disease. PMID:17950310

  7. Pulmonary Thromboendarterectomy for Pulmonary Hypertension Before Considering Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooperkamp, Hannah; Mehta, Inder; Fary, David; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: In cases of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), referral for possible surgical intervention is important because surgery can be curative. Surgery necessitates cardiopulmonary bypass and deep circulatory arrest with pulmonary thrombectomy and bilateral endarterectomy (PTE). If surgery fails, lung transplant is the next best surgical option. Medical treatment is also an important adjunct. Case Report: A 35-year-old female presented 3 months after a pulmonary embolus was found to be completely occluding her left pulmonary artery. She was found to have pulmonary hypertension with a pulmonary artery pressure of 81/33 mmHg, with a mean pressure of 52 mmHg. The right atrial pressure was also severely elevated at 29 mmHg, and her echocardiogram revealed severe tricuspid regurgitation and severe right ventricular dysfunction. She underwent PTE and postoperatively was followed by the heart failure team. Her 6-minute walk distance improved from 396 meters at 1 month to 670 meters at 7 months, and her pulmonary artery pressure improved significantly to 55/17 mmHg with a mean pressure of 31 mmHg. The patient's right atrial pressure also improved significantly from 29 mmHg to 13 mmHg. Conclusion: CTEPH is likely underrecognized, and patients with pulmonary hypertension or a history of pulmonary embolism should be screened for CTEPH. This case illustrates the surgical treatment for CTEPH and discusses alternative and adjunctive treatments. Residual pulmonary hypertension after PTE occurs in approximately 35% of patients. Overall, 4-year mortality rates after surgery appear to be approximately 15%, and mortality rates correlate with the postoperative pulmonary vascular resistance. Recognition of chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease as the etiology of pulmonary hypertension warrants evaluation for surgery.

  8. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2016-10-20

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS.

  9. 不同剂量沙美特罗/氟替卡松治疗对稳定期慢性阻塞性肺疾病患者气道炎症和生理学功能的影响%Effect and its side effects of long-term inhalation of different doses of salmeterol/fluticasone on moderate to severe stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients' airway inflammation and physiological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍晓颖; 崔萌; 石志红

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨长期吸入不同剂量沙美特罗/氟替卡松对中重度稳定期慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)患者的气道炎症及生理学功能的影响以及药物的不良反应,通过不同剂量沙美特罗/氟替卡松治疗的对比,从而探索中重度稳定期COPD患者更为合理的安全有效经济的长期治疗方案.方法 对89例确诊为稳定期中重度COPD的患者分两组分别给予吸入沙美特罗/氟替卡松50/250μg,每日两吸及沙美特罗/氟替卡松50/500 μg,每日两吸.治疗6个月,分别比较治疗前后炎症指标及肺功能指标等的变化以及组间上述指标变化的差异.结果 ①肺功能指标比较:A组B组在治疗后6个月时FEV1%pred、FEV1/FVC指标的平均值均有升高,且与治疗前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),组间比较表明,两组FEV1%pred,FEV1/FVC的改善程度相比差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).②生活质量评分比较:两组QOL评分治疗后有改善,较治疗前相比差异有统计学意义,组间比较差异无统计学意义.③炎症指标比较:6个月时两组血清CRP值及诱导痰中性粒细胞计数较治疗前相比差异有统计学意义,B组改善优于A组,差异有统计学意义.④不良反应发生率比较,两组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 长期吸入不同剂量的沙美特罗/氟替卡松均能够延缓稳定期中重度COPD患者肺功能的恶化,减轻炎症反应,改善生活质量,减少急性发作,吸入高剂量沙美特罗/氟替卡松在减轻炎症反应方面有优势.%Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the effect and its side effects of longterm inhalation of different doses of salmeterol/fluticasone on moderate to severe stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients' airway inflammation and physiological function.By comprising the effect of different dose of salmeterol/fluticasone treatment to explore a more reasonable long term

  10. Genetic ablation of CXCR2 protects against cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation and injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Lerner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antagonism of CXCR2 receptors, predominately located on neutrophils and critical for their immunomodulatory activity, is an attractive pharmacological therapeutic approach aimed at reducing the potentially damaging effects of heightened neutrophil influx into the lung caused by environmental agents including tobacco smoke. The role CXCR2 in lung inflammation in response to cigarette smoke (CS inhalation using the mutant mouse approach is not known. We hypothesized that genetic ablation of CXCR2 would protect mice against CS-induced inflammation and DNA damaging response. We used CXCR2 -/- deficient/mutant (knock-out, KO mice, and assessed the changes in critical lung inflammatory NF-B-driven chemokines released from the parenchyma of CS-exposed mice, and indications of the extent of tissue damage assessed by the number of DNA damaging γH2AX positive cells. CXCR2 KO mice exhibited protection from heightened levels of neutrophils measured in BALF taken from mice exposed to CS. IL-8 (KC mouse levels in the BALF from CS-exposed CXCR2 KO were elevated compared to WT. IL-6 levels in BALF were refractory to increase by CS in CXCR2 KO mice. There were no significant changes to MIP-2, MCP-1, or IL-1β. Total levels of NF-κB were maintained at lower levels in CS-exposed CXCR2 KO mice compared to WT mice exposed to CS. Finally CXCR2 KO mice were protected from increased number of lung cells positive for DNA damage response and senescence marker γH2AX, CXCR2 KO mice are protected from heightened inflammatory response mediated by increased neutrophil response as a result of acute 3 day CS exposure. This is also associated with changes in pro-inflammatory chemokines and reduced incursion of γH2AX indicating CXCR2 deficient mice are protected from lung injury. Thus CXCR2 may be a pharmacological target in setting of inflammation and DNA damage in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  11. [Use of essential oil of peppermint (Mentha piperita) in the complex treatment of patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurupiĭ, V A; Odintsova, O A; Kazarinova, N V; Tkrachenko, K G

