WorldWideScience

Sample records for crystallographically independent molecules

  1. Crystallographic analysis of TPP riboswitch binding by small-molecule ligands discovered through fragment-based drug discovery approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Katherine Deigan; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are structured mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to metabolite or second-messenger binding and are promising targets for drug discovery. Fragment-based drug discovery methods have identified weakly binding small molecule "fragments" that bind a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch. However, these fragments require substantial chemical elaboration into more potent, drug-like molecules. Structure determination of the fragments bound to the riboswitch is the necessary next step. In this chapter, we describe the methods for co-crystallization and structure determination of fragment-bound TPP riboswitch structures. We focus on considerations for screening crystallization conditions across multiple crystal forms and provide guidance for building the fragment into the refined crystallographic model. These methods are broadly applicable for crystallographic analyses of any small molecules that bind structured RNAs.

  2. Cluster Analysis of Time-Dependent Crystallographic Data: Direct Identification of Time-Independent Structural Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Konstantin S.; Moffat, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The initial output of a time-resolved macromolecular crystallography experiment is a time-dependent series of difference electron density maps that displays the time-dependent changes in underlying structure as a reaction progresses. The goal is to interpret such data in terms of a small number of crystallographically refinable, time-independent structures, each associated with a reaction intermediate; to establish the pathways and rate coefficients by which these intermediates interconvert; and thereby to elucidate a chemical kinetic mechanism. One strategy toward achieving this goal is to use cluster analysis, a statistical method that groups objects based on their similarity. If the difference electron density at a particular voxel in the time-dependent difference electron density (TDED) maps is sensitive to the presence of one and only one intermediate, then its temporal evolution will exactly parallel the concentration profile of that intermediate with time. The rationale is therefore to cluster voxels with respect to the shapes of their TDEDs, so that each group or cluster of voxels corresponds to one structural intermediate. Clusters of voxels whose TDEDs reflect the presence of two or more specific intermediates can also be identified. From such groupings one can then infer the number of intermediates, obtain their time-independent difference density characteristics, and refine the structure of each intermediate. We review the principles of cluster analysis and clustering algorithms in a crystallographic context, and describe the application of the method to simulated and experimental time-resolved crystallographic data for the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein. PMID:21244840

  3. Crystallographic structure of a small molecule SIRT1 activator-enzyme complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Han; Case, April W.; Riera, Thomas V.; Considine, Thomas; Lee, Jessica E.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Zhao, Huizhen; Jiang, Yong; Sweitzer, Sharon M.; Pietrak, Beth; Schwartz, Benjamin; Blum, Charles A.; Disch, Jeremy S.; Caldwell, Richard; Szczepankiewicz, Bruce; Oalmann, Christopher; Yee Ng, Pui; White, Brian H.; Casaubon, Rebecca; Narayan, Radha; Koppetsch, Karsten; Bourbonais, Francis; Wu, Bo; Wang, Junfeng; Qian, Dongming; Jiang, Fan; Mao, Cheney; Wang, Minghui; Hu, Erding; Wu, Joe C.; Perni, Robert B.; Vlasuk, George P.; Ellis, James L.

    2015-07-01

    SIRT1, the founding member of the mammalian family of seven NAD+-dependent sirtuins, is composed of 747 amino acids forming a catalytic domain and extended N- and C-terminal regions. We report the design and characterization of an engineered human SIRT1 construct (mini-hSIRT1) containing the minimal structural elements required for lysine deacetylation and catalytic activation by small molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs). Using this construct, we solved the crystal structure of a mini-hSIRT1-STAC complex, which revealed the STAC-binding site within the N-terminal domain of hSIRT1. Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis using full-length hSIRT1, these data establish a specific STAC-binding site and identify key intermolecular interactions with hSIRT1. The determination of the interface governing the binding of STACs with human SIRT1 facilitates greater understanding of STAC activation of this enzyme, which holds significant promise as a therapeutic target for multiple human diseases.

  4. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bengio, S

    2003-01-01

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) sq root 3x sq root 3R30 sup 0 , H sub 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH sub 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( sq root 3 sq root 3)R30 sup 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H sub 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was esta...

  5. Crystallographic characterization of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of adhesion molecule CD44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Tomoyuki; Kitano, Ken; Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Maesaki, Ryoko; Hakoshima, Toshio, E-mail: hakosima@bs.naist.jp [Structural Biology Laboratory, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Keihanna Science City, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    The radixin FERM domain complexed with the CD44 cytoplasmic tail peptide has been crystallized. A diffraction data set from the complex was collected to 2.1 Å. CD44 is an important adhesion molecule that specifically binds hyaluronic acid and regulates cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. Increasing evidence has indicated that CD44 is assembled in a regulated manner into the membrane–cytoskeletal junction, a process that is mediated by ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins. Crystals of a complex between the radixin FERM domain and the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of CD44 have been obtained. The crystal of the radixin FERM domain bound to the CD44 cytoplasmic tail peptide belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.70, b = 66.18, c = 86.22 Å, and contain one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.1 Å.

  6. Biosynthetic incorporation of telluromethionine into dihydrofolate reductase and crystallographic analysis of the distribution of tellurium atoms in the protein molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunkle, M.G.; Lewinski, K.; Boles, J.O.; Dunlap, R.B.; Odom, J.D.; Lebioda, L. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Recent successes in crystallographic studies of proteins with methionine (Met) residues replaced with SeMet, pioneered by Hendrickson and coworkers, inspired us to replace Met with TeMet in Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). E. coli DHFR, which catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of dihydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate, consists of 159 residues, 5 of which are Met. TeMet was incorporated into DHFR using the Met auxotroph, E. coli DL41, carrying the expression vector pWT8 with an IPTG inducible promoter and ampicillin resistance gene. The enzyme was purified by successive chromatography on Q-Sepharose and PHenyl Sepharose resins, yielding milligram quantities of homogeneous enzyme with a specific activity of 40 units/mg. TeMet DHFR exhibits kinetic properties similar to those of wt DHFR. Amino acid analysis indicated 3 authentic Met residues in TeMet DHFR, whereas atomic absorption spectroscopy detected 2 Te per protein molecule. Amino acid sequence analysis results suggested that only authentic Met was present in the first three Met positions (1,16,and 20). Crystals of Te-DHFR were grown in the presence of methotrexate from PEG 4000 and were isomorphous with wt-DHFR crystals grown from ethanol. Difference Fourier maps and restrained least-squares refinement show very little, if any, Te in the first three Met positions: Met{sup 1}, Met{sup 16}, and Met{sup 20}, whereas the occupancy of Te in positions 42 and 92 is 0.64. Apparently, the process of folding, subsequent purification, and crystallization select DHFR molecules with Te in Met{sup 42} and Met{sup 92}. Replacing Met with TeMet provides an internal probe that should facilitate structural and mechanistic studies of proteins.

  7. Model independence in two dimensions and polarized cold dipolar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosniev, A G; Fedorov, D V; Jensen, A S; Zinner, N T

    2011-06-24

    We calculate the energy and wave functions of two particles confined to two spatial dimensions interacting via arbitrary anisotropic potentials with negative or zero net volume. The general rigorous analytic expressions are given in the weak coupling limit where universality or model independence are approached. The monopole part of anisotropic potentials is crucial in the universal limit. We illustrate the universality with a system of two arbitrarily polarized cold dipolar molecules in a bilayer. We discuss the transition to universality as a function of polarization and binding energy and compare analytic and numerical results obtained by the stochastic variational method. The universal limit is essentially reached for experimentally accessible strengths.

  8. Data-driven high-throughput prediction of the 3-D structure of small molecules: review and progress. A response to the letter by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pierre

    2011-12-27

    A response is presented to sentiments expressed in "Data-Driven High-Throughput Prediction of the 3-D Structure of Small Molecules: Review and Progress. A Response from The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre", recently published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, (1) which may give readers a misleading impression regarding significant impediments to scientific research posed by the CCDC.

  9. Identification of cell surface molecules involved in dystroglycan-independent Lassa virus cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojima, Masayuki; Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry.

  10. CIF (Crystallographic Information File): A Standard for Crystallographic Data Interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. D.

    1996-01-01

    The Crystallographic Information File (CIF) uses the self-defining STAR file structure. This requires the creation of a dictionary of data names and definitions. A basic dictionary of terms needed to describe the crystal structures of small molecules was approved in 1991 and is currently used for the submission of papers to Acta Crystallographica C. A number of extensions to this dictionary are in preparation. By storing the dictionary itself as a STAR file, the definitions and relationships in the CIF dictionary become computer interpretable. This offers many possibilities for the automatic handling of crystallographic information. PMID:27805170

  11. Gauge-origin-independent magnetizabilities of solvated molecules using the polarizable continuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Marchesan, Domenico; Ruud, Kenneth; Frediani, Luca; Coriani, Sonia

    2005-11-01

    We present an implementation of the polarizable continuum model in its integral equation formulation for the calculation of the magnetizabilities of solvated molecules. The gauge-origin independence of the calculated magnetizabilities and the fast basis set convergence are ensured through the use of London atomic orbitals. Our implementation can use Hartree-Fock and multiconfigurational self-consistent-field (MCSCF) wave functions as well as density-functional theory including hybrid functionals such as B3LYP. We present the results of dielectric continuum effects on water and pyridine using MCSCF wave functions, as well as dielectric medium effects on the magnetizability of the aromatic amino acids as a model for how a surrounding protein environment affects the magnetizability of these molecules. It is demonstrated that the dielectric medium effects on the magnetizability anisotropies of the aromatic amino acids may be substantial, being as large as 25% in the case of tyrosine.

  12. Cell adhesion molecules regulate contractile ring-independent cytokinesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Nagasaki; Masamitsu Kanada; Taro QP Uyeda

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the roles of substrate adhesion in cytokinesis, we established cell lines lacking paxiUin (PAXB) or vinculin (VINA), and those expressing the respective GFP fusion proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum. As in mammalian cells, GFP-PAXB and GFP-VINA formed focal adhesion-like complexes on the cell bottom, paxB cells in suspension grew normally, but on substrates, often failed to divide after regression of the furrow. The efficient cytokinesis of paxB cells in suspension is not because of shear forces to assist abscission, as they divided normally in static suspension culture as well. Double knockout strains lacking mhcA, which codes for myosin I1, and paxB or vinA displayed more severe cytokinetic defects than each single knockout strain. In mitotic wild-type cells, GFP-PAXB was diffusely distributed on the basal membrane, but was strikingly condensed along the polar edges in mitotic mhcA cells. These results are consistent with our idea that Dictyostelium displays two forms of cytokinesis, one that is contractile ringdependent and adhesion-independent, and the other that is contractile ring-independent and adhesion-dependent, and that the latter requires PAXB and VINA. Furthermore, that paxB cells fail to divide normally in the presence of substrate adhesion suggests that this adhesion molecule may play additional signaling roles.

  13. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the swine major histocompatibility complex molecule SLA-1*1502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaocheng; Qi, Jianxun; Zhang, Nianzhi; Li, Qirun; Yin, Chunsheng; Chen, Rong; Gao, Feng; Xia, Chun

    2011-05-01

    In order to illustrate the structure of the swine MHC class I (SLA-I) molecule and to evaluate the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the ternary complex of the SLA-I molecule termed SLA-1*1502 with β(2)-microglobulin and the CTL epitope TMPPGFELY (PRRSV-NSP9(TY9)) derived from PRRSV nonstructural protein 9 (residues 198-206) was assembled and crystallized. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 66.1, b = 74.1, c = 98.6 Å; it contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were calculated to be 2.74 Å(3) Da(-1) and 55.17%, respectively. The results will be helpful in obtaining insight into the structural basis of the presentation of viral epitopes by SLA-I.

  14. Characterization of a Proteasome and TAP-independent Presentation of Intracellular Epitopes by HLA-B27 Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Magnacca, A.

    2012-07-17

    Nascent HLA-class I molecules are stabilized by proteasome-derived peptides in the ER and the new complexes proceed to the cell surface through the post-ER vesicles. It has been shown, however, that less stable complexes can exchange peptides in the Trans Golgi Network (TGN). HLA-B27 are the most studied HLA-class I molecules due to their association with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). Chimeric proteins driven by TAT of HIV have been exploited by us to deliver viral epitopes, whose cross-presentation by the HLA-B27 molecules was proteasome and TAP-independent and not restricted to Antigen-Presenting Cells (APC). Here, using these chimeric proteins as epitope suppliers, we compared with each other and with the HLA-A2 molecules, the two HLA-B*2705 and B*2709 alleles differing at residue 116 (D116H) and differentially associated with AS. We found that the antigen presentation by the two HLA-B27 molecules was proteasome-, TAP-, and APC-independent whereas the presentation by the HLA-A2 molecules required proteasome, TAP and professional APC. Assuming that such difference could be due to the unpaired, highly reactive Cys-67 distinguishing the HLA-B27 molecules, C67S mutants in HLA-B*2705 and B*2709 and V67C mutant in HLA-A*0201 were also analyzed. The results showed that this mutation did not influence the HLA-A2-restricted antigen presentation while it drastically affected the HLA-B27-restricted presentation with, however, remarkable differences between B*2705 and B*2709. The data, together with the occurrence on the cell surface of unfolded molecules in the case of C67S-B*2705 mutant but not in that of C67S-B*2709 mutant, indicates that Cys-67 has a more critical role in stabilizing the B*2705 rather than the B*2709 complexes.

  15. A novel three primers PCR (TP-PCR) method to obtain recombinant DNA molecule independent of restriction enzyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this note, we report a novel and efficient three primers PCR (TP-PCR) method to rapidly generate recombinant DNA molecule at precise junction between two arbitrary DNA fragments. TP-PCR method is characterized by its reaction system with two templates and three primers, which can produce a recombinant DNA molecule in one PCR reaction. The main advantages of this method are the independence of sequences at the recombination site, the rapidness, and the easy establishment of adequate conditions. This method has been successfully applied to constructing a fusion protein gene, sck gene.

  16. Crystallographic Information Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic information provides the fundamental basis for understanding the properties and behavior of materials. This data, such as chemical composition, unit cell dimensions, space group, and atomic positions, derives from the primary literature--that is, from published experimental measurement or theoretical calculation. Although the…

  17. Novel mechanism for temperature-independent transitions in flexible molecules: role of thermodynamic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslenko, V I; Petrov, E G; Verkhratsky, A; Krishtal, O A

    2010-04-30

    A novel physical mechanism is proposed to explain the temperature-independent transition reactions in molecular systems. The mechanism becomes effective in the case of conformation transitions between quasi-isoenergetic molecular states. It is shown that at room temperatures, stochastic broadening of molecular energy levels predominates the energy of low-frequency vibrations accompanying the transition. This leads to a cancellation of temperature dependence in the stochastically averaged rate constants. As an example, a physical interpretation of temperature-independent onset of P2X{3} receptor desensitization in neuronal membranes is provided.

  18. Optical Tweezers Studies on Notch: Single-molecule Interaction Strength is Independent of Ligand Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shergill, Bhupinder; Meloty-Kapella, Laurence; Musse, Abdiwahab A.; Weinmaster, Gerry; Botvinick, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Notch signaling controls diverse cellular processes critical to development and disease. Cell surface ligands bind Notch on neighboring cells yet require endocytosis to activate signaling. The role ligand endocytosis plays in Notch activation has not been established. Here we integrate optical tweezers with cell biological and biochemical methods to test the prevailing model that ligand endocytosis facilitates recycling to enhance ligand interactions with Notch necessary to trigger signaling. Specifically, single-molecule measurements indicate that interference of ligand endocytosis and/or recycling does not alter the force required to rupture bonds formed between cells expressing the Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) and laser-trapped Notch1-beads. Together, our analyses eliminate roles for ligand endocytosis and recycling in Dll1-Notch1 interactions, and indicate that recycling indirectly affects signaling by regulating the accumulation of cell-surface ligand. Importantly, our study demonstrates the utility of optical tweezers to test a role for ligand endocytosis in generating cell-mediated mechanical force. PMID:22658935

  19. Peptide-independent stabilization of MHC class I molecules breaches cellular quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Zeynep; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Abualrous, Esam Tolba; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Janßen, Linda; Van Hateren, Andy; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Momburg, Frank; Achour, Adnane; Elliott, Tim; Springer, Sebastian; Boulanger, Denise

    2014-07-01

    The intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins is directed by three quality control mechanisms that test for their structural integrity, which is correlated to the binding of high-affinity antigenic peptide ligands. To investigate which molecular features of MHC-I these quality control mechanisms detect, we have followed the hypothesis that suboptimally loaded MHC-I molecules are characterized by their conformational mobility in the F-pocket region of the peptide-binding site. We have created a novel variant of an MHC-I protein, K(b)-Y84C, in which two α-helices in this region are linked by a disulfide bond that mimics the conformational and dynamic effects of bound high-affinity peptide. K(b)-Y84C shows a remarkable increase in the binding affinity to its light chain, beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), and bypasses all three cellular quality control steps. Our data demonstrate (1) that coupling between peptide and β2m binding to the MHC-I heavy chain is mediated by conformational dynamics; (2) that the folded conformation of MHC-I, supported by β2m, plays a decisive role in passing the ER-to-cell-surface transport quality controls; and (3) that β2m association is also tested by the cell surface quality control that leads to MHC-I endocytosis.

  20. Combined, Independent Small Molecule Release and Shape Memory via Nanogel-Coated Thiourethane Polymer Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailing, Eric A; Nair, Devatha P; Setterberg, Whitney K; Kyburz, Kyle A; Yang, Chun; D'Ovidio, Tyler; Anseth, Kristi S; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-28

    Drug releasing shape memory polymers (SMPs) were prepared from poly(thiourethane) networks that were coated with drug loaded nanogels through a UV initiated, surface mediated crosslinking reaction. Multifunctional thiol and isocyanate monomers were crosslinked through a step-growth mechanism to produce polymers with a homogeneous network structure that exhibited a sharp glass transition with 97% strain recovery and 96% shape fixity. Incorporating a small stoichiometric excess of thiol groups left pendant functionality for a surface coating reaction. Nanogels with diameter of approximately 10 nm bearing allyl and methacrylate groups were prepared separately via solution free radical polymerization. Coatings with thickness of 10-30 μm were formed via dip-coating and subsequent UV-initiated thiol-ene crosslinking between the SMP surface and the nanogel, and through inter-nanogel methacrylate homopolymerization. No significant change in mechanical properties or shape memory behavior was observed after the coating process, indicating that functional coatings can be integrated into an SMP without altering its original performance. Drug bioactivity was confirmed via in vitro culturing of human mesenchymal stem cells with SMPs coated with dexamethasone-loaded nanogels. This article offers a new strategy to independently tune multiple functions on a single polymeric device, and has broad application toward implantable, minimally invasive medical devices such as vascular stents and ocular shunts, where local drug release can greatly prolong device function.

  1. A novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide involves cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, Jason L; Min, Kyung-Won; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Baek, Seung Joon

    2014-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are extensively used over the counter to treat headaches and inflammation as well as clinically to prevent cancer among high-risk groups. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity by NSAIDs plays a role in their anti-tumorigenic properties. NSAIDs also have COX-independent activity which is not fully understood. In this study, we report a novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide (SS), which facilitates a previously uncharacterized cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) protein. EpCAM is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that has been implemented as an over-expressed oncogene in many cancers including colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate. We found EpCAM to be down-regulated by SS in a manner that is independent of COX activity, transcription regulation, de novo protein synthesis, and proteasomal degradation pathway. Our findings clearly demonstrate that SS drives cleavage of the extracellular portion of EpCAM near the N-terminus. This SS driven cleavage is blocked by a deleting amino acids 55-81 as well as simply mutating arginine residues at positions 80 and 81 to alanine of EpCAM. Proteolysis of EpCAM by SS may provide a novel mechanism by which NSAIDs affect anti-tumorigenesis at the post-translational level.

  2. Macromolecular crystallographic estructure refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonine, Pavel V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Model refinement is a key step in crystallographic structure determination that ensures final atomic structure of macromolecule represents measured diffraction data as good as possible. Several decades have been put into developing methods and computational tools to streamline this step. In this manuscript we provide a brief overview of major milestones of crystallographic computing and methods development pertinent to structure refinement.El refinamiento es un paso clave en el proceso de determinación de una estructura cristalográfica al garantizar que la estructura atómica de la macromolécula final represente de la mejor manera posible los datos de difracción. Han hecho falta varias décadas para poder desarrollar nuevos métodos y herramientas computacionales dirigidas a dinamizar esta etapa. En este artículo ofrecemos un breve resumen de los principales hitos en la computación cristalográfica y de los nuevos métodos relevantes para el refinamiento de estructuras.

  3. Crystallographic structure of ubiquitin in complex with cadmium ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitination plays a critical role in regulating many cellular processes, from DNA repair and gene transcription to cell cycle and apoptosis. It is catalyzed by a specific enzymatic cascade ultimately leading to the conjugation of ubiquitin to lysine residues of the target protein that can be the ubiquitin molecule itself and to the formation of poly-ubiquitin chains. Findings We present the crystal structure at 3.0 Å resolution of bovine ubiquitin crystallized in presence of cadmium ions. Two molecules of ubiquitin are present in the asymmetric unit. Interestingly this non-covalent dimeric arrangement brings Lys-6 and Lys-63 of each crystallographically-independent monomer in close contact with the C-terminal ends of the other monomer. Residues Leu-8, Ile-44 and Val-70 that form a hydrophobic patch at the surface of the Ub monomer are trapped at the dimer interface. Conclusions The structural basis for signalling by poly-Ub chains relies on a visualization of conformations of alternatively linked poly-Ub chains. This arrangement of ubiquitin could illustrate how linkages involving Lys-6 or Lys-63 of ubiquitin are produced in the cell. It also details how ubiquitin molecules can specifically chelate cadmium ions.

  4. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Wall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  5. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  6. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement. PMID:27437111

  7. The carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CORM-3) inhibits expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin independently of haem oxygenase-1 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, H.; Bergstrasser, C.; Rafat, N.; Hoeger, S.; Schmidt, M.; Endres, N.; Goebeler, M.; Hillebrands, J. L.; Brigelius-Flohe, R.; Banning, A.; Beck, G.; Loesel, R.; Yard, B. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Although carbon monoxide (CO) can modulate inflammatory processes, the influence of CO on adhesion molecules is less clear. This might be due to the limited amount of CO generated by haem degradation. We therefore tested the ability of a CO releasing molecule (CORM-3), used i

  8. Phaser crystallographic software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Airlie J; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Adams, Paul D; Winn, Martyn D; Storoni, Laurent C; Read, Randy J

    2007-08-01

    Phaser is a program for phasing macromolecular crystal structures by both molecular replacement and experimental phasing methods. The novel phasing algorithms implemented in Phaser have been developed using maximum likelihood and multivariate statistics. For molecular replacement, the new algorithms have proved to be significantly better than traditional methods in discriminating correct solutions from noise, and for single-wavelength anomalous dispersion experimental phasing, the new algorithms, which account for correlations between F(+) and F(-), give better phases (lower mean phase error with respect to the phases given by the refined structure) than those that use mean F and anomalous differences DeltaF. One of the design concepts of Phaser was that it be capable of a high degree of automation. To this end, Phaser (written in C++) can be called directly from Python, although it can also be called using traditional CCP4 keyword-style input. Phaser is a platform for future development of improved phasing methods and their release, including source code, to the crystallographic community.

  9. Transuranic Hybrid Materials: Crystallographic and Computational Metrics of Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surbella, Robert G. [Department; Ducati, Lucas C. [Department; Pellegrini, Kristi L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Autschbach, Jochen [Department; Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Cahill, Christopher L. [Department

    2017-07-26

    A family of twelve supramolecular [AnO2Cl4]2- (An = U, Np, Pu) containing compounds assembled via hydrogen and halogen bonds donated by substituted 4-X-pyridinium cations (X = H, Cl, Br, I) is reported. These materials were prepared from a room-temperature synthesis wherein crystallization of unhydrolyzed and valence pure [An(VI)O2Cl4]2- (An = U, Np, Pu) tectons are the norm. We present a hierarchy of assembly criteria based on crystallographic observations, and subsequently quantify the strengths of the non-covalent interactions using Kohn-Sham density functional calculations. We provide, for the first time, a detailed description of the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) of the actinyl tetrahalide dianions and reconcile crystallographically observed structural motifs and non-covalent interaction (NCI) acceptor-donor pairings. Our findings indicate that the average electrostatic potential across the halogen ligands (the acceptors) changes by only ~2 kJ mol-1 across the AnO22+ series, indicating the magnitude of the potential is independent of the metal center. The role of the cation is therefore critical in directing structural motifs and dictating the resulting hydrogen and halogen bond strengths, the former being stronger due to the positive charge centralized on the pyridyl nitrogen N-H+. Subsequent analyses using the Quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches support this conclusion and highlight the structure directing role of the cations. Whereas one can infer that the 2 Columbic attraction is the driver for assembly, the contribution of the non-covalent interaction is to direct the molecular-level arrangement (or disposition) of the tectons.

  10. Crystallographic topology and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.K.; Burnett, M.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, W.D. [Simon`s Rock Coll., Great Barrington, MA (United States). Div. of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

    1996-10-01

    Geometric topology and structural crystallography concepts are combined to define a new area we call Structural Crystallographic Topology, which may be of interest to both crystallographers and mathematicians. In this paper, we represent crystallographic symmetry groups by orbifolds and crystal structures by Morse - functions. The Morse function uses mildly overlapping Gaussian thermal-motion probability density functions centered on atomic sites to form a critical net with peak, pass, pale, and pit critical points joined into a graph by density gradient-flow separatrices. Critical net crystal structure drawings can be made with the ORTEP-III graphics pro- An orbifold consists of an underlying topological space with an embedded singular set that represents the Wyckoff sites of the crystallographic group. An orbifold for a point group, plane group, or space group is derived by gluing together equivalent edges or faces of a crystallographic asymmetric unit. The critical-net-on-orbifold model incorporates the classical invariant lattice complexes of crystallography and allows concise quotient-space topological illustrations to be drawn without the repetition that is characteristic of normal crystal structure drawings.

  11. The birth of the European Crystallographic Committee (ECC) and of the European Crystallographic Meetings (ECMs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the circumstances of the establishment of the European Crystallographic Committee, now the European Crystallographic Association, a regional associate of the IUCr, and of the European Crystallographic Meetings.

  12. The rare crystallographic structure of d(CGCGCG)(2): the natural spermidine molecule bound to the minor groove of left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG)(2) at 10 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Hirofumi; Tozuka, Yoshitaka; Da-Yang, Zhou; Ishida, Toshimasa; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2007-06-22

    Several crystal structure analyses of complexes of synthetic polyamine compounds, including N(1)-(2-(2-aminoethylamino))ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine PA(222) and N(1)-(2-(2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethylamino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine PA(2222), and left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG)(2) have been reported. However, until now, there have been no examples of naturally occurring polyamines bound to the minor groove of the left-handed Z-DNA of d(CGCGCG)(2) molecule. We have found that spermidine, a natural polyamine, is connected to the minor groove of left-handed Z-DNA of d(CGCGCG)(2) molecule in a crystalline complex grown at 10 degrees C. The electron density of the DNA molecule was clear enough to determine that the spermidine was connected in the minor groove of two symmetry related molecules of left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG)(2). This is the first example that a spermidine molecule can form a bridge conformation between two symmetry related molecules of left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG)(2) in the minor groove.

  13. The Crystallographic Information File (CIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I D Brown

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The Crystallographic Information File (CIF, owned by the International Union of Crystallography, is a file structure based on tag-value ASCII pairs with tags defined in machine-readable dictionaries. The crystallographic community publishes and archives large quantities of numeric information generated by crystal structure determinations, and CIF's acceptance was assured by its adoption as the submission format for Acta Crystallographica and by the obvious needs of the community. CIF's strength lies in its dictionaries, which define most of the concepts of crystallography; its weakness is the difficulty of writing software that exploits its full potential.

  14. Crystallographic B factor of critical residues at enzyme active site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海龙; 宋时英; 林政炯

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-seven sets of crystallographic enzyme data were selected from Protein Data Bank (PDB, 1995). The average temperature factors (B) of the critical residues at the active site and the whole molecule of those enzymes were calculated respectively. The statistical results showed that the critical residues at the active site of most of the enzymes had lower B factors than did the whole molecules, indicating that in the crystalline state the critical residues at the active site of the natural enzymes possess more stable conformation than do the whole molecules. The flexibility of the active site during the unfolding by denaturing was also discussed.

  15. Crystallographic structure solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millán, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional view of molecules at the atomic level provided by X-ray crystallography is not only extremely informative but is also easily and intuitively understood by humans, who very much rely on their vision. However, unlike microscopy, this technique does not directly yield an image. The structural model cannot be directly calculated from the diffraction data, as only the intensities of scattered beams and not their phases are experimentally accessible. In order to obtain the 3-dimensional structure phases have to be obtained by either additional experimental or computational methods. This is known as the phase problem in crystallography. In this manuscript we provide an overview of major milestones along the quest for the lost phases.La cristalografía proporciona una visión tridimensional de las moléculas a un nivel de detalle atómico, que no sólo resulta muy informativa sino que además puede ser fácil e intuitivamente comprendida por seres tan predominantemente visuales como solemos ser los humanos. Sin embargo, al contrario que la microscopía, esta técnica no ofrece directamente una imagen y el modelo estructural no puede calcularse directamente a partir de los datos de difracción, ya que solamente las intensidades de los rayos difractados y no sus fases son accesibles a la medida experimental. Para determinar la estructura tridimensional las fases deben ser obtenidas por medio de métodos adicionales, bien experimentales o computacionales. Esto constituye el problema de la fase en cristalografía. En este artículo ofreceremos una visión general de los principales hitos en la búsqueda de las fases perdidas.

  16. Triboluminescence dominated by crystallographic orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuifang; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Wen, Shizhu; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-05-01

    Triboluminescence (TL) is an optical phenomenon that has a long and varied history with broad applications, such as damage detection, X-ray source, and mass health monitoring sensor. So far, the properties and mechanisms of TL remain not completely understood. The TL properties emitted during the sliding contact between Al2O3 and SiO2 surfaces were studied along different crystallographic orientations. In this study, the TL intensity of Al2O3 was significantly enhanced as Al2O3 surface was along a particular crystallographic orientation, which is an unconventional phenomenon. TL enhancement of Al2O3 was not affected by air atmosphere and atomic stocking mode of Al2O3. The enhancement mechanism of Al2O3 may be influenced by the surface state of Al2O3. This work provides a new method to control the intensity of TL and novel ideas to elucidate the TL mechanism.

  17. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  18. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  19. Separated-pair independent particle model and the generalized Brillouin theorem: ab initio calculations on the dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method is developed to optimize the separated-pair independent particle (SPIP) wave function; it is a special case of the separated-pair theory obtained by using two-term natural expansions of the geminals. The orbitals are optimized by a theory based on the generalized Brillouin theorem and iterative configuration interaction (CI) calculations in the space of the SPIP function and its single excitations. The geminal expansion coefficients are optimized by serial 2 x 2 CI calculations. Formulas are derived for the matrix elements. An algorithm to implement the method is presented, and the work needed to evaluate the molecular integrals is discussed. (auth)

  20. Small molecule screening reveals a transcription-independent pro-survival function of androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narizhneva, Natalia V; Tararova, Natalia D; Ryabokon, Petro; Shyshynova, Inna; Prokvolit, Anatoly; Komarov, Pavel G; Purmal, Andrei A; Gudkov, Andrei V; Gurova, Katerina V

    2009-12-15

    In prostate cancer (PCa) patients, initial responsiveness to androgen deprivation therapy is frequently followed by relapse due to development of treatment-resistant androgen-independent PCa. This is typically associated with acquisition of mutations in AR that allow activity as a transcription factor in the absence of ligand, indicating that androgen-independent PCa remains dependent on AR function. Our strategy to effectively target AR in androgen-independent PCa involved using a cell-based readout to isolate small molecules that inhibit AR transactivation function through mechanisms other than modulation of ligand binding. A number of the identified inhibitors were toxic to AR-expressing PCa cells regardless of their androgen dependence. Among these, some only suppressed PCa cell growth (ARTIS), while others induced cell death (ARTIK). ARTIK, but not ARTIS, compounds caused disappearance of AR protein from treated cells. siRNA against AR behaved like ARTIK compounds, while a dominant negative AR mutant that prevents AR-mediated transactivation but does not eliminate the protein showed only a growth suppressive effect. These observations reveal a transcription-independent function of AR that is essential for PCa cell viability and, therefore, is an ideal target for anti-PCa treatment. Indeed, several of the identified AR inhibitors demonstrated in vivo efficacy in mouse models of PCa and are candidates for pharmacologic optimization.

  1. Long-term antibody synthesis in vitro- IV. Independent segregation of antibodies directed to different determinants of an antigen molecule in its native configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway de Macario, E; Macario, A J

    1976-10-01

    Independent segregation of antibody populations directed to different portions of E. coli beta-d-galactosidase occurs during the immune response against the enzyme. Anti-enzyme antibodies able to interact and activate a naturally occurring ligand, the mutant-defective enzyme AMEF (Antibody Mediated Enzyme Factor), do not parallel anti-enzyme antibodies which are measured by a coprecipitation assay involving precipitation of the wild-type molecule. Dissociation of the two antibody populations is best achieved in microcultures sustaining long-lasting responses. Similarly, anti-NIP (4-hydroxy-3-iodo-5-nitrophenylacetic acid) antibodies could be elicited without concomitant synthesis of anti-carrier antibodies by short-term challenge in vitro of ovalbumin-NIP-primed lymph nodes with a heterologous conjugate in which the hapten NIP was coupled to a carrier known to be non-immunogenic under the conditions of challenge. The potential applications of these findings are indicated, namely: large-scale production of monospecific antibodies in vitro; and the possibility of studying the regulatory role of antibodies directed towards on portion of the immunogenic molecule on the response to other regions of the same molecule.

  2. A crystallographic perspective on sharing data and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Ian J; Groom, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    The crystallographic community is in many ways an exemplar of the benefits and practices of sharing data. Since the inception of the technique, virtually every published crystal structure has been made available to others. This has been achieved through the establishment of several specialist data centres, including the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, which produces the Cambridge Structural Database. Containing curated structures of small organic molecules, some containing a metal, the database has been produced for almost 50 years. This has required the development of complex informatics tools and an environment allowing expert human curation. As importantly, a financial model has evolved which has, to date, ensured the sustainability of the resource. However, the opportunities afforded by technological changes and changing attitudes to sharing data make it an opportune moment to review current practices.