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the effects of peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil inhaled by patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the penitentiary system. This procedure is shown to be most effective in infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the phase of resorption of infiltrates and/or closure of decay cavities. The efficiency is determined by the rapid positive changes in a tuberculous process, which appear as a rapider regression of tuberculous inflammation, causing small residual changes. This procedure may be used to prevent recurrences and exacerbations of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  12. Models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung K Fan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major global health problem and is predicted to become the third most common cause of death by 2020. Apart from the important preventive steps of smoking cessation, there are no other specific treatments for COPD that are as effective in reversing the condition, and therefore there is a need to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to new therapeutic strategies. The development of experimental models will help to dissect these mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level. COPD is a disease characterized by progressive airflow obstruction of the peripheral airways, associated with lung inflammation, emphysema and mucus hypersecretion. Different approaches to mimic COPD have been developed but are limited in comparison to models of allergic asthma. COPD models usually do not mimic the major features of human COPD and are commonly based on the induction of COPD-like lesions in the lungs and airways using noxious inhalants such as tobacco smoke, nitrogen dioxide, or sulfur dioxide. Depending on the duration and intensity of exposure, these noxious stimuli induce signs of chronic inflammation and airway remodelling. Emphysema can be achieved by combining such exposure with instillation of tissue-degrading enzymes. Other approaches are based on genetically-targeted mice which develop COPD-like lesions with emphysema, and such mice provide deep insights into pathophysiological mechanisms. Future approaches should aim to mimic irreversible airflow obstruction, associated with cough and sputum production, with the possibility of inducing exacerbations.

  13. Relation between physical capacity, nutritional status and systemic inflammation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Runa; Janson, Christer; Arnardottir, Ragnheiður Harpa; Olsson, Roger; Emtner, Margareta; Branth, Stefan; Boman, Gunnar; Slinde, Frode

    2011-07-01

    Decreased physical capacity, weight loss, fat-free mass depletion and systemic inflammation are frequently observed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our aim was to examine relations between physical capacity, nutritional status, systemic inflammation and disease severity in COPD. Forty nine patients with moderate to severe COPD were included in the study. Spirometry was preformed. Physical capacity was determined by a progressive symptom limited cycle ergo meter test, incremental shuttle walking test, 12-minute walk distance and hand grip strength test. Nutritional status was investigated by anthropometric measurements, (weight, height, arm and leg circumferences and skinfold thickness) and bioelectrical impedance assessment was performed. Blood samples were analyzed for C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen. Working capacity was positively related to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1) ) (p chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is related to lung function, body composition and systemic inflammation. A depiction of all three aspects of the disease might be important when targeting interventions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, E S; Lee, H; Suh, Y K; Tang, W; Qi, M; Yin, S; Remick, D G; Ulich, T R

    1996-10-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations.

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  16. BIIL 284 reduces neutrophils numbers but increases P. aeruginosa bacteraemia and inflammation in mouse lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Gerd; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Paroni, Moira; Aktürk, Firdevs-Fatma; Cigana, Cristina; Schmidt, Annika; Gilpin, Deirdre; Heyder, Susanne; Born, Torsten; Smaczny, Christina; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Wagner, Thomas O. F.; Loebinger, Michael R.; Bilton, Diana; Tunney, Michael M.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Pier, Gerald B.; Konstan, Michael W.; Ulrich, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Background A clinical study to investigate the leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-receptor antagonist BIIL 284 in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was prematurely terminated due to a significantly increased risk of adverse pulmonary events. We aimed to establish the effect of BIIL284 in models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, thereby contributing to a better understanding of what could have led to adverse pulmonary events in CF patients. Methods P. aeruginosa DNA in the blood of CF patients during and after acute pulmonary exacerbations and in stable patients with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB) and healthy individuals was assessed by PCR. The effect of BIIL 284 treatment was tested in an agar beads murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. Bacterial count and inflammation were evaluated in lung and other organs. Result Most CF patients (98%) and all patients with NCFB and healthy individuals had negative P. aeruginosa DNA in their blood. Similarly, the P. aeruginosa-infected mice showed bacterial counts in the lung but not blood or spleen. BIIL 284 treatment decreased pulmonary neutrophils and increased P. aeruginosa numbers in mouse lungs leading to significantly higher bacteremia rates and lung inflammation compared to placebo treated animals. Conclusions Decreased airway neutrophils induced lung proliferation and severe bacteraemia in a murine model of P. aeruginosa lung infection. These data suggest that caution should be taken when administering anti-inflammatory compounds to patients with bacterial infections. PMID:24183915

  17. Current practice for pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toru Satoh

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current practice of pulmonary hypertension including current epidemiology,diagnosis and treatment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection Articles with high level of evidence or current best evidence in each issue were selected to be reviewed.Results Overall prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 0.3% to 6% with left heart disease occupying the most proportion,followed by pulmonary disease,pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.In diagnosis,a flow diagram of diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension,differential diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and how to determine the severity of pulmonary hypertension are explained including recent development of magnetic resonance imaging and gene abnormality study on bone morphogenetic protein receptor Ⅱ.In treatment,newlydeveloped pulmonary vasodilators and the way to use them are shown to treat pulmonary hypertension.Conclusion Safer and more effective treatment algorithm and basic researches and clinical trials are warranted to be explored.

  18. Pulmonary manifestations of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H James; Roubey, Robert A S

    2010-09-01

    A broad spectrum of pulmonary disease may occur in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. The most common pulmonary manifestations are pulmonary thromboembolism and pulmonary hypertension. In this article the authors review these manifestations, as well as less common findings including acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar hemorrhage, and pulmonary capillaritis.