  3. Determination of crystallographic intensities from sparse data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Ayyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray serial microcrystallography involves the collection and merging of frames of diffraction data from randomly oriented protein microcrystals. The number of diffracted X-rays in each frame is limited by radiation damage, and this number decreases with crystal size. The data in the frame are said to be sparse if too few X-rays are collected to determine the orientation of the microcrystal. It is commonly assumed that sparse crystal diffraction frames cannot be merged, thereby setting a lower limit to the size of microcrystals that may be merged with a given source fluence. The EMC algorithm [Loh & Elser (2009, Phys. Rev. E, 80, 026705] has previously been applied to reconstruct structures from sparse noncrystalline data of objects with unknown orientations [Philipp et al. (2012, Opt. Express, 20, 13129–13137; Ayyer et al. (2014, Opt. Express, 22, 2403–2413]. Here, it is shown that sparse data which cannot be oriented on a per-frame basis can be used effectively as crystallographic data. As a proof-of-principle, reconstruction of the three-dimensional diffraction intensity using sparse data frames from a 1.35 kDa molecule crystal is demonstrated. The results suggest that serial microcrystallography is, in principle, not limited by the fluence of the X-ray source, and collection of complete data sets should be feasible at, for instance, storage-ring X-ray sources.

  4. Internet Based Open Access Crystallographic Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Girish; Seipel, Bjoern; Harvey, Morgan; Garrick, Will; Moeck, Peter

    2006-05-01

    Two freely accessible crystallographic databases are discussed: the Crystallographic Open Database (COD, http://crystallography.net) which contains over 37,000 crystal structures, and the Nano-Crystallography Database (NCD, http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu) which we recently started to support image-based nanocrystallography and (nano) materials science education. Both databases collect crystallographic relevant information in a standardized format; the Crystallographic Information File (CIF). CIF is the standard file format adopted by the International Union of Crystallography (http://iucr.org) for the archiving and distribution of crystallographic information. A subset of the COD, the Predicted Crystallographic Online Database, allows for 3D structural displays of structural polyhedra and wireframes of approximately 2,600 entries. Since electron microscopist are interested in simple, yet technologically important materials, the crystallographic information for those materials will be included in our database. At our NCD site, entries in the COD and the NCD can be visualized in three dimensions (3D) along with (2D) lattice fringe fingerprints plots. The latter supports the identification of unknown nanocrystal phases from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images. Morphological crystal information from the database ``Bestimmungstabellen f"ur Kristalle/ ???????????? ??????????,'' (A.K. Boldyrew and W.W. Doliwo-Dobrowolsky, Zentrales Wissenschaftlichers Institute der Geologie und Sch"urfung, Leningrad/ Moscow, 1937/1939) will also be included in the NCD to support image-based nanocrystallography in 3D.

  5. The New NRL Crystallographic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Michael; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hicks, David; Toher, Cormac; Levy, Ohad; Hart, Gus

    For many years the Naval Research Laboratory maintained an online graphical database of crystal structures for a wide variety of materials. This database has now been redesigned, updated and integrated with the AFLOW framework for high throughput computational materials discovery (http://materials.duke.edu/aflow.html). For each structure we provide an image showing the atomic positions; the primitive vectors of the lattice and the basis vectors of every atom in the unit cell; the space group and Wyckoff positions; Pearson symbols; common names; and Strukturbericht designations, where available. References for each structure are provided, as well as a Crystallographic Information File (CIF). The database currently includes almost 300 entries and will be continuously updated and expanded. It enables easy search of the various structures based on their underlying symmetries, either by Bravais lattice, Pearson symbol, Strukturbericht designation or commonly used prototypes. The talk will describe the features of the database, and highlight its utility for high throughput computational materials design. Work at NRL is funded by a Contract with the Duke University Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  6. Defining the Crystallographic Fingerprint of Extraterrestrial Treasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, L. V.; Bland, P. A.; Timms, N. E.; Daly, L.; Benedix, G. K.; Trimby, P. W.

    2016-08-01

    An approach to determine the crystallographic fingerprint of chondritic matrix grains, which is complimentary to the geochemical signature commonly identified to constrain some aspects of the petrogenesis of a sample.

  7. MicroRNA let-7b targets important cell cycle molecules in malignant melanoma cells and interferes with anchorage-independent growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia Schultz; Peter Lorenz; Gerd Gross; Saleh Ibrahim; Manfred Kunz

    2008-01-01

    A microRNA expression screen was performed analyzing 157 different microRNAs in laser-microdissected tissues from benign melanocytic nevi (n=10) and primary malignant melanomas (n=10),using quantitative real-time PCR.Differential expression was found for 72 microRNAs.Members of the let-7 family of microRNAs were significantly downregulated in primary melanomas as compared with benign nevi,suggestive for a possible role of these molecules as tumor suppressors in malignant melanoma.Interestingly,similar findings had been described for lung and colon cancer.Overexpression of let-7b in melanoma cells in vitro downregulated the expression of cyclins D1,D3,and A,and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 4,all of which had been described to play a role in melanoma development.The effect oflet-7b on protein expression was due to targeting of 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of individual mRNAs,as exemplified by reporter gene analyses for cyclin DI.In line with its downmodulating effects on cell cycle regulators,let-7b inhibited cell cycle progression and anchorage-independent growth of melanoma cells.Taken together,these findings not only point to new regulatory mechanisms of early melanoma development,but also may open avenues for future targeted therapies of this tumor.

  8. Crystallographic studies of gas sorption in metal–organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Elliot J.; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Brammer, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous crystalline materials of modular design. One of the primary applications of these materials is in the adsorption and separation of gases, with potential benefits to the energy, transport and medical sectors. In situ crystallography of MOFs under gas atmospheres has enabled the behaviour of the frameworks under gas loading to be investigated and has established the precise location of adsorbed gas molecules in a significant number of MOFs. This article reviews progress in such crystallographic studies, which has taken place over the past decade, but has its origins in earlier studies of zeolites, clathrates etc. The review considers studies by single-crystal or powder diffraction using either X-rays or neutrons. Features of MOFs that strongly affect gas sorption behaviour are discussed in the context of in situ crystallographic studies, specifically framework flexibility, and the presence of (organic) functional groups and unsaturated (open) metal sites within pores that can form specific interactions with gas molecules. PMID:24892587

  9. Caspase-1-independent IL-1 release mediates blister formation in autoantibody-induced tissue injury through modulation of endothelial adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Hengameh; Lockmann, Anike; Hund, Anna-Carina; Samavedam, Unni K S R L; Pipi, Elena; Vafia, Katerina; Hauenschild, Eva; Kalies, Kathrin; Pas, Hendri H; Jonkman, Marcel F; Iwata, Hiroaki; Recke, Andreas; Schön, Michael P; Zillikens, Detlef; Schmidt, Enno; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2015-04-15

    Although reports documented aberrant cytokine expression in autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBDs), cytokine-targeting therapies have not been established in these disorders. We showed previously that IL-6 treatment protected against tissue destruction in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), an AIBD caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen (COL7). The anti-inflammatory effects of IL-6 were mediated by induction of IL-1ra, and prophylactic IL-1ra administration prevented blistering. In this article, we demonstrate elevated serum concentrations of IL-1β in both mice with experimental EBA induced by injection of anti-COL7 IgG and in EBA patients. Increased IL-1α and IL-1β expression also was observed in the skin of anti-COL7 IgG-injected wild-type mice compared with the significantly less diseased IL-1R-deficient or wild-type mice treated with the IL-1R antagonist anakinra or anti-IL-1β. These findings suggested that IL-1 contributed to recruitment of inflammatory cells into the skin. Accordingly, the expression of ICAM-1 was decreased in IL-1R-deficient and anakinra-treated mice injected with anti-COL7. This effect appeared to be specifically attributable to IL-1 because anakinra blocked the upregulation of different endothelial adhesion molecules on IL-1-stimulated, but not on TNF-α-stimulated, cultured endothelial cells. Interestingly, injection of caspase-1/11-deficient mice with anti-COL7 IgG led to the same extent of skin lesions as in wild-type mice. Collectively, our data suggest that IL-1, independently of caspase-1, contributes to the pathogenesis of EBA. Because anti-IL-1β in a prophylactic setting and anakinra in a quasi-therapeutic setting (i.e., when skin lesions had already developed) improved experimental EBA, IL-1 appears to be a potential therapeutic target for EBA and related AIBDs.

  10. Nexus, crystallographic computing all around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranswick, Lachlan Michael David; Bisson, William; Cockcroft, Jeremy Karl

    2008-01-01

    Crystallographic Nexus CD-ROMs, containing a range of free crystallographic software for single-crystal and powder diffraction available on the Internet, have been distributed on request since 1996. The free CD is made in the form of a ;virtual Internet' with the main intent of benefiting crystallographers with inadequate Internet access. The IUCr funds an annual/biennial update which is distributed to known previous recipients. Feedback from current recipients indicates the CD is still useful. The most current IUCr-funded CD is being produced by the CCP14 project at University College London and The Royal Institution UK for distribution to the ECM 2007 and AsCA 2007 conferences.

  11. Non-Crystallographic Symmetry in Packing Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery G. Rau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the following, isomorphism of an arbitrary finite group of symmetry, non-crystallographic symmetry (quaternion groups, Pauli matrices groups, and other abstract subgroups, in addition to the permutation group, are considered. Application of finite groups of permutations to the packing space determines space tilings by policubes (polyominoes and forms a structure. Such an approach establishes the computer design of abstract groups of symmetry. Every finite discrete model of the real structure is an element of symmetry groups, including non-crystallographic ones. The set packing spaces of the same order N characterizes discrete deformation transformations of the structure.

  12. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and flow-mediated dilatation are related to the estimated risk of coronary heart disease independently from each other

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, D.R.; Broekmans, W.M.R.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Poppel, G. van; Bots, M.L.; Kluft, C.; Princen, J.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) are measures of distinct functions of the endothelium, reflecting nitric oxide (NO)-mediated and pro-inflammatory status, respectively. The comparative value of the two measures

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of an SH3 domain from the IB1 scaffold protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dar, Imran; Bonny, Christophe; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2003-01-01

    with unmodified protein and deliberately oxidized protein have led to different crystal forms. X-ray data have been collected to 3.0 A resolution from a crystal form with rectangular prism morphology. These crystals are orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2(1)), with unit-cell parameters a = 45.9, b = 57.0, c = 145.5 A....... These are the first crystallographic data on a scaffold molecule such as IB1 to be reported....

  14. Crystallographic theory of the martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The martensitic transformation is one of the most researched topics in the materials science during the 20th century. The second half of this century was mainly remembered by the development of several theories related with the kinetics of phase transformation, the mechanisms involved in the nucleation phenomenon, and the way as the crystallographic change is produced. In this paper are described the fundamental concepts that are defined in the crystallographic framework of the martensitic transformation. The study is focused on the application of the most outstanding crystallographic models: the Bain; the Wechsler, Lieberman & Read; and the Bowles & Mackenzie. The topic is presented based upon the particular features of the martensitic transformation, such as its non-diffusional character, type of interface between parent (austenite and product (martensite phases, the formation of substructural defects, and the shape change; all of these features are mathematically described by equations aimed to predict how the transformation will take place rather than to explain the actual movement of the atoms within the structure. This mathematical development is known as the Phenomenological Theory of Martensite Crystallography (PTMC.

  15. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Susana C. M. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Leal, Ricardo M. F. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Mitchell, Edward P. [EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Forsyth, V. Trevor, E-mail: tforsyth@ill.fr [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  16. World directory of crystallographers and of other scientists employing crystallographic methods

    CERN Document Server

    Filippini, G; Hashizume, H; Torriani, I; Duax, W

    1995-01-01

    The 9th edition of the World Directory of Crystallographers and of Other Scientists Employing Crystallographic Methods, which contains 7907 entries embracing 72 countries, differs considerably from the 8th edition, published in 1990. The content has been updated, and the methods used to acquire the information presented and to produce this new edition of the Directory have involved the latest advances in technology. The Directory is now also available as a regularly updated electronic database, accessible via e-mail, Telnet, Gopher, World-Wide Web, and Mosaic. Full details are given in an Appendix to the printed edition.

  17. Crystallographic Analysis of Tapering of ADP Crystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of crystallographic characteristics of ADP (ammonium dihydrogen phosphate) crystals and the selected growth conditions, the growth habit of ADP crystals was studied. In comparison with pyramidal planes, the growth rate of prismatic faces is slower and more sensitive to the additives and impurities for ADP crystals. When the supersaturation is low, the advance of growth steps on prismatic face can be blocked by ethanol or impurities, the crystal morphology is changed from the tetragonal prism to shuttle (i.e., the tapered shape). The tapering formation of ADP crystallites was structurally studied in a novel view.

  18. Orbits of crystallographic embedding of non-crystallographic groups and applications to virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarock, Reidun; Valiunas, Motiejus; Zappa, Emilio

    2015-11-01

    The architecture of infinite structures with non-crystallographic symmetries can be modelled via aperiodic tilings, but a systematic construction method for finite structures with non-crystallographic symmetry at different radial levels is still lacking. This paper presents a group theoretical method for the construction of finite nested point sets with non-crystallographic symmetry. Akin to the construction of quasicrystals, a non-crystallographic group G is embedded into the point group P of a higher-dimensional lattice and the chains of all G-containing subgroups are constructed. The orbits of lattice points under such subgroups are determined, and it is shown that their projection into a lower-dimensional G-invariant subspace consists of nested point sets with G-symmetry at each radial level. The number of different radial levels is bounded by the index of G in the subgroup of P. In the case of icosahedral symmetry, all subgroup chains are determined explicitly and it is illustrated that these point sets in projection provide blueprints that approximate the organization of simple viral capsids, encoding information on the structural organization of capsid proteins and the genomic material collectively, based on two case studies. Contrary to the affine extensions previously introduced, these orbits endow virus architecture with an underlying finite group structure, which lends itself better to the modelling of dynamic properties than its infinite-dimensional counterpart.

  19. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues.

  20. Crystallographic control on the substructure of nacre tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio G; Mutvei, Harry; Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio J; Bonarski, Jan T; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Pina, Carlos M; Rousseau, Marthe; Macías-Sánchez, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Nacre tablets of mollusks develop two kinds of features when either the calcium carbonate or the organic portions are removed: (1) parallel lineations (vermiculations) formed by elongated carbonate rods, and (2) hourglass patterns, which appear in high relief when etched or in low relief if bleached. In untreated tablets, SEM and AFM data show that vermiculations correspond to aligned and fused aragonite nanogloblules, which are partly surrounded by thin organic pellicles. EBSD mapping of the surfaces of tablets indicates that the vermiculations are invariably parallel to the crystallographic a-axis of aragonite and that the triangles are aligned with the b-axis and correspond to the advance of the {010} faces during the growth of the tablet. According to our interpretation, the vermiculations appear because organic molecules during growth are expelled from the a-axis, where the Ca-CO3 bonds are the shortest. In this way, the subunits forming nacre merge uninterruptedly, forming chains parallel to the a-axis, whereas the organic molecules are expelled to the sides of these chains. Hourglass patterns would be produced by preferential adsorption of organic molecules along the {010}, as compared to the {100} faces. A model is presented for the nanostructure of nacre tablets. SEM and EBSD data also show the existence within the tablets of nanocrystalline units, which are twinned on {110} with the rest of the tablet. Our study shows that the growth dynamics of nacre tablets (and bioaragonite in general) results from the interaction at two different and mutually related levels: tablets and nanogranules.

  1. Identification and Characterization of a Potent Activator of p53-Independent Cellular Senescence via a Small-Molecule Screen for Modifiers of the Integrated Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Carly M.; Papandreou, Ioanna; Guttmann, David M.; Maas, Nancy L.; Diehl, J. Alan; Witze, Eric S.; Koong, Albert C.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Stress Response (ISR) is a signaling program that enables cellular adaptation to stressful conditions like hypoxia and nutrient deprivation in the tumor microenvironment. An important effector of the ISR is activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a transcription factor that regulates genes involved in redox homeostasis and amino acid metabolism and transport. Because both inhibition and overactivation of the ISR can induce tumor cell death, modulators of ATF4 expression could prove to be clinically useful. In this study, chemical libraries were screened for modulators of ATF4 expression. We identified one compound, E235 (N-(1-benzyl-piperidin-4-yl)-2-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-benzo[d]imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-7-carboxamide), that activated the ISR and dose-dependently increased levels of ATF4 in transformed cells. A dose-dependent decrease in viability was observed in several mouse and human tumor cell lines, and knockdown of ATF4 significantly increased the antiproliferative effects of E235. Interestingly, low μM doses of E235 induced senescence in many cell types, including HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. E235-mediated induction of senescence was not dependent on p21 or p53; however, p21 conferred protection against the growth inhibitory effects of E235. Treatment with E235 resulted in an increase in cells arrested at the G2/M phase with a concurrent decrease in S-phase cells. E235 also activated DNA damage response signaling, resulting in increased levels of Ser15-phosphorylated p53, γ-H2AX, and phosphorylated checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), although E235 does not appear to cause physical DNA damage. Induction of γ-H2AX was abrogated in ATF4 knockdown cells. Together, these results suggest that modulation of the ISR pathway with the small molecule E235 could be a promising antitumor strategy. PMID:23229510

  2. X-ray crystallographic studies of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbeda, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox active metals and to the complication of structural changes that may be induced by X-ray irradiation of protein crystals.

  3. The X-ray system of crystallographic programs for any computer having a PIDGIN FORTRAN compiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J. M.; Kruger, G. J.; Ammon, H. L.; Dickinson, C.; Hall, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    A manual is presented for the use of a library of crystallographic programs. This library, called the X-ray system, is designed to carry out the calculations required to solve the structure of crystals by diffraction techniques. It has been implemented at the University of Maryland on the Univac 1108. It has, however, been developed and run on a variety of machines under various operating systems. It is considered to be an essentially machine independent library of applications programs. The report includes definition of crystallographic computing terms, program descriptions, with some text to show their application to specific crystal problems, detailed card input descriptions, mass storage file structure and some example run streams.

  4. Variations in Reactivity on Different Crystallographic Orientations of Cerium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, David R [ORNL; Albrecht, Peter M [ORNL; Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide is a principal component in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. One of its key characteristics is the ability to provide or remove oxygen in chemical reactions. The different crystallographic faces of ceria present significantly different surface structures and compositions that may alter the catalytic reactivity. The structure and composition determine the number of coordination vacancies surrounding surface atoms, the availability of adsorption sites, the spacing between adsorption sites and the ability to remove O from the surface. To investigate the role of surface orientation on reactivity, CeO2 films were grown with two different orientations. CeO2(100) films were grown ex situ by pulsed laser deposition on Nb-doped SrTiO3(100). CeO2(111) films were grown in situ by thermal deposition of Ce metal onto Ru(0001) in an oxygen atmosphere. The chemical reactivity was characterized by the adsorption and decomposition of various molecules such as alcohols, aldehydes and organic acids. In general the CeO2(100) surface was found to be more active, i.e. molecules adsorbed more readily and reacted to form new products, especially on a fully oxidized substrate. However the CeO2(100) surface was less selective with a greater propensity to produce CO, CO2 and water as products. The differences in chemical reactivity are discussed in light of possible structural terminations of the two surfaces. Recently nanocubes and nano-octahedra have been synthesized that display CeO2(100) and CeO2(111) faces, respectively. These nanoparticles enable us to correlate reactions on high surface area model catalysts at atmospheric pressure with model single crystal films in a UHV environment.

  5. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-03-14

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  6. Channel-selective independent sorption and collection of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules by Cs2[Cr3O(OOCC2H5)6(H2O)3]2[alpha-SiW12O40] ionic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunjie; Lesbani, Aldes; Kawamoto, Ryosuke; Uchida, Sayaka; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2006-11-08

    An ionic crystal of Cs2[Cr3O(OOCC2H5)6(H2O)3]2[alpha-SiW12O40].4H2O 1a with hydrophilic and hydrophobic channels has been designed and successfully synthesized. The guest-free phase 1b sorbs dichloromethane and water in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic channels, respectively. The rate and equilibrium amount of the dichloromethane sorption into the hydrophobic channel and those of water into the hydrophilic channel were independent of each other. The sorption properties can be applied to the channel-selective sorption and collection of hydrophobic (dichloromethane) and hydrophilic (water) molecules from the mixture.

  7. Crystallographic orientation dependent etching of graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemes-Incze, Peter; Biro, Laszlo Peter [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, PO. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Magda, Gabor [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), PO Box 91, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Kamaras, Katalin [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, PO Box 49, 1525, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-04-15

    Graphene has gripped the scientific community ever since its discovery in 2004, with very promising electronic properties and hopes to integrate graphene into nanoelectronic devices. For graphene to make its way into electronic devices, two major obstacles have to be overcome: reproducible preparation of large area graphene samples and patterning techniques to obtain functional components. In this paper we present a graphene etching technique, which is crystallographic orientation selective and allows for the patterning of graphene layers using a chemical reduction process. The process involves the reduction of the SiO{sub 2} support by the carbon in the graphene itself. This reaction only occurs at the sample edges and does not result in the degradation of the graphene crystal lattice itself. However, we have observed evidence of strong hole doping in our etched samples. This etching technique opens up new possibilities in graphene patterning and modification. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Crystallographic interpretation of Galois symmetries for magnetic pentagonal ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, J.; Lulek, T.; Łabuz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Galois symmetry of exact Bethe Ansatz eigenstates for the magnetic pentagonal ring within the XXX model are investigated by a comparison with crystallographic constructions of space groups. It follows that the arithmetic symmetry of Bethe parameters for the interior of the Brillouin zone admits crystallographic interpretation, in terms of the periodic square Z2 ×Z2 , that is the two-dimensional crystal lattice with Born-Karman period two in both directions.

  9. Evaluating Free Energies of Binding and Conservation of Crystallographic Waters Using SZMAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Moustakas, Demetri T; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane; Lamb, Michelle L

    2015-08-24

    The SZMAP method computes binding free energies and the corresponding thermodynamic components for water molecules in the binding site of a protein structure [ SZMAP, 1.0.0 ; OpenEye Scientific Software Inc. : Santa Fe, NM, USA , 2011 ]. In this work, the ability of SZMAP to predict water structure and thermodynamic stability is examined for the X-ray crystal structures of a series of protein-ligand complexes. SZMAP results correlate with higher-level replica exchange thermodynamic integration double decoupling calculations of the absolute free energy of bound waters in the test set complexes. In addition, SZMAP calculations show good agreement with experimental data in terms of water conservation (across multiple crystal structures) and B-factors over a subset of the test set. In particular, the SZMAP neutral entropy difference term calculated at crystallographic water positions within each of the complex structures correlates well with whether that crystallographic water is conserved or displaceable. Furthermore, the calculated entropy of the water probe relative to the continuum shows a significant degree of correlation with the B-factors associated with the oxygen atoms of the water molecules. Taken together, these results indicate that SZMAP is capable of quantitatively predicting water positions and their energetics and is potentially a useful tool for determining which waters to attempt to displace, maintain, or build in through water-mediated interactions when evolving a lead series during a drug discovery program.

  10. Calculation of Crystallographic Texture of BCC Steels During Cold Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arpan

    2017-05-01

    BCC alloys commonly tend to develop strong fibre textures and often represent as isointensity diagrams in φ 1 sections or by fibre diagrams. Alpha fibre in bcc steels is generally characterised by crystallographic axis parallel to the rolling direction. The objective of present research is to correlate carbon content, carbide dispersion, rolling reduction, Euler angles (ϕ) (when φ 1 = 0° and φ 2 = 45° along alpha fibre) and the resulting alpha fibre texture orientation intensity. In the present research, Bayesian neural computation has been employed to correlate these and compare with the existing feed-forward neural network model comprehensively. Excellent match to the measured texture data within the bounding box of texture training data set has been already predicted through the feed-forward neural network model by other researchers. Feed-forward neural network prediction outside the bounds of training texture data showed deviations from the expected values. Currently, Bayesian computation has been similarly applied to confirm that the predictions are reasonable in the context of basic metallurgical principles, and matched better outside the bounds of training texture data set than the reported feed-forward neural network. Bayesian computation puts error bars on predicted values and allows significance of each individual parameters to be estimated. Additionally, it is also possible by Bayesian computation to estimate the isolated influence of particular variable such as carbon concentration, which exactly cannot in practice be varied independently. This shows the ability of the Bayesian neural network to examine the new phenomenon in situations where the data cannot be accessed through experiments.

  11. Crystallographic analysis of small ribozymes and riboswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Geoffrey M; Liberman, Joseph A; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Krucinska, Jolanta; Salim, Mohammad; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Ribozymes and riboswitches are RNA motifs that accelerate biological reactions and regulate gene expression in response to metabolite recognition, respectively. These RNA molecules gain functionality via complex folding that cannot be predicted a priori, and thus requires high-resolution three-dimensional structure determination to locate key functional attributes. Herein, we present an overview of the methods used to determine small RNA structures with an emphasis on RNA preparation, crystallization, and structure refinement. We draw upon examples from our own research in the analysis of the leadzyme ribozyme, the hairpin ribozyme, a class I preQ(1) riboswitch, and variants of a larger class II preQ(1) riboswitch. The methods presented provide a guide for comparable investigations of noncoding RNA molecules including a 48-solution, "first choice" RNA crystal screen compiled from our prior successes with commercially available screens.

  12. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crys...

  13. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Ronny C.; McFeeters, Hana; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Robert L.

    2014-10-15

    The peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase enzyme from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray structural analysis. Suitable crystals were grown using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method after one week of incubation against a reservoir solution consisting of 20% polyethylene glycol 4000, 100 mM Tris pH 7.5, 10%(v/v) isopropyl alcohol. The crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.77 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P6122 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.62,c = 155.20 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of a single copy of the enzyme molecule with a 43% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.43 Å3 Da-1. The crystallographic structure reported here will serve as the foundation for future structure-guided efforts towards the development of novel small-molecule inhibitors specific to bacterial Pths.

  14. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  15. Crystallographic orientation and concentric layers in spicules of calcareous sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, André Linhares; Ribeiro, Bárbara; Lemos, Moara; Werckmann, Jacques; Borojevic, Radovan; Fromont, Jane; Klautau, Michelle; Farina, Marcos

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the crystallography of calcareous sponges (Porifera) spicules and the organization pattern of the concentric layers present in their inner structure were investigated in 10 species of the subclass Calcaronea and three species of the subclass Calcinea. Polished spicules had specific concentric patterns that varied depending on the plane in which the spicules were sectioned. A 3D model of the concentric layers was created to interpret these patterns and the biomineralization process of the triactine spicules. The morphology of the spicules was compared with the crystallographic orientation of the calcite crystals by analyzing the Kikuchi diffraction patterns using a scanning electron microscope. Triactine spicules from the subclass Calcinea had actines (rays) elongated in the 〈210〉 direction, which is perpendicular to the c-axis. The scale spicules of the hypercalcified species Murrayona phanolepis presented the c-axis perpendicular to the plane of the scale, which is in accordance with the crystallography of all other Calcinea. The triactine spicules of the calcaronean species had approximately the same crystallographic orientation with the unpaired actine elongated in the ∼[211] direction. Only one Calcaronea species, whose triactine was regular, had a different orientation. Three different crystallographic orientations were found in diactines. Spicules with different morphologies, dimensions and positions in the sponge body had similar crystallographic directions suggesting that the crystallographic orientation of spicules in calcareous sponges is conserved through evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preliminary crystallographic characterization of ricin agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, E C; Tonevitsky, A G; Temiakov, D E; Agapov, I I; Saward, S; Palmer, R A

    1997-08-01

    The quaternary structure of ricin agglutinin (RCA) has been determined by x-ray crystallography. The refined structure of ricin proved to be a successful search model using the molecular replacement method of phase determination. RCA forms an elongated molecule of dimensions 120 A x 60 A x 40 A with two A chains at the center and a B chain at each end. The A chains are covalently associated via a disulfide bridge between Cys 156 of both chains. Additional contacts at residues 114-5 stabilize the dimer interface. The covalent association of RCAA chains was confirmed by gel filtration under reducing and nonreducing conditions.

  17. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  18. Crystallographic Topology 2: Overview and Work in Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    This overview describes an application of contemporary geometric topology and stochastic process concepts to structural crystallography. In this application, crystallographic groups become orbifolds, crystal structures become Morse functions on orbifolds, and vibrating atoms in a crystal become vector valued Gaussian measures with the Radon-Nikodym property. Intended crystallographic benefits include new methods for visualization of space groups and crystal structures, analysis of the thermal motion patterns seen in ORTEP drawings, and a classification scheme for crystal structures based on their Heegaard splitting properties.

  19. Crystal structure refinement a crystallographers guide to SHELXL

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A crystallographers guide to SHELXL, covering various aspects of practical crystal structure refinement, from the treatment of hydrogen atoms to the assignment of atom types, and more. After an introduction to SHELXL, a brief survey of crystal structure refinement is provided.

  20. Computational simulations of asymmetric fluxes of large molecules through gap junction channel pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhijit; Appadurai, Daniel A; Akoum, Nazem W; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-07

    Gap junction channels are formed out of connexin isoforms, which enable molecule and ion selective diffusion amongst neighboring cells. HeLa cells expressing distinct connexins (Cx) allow the formation of heterotypic channels, where we observed a molecular charge-independent preferential flux of large fluorescent molecules in the Cx45 to Cx43 direction. We hypothesize that the pore's shape is a significant factor along-side charge and transjunctional voltages for this asymmetric flux. To test this hypothesis, we developed a 3D computational model simulating Brownian diffusion of large molecules in a gap junction channel pore. The basic pore contour was derived from x-ray crystallographic structures of Cx43 and Cx26 and approximated using basic geometric shapes. Lucifer yellow dye molecules and cesium counter-ions were modeled as spheres using their respective Stokes radii. Our simulation results from simple diffusion and constant concentration gradient experiments showed that only charged particles yield asymmetric fluxes in heterotypic pores. While increasing the inner mouth size resulted in a near-quadratic rise in flux, the rise was asymptotic for outer mouth radii increase. Probability maps and average force per particle per pore section explain the asymmetric flux with variation in pore shape. Furthermore, the simulation results are in agreement with our in vitro experimental results with HeLa cells in Cx43-Cx45 heterotypic configurations. The presence of asymmetric fluxes can help us to understand effects of the molecular structure of the pore and predict potential differences in vivo.

  1. Recovery of crystallographic texture in remineralized dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Samera; Anderson, Paul; Al-Jawad, Maisoon

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) and position of the (002) Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected enamel to regain

  2. Crystallographic Mapping of Guided Nanowires by Second Harmonic Generation Polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeman, Lior; Ben-Zvi, Regev; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Oron, Dan; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-02-08

    The growth of horizontal nanowires (NWs) guided by epitaxial and graphoepitaxial relations with the substrate is becoming increasingly attractive owing to the possibility of controlling their position, direction, and crystallographic orientation. In guided NWs, as opposed to the extensively characterized vertically grown NWs, there is an increasing need for understanding the relation between structure and properties, specifically the role of the epitaxial relation with the substrate. Furthermore, the uniformity of crystallographic orientation along guided NWs and over the substrate has yet to be checked. Here we perform highly sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) polarimetry of polar and nonpolar guided ZnO NWs grown on R-plane and M-plane sapphire. We optically map large areas on the substrate in a nondestructive way and find that the crystallographic orientations of the guided NWs are highly selective and specific for each growth direction with respect to the substrate lattice. In addition, we perform SHG polarimetry along individual NWs and find that the crystallographic orientation is preserved along the NW in both polar and nonpolar NWs. While polar NWs show highly uniform SHG along their axis, nonpolar NWs show a significant change in the local nonlinear susceptibility along a few micrometers, reflected in a reduction of 40% in the ratio of the SHG along different crystal axes. We suggest that these differences may be related to strain accumulation along the nonpolar wires. We find SHG polarimetry to be a powerful tool to study both selectivity and uniformity of crystallographic orientations of guided NWs with different epitaxial relations.

  3. Recovery of crystallographic texture in remineralized dental enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samera Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture and position of the (002 Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected

  4. Paramagnetic and crystallographic effects of low temperature ashing on human bone and tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochon-Danguy, H J; Very, J M; Geoffroy, M; Baud, C A

    1978-02-28

    Low temperature ashing by excited gas (LTA) causes crystallographic and paramagnetic alterations of the human bone and tooth enamel mineral. On the one hand, LTA induces variations of the alpha lattice parameter. These variations depend upon the nature of the gas used, but are little affected by its degree of excitation. Trapping of gas molecules in the crystal structure is demonstrated. On the other hand, LTA produces two preponderant paramagnetic centers in bone and enamel samples at 20 degrees C. Their inorganic origin clearly indicated. One of the two radicals has been identified as O3- (g1 = 2.002, g2 = 2.010, g3 = 2.016) and the other as (CO3-3 (parallel = 1.996, g = perpendicular 2.003). Variations of the alpha lattice parameter and trapping of paramagnetic gas species do not seem to be directly related.

  5. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tokuoka, Keiji [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uchiyama, Nahoko [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Urade, Yoshihiro [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: inouet@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    Old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F{sub 2α}, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model.

  6. Applied and implied semantics in crystallographic publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMahon Brian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crystallography is a data-rich, software-intensive scientific discipline with a community that has undertaken direct responsibility for publishing its own scientific journals. That community has worked actively to develop information exchange standards allowing readers of structure reports to access directly, and interact with, the scientific content of the articles. Results Structure reports submitted to some journals of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr can be automatically validated and published through an efficient and cost-effective workflow. Readers can view and interact with the structures in three-dimensional visualization applications, and can access the experimental data should they wish to perform their own independent structure solution and refinement. The journals also layer on top of this facility a number of automated annotations and interpretations to add further scientific value. Conclusions The benefits of semantically rich information exchange standards have revolutionised the scholarly publishing process for crystallography, and establish a model relevant to many other physical science disciplines.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a cysteine protease inhibitor from the human nematode parasite Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sanling; Dong, Jianmei; Mei, Guoqiang; Liu, Guiyun; Xu, Wei; Su, Zhong; Liu, Jinsong

    2011-02-01

    The cysteine protease inhibitor from Ascaris lumbricoides, a roundworm that lives in the human intestine, may be involved in the suppression of human immune responses. Here, the molecular cloning, protein expression and purification, preliminary crystallization and crystallographic characterization of the cysteine protease inhibitor from A. lumbricoides are reported. The rod-shaped crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.40, b = 37.52, c = 62.92 Å, β = 118.26°. The crystal diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  8. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  9. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Henriques

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  10. Recent developments in crystallographic investigation of martensitic transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Nanju; DONG Guixia; LIN Xiaoping; WANG Baoqi; MA Xiaoli

    2004-01-01

    The results and new knowledge obtained in recent years by using an atom force microscope (AFM) to investigate the surface relieves and to reveal the lattice deformation characteristics in martensitic transformation (MT) are summarized. All-round analysis and research about crystallography and morphology of MT have been done based on our "displacement vector" theory. New viewpoints that the "invariant-plane-strain" criterion have no universality and that the large rotation of habit-planes takes place in {557} lath and {225} plate martensites are put forward. Thereby, the formation mode of {557} martensite is established, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, according to the self-accommodation principle between variants crystallographic calculations of twin and multi-variant martensites in shape memory alloys have been carried out. The calculation method greatly simplifies the crystallographic calculation process of phenomenological theory. And the calculated results are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  11. High-temperature in situ crystallographic observation of reversible gas sorption in impermeable organic cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Bin; Moon, Dohyun; Graf, Robert; Cho, Woo Jong; Park, Sung Woo; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Cho, Seung Joo; Hwang, In-Chul; Bae, Youn-Sang; Spiess, Hans W; Lee, Hee Cheon; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-11-17

    Crystallographic observation of adsorbed gas molecules is a highly difficult task due to their rapid motion. Here, we report the in situ single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray observations of reversible CO2 sorption processes in an apparently nonporous organic crystal under varying pressures at high temperatures. The host material is formed by hydrogen bond network between 1,3,5-tris-(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (H3BTB) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and by π-π stacking between the H3BTB moieties. The material can be viewed as a well-ordered array of cages, which are tight packed with each other so that the cages are inaccessible from outside. Thus, the host is practically nonporous. Despite the absence of permanent pathways connecting the empty cages, they are permeable to CO2 at high temperatures due to thermally activated molecular gating, and the weakly confined CO2 molecules in the cages allow direct detection by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 323 K. Variable-temperature in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies also show that the CO2 sorption is reversible and driven by temperature increase. Solid-state magic angle spinning NMR defines the interactions of CO2 with the organic framework and dynamic motion of CO2 in cages. The reversible sorption is attributed to the dynamic motion of the DMF molecules combined with the axial motions/angular fluctuations of CO2 (a series of transient opening/closing of compartments enabling CO2 molecule passage), as revealed from NMR and simulations. This temperature-driven transient molecular gating can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties and release them for ready use.

  12. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E. [ETSIT-ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M. [Dept. Química Inorgánica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  13. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gačević, Ž.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M.; Calleja, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  14. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  15. Enumerating molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  16. Structural requirements of Na+-dependent antidopaminergic agents: Tropapride, Piquindone, Zetidoline, and Metoclopramide Comparison with Na+-independent ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Sonia; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Vanderveken, Didier; Evrard, Guy; Durant, François

    1989-03-01

    Molecular graphic design coupled with PCILO and crystallographic results have been used to investigate the three-dimensional structure of Tropapride, Piquindone, Zetidoline, and Metoclopramide, four dopamine D-2 receptor antagonists showing Na+-dependent binding. Three putative pharmacophoric elements, a nitrogen lone pair, a phenyl ring and a carbonyl moiety, are similarly oriented in all the Na+-dependent drugs. Conversely, for Na+-independent analogs, the two latter pharmacophoric elements play a subordinate role, but two Π-electron regions are systematically localized on the other side of the molecule: the first is a phenyl group while the second is a carbonyl function as in butyrophenones, a cyano group as in R48455, or a phenyl ring as in diphenylbutylpiperidines or tricyclics. The presence of a benzyl ring on this side in Tropapride might explain its weak extrapyramidal effects.

  17. Prediction of molecular crystal structures by a crystallographic QM/MM model with full space-group symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörschel, Philipp; Schmidt, Martin U

    2015-01-01

    A crystallographic quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical model (c-QM/MM model) with full space-group symmetry has been developed for molecular crystals. The lattice energy was calculated by quantum-mechanical methods for short-range interactions and force-field methods for long-range interactions. The quantum-mechanical calculations covered the interactions within the molecule and the interactions of a reference molecule with each of the surrounding 12-15 molecules. The interactions with all other molecules were treated by force-field methods. In each optimization step the energies in the QM and MM shells were calculated separately as single-point energies; after adding both energy contributions, the crystal structure (including the lattice parameters) was optimized accordingly. The space-group symmetry was maintained throughout. Crystal structures with more than one molecule per asymmetric unit, e.g. structures with Z' = 2, hydrates and solvates, have been optimized as well. Test calculations with different quantum-mechanical methods on nine small organic molecules revealed that the density functional theory methods with dispersion correction using the B97-D functional with 6-31G* basis set in combination with the DREIDING force field reproduced the experimental crystal structures with good accuracy. Subsequently the c-QM/MM method was applied to nine compounds from the CCDC blind tests resulting in good energy rankings and excellent geometric accuracies.

  18. Independent Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringe, Wolf-Georg

    2013-01-01

    This paper re-evaluates the corporate governance concept of ‘board independence’ against the disappointing experiences during the 2007-08 financial crisis. Independent or outside directors had long been seen as an essential tool to improve the monitoring role of the board. Yet the crisis revealed...... that they did not prevent firms' excessive risk taking; further, these directors sometimes showed serious deficits in understanding the business they were supposed to control, and remained passive in addressing structural problems. A closer look reveals that under the surface of seemingly unanimous consensus...... about board independence in Western jurisdictions, a surprising disharmony prevails about the justification, extent and purpose of independence requirements. These considerations lead me to question the benefits of the current system. Instead, this paper proposes a new, ‘functional’ concept of board...

  19. Choosing Independence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Milo Djukanovic, Prime Minister of Montenegro, won a key referendum May 21 when voters in his tiny, mountainous nation endorsed a plan to split from Serbia and become an independent state. This marked a final step in the breakup of the former Yugoslavia formed by six republics.

  20. The UL41-encoded virion host shutoff (vhs) protein and vhs-independent mechanisms are responsible for down-regulation of MHC class I molecules by bovine herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppers-Lalic, D; Rijsewijk, F A; Verschuren, S B; van Gaans-Van den Brink, J A; Neisig, A; Ressing, M E; Neefjes, J; Wiertz, E J

    2001-09-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of alphaherpesviruses causes a rapid shutoff of host cell protein synthesis. We constructed a bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) deletion mutant in which the putative vhs gene, UL41, has been disrupted. Whereas protein synthesis is inhibited within 3 h after infection with wild-type BHV1, no inhibition was observed after infection with the BHV1(vhs-) deletion mutant. These results indicate that the BHV1 UL41 gene product is both necessary and sufficient for shutoff of host cell protein synthesis at early times post-infection. Using the vhs deletion mutant, we investigated the mechanism of BHV1-induced down-regulation of MHC class I cell surface expression. In contrast to BHV1 wild-type infection, the BHV1(vhs-) mutant allows detection of MHC class I molecules at much later time-points after infection. This illustrates the role the vhs protein plays in MHC class I down-regulation. However, even after infection with BHV1(vhs-), MHC class I cell surface expression is impaired. In BHV1(vhs-)-infected cells, MHC class I molecules are retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) is still blocked. Temporal control of viral protein expression using chemical inhibitors shows that viral protein(s) expressed within the early phase of BHV1 infection are responsible for ER retention of MHC class I molecules. These results indicate that multiple mechanisms are responsible for down-regulation of MHC class I molecules in BHV1-infected cells.

  1. Independent preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Karl

    1991-01-01

    A simple mathematical result characterizing a subset of a product set is proved and used to obtain additive representations of preferences. The additivity consequences of independence assumptions are obtained for preferences which are not total or transitive. This means that most of the economic...... theory based on additive preferences - expected utility, discounted utility - has been generalized to preferences which are not total or transitive. Other economic applications of the theorem are given...

  2. Crystallographic Orientation Effect on Electromigration in Ni-Sn Microbump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-09-01

    This article addresses the reliability challenges regarding electromigration in developing three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-ICs). The line-type sandwich structure of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was used to simulate microbumps to examine the reliability of electromigration in 3D-IC technology. The solder strip of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was stressed with a current density of 1.0 × 104 A/cm2 at 150°C. The current stressing enhanced the reaction between the solder and Ni to form Ni3Sn4, which occupied the entire joint and transformed into a Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni structure when the solder was completely consumed. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to analyze the crystallographic characteristics of Sn and Ni3Sn4 as related to the electromigration effect. The results indicated that the crystallographic orientation of Sn plays a significant role in the Ni/Sn3.5Ag/Ni, whereas the orientation of Ni3Sn4 is the dominant factor of diffusion behavior in the Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni.

  3. Crystallographic properties of magnetron sputtered barium ferrite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capraro, S. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: stephane.capraro@univ-st-etienne.fr; Berre, M. Le [LPM, UMR 5511, INSA Lyon, 7 av. Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chatelon, J.P. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France); Bayard, B. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France); Joisten, H. [CEA-LETI, 17 rue des martyrs, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Canut, C. [LPMCN, University Lyon I, 43 Bvd. du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villerbanne, Cedex (France); Barbier, D. [LPM, UMR 5511, INSA Lyon, 7 av. Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Rousseau, J.J. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France)

    2004-09-15

    The development of devices combining a ferrite with a semiconductor chip is a major focus of current research. Barium hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} or BaM) thick films are deposited here using a RF magnetron sputtering system. Films are amorphous and non magnetic after deposition. Post-deposition thermal annealing is employed to make the films crystallize. The effects of the substrate, thermal annealing process, thickness, substrate temperature on crystallographic properties and stoichiometry are studied using a X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Rutherford back-scattering (RBS). The in-depth homogeneity of Ba, Fe and O is evaluated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The study shows a good crystallization of BaM films and there is a preferential orientation among the crystallographic planes (1 0 1), (2 0 0), (2 0 3), (1 0 2), (1 1 0) and (2 0 5) when BaM films are prepared at low RF power and when the substrate is heated. For several elaboration parameters, grains size is in the range of 25 and 40 nm and BaM films are stoichiometric with regard to the target stoichiometry.

  4. Crystallographic Orientation Effect on Electromigration in Ni-Sn Microbump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses the reliability challenges regarding electromigration in developing three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-ICs). The line-type sandwich structure of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was used to simulate microbumps to examine the reliability of electromigration in 3D-IC technology. The solder strip of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was stressed with a current density of 1.0 × 104 A/cm2 at 150°C. The current stressing enhanced the reaction between the solder and Ni to form Ni3Sn4, which occupied the entire joint and transformed into a Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni structure when the solder was completely consumed. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to analyze the crystallographic characteristics of Sn and Ni3Sn4 as related to the electromigration effect. The results indicated that the crystallographic orientation of Sn plays a significant role in the Ni/Sn3.5Ag/Ni, whereas the orientation of Ni3Sn4 is the dominant factor of diffusion behavior in the Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni.

  5. Crystallographic alignment of high-density gallium nitride nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Zhang, Yanfeng; Goldberger, Joshua; Sirbuly, Donald; Denlinger, Jonathan; Yang, Peidong

    2004-08-01

    Single-crystalline, one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are considered to be one of the critical building blocks for nanoscale optoelectronics. Elucidation of the vapour-liquid-solid growth mechanism has already enabled precise control over nanowire position and size, yet to date, no reports have demonstrated the ability to choose from different crystallographic growth directions of a nanowire array. Control over the nanowire growth direction is extremely desirable, in that anisotropic parameters such as thermal and electrical conductivity, index of refraction, piezoelectric polarization, and bandgap may be used to tune the physical properties of nanowires made from a given material. Here we demonstrate the use of metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and appropriate substrate selection to control the crystallographic growth directions of high-density arrays of gallium nitride nanowires with distinct geometric and physical properties. Epitaxial growth of wurtzite gallium nitride on (100) gamma-LiAlO(2) and (111) MgO single-crystal substrates resulted in the selective growth of nanowires in the orthogonal [1\\[Evec]0] and [001] directions, exhibiting triangular and hexagonal cross-sections and drastically different optical emission. The MOCVD process is entirely compatible with the current GaN thin-film technology, which would lead to easy scale-up and device integration.

  6. Diffusion-equation method for crystallographic figure of merits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvardsen, Anders J; David, William I F

    2010-09-01

    Global optimization methods play a significant role in crystallography, particularly in structure solution from powder diffraction data. This paper presents the mathematical foundations for a diffusion-equation-based optimization method. The diffusion equation is best known for describing how heat propagates in matter. However, it has also attracted considerable attention as the basis for global optimization of a multimodal function [Piela et al. (1989). J. Phys. Chem. 93, 3339-3346]. The method relies heavily on available analytical solutions for the diffusion equation. Here it is shown that such solutions can be obtained for two important crystallographic figure-of-merit (FOM) functions that fully account for space-group symmetry and allow the diffusion-equation solution to vary depending on whether atomic coordinates are fixed or not. The resulting expression is computationally efficient, taking the same order of floating-point operations to evaluate as the starting FOM function measured in terms of the number of atoms in the asymmetric unit. This opens the possibility of implementing diffusion-equation methods for crystallographic global optimization algorithms such as structure determination from powder diffraction data.

  7. Crystal growth and first crystallographic characterization of mixed uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) oxalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamain, Christelle; Arab Chapelet, Bénédicte; Rivenet, Murielle; Abraham, Francis; Caraballo, Richard; Grandjean, Stéphane

    2013-05-06

    The mixed-actinide uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) oxalate single crystals (NH4)0.5[Pu(III)0.5U(IV)0.5(C2O4)2·H2O]·nH2O (1) and (NH4)2.7Pu(III)0.7U(IV)1.3(C2O4)5·nH2O (2) have been prepared by the diffusion of different ions through membranes separating compartments of a triple cell. UV-vis, Raman, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry analyses demonstrate the presence of both uranium and plutonium metal cations with conservation of the initial oxidation state, U(IV) and Pu(III), and the formation of mixed-valence, mixed-actinide oxalate compounds. The structure of 1 and an average structure of 2 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and were solved by direct methods and Fourier difference techniques. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first mixed uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) compounds to be structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure of 1, space group P4/n, a = 8.8558(3) Å, b = 7.8963(2) Å, Z = 2, consists of layers formed by four-membered rings of the two actinide metals occupying the same crystallographic site connected through oxalate ions. The actinide atoms are nine-coordinated by oxygen atoms from four bidentate oxalate ligands and one water molecule, which alternates up and down the layer. The single-charged cations and nonbonded water molecules are disordered in the same crystallographic site. For compound 2, an average structure has been determined in space group P6/mmm with a = 11.158(2) Å and c = 6.400(1) Å. The honeycomb-like framework [Pu(III)0.7U(IV)1.3(C2O4)5](2.7-) results from a three-dimensional arrangement of mixed (U0.65Pu0.35)O10 polyhedra connected by five bis-bidentate μ(2)-oxalate ions in a trigonal-bipyramidal configuration.

  8. Crystallographic shear mechanisms in Rh one-dimensional oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, María; Boulahya, Khalid; Parras, Marina; González-Calbet, José M.

    2005-02-01

    Electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy have been used to characterize two new one-dimensional superstructures in the A sbnd Rh sbnd O system (A = Ca, Sr) related to the 2H-ABO 3-type. They are formed by the intergrowth of n A 3A'BO 6 blocks, showing the Sr 4RhO 6-type, with A 12A' 2B 8O 30 blocks, constituted by two A 3O 9 and two A 3A'O 6 layers alternating in the stacking sequence 1:1, leading to the A 27A' 7B 13O 60 ( n=5) and A 30A' 8B 14O 66 ( n=6) compositions. A crystallographic shear mechanism is proposed to describe the structural relationship between Sr 4RhO 6 (A 3A'BO 6-type) and the new superstructures.

  9. 3D characterization of crystallographic orientation in polycrystals via EBSD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefan ZAEFFERER; Stuart I. WRIGHT

    2007-01-01

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has been used in conjunction with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) combined with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain three dimensional (3D) high resolution characterizations of crystalline microstructures. This work reports on continued development that has proceeded on this technique. The technique is based on automated in-situ serial sectioning using the FIB and characterization of the sections using automated EBSD or orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The technique extends the powerful features of two dimensional OIM into the third spatial dimension. This allows additional descriptive microstructural parameters to be obtained, for example the morphology and the crystallographic indices of interface planes. This paper provides an overview of the technique and shows results from two different samples: pearlite colonies in a high carbon steel and twin related grain triplets in a NiCo thin film.

  10. Crystallographic texturing in Nb3Sn multifilamentary superconducting composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rose, Robert M.

    1980-03-01

    Crystallographic texturing in Nb3Sn composites, fabricated by both the external diffusion and the commercial bronze processes, has been investigated. In the external-diffusion-processed composite the as-drawn texture of the copper matrix contained ca. 55% and 45% ; after recrystallization at 650 °C for 16 h this changed to 70% and 30% . Tin plating and reaction heat treatment for 40 h at 650 °C eliminated most of the texturing. In a commercial bronze-processed composite a or texture was obtained in the as-drawn bronze matrix, and after a reaction heat treatment at 700 °C for 30 h a diffuse texture was developed. In both composites the Nb3Sn reaction layer exhibited no preferred orientation.

  11. Ocean acidification reduces the crystallographic control in juvenile mussel shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzer, Susan C; Cusack, Maggie; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    Global climate change threatens the oceans as anthropogenic carbon dioxide causes ocean acidification and reduced carbonate saturation. Future projections indicate under saturation of aragonite, and potentially calcite, in the oceans by 2100. Calcifying organisms are those most at risk from such ocean acidification, as carbonate is vital in the biomineralisation of their calcium carbonate protective shells. This study highlights the importance of multi-generational studies to investigate how marine organisms can potentially adapt to future projected global climate change. Mytilus edulis is an economically important marine calcifier vulnerable to decreasing carbonate saturation as their shells comprise two calcium carbonate polymorphs: aragonite and calcite. M. edulis specimens were cultured under current and projected pCO2 (380, 550, 750 and 1000μatm), following 6months of experimental culture, adults produced second generation juvenile mussels. Juvenile mussel shells were examined for structural and crystallographic orientation of aragonite and calcite. At 1000μatm pCO2, juvenile mussels spawned and grown under this high pCO2 do not produce aragonite which is more vulnerable to carbonate under-saturation than calcite. Calcite and aragonite were produced at 380, 550 and 750μatm pCO2. Electron back scatter diffraction analyses reveal less constraint in crystallographic orientation with increased pCO2. Shell formation is maintained, although the nacre crystals appear corroded and crystals are not so closely layered together. The differences in ultrastructure and crystallography in shells formed by juveniles spawned from adults in high pCO2 conditions may prove instrumental in their ability to survive ocean acidification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PPARγ-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Hogan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic lung inflammation is associated with numerous important disease pathologies including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and silicosis. Lung fibroblasts are a novel and important target of anti-inflammatory therapy, as they orchestrate, respond to, and amplify inflammatory cascades and are the key cell in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ ligands are small molecules that induce anti-inflammatory responses in a variety of tissues. Here, we report for the first time that PPARγ ligands have potent anti-inflammatory effects on human lung fibroblasts. 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxoolean-1, 9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 inhibit production of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-6 (IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, COX-2, and prostaglandin (PGE2 in primary human lung fibroblasts stimulated with either IL-1β or silica. The anti-inflammatory properties of these molecules are not blocked by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 and thus are largely PPARγ independent. However, they are dependent on the presence of an electrophilic carbon. CDDO and 15d-PGJ2, but not rosiglitazone, inhibited NF-κB activity. These results demonstrate that CDDO and 15d-PGJ2 are potent attenuators of proinflammatory responses in lung fibroblasts and suggest that these molecules should be explored as the basis for novel, targeted anti-inflammatory therapies in the lung and other organs.

  13. Hadron Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Faessler, Amand; Lee, Ian Woo; Lyubovitskij, Valery E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a possible interpretation of the open charm mesons $D_{s0}^*(2317)$, $D_{s1}(2460)$ and the hidden charm mesons X(3872), Y(3940) and Y(4140) as hadron molecules. Using a phenomenological Lagrangian approach we review the strong and radiative decays of the $D_{s0}^* (2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ states. The X(3872) is assumed to consist dominantly of molecular hadronic components with an additional small admixture of a charmonium configuration. Determing the radiative ($\\gamma J/\\psi$ and $\\gamma \\psi(2s)$) and strong ($J/\\psi 2\\pi $ and $ J/\\psi 3\\pi$) decay modes we show that present experimental observation is consistent with the molecular structure assumption of the X(3872). Finally we give evidence for molecular interpretations of the Y(3940) and Y(4140) related to the observed strong decay modes $J/\\psi + \\omega$ or $J/\\psi + \\phi$, respectively.

  14. Diiododurene: four centrosymmetric molecules in general positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Doyle; Gleason, William B

    2003-08-01

    Diiododurene (1,4-diodo-2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzene), C(10)H(12)I(2), packs with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. All four of these moleules violate Kitaigorodsky's suggestion that molecules with centers of symmetry will lie on crystallographic centers of symmetry. There is 5.6% disorder at one of the sites. Most of the I atoms are in contact with other I atoms, but only six of the I.I contacts are shorter than 4.2 A. Of these six contacts, one set of three contacts forms a triangular set in which all of the I.I distances are less than 3.9 A.

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Dipak N; Chaudhry, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-07-01

    A Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor has been purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. SDS-PAGE analysis of a purified sample showed a homogeneous band corresponding to a molecular weight of 21 kDa. The protein was identified as a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor based on N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6000. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 77.1, c = 129.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 A. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of one proteinase inhibitor molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 44%.

  16. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a haem-utilizing protein, HutX, from Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tiantian; Chi, Kaikai; Wang, Kang; Guo, Liming; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has developed a variety of mechanisms to obtain the limited-availability iron from human hosts. One important method for iron acquisition is through haem-uptake systems. Although the transport of haem has been widely studied, the fate of haem once it enters the cytoplasm remains an open question. Here, preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis was performed on HutX, a member of the conserved haem-utilization operon from V. cholerae strain N16961. The crystals of HutX were found to belong to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.1, b = 169.0, c = 81.8 Å. There are two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding Matthews coefficient V M of 2.06 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 40.28%. PMID:25664785

  17. Towards the design of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors based on 4',5 di-substituted biphenyl acetic acid molecules: a QSAR study with a new DFT based descriptor - nucleus independent chemical shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Ananda; Mostafa, Golam

    2009-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a well-known enzyme, which converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins H(2) (PGH(2)), which are the effective mediators of inflammation. 4', 5 di-substituted 3-biphenyl acetic acids (BPA) and several alpha-methyl derivatives (MBPA) of it are widely used as powerful nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. We have chosen these activity data because the relation between the substituents and activity is not obvious and is hard to explain and also to show the superiority of DFT method. From the DFT results, various quantum chemical based descriptors were computed but the QSAR results showed that the descriptors based on frontier electron density and a new DFT based quantum chemical descriptor, nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) are likely to be responsible for the in vitro inhibiting activity of BPA and MPBA. It has been proposed that NICS accounts for pi...pi interaction and indeed leads to a better result. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of NICS as a descriptor to get a better relationship to facilitate the design of COX inhibitors with potentially higher biological activity.

  18. Use of multiple picosecond high-mass molecular dynamics simulations to predict crystallographic B-factors of folded globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Predicting crystallographic B-factors of a protein from a conventional molecular dynamics simulation is challenging, in part because the B-factors calculated through sampling the atomic positional fluctuations in a picosecond molecular dynamics simulation are unreliable, and the sampling of a longer simulation yields overly large root mean square deviations between calculated and experimental B-factors. This article reports improved B-factor prediction achieved by sampling the atomic positional fluctuations in multiple picosecond molecular dynamics simulations that use uniformly increased atomic masses by 100-fold to increase time resolution. Using the third immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, ubiquitin, and lysozyme as model systems, the B-factor root mean square deviations (mean ± standard error) of these proteins were 3.1 ± 0.2-9 ± 1 Å(2) for Cα and 7.3 ± 0.9-9.6 ± 0.2 Å(2) for Cγ, when the sampling was done for each of these proteins over 20 distinct, independent, and 50-picosecond high-mass molecular dynamics simulations with AMBER forcefield FF12MC or FF14SB. These results suggest that sampling the atomic positional fluctuations in multiple picosecond high-mass molecular dynamics simulations may be conducive to a priori prediction of crystallographic B-factors of a folded globular protein.

  19. An introduction to the tools hosted in the Bilbao Crystallographic Server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroyo M.I.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The programs hosted in the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (http://www.cryst.ehu.es are briefly explained along with worked examples on various cases related to different fields of applications. It is our aim to have this text acting as a primer on the various usage of the crystallographic tools in conjunction with each other due to the modular structure of the server. For this reason, diverse topics such as crystallographic groups and their subgroups, pseudosymmetry, extinction conditions, k-vectors and irreducible representations have been discussed in the context.

  20. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Ringe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR, the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask `how are nanoshapes created?', `how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', `how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  1. Pulsed neutron spectroscopic imaging for crystallographic texture and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Hirotaka, E-mail: hakuryu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kamiyama, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Iwase, Kenji; Ishigaki, Toru [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    A time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopic neutron imaging at a pulsed neutron source is expected to be a new material analysis tool because this method can non-destructively investigate the spatial dependence of the crystallographic and metallographic information in a bulk material. For quantitative evaluation of such information, a spectral analysis code for the transmission data is necessary. Therefore, we have developed a Rietveld-like analysis code, RITS. Furthermore, we have applied the RITS code to evaluation of the position dependence of the crystal orientation anisotropy, the preferred orientation and the crystallite size of a welded {alpha}-iron plate, and we successfully obtained the information on the texture and the microstructure. However, the reliability of the values given by the RITS code has not been evaluated yet in detail. For this reason, we compared the parameters provided by the RITS code with the parameters obtained by the neutron TOF powder diffractometry and its Rietveld analysis. Both the RITS code and the Rietveld analysis software indicated values close to each other, but there were systematic differences on the preferred orientation and the crystallite size.

  2. Cassia grandis Linn. f. seed galactomannan: structural and crystallographical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harsha; Kapoor, Virendra P

    2003-09-01

    Cassia grandis is a small or medium sized tree, found in abundance throughout India. The seeds contain about 50% endosperm gum and possess the characteristics of becoming a potential source of seed gum. The purified polysaccharide has been characterized as a pure galactomannan having a mannose-galactose ratio of 3.15; molecular weight (Mw) 80,200; polydispersity (Mw/Mn), 1.35 and intrinsic viscosity [eta], 848 mL/g. Methylation, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation and 13C NMR studies confirm that the polysaccharide has the basic structure of legume galactomannans consisting of a beta-(1-->4)-linked main mannan backbone to which galactose units are attached at O-6. The orthorhombic lattice constants of the hydrated gum are as follows: a=9.00, b=24.81, c=10.30 A. The crystallographic data establish that the probable space group symmetry of the unit cell is P2(1)2(1)2. The results are in contradiction to earlier reports (Indian J. Chem. 16B (1978) 966; J. Indian Chem. Soc. 55 (1978) 1216) in which a non-galactomannan polysaccharide structure has been assigned having a main chain of (1-->4)-linked galactose and mannose units in the molar ratio 6:3, where 50% of the galactose units branched with two galactose and one mannose through 1-->3 linkage.

  3. Crystallographic analysis of amorphization caused by ion irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, S T; Ono, T; Hada, Y; Betz, G

    2003-01-01

    Ion irradiation often causes amorphization in a crystal. We have presented a new crystallographic analysis that defines a new type of order parameter, which we call pixel mapping (PM). PM can describe algebraically to what extent and how the crystallinity has changed under ion bombardment. In other words, PM describes the long-range-order (LRO) interactions, based on the crystallography. PM can be effectively used, when it is incorporated in a classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculation. In the case of B ions implanted into a Si crystal, we observed crystal to amorphous (CA) transitions under energetic ion bombardment at low temperature. The PM profiling was more effective to reveal the CA transition than other atomistic methods of analyses as radial distribution function g(r) or vacancy mapping N sub v. PM could distinguish between perfect crystalline states, transition states, and random states. Moreover, PM revealed that the lattice reaction was cooperative even in a mesoscopic volume, e.g. in a cube of ...

  4. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  5. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of recombinant human galectin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222 (Australia); Scott, Ken [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222 (Australia)

    2007-11-01

    Human galectin-1 has been cloned, expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of both lactose (ligand) and β-mercaptoethanol under six different conditions. The X-ray diffraction data obtained have enabled the assignment of unit-cell parameters for two novel crystal forms of human galectin-1. Galectin-1 is considered to be a regulator protein as it is ubiquitously expressed throughout the adult body and is responsible for a broad range of cellular regulatory functions. Interest in galectin-1 from a drug-design perspective is founded on evidence of its overexpression by many cancers and its immunomodulatory properties. The development of galectin-1-specific inhibitors is a rational approach to the fight against cancer because although galectin-1 induces a plethora of effects, null mice appear normal. X-ray crystallographic structure determination will aid the structure-based design of galectin-1 inhibitors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of human galectin-1 crystals generated under six different conditions is reported. X-ray diffraction data enabled the assignment of unit-cell parameters for crystals grown under two conditions, one belongs to a tetragonal crystal system and the other was determined as monoclinic P2{sub 1}, representing two new crystal forms of human galectin-1.

  7. Phormidium phycoerythrin forms hexamers in crystals: a crystallographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Sharma, Mahima; Gupta, Gagan Deep; Kumar, Vinay; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-08-01

    The crystallographic analysis of a marine cyanobacterium (Phormidium sp. A09DM) phycoerythrin (PE) that shows distinct sequence features compared with known PE structures from cyanobacteria and red algae is reported. Phormidium PE was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Diffraction data were collected on the protein crystallography beamline at the Indus-2 synchrotron. The crystals diffracted to about 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals, with an apparent hexagonal morphology, belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 108.3, b = 108.4 Å, c = 116.6 Å, α = 78.94, β = 82.50, γ = 60.34°. The molecular-replacement solution confirmed the presence of 12 αβ monomers in the P1 cell. The Phormidium PE elutes as an (αβ)3 trimer of αβ monomers from a molecular-sieve column and exists as [(αβ)3]2 hexamers in the crystal lattice. Unlike red algal PE proteins, the hexamers of Phormidium PE do not form higher-order structures in the crystals. The existence of only one characteristic visual absorption band at 564 nm suggests the presence of phycoerythrobilin chromophores, and the absence of any other types of bilins, in the Phormidium PE assembly.

  8. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  9. Functional analysis of hyperthermophilic endocellulase from Pyrococcus horikoshii by crystallographic snapshots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Woo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2011-07-15

    A hyperthermophilic membrane-related β-1,4-endoglucanase (family 5, cellulase) of the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii was found to be capable of hydrolysing cellulose at high temperatures. The hyperthermophilic cellulase has promise for applications in biomass utilization. To clarify its detailed function, we determined the crystal structures of mutants of the enzyme in complex with either the substrate or product ligands. We were able to resolve different kinds of complex structures at 1.65-2.01 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm). The structural analysis of various mutant enzymes yielded a sequence of crystallographic snapshots, which could be used to explain the catalytic process of the enzyme. The substrate position is fixed by the alignment of one cellobiose unit between the two aromatic amino acid residues at subsites +1 and +2. During the enzyme reaction, the glucose structure of cellulose substrates is distorted at subsite -1, and the β-1,4-glucoside bond between glucose moieties is twisted between subsites -1 and +1. Subsite -2 specifically recognizes the glucose residue, but recognition by subsites +1 and +2 is loose during the enzyme reaction. This type of recognition is important for creation of the distorted boat form of the substrate at subsite -1. A rare enzyme-substrate complex was observed within the low-activity mutant Y299F, which suggested the existence of a trapped ligand structure before the formation by covalent bonding of the proposed intermediate structure. Analysis of the enzyme-substrate structure suggested that an incoming water molecule, essential for hydrolysis during the retention process, might be introduced to the cleavage position after the cellobiose product at subsites +1 and +2 was released from the active site.

  10. Shape and crystallographic orientation of nanodiamonds for quantum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, S Y; Chipaux, M; Nagl, A; Schirhagl, R

    2017-01-23

    Nanodiamonds with dimensions down to a few tens of nanometers containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers have revealed their potential as powerful and versatile quantum sensors with a unique combination of spatial resolution and sensitivity. The NV centers allow transducing physical properties, such as strain, temperature, and electric or magnetic field, to an optical transition that can be detected in the single photon range. For example, this makes it possible to sense a single electron spin or a few nuclear spins by detecting their magnetic resonance. The location and orientation of these defects with respect to the diamond surface play a crucial role in interpreting the data and predicting their sensitivities. Despite its relevance, the geometry of these nanodiamonds has never been thoroughly investigated. Without accurate data, spherical models have been applied to interpret or predict results in the past. With the use of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), we investigated nanodiamonds with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 25 nm (the most common type for quantum sensing) and found a flake-like geometry, with 23.2 nm and 4.5 nm being the average lateral and vertical dimensions. We have also found evidence for a preferred crystallographic orientation of the main facet in the (110) direction. Furthermore, we discuss the consequences of this difference in geometry on diamond-based applications. Shape not only influences the creation efficiency of nitrogen-vacancy centers and their quantum coherence properties (and thus sensing performance), but also the optical properties of the nanodiamonds, their interaction with living cells, and their surface chemistry.