  19. Postoperative Pulmonary Dysfunction and Mechanical Ventilation in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Badenes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction (PPD is a frequent and significant complication after cardiac surgery. It contributes to morbidity and mortality and increases hospitalization stay and its associated costs. Its pathogenesis is not clear but it seems to be related to the development of a systemic inflammatory response with a subsequent pulmonary inflammation. Many factors have been described to contribute to this inflammatory response, including surgical procedure with sternotomy incision, effects of general anesthesia, topical cooling, and extracorporeal circulation (ECC and mechanical ventilation (VM. Protective ventilation strategies can reduce the incidence of atelectasis (which still remains one of the principal causes of PDD and pulmonary infections in surgical patients. In this way, the open lung approach (OLA, a protective ventilation strategy, has demonstrated attenuating the inflammatory response and improving gas exchange parameters and postoperative pulmonary functions with a better residual functional capacity (FRC when compared with a conventional ventilatory strategy. Additionally, maintaining low frequency ventilation during ECC was shown to decrease the incidence of PDD after cardiac surgery, preserving lung function.

  20. Pulmonary endarterectomy outputs in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Gude, María Jesús; Pérez de la Sota, Enrique; Pérez Vela, Jose Luís; Centeno Rodríguez, Jorge; Muñoz Guijosa, Christian; Velázquez, María Teresa; Alonso Chaterina, Sergio; Hernández González, Ignacio; Escribano Subías, Pilar; Cortina Romero, José María

    2017-07-07

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension; extremely high pulmonary vascular resistance constitutes a risk factor for hospital mortality. The objective of this study was to analyze the immediate and long-term results of the surgical treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in patients with very severe pulmonary hypertension. Since February 1996, we performed 160 pulmonary thromboendarterectomies. We divided the patient population in 2 groups: group 1, which included 40 patients with pulmonary vascular resistance≥1090dyn/sec/cm(-5), and group 2, which included the remaining 120 patients. Hospital mortality (15 vs. 2.5%), reperfusion pulmonary edema (33 vs. 14%) and heart failure (23 vs. 3.3%) were all higher in group 1; however, after one year of follow-up, there were no significant differences in the clinical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic conditions of both groups. Survival rate after 5 years was 77% in group 1 and 92% in group 2 (P=.033). After the learning curve including the 46 first patients, there was no difference in hospital mortality (3.8 vs. 2.3%) or survival rate after 5 years (96.2% in group 1 and 96.2% in group 2). Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is linked to significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates in patients with severe chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Nevertheless, these patients benefit the same from the procedure in the mid-/long-term. In our experience, after the learning curve, this surgery is safe in severe pulmonary hypertension and no level of pulmonary vascular resistance should be an absolute counter-indication for this surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Persistent diffuse pulmonary interstitial emphysema mimicking pulmonary emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Demura, Y.; Ishizaki, T; Nakanishi, M; Ameshima, S; Itoh, H.

    2009-01-01

    A 69-year-old male non-smoker with a history of atopic asthma presented with symptoms suggestive of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and this appeared to be corroborated by lung function testing and a chest radiograph. However, a chest CT showed no evidence of pulmonary emphysema and instead demonstrated free air along the bronchovascular sheaths indicative of pulmonary interstistial emphysema, possibly caused by repeated prior exacerbations of asthma. His lung function tests and symptom...

  2. Pulmonary Strongyloidiasis Masquerading as Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Gourahari; Behera, Priyadarshini; Bhuniya, Sourin; Mohapatra, Prasanta Raghab; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Mohanty, Srujana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is an uncommon presentation of Strongyloides infection, usually seen in immunocompromised hosts. The manifestations are similar to that of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis could be challenging in a COPD patient, unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. Here, we present a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection in a COPD patient mimicking acute exacerbation, who was on chronic steroid therapy. PMID:27790284

  3. Role of Resistin in Inflammation and Inflammation-Related Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Pang; Yingying Le

    2006-01-01

    Resistin is a newly identified adipocyte secreted hormone belonging to a cysteine-rich protein family. It is expressed in white adipose tissues in rodents and has also been found in several other tissues in human. Insulin, glucose,many cytokines and anti-diabetic thiazolidinediones are regulators of resistin gene expression. Resistin was firstly proposed to be involved in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Recently, it was found to be relevant to inflammation and inflammation-related diseases like atherosclerosis and arthritis.

  4. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: an increasingly recognized condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olívia Meira Dias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE has been increasingly recognized in the literature. Patients with CPFE are usually heavy smokers or former smokers with concomitant lower lobe fibrosis and upper lobe emphysema on chest HRCT scans. They commonly present with severe breathlessness and low DLCO, despite spirometry showing relatively preserved lung volumes. Moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension is common in such patients, who are also at an increased risk of developing lung cancer. Unfortunately, there is currently no effective treatment for CPFE. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and prognostic factors of CPFE. Given that most of the published data on CPFE are based on retrospective analysis, more studies are needed in order to address the role of emphysema and its subtypes; the progression of fibrosis/emphysema and its correlation with inflammation; treatment options; and prognosis.

  5. Pulmonary Abscess In An Adult Horse: Report Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Enrique Gutiérrez Boada

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Abscess is the consequence of an inflammatory process delimitation on the lung, this illness is more common in young horses. On February 25 of 2006, was received at Large Animal Clinic of the National University of Colombia, a male horse, who was 5 years old, with the following symptoms: chronic cough, epistaxis, weight loss, jaundice and inflammation of limbs. The clinic exam found that the patient had a Pulmonary Abscess; for that reason it was started with antibiotic therapy (Rifampicina and Sulfa Trimetoprim and AINES (Flunixin Meglumine. During that period of time the patient showed different alterations in other systems (Diarrhea, Laminitis and Phlebitis which were treated and solved, before the patient leave de clinic.