  11. A Crystallin Fold in the Interleukin-4-inducing Principle of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs (IPSE/α-1) Mediates IgE Binding for Antigen-independent Basophil Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, N Helge; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Blindow, Silke; Barths, Daniela; Mewes, Astrid; Weimar, Thomas; Köhli, Thies; Bade, Steffen; Madl, Tobias; Frey, Andreas; Haas, Helmut; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Sattler, Michael; Schramm, Gabriele

    2015-09-04

    The IL-4-inducing principle from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (IPSE/α-1), the major secretory product of eggs from the parasitic worm S. mansoni, efficiently triggers basophils to release the immunomodulatory key cytokine interleukin-4. Activation by IPSE/α-1 requires the presence of IgE on the basophils, but the detailed molecular mechanism underlying activation is unknown. NMR and crystallographic analysis of IPSEΔNLS, a monomeric IPSE/α-1 mutant, revealed that IPSE/α-1 is a new member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. We demonstrate that this molecule is a general immunoglobulin-binding factor with highest affinity for IgE. NMR binding studies of IPSEΔNLS with the 180-kDa molecule IgE identified a large positively charged binding surface that includes a flexible loop, which is unique to the IPSE/α-1 crystallin fold. Mutational analysis of amino acids in the binding interface showed that residues contributing to IgE binding are important for IgE-dependent activation of basophils. As IPSE/α-1 is unable to cross-link IgE, we propose that this molecule, by taking advantage of its unique IgE-binding crystallin fold, activates basophils by a novel, cross-linking-independent mechanism.

  12. Recent progress in the crystallographic studies of photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Kern, Jan; Frank, Joachim; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-01-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) is the only known biochemical system that is able to oxidize water molecules and thereby generates almost all oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The elucidation of the structural and mechanistic aspects of PSII keeps scientists all over the wor

  13. A binding hotspot in Trypanosoma cruzi histidyl-tRNA synthetase revealed by fragment-based crystallographic cocktail screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Siddaramaiah, Latha Kallur; Ranade, Ranae M; Nguyen, Jasmine; Jian, Tengyue; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2015-08-01

    American trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The chronic form of the infection often causes debilitating morbidity and mortality. However, the current treatment for the disease is typically inadequate owing to drug toxicity and poor efficacy, necessitating a continual effort to discover and develop new antiparasitic therapeutic agents. The structure of T. cruzi histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS), a validated drug target, has previously been reported. Based on this structure and those of human cytosolic HisRS, opportunities for the development of specific inhibitors were identified. Here, efforts are reported to identify small molecules that bind to T. cruzi HisRS through fragment-based crystallographic screening in order to arrive at chemical starting points for the development of specific inhibitors. T. cruzi HisRS was soaked into 68 different cocktails from the Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (MSGPP) fragment library and diffraction data were collected to identify bound fragments after soaking. A total of 15 fragments were identified, all bound to the same site on the protein, revealing a fragment-binding hotspot adjacent to the ATP-binding pocket. On the basis of the initial hits, the design of reactive fragments targeting the hotspot which would be simultaneously covalently linked to a cysteine residue present only in trypanosomatid HisRS was initiated. Inhibition of T. cruzi HisRS was observed with the resultant reactive fragments and the anticipated binding mode was confirmed crystallographically. These results form a platform for the development of future generations of selective inhibitors for trypanosomatid HisRS.

  14. Crystallographic and kinetic study of riboflavin synthase from Brucella abortus, a chemotherapeutic target with an enhanced intrinsic flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serer, María I.; Bonomi, Hernán R. [IIBBA–CONICET, Avenida Patricias Argentinas 435, C1405BWE Buenos Aires (Argentina); Guimarães, Beatriz G. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France); Rossi, Rolando C. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 956, C1113AAD Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Klinke, Sebastián, E-mail: sklinke@leloir.org.ar [IIBBA–CONICET, Avenida Patricias Argentinas 435, C1405BWE Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-05-01

    This work reports crystal structures of trimeric riboflavin synthase from the pathogen B. abortus both as the apo protein and in complex with several ligands of interest. It is shown that ligand binding drives the assembly of the unique active site of the trimer, and these findings are complemented by a detailed kinetic study on this enzyme, in which marked inhibition by substrate and product was observed. Riboflavin synthase (RS) catalyzes the last step of riboflavin biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants, which corresponds to the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine to yield one molecule of riboflavin and one molecule of 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione. Owing to the absence of this enzyme in animals and the fact that most pathogenic bacteria show a strict dependence on riboflavin biosynthesis, RS has been proposed as a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Eubacterial, fungal and plant RSs assemble as homotrimers lacking C{sub 3} symmetry. Each monomer can bind two substrate molecules, yet there is only one active site for the whole enzyme, which is located at the interface between two neighbouring chains. This work reports the crystallographic structure of RS from the pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus (the aetiological agent of the disease brucellosis) in its apo form, in complex with riboflavin and in complex with two different product analogues, being the first time that the structure of an intact RS trimer with bound ligands has been solved. These crystal models support the hypothesis of enhanced flexibility in the particle and also highlight the role of the ligands in assembling the unique active site. Kinetic and binding studies were also performed to complement these findings. The structural and biochemical information generated may be useful for the rational design of novel RS inhibitors with antimicrobial activity.

  15. Local dynamics of proteins and DNA evaluated from crystallographic B factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Bohdan, E-mail: bohdan.schneider@gmail.com [Institute of Biotechnology AS CR, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Brevern, Alexandre G. de [INSERM, U1134, DSIMB, 75739 Paris (France); Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1134, 75739 Paris (France); Institut National de la Transfusion Sanguine (INTS), 75739 Paris (France); Laboratoire d’Excellence GR-Ex, 75739 Paris (France); Černý, Jiří [Institute of Biotechnology AS CR, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-01

    Distributions of scaled B factors from 704 protein–DNA complexes reflect primarily the neighbourhood of amino-acid and nucleotide residues: their flexibility grows from the protein core to protein–protein and protein–DNA interfaces, to solvent-exposed residues. Some of the findings clearly observed at higher resolution structures can no longer be observed for structures at low resolution indicating problems in refinement protocols. The dynamics of protein and nucleic acid structures is as important as their average static picture. The local molecular dynamics concealed in diffraction images is expressed as so-called B factors. To find out how the crystal-derived B factors represent the dynamic behaviour of atoms and residues of proteins and DNA in their complexes, the distributions of scaled B factors from a carefully curated data set of over 700 protein–DNA crystal structures were analyzed [Schneider et al. (2014 ▶), Nucleic Acids Res.42, 3381–3394]. Amino acids and nucleotides were categorized based on their molecular neighbourhood as solvent-accessible, solvent-inaccessible (i.e. forming the protein core) or lying at protein–protein or protein–DNA interfaces; the backbone and side-chain atoms were analyzed separately. The B factors of two types of crystal-ordered water molecules were also analyzed. The analysis confirmed several expected features of protein and DNA dynamics, but also revealed surprising facts. Solvent-accessible amino acids have B factors that are larger than those of residues at the biomolecular interfaces, and core-forming amino acids are the most restricted in their movement. A unique feature of the latter group is that their side-chain and backbone atoms are restricted in their movement to the same extent; in all other amino-acid groups the side chains are more floppy than the backbone. The low values of the B factors of water molecules bridging proteins with DNA and the very large fluctuations of DNA phosphates are

  16. Energetic, crystallographic and diffusion characteristics of hydrogen isotopes in iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivak, A.B., E-mail: sivak_ab@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenina pr., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Sivak, P.A., E-mail: sivak_pa@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Romanov, V.A., E-mail: romanov-ippe@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenina pr., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); A.I. Leypunski Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), 1, Bondarenko pl., Obninsk, Kaluga reg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Chernov, V.M., E-mail: vmchernov@bochvar.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenina pr., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); A.A. Bochvar High-technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (JSC “VNIINM”), 5-a, Rogova ul., PoB 369, Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, 31, Kashirskoye sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • H isotopes properties in Fe were calculated by molecular statics and dynamics methods. • The binding energies of complexes “H atoms – self-defects” were calculated. • Temperature dependencies of H isotopes diffusivities have parabolic form at T > 250 K. • There is a good agreement between MD and experimental data for protium diffusivity. • H isotopes diffusivities are within 10% at 293 K. Isotope effect increases with temperature. - Abstract: Energetic, crystallographic and diffusion characteristics of various interstitial configurations of H atoms and their complexes with self-point defects (SIA – self-interstitial atom, V – vacancy) in bcc iron have been calculated by molecular statics and molecular dynamics using Fe–H interatomic interaction potential developed by Ramasubramaniam et al. (2009) and modified by the authors of the present work and Fe–Fe matrix potential M07 developed by Malerba et al. (2010). The most energetically favorable configuration of an interstitial H atom is tetrahedral configuration. The energy barrier for H atom migration is 0.04 eV. The highest binding energy of all the considered complexes “vacancy – H atom” and “SIA – H atom” is 0.54 and 0.15 eV, respectively. The binding energy of H atom with edge dislocations in slip systems 〈1 1 1〉{1 1 0}, 〈1 1 1〉{1 1 2}, 〈1 0 0〉{1 0 0}, 〈1 0 0〉{1 1 0} is 0.32, 0.30, 0.45, 0.54 eV, respectively. The binding energy of H atom in VH{sub n} complexes (n = 1 … 15) decreases from 0.54 to 0.35 eV with increasing of n from 1 to 6. At n > 6, it decreases to ∼0.1 eV. The temperature dependences of hydrogen isotopes (P, D, T) diffusivities have been calculated for the temperature range 70–1800 K. Arrhenius-type dependencies describe the calculated data at temperatures T < 100 K. At T > 250 K, the temperature dependencies of the diffusivities D{sup P}, D{sup D}, D{sup T} have a parabolic form. The diffusivities of H isotopes are within 10

  17. Crystallographic transformation of limestone during calcination under CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Medina, Santiago

    2015-09-14

    The calcination reaction of limestone (CaCO3) to yield lime (CaO) is at the heart of many industrial applications as well as natural processes. In the recently emerged calcium-looping technology, CO2 capture is accomplished by the carbonation of CaO in a gas-solid reactor (carbonator). CaO is derived by the calcination of limestone in a calciner reactor under necessarily high CO2 partial pressure and high temperature. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been employed in this work to gain further insight into the crystallographic transformation that takes place during the calcination of limestone under CO2, at partial pressures (P) close to the equilibrium pressure (Peq) and at high temperature. Calcination under these conditions becomes extremely slow. The in situ XRD analysis presented here suggests the presence of an intermediate metastable CaO* phase stemming from the parent CaCO3 structure. According to the reaction mechanism proposed elsewhere, the exothermicity of the CaO* → CaO transformation and high values of P/Peq inhibit the nucleation of CaO at high temperatures. The wt% of CaO* remains at a relatively high level during slow calcination. Two diverse stages have been identified in the evolution of CaO crystallite size, L. Initially, L increases with CaCO3 conversion, following a logarithmic law. Slow calcination allows the crystallite size to grow up from a few nanometers at nucleation up to around 100 nm near the end of conversion. Otherwise, quick calcination at relatively lower CO2 concentrations limits CaO crystallite growth. Once calcination reaches an advanced state, the presence of CaO* drops to zero and the rate of increase of the CaO crystallite size is significantly hindered. Arguably, the first stage in CaO crystallite growth is driven by aggregation of the metastable CaO* nanocrystals, due to surface attractive forces, whereas the second one is consistent with sintering of the aggregated CaO crystals, and persists with time after full

  18. Crystallographic and Computational Study of Purine: Caffeine Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. Mabied

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of substituted purine derivative, 8-(3-butyl-4-phenyl-2,3-dihydrothiazol-2-ylidenehydrazino-3,7-dihydro-1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-diones, caffeine derivative, has been determined. It crystallized in monoclinic system and space group P21/c with unit cell parameters a = 15.2634 (9, b = 13.4692 (9, c = 11.9761 (7 Å, and β = 108.825 (3°. Although each constituting moiety of the structure individually is planar, nonplanar configuration for the whole molecule was noticed. Molecular mechanics computations indicated the same nonplanar feature of the whole molecule. A network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds contacts and π interactions stabilized the structure.

  19. A log-likelihood-gain intensity target for crystallographic phasing that accounts for experimental error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Randy J; McCoy, Airlie J

    2016-03-01

    The crystallographic diffraction experiment measures Bragg intensities; crystallographic electron-density maps and other crystallographic calculations in phasing require structure-factor amplitudes. If data were measured with no errors, the structure-factor amplitudes would be trivially proportional to the square roots of the intensities. When the experimental errors are large, and especially when random errors yield negative net intensities, the conversion of intensities and their error estimates into amplitudes and associated error estimates becomes nontrivial. Although this problem has been addressed intermittently in the history of crystallographic phasing, current approaches to accounting for experimental errors in macromolecular crystallography have numerous significant defects. These have been addressed with the formulation of LLGI, a log-likelihood-gain function in terms of the Bragg intensities and their associated experimental error estimates. LLGI has the correct asymptotic behaviour for data with large experimental error, appropriately downweighting these reflections without introducing bias. LLGI abrogates the need for the conversion of intensity data to amplitudes, which is usually performed with the French and Wilson method [French & Wilson (1978), Acta Cryst. A35, 517-525], wherever likelihood target functions are required. It has general applicability for a wide variety of algorithms in macromolecular crystallography, including scaling, characterizing anisotropy and translational noncrystallographic symmetry, detecting outliers, experimental phasing, molecular replacement and refinement. Because it is impossible to reliably recover the original intensity data from amplitudes, it is suggested that crystallographers should always deposit the intensity data in the Protein Data Bank.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy induced by crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment in directionally-solidified eutectic Mn-Sb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chang-Sheng; Liu, Tie; Dong, Meng; Wu, Chun; Shao, Jian-Guo; Wang, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    The influences of the crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of polycrystalline materials were investigated. Microstructures obtained in eutectic Mn-Sb alloys via directional solidification simultaneously displayed crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment. Both the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment were able to induce magnetic anisotropy in the alloys, wherein the influence of the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of the alloys strongly depended upon their directions and exhibited either mutual promotion or competition. These findings may provide useful guidance for the fabrication design of functional magnetic materials.

  1. Crystallographic study of Glu58Ala RNase T1 x 2'-guanosine monophosphate at 1.9-A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletinckx, J; Steyaert, J; Zegers, I; Choe, H W; Heinemann, U; Wyns, L

    1994-02-22

    Glu58 is known to participate in phosphodiester transesterification catalyzed by the enzyme RNase T1. For Glu58 RNase T1, an altered mechanism has been proposed in which His40 replaces Glu58 as the base catalyst [Steyaert, J., Hallenga, K., Wyns, L., & Stanssens, P. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9064-9072]. Glu58Ala Rnase T1 has been cocrystallized with guanosine 2'-monophosphate (2'-GMP). The crystals are of space group P2(1), with one molecule per asymmetric unit (a = 32.44 A, b = 49.64 A, c = 26.09 A, beta = 99.17 degrees). The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined to a nominal resolution of 1.9 A, yielding a crystallographic R factor of 0.178 for all X-ray data. Comparison of this structure with wild-type structures leads to the following conclusions. The minor changes apparent in the tertiary structure can be explained by either the mutation of Glu58 or by the change in the space group. In the active site, the extra space available through the mutation of Glu58 is occupied by the phosphate group (after a reorientation) and by a solvent molecule replacing a carboxylate oxygen of Glu58. This solvent molecule is a candidate for participation in the altered mechanism of this mutant enzyme. Following up on a study of conserved water sites in RNase T1 crystallized in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) [Malin, R., Zielenkiewicz, P., & Saenger, W. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 266, 4848-4852], we investigated the hydration structure for four different packing modes of RNase T1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yanquan; Zhang, Junjie; Yan, Yongda; Yu, Bowen; Geng, Lin; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations. PMID:26147506

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanquan Geng

    Full Text Available In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations.

  4. Evolution of the preferred crystallographic orientation across the thickness of nickel electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Somers, Marcel A. J.;

    Numerous industrial applications of nickel electrodeposits, like for example as microcomponents, essentially depend on their preferred crystallographic orientation. As a function of the electrodeposition conditions, the microstructure can be tailored with respect to the size, shape...... for such advanced investigations. The present work reports on the evolution of the preferred crystallographic orientation on the example of various fiber textured nickel electrodeposits. Tailored electrodeposition provided nickel deposits with different fibre textures being , , and ... and crystallographic orientation of grains. Thorough microstructure characterization, however, is not straightforward, because the microstructure of electrodeposits often changes across the thickness of the deposits and numerous twin orientations even with nano-size dimensions can evolve during growth of the deposits...

  5. Advanced yield strength of interconnector ribbon for photovoltaic module using crystallographic texture control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byungjun; Park, Nochang; Tark, Sung Ju; Oh, Won Wook; Park, Sungeun; Kim, Young Do; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports a study on reducing the yield strength of Cu ribbon wire used for Si solar cell interconnections in solar panels. Low yield strength Cu core should be used as the interconnector ribbon to minimize the fracture of Si solar cells during the tabbing process. We lowered the yield strength of Cu ribbon by controlling the crystallographic texture without increasing the annealing time and temperature. The crystallographic texture was controlled by lubrication in a cold rolling process. The crystallographic texture was observed by scanning electron microscopy with electron back scattered diffraction. A tensile test was performed for the comparison of the mechanical properties of Cu with and without lubrication. The average yield strength was 91.2 MPa with lubrication whereas the yield strength was 99.6 MPa without lubrication. The lower value of the lubricated samples seemed to be caused by the higher cube texture intensity than that of the samples without lubrication.

  6. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  7. The Ultrasonic Measurement of Crystallographic Orientation for Imaging Anisotropic Components with 2d Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Dunhill, A. K.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    Single crystal components are used widely in the gas-turbine industry. However, these components are elastically anisotropic which causes difficulties when performing NDE inspections with ultrasound. Recently an ultrasonic algorithm for a 2D array has been corrected to perform the reliable volumetric inspection of single crystals. For the algorithm to be implemented the crystallographic orientation of the components must be known. This paper, therefore, develops and reviews crystallographic orientation methods using 2D ultrasonic arrays. The methods under examination are based on the anisotropic propagation of surface and bulk waves and an image-based orientation method is also considered.

  8. Elasto-Plastic Behavior of High RRR Niobium: Effects of Crystallographic Texture, Microstructure and Hydrogen Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.R. Myneni; S.R. Agnew

    2002-11-01

    Conventional assessments of the mechanical properties of polycrystalline high RRR niobium via tensile testing have revealed unusually low apparent Young's moduli and yield strength in annealed samples. These observations motivated the current investigation of a variety of possible contributors: crystallographic texture, grain size, and impurity concentration. It is shown that the crystallographic textures of a single lot of niobium are essentially unchanged by post-recrystallization anneals at temperatures up to 800 C. Ultrasonic measurements reveal that the elastic response is not degraded by annealing. Rather, the material's extremely low yield point gives the impression of a low elastic modulus during tensile testing.

  9. Crystallographic analysis of FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Hirofumi; Inaka, Koji; Furubayashi, Naoki; Honda, Michinari; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2015-08-01

    An FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Aspergillus terreus was purified and crystallized at 293 K using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. A data set was collected to a resolution of 1.6 Å from a single crystal at 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source. The crystal belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.56, b = 135.74, c = 74.13 Å, β = 90.37°. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of GDH. The Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 2.2 Å(3) Da(-1) and the solvent content was estimated to be 44%.

  10. Crystallographic preferred orientation and deformation of deep Earth minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaercher, Pamela Michelle

    This thesis aims to provide further insight into crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and deformation mechanisms active at high pressure. Preferred orientation of iron-rich magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O, a major mantle mineral phase, stishovite (SiO2), the high pressure polymorph of quartz that is likely present in the lower crust and mantle, and in NaMgF3 + NaCl, an analog system to lower mantle minerals MgSiO3 + MgO, have been examined with synchrotron X-ray diffraction while at high pressure in either a diamond anvil cell or a multianvil press. Magnesiowustite, (Mg0.08Fe0.88)O, and wustite, Fe0.94O, were compressed up to 37 GPa at ambient temperature in diamond anvil cells (DAC) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray diffraction patterns were taken in situ in radial geometry in order to study the evolution of CPO through the cubic-to-rhombohedral phase transition. Under uniaxial stress in the DAC, cubic texture developed (i.e. {100} c planes aligned perpendicular to the compression direction). Variant selection of preferred orientation was observed immediately following the transition to the rhombohedral phase. Upon decompression in the DAC, FeO reverted back to cubic symmetry and the cubic texture reappeared, demonstrating that the transition is reversible and has texture memory. The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, but little is known about texture development during deformation, which provides information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Radial DAC experiments were done at the ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) while collecting X-ray diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of CPO. Starting pressure in the sample chamber was still in the quartz stability field, and compression of quartz produced a weak texture, likely due to Dauphine twinning. Following compression of quartz into the stishovite stability field

  11. Salicylic acid-independent plant defence pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L. C. Van

    1999-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule involved in both locally and systemically induced disease resistance responses. Recent advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling have revealed that plants employ a network of signal transduction pathways, some of which are independent of salicylic acid. Evidence is emerging that jasmonic acid and ethylene play key roles in these salicylic acid-independent pathways. Cross-talk between the salicylic acid-dependent and the salicy...

  12. 40-Godišnjica institucije Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre posvećene pohranjivanju podataka o molekularnim i kristalnim strukturama -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molčanov, K.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to 40th anniversary of The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC, the world-known centre (http://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk responsible for deposition and control of crystallographic data, including atomic coordinates that define the three-dimensional structures of organic molecules and metal complexes containing organic ligands. Cambride Structural Database (CSD, one among the first established electronic databases, nowadays is the most significant crystallographic database in the world. CSD has about 400,000 deposited structures. The use of the extensive database, which is growing rapidly, needs support of efficient and sophisticated software for searching, analysing and visualising structural data. The seminal role of CSD in the research related to crystallography, chemistry, material sciences, solid state physics and chemistry, life sciences, pharmacology, and in particular in drug design, has been documented in more than 1300 scientific papers. The important issues of CCDC are the accuracy of deposited data and development of software that enables a wide variety of applications. Such demanding project requires higly competent team of experts; thus the article brings into focus the scientific approach of the team based on the long tradition in crystallography, modelling and informatics. The article is not dedicated to 40th anniversary of the centre only, but it also reveals how Cambridge Structural Database can be used in the research and teaching. The use of electronic media and computer graphics makes “data mining" very efficient and useful but also esthetically appealing due to the molecular architecture. At the Rudjer Bošković Institute, Zagreb, Croatia there is The National Affiliated Centre of Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre responsible for communication and dissemination of CSD in Croatia, Slovenia and Macedonia. The use of CSD is illustrated by two examples performed and published by the presenting

  13. Enzyme transient state kinetics in crystal and solution from the perspective of a time-resolved crystallographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marius; Saldin, Dilano K

    2014-03-01

    With recent technological advances at synchrotrons [Graber et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 18, 658-670 (2011)], it is feasible to rapidly collect time-resolved crystallographic data at multiple temperature settings [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534-2542 (2013)], from which barriers of activation can be extracted. With the advent of fourth generation X-ray sources, new opportunities emerge to investigate structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules in real time [M. Schmidt, Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 1-10] in crystals and potentially from single molecules in random orientation in solution [Poon et al., Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 750371]. Kinetic data from time-resolved experiments on short time-scales must be interpreted in terms of chemical kinetics [Steinfeld et al., Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, 2nd ed. (Prentience Hall, 1985)] and tied to existing time-resolved experiments on longer time-scales [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534-2542 (2013); Jung et al., Nat. Chem. 5, 212-220 (2013)]. With this article, we will review and outline steps that are required to routinely determine the energetics of reactions in biomolecules in crystal and solution with newest X-ray sources. In eight sections, we aim to describe concepts and experimental details that may help to inspire new approaches to collect and interpret these data.

  14. Enzyme transient state kinetics in crystal and solution from the perspective of a time-resolved crystallographer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With recent technological advances at synchrotrons [Graber et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 18, 658–670 (2011], it is feasible to rapidly collect time-resolved crystallographic data at multiple temperature settings [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534–2542 (2013], from which barriers of activation can be extracted. With the advent of fourth generation X-ray sources, new opportunities emerge to investigate structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules in real time [M. Schmidt, Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 1–10] in crystals and potentially from single molecules in random orientation in solution [Poon et al., Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 750371]. Kinetic data from time-resolved experiments on short time-scales must be interpreted in terms of chemical kinetics [Steinfeld et al., Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, 2nd ed. (Prentience Hall, 1985] and tied to existing time-resolved experiments on longer time-scales [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534–2542 (2013; Jung et al., Nat. Chem. 5, 212–220 (2013]. With this article, we will review and outline steps that are required to routinely determine the energetics of reactions in biomolecules in crystal and solution with newest X-ray sources. In eight sections, we aim to describe concepts and experimental details that may help to inspire new approaches to collect and interpret these data.

  15. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations...

  16. Interpretation of quantitative crystallographic texture in copper electrodeposits on amorphous substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Jensen, Jens Arne Dahl; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallographic texture and morphology in Cu electrodeposits was studied in relation to the current density and the content of the organic levelling additive 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate. The substrate onto which Cu was electrodeposited consisted of amorphous Ni-P in order to allow substrate...

  17. Crystallographic structural organization of human rhinovirus serotype 16, 14, 3, 2 and 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, A.

    2006-07-01

    The capsid of the icosahedral virion is encapsulated between two polyhedra scaled according to the golden mean, each being composed of an icosahedron and a dodecahedron. Structural units of the coat proteins are enclosed into forms whose projections along the icosahedral symmetry axes obey the crystallographic law of rational indices.

  18. Crystallographic study of FABP5 as an intracellular endocannabinoid transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, Benoît; Wang, Tao [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sun, Jing; Wang, Liqun; Kaczocha, Martin [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Ojima, Iwao [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 1794-3400 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Deutsch, Dale, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Li, Huilin, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    FABP5 was recently found to intracellularly transport endocannabinoid signaling lipids. The structures of FABP5 complexed with two endocannabinoids and an inhibitor were solved. Human FABP5 was found to dimerize via a domain-swapping mechanism. This work will help in the development of inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels. In addition to binding intracellular fatty acids, fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) have recently been reported to also transport the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid derivatives that function as neurotransmitters and mediate a diverse set of physiological and psychological processes. To understand how the endocannabinoids bind to FABPs, the crystal structures of FABP5 in complex with AEA, 2-AG and the inhibitor BMS-309403 were determined. These ligands are shown to interact primarily with the substrate-binding pocket via hydrophobic interactions as well as a common hydrogen bond to the Tyr131 residue. This work advances our understanding of FABP5–endocannabinoid interactions and may be useful for future efforts in the development of small-molecule inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels.

  19. Enzymes for carbon sequestration: neutron crystallographic studies of carbonic anhydrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, S. Z., E-mail: zfisher@lanl.gov; Kovalevsky, A. Y. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Domsic, J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, PO Box 100245, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Mustyakimov, M. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Silverman, D. N. [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, PO Box 100267, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, PO Box 100245, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Langan, P. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The first neutron crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase is presented. The structure reveals interesting and unexpected features of the active site that affect catalysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a ubiquitous metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to form HCO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sup +} using a Zn–hydroxide mechanism. The first part of catalysis involves CO{sub 2} hydration, while the second part deals with removing the excess proton that is formed during the first step. Proton transfer (PT) is thought to occur through a well ordered hydrogen-bonded network of waters that stretches from the metal center of CA to an internal proton shuttle, His64. These waters are oriented and ordered through a series of hydrogen-bonding interactions to hydrophilic residues that line the active site of CA. Neutron studies were conducted on wild-type human CA isoform II (HCA II) in order to better understand the nature and the orientation of the Zn-bound solvent (ZS), the charged state and conformation of His64, the hydrogen-bonding patterns and orientations of the water molecules that mediate PT and the ionization of hydrophilic residues in the active site that interact with the water network. Several interesting and unexpected features in the active site were observed which have implications for how PT proceeds in CA.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human glycosylated haemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syakhovich, Vitaly E. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, International Sakharov Environmental University, Dolgobrodskaya St 23, 220009 Minsk (Belarus); Saraswathi, N. T.; Ruff, Marc, E-mail: ruff@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Département de Biologie et Génomique Structurales, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch (France); Bokut, Sergey B. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, International Sakharov Environmental University, Dolgobrodskaya St 23, 220009 Minsk (Belarus); Moras, Dino [Département de Biologie et Génomique Structurales, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch (France); Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, International Sakharov Environmental University, Dolgobrodskaya St 23, 220009 Minsk (Belarus)

    2006-02-01

    Non enzymatic modification of haemoglobin by glucose plays an important role in diabetes pathogenesis. Here the purification, characterization and crystallization of human glycosylated haemoglobin are reported. Human glycosylated haemoglobin A{sub 1C} is a stable minor variant formed in vivo by post-translational modification of the main form of haemoglobin by glucose. Crystals of oxyHbA{sub 1C} were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and PEG as precipitant. The diffraction pattern of the crystal extends to a resolution of 2.3 Å at 120 K. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 237.98, b = 59.27, c = 137.02 Å, α = 90.00, β = 125.40, γ = 90.00°. The presence of two and a half molecules per asymmetric unit gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 9.70 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 49%.

  1. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of human ketohexokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, M; Hayward, B; Borek, D; Bonthron, D T; Jaskólski, M

    2001-04-01

    Ketohexokinase (KHK; E.C. 2.7.1.3) catalyses the (reversible) phosphorylation of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate. KHK is the first enzyme in a specialized catabolic pathway metabolizing dietary fructose to the glycolytic intermediate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. Mutations inactivating KHK underlie the metabolic disorder essential fructosuria. The primary structure of KHK shows no significant homology to other mammalian hexokinases. It is most similar to prokaryotic ribokinases, but catalyses a distinct phosphorylation reaction. Recombinant human KHK has been crystallized in the orthorhombic form (space group P2(1)2(1)2 or P2(1)2(1)2(1)). Single crystals of this polymorph suitable for X-ray diffraction have been obtained by vapour diffusion using 2-propanol and MPD as precipitants (pH 7.5). The crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 93.4, b = 121.5, c = 108.4 A. Diffraction data were collected to 4.3 A resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four protein molecules.

  2. Flanking p10 contribution and sequence bias in matrix based epitope prediction: revisiting the assumption of independent binding pockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parry Christian S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eluted natural peptides from major histocompatibility molecules show patterns of conserved residues. Crystallographic structures show that the bound peptide in class II major histocompatibility complex adopts a near uniform polyproline II-like conformation. This way allele-specific favoured residues are able to anchor into pockets in the binding groove leaving other peptide side chains exposed for recognition by T cells. The anchor residues form a motif. This sequence pattern can be used to screen large sequences for potential epitopes. Quantitative matrices extend the motif idea to include the contribution of non-anchor peptide residues. This report examines two new matrices that extend the binding register to incorporate the polymorphic p10 pocket of human leukocyte antigen DR1. Their performance is quantified against experimental binding measurements and against the canonical nine-residue register matrix. Results One new matrix shows significant improvement over the base matrix; the other does not. The new matrices differ in the sequence of the peptide library. Conclusion One of the extended quantitative matrices showed significant improvement in prediction over the original nine residue matrix and over the other extended matrix. Proline in the sequence of the peptide library of the better performing matrix presumably stabilizes the peptide conformation through neighbour interactions. Such interactions may influence epitope prediction in this test of quantitative matrices. This calls into question the assumption of the independent contribution of individual binding pockets.

  3. Crystallographic structure of the human leukocyte antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: models of a directional alloimmune response and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Christian S; Gorski, Jack; Stern, Lawrence J

    2007-08-10

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin alphaII(B)betaIII glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the alphaII(B)betaIII 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 A. There are two alphabeta heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4(1)2(1)2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive "1-4-9" peptide binding motif. A beta57 Asp-->Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to alpha76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic beta37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  4. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  5. The symmetry of single-molecule conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-14

    We introduce the conductance point group which defines the symmetry of single-molecule conduction within the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown, either rigorously or to within a very good approximation, to correspond to a molecular-conductance point group defined purely in terms of the properties of the conducting molecule. This enables single-molecule conductivity to be described in terms of key qualitative chemical descriptors that are independent of the nature of the molecule-conductor interfaces. We apply this to demonstrate how symmetry controls the conduction through 1,4-benzenedithiol chemisorbed to gold electrodes as an example system, listing also the molecular-conductance point groups for a range of molecules commonly used in molecular electronics research.

  6. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  7. Reactive molecular dynamics of hypervelocity collisions of PETN molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerville, A C; Oleynik, I I; White, C T

    2009-11-05

    Born-Oppenheimer direct dynamics classical trajectory simulations of bimolecular collisions of PETN molecules have been performed to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of hypervelocity chemistry relevant to initiating reactions immediately behind the shock wavefront in energetic molecular crystals. The solid-state environment specifies the initial orientations of colliding molecules. The threshold velocities for initiating chemistry for a variety of crystallographic orientations were correlated with available experimental data on anisotropic shock sensitivity of PETN. Collisions normal to the planes (001) and (110) were found to be most sensitive with threshold velocities on the order of characteristic particle velocities in detonating PETN. The production of NO2 is the dominant reaction pathway in most of the reactive cases. The simulations show that the reactive chemistry, driven by dynamics rather than temperature during hypervelocity collisions, can occur at a very short time scale (10(-13) s) under highly nonequilibrium conditions.

  8. Are Independent Fiscal Institutions Really Independent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Franek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the number of independent fiscal institutions (known also as fiscal councils has tripled. They play an important oversight role over fiscal policy-making in democratic societies, especially as they seek to restore public finance stability in the wake of the recent financial crisis. Although common functions of such institutions include a role in analysis of fiscal policy, forecasting, monitoring compliance with fiscal rules or costing of spending proposals, their roles, resources and structures vary considerably across countries. The aim of the article is to determine the degree of independence of such institutions based on the analysis of the independence index of independent fiscal institutions. The analysis of this index values may be useful to determine the relations between the degree of independence of fiscal councils and fiscal performance of particular countries. The data used to calculate the index values will be derived from European Commission and IMF, which collect sets of information about characteristics of activity of fiscal councils.

  9. HEXAMERS OF SUBUNIT-II FROM LIMULUS HEMOCYANIN (A 48-MER) HAVE THE SAME QUATERNARY STRUCTURE AS WHOLE PANULIRUS HEMOCYANIN MOLECULES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAGNUS, KA; LATTMAN, EE; VOLBEDA, A; HOL, WGJ

    1991-01-01

    Hemocyanins are copper-containing proteins that transport oxygen in a variety of invertebrates. Considerable evidence has accumulated that arthropodan hemocyanins are multimers of a fundamental hexameric unit. X-Ray crystallographic structure determination has revealed that the hemocyanin molecule f

  10. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  11. Central Bank independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile DEDU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the key aspects regarding central bank’s independence. Most economists consider that the factor which positively influences the efficiency of monetary policy measures is the high independence of the central bank. We determined that the National Bank of Romania (NBR has a high degree of independence. NBR has both goal and instrument independence. We also consider that the hike of NBR’s independence played an important role in the significant disinflation process, as headline inflation dropped inside the targeted band of 3% ± 1 percentage point recently.

  12. X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Youjun [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Qi, Jianxun [Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Jinzi [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Liu, Jinhua [College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Jiang, Fan [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao, Feng, E-mail: gaofeng@im.ac.cn [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2006-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the rhesus macaque is regarded as a classic animal model, playing a crucial role in HIV vaccine strategies and therapeutics by characterizing various cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in macaque monkeys. However, the availability of well documented structural reports focusing on rhesus macaque major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules remains extremely limited. Here, a complex of the rhesus macaque MHC I molecule (Mamu-A*02) with human β{sub 2}m and an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide, GESNLKSLY (GY9), has been crystallized. The crystal diffracts X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution and belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.11, b = 110.45, c = 100.06 Å, and contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The availability of the structure, which is being solved by molecular replacement, will provide new insights into rhesus macaque MHC I (Mamu-A*02) presenting pathogenic SIV peptides.

  13. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  14. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  15. The relation between microstructure and crystallographic orientation in rolled copper and brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, H.; Leffers, Torben

    2002-01-01

    The relation between microstructure and crystallographic orientation is investigated in rolled copper and brass. For the two main types of microstructure in copper (the high wall density and the low wall density structure) there is a certain relation: theorientations corresponding to a specific...... type tend to cluster in certain regions of orientation space. However, the clustering is not very pronounced (there is a lot of overlap), and it cannot be related to any model. There is also a certain grain-sizeeffect: the average grain with high wall density structure is larger than the average grain...... with low wall density structure. For a third type of microstructure (to be described) there is a very clear relation to the crystallographic orientation. For brassthe distinction is between grains with and grains without deformation twins. There is a clear trend for the grains with twins to cluster...

  16. Crystallographic dependence of CO activation on cobalt catalysts: HCP versus FCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Xun; Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Da-Peng; Zhang, Bing-Yan; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-11-06

    Identifying the structure sensitivity of catalysts in reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H2 over cobalt catalysts, is an important yet challenging issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Based on a first-principles kinetic study, we find for the first time that CO activation on hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co not only has much higher intrinsic activity than that of face centered-cubic (FCC) Co but also prefers a different reaction route, i.e., direct dissociation with HCP Co but H-assisted dissociation on the FCC Co. The origin is identified from the formation of various denser yet favorable active sites on HCP Co not available for FCC Co, due to their distinct crystallographic structure and morphology. The great dependence of the activity on the crystallographic structure and morphology of the catalysts revealed here may open a new avenue for better, stable catalysts with maximum mass-specific reactivity.

  17. Novel Kac-Moody-type affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Twarock, Reidun

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent results in mathematical virology, we present novel asymmetric Z[tau]-integer-valued affine extensions of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H_2, H_3 and H_4 derived in a Kac-Moody-type formalism. In particular, we show that the affine reflection planes which extend the Coxeter group H_3 generate (twist) translations along 2-, 3- and 5-fold axes of icosahedral symmetry and classify these translations in terms of Fibonacci recursion relations, thus providing a framework to explain results of Keef et al and Wardman at the group level. Finally, we extend this classification to the case of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H_2 and H_4. These results should have applications in physics (quasicrystals), biology (viruses) and chemistry (fullerenes).

  18. Determination of crystallographic and macroscopic orientation of planar structures in TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, X.; Liu, Q.

    1998-01-01

    With the aid of a double-tilt holder in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), simple methods are described for determination of the crystallographic orientation of a planar structure and for calculation of the macroscopic orientation of the planar structure. The correlation between a planar s...... taken at tilted positions, can be transformed to the real macroscopic orientation of the planar structures with estimated error of about +/- 2 degrees. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....... structure and a crystallographic plane can be found by comparing the differences in their trace directions on the projection plane and inclination angles with respect to that plane. The angles between the traces of planar structures and the sample axis measured from the TEM micrographs, which have been...

  19. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeudy, Sandra; Coutard, Bruno; Lebrun, Régine; Abergel, Chantal

    2005-06-01

    The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004), Science, 306, 1344-1350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005), Acta Cryst. F61, 212-215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P2(1)3, with unit-cell parameter 99.425 A. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities.

  20. Preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice I ← II transformation and the flow of ice II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, K.; Wenk, H.-R.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The preferred crystallographic orientation developed during the ice I ← II transformation and during the plastic flow of ice II was measured in polycrystalline deuterium oxide (D2O) specimens using low-temperature neutron diffraction. Samples partially transformed from ice I to II under a non-hydrostatic stress developed a preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice II. Samples of pure ice II transformed from ice I under a hydrostatic stress and then when compressed axially, developed a strong preferred orientation of compression axes parallel to (1010). A match to the observed preferred orientation using the viscoplastic self-consistent theory was obtained only when (1010) [0001] was taken as the predominant slip system in ice II.

  1. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of natural kaolins from the Ivory Coast (West Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, J.; Morato, F.; Kra, G.; Staunton, S.; Quiquampoix, H.; Jumas, J. C.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen clay samples from four deposits in the Ivory Coast (West Africa) were studied using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and chemical analysis. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of these samples are given. Kaolinite is the principal mineral but other minerals are present in small quantities: illite, quartz, anatase and iron oxides (oxides and oxyhydroxides). The crystallographic, morphological and surface characteristics are influenced by the presence of these impurities. In particular, the presence of iron oxides was associated with reduced structural ordering and thermal stability of kaolinite and increased specific surface area. These clays could be used in the ceramics industry to make tiles and bricks, and also in agronomy as supports for chemical fertilizers or for environmental protection by immobilising potentially toxic waste products.

  2. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang; Wu, Guilin; Liu, Qing; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations. It is found that indentations are preferential nucleation sites. The crystallographic orientations of the deformed grains affect the hardness and the nucleation potentials at the indentations. Higher hardness gives increased nucleation probabilities. Orientation relationships between nuclei developed at different indentations within one original grain are analyzed and it is found that the orientation distribution of the nuclei is far from random. It is suggested that it relates to the orientations present near the indentation tips which in turn depend on the orientation of the selected grain in which they form. Finally, possible nucleation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  3. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic characterization of FlhF from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bange, Gert; Petzold, Georg; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Centre (BZH), INF 328, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-05-01

    Preliminary crystallographic data are reported for the third SRP GTPase FlhF from Bacillus subtilis. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis contains three proteins belonging to the signal recognition particle (SRP) type GTPase family. The well characterized signal sequence-binding protein SRP54 and the SRP receptor protein FtsY are universally conserved components of the SRP system of protein transport. The third member, FlhF, has been implicated in the placement and assembly of polar flagella. This article describes the overexpression and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of an FlhF fragment that corresponds to the well characterized GTPase domains in SRP54 and FtsY. Three crystal forms are reported with either GDP or GMPPNP and diffract to a resolution of about 3 Å.

  4. Crystallographic orientation and induced potential effects in photoelectron emission from metal surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiano, C A Rios; Mitnik, D M; Silkin, V M; Gravielle, M S

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the crystallographic orientation of a typical metal surface, like aluminum, on electron emission spectra produced by grazing incidence of ultrashort laser pulses is investigated by using the band-structure-based-Volkov (BSB-V) approximation. The present version of the BSB-V approach includes not only a realistic description of the surface interaction, accounting for band structure effects, but also effects due to the induced potential that originates from the collective response of valence-band electrons to the external electromagnetic field. The model is applied to evaluate differential electron emission probabilities from the valence band of Al(100) and Al(111). For both crystallographic orientations, the contribution of partially occupied surface electronic states and the influence of the induced potential are separately analyzed as a function of the laser carrier frequency. We found that the induced potential strongly affects photoelectron emission distributions, opening a window to scrut...

  5. Crystallographic similarity between the lath martensite and lower bainite in medium-carbon alloy steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiangwen; LUO Chengping; WU Dongxiao

    2005-01-01

    Progress in the crystallography of lath martensitic and lower bainitic transformations is briefly reviewed, followed by a presentation of the experimentally measured crystallographic characteristics of both lath martensite and lower bainite formed in mediumcarbon steels containing Si, Mn and Mo. It is found that the bainite plates relate to each other by a relative rotation of 54.7°or 60°about the normal to their common close-packed planes {110} b, which ensures a pseudo- {112}b twin relationship between two adjacent plates,and that all bainite variants formed in a single packet keep a unique G-T orientation relationship with the austenite matrix. These two types of OR of lower bainite are similar to that of the lath martensite, respectively. Furthermore, the measured habit planes of both the lower bainite and lath martensite are all {335} f type, which can verify the crystallographic similarity between the lath martensite and lower bainite.

  6. Microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA2017A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.M.Z., E-mail: mohamed_ahmed4@s-petrol.suez.edu.eg [Institute for Microstructural and Mechanical Processing Engineering, University of Sheffield (IMMPETUS), Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Suez Canal University, Suez 43721 (Egypt); Wynne, B.P.; Rainforth, W.M. [Institute for Microstructural and Mechanical Processing Engineering, University of Sheffield (IMMPETUS), Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Threadgill, P.L. [TWI LTD, Granta Park, Great Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    In this study a thick section (20 mm) friction stir welded AA2017A-T451 has been characterized in terms of microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties. For microstructural analysis both optical and scanning electron microscopes have been used. A detailed crystallographic texture analysis has been carried out using the electron back scattering diffraction technique. Crystallographic texture has been examined in both shoulder and probe affected regions of the weld NG. An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region which is mainly explained by the effect of the sequential multi pass deformation experienced by both tool probe and tool shoulder. The texture in the probe dominated region at the AS side of the weld is relatively weak but still assembles the simple shear texture of FCC metals with B/B{sup Macron} and C components existing across the whole map. However, the texture is stronger at the RS than at the AS of the weld, mainly dominated byB/B{sup Macron} components and with C component almost absent across the map. An alternating bands between (B) components and (B{sup Macron }) component are observed only at the AS side of the weld. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed investigation of microstructure and crystallographic texture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grain size is varied from the top to the bottom of the NG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The texture in the probe affected region is dominated by simple shear texture.

  7. Crystallographic orientation-dependent pattern replication in direct imprint of aluminum nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations corroborated by experimental validations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single-crystalline aluminum under direct imprint using a rigid silicon master. We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the microscopic deformation behavior of the substrate materials and its correlation with the macroscopic pattern replications. Furthermore, the surface mechanical properties of the patterned struc...

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined....

  9. Crystallographic mechanism of inverse twinning in ordered β′-CuZn alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛卫民

    2000-01-01

    The basic process of mechanical twinning in β’-CuZn phase, as an example of B2 structured metals, has been analyzed under the rolling stresses. The behavior of inverse twinning in B2 structured metals is discussed in terms of mechanics and crystallographic stability. It is shown that the inverse twinning could remain the B2 structure, and the resulting strains will have the lowest resistance during the rolling deformation of the polycrystalline.

  10. Crystallographic mechanism of inverse twinning in ordered β'-CuZn alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The basic process of mechanical twinning in β'-CuZn phase, as an example of B2 structured metals, has been analyzed under the rolling stresses. The behavior of inverse twinning in B2 structured metals is discussed in terms of mechanics and crystallographic stability. It is shown that the inverse twinning could remain the B2 structure, and the resulting strains will have the lowest resistance during the rolling deformation of the polycrystalline.

  11. Keep it together: restraints in crystallographic refinement of macromolecule–ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Roberto A.; Tucker, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    A short introduction is provided to the concept of restraints in macromolecular crystallographic refinement. A typical ligand restraint-generation process is then described, covering types of input, the methodology and the mechanics behind the software in general terms, how this has evolved over recent years and what to look for in the output. Finally, the currently available restraint-generation software is compared, concluding with some thoughts for the future. PMID:28177305

  12. Affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups induced by projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; BÅ`hm, Céline; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we show that affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups can be derived via Coxeter-Dynkin diagram foldings and projections of affine extended versions of the root systems E8, D6, and A4. We show that the induced affine extensions of the non-crystallographic groups H4, H3, and H2 correspond to a distinguished subset of those considered in [P.-P. Dechant, C. Bœhm, and R. Twarock, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 285202 (2012)]. This class of extensions was motivated by physical applications in icosahedral systems in biology (viruses), physics (quasicrystals), and chemistry (fullerenes). By connecting these here to extensions of E8, D6, and A4, we place them into the broader context of crystallographic lattices such as E8, suggesting their potential for applications in high energy physics, integrable systems, and modular form theory. By inverting the projection, we make the case for admitting different number fields in the Cartan matrix, which could open up enticing possibilities in hyperbolic geometry and rational conformal field theory.

  13. Electron diffraction study of {alpha}-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-06-01

    The structure of crystalline {alpha}-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes, allowing the space group symmetry to be studied. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pm3-bar were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for very thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. The structural basis of the Pm3-bar to Im3-bar transformation may be understood in terms of an analysis of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns is described. An electron diffraction pattern of the 5-fold axis of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi is also included; this is compared with the experimental results and calculations for the [0{tau}1] axis of Pm3-bar and Im3-bar crystalline phases. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  14. Rapid Creation of Three-Dimensional, Tactile Models from Crystallographic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan B. Fisher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the conversion of crystallographic information framework (CIF files to stereo lithographic data files suitable for printing on three-dimensional printers is presented. Crystallographic information framework or CIF files are capable of being manipulated in virtual space by a variety of computer programs, but their visual representations are limited to the two-dimensional surface of the computer screen. Tactile molecular models that demonstrate critical ideas, such as symmetry elements, play a critical role in enabling new students to fully visualize crystallographic concepts. In the past five years, major developments in three-dimensional printing has lowered the cost and complexity of these systems to a level where three-dimensional molecular models may be easily created provided that the data exists in a suitable format. Herein a method is described for the conversion of CIF file data using existing free software that allows for the rapid creation of inexpensive molecular models. This approach has numerous potential applications in basic research, education, visualization, and crystallography.

  15. Independent candidates in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Gonzalo Santiago

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the issue of independent candidates in Mexico, because through the so-called political reform of 2012 was incorporated in the Political Constitution of the Mexican United States the right of citizens to be registered as independent candidates. Also, in September 2013 was carried out a reform of Article 116 of the Political Constitution of the Mexican United States in order to allow independent candidates in each state of the Republic. However, prior to the constitutio...

  16. Central bank Financial Independence

    OpenAIRE

    J.Ramon Martinez-Resano

    2004-01-01

    Central bank independence is a multifaceted institutional design. The financial component has been seldom analysed. This paper intends to set a comprehensive conceptual background for central bank financial independence. Quite often central banks are modelled as robot like maximizers of some goal. This perspective neglects the fact that central bank functions are inevitably deployed on its balance sheet and have effects on its income statement. A financially independent central bank exhibits ...

  17. Gravity Independent Compressor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and demonstrate a small, gravity independent, vapor compression refrigeration system using a linear motor compressor which effectively...

  18. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  19. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  20. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  1. Molecules in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Omont, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The main achievements, current developments and prospects of molecular studies in external galaxies are reviewed. They are put in the context of the results of several decades of studies of molecules in local interstellar medium, their chemistry and their importance for star formation. CO observations have revealed the gross structure of molecular gas in galaxies. Together with other molecules, they are among the best tracers of star formation at galactic scales. Our knowledge about molecular abundances in various local galactic environments is progressing. They trace physical conditions and metallicity, and they are closely related to dust processes and large aromatic molecules. Major recent developments include mega-masers, and molecules in Active Galactic Nuclei; millimetre emission of molecules at very high redshift; and infrared H2 emission as tracer of warm molecular gas, shocks and photodissociation regions. The advent of sensitive giant interferometers from the centimetre to sub-millimetre range, espe...

  2. An approach to water molecule dynamics associated with motion of catalytic moiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimahara, Hideto; Sugimori, Kimikazu; Koyimatu, Muhmad; Nagao, Hidemi; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2013-02-01

    A water bridge composed of several water molecules between the catalytic moieties, His64 and the zinc-bound solvent, in human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) is disrupted when the inhibitor acetazolamide (ACZ) binds to the zinc ion, according to the crystallographic structure of the ACZ-hCAII complex. In this structure, the ACZ methyl group is far (˜10 Å) from the His64. However, this binding causes an 1H NMR chemical shift change (˜1 ppm) in His64 in solution. This suggests two alternative mechanisms: a) the ACZ methyl group may be closer to His64 in the complex in solution, compared to the crystal, or b) the disruption of the water bridge might cause the His64 to move or behave in a different manner. The binding of ACZ to the enzyme in solution was examined by observing the NMR signals of the 13C-labeled ACZ methyl group in the ACZ-hCAII complex. The 13C signals of the free and bound forms were detected. In the bound form, the signal for the acetamide group was pH dependent, whereas the sulfonamide group signal was pH independent. Some 13C-filtered NOE signals were observed, although none of the signals were related to the His64 chemical shift. Based on these observations, we suggest that the position or motion of His64 is associated with disruption of the water bridge in the ACZ-hCAII complex in solution, which could change the 1H chemical shift.

  3. Crystallographic groups and topology in Escher. (Spanish:Grupos cristalográficos y topología en Escher).

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos Amilibia, José María

    2010-01-01

    In the late 19th century Fedorov, Schoenflies, and Barlow classified the seventeen wallpaper groups (two-dimensional crystallographic groups, five of them direct movements and twelve of them inverse movements) and the 320 three-dimensional crystallographic groups. In order to get the lists of groups, they all used the same geometric strategy: to combine all possible movements and study them case by case. Later on, Zassenhaus developed a purely algebraic algorithm which allowed him to u...

  4. Models for Copper Dynamic Behavior in Doped Cadmium dl-Histidine Crystals: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Crystallographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaneri, Michael J; Teat, Simon J; Vitali, Jacqueline

    2015-11-12

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and crystallographic studies of copper-doped cadmium dl-histidine, abbreviated as CdDLHis, were undertaken to gain further understanding on the relationship between site structure and dynamic behavior in biological model complexes. X-ray diffraction measurements determined the crystal structure of CdDLHis at 100 and 298 K. CdDLHis crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with two cadmium complexes per asymmetric unit. In each complex, the Cd is hexacoordinated to two histidine molecules. Both histidines are l in one complex and d in the other. Additionally, each complex contains multiple waters of varying disorder. Single crystal EPR spectroscopic splitting (g) and copper hyperfine (A(Cu)) tensors at room temperature (principal values: g = 2.249, 2.089, 2.050; A(Cu) = -453, -30.5, -0.08 MHz) were determined from rotational experiments. Alignments of the tensor directions with the host structure were used to position the copper unpaired dx(2)-y(2) orbital in an approximate plane made by four proposed ligand atoms: the N-imidazole and N-amino of one histidine, and the N-amino and O-carboxyl of the other. Each complex has two such planes related by noncrystallographic symmetry, which make an angle of 65° and have a 1.56 Å distance between their midpoints. These findings are consistent with three interpretations that can adequately explain previous temperature-dependent EPR powder spectra of this system: (1) a local structural distortion (static strain) at the copper site has a temperature dependence significant enough to affect the EPR pattern, (2) the copper can hop between the two sites in each complex at high temperature, and (3) there exists a dynamic Jahn-Teller effect involving the copper ligands.

  5. Accounting for Independent Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonenstein, Burton

    The diversity of independent schools in size, function, and mode of operation has resulted in a considerable variety of accounting principles and practices. This lack of uniformity has tended to make understanding, evaluation, and comparison of independent schools' financial statements a difficult and sometimes impossible task. This manual has…

  6. Independence of Internal Auditors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montondon, Lucille; Meixner, Wilda F.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 288 college and university auditors investigated patterns in their appointment, reporting, and supervisory practices as indicators of independence and objectivity. Results indicate a weakness in the positioning of internal auditing within institutions, possibly compromising auditor independence. Because the auditing function is…

  7. Fostering Musical Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Eric; Allsup, Randall Everett

    2016-01-01

    Musical independence has always been an essential aim of musical instruction. But this objective can refer to everything from high levels of musical expertise to more student choice in the classroom. While most conceptualizations of musical independence emphasize the demonstration of knowledge and skills within particular music traditions, this…

  8. On Background Independence

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns what Background Independence itself is (as opposed to some particular physical theory that is background independent). The notions presented mostly arose from a layer-by-layer analysis of the facets of the Problem of Time in Quantum Gravity. Part of this coincides with two relational postulates which are thus identified as classical precursors of two of the facets of the Problem of Time. These are furthemore tied to the forms of each of the GR Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Other aspects of Background Independence include the algebraic closure of these constraints, expressing physics in terms of beables, foliation independence as implemented by refoliation invariance, the reconstruction of spacetime from space. The final picture is that Background Independence - a philosophically desirable and physically implementable feature for a theory to have - has the facets of the Problem of Time among its consequences. Thus these arise naturally and are problems to be resolved, as opposed to ...

  9. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  10. Heavy Exotic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general strictures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral $X(3872)$. The bottom isotriplet exotic with $J^{PC}=1^{+-}$ binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics $Z^+_b(10610)$ and $Z^+_b(10650)$. The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is a possible neutral $X_b(10532)$ to be observed.

  11. Heavy exotic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  12. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  13. Expression, limited proteolysis and preliminary crystallographic analysis of IpaD, a component of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Steven [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Roversi, Pietro [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Espina, Marianela [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Deane, Janet E. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Birket, Susan; Picking, William D. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Blocker, Ariel [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Picking, Wendy L. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Lea, Susan M., E-mail: susan.lea@path.ox.ac.uk [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the S. flexneri type III secretion system, has been crystallized in a variety of crystal forms using in-drop proteolysis. Native and selenomethionine-labelled data collection and preliminary analyses are reported. IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system, has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of the native protein in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.9, b = 100.7, c = 112.0 Å, and data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak at 50% of the origin on the Harker section v = 0.5, suggesting twofold non-crystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. As attempts to derivatize or grow selenomethionine-labelled protein crystals failed, in-drop proteolysis was used to produce new crystal forms. A trace amount of subtilisin Carlsberg was added to IpaD before sparse-matrix screening, resulting in the production of several new crystal forms. This approach produced SeMet-labelled crystals and diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The SeMet crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 139.4, b = 45.0, c = 99.5 Å, β = 107.9°. An anomalous difference Patterson map revealed peaks on the Harker section v = 0, while the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold noncrystallographic symmetry axis, which is consistent with two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  14. Probabilistic conditional independence structures

    CERN Document Server

    Studeny, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Probabilistic Conditional Independence Structures provides the mathematical description of probabilistic conditional independence structures; the author uses non-graphical methods of their description, and takes an algebraic approach.The monograph presents the methods of structural imsets and supermodular functions, and deals with independence implication and equivalence of structural imsets.Motivation, mathematical foundations and areas of application are included, and a rough overview of graphical methods is also given.In particular, the author has been careful to use suitable terminology, and presents the work so that it will be understood by both statisticians, and by researchers in artificial intelligence.The necessary elementary mathematical notions are recalled in an appendix.

  15. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  16. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  17. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  18. Is JPC = 3-+ molecule possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Yan-Rui; Yao, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The confirmation of charged charmonium-like states indicates that heavy quark molecules should exist. Here we discuss the possibility of a molecule state with JPC = 3-+. In a one-boson-exchange model investigation for the S wave C = + D*D¯2* states, one finds that the strongest attraction is in the case J = 3 and I = 0 for both π and σ exchanges. Numerical analysis indicates that this hadronic bound state might exist if a phenomenological cutoff parameter around 2.3 GeV (1.5 GeV) is reasonable with a dipole (monopole) type form factor in the one-pion-exchange model. The cutoff for binding solutions may be reduced to a smaller value once the σ exchange contribution is included. If a state around the D*D¯2* threshold (≈4472 MeV) in the channel J/ψω (P wave) is observed, the heavy quark spin symmetry implies that it is not a cc¯ meson and the JPC are likely to be 3-+. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275115), Shandong Province Natural Science Foundation (ZR2010AM023), SRF for ROCS, SEM, and Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University

  19. Self-assembled ultra-nanocrystalline silicon films with preferred crystallographic orientation for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Das, Debajyoti

    2015-03-01

    Using low-pressure planar inductively coupled plasma CVD at 87% H2-dilution to the SiH4 plasma, nc-Si:H films are prepared that possess preferential growth along crystallographic orientation with I220/I111 > 1.2, bonded H-content of ∼5.5 at.%, a low microstructure factor of ∼0.56, along with a reasonably high σD ∼ 5.2 × 10-4 S cm-1, ΔE ∼ 143 meV and σPh ∼ 1.4 × 10-3 S cm-1. The growth of the nc-Si:H network has been optimized to a moderately high nanocrystallinity (∼68%), with an average grain size of ∼8 nm. The overall network comprises a significant fraction of ultra-nanocrystalline component, Xunc/Xnc ∼ 0.47, which are dominantly inhabited by the thermodynamically preferred crystallographic orientation that provides convenient electrical transport perpendicular to the film surface and subsequently could facilitate photovoltaic performance. The cross-sectional view of the fracture surface demonstrates columnar structures, closely correlated to the favored growth of the nanocrystallites along crystallographic orientation that retains direction perpendicular to the substrate surface. The underlying phenomena could be demonstrated as a consequence of preferential growth induced by high atomic H density present in the planar inductively coupled SiH4 plasma obtained via much lower H2-dilution compared to that realized in conventional capacitively coupled plasma-CVD. The nc-Si:H films with precise material properties as well as the allied low-pressure ICP-CVD growth process could be of significant use in further progress of nc-Si solar cells.

  20. Trapping of Oxygen Vacancies at Crystallographic Shear Planes in Acceptor-Doped Pb-Based Ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Hadermann, Joke; Abakumov, Artem M

    2015-12-01

    The defect chemistry of the ferroelectric material PbTiO3 after doping with Fe(III) acceptor ions is reported. Using advanced transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray and neutron diffraction, we demonstrate that even at concentrations as low as circa 1.7% (material composition approximately ABO2.95), the oxygen vacancies are trapped into extended planar defects, specifically crystallographic shear planes. We investigate the evolution of these defects upon doping and unravel their detailed atomic structure using the formalism of superspace crystallography, thus unveiling their role in nonstoichiometry in the Pb-based perovskites.

  1. Crystallographic dependence of photocatalytic activity of WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Varga, Tamas; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Chongmin; Chambers, Scott A; Du, Yingge

    2015-06-21

    We investigated the impact of crystallographic orientation on the photocatalytic activity of single crystalline WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB). A clear effect is observed, with (111) being the most reactive surface, followed by (110) and (001). Photoreactivity is directly correlated with the surface free energy determined by density functional theory calculations. The RhB photodegradation mechanism is found to involve hydroxyl radicals in solution formed from photo-generated holes and differs from previous studies performed on nanoparticles and composites.

  2. Regularities of crystallographic texture formation in cladding tubes from Zr-based alloys during their production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaenkova, M.; Perlovich, Yu; Fesenko, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes researches of the authors, which are directed on the development of the methodological basis of X-ray studies in the materials science of zirconium and on the systematization of new experimental results obtained using developed methods. The paper describes regularities of the formation of the crystallographic texture and the substructure inhomogeneity of cladding tubes from zirconium alloys at various stages of their manufacturing, i.e. during hot and cold deformation, recrystallization, phase transformations and interactions of the above processes.

  3. (Fundamental studies of new magnetic heterostructures: Their growth, crystallographic structure, magnetic and electronic properties)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onellion, M. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Physics); Dowben, P.A. (Syracuse Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    As part of our request for renewal of our grant, we include this progress report on the significant results obtained under grant number FG02-89ER45319, Fundamental Studies of New Magnetic Heterostructures: Their Growth, Crystallographic Structure, Magnetic and Electronic Properties,'' since the inception of the grant. The results include the scientific accomplishments, the instrumentation developed, and the technological applications of our work. Each area is discussed separately and an initial summary of all areas is provided before the detailed discussion.

  4. Use of Bayesian Inference in Crystallographic Structure Refinement via Full Diffraction Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Chris M.; Han, Zhen; Levin, Igor; Page, Katharine; Reich, Brian J.; Smith, Ralph C.; Wilson, Alyson G.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian inference method for refining crystallographic structures is presented. The distribution of model parameters is stochastically sampled using Markov chain Monte Carlo. Posterior probability distributions are constructed for all model parameters to properly quantify uncertainty by appropriately modeling the heteroskedasticity and correlation of the error structure. The proposed method is demonstrated by analyzing a National Institute of Standards and Technology silicon standard reference material. The results obtained by Bayesian inference are compared with those determined by Rietveld refinement. Posterior probability distributions of model parameters provide both estimates and uncertainties. The new method better estimates the true uncertainties in the model as compared to the Rietveld method. PMID:27550221

  5. Morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in Fe-0.15C binary alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Terasaki, Hidenori; Komizo, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an in situ observation method, combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron backscattering diffraction, was used to investigate the morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in a Fe-0.15C binary alloy. The nucleation at a grain boundary and inclusions, sympathetic nucleation, and impingement event of bainitic ferrite were directly shown in real time. The variant evolution during bainite transformation and misorientation between bainitic ferrites were clarified. Strong variant selection was observed during sympathetic nucleation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. How the R factor changes as molecules become larger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C

    2000-01-01

    The R factors and the numbers of independent atoms for the entire set of molecular organic structures contained in the Cambridge Structural Database were retrieved and analysed. The average R factor for all structures containing the same number of independent atoms was plotted against the number...... of independent atoms. A clear correlation was observed. The plot is suggested to give a graphical overview of how values of the R factor for large-molecule structures with 200-1000 independent atoms increase as the number of independent atoms increases. (C) 2000 International Union of Crystallography Printed...

  7. Molecules as Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelli, Luca

    Molecular biology investigates the structure and function of biochemical systems starting from their basic building blocks: macromolecules. A macromolecule is a large, complex molecule (a protein or a nucleic acid) that usually has inner mutable state and external activity. Informal explanations of biochemical events trace individual macromolecules through their state changes and their interaction histories: a macromolecule is endowed with an identity that is retained through its transformations, even through changes in molecular energy and mass. A macromolecule, therefore, is qualitatively different from the small molecules of inorganic chemistry. Such molecules are stateless: in the standard notation for chemical reactions they are seemingly created and destroyed, and their atomic structure is used mainly for the bookkeeping required by the conservation of mass.

  8. Molecules in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The first molecules detected at infrared wavelengths in the ejecta of a Type II supernova, namely SN1987A, consisted of CO and SiO. Since then, confirmation of the formation of these two species in several other supernovae a few hundred days after explosion has been obtained. However, supernova environments appear to hamper the synthesis of large, complex species due to the lack of microscopically-mixed hydrogen deep in supernova cores. Because these environments also form carbon and silicate dust, it is of importance to understand the role played by molecules in the depletion of elements and how chemical species get incorporated into dust grains. In the present paper, we review our current knowledge of the molecular component of supernova ejecta, and present new trends and results on the synthesis of molecules in these harsh, explosive events.

  9. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  10. Molecules in \\eta\\ Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A; Rodriguez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward \\eta\\ Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO+, HCN, HNC, and N2H+, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13CO and H13CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (about 100 km /s) indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO+ do not appear to be under-abundant in \\eta\\ Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of eta Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  11. Independent technical review, handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Purpose Provide an independent engineering review of the major projects being funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The independent engineering review will address questions of whether the engineering practice is sufficiently developed to a point where a major project can be executed without significant technical problems. The independent review will focus on questions related to: (1) Adequacy of development of the technical base of understanding; (2) Status of development and availability of technology among the various alternatives; (3) Status and availability of the industrial infrastructure to support project design, equipment fabrication, facility construction, and process and program/project operation; (4) Adequacy of the design effort to provide a sound foundation to support execution of project; (5) Ability of the organization to fully integrate the system, and direct, manage, and control the execution of a complex major project.

  12. Distro’: Independent Creativity for Independent Industr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Sri Wulandari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To shortened this introduction, ‘Distro’ is one of cultural phenomenon in theyoung generation nowadays. The word of ‘Distro’ is the shortened of DistributionOutlet. The phenomenon of ‘Distro’ has been some kind of new trends inproducing and distributing creative design products of goods amongst theyoungsters independently, in an independence industry that open for challengingand competitiveness for everyone. This field research has been done in the city ofYogyakarta, reknown as the second city in creative design products after the cityof Bandung. Yogyakarta is welknown as the students’ city as well as the capital cityof culture of Indonesia. As a students’ city it is normal that Yogyakarta is growingin numbers of young people who pursued to study here and enriched the cultureof the city to become more multicultural and the varieties of pluralism as well.This sociocultural phenomenon not only brought some dynamic changing tosociety, economy and cultural life of the city, but also social problems that needsto be overcome. My first research question then is about how the existence of‘Distro’ in Yogyakarta can be a positive answer for social problems that may arisesfrom the hegemony of globalization markets domestically? My second questionis how the creative product designs are being made and distributed creatively inindependent industry? Lastly, my third question is dealling with the genres ofthe design products and how it can be a new trend in art expression? ‘Distro’ is aproduct of culture and it is also creating cultural change in some aspects of the lifeof the youngsters who are ‘Distro’ enthusiasts. ‘Distro’ phenomenon basically is anoffensive to the hegemony of internationally branded product design which turnsto become more over-dominated to the domestic markets and industry and thus,‘Distro’ has the spirit of survival whilts at the same time producing opportunity ofenterpreneurship

  13. Symmetry implies independence

    CERN Document Server

    Renner, R

    2007-01-01

    Given a quantum system consisting of many parts, we show that symmetry of the system's state, i.e., invariance under swappings of the subsystems, implies that almost all of its parts are virtually identical and independent of each other. This result generalises de Finetti's classical representation theorem for infinitely exchangeable sequences of random variables as well as its quantum-mechanical analogue. It has applications in various areas of physics as well as information theory and cryptography. For example, in experimental physics, one typically collects data by running a certain experiment many times, assuming that the individual runs are mutually independent. Our result can be used to justify this assumption.

  14. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  15. Multicolor Bound Soliton Molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Rui; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We show a new class of bound soliton molecule that exists in a parametrically driven nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The composed solitons exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, bound together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor bound soliton molecule shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which may open up a great avenue towards versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy.