  6. Relationship between pulmonary and systemic markers of exposure to multiple types of welding particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdely, Aaron; Salmen-Muniz, Rebecca; Liston, Angie; Hulderman, Tracy; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M; Simeonova, Petia P

    2011-09-05

    Welding results in a unique and complex occupational exposure. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of cardiovascular disease following welding fume exposure. In this study, we compared the induction of pulmonary and systemic inflammation following exposure to multiple types of welding fumes. Mice were exposed to 340μg of manual metal arc stainless steel (MMA-SS), gas metal arc-SS (GMA-SS) or GMA-mild steel (GMA-MS) by pharyngeal aspiration. Mice were sacrificed at 4 and 24h post-exposure to evaluate various parameters of pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Alterations in pulmonary gene expression by a custom designed TaqMan array showed minimal differences between the fumes at 4h. Conversely at 24h, gene expression changes were further increased by SS but not GMA-MS exposure. These findings were associated with the surrogate marker of systemic inflammation, liver acute phase gene induction. Interestingly, stress response genes in cardiovascular tissues were only increased following MMA-SS exposure. These effects were related to the initial level of pulmonary cytotoxicity, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase activity, which was greatest following MMA-SS exposure. In conclusion, varying types of welding fumes elicit quantitatively different systemic inflammatory and/or stress responses. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Catherine J

    2015-09-16

    Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk.

  8. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Andersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk.

  9. Endogenous Receptor Agonists: Resolving Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Bannenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled resolution or the physiologic resolution of a well-orchestrated inflammatory response at the tissue level is essential to return to homeostasis. A comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events that control the termination of acute inflammation is needed in molecular terms given the widely held view that aberrant inflammation underlies many common diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of arachidonic acid and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA–derived lipid mediators in regulating the resolution of inflammation. Using a functional lipidomic approach employing LC-MS-MS–based informatics, recent studies, reviewed herein, uncovered new families of local-acting chemical mediators actively biosynthesized during the resolution phase from the essential fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. These new families of local chemical mediators are generated endogenously in exudates collected during the resolution phase, and were coined resolvins and protectins because specific members of these novel chemical families control both the duration and magnitude of inflammation in animal models of complex diseases. Recent advances on the biosynthesis, receptors, and actions of these novel anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediators are reviewed with the aim to bring to attention the important role of specific lipid mediators as endogenous agonists in inflammation resolution.

  10. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidula T. Vachharajani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins (SIRT, first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1–7 guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to “defend and mend” against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to “defend” against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to “mend,” leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis.

  11. Lack of bcr and abr promotes hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bcr and Abr are GTPase activating proteins that specifically downregulate activity of the small GTPase Rac in restricted cell types in vivo. Rac1 is expressed in smooth muscle cells, a critical cell type involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. The molecular mechanisms that underlie hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension are not well-defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bcr and abr null mutant mice were compared to wild type controls for the development of pulmonary hypertension after exposure to hypoxia. Also, pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from those mice were cultured in hypoxia and examined for proliferation, p38 activation and IL-6 production. Mice lacking Bcr or Abr exposed to hypoxia developed increased right ventricular pressure, hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Perivascular leukocyte infiltration in the lungs was increased, and under hypoxia bcr-/- and abr-/- macrophages generated more reactive oxygen species. Consistent with a contribution of inflammation and oxidative stress in pulmonary hypertension-associated vascular damage, Bcr and Abr-deficient animals showed elevated endothelial leakage after hypoxia exposure. Hypoxia-treated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from Bcr- or Abr-deficient mice also proliferated faster than those of wild type mice. Moreover, activated Rac1, phosphorylated p38 and interleukin 6 were increased in these cells in the absence of Bcr or Abr. Inhibition of Rac1 activation with Z62954982, a novel Rac inhibitor, decreased proliferation, p38 phosphorylation and IL-6 levels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells exposed to hypoxia. CONCLUSIONS: Bcr and Abr play a critical role in down-regulating hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by deactivating Rac1 and, through this, reducing both oxidative stress generated by leukocytes as well as p38 phosphorylation, IL-6 production and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

  12. Pulmonary sarcoidosis: management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma O

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades many advances have been made in the field of sarcoidosis. The disease is now recognised as a multisystem disorder occurring in patients with a genetic predisposition and an exposure to yet unknown transmissible environmental agent/s. The diagnosis is based on a compatible clinical and/or radiological picture, histological evidence of non-caseating granuloma and exclusion of other diseases capable of producing a similar clinical or histological picture. Treatment primarily consists of administration of corticosteroids, although there are valuable alternative drugs. Treatment should be considered in symptomatic patients with evidence of radiologic or lung function deterioration. The patients with extra-pulmonary involvement particularly with ocular, myocardial, and neuro-sarcoidosis almost always need treatment. For asymptomatic pulmonary sarcoidosis patients no therapy is needed.

  13. Update in pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, John H

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary disorders are common and important causes of morbidity and even mortality in adolescents. Conditions that are considered in this article include asthma, cystic fibrosis, and vocal cord dysfunction. Chronic and recurrent exacerbations may occur in youth with such disorders; therefore, they must adhere to potentially many pharmacologic agents and therapeutic procedures on a regular basis for maximum medical and psychosocial outcomes. It is important that physicians use au courant evidence-based guidelines in the management of adolescents. It is also critical that physicians educate adolescents about these regimens to help them maximize management outcomes. If disease control is inadequate, referral to a pulmonary specialist can be helpful to verify the correct diagnosis(es) and ensure that the most appropriate therapies are used.

  14. Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanfranchi, Michael [Creighton University Medical School, Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Allbery, Sandra M.; Wheelock, Lisa [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Perry, Deborah [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common cause of interstitial lung disease in chronically intubated premature neonates, other interstitial lung disease in nonintubated infants is rare. We present a case of pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis that developed in a nonintubated, 31-week gestation infant in whom infectious etiologies had been excluded. The infant was well initially and then developed respiratory distress at 18 days of life. Radiographs at first day of life were normal, but CT and radiographic findings at 18 days of life showed severe interstitial lung disease, mimicking BPD. Lung biopsy showed pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. This entity is not well described in the pediatric radiology literature and is important to consider, as the condition is responsive to a course of corticosteroids. (orig.)

  15. "Vanishing" pulmonary valve stenosis

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    Nofil I Arain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Both spontaneous resolution and progression of mild pulmonary valve stenosis (PS have been reported. We reviewed characteristics of the pulmonary valve (PV to determine factors that could influence resolution of mild PS. Methods: Fifteen asymptomatic pediatric patients with spontaneous resolution of isolated mild PS were retrospectively reviewed. Results: There was no correlation between the PV gradient, clinical presentation, age at diagnosis, or PV morphology. The PV annulus was small at initial presentation, which normalized at follow up. When corrected for the body surface area (z-score, the PV annulus was normal in all patients, including at initial evaluation. Conclusions: Based on our observation, neither age at diagnosis, nor PV-morphology-influenced resolution of mild PS. The variable clinical presentation makes it difficult to categorize and observe mild PS by auscultation alone. The PV annulus z-score could be a useful adjunct to determine the course and serial observation of mild PS.

  16. Rosette nanotubes show low acute pulmonary toxicity in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Shane Journeay

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available W Shane Journeay1, Sarabjeet S Suri1, Jesus G Moralez2, Hicham Fenniri2, Baljit Singh11Immunology Research Group, Toxicology Graduate Program and Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 52 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B4, Canada; 2National Institute of Nanotechnology, National Research Council (NINT-NRC and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2M9, CanadaAbstract: Nanotubes are being developed for a large variety of applications ranging from electronics to drug delivery. Common carbon nanotubes such as single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been studied in the greatest detail but require solubilization and removal of catalytic contaminants such as metals prior to being introduced to biological systems for medical application. The present in vivo study characterizes the degree and nature of inflammation caused by a novel class of self-assembling rosette nanotubes, which are biologically inspired, naturally water-soluble and free of metal content upon synthesis. Upon pulmonary administration of this material we examined responses at 24 h and 7d post-exposure. An acute inflammatory response is triggered at 50 and 25 μg doses by 24 h post-exposure but an inflammatory response is not triggered by a 5 μg dose. Lung inflammation observed at a 50 μg dose at 24 h was resolving by 7d. This work suggests that novel nanostructures with biological design may negate toxicity concerns for biomedical applications of nanotubes. This study also demonstrates that water-soluble rosette nanotube structures represent low pulmonary toxicity, likely due to their biologically inspired design, and their self-assembled architecture.Keywords: nanotoxicology, biocompatibility, nanomedicine, pulmonary drug delivery, lung inflammation

  17. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

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    Irene Lang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is thought to result from incomplete resolution of pulmonary thromboemboli that undergo organisation into fibrous tissue within pulmonary arterial branches, filling pulmonary arterial lumina with collagenous obstructions. The treatment of choice is pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA in CTEPH centres, which has low post-operative mortality and good long-term survival. For patients ineligible for PEA or who have recurrent or persistent pulmonary hypertension after surgery, medical treatment with riociguat is beneficial. In addition, percutaneous balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA is an emerging option, and promises haemodynamic and functional benefits for inoperable patients. In contrast to conventional angioplasty, BPA with undersized balloons over guide wires exclusively breaks intraluminal webs and bands, without dissecting medial vessel layers, and repeat sessions are generally required. Observational studies report that BPA improves haemodynamics, symptoms and functional capacity in patients with CTEPH, but controlled trials with long-term follow-up are needed. Complications include haemoptysis, wire injury, vessel dissection, vessel rupture, reperfusion pulmonary oedema, pulmonary parenchymal bleeding and haemorrhagic pleural effusions. This review summarises the available evidence for BPA, patient selection, recent technical refinements and periprocedural imaging, and discusses the potential future role of BPA in the management of CTEPH.

  18. Isolated Pulmonary Valve Endocarditis

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    Mohammad Ali Hatamizadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is one of the most severe complications of parenteral drug abuse. The outstanding clinical feature of infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers is the high incidence of right-sided valve infection, and the tricuspid valve is involved in 60% to 70% of the cases. We herein report a case of isolated pulmonic valve infective endocarditis with a native pulmonary valve.

  19. Assessment of Pulmonary Toxicity Induced by Inhaled Toner with External Additives

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    Taisuke Tomonaga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the harmful effects of exposure to a toner with external additives by a long-term inhalation study using rats, examining pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and histopathological changes in the lung. Wistar rats were exposed to a well-dispersed toner (mean of MMAD: 2.1 μm at three mass concentrations of 1, 4, and 16 mg/m3 for 22.5 months, and the rats were sacrificed after 6 months, 12 months, and 22.5 months of exposure. The low and medium concentrations did not induce statistically significant pulmonary inflammation, but the high concentration did, and, in addition, a histopathological examination showed fibrosis in the lung. Although lung tumor was observed in one sample of high exposure for 22.5 months, the cause was not statistically significant. On the other hand, a persistent increase in 8-OHdG was observed in the high exposure group, indicating that DNA damage by oxidative stress with persistent inflammation leads to the formation of tumorigenesis. The results of our studies show that toners with external additives lead to pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis only at lung burdens beyond overload. These data suggest that toners with external additives may have low toxicity in the lung.