  16. Gated container molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fang; WANG Hao; HOUK K. N.

    2011-01-01

    Donald J.Cram,the great UCLA chemist,received the Nobel Prize for his discoveries about host-guest complexes [1].Both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted about the nature and strength of interactions between the host and guest molecules.The concepts of constrictive binding (the activation energy of the binding process) and intrinsic binding (the free energy difference between the complex and the free host and guest molecules) were introduced to characterize different binding properties (Figure 1)[2].

  17. Magnetic transition temperatures follow crystallographic symmetry in samarium under high-pressures and low-temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig R.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal samarium (Sm) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to high-pressure up to 47 GPa and low-temperature to 10 K. The two magnetic transitions at 106 K and 14 K in the α-Sm phase, attributed to antiferromagnetic ordering on hexagonal and cubic layers respectively, collapse in to one magnetic transition near 10 GPa when Sm assumes a double hexagonal close packed (dhcp) phase. On further increase in pressure above 34 GPa, the magnetic transitions split again as Sm adopts a hexagonal-hP3 structure indicating different magnetic transition temperatures for different crystallographic sites. A model for magnetic ordering for the hexagonal-hP3 phase in samarium has been proposed based on the experimental data. The magnetic transition temperatures closely follow the crystallographic symmetry during α-Sm  →  dhcp  →  fcc/dist.fcc  →  hP3 structure sequence at high-pressures and low-temperatures.

  18. Erbium-ion implantation into various crystallographic cuts of Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvindova, P.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Cajzl, J.; Svecova, B.; Oswald, J.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the importance of crystallographic cuts with a different orientation on the luminescent properties and structural changes of Al2O3 implanted with Er+ ions at 190 keV and with a fluence of 1.0 × 1016 cm-2. Post-implantation annealing at 1000 °C in oxygen atmosphere was also done. The chemical compositions and erbium concentration-depth profiles of implanted layers were studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and compared to SRIM simulations. The same value of the maximum erbium concentration (up to 2 at.%) was observed at a depth of about 40 nm for all crystallographic cuts. The structural properties of the prepared layers were characterised by RBS/channelling. The relative amount of disordered atoms of 70-80% was observed in the prepared implanted layers and discussed for various cuts. It has been found that erbium is positioned randomly in the Al2O3 crystalline matrix, and no preferential positions appeared even after the annealing procedure. Erbium luminescence properties were measured in the wavelength range of 1440-1650 nm for all samples. As-implanted Al2O3 samples had a significant luminescence band at 1530 nm. The best luminescence was repeatedly observed in the cut of Al2O3. The annealing procedure significantly improved the luminescent properties.

  19. Crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating on the affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yaw-Jen; Chen, Sheng-Zheng; Ho, Ching-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The principle of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been recently implemented for protein microarrays for the study of protein abundance and function. Ni-Co film fabricated by electrodeposition is a novel microarray surface in an alloy type for immobilizing histidine-tagged proteins based on IMAC. In this paper, the effects of crystallographic structures and surface properties of Ni-Co coatings, with and without the annealing process, on the immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins were systematically investigated. The experimental results reveal that the stronger hcp texture, due to a higher Co content, results in better affinity adsorption for histidine-tagged biotin. Nevertheless, the allotropic phase transformation from hcp to fcc, due to the annealing process, leads to the decrease of affinity adsorption. The wettability property and the surface roughness of Ni-Co coating are, however, not important factors. Obviously, the crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating is the dominant factor for the specific affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein.

  20. Crystallographic superstructure in R2PdSi3 compounds (R=heavy rare earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fei; Frontzek, Matthias; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Leisegang, Tilmann; Zschornak, Matthias; Mietrach, Robert; Hoffmann, Jens-Uwe; Löser, Wolfgang; Gemming, Sibylle; Meyer, Dirk C.; Loewenhaupt, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The R2PdSi3 intermetallic compounds have been reported to crystallize in a hexagonal AlB2-derived structure, with the rare earth atoms on the Al sites and Pd and Si atoms randomly distributed on the B sites. However, the intricate magnetic properties observed in the series of compounds have always suggested complications to the assumed structure. To clarify the situation, x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements were performed on the heavy rare earth compounds with R=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, which revealed the existence of a crystallographic superstructure. The superstructure features a doubled unit cell in the hexagonal basal plane and an octuplication along the perpendicular c direction with respect to the primitive cell. No structural transition was observed between 300 and 1.5 K. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations were utilized to investigate the local environments of the respective atoms. In this paper the various experimental results will be presented and it will be shown that the superstructure is mainly due to the Pd-Si order on the B sites. A structure model will be proposed to fully describe the superstructure of Pd-Si order in R2PdSi3. The connection between the crystallographic superstructure and the magnetic properties will be discussed in the framework of the presented model.

  1. Reaction temperature variations on the crystallographic state of spinel cobalt aluminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Minori; Nakane, Takayuki; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Shimizu, Tadashi; Sakka, Yoshio; Matsushita, Akiyuki; Abe, Hiroya; Funazukuri, Toshitaka; Naka, Takashi

    2013-05-21

    In this study, we report a rapid and simple technique for obtaining cobalt aluminate having a spinel structure. The products were prepared from a hydroxide precursor synthesized by coprecipitation of cobalt (Co(2+)) and aluminum (Al(3+)) nitrates with an alkaline solution. The chosen precursor enabled low temperature fabrication of cobalt aluminate with a spinel structure by sintering it for 2 hours at low temperatures (>400 °C). Crystallographic and thermal analyses suggest that the low-temperature-sintered products contain Co(3+) ions stabilized by chemisorbed water and/or hydroxide groups, which was not observed for products sintered at temperatures higher than 1000 °C. The color of the products turned from clear blue (Thenard's blue) to dark green when sintering temperatures were below 1000 °C. Magnetic quantities, Curie constants, and Weiss temperatures show a strong dependence on the sintering temperature. These findings suggest that there are mixed valent states, i.e. Co(2+) and Co(3+), and unique cation distributions at the different crystallographic sites in the spinel structure, especially in the products sintered at lower temperatures.

  2. Synthesis of crystallographically oriented olivine aggregates using colloidal processing in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Sanae; Suzuki, Tohru S.; Sakka, Yoshio; Yabe, Kosuke; Hiraga, Takehiko

    2016-11-01

    This study develops a fabrication technique to obtain Fe-free and Fe-bearing (Fe:Mg = 1:9) olivine aggregates not only with high density and fine grain size but with crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). A magnetic field (≤12 T) is applied to synthetic, fine-grained ( 120 nm), olivine particles dispersed in solvent. The alignment of certain crystallographic axes of the particles with respect to a magnetic direction is anticipated due to magnetic anisotropy of olivine. The dispersed particles are gradually consolidated on a porous alumina mold covered with a solid-liquid separation filter during drainage of the solvent. The resultant aligned consolidated aggregate is then isostatically pressed and vacuum sintered. We find that (1) preparation of fully reacted olivine particles, with less propensity to coalesce; (2) preparation of a suspension with highly dispersed particles; and (3) application of a certain strength of the magnetic field are essential to obtain well-sintered and well-aligned aggregates. High density (i.e., olivine aggregates were successfully synthesized with uniaxially aligned a- and c-axes, respectively. Attempts to uniaxially align the magnetization hard axis and to triaxially align Fe-bearing olivine by rotating the suspension in the magnetic field succeeded in obtaining weakly developed CPO aggregates.

  3. Crystallographic and electronic properties of AlCrN films that absorb visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatemizo, N.; Imada, S.; Miura, Y.; Nishio, K.; Isshiki, T.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the crystallographic and electronic properties of wurtzite Cr-doped AlN (AlCrN) films (Cr ≤12.0%) that absorb visible light. We confirmed that the films consist of wurtzite columnar single crystals that are densely packed, c-axis oriented, and exhibit a random rotation along the a-axis in plane by using transmission electron microscopy. The oxidation state of Cr was found to be 3+ using Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, which implies that Cr can be a substitute for Al3+ in AlN. The first nearest neighbor distances estimated using Cr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were found to be nearly isotropic for incident light with electric fields that are parallel and perpendicular to the plane. The results of ab initio lattice relaxation calculations for the model of wurtzite Al1-xCrxN supercell where Cr replaces Al support the EXAFS results. The calculations for the model showed that additional energy bands are formed in the band gap of AlN, in which the Fermi energy (EF) is present. As expected from the calculation results, the electrical conductivity increases with increase in the Cr concentration, implying that the density of states at EF increases monotonically. From these results, we can conclude that AlCrN films are an intermediate band material with respect to their crystallographic and electric properties.

  4. Determination of precise crystallographic directions for mask alignment in wet bulk micromachining for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sajal Sagar; Pal, Prem; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Xing, Yan; Sato, Kazuo

    2016-12-01

    In wet bulk micromachining, the etching characteristics are orientation dependent. As a result, prolonged etching of mask openings of any geometric shape on both Si{100} and Si{110} wafers results in a structure defined by the slowest etching planes. In order to fabricate microstructures with high dimensional accuracy, it is vital to align the mask edges along the crystal directions comprising of these slowest etching planes. Thus, precise alignment of mask edges is important in micro/nano fabrication. As a result, the determination of accurate crystal directions is of utmost importance and is in fact the first step to ensure dimensionally accurate microstructures for improved performance. In this review article, we have presented a comprehensive analysis of different techniques to precisely determine the crystallographic directions. We have covered various techniques proposed in the span of more than two decades to determine the crystallographic directions on both Si{100} and Si{110} wafers. Apart from a detailed discussion of each technique along with their design and implementation, we have provided a critical analysis of the associated constraints, benefits and shortcomings. We have also summed up the critical aspects of each technique and presented in a tabular format for easy reference for readers. This review article comprises of an exhaustive discussion and is a handy reference for researchers who are new in the field of wet anisotropic etching or who want to get abreast with the techniques of determination of crystal directions.

  5. Conformation-changing aggregation in hydroxyacetone: a combined low-temperature FTIR, jet, and crystallographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Archna; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui; Hesse, Susanne; Xue, Zhifeng; Suhm, Martin A; Nayak, Susanta K; Sathishkumar, Ranganthan; Pal, Rumpa; Row, Tayur N Guru

    2011-12-21

    Aggregation in hydroxyacetone (HA) is studied using low-temperature FTIR, supersonic jet expansion, and X-ray crystallographic (in situ cryocrystallization) techniques. Along with quantum chemical methods (MP2 and DFT), the experiments unravel the conformational preferences of HA upon aggregation to dimers and oligomers. The O-H···O═C intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the gas-phase monomer partially opens upon aggregation in supersonic expansions, giving rise to intermolecular cooperatively enhanced O-H···O-H hydrogen bonds in competition with isolated O-H···O═C hydrogen bonds. On the other hand, low-temperature IR studies on the neat solid and X-ray crystallographic data reveal that HA undergoes profound conformational changes upon crystallization, with the HOCC dihedral angle changing from ~0° in the gas phase to ~180° in the crystalline phase, hence giving rise to a completely new conformation. These conclusions are supported by theoretical calculations performed on the geometry derived from the crystalline phase. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeudy, Sandra [Information Génomique et Structurale, CNRS UPR 2589, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France); Coutard, Bruno [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, CNRS UMR 6098, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France); Lebrun, Régine [IBSM, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France); Abergel, Chantal, E-mail: chantal.abergel@igs.cnrs-mrs.fr [Information Génomique et Structurale, CNRS UPR 2589, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France)

    2005-06-01

    A. polyphaga mimivirus, the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, is the first virus to exhibit a nucleoside diphosphate kinase gene. The expression and crystallization of the viral NDK are reported. The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004 ▶), Science, 306, 1344–1350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005 ▶), Acta Cryst. F61, 212–215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameter 99.425 Å. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities.

  7. The fourth crystallographic closest packing unveiled in the gold nanocluster crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zibao; Chen, Jishi; Wang, Juan; Wang, Chengming; Li, Man-Bo; Yao, Chuanhao; Zhuang, Shengli; Xu, An; Li, Lingling; Wu, Zhikun

    2017-03-01

    Metal nanoclusters have recently attracted extensive interest not only for fundamental scientific research, but also for practical applications. For fundamental scientific research, it is of major importance to explore the internal structure and crystallographic arrangement. Herein, we synthesize a gold nanocluster whose composition is determined to be Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36 by using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray crystallography (SCXC). SCXC also reveals that Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36 consists of a fcc-like Au20 kernel protected by a pair of giant Au20S3(SCH2Ph)18 staple motifs, which contain 6 tetrahedral-coordinate μ4-S atoms not previously reported in the Au-S interface. Importantly, the fourth crystallographic closest-packed pattern, termed 6H left-handed helical (6HLH) arrangement, which results in the distinct loss of solid photoluminescence of amorphous Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36, is found in the crystals of Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36. The solvent-polarity-dependent solution photoluminescence is also demonstrated. Overall, this work provides important insights about the structure, Au-S bonding and solid photoluminescence of gold nanoclusters.

  8. Development of Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture in a Double-Sided Friction Stir Welded Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, S.; Wynne, B. P.; Baker, T. N.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and crystallographic texture has been investigated in double-sided friction stir welded microalloyed steel, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure analyses show that the center of stirred zone reached a temperature between Ac1 and Ac3 during FSW, resulting in a dual-phase austenitic/ ferritic microstructure. The temperatures in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the overlapped area between the first and second weld pass did not exceed the Ac1. The shear generated by the rotation probe occurs in austenitic/ferritic phase field where the austenite portion of the microstructure is transformed to a bainitic ferrite, on cooling. Analysis of crystallographic textures with regard to shear flow lines generated by the probe tool shows the dominance of simple shear components across the whole weld. The austenite texture at Ac1 - Ac3 is dominated by the B { {1bar{1}2} }stirred zone and the ferrites in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and the overlapped area underwent shear deformation with textures dominated by the D1 { {bar{1}bar{1}2} }weld pass. This is due to continuous dynamic strain-induced recrystallization as a result of simultaneous severe shear deformation and drastic undercooling.

  9. Enhancing nanoscale SEM image segmentation and reconstruction with crystallographic orientation data and machine learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Converse, Matthew I., E-mail: mconverse85@yahoo.com; Fullwood, David T.

    2013-09-15

    Current methods of image segmentation and reconstructions from scanning electron micrographs can be inadequate for resolving nanoscale gaps in composite materials (1–20 nm). Such information is critical to both accurate material characterizations and models of piezoresistive response. The current work proposes the use of crystallographic orientation data and machine learning for enhancing this process. It is first shown how a machine learning algorithm can be used to predict the connectivity of nanoscale grains in a Nickel nanostrand/epoxy composite. This results in 71.9% accuracy for a 2D algorithm and 62.4% accuracy in 3D. Finally, it is demonstrated how these algorithms can be used to predict the location of gaps between distinct nanostrands — gaps which would otherwise not be detected with the sole use of a scanning electron microscope. - Highlights: • A method is proposed for enhancing the segmentation/reconstruction of SEM images. • 3D crystallographic orientation data from a nickel nanocomposite is collected. • A machine learning algorithm is used to detect trends in adjacent grains. • This algorithm is then applied to predict likely regions of nanoscale gaps. • These gaps would otherwise be unresolved with the sole use of an SEM.

  10. CRYSNET manual. Informal report. [Hardware and software of crystallographic computing network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1976-07-01

    This manual describes the hardware and software which together make up the crystallographic computing network (CRYSNET). The manual is intended as a users' guide and also provides general information for persons without any experience with the system. CRYSNET is a network of intelligent remote graphics terminals that are used to communicate with the CDC Cyber 70/76 computing system at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Central Scientific Computing Facility. Terminals are in active use by four research groups in the field of crystallography. A protein data bank has been established at BNL to store in machine-readable form atomic coordinates and other crystallographic data for macromolecules. The bank currently includes data for more than 20 proteins. This structural information can be accessed at BNL directly by the CRYSNET graphics terminals. More than two years of experience has been accumulated with CRYSNET. During this period, it has been demonstrated that the terminals, which provide access to a large, fast third-generation computer, plus stand-alone interactive graphics capability, are useful for computations in crystallography, and in a variety of other applications as well. The terminal hardware, the actual operations of the terminals, and the operations of the BNL Central Facility are described in some detail, and documentation of the terminal and central-site software is given. (RWR)

  11. The Structural Biology Center 19ID undulator beamline: facility specifications and protein crystallographic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Alkire, Randy W; Evans, Gwyndaf; Rotella, Frank J; Lazarski, Krzystof; Zhang, Rong Guang; Ginell, Stephan L; Duke, Norma; Naday, Istvan; Lazarz, Jack; Molitsky, Michael J; Keefe, Lisa; Gonczy, John; Rock, Larry; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Walsh, Martin A; Westbrook, Edwin; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The 19ID undulator beamline of the Structure Biology Center has been designed and built to take full advantage of the high flux, brilliance and quality of X-ray beams delivered by the Advanced Photon Source. The beamline optics are capable of delivering monochromatic X-rays with photon energies from 3.5 to 20 keV (3.5-0.6 A wavelength) with fluxes up to 8-18 x 10(12) photons s(-1) (depending on photon energy) onto cryogenically cooled crystal samples. The size of the beam (full width at half-maximum) at the sample position can be varied from 2.2 mm x 1.0 mm (horizontal x vertical, unfocused) to 0.083 mm x 0.020 mm in its fully focused configuration. Specimen-to-detector distances of between 100 mm and 1500 mm can be used. The high flexibility, inherent in the design of the optics, coupled with a kappa-geometry goniometer and beamline control software allows optimal strategies to be adopted in protein crystallographic experiments, thus maximizing the chances of their success. A large-area mosaic 3 x 3 CCD detector allows high-quality diffraction data to be measured rapidly to the crystal diffraction limits. The beamline layout and the X-ray optical and endstation components are described in detail, and the results of representative crystallographic experiments are presented.

  12. Mode decomposition based on crystallographic symmetry in the band-unfolding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yuji; Carreras, Abel; Seko, Atsuto; Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2017-01-01

    The band-unfolding method is widely used to calculate the effective band structures of a disordered system from its supercell model. The unfolded band structures show the crystallographic symmetry of the underlying structure, where the difference of chemical components and the local atomic relaxation are ignored. However, it has still been difficult to decompose the unfolded band structures into the modes based on the crystallographic symmetry of the underlying structure, and therefore detailed analyses of the unfolded band structures have been restricted. In this study, a procedure to decompose the unfolded band structures according to the small representations (SRs) of the little groups is developed. The decomposition is performed using the projection operators for SRs derived from the group representation theory. The current method is employed to investigate the phonon band structure of disordered face-centered-cubic Cu0.75Au0.25 , which has large variations of atomic masses and force constants among the atomic sites due to the chemical disorder. In the unfolded phonon band structure, several peculiar behaviors such as discontinuous and split branches are found in the decomposed modes corresponding to specific SRs. They are found to occur because different combinations of the chemical elements contribute to different regions of frequency.

  13. The Critical Independence Number and an Independence Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, Craig Eric

    2009-01-01

    An independent set $I_c$ is a \\textit{critical independent set} if $|I_c| - |N(I_c)| \\geq |J| - |N(J)|$, for any independent set $J$. The \\textit{critical independence number} of a graph is the cardinality of a maximum critical independent set. This number is a lower bound for the independence number and can be computed in polynomial-time. Any graph can be decomposed into two subgraphs where the independence number of one subgraph equals its critical independence number, where the critical independence number of the other subgraph is zero, and where the sum of the independence numbers of the subgraphs is the independence number of the graph. A proof of a conjecture of Graffiti.pc yields a new characterization of K\\"{o}nig-Egervary graphs: these are exactly the graphs whose independence and critical independence numbers are equal.

  14. Independent School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, E. Laurence

    This book deals with the management of privately supported schools and offers guidelines on how these schools might be operated more effectively and economically. The discussions and conclusions are based on observations and data from case studies of independent school operations. The subjects discussed include the role and organization of…

  15. Independence in appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming-Rasmussen, Bent; Quick, Reiner; Liempd, Dennis van

    2011-01-01

    article presents research contributions to the question whether the auditor is to continue to provide both audit and non-audit services (NAS) to an audit client. Research results show that this double function for the same audit client is a problem for stakeholders' confidence in auditor independence...

  16. A geometry-based simulation of the hydration of ions and small molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Plumridge, T H

    2001-01-01

    software has been tested with a set of twenty widely varying solutes and has produced results which generally agree with experimental data for structure makers and breakers, and also agrees well with traditional techniques such as molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques. The behaviour of solutes in water is of universal significance, but still not fully understood. This thesis provides details of a new computer simulation technique used to investigate the hydration of ions and small molecules. In contrast to conventional techniques such as molecular dynamics, this is a purely geometric method involving no forcefield or energy terms. Molecules of interest are modelled using crystallographic data to ensure that the structures are accurate. Water molecules are added randomly at any hydrogen bonding site in chains. At each addition the chain is rotated through all available space testing for the possibility of ring formation. The constraints used by the program to decide whether a ring should be conserved, ...

  17. Synthesis beyond the molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhoudt, D.N.; Crego-Calama, M.

    2002-01-01

    Weak, noncovalent interactions between molecules control many biological functions. In chemistry, noncovalent interactions are now exploited for the synthesis in solution of large supramolecular aggregates. The aim of these syntheses is not only the creation of a particular structure, but also the i

  18. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  19. Disentangling DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  20. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  1. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  2. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  3. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yanxia [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Zhan Mingsheng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2004-09-14

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules {rho}{sub I} introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZ), vertical bar W{sub N}) and vertical bar {phi}{sub N}). We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms {rho}{sub ij} is disentangled, the entanglement of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  4. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Xia; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules rgrI introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZrang, |WNrang and |phgrNrang. We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state |psgrNrangagr corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms rgrij is disentangled, the entanglement of the state |psgrNrangagr is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  5. Nuclear magnetic shieldings of stacked aromatic and antiaromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Rauhalahti, Markus; Özcan, Nergiz; Mera-Adasme, Raul; Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-03-13

    Nuclear magnetic shieldings have been calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level for stacks of benzene, hexadehydro[12]annulene, dodecadehydro[18]annulene and hexabenzocoronene. The magnetic shieldings due to the ring currents in the adjacent molecules have been estimated by calculating nucleus independent molecular shieldings for the monomer in the atomic positions of neighbor molecules. The calculations show that the independent shielding model works reasonable well for the (1)H NMR shieldings of benzene and hexadehydro[12]annulene, whereas for the larger molecules and for the (13)C NMR shieldings the interaction between the molecules leads to shielding effects that are at least of the same size as the ring current contributions from the adjacent molecules. A better agreement is obtained when the nearest neighbors are also considered at full quantum mechanical (QM) level. The calculations suggest that the nearest solvent molecules must be included in the quantum mechanical system, at least when estimating solvent shifts at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. Current density calculations show that the stacking does not significantly affect the ring current strengths of the individual molecules, whereas the shape of the ring current for a single molecule differs from that of the stacked molecules.

  6. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  7. Quantum independent increment processes

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    This volume is the first of two volumes containing the revised and completed notes lectures given at the school "Quantum Independent Increment Processes: Structure and Applications to Physics". This school was held at the Alfried-Krupp-Wissenschaftskolleg in Greifswald during the period March 9 – 22, 2003, and supported by the Volkswagen Foundation. The school gave an introduction to current research on quantum independent increment processes aimed at graduate students and non-specialists working in classical and quantum probability, operator algebras, and mathematical physics. The present first volume contains the following lectures: "Lévy Processes in Euclidean Spaces and Groups" by David Applebaum, "Locally Compact Quantum Groups" by Johan Kustermans, "Quantum Stochastic Analysis" by J. Martin Lindsay, and "Dilations, Cocycles and Product Systems" by B.V. Rajarama Bhat.

  8. Field Independent Cosmic Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayem Sk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown earlier that Noether symmetry does not admit a form of corresponding to an action in which is coupled to scalar-tensor theory of gravity or even for pure theory of gravity taking anisotropic model into account. Here, we prove that theory of gravity does not admit Noether symmetry even if it is coupled to tachyonic field and considering a gauge in addition. To handle such a theory, a general conserved current has been constructed under a condition which decouples higher-order curvature part from the field part. This condition, in principle, solves for the scale-factor independently. Thus, cosmological evolution remains independent of the form of the chosen field, whether it is a scalar or a tachyon.

  9. TO BE INDEPENDENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石波

    2000-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ. Introduction At present, in the college, English extensive reading class, most students are not used to being independent. They always ask the teacher to explain the passages sentence by sentence and they need a lot of time to use the dictionary. Yet, we should take the responsibility for the students by making clear the difference between intensive and extensive reading. The traditional teaching approaches pays more attention to the teacher-centered way;the teacher always plays a monodrama, and the teacher dominates the class. The students are lack initiative. Some students do not know where they could start from, and the others are short of fast-reading skills, always fixing their eyes on one word or one sentence. Under the new situation and new thinking, students should learn to be more independent.

  10. Effect of crystallographic orientation on hillock formation in thermally cycled large grain tin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, John Patrick

    Tin whiskers and hillocks grow spontaneously from the surfaces of polycrystalline Sn films at room temperature. Whiskers can grow long enough to cause short circuits in electronic devices. We hypothesized that the anisotropies of the crystal structure lead to locally high strain energies that are relieved by the growth of whiskers and hillocks. This research studies hillock formations on large grain Sn-alloy films relative to the crystallographic orientations of the adjacent grains. Large grain films were produced by solidifying 96.5wt% Sn - 3wt% Ag - 0.5wt% Cu solder alloy on a Cu substrate. These surface defects (hillocks) grew predominately at grain boundaries during thermal cycling. The formation of the surface defects between two grains created a pseudo-bi-crystal sample geometry, making it ideal for studying surface defects relative to the local crystallographic orientations and the grains' corresponding anisotropic properties. The crystallographic orientations of the grains were studied with Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) and Laue micro-diffraction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Local orientation studies of the surface defects and the surrounding grains indicated that the surface defects nucleated and grew with low dislocation densities. In addition, the linear surface defect densities along the grain boundaries were measured and observed to change as a function of orientation. The change in linear defect density with respect to orientation was due, in part, to the anisotropy of the coefficient of thermal expansion of β-Sn. In addition, it was important to account for elastic anisotropies. The elastic stresses, strains, and strain energy densities of the microstructures were determined with Object Oriented Finite element analysis. The simulations indicated that during thermal cycling the local stresses exceeded the yield strength. As a result, the highest linear defect densities did not occur at orientations

  11. The peculiarities of the crystallographics modification of a tissues from corpse during putrefactive corpse transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorova Е.А.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The crystallographic method was used to study the extracts of organs and blood in forensic medicine is not developed yet. However, it is fairly easy to use and does not require additional special equipment, so there is quite promising. Objective. The aim of research are became basis of possibility and effectively to use by thezygraphy method for medico-legal definition of prescription of approach of death by tissue of a corpse during its putrefaction. Methods. Thezygraphy method is used a modification of crystallogramms during dynamics postmortem period for medico-legal definition of prescription of approach of death. Sectional material consisted of the corpses of people who died from violent and nonviolent death in the age range from 18 to 92 years. All the bodies after death were preserved in the same temperature conditions. The tissues from various internal organs: brain, heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, spleen and blood from 30 cadavers were the object of sectional study. There for 939 biological objects were investigated. Results. The article deals with generalization the crystallography (thezigraphy observation of crystallogramms from different tissues extract and blood depending on the different cause of violent and nonviolent death. The main purpose is to identify common crystallogramms features of the extracts of internal organs taken during putrefactive corpse transformation of people who died from various kinds of death. It has been proved that: 1.The typical сrystallogramms were formed from various tissue extracts: blood, brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen in first day after of approach of death, depending on the cause of deaths. 2. In the dynamics of postmortem period and putrefactive transformation of the corpses (first week the dynamic changes occur in crystallographic patterns obtained from extracts of the internal organs, and they can be used to establish the approach of death. Conclusion. The thezygraphy

  12. Bayesian Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ole; Petersen, Kaare Brandt

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical Bayesian framework for independent component analysis. The framework provides estimates of the sources, the mixing matrix and the noise parameters, and is flexible with respect to choice of source prior and the number of sources and sensors. Inside the engine...... in a Matlab toolbox, is demonstrated for non-negative decompositions and compared with non-negative matrix factorization....

  13. Random Independence Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    Whitney provided a set of axioms for a structure commonly called i a matroid. Matroid theory (see ( Tutte , 19711, [Lawler, 19761) has applications to a wide...applicable in this case. On the other hand, there is no known efficient ( polynomial time) algorithm for constructing cliques of size 2 log n with...intersection. The problem of constructing a maximal independent set in the intersection of k matroids has a polynomial time (in tEl) algorithm [Lawler, 197

  14. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  15. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  16. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed.

  17. Hydrogen molecules in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Joerg [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: joerg.weber@tu-dresden.de; Hiller, Martin; Lavrov, Edward V. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Molecular hydrogen, the simplest of all molecules, allows a direct insight into the fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In the case of H{sub 2}, the Pauli principle leads to two different species, para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2}. A conversion between these species is prohibited. Vibrational mode spectra reflect the fundamental properties and allow an unambiguous identification of the H{sub 2} molecules. Today, we have experimental evidence for the trapping of hydrogen molecules in the semiconductors Si, Ge and GaAs at the interstitial sites, within hydrogen-induced platelets, in voids and at impurities (interstitial oxygen in Si). Interstitial H{sub 2} is a nearly free rotor with a surprisingly simple behavior. We review on interstitial H{sub 2} in semiconductors and report on the unexpected preferential disappearance of the para-H{sub 2} or ortho-D{sub 2} species. The origin of the detected ortho-para conversion will be discussed.

  18. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  19. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of Pru du amandin, an allergenic protein from Prunus dulcis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaur, Vineet; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Salunke, Dinakar M., E-mail: dinakar@nii.res.in [National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2008-01-01

    The purification, identification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an allergy-related protein, Pru du amandin, from P. dulcis nuts are reported. Food allergies appear to be one of the foremost causes of hypersensitivity reactions. Nut allergies account for most food allergies and are often permanent. The 360 kDa hexameric protein Pru du amandin, a known allergen, was purified from almonds (Prunus dulcis) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion-exchange chromatography. The protein was identified by a BLAST homology search against the nonredundant sequence database. Pru du amandin belongs to the 11S legumin family of seed storage proteins characterized by the presence of a cupin motif. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 150.7, c = 164.9 Å.

  20. Radiation of high-energy electrons near crystallographic axes and planes of a diamond crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Avakyan, E.O.; Avetisyan, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the experimental study of high-energy electrons interaction with diamond crystals of different thicknesses at small incident angles with respect to crystallographic axes and planes. The effect of the so-called channeling phenomenon on the process of electron radiation in a crystal is studied. Results of the measurements of 4.5. GeV electrons radiation spectra at incident angles approximately O are given. For comparison, we have also presented the spectrum of the radiation on an amorphous target /sup 12/C of similar thickness. Results indicate that the low-energy part of spectra greatly surpass the amorphous spectrum with a pronounced peak structure, with peak widths being noticeably wider in the case of axial channeling than in the planar case. Spectra are measured by a No.I(Tl) total absorption detector. The experiment is performed on the Yerevan electron synchrotron beam with small angular divergence.

  1. Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses,Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2006-10-03

    Monomeric thiosalicylaldiminate complexes of rhodium(I) and iridium(I) were prepared by ligand transfer from the homoleptic zinc(II) species. In the presence of strongly donating ligands, the iridium complexes undergo insertion of the metal into the imine carbon-hydrogen bond. Thiophenoxyketimines were prepared by non-templated reaction of o-mercaptoacetophenone with anilines, and were complexed with rhodium(I), iridium(I), nickel(II) and platinum(II). X-ray crystallographic studies showed that while the thiosalicylaldiminate complexes display planar ligand conformations, those of the thiophenoxyketiminates are strongly distorted. Results of a computational study were consistent with a steric-strain interpretation of the difference in preferred ligand geometries.

  2. Processing and crystallographic structure of non-equilibrium Si-doped HfO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dong; Fancher, Chris M.; Esteves, Giovanni; Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Zhao, Lili [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710127 (China)

    2015-06-28

    Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was confirmed to exist as a non-equilibrium state. The crystallographic structures of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} were studied using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and the Rietveld refinement method. Incorporation of Si into HfO{sub 2} and diffusion of Si out of (Hf,Si)O{sub 2} were determined as a function of calcination temperature. Higher thermal energy input at elevated calcination temperatures resulted in the formation of HfSiO{sub 4}, which is the expected major secondary phase in Si-doped HfO{sub 2}. The effect of SiO{sub 2} particle size (nano- and micron-sized) on the formation of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was also determined. Nano-crystalline SiO{sub 2} was found to incorporate into HfO{sub 2} more readily.

  3. Quantification of thin film crystallographic orientation using X-ray diffraction with an area detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jessy L; Jimison, Leslie H; Mannsfeld, Stefan; Volkman, Steven; Yin, Shong; Subramanian, Vivek; Salleo, Alberto; Alivisatos, A Paul; Toney, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    As thin films become increasingly popular (for solar cells, LEDs, microelectronics, batteries), quantitative morphological and crystallographic information is needed to predict and optimize the film's electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. This quantification can be obtained quickly and easily with X-ray diffraction using an area detector in two sample geometries. In this paper, we describe a methodology for constructing complete pole figures for thin films with fiber texture (isotropic in-plane orientation). We demonstrate this technique on semicrystalline polymer films, self-assembled nanoparticle semiconductor films, and randomly packed metallic nanoparticle films. This method can be immediately implemented to help understand the relationship between film processing and microstructure, enabling the development of better and less expensive electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  4. Maximum a posteriori estimation of crystallographic phases in X-ray diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Bicer, Tekin; Almer, Jonathan D.; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; Stock, Stuart; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-06-13

    A maximum a posteriori approach is proposed for X-ray diffraction tomography for reconstructing three-dimensional spatial distribution of crystallographic phases and orientations of polycrystalline materials. The approach maximizes the a posteriori density which includes a Poisson log-likelihood and an a priori term that reinforces expected solution properties such as smoothness or local continuity. The reconstruction method is validated with experimental data acquired from a section of the spinous process of a porcine vertebra collected at the 1-ID-C beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, at Argonne National Laboratory. The reconstruction results show significant improvement in the reduction of aliasing and streaking artefacts, and improved robustness to noise and undersampling compared to conventional analytical inversion approaches. The approach has the potential to reduce data acquisition times, and significantly improve beamtime efficiency.