  20. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed titanium dioxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiura, Yukiko, E-mail: y-yoshiura@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Izumi, Hiroto [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Occupational Pneumology, Institute of Industrial Ecological Science (Japan); Oyabu, Takako [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences (Japan); Hashiba, Masayoshi; Kambara, Tatsunori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Occupational Pneumology, Institute of Industrial Ecological Science (Japan); Mizuguchi, Yohei; Lee, Byeong Woo; Okada, Takami [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences (Japan); Tomonaga, Taisuke [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Occupational Pneumology, Institute of Industrial Ecological Science (Japan); Myojo, Toshihiko [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences (Japan); Yamamoto, Kazuhiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan); Kitajima, Shinichi [National Sanatorium Hoshizuka Keiaien (Japan); Horie, Masanori [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Health Research Institute (HRI) (Japan); Kuroda, Etsushi [Osaka University, Laboratory of Vaccine Science, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center (Japan); Morimoto, Yasuo [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Occupational Pneumology, Institute of Industrial Ecological Science (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    In order to investigate the pulmonary toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles, we performed an intratracheal instillation study with rats of well-dispersed TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and examined the pulmonary inflammation and histopathological changes in the lung. Wistar Hannover rats were intratracheally administered 0.2 mg (0.66 mg/kg) and 1.0 mg (3.3 mg/kg) of well-dispersed TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (P90; diameter of agglomerates: 25 nm), then the pulmonary inflammation responses were examined from 3 days to 6 months after the instillation, and the pathological features were examined up to 24 months. Transient inflammation and the upregulation of chemokines in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid were observed for 1 month. No respiratory tumors or severe fibrosis were observed during the recovery time. These data suggest that transient inflammation induced by TiO{sub 2} may not lead to chronic, irreversible legions in the lung, and that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles may not have a high potential for lung disorder.

  1. Pulmonary trichomoniasis and Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, S M

    1985-08-01

    Pulmonary trichomoniasis is usually caused by aspirated Trichomonas tenax. Adult men with chronic purulent or necrotic pulmonary disease are usually affected. Sixty-eight patients were previously described. A Russian study demonstrated pulmonary trichomoniasis in 19 of 112 patients (17%), mostly in patients with lung cancer, lung abscess, or bronchiectasis. Rarely, pulmonary trichomoniasis may be caused by an intra-abdominal (T. hominis) or genitourinary (T. vaginalis) infection. T. tenax is usually regarded as a harmless commensal of the human mouth. Its prevalence ranges from 4% to 53% and may exceed that of vaginal infection with T. vaginalis in adult females. It is frequently found in patients with poor oral hygiene. Cultural identification is superior to microscopic examination of wet-smear, gram-stained and Papanicolaou-stained preparations. Aspirated pulmonary trichomoniasis is an opportunistic infection. Until the question of possible pathogenicity is resolved, metronidazole should be given. The underlying pulmonary disease should be vigorously treated.

  2. Points of control in inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Carl

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a complex set of interactions among soluble factors and cells that can arise in any tissue in response to traumatic, infectious, post-ischaemic, toxic or autoimmune injury. The process normally leads to recovery from infection and to healing, However, if targeted destruction and assisted repair are not properly phased, inflammation can lead to persistent tissue damage by leukocytes, lymphocytes or collagen. Inflammation may be considered in terms of its checkpoints, where binary or higher-order signals drive each commitment to escalate, go signals trigger stop signals, and molecules responsible for mediating the inflammatory response also suppress it, depending on timing and context. The non-inflammatory state does not arise passively from an absence of inflammatory stimuli; rather, maintenance of health requires the positive actions of specific gene products to suppress reactions to potentially inflammatory stimuli that do not warrant a full response.

  3. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  4. Granulomatous inflammation in Acanthamoeba sclerokeratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samrat Chatterjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the histopathological findings in a patient with Acanthamoeba sclerokeratitis (ASK. A 58-year-old patient with ASK underwent enucleation and sections of the cornea and sclera were subjected to histopathology and immunohistochemistry with monoclonal mouse antihuman antibodies against T cell CD3 and B cell CD20 antigens. Hematoxylin and Eosin stained sections of the cornea revealed epithelial ulceration, Bowman′s membrane destruction, stromal vascularization, infiltration with lymphocytes, plasma cells, and granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated giant cells (MNGC. The areas of scleritis showed complete disruption of sclera collagen, necrosis and infiltration with neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulomatous inflammation with MNGC. No cyst or trophozoites of Acanthamoeba were seen in the cornea or sclera. Immunophenotyping revealed that the population of lymphocytes was predominantly of T cells. Granulomatous inflammation in ASK is probably responsible for the continuance and progression of the scleritis and management protocols should include immunosuppressive agents alongside amoebicidal drugs.

  5. A case of Amyopathic Dermatomyositis associated with Interstitial Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugan, Y; Sahin, M; Dogru, A; Bayram, D; Ceyhan, A M; Tunc, S E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases with unknown etiology characterized by inflammation of the skeletal muscles and proximal muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with characteristic cutaneous findings such as heliotrope rash, Gottron's sign, Gottron's papules, shawl sign and machinist hand. Amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) is a rare but well-recognized clinical subtype of DM, constituting aproximately 10-20% of patients with this disease. It generally manifests only pathognomonic skin findings without clinical and laboratory evidence of muscle involvement. In this report, we present a rare case of ADM associated with interstitial pulmonary disease.

  6. Effect of Xuebijing injection on expressions of plasma mediators of inflammation in patients with pulmonary infection after severe traumatic craniocerebral injury%血必净注射液对重型颅脑创伤后肺部感染患者血浆炎症介质表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁云锋; 杨细平; 涂悦; 张赛; 孙世中; 张民

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of XuebijinR injection on the expressions of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α ) in plasma in patients with pulmonary infection after severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods Eighty-five patients with pulmonary infection after sTBI were randomly assigned to the control group (42 cases) and the treatment group (43 cases). Conventional treatment was given to both groups, while in the treatment group, Xuebijing Injection was additionally given for consecutive 7 Gays. The numbers of cases with body temperature, white blood cell count (WBC), and imaging studies basically returnee to normal and disappearance of pulmonary rales were observed, and the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-a in plasma were detected by radioimrnunoassay method at different time points in both groups. Results Compared with the control group, the numbers of cases with body temperature and WBC recovered to normal arm the number of cases with imaging studies basically normal and the disappearance of pulmonary rales were significantly higher in the treatment group than those In the control group [ body temperature returned to normal (cases) : 38 vs. 26, WBC returnee to normal (cases) ; 34 vs. 22, imaging studies returned to normal and pulmonary rales disappeared (cases) ; 35 vs. 23, allP<0.01 ) .Compared with the control group at the same time, the plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before treatment and 1 day after treatment had no significant difference [ IL-6 (ng/L) before treatment ; 40.7±12.6 vs. 41.3± 11.5, [ day after treatment ;39.8±10.3 vs. 40.5±9.7 ; TNF-α (ng/L) before treatment :73.4±11.5 vs. 72.8=13.3, 1 day after treatment : 74.1 ±11.8 vs. 73.6± 14.2, all P>0.05 ] . On the 4th anc 7th day after treatment in both groups, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-a were obviously lower than those before treatment, and the levels were decreased more significantly in the treatment group than those in the control group [ IL-6 (ng

  7. Pulmonary edema: radiographic differential diagnosis

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    Yoo, Dong Soo; Choi, Young Hi; Kim, Seung Cheol; An, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jee Young; Park, Hee Hong [Dankook Univ. College of Medicine, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using chest radiography to differentiate between three different etiologies of pulmonary edema. Plain chest radiographs of 77 patients, who were clinically confirmed as having pulmonary edema, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into three groups : group 1 (cardiogenic edema : n = 35), group 2 (renal pulmonary edema : n = 16) and group 3 (permeability edema : n = 26). We analyzed the radiologic findings of air bronchogram, heart size, peribronchial cuffing, septal line, pleural effusion, vascular pedicle width, pulmonary blood flow distribution and distribution of pulmonary edema. In a search for radiologic findings which would help in the differentiation of these three etiologies, each finding was assessed. Cardiogenic and renal pulmonary edema showed overlapping radiologic findings, except for pulmonary blood flow distribution. In cardiogenic pulmonary edema (n=35), cardiomegaly (n=29), peribronchial cuffing (n=29), inverted pulmonary blood flow distribution (n=21) and basal distribution of edema (n=20) were common. In renal pulmonary edema (n=16), cardiomegaly (n=15), balanced blood flow distribution (n=12), and central (n=9) or basal distribution of edema (n=7) were common. Permeability edema (n=26) showed different findings. Air bronchogram (n=25), normal blood flow distribution (n=14) and peripheral distribution of edema (n=21) were frequent findings, while cardiomegaly (n=7), peribronchial cuffing (n=7) and septal line (n=5) were observed in only a few cases. On plain chest radiograph, permeability edema can be differentiated from cardiogenic or renal pulmonary edema. The radiographic findings which most reliably differentiated these two etiologies were air bronchogram, distribution of pulmonary edema, peribronchial cuffing and heart size. Only blood flow distribution was useful for radiographic differentiation of cardiogenic and renal edema.

  8. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases.

  9. Sirtuin 1 and aging theory for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, V; Corbi, G; Manzo, V; Pelaia, G; Filippelli, A; Vatrella, A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory syndrome that represents an increasing health problem, especially in the elderly population. Drug therapies are symptomatic and inadequate to contrast disease progression and mortality. Thus, there is an urgent need to clarify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this condition in order to identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Processes including oxidant/antioxidant, protease/antiprotease, and proliferative/antiproliferative balance and control of inflammatory response become dysfunctional during aging as well as in COPD. Recently it was suggested that Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an antiaging molecule involved in the response to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, is implicated in both development and progression of COPD. The present review focuses on the involvement of SIRT1 in the regulation of redox state, inflammation, and premature senescence, all crucial characteristics of COPD phenotypes. Recent evidence corroborating the statement of the "aging theory for COPD" was also discussed.

  10. The Unfolded Protein Response in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of nonfunctional and potentially cytotoxic, misfolded proteins in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is believed to contribute to lung cell apoptosis, inflammation, and autophagy. Because of its fundamental role as a quality control system in protein metabolism, the "unfolded protein response" (UPR) is of potential importance in the pathogenesis of COPD. The UPR comprises a series of transcriptional, translational, and post-translational processes that decrease protein synthesis while enhancing protein folding capacity and protein degradation. Several studies have suggested that the UPR contributes to lung cell apoptosis and lung inflammation in at least some subjects with human COPD. However, information on the prevalence of the UPR in subjects with COPD, the lung cells that manifest a UPR, and the role of the UPR in the pathogenesis of COPD is extremely limited and requires additional study.

  11. Impact of nutritional status on body functioning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and how to intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniwidyaningsih, Wahju; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Cano, Noel; Pison, Christophe

    2008-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fifth leading cause of mortality in the world. This study reviews diet as a risk or protective factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mechanisms of malnutrition, undernutrition consequences on body functioning and how to modulate nutritional status of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Different dietary factors (dietary pattern, foods, nutrients) have been associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the course of the disease. Mechanical disadvantage, energy imbalance, disuse muscle atrophy, hypoxemia, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress have been reported to cause systemic consequences such as cachexia and compromise whole body functioning. Nutritional intervention makes it possible to modify the natural course of the disease provided that it is included in respiratory rehabilitation combining bronchodilators optimization, infection control, exercise and, in some patients, correction of hypogonadism. Diet, as a modifiable risk factor, appears more as an option to prevent and modify the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Reduction of mechanical disadvantage, physical training and anabolic agents should be used conjointly with oral nutrition supplements to overcome undernutrition and might change the prognosis of the disease in some cases. Major research challenges address the role of systemic inflammation and the best interventions for controlling it besides smoking cessation.