  5. Ge/SrTiO{sub 3}(001): Correlation between interface chemistry and crystallographic orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobaut, B.; Penuelas, J.; Grenet, G.; Ferrah, D.; Benamrouche, A.; Chettaoui, A.; Robach, Y.; Botella, C.; Saint-Girons, G. [Universite de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); El Kazzi, M.; Silly, M. G.; Sirotti, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL (TEMPO beamline), l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the desorption of a submonolayer deposit of Ge on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) is studied by reflection high energy electron diffraction. The results are compared to those of a previous experiment done using soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Combining these techniques allows for correlating interface chemistry and crystal orientation, and for bringing clarifying elements concerning the competition between (111) and (001) crystal orientation typical for the semiconductor/perovskite epitaxial systems. Despite poor interface matching, (111)-oriented islands are stabilized at the expense of (001)-oriented islands due to the relatively low energy of their free facets. Such 'surface energy driven' crystallographic orientation of the deposit is enhanced by the low adhesion energy characteristic of the Ge/SrTiO{sub 3} system.

  6. Dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes: Synthesis, crystallographic structures and applications in organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Gaole

    2015-01-01

    Two soluble and stable dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes with two (DAP1) and six (DAP2) phenyl substituents were synthesized. Both compounds possess a small energy band gap and show amphoteric redox behaviour due to intramolecular donor-accepter interactions. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that DAP2 has a closely packed structure with multi-dimensional [C-H⋯π] interactions although there are no π-π interactions between the dianthraceno[a,e]pentalene cores. As a result, solution-processed field effect transistors based on DAP2 exhibited an average hole mobility of 0.65 cm2 V-1 s-1. Under similar conditions, DAP1 showed an average field effect hole mobility of 0.001 cm2 V-1 s-1. This journal is

  7. Preliminary crystallographic data for the thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase from brewers' yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyda, F; Furey, W; Swaminathan, S; Sax, M; Farrenkopf, B; Jordan, F

    1990-10-15

    Single crystals of the thiamin diphosphate (the vitamin B1 coenzyme)-dependent enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) from brewers' yeast have been grown using polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. Crystals of the homotetrameric version alpha 4 of the holoenzyme are triclinic, space group P1, with cell constants a = 81.0, b = 82.4, c = 116.6 A, alpha = 69.5 beta = 72.6, gamma = 62.4 degrees. The crystals are reasonably stable in a rotating anode x-ray beam and diffract to at least 2.5 A resolution. The Vm value of 2.55 A/dalton is consistent with a unit cell containing four subunits with mass of approximately 60 kDa each. Rotation function results with native data indicate strong non-crystallographic 222 symmetry relating the four identical subunits, thus density averaging methods are likely to play a role in the structure determination.

  8. Crystallographic analysis of CVD films using x-ray polychromatic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, B. [CNRS, Toulouse (France). Centre d`Elaboration de Materiaux et d`Etudes Structurales; Brissonneau, L.; Baggot, E.; Vahlas, C. [INPT-CNRS, Toulouse (France). Lab. Materiaux et Interfaces

    1998-12-31

    The Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffractometry (EDXD) technique was tested for in-situ crystallographic characterization of nickel films processed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The diffracted beam at low Bragg angle was analyzed in energy by a solid state detector. A nickel reference sample was used to face the problems of EDXD background signal and uncertainty of sample location. The relative accuracy on lattice parameters measurements is 1.5.10{sup {minus}3}, to be compared to 0.5.10{sup {minus}3} for classical (monochromatic) X-ray diffraction. Texture measurements yields results in agreement with those obtained form recent texture goniometer. Finally, an estimation of the thickness was obtained from the intensity of nickel fluorescence peak. In view of the obtained results, EDXD appears to be a promising technique for in-situ studies. Although less powerful compared to the synchrotron facility, it is more flexible and can be applied at lower cost.

  9. Crystallographic and magnetic structures of Pr6Fe13Ge studied by powder neutron diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fang-Wei; Zhang Pan-Lin; Shen Bao-Gen; Yan Qi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Crystallographic and magnetic structures of Pr6Fel3Ge have been investigated by high-resolution powder neutron diffraction in the temperature range of 10-300 K. The magnetic structure consists of ferromagnetic Pr6Fe13 slabs that alternate antiferromagnetically, along c, with the next Pr6Fe13 slab separated by a non-magnetic Ge layer. The magnetic moments lie within the ab-planes. The propagation vector of this structure is k=(001) with respect to the conventional reciprocal lattice of the Ⅰ-centred structure. However, the temperature-dependence of neutron-scattering intensity of the (110) Bragg peak, very similar to the temperature-dependent magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer,indicates that a small c-axis ferromagnetic component should be added to the above antiferromagnetic model.

  10. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases: a crystallographer's view on a new class of biomass-degrading enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian E. H. Frandsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs are a new class of microbial copper enzymes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides. They have only been discovered and characterized in the last 5–10 years and have stimulated strong interest both in biotechnology and in bioinorganic chemistry. In biotechnology, the hope is that these enzymes will finally help to make enzymatic biomass conversion, especially of lignocellulosic plant waste, economically attractive. Here, the role of LPMOs is likely to be in attacking bonds that are not accessible to other enzymes. LPMOs have attracted enormous interest since their discovery. The emphasis in this review is on the past and present contribution of crystallographic studies as a guide to functional understanding, with a final look towards the future.

  11. Transfer of olivine crystallographic orientation through a cycle of serpentinisation and dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-08-01

    Our ability to decipher the mechanisms behind metamorphic transformation processes depends in a major way on the extent to which crystallographic and microstructural information is transferred from one stage to another. Within the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides, prograde olivine veins that formed by dehydration of serpentinite veins in dunites exhibit a characteristic distribution of microstructures: The outer part of the veins comprises coarse-grained olivine that forms an unusual, brick-like microstructure. The inner part of the veins, surrounding a central fault, is composed of fine-grained olivine. Where the fault movement included a dilational component, optically clear, equant olivine occurs in the centre. Electron backscatter diffraction mapping reveals that the vein olivine has inherited its crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) from the olivine in the porphyroclastic host rock; however, misorientation is weaker and associated to different rotation axes. We propose that prograde olivine grew epitaxially on relics of mantle olivine and thereby acquired its CPO. Growth towards pre-existing microfractures along which serpentinisation had occurred led to straight grain boundaries and a brick-like microstructure in the veins. When dehydration embrittlement induced slip, a strong strain localisation on discrete fault planes prevented distortion of the CPO due to cataclastic deformation; grain size reduction did not significantly modify the olivine CPO. This illustrates how a CPO can be preserved though an entire metamorphic cycle, including hydration, dehydration, and deformation processes, and that the CPO and the microstructures (e.g. grain shape) of one phase do not necessarily record the same event.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Linnea E. K. [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland); Krasotkina, Julya; Kuchumova, Anastasia; Sokolov, Nikolay N. [Institute for Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 559-B, 10 Pogodinskay St, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Papageorgiou, Anastassios C., E-mail: tassos.papageorgiou@btk.fi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland)

    2005-04-01

    Er. carotovoral-asparaginase, a potential antileukaemic agent, has been crystallized. Crystals diffract to 2.6 Å using a rotating-anode source and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Bacterial l-asparaginases have been used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia for over 30 y. However, their use is limited owing to the glutaminase activity of the administered enzymes, which results in serious side effects. In contrast, l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora exhibits low glutaminase activity at physiological concentrations of l-asparagine and l-glutamine in the blood. Recombinant Er. carotovoral-asparaginase was crystallized in the presence of l-glutamate by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 10 mg ml{sup −1} purified enzyme, 16–18%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M NaF. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å at 293 K using an in-house rotating-anode generator. The crystals belong to the monoclinic P2{sub 1} space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found and refinement is currently in progress. The crystal structure may provide leads towards protein-engineering efforts aimed at safer asparaginase administration in leukaemia treatment.

  13. Independence among People with Disabilities: II. Personal Independence Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Margaret A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Developed Personal Independence Profile (PIP) as an instrument to measure aspects of independence beyond physical and cognitive functioning in people with diverse disabilities. PIP was tested for reliability and validity with 185 subjects from 10 independent living centers. Findings suggest that the Personal Independence Profile measures the…

  14. High-level expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Qin, Lin; Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and can cause neuroparalytic disease botulism. Due to the limitations of production and manipulation of holoenzymes, expressing non-toxic heavy chain receptor binding domains (HCR) has become a common strategy for vaccine and antibody development. Meanwhile, large quantities and highly purified soluble proteins are required for research areas such as antibody maturation and structural biology. We present high level expression and purification of the BoNT serotype D HCR in E. coli using a codon-optimized cDNA. By varying expression conditions, especially at low temperature, the protein was expressed at a high level with high solubility. About 150-200 mg protein was purified to >90% purity from 1 L cell culture. The recombinant D_HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P212121 with unit cell dimensions a = 60.8 Å, b = 89.7 Å, c = 93.9 Å. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed one molecule in asymmetric unit.

  15. Crystallographic and Computational Studies of a Class II MHC Complex with a Nonconforming Peptide: HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Christian S.; Gorski, Jack; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2003-03-01

    The stable binding of processed foreign peptide to a class II major histocompatibility (MHC) molecule and subsequent presentation to a T cell receptor is a central event in immune recognition and regulation. Polymorphic residues on the floor of the peptide binding site form pockets that anchor peptide side chains. These and other residues in the helical wall of the groove determine the specificity of each allele and define a motif. Allele specific motifs allow the prediction of epitopes from the sequence of pathogens. There are, however, known epitopes that do not satisfy these motifs: anchor motifs are not adequate for predicting epitopes as there are apparently major and minor motifs. We present crystallographic studies into the nature of the interactions that govern the binding of these so called nonconforming peptides. We would like to understand the role of the P10 pocket and find out whether the peptides that do not obey the consensus anchor motif bind in the canonical conformation observed in in prior structures of class II MHC-peptide complexes. HLA-DRB3*0101 complexed with peptide crystallized in unit cell 92.10 x 92.10 x 248.30 (90, 90, 90), P41212, and the diffraction data is reliable to 2.2ÅWe are complementing our studies with dynamical long time simulations to answer these questions, particularly the interplay of the anchor motifs in peptide binding, the range of protein and ligand conformations, and water hydration structures.

  16. Correlative atomic force and confocal fluorescence microscopy: single molecule imaging and force induced spectral shifts (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basché, Thomas; Hinze, Gerald; Stöttinger, Sven

    2016-09-01

    A grand challenge in nanoscience is to correlate structure or morphology of individual nano-sized objects with their photo-physical properties. An early example have been measurements of the emission spectra and polarization of single semiconductor quantum dots as well as their crystallographic structure by a combination of confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.[1] Recently, the simultaneous use of confocal fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) has allowed for correlating the morphology/conformation of individual nanoparticle oligomers or molecules with their photo-physics.[2, 3] In particular, we have employed the tip of an AFM cantilever to apply compressive stress to single molecules adsorbed on a surface and follow the effect of the impact on the electronic states of the molecule by fluorescence spectroscopy.[3] Quantum mechanical calculations corroborate that the spectral changes induced by the localized force can be associated to transitions among the different possible conformers of the adsorbed molecule.

  17. Synthetic, crystallographic, computational, and biological studies of 1,4-difluorobenzo[c]phenanthrene and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Suyeal; Mah, Heduck; Chaturvedi, Surendrakumar; Jeknic, Tamara Musafia; Baird, William M; Katz, Amy K; Carrell, H L; Glusker, Jenny P; Okazaki, Takao; Laali, Kenneth K; Zajc, Barbara; Lakshman, Mahesh K

    2007-09-28

    1,4-Difluorobenzo[c]phenanthrene (1,4-DFBcPh) and its putative metabolites, the dihydrodiol and diol epoxides, have been synthesized and structurally characterized, and the extent of DNA binding by the metabolites has been assessed. 1,4-DFBcPh and 1,4-difluoro-10-methoxybenzo[c]phenanthrene were prepared by photochemical cyclization of appropriate naphthylphenylethylenes. The dihydrodiol was synthesized from 1,4-difluoro-10-methoxybenzo[c]phenanthrene, and the diol epoxides were diastereoselectively synthesized from the dihydrodiol. Interesting differences were noted in 1H NMR spectra of the series 1 (syn) diol epoxides of benzo[c]phenanthrene (BcPh) and 1,4-DFBcPh; the BcPh diol epoxide displays a quasi-diequatorial orientation of the hydroxyl groups, but in the 1,4-DFBcPh case these are diaxially disposed. This difference probably stems from the presence of the fjord-region fluorine atom in 1,4-DFBcPh. A through-space, fjord-region H-F coupling has also been observed for 1,4-DFBcPh and its derivatives. Comparative X-ray crystallographic analyses of BcPh and 1,4-DFBcPh and their dihydrodiols show that introduction of fluorine increases the molecular distortion by about 6-7 degrees . As a guide to estimating the molecular distortion and its effects, and for comparison with the X-ray structures in known cases, optimized structures of BcPh, 1,4-DFBcPh, and 1,4-DMBcPh (the dimethyl analogue) as well as their dihydrodiols and diol epoxides were computed. Relative aromaticities of these compounds were assessed by nucleus-independent chemical shift calculations, and 13C NMR chemical shifts were computed by gauge-inducing atomic orbital calculations. 1,4-DFBcPh and its dihydrodiol were subjected to metabolism, and the amount of DNA binding in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was assessed. The extent of DNA binding was then compared with that for BcPh and its dihydrodiol and the potent carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene. The 1,4-DFBcPh series 2 (anti) diol epoxide-derived DNA

  18. The effect of crystallographic texture on stress-induced martensitic transformation in NiTi: A computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, F M; Guo, Y; Bruzzi, M S

    2016-01-01

    NiTi׳s superelasticity is exploited in a number of biomedical devices, in particular self-expanding endovascular stents. These stents are often laser-cut from textured micro-tubing; texture is the distribution of crystallographic grain orientations in a polycrystalline material which has been experimentally shown to have a marked influence on mechanical properties. This study offers a computational examination into the effect of texture on the stress-induced martensite transformation (SIMT) in a micro-dogbone NiTi specimen subject to tensile loading. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is employed to simulate the transformational behaviour of the specimen on a micro-scale level. To represent a realistic grain structure in the FEA model, grains present in a 200µm×290µm test site located at the centre edge of the specimen were identified using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Grains are assumed to have homogenous behaviour with properties varying according to their crystallographic orientation to the loading direction. Required material properties were extracted from uniaxial stress-strain curves of single crystals for each crystallographic orientation for input into the in-built UMAT/Nitinol. The orientation of each grain in the test site was identified using Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) techniques. In this way, a quantitative explanation is offered to the effect of crystallographic texture on SIMT. Finally, the evolution of grains in the specimen, during the transformation process, was experimentally investigated by means of an in-situ SEM tensile test.

  19. Crystallographic Behavior of Iron Oxide Minerals in the Deformed Iron Formation of Quadrilátero Ferrífero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Lisboa, Filipe Augusto; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Martins Graça, Leonardo; Ávila, Carlos Fernando; Ferreira Barbosa, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) which is located in Brazil represents a mineral province of great importance for hosting Banded Iron Formation deposits (BIFs). The Alegria mine which belongs to Vale Company is located in the east part of Quadrilátero Ferrífero and it explores iron ore from a region of great structural complexity. A deformed BIF sample that presents a micro-fold on quartz and hematite bands was analyzed through Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD) in order to relate the crystallographic orientations with the microstructures along the micro-fold envelop. For the sample orientation the Z-axis is taken parallel to the fold limb, Y-axis is perpendicular to the fold hinge and X-axis perpendicular to the YZ plane. In the limbs hematite grains are mostly stretched whereas at the hinge grains tend to be somewhat equant. On the other hand, quartz grain shapes are invariable along the fold, with a few exceptions in the hinge where grains are slightly elongated. Grains of hematite present a strong c-axis ({0001}) preferred orientation forming a subtle girdle somewhat parallel to the XY plane of the strain ellipsoid determined macroscopically (XY being the foliation plane), and a strong () crystallographic fabric approximately parallel to the Z-axis. Similarly, the poles to the prismatic planes ({m} or {10bar10}) also have a stronger crystallographic fabric parallel to the Z axis. It seems that there are two crossing planes for the orientation of and {m} with the two maxima at the intersection of the two planes. Typical hematite crystallographic fabrics are somewhat distinct, since {c} axis commonly forms a very strong fiber texture parallel to the pole of the foliation. Most studies regard such crystallographic texture as evidence for high activity of {c} slip. The {c} girdles observed here are common for mica grains under rigid body rotation in constriction strain, which mechanism is commonly observed in the hematite grains of the sample. The

  20. Melanoma biomolecules: independently identified but functionally intertwined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Danielle E; Medic, Sandra; Ziman, Mel; Coombe, Deirdre R

    2013-09-24

    The majority of patients diagnosed with melanoma present with thin lesions and generally these patients have a good prognosis. However, 5% of patients with early melanoma (CSPG4), and paired box 3 (PAX3). The goal is to provide context around what is known about the contribution of these biomarkers to melanoma biology and metastasis. Although each of these molecules have been independently identified as likely biomarkers, it is clear from our analyses that each are closely linked with each other, with intertwined roles in melanoma biology.

  1. Basis set independent calculation of molecular polarizabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, James D.

    2012-08-01

    It is shown that e-F, where F is the Hartree-Fock (HF) operator, can be inverted, for molecular systems, in numerical Cartesian coordinates. The method was originally applied to finding corrections to approximate Hartree-Fock orbitals [J. D. Talman, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.052518 82, 052518 (2010)]. The approach is applied to determine basis set independent dipole polarizabilities for the water molecule using the Sternheimer method within the uncoupled HF and coupled perturbed HF approximations.

  2. The importance of board independence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, N.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the attributed importance of board independence is high, a clear definition of independence does not exist. Furthermore, the aim and consequences of independence are the subject of discussion and empirical evidence about the impact of independence is weak and disputable. Despite this lack o

  3. Molecules in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  4. Probing mesitylborane and mesitylborate ligation within the coordination sphere of Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr3)+: a combined synthetic, X-ray crystallographic, and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesp, Kevin D; Kannemann, Felix O; Rankin, Matthew A; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Stradiotto, Mark

    2011-03-21

    The reaction of Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))Cl (1) with MesBH(2) (Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) afforded the mesitylborate complex Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))(BH(2)MesCl) (2, 66%). Exposure of 2 to the chloride abstracting agent LiB(C(6)F(5))(4)·2.5OEt(2) provided [Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))(BH(2)Mes)](+)B(C(6)F(5))(4)(-) (3, 54%), which features an unusual η(2)-B-H monoborane ligand. The related borate complex Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))(BH(3)Mes) (5, 65%) was prepared from 1 and LiH(3)BMes. Attempts to effect the insertion of unsaturated organic substrates into the B-H bonds of 3 were unsuccessful, and efforts to dehydrohalogenate 2 using KO(t)Bu instead afforded the mesitylborate complex Cp*(P(i)Pr(3))Ru(BH(2)MesOH) (6, 48%). Treatment of 1 with benzyl potassium generated an intermediate hydridoruthenium complex (7) resulting from dehydrogenation of a P(i)Pr fragment, which in turn was observed to react with MesBH(2) to afford the mesitylborate complex Cp*(P((i)Pr)(2)(CH(3)CCH(2)))Ru(BH(3)Mes) (8, 47%). Crystallographic characterization data are provided for 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8. A combined X-ray crystallographic and density functional theory (DFT) investigation of 3 and 5, using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) analysis, revealed that 3 and 5 are best described as donor-acceptor complexes between a Cp*(P(i)Pr(3))Ru(+) fragment and a bis(η(2)-B-H) coordinating mesitylborane(borate) ligand. Significant σ-donation from the B-H bonds into the Ru(II) center exists as evidenced by the NBO populations, bond orders, and AIM delocalization indices. In the case of 3, the vacant p orbital on boron is stabilized by Ru→B π back-donation as well as by resonance with the mesityl group.

  5. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  6. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan, E-mail: t.prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, 3585 CE Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  7. Emissivity independent optical pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; Kisner, Roger A.

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for determining the temperature of an object using an optical pyrometer. Certain embodiments of the disclosed technology allow for making optical temperature measurements that are independent of the surface emissivity of the object being sensed. In one of the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein, a plurality of spectral radiance measurements at a plurality of wavelengths is received from a surface of an object being measured. The plurality of the spectral radiance measurements is fit to a scaled version of a black body curve, the fitting comprising determining a temperature of the scaled version of the black body curve. The temperature is then output. The present disclosure is not to be construed as limiting and is instead directed toward all novel and nonobvious features and aspects of the various disclosed embodiments, alone or in various combinations and subcombinations with one another.

  8. Emissivity independent optical pyrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; Kisner, Roger A.

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for determining the temperature of an object using an optical pyrometer. Certain embodiments of the disclosed technology allow for making optical temperature measurements that are independent of the surface emissivity of the object being sensed. In one of the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein, a plurality of spectral radiance measurements at a plurality of wavelengths is received from a surface of an object being measured. The plurality of the spectral radiance measurements is fit to a scaled version of a black body curve, the fitting comprising determining a temperature of the scaled version of the black body curve. The temperature is then output. The present disclosure is not to be construed as limiting and is instead directed toward all novel and nonobvious features and aspects of the various disclosed embodiments, alone or in various combinations and subcombinations with one another.

  9. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  10. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  11. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  12. Astrochemistry and Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Y. C.

    2010-03-01

    Astrochemistry provides powerful tools to understand various cosmic phenomena, including those in our solar system to the large-scale structure of the universe. In addition, the chemical property of an astronomical body is a crucial factor which governs the evolution of the system. Recent progress in astrophysical theories, computational modelings, and observational techniques requires a detailed understanding of the interactions between the constituents of an astronomical system, which are atoms and molecules within the system. Especially the far-infrared/sub-millimeter wave range, which is called as the last frontier in astronomical observations, contains numerous molecular lines, which may provide a huge amount of new information. However, we need an astrochemical understanding to use this information fully. Although this review is very limited, I would like to stress the importance of astrochemical approach in this overview for the field, which is getting much more attention than ever before.

  13. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  14. Forces in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  15. Effect of crystallographic texture and dislocation hardening on limit strain in sheet metal forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiyu

    2000-10-01

    In the metal industry, sheet metals are widely used to produce packaging materials for consumer goods, for structures such as automobilse, and for building construction and transportation. The desired shape of the products is imparted by plastic deformation in either the cold or hot state. Traditionally, the prediction of the forming limit of sheet metals is based on tensile tests, simulation tests and continuum mathematical models. Continuum models used in the prediction of the plastic behavior of sheet metals are based on average values of mechanical properties such as elongation, yield strength, work hardening and work-hardening rate, which are usually derived from tensile tests. Although attempts have been made to abandon the phenomenological description of the yield function by applying the theory of crystal plasticity to calculate the yield surface of texture polycrystals and hence the limit strains, only the average properties of the microstructure (e.g., the crystallographic texture of the bulk sheet) have been taken into account. So far, there has been no model for the prediction of the strain path and the limit strain of sheet metals that takes into account the effect of individual grain orientation and the dislocation property. In this thesis, different approaches in the study of plastic deformation are reviewed from the view-point of both macroplasticity and microplasticity. Instead of relying on a unique flow rule to describe the stress and strain relationship, the role of work hardening in the instability process of sheet metal and hence the flow localization phenomenon is explored from a study of the changes in the orientation of the constituent crystallites and from the changes in the dislocation density associated with different grain orientations during the course of large biaxial deformation. The changes in the crystallographic textures of an aluminium sheet sample deformed under various stress states from plane-strain tension to equi

  16. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A.; Wiener, Diane M.; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level.

  17. Small-molecule stabilization of the p53 - 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doveston, Richard G; Kuusk, Ave; Andrei, Sebastian A; Leysen, Seppe; Cao, Qing; Castaldi, Maria P; Hendricks, Adam; Brunsveld, Luc; Chen, Hongming; Boyd, Helen; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-08-01

    14-3-3 proteins are positive regulators of the tumor suppressor p53, the mutation of which is implicated in many human cancers. Current strategies for targeting of p53 involve restoration of wild-type function or inhibition of the interaction with MDM2, its key negative regulator. Despite the efficacy of these strategies, the alternate approach of stabilizing the interaction of p53 with positive regulators and, thus, enhancing tumor suppressor activity, has not been explored. Here, we report the first example of small-molecule stabilization of the 14-3-3 - p53 protein-protein interaction (PPI) and demonstrate the potential of this approach as a therapeutic modality. We also observed a disconnect between biophysical and crystallographic data in the presence of a stabilizing molecule, which is unusual in 14-3-3 PPIs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Differences between primed allogeneic T-cell responses and the primary mixed leucocyte reaction. Primed T cells become independent of the blocking effects of monoclonal antibodies against IL-1 beta and the CD5, CD11a (LFA-1), and CD11c (p 150,95) molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Morling, N

    1988-01-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that the primary mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) is dependent on certain accessory molecules, e.g. CD4 and LFA-1. We have compared the requirements of the primary MLR and the responses of alloreactive, primed lymphocytes (PL) by inhibition studies using......-reactive MoAb significantly inhibited the primary MLR (inhibition = 25%, P less than or equal to 0.01; 48%, P less than or equal to 0.01 and 13%, P less than or equal to 0.05, respectively) but these MoAb did not inhibit the primed lymphocyte reaction (PLR). The CD11b-reactive MoAb had no significant.......01) and the purified protein derivative (PPD) induced lymphocyte transformation response (42%, P less than or equal to 0.01) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whereas primed allogeneic responses to PBMC and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cell lines were unaffected by this MoAb. In addition, preliminary data...

  19. Biochemical and crystallographic characterization of a glucansucrase from Lactobacillus reuteri 180

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijning, Tjaard; Vujicic-Zagar, Andreja; Kralj, Slavko; Eeuwema, Wieger; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2008-01-01

    Glucansucrases are large extracellular transglycosidases secreted by lactic acid bacteria. Using sucrose as a substrate they synthesize high molecular mass alpha-glucans or, in the presence of suitable acceptor molecules, low molecular mass oligosaccharides. Although about 60 glucansucrases have

  20. Media independence and dividend policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Dandoune, Salma

    2012-01-01

    independence and dividend policies in emerging markets. Using a dataset from twenty three emerging markets, we show a significantly negative relationship between dividend policies (payout ratio and decision to pay dividend) and media independence. We argue that independent media reduces information asymmetries...... for stock market participants. Consequently, stock market participants in emerging markets with more independent media do not demand as high and as much dividends as their counterparts in emerging markets with less independent media. We also show that press independence is more important in defining......Can media pressurize managers to disgorge excess cash to shareholders? Do firms in countries with more independent media follow different dividend policies than firms with less independent media? This paper seeks to answer these questions and aims to document the relationship between media...

  1. Media independence and dividend policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Dandoune, Salma

    2012-01-01

    for stock market participants. Consequently, stock market participants in emerging markets with more independent media do not demand as high and as much dividends as their counterparts in emerging markets with less independent media. We also show that press independence is more important in defining...... independence and dividend policies in emerging markets. Using a dataset from twenty three emerging markets, we show a significantly negative relationship between dividend policies (payout ratio and decision to pay dividend) and media independence. We argue that independent media reduces information asymmetries......Can media pressurize managers to disgorge excess cash to shareholders? Do firms in countries with more independent media follow different dividend policies than firms with less independent media? This paper seeks to answer these questions and aims to document the relationship between media...

  2. Independent sets in chain cacti

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlar, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    In this paper chain cacti are considered. First, for two specific classes of chain cacti (orto-chains and meta-chains of cycles with h vertices) the recurrence relation for independence polynomial is derived. That recurrence relation is then used in deriving explicit expressions for independence number and number of maximum independent sets for such chains. Also, the recurrence relation for total number of independent sets for such graphs is derived. Finaly, the proof is provided that orto-ch...

  3. Crystallographic orientation and electrode nature are key factors for electric current generation by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Beatriz; Ortiz, Juan M; Schrott, Germán; Busalmen, Juan P; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the influence of electrode material and crystallographic structure on electron transfer and biofilm formation of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Single-crystal gold-Au(110), Au(111), Au(210)-and platinum-Pt(100), Pt(110), Pt(111), Pt(210)-electrodes were tested and compared to graphite rods. G. sulfurreducens electrochemically interacts with all these materials with different attachment kinetics and final current production, although redox species involved in the electron transfer to the anode are virtually the same in all cases. Initial bacterial colonization was fastest on graphite up to the monolayer level, whereas gold electrodes led to higher final current densities. Crystal geometry was shown to have an important influence, with Au(210) sustaining a current density of up to 1442±101μAcm(-2) at the steady state, over Au(111) with 961±94μAcm(-2) and Au(110) with 944±89μAcm(-2). On the other hand, the platinum electrodes displayed the lowest performances, including Pt(210). Our results indicate that both crystal geometry and electrode material are key parameters for the efficient interaction of bacteria with the substrate and should be considered for the design of novel materials and microbial devices to optimize energy production.

  4. Synthetic, crystallographic, and computational study of copper(II) complexes of ethylenediaminetetracarboxylate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matović, Zoran D; Miletić, Vesna D; Ćendić, Marina; Meetsma, Auke; van Koningsbruggen, Petra J; Deeth, Robert J

    2013-02-04

    Copper(II) complexes of hexadentate ethylenediaminetetracarboxylic acid type ligands H(4)eda3p and H(4)eddadp (H(4)eda3p = ethylenediamine-N-acetic-N,N',N'-tri-3-propionic acid; H(4)eddadp = ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic-N,N'-di-3-propionic acid) have been prepared. An octahedral trans(O(6)) geometry (two propionate ligands coordinated in axial positions) has been established crystallographically for the Ba[Cu(eda3p)]·8H(2)O compound, while Ba[Cu(eddadp)]·8H(2)O is proposed to adopt a trans(O(5)) geometry (two axial acetates) on the basis of density functional theory calculations and comparisons of IR and UV-vis spectral data. Experimental and computed structural data correlating similar copper(II) chelate complexes have been used to better understand the isomerism and departure from regular octahedral geometry within the series. The in-plane O-Cu-N chelate angles show the smallest deviation from the ideal octahedral value of 90°, and hence the lowest strain, for the eddadp complex with two equatorial β-propionate rings. A linear dependence between tetragonality and the number of five-membered rings has been established. A natural bonding orbital analysis of the series of complexes is also presented.

  5. On elliptic Calogero-Moser systems for complex crystallographic reflection groups

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, Pavel; Ma, Xiaoguang; Veselov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    To every irreducible finite crystallographic reflection group (i.e., an irreducible finite reflection group G acting faithfully on an abelian variety X), we attach a family of classical and quantum integrable systems on X (with meromorphic coefficients). These families are parametrized by G-invariant functions of pairs (T,s), where T is a hypertorus in X (of codimension 1), and s in G is a reflection acting trivially on T. If G is a real reflection group, these families reduce to the known generalizations of elliptic Calogero-Moser systems, but in the non-real case they appear to be new. We give two constructions of the integrals of these systems - an explicit construction as limits of classical Calogero-Moser Hamiltonians of elliptic Dunkl operators as the dynamical parameter goes to 0 (implementing an idea of arXiv:hep-th/9403178), and a geometric construction as global sections of sheaves of elliptic Cherednik algebras for the critical value of the twisting parameter. We also prove algebraic integrability ...

  6. Surface energy-mediated construction of anisotropic semiconductor wires with selective crystallographic polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jung Inn; Hong, Woong-Ki; Lee, Sunghoon; Lee, Sanghyo; Ku, Jiyeon; Park, Young Jun; Hong, Jinpyo; Hwang, Sungwoo; Park, Kyung Ho; Warner, Jamie H.; Cha, Seungnam; Kim, Jong Min

    2014-07-01

    ZnO is a wide band-gap semiconductor with piezoelectric properties suitable for opto-electronics, sensors, and as an electrode material. Controlling the shape and crystallography of any semiconducting nanomaterial is a key step towards extending their use in applications. Whilst anisotropic ZnO wires have been routinely fabricated, precise control over the specific surface facets and tailoring of polar and non-polar growth directions still requires significant refinement. Manipulating the surface energy of crystal facets is a generic approach for the rational design and growth of one-dimensional (1D) building blocks. Although the surface energy is one basic factor for governing crystal nucleation and growth of anisotropic 1D structures, structural control based on surface energy minimization has not been yet demonstrated. Here, we report an electronic configuration scheme to rationally modulate surface electrostatic energies for crystallographic-selective growth of ZnO wires. The facets and orientations of ZnO wires are transformed between hexagonal and rectangular/diamond cross-sections with polar and non-polar growth directions, exhibiting different optical and piezoelectrical properties. Our novel synthetic route for ZnO wire fabrication provides new opportunities for future opto-electronics, piezoelectronics, and electronics, with new topological properties.

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF 328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  8. Protein structure prediction provides comparable performance to crystallographic structures in docking-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongying; Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Structure based virtual screening has largely been limited to protein targets for which either an experimental structure is available or a strongly homologous template exists so that a high-resolution model can be constructed. The performance of state of the art protein structure predictions in virtual screening in systems where only weakly homologous templates are available is largely untested. Using the challenging DUD database of structural decoys, we show here that even using templates with only weak sequence homology (identity) structural models can be constructed by I-TASSER which achieve comparable enrichment rates to using the experimental bound crystal structure in the majority of the cases studied. For 65% of the targets, the I-TASSER models, which are constructed essentially in the apo conformations, reached 70% of the virtual screening performance of using the holo-crystal structures. A correlation was observed between the success of I-TASSER in modeling the global fold and local structures in the binding pockets of the proteins versus the relative success in virtual screening. The virtual screening performance can be further improved by the recognition of chemical features of the ligand compounds. These results suggest that the combination of structure-based docking and advanced protein structure modeling methods should be a valuable approach to the large-scale drug screening and discovery studies, especially for the proteins lacking crystallographic structures.

  9. Crystallographic and Computational Analyses of AUUCU Repeating RNA That Causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10 (SCA10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, HaJeung; González, Àlex L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Tran, Tuan; Lohman, Jeremy R; Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-06-23

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of r(AUUCU) within intron 9 of the ATXN10 pre-mRNA. The RNA causes disease by a gain-of-function mechanism in which it inactivates proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. Spectroscopic studies showed that r(AUUCU) repeats form a hairpin structure; however, there were no high-resolution structural models prior to this work. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of model r(AUUCU) repeats refined to 2.8 Å and analysis of the structure via molecular dynamics simulations. The r(AUUCU) tracts adopt an overall A-form geometry in which 3 × 3 nucleotide (5')UCU(3')/(3')UCU(5') internal loops are closed by AU pairs. Helical parameters of the refined structure as well as the corresponding electron density map on the crystallographic model reflect dynamic features of the internal loop. The computational analyses captured dynamic motion of the loop closing pairs, which can form single-stranded conformations with relatively low energies. Overall, the results presented here suggest the possibility for r(AUUCU) repeats to form metastable A-from structures, which can rearrange into single-stranded conformations and attract proteins such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). The information presented here may aid in the rational design of therapeutics targeting this RNA.

  10. Scattering of slow ions by various crystallographic planes of tungsten single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolov, S N; Kortenraad, R; Must, B; Shtinov, E D; Brongersma, K K

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of low-energy ion scattering signal intensity on single crystal surface orientation is investigated, and it is shown that this dependence is not necessarily in direct proportion to atomic density in the uppermost atomic layer. On the basis of comparison of signals from various crystallographic planes of a high purity W single crystal a conclusion is made that the ions scattered from more deep atomic layers contribute considerably to the signal measured for the surface with an open structure. It is shown that reference specimens with a known surface density are needed for quantitative analysis of surface composition by the method of low-energy ion scattering. The best reference specimens are well-oriented single crystals with close-packed planes at the surface, since in this case the low-energy ion scattering signal is proportional to atomic density of the uppermost atomic layer. It single crystals with open surface structure are used as reference specimens the contribution of deeper atomic laye...

  11. CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC RELATIONS OF CEMENTITE–AUSTENITE–FERRITE IN THE DIFFUSIVE DECOMPOSITION OF AUSTENITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary. It was made a search for new and more accurate orientation relations between the crystal lattice in the pearlite and bainite austenite decomposition products. Methods. It were used the methods: transmission electron microscopy, the micro-, mathematical matrix and stereographic analysis. The purpose of the research is with theoretical, numerical and experimental methods to set up to a 0.2 degree angular orientation relations between the lattices of ferrite and cementite in the austenite decomposition products in the temperature range 400 ... 700С. Results. It was established a new, refined value for grids in the diffusion decay of γ → α + (α + θ. Practical significance. It was proposed a new oriented dependence and the corresponding double gnomonic projection with poles to planes α and θ phases, which can be used in patterns of crystallographic lattices relations studies at phase transitions, as well as the subsequent modeling of complex physical processes of structure formation in metals and binary systems.

  12. Changes of structure and crystallographic texture of cladding tubes from austenitic steel under thermal creep testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu; Isaenkova, M.; Fesenko, V.; Dobrokhotov, P.; Tselishchev, A.

    2016-04-01

    The process of changes in structure and crystallographic texture of cladding tubes from austenitic steel ChS68 under thermal creep testing were studied. Testing of tubes was conducted at the temperature 700 oC in the air by their stretching in axial direction under the stress 160 MPa until rupture. By data of phase and texture analysis a number of processes, accompanying plastic deformation of tubes during thermal creep tests at elevated temperature, were identified. The main texture components of original tube, as well as texture components of different parts of the tested tube are {110} and {112}. In the rupture zone the component of the texture of tension with axis along the tube axis becomes stronger. This effect is connected with activation of dislocation slip in the deformed area of tested tube near the new-formed neck. At the same time the character of texture changes in the zone of tube rupture indicates to development of the dynamic recrystallization, conditioned by the total influence of all factors, which control the passage in the tube of thermal creep. In addition, it was revealed the activation of martensitic transformations in the zone of maximal deformation of tube as a result of its creep tests.

  13. Reintroducing electrostatics into macromolecular crystallographic refinement: application to neutron crystallography and DNA hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Timothy D; Schnieders, Michael J; Mustyakimov, Marat; Wu, Chuanjie; Langan, Paul; Pande, Vijay S; Brunger, Axel T

    2011-04-13

    Most current crystallographic structure refinements augment the diffraction data with a priori information consisting of bond, angle, dihedral, planarity restraints, and atomic repulsion based on the Pauli exclusion principle. Yet, electrostatics and van der Waals attraction are physical forces that provide additional a priori information. Here, we assess the inclusion of electrostatics for the force field used for all-atom (including hydrogen) joint neutron/X-ray refinement. Two DNA and a protein crystal structure were refined against joint neutron/X-ray diffraction data sets using force fields without electrostatics or with electrostatics. Hydrogen-bond orientation/geometry favors the inclusion of electrostatics. Refinement of Z-DNA with electrostatics leads to a hypothesis for the entropic stabilization of Z-DNA that may partly explain the thermodynamics of converting the B form of DNA to its Z form. Thus, inclusion of electrostatics assists joint neutron/X-ray refinements, especially for placing and orienting hydrogen atoms.

  14. Protein crystallography for aspiring crystallographers or how to avoid pitfalls and traps in macromolecular structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2013-11-01

    The number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank now approaches 100,000, with the vast majority of them determined by crystallographic methods. Thousands of papers describing such structures have been published in the scientific literature, and 20 Nobel Prizes in chemistry or medicine have been awarded for discoveries based on macromolecular crystallography. New hardware and software tools have made crystallography appear to be an almost routine (but still far from being analytical) technique and many structures are now being determined by scientists with very limited experience in the practical aspects of the field. However, this apparent ease is sometimes illusory and proper procedures need to be followed to maintain high standards of structure quality. In addition, many noncrystallographers may have problems with the critical evaluation and interpretation of structural results published in the scientific literature. The present review provides an outline of the technical aspects of crystallography for less experienced practitioners, as well as information that might be useful for users of macromolecular structures, aiming to show them how to interpret (but not overinterpret) the information present in the coordinate files and in their description. A discussion of the extent of information that can be gleaned from the atomic coordinates of structures solved at different resolution is provided, as well as problems and pitfalls encountered in structure determination and interpretation.

  15. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araullo-Peters, Vicente J., E-mail: vicente.araullopeters@gmail.com [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia); Breen, Andrew; Ceguerra, Anna V. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ringer, Simon P.; Cairney, Julie M. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed. - Highlights: • A new analysis method was designed that determines if reconstructed planes are present in atom probe data. • The location, orientation, and planar spacing of these planes are obtained. • This method was applied to simulated, aluminium alloy and silicon data where the extent of planes was shown to vary considerably. • This method can be used to examine atom probe reconstruction quality.

  16. Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation of anorthosites from Oman ophiolite and the dynamics of melt lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luiz F. G.; Boudier, FrançOise; Nicolas, Adolphe

    2011-04-01

    Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of anorthosite samples interlayered in the upper and lower gabbro sections in the Oman ophiolite were analyzed in this paper. In the anorthosites registering the dynamics of the melt lenses, foliation is flat lying and starts to develop a few meters below the root zone of the sheeted dike complex (RZSDC). Microstructures and CPO of these rocks were developed in response to four different mechanisms: (1) density-controlled settling of plagioclase on the lens floor, (2) deposition of anorthosites related to convection currents, (3) melt compaction, and (4) uncompacted melt accumulation. In these anorthosites, the poles to (010) of plagioclase are parallel to the flow plane of convection, whereas the [100] axes and poles to (001) express the convection flow direction and the axis of convection rolls, respectively. The effect of subsidence of melt lens floor is recorded immediately below the RZSDC and is characterized by the rapid (but progressive) development of dipping foliation and lineation, reflecting the increase of deformation downsection. The degree of foliation and CPO development in the anorthosites is directly related to the distance of the center of the melt lenses before the subsidence starts. Despite the uncertain origin of the anorthosites from the lower gabbro section, all the samples lost the magmatic microstructural characteristics and presently are reequilibrated aggregates. However, they still preserve plagioclase CPO, where some of these patterns present similarities with the anorthosites from the upper gabbro section, but no evidence of intracrystalline deformation under high temperatures.

  17. Purification and crystallographic analysis of a FAD-dependent halogenase from Streptomyces sp. JCM9888.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqun; Yan, Baohua; Yang, Ting; Jiang, Jian; Wei, Heng; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    A new FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide)-dependent halogenase HalY from Streptomyces sp. JCM9888 was reported to be involved in the regioselective halogenation of adenine. HalY is a variant B FAD-dependent halogenase that is most similar to the halogenase PltA involved in pyoluteorin biosynthesis. This study reports the overexpression and purification of HalY with an N-terminal hexahistidine tag, followed by crystallization experiments and X-ray crystallographic analysis. HalY was purified as a monomer in solution and crystallized to give X-ray diffraction to a resolution of 1.7 Å. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.4, b = 113.4, c = 47.6 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 107.4°, and contained one monomer of HalY in the asymmetric unit, with a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.3 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 46%. The structure of the halogenase CndH was used as a search model in molecular replacement to obtain the initial model of HalY. Manual model building and structure refinement of HalY are in progress.

  18. Crystallographic Evidence for the Host-Guest Interaction of MetallamacromoleculesCrystallographic Evidence for the Host-Guest Interaction of Metallamacromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hua Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallamacromolecules offer opportunities to create structural diversity and interesting properties based on their unique frameworks and host-guest chemistry. Various types of assemblies can be created by the appropriate choice of the predesigned organic ligands containing various backbones and connectivity information and metal centers. These macrocyclic hosts contain a large and tunable hydrophobic inner cavity, which can be able selectively to recognize guest molecules. The goal of this highlight review is to describe the synthetic routes for the preparation of metallamacromolecules including stepwise and self-assembly strategies as well as their molecular recognition properties.

  19. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  20. Studying the Independent School Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoy, Ellysa Stern; Williamson, Susan G.

    2008-01-01

    In 2005, the American Association of School Librarians' Independent Schools Section conducted a national survey of independent school libraries. This article analyzes the results of the survey, reporting specialized data and information regarding independent school library budgets, collections, services, facilities, and staffing. Additionally, the…

  1. Glassy Carbon Electrode-Supported Au Nanoparticles for the Glucose Electrooxidation: On the Role of Crystallographic Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guerra-Balcázar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose electrooxidation in alkaline solution was examined using glassy carbon electrodes modified with Au nanoparticles. Au nanoparticles were prepared following the two-phase protocol and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD, and cyclic voltammetry (CV. It was found that, under the study conditions, it is possible to obtain nanoparticles between 1 and 5 nm; also it was found that the crystallographic orientation is strongly influenced by the ratio metal/thiol and to a lesser extent by the synthesis temperature. The voltammetric response for the electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose at carbon Au nanoparticle-modified electrode shows an increasing activity with nanoparticles size. Electroactivity and possibly selectivity are found to be nanoparticles' crystallographic orientation dependent. Classical electrochemical analysis shows that glucose electrooxidation is a diffusion-controlled process followed by a homogenous reaction.

  2. Melanoma biomolecules: independently identified but functionally intertwined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Erin Dye

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients diagnosed with melanoma present with thin lesions and generally these patients have a good prognosis. However, 5% of patients with early melanoma (< 1mm thick will have recurrence and die within 10 years, despite no evidence of local or metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis. Thus, there is a need for additional prognostic markers to help identify those patients that may be at risk of recurrent disease. Many studies and several meta-analyses have compared gene and protein expression in melanocytes, naevi, primary and metastatic melanoma in an attempt to find informative prognostic markers for these patients. However, although a large number of putative biomarkers have been described, few of these molecules are informative when used in isolation. The best approach is likely to involve a combination of molecules. We believe one approach could be to analyze the expression of a group of interacting proteins that regulate different aspects of the metastatic pathway. This is because a primary lesion expressing proteins involved in multiple stages of metastasis may be more likely to lead to secondary disease than one that does not. This review focuses on five putative biomarkers - melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, galectin-3 (gal-3, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4 and paired box 3 (PAX3. The goal is to provide context around what is known about the contribution of these biomarkers to melanoma biology and metastasis. Although each of these molecules have been independently identified as likely biomarkers, it is clear from our analyses that each are closely linked with each other, with intertwined roles in melanoma biology.

  3. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Yakhmi

    2009-06-01

    The conventional magnetic materials used in current technology, such as, Fe, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, SmCo5, Nd2Fe14B etc are all atom-based, and their preparation/processing require high temperature routes. Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material with long-range magnetic order, mainly because one can play with the weak intermolecular interactions. Since the first successful synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be categorized on the basis of the chemical nature of the magnetic units involved: organic-, metal-based systems, heterobimetallic assemblies, or mixed organic–inorganic systems. The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of molecular magnets. Being weakly coloured, unlike their opaque classical magnet ‘cousins’ listed above, possibilities of photomagnetic switching exist. Persistent efforts also continue to design the ever-elusive polymer magnets towards applications in industry. While providing a brief overview of the field of molecular magnetism, this article highlights some recent developments in it, with emphasis on a few studies from the author’s own lab.

  4. Crystallographic Features and State Stability of the Decagonal Quasicrystal in the Al-Co-Cu Alloy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kei; Mizutani, Akito; Koyama, Yasumasa

    2016-11-01

    In the Al-Co-Cu alloy system, both the decagonal quasicrystal with the space group of Poverline{10}m2 and its approximant Al13Co4 phase with monoclinic Cm symmetry are present around 20 at. % Co-10 at. % Cu. In this study, we examined the crystallographic features of prepared Al-(30 - x) at. % Co-x at. % Cu samples mainly by transmission electron microscopy in order to make clear the crystallographic relation between the decagonal quasicrystal and the monoclinic Al13Co4 structure. The results revealed a coexistence state consisting of decagonal quasicrystal and approximant Al13Co4 regions in Al-20 at. % Co-10 at. % Cu alloy samples. With the help of the coexistence state, the orientation relationship was established between the monoclinic Al13Co4 structure and the decagonal quasicrystal. In the determined relationship, the crystallographic axis in the quasicrystal was found to be parallel to the normal direction of the (010)m plane in the Al13Co4 structure, where the subscript m denotes the monoclinic system. Based on data obtained experimentally, the state stability of the decagonal quasicrystal was also examined in terms of the Hume-Rothery (HR) mechanism on the basis of the nearly-free-electron approximation. It was found that a model based on the HR mechanism could explain the crystallographic features such as electron diffraction patterns and atomic arrangements found in the decagonal quasicrystal. In other words, the HR mechanism is most likely appropriate for the stability of the decagonal quasicrystal in the Al-Co-Cu alloy system.

  5. The fcc-bcc crystallographic orientation relationship in AlxCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, J. C.; Ocelik, V.; Vainchtein, D.; Tang, Z.; Liaw, P. K.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the crystallographic-orientation relationship between the various phases in the Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni high-entropy alloys. Two types of orientation relationships of bcc phases (some with ordered B2 structures) and fcc matrix were observed in Al0.5CoCrFeNi and Al0.7CoCrFeNi alloys

  6. Self-Assembled Monolayers: Star-Shaped Crystallographic Cracking of Localized Nanoporous Defects (Adv. Mater. 33/2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Frank Uwe; Ankah, Genesis Ngwa; Bashir, Asif; Ma, Duancheng; Biedermann, P Ulrich; Shrestha, Buddha Ratna; Nellessen, Monika; Khorashadizadeh, Anahita; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Duarte, Maria Jazmin; Raabe, Dierk; Valtiner, Markus

    2015-09-02

    On page 4877, F. U. Renner, A. Bashir, M. Valtiner, and co-workers describe a star-like dealloying corrosion morphology that appears during the localized attack of smooth well-prepared Cu-Au surfaces. The surfaces are initially protected by thiol or selenol inhibitior films. Localized dealloying of Cu-Au produces nanoporous gold under stress and crystallographic cracks - thereby opening a new approach combining surface science with nanoscale mechanical testing.

  7. A numerical investigation of grain shape and crystallographic texture effects on the plastic strain localization in friction stir weld zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, V.; Balokhonov, R.; Batukhtina, E.; Shakhidjanov, V.

    2015-10-01

    Crystal plasticity approaches were adopted to build models accounting for the microstructure and texture observed in different friction stir weld zones. To this end, a numerical investigation of crystallographic texture and grain shape effects on the plastic strain localization in a friction stir weld of an aluminum-base alloy was performed. The presence of texture was found to give rise to pronounced mesoscale plastic strain localization.

  8. Independent sets in chain cacti

    CERN Document Server

    Sedlar, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    In this paper chain cacti are considered. First, for two specific classes of chain cacti (orto-chains and meta-chains of cycles with h vertices) the recurrence relation for independence polynomial is derived. That recurrence relation is then used in deriving explicit expressions for independence number and number of maximum independent sets for such chains. Also, the recurrence relation for total number of independent sets for such graphs is derived. Finaly, the proof is provided that orto-chains and meta-chains are the only extremal chain cacti with respect to total number of independent sets (orto-chains minimal and meta-chains maximal).

  9. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  10. Coupled Crystal Plasticity-Phase Field Fracture Simulation Study on Damage Evolution Around a Void: Pore Shape Versus Crystallographic Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Martin; Wicke, Marcel; Shanthraj, Pratheek; Roters, Franz; Brueckner-Foit, Angelika; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-03-01

    Various mechanisms such as anisotropic plastic flow, damage nucleation, and crack propagation govern the overall mechanical response of structural materials. Understanding how these mechanisms interact, i.e. if they amplify mutually or compete with each other, is an essential prerequisite for the design of improved alloys. This study shows—by using the free and open source software DAMASK (the Düsseldorf Advanced Material Simulation Kit)—how the coupling of crystal plasticity and phase field fracture methods can increase the understanding of the complex interplay between crystallographic orientation and the geometry of a void. To this end, crack initiation and propagation around an experimentally obtained pore with complex shape is investigated and compared to the situation of a simplified spherical void. Three different crystallographic orientations of the aluminum matrix hosting the defects are considered. It is shown that crack initiation and propagation depend in a non-trivial way on crystallographic orientation and its associated plastic behavior as well as on the shape of the pore.

  11. The effect of magnetic annealing on crystallographic texture and magnetic properties of Fe-2.6% Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salih, M.Z., E-mail: mohammedzs2007@hotmail.com [Institut für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik, TU Clausthal, Agricolastraße 6, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Uhlarz, M. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory (HLD), Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Pyczak, F. [Instiute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Brokmeier, H.-G. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik, TU Clausthal, Agricolastraße 6, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Instiute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Weidenfeller, B. [Institut für Elektrochemie, Abteilung für Materialwissenschaft, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Straße 6, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Al-hamdany, N. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik, TU Clausthal, Agricolastraße 6, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Gan, W.M. [Instiute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Zhong, Z.Y. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik, TU Clausthal, Agricolastraße 6, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Schell, N. [Instiute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The effect of magnetic annealing on crystallographic texture, microstructure, defects density and magnetic properties of a Fe-2.6% Si steel has been analyzed. After two stage cold rolling (75% and 60% cold rolled) with intermediate annealing process at (600 °C/1 h) the sample annealed at 600 °C for one hour during which different magnetic field of 0, 7 and 14 T were applied has been investigated. The effect of defects density after cold rolling process on the recrystallization texture and magnetic properties was characterized. Heat treatments under a high external field of 14 T show a drastic improvement of the magnetic properties such as significantly increased permeability. Neutron diffraction measurements were preferred for measurement of the bulk sample texture so that sufficient grain statistics were obtained. Because of its small wavelength (0.05–0.2 Å) Synchrotron diffraction with high photon energy was used to evaluate the defects density by a modified Williamson–Hall plot. - Highlights: • We show the effect of the magnetic annealing after intermediate cold rolling on the crystallographic texture and magnetic properties. • Due the coarse grained we used Neutron diffraction for texture measurement. • We used hysteresis recorder to measure the magnetic properties. • The magnetic annealing leads to drastic improvements of the magnetic properties such as significantly increased permeability. • We show the effect of defect density on the crystallographic texture and magnetic properties.

  12. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  14. STM investigation of surfactant molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption and self-organization of sodium alkyl sulfonates (STS and SHS) have been studied on HOPG by using the in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both SHS and STS molecules adsorb on the HOPG surface and form long-range well-ordered monolayers. The neighboring molecules in different rows form a "head to head" configuration. In the high-resolution images of STS and SHS molecules, one end of the molecules shows bright spots which are attributed to the SO3- groups.

  15. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  16. ForceGen 3D structure and conformer generation: from small lead-like molecules to macrocyclic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce the ForceGen method for 3D structure generation and conformer elaboration of drug-like small molecules. ForceGen is novel, avoiding use of distance geometry, molecular templates, or simulation-oriented stochastic sampling. The method is primarily driven by the molecular force field, implemented using an extension of MMFF94s and a partial charge estimator based on electronegativity-equalization. The force field is coupled to algorithms for direct sampling of realistic physical movements made by small molecules. Results are presented on a standard benchmark from the Cambridge Crystallographic Database of 480 drug-like small molecules, including full structure generation from SMILES strings. Reproduction of protein-bound crystallographic ligand poses is demonstrated on four carefully curated data sets: the ConfGen Set (667 ligands), the PINC cross-docking benchmark (1062 ligands), a large set of macrocyclic ligands (182 total with typical ring sizes of 12-23 atoms), and a commonly used benchmark for evaluating macrocycle conformer generation (30 ligands total). Results compare favorably to alternative methods, and performance on macrocyclic compounds approaches that observed on non-macrocycles while yielding a roughly 100-fold speed improvement over alternative MD-based methods with comparable performance.

  17. Nucleus-independent chemical shift criterion for aromaticity in Π-extended tetraoxa[8]circulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baryshnikov, Gleb V.; Minaev, Boris F.; Pittelkow, Michael;

    2013-01-01

    Recently synthesized p-extended symmetrical tetraoxa[8]circulenes that exhibit electroluminescent properties were calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) approach to electron density distribution analysis. Nucleus-independent ...

  18. Crystallographic control on early stages of cataclasis in carbonate fault gouges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Smith, Steven A. F.; Fondriest, Michele; Spagnuolo, Elena; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Carbonates are a recurring lithology in most of active seismic areas worldwide, such as the Apennines (Italy). Here, typical fault products are gouges and cataclasites made of mixtures of carbonate minerals (i.e., calcite and dolomite) that occasionally exhibit a foliation. Natural fault gouges often contain minerals with strong anisotropies, such as cleavage surfaces in phyllosilicates and carbonates. Therefore, the understanding of the role of such anisotropies during shearing is important to develop realistic microphysical models of brittle fragmentation and grain size reduction. Here we present results of microstructural and coupled EDS-EBSD (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy - Electron Backscattered Diffraction) analysis on mixtures (50/50wt%) of calcite-dolomite gouges deformed experimentally in a rotary shear apparatus (SHIVA, INGV-Rome) at room temperature under constant normal stress of 17.5 MPa and slip rates of 30 µm/s to 1 m/s. The EDS-EBSD analysis was focused on the gouge layer underlying the slip zone, which has been previously demonstrated to accommodate low finite shear strain during deformation. At all investigated slip rates, calcite develops a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) on the (0001) plane, with the c-axis inclined subparallel to the principal stress and the [-1-120] direction forming a girdle perpendicular to it. Texture strength typically increases with slip rate and appears not to be influenced by the presence of water or foliation development in the gouge during deformation. Misorientation analysis suggests twinning as the principal crystallographic active deformation mechanism. Instead, dolomite grains do not develop a CPO. Microfractures are closely spaced, mainly oriented subparallel to the principal stress and rarely exploit calcite twin planes. The latter typically occur at high angle with respect to fractures, are oriented consistently with the sense of shear and almost orthogonal to the principal stress. Calcite grains

  19. Phosphate tungsten bronze series: crystallographic and structural properties of low-dimensional conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, P; Pérez, O; Labbé, P

    2001-10-01

    Phosphate tungsten bronzes have been shown to be conductors of low dimensionality. A review of the crystallographic and structural properties of this huge series of compounds is given here, corresponding to the present knowledge of the different X-ray studies and electron microscopy investigations. Three main families are described, monophosphate tungsten bronzes, Ax(PO2)4(WO3)2m, either with pentagonal tunnels (MPTBp) or with hexagonal tunnels (MPTBh), and diphosphate tungsten bronzes, Ax(P2O4)2(WO3)2m, mainly with hexagonal tunnels (DPTBh). The general aspect of these crystal structures may be described as a building of polyhedra sharing oxygen corners made of regular stacking of WO3-type slabs with a thickness function of m, joined by slices of tetrahedral PO4 phosphate or P2O7 diphosphate groups. The relations of the different slabs with respect to the basic perovskite structure are mentioned. The structural description is focused on the tilt phenomenon of the WO6 octahedra inside a slab of WO3-type. In this respect, a comparison with the different phases of the WO3 crystal structures is established. The various modes of tilting and the different possible connections between two adjacent WO3-type slabs involve a great variety of structures with different symmetries, as well as the existence of numerous twins in MPTBp's. Several phase transitions, with the appearance of diffuse scattering and modulation phenomena, were analysed by X-ray scattering measurements and through the temperature dependence of various physical properties for the MPTBp's. The role of the W displacements within the WO3-type slabs, in two modulated structures (m = 4 and m = 10), already solved, is discussed. Finally, the complexity of the structural aspects of DPTBh's is explained on the basis of the average structures which are the only ones solved.

  20. Identifying unknown nanocrystals by fringe fingerprinting in two dimensions and free-access crystallographic databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Peter; Čertik, Ondřej; Seipel, Bjoern; Groebner, Rebecca; Noice, Lori; Upreti, Girish; Fraundorf, Philip; Erni, Rolf; Browning, Nigel D.; Kiesow, Andreas; Jolivet, Jean-Pierre

    2005-11-01

    New needs to determine the crystallography of nanocrystals arise with the advent of science and engineering on the nanometer scale. Direct space high-resolution phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic resolution Z-contrast scanning TEM (Z-STEM), when combined with tools for image-based nanocrystallography possess the capacity to meet these needs. This paper introduces such a tool, i.e. fringe fingerprinting in two dimensions (2D), for the identification of unknown nanocrystal phases and compares this method briefly to qualitative standard powder X-ray diffractometry (i.e. spatial frequency fingerprinting). Free-access crystallographic databases are also discussed because the whole fingerprinting concept is only viable if there are comprehensive databases to support the identification of an unknown nanocrystal phase. This discussion provides the rationale for our ongoing development of a dedicated free-access Nano-Crystallography Database (NCD) that contains comprehensive information on both nanocrystal structures and morphologies. The current status of the NCD project and plans for its future developments are briefly outlined. Although feasible in contemporary HRTEMs and Z-STEMs, fringe fingerprinting in 2D (and image-based nanocrystallography in general) will become much more viable with the increased availability of aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes. When the image acquisition and interpretation are, in addition, automated in such microscopes, fringe fingerprinting in 2D will be able to compete with powder X-ray diffraction for the identification of unknown nanocrystal phases on a routine basis. Since it possesses a range of advantages over powder X-ray diffractometry, e.g., fringe fingerprint plots contain much more information for the identification of an unknown crystal phase, fringe fingerprinting in 2D may then capture a significant part of the nanocrystal metrology market.

  1. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya Riffo, A.; Vicente Alvarez, M. A.; Santisteban, J. R.; Vizcaino, P.; Limandri, S.; Daymond, M. R.; Kerr, D.; Okasinski, J.; Almer, J.; Vogel, S. C.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α(hcp) to β(bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β->α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong variant selection.

  2. Identification of succinic semialdehyde reductases from Geobacter: expression,purification, crystallization, preliminary functional, and crystallographic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanfeng Zhang; Xiaoli Gao; Yi Zheng; R. Michae; Garavito

    2011-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde reductase (SSAR) is an important enzyme involved in γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) metabolism.By converting succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB),the SSAR facilitates an alternative pathway for GABA degradation.In this study,we identified SSARs from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens (GsSSAR and GmSSAR,respectively).The enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coil and purified to near homogeneity.Both GsSSAR and GmSSAR showed the activity of reducing SSA using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a co-factor.The oligomeric sizes of GsSSAR and GmSSAR,as determined by analytical size exclusion chromatography,suggest that the enzymes presumably exist as tetramers in solution.The recombinant GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystallized in the presence of NADP+,and the resulting crystals diffracted to 1.89 (A) (GsSSAR) and 2.25 (A)(GmSSAR) resolution.The GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystals belong to the space groups P21221 (a =99.61 (A),b =147.49 (A),c =182.47 A) and P1 (a =75.97 (A) b =79.14 (A) c =95.47 (A),α =82.15°,β =88.80°,γ=87.66°),respectively.Preliminary crystallographic data analysis suggests the presence of eight protein monomers in the asymmetric units for both GsSSAR and GmSSAR.

  3. Identification of succinic semialdehyde reductases from Geobacter: expression, purification, crystallization, preliminary functional, and crystallographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R. Michael (MSU)

    2012-04-30

    Succinic semialdehyde reductase (SSAR) is an important enzyme involved in {gamma}-aminobutyrate (GABA) metabolism. By converting succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to {gamma}-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), the SSAR facilitates an alternative pathway for GABA degradation. In this study, we identified SSARs from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens (GsSSAR and GmSSAR, respectively). The enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. Both GsSSAR and GmSSAR showed the activity of reducing SSA using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a co-factor. The oligomeric sizes of GsSSAR and GmSSAR, as determined by analytical size exclusion chromatography, suggest that the enzymes presumably exist as tetramers in solution. The recombinant GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystallized in the presence of NADP{sup +}, and the resulting crystals diffracted to 1.89 {angstrom} (GsSSAR) and 2.25 {angstrom} (GmSSAR) resolution. The GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystals belong to the space groups P2{sub 1}22{sub 1} (a = 99.61 {angstrom}, b = 147.49 {angstrom}, c = 182.47 {angstrom}) and P1 (a = 75.97 {angstrom}, b = 79.14 {angstrom}, c = 95.47 {angstrom}, {alpha} = 82.15{sup o}, {beta} = 88.80{sup o}, {gamma} = 87.66{sup o}), respectively. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis suggests the presence of eight protein monomers in the asymmetric units for both GsSSAR and GmSSAR.

  4. Crystallographic, microstructure and mechanical characteristics of dynamically processed IN718 superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.D., E-mail: ads.hpu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla 171005 (India); Sharma, A.K. [Terminal Ballistics Research Laboratory, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Thakur, N. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla 171005 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Measurement of detonation velocity and compaction of powder are achieved together. • A plastic explosive detonation results into dense compacts without grain-growth. • We have studied crystallographic, micromechanical and microstructural features. • The results show no segregation within the compacts. • Density (98%), microhardness (470 ± 3)H{sub v}, microstrain (0.3%), UTS (806 MPa) are obtained. - Abstract: Dynamic consolidation of IN718 superalloy powder without grain-growth and negligible density gradient is accomplished through explosively generated shock wave loading. The compaction of powder and measurement of detonation velocity are achieved successfully in a single-shot experiment by employing instrumented detonics. A plastic explosive having a detonation velocity of the order of 7.1 km/s in a direct proximity with superalloy powder is used for the consolidation process. The compacted specimens are examined for structural, microstructure and mechanical characteristics. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study suggests intact crystalline structure of the compacts. A small micro-strain (0.26%) is observed by using Williamson–Hall method. Wavelength dispersive spectroscopy indicates no segregation within the shock processed superalloy compacted specimens. The monoliths investigated for fractography by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) show original dendritic structure accompanied by re-solidified molten regions across the interparticle boundaries. Depth-sensing indentations (at 1.96 N) on compacted specimens show excellent micro-hardness of the order of (470 ± 3)H{sub v}. Tensile and compressive strengths of the superalloy monolith are observed to be 806 and 822 MPa, respectively.

  5. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffo, A. Moya; Alvarez, M.A.Vicente; Santisteban, J R; Vizcaino, P; Limandri, S.; Daymond, M. R.; Kerr, D.; Vogel, S C; Almer, J.; Okasinski, J.

    2017-02-08

    This study presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α(hcp) to β(bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β–>α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong

  6. Structure and function of proteins investigated by crystallographic and spectroscopic time-resolved methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Namrta

    Biomolecules play an essential role in performing the necessary functions for life. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to an understanding of how biological systems work on the molecular level. We used two biological systems, beef liver catalase (BLC) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BLC is a metalloprotein that protects living cells from the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species by converting H2O2 into water and oxygen. By binding nitric oxide (NO) to the catalase, a complex was generated that mimics the Cat-H2O2 adduct, a crucial intermediate in the reaction promoted by the catalase. The Cat-NO complex is obtained by using a convenient NO generator (1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate). Concentrations up to 100˜200 mM are reached by using a specially designed glass cavity. With this glass apparatus and DEANO, sufficient NO occupation is achieved and structure determination of the catalase with NO bound to the heme iron becomes possible. Structural changes upon NO binding are minute. NO has a slightly bent geometry with respect to the heme normal, which results in a substantial overlap of the NO orbitals with the iron-porphyrin molecular orbitals. From the structure of the iron-NO complex, conclusions on the electronic properties of the heme iron can be drawn that ultimately lead to an insight into the catalytic properties of this enzyme. Enzyme kinetics is affected by additional parameters such as temperature and pH. Additionally, in crystallography, the absorbed X-ray dose may impair protein function. To address the effect of these parameters, we performed time-resolved crystallographic experiments on a model system, PYP. By collecting multiple time-series on PYP at increasing X-ray dose levels, we determined a kinetic dose limit up to which kinetically meaningful X-ray data sets can be collected. From this, we conclude that comprehensive time-series spanning up to 12 orders of magnitude in time can be collected from a single PYP

  7. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  8. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...

  9. Triatomic molecules laser-cooled

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Molecules containing three atoms have been laser-cooled to ultracold temperatures for the first time. John Doyle and colleagues at Harvard University in the US used a technique called Sisyphus cooling to chill an ensemble of about a million strontium-monohydroxide molecules to 750 μK.

  10. The Independence of Jane Eyre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董引娣

    2015-01-01

    <正>Ⅰ.General Review of Jane Eyre’s Independence Jane’s independence also has something to do with dignity.Every time she was teased by her cousin,she would resist rather than keep silent.Even when she stayed with the so-called upperclass people,she behaved without any self-humiliation.Jane’s sufferings that give rise to her independence and unconquerable spirit to stay with Rochester,Jane didn’t feel herself inferior

  11. Nuclear, uranium, reserves, sustainability, independence; Nucleaire, Uranium, reserves, durabilite, independance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acket, C

    2007-06-15

    In order to evaluate the energy independence