  12. Rupatadine protects against pulmonary fibrosis by attenuating PAF-mediated senescence in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-xi Lv

    Full Text Available A similar immune response is implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and allergic disorders. We investigated the potential therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of rupatadine, a dual antagonist of histamine and platelet-activation factor (PAF, in bleomycin- (BLM- and silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The indicated dosages of rupatadine were administered in rodents with bleomycin or silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The tissue injury, fibrosis, inflammatory cells and cytokines, and lung function were examined to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of rupatadine. The anti-fibrosis effect of rupatadine was compared with an H1 or PAF receptor antagonist, and efforts were made to reveal rupatadine's anti-fibrotic mechanism. Rupatadine promoted the resolution of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner, as indicated by the reductions in inflammation score, collagen deposition and epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, and infiltration or expression of inflammatory cells or cytokines in the fibrotic lung tissue. Thus, rupatadine treatment improved the declined lung function and significantly decreased animal death. Moreover, rupatadine was able not only to attenuate silica-induced silicosis but also to produce a superior therapeutic efficacy compared to pirfenidone, histamine H1 antagonist loratadine, or PAF antagonist CV-3988. The anti-fibrotic action of rupatadine might relate to its attenuation of BLM- or PAF-induced premature senescence because rupatadine treatment protected against the in vivo and in vitro activation of the p53/p21-dependent senescence pathway. Our studies indicate that rupatadine promotes the resolution of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating the PAF-mediated senescence response. Rupatadine holds promise as a novel drug to treat the devastating disease of pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  14. Omeprazole Attenuates Pulmonary Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation and Potentiates Hyperoxia-Induced Developmental Lung Injury in Newborn Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Binoy; Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E.; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in human preterm infants and a similar lung phenotype characterized by alveolar simplification in newborn mice. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury (HLI) in adult mice. Whether OM activates pulmonary AhR and protects C57BL/6J newborn mice against hyperoxia-induced developmental lung (alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, inflammation, and oxidative stress) injury (HDLI) is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that OM will activate pulmonary AhR and mitigate HDLI in newborn mice. Newborn mice were treated daily with i.p. injections of OM at doses of 10 (OM10) or 25 (OM25) mg/kg while being exposed to air or hyperoxia (FiO2 of 85%) for 14 days, following which their lungs were harvested to determine alveolarization, pulmonary vascularization, inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular injury, and AhR activation. To our surprise, hyperoxia-induced alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, inflammation, oxidative stress, and vascular injury were augmented in OM25-treated animals. These findings were associated with attenuated pulmonary vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression and decreased pulmonary AhR activation in the OM25 group. We conclude that contrary to our hypothesis, OM decreases functional activation of pulmonary AhR and potentiates HDLI in newborn mice. These observations are consistent with our previous findings, which suggest that AhR activation plays a protective role in HDLI in newborn mice. PMID:26272953

  15. Pulmonary alterations in cocaine users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Terra Filho

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Brazilian researchers have recently recognized a marked increase in the number of people using abusable drugs and the consequences of this habit. It has become a major public health problem in a potentially productive segment of the general population. In the last few years, several medical articles have given special emphasis to pulmonary complications related to cocaine use. This review is based on this information and experience acquired with groups of cocaine users. OBJECTIVE: To present to physicians the pulmonary aspects of cocaine use and warn about the various effects this drug has on the respiratory system, stressing those related to long-term use. DESIGN: Narrative review. METHOD: Pulmonary complications are described. These may include infections (Staphylococcus aureus, pulmonary tuberculosis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome/aids, etc., aspiration pneumonia, lung abscess, empyema, septic embolism, non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, barotrauma, pulmonary granulomatosis, bronchiolitis obliterans and organizing pneumonia, pneumonitis and interstitial fibrosis, pneumonitis hypersensitivity, lung infiltrates and eosinophilia in individuals with bronchial hyperreactivity, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, vasculitis, pulmonary infarction, pulmonary hypertension and alterations in gas exchange. It is concluded that physicians should give special attention to the various pulmonary and clinical manifestations related to cocaine use, particularly in young patients.

  16. Varicosity of the pulmonary veins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicher-Dueber, A.; Lindner, P.; Schild, H.; Plewe, G.

    1986-04-01

    Varicosity of the pulmonary veins is a rare anomaly of the pulmonary vascular system. The varices do not usually change in size over years, do not cause symptoms and need no therapy. However, raised left atrial pressure can cause increase in the diameter of pulmonary vein varices. A case of lung vein varicosity in the right middle and upper lobe associated with coarctation of the aorta and an anomalous upper-middle lobe vein was observed over a period of 10 years. Increase in left atrial pressure (aortic and relative mitral regurgitation) led to enlargement of the pulmonary veins.

  17. Prenatal prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebwasser, Jourdan E; Treadwell, Marjorie C

    2017-03-15

    Pulmonary hypoplasia, although rare, is associated with significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. Conditions associated with pulmonary hypoplasia include those which limit normal thoracic capacity or movement, including skeletal dysplasias and abdominal wall defects; those with mass effect, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia and pleural effusions; and those with decreased amniotic fluid, including preterm, premature rupture of membranes, and genitourinary anomalies. The ability to predict severe pulmonary hypoplasia prenatally aids in family counseling, as well as obstetric and neonatal management. The objective of this review is to outline the imaging techniques that are widely used prenatally to assess pulmonary hypoplasia and to discuss the limitations of these methods.

  18. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, T.J.P., E-mail: timothyjpbray@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); Mortensen, K.H., E-mail: mortensen@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); University Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Box 318, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D., E-mail: deepa.gopalan@btopenworld.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis.

  19. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Muñoz-Esquerre

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes.All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1 COPD, 2 smokers, and 3 non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1 percentage of intimal area (%IA, 2 percentage of luminal narrowing, 3 intimal thickness index, and 4 intima-to-media ratio.In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038. In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016. Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman's rho = 0.46, p = 0.008.Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions pulmonary arterial hypertension pulmonary arterial hypertension Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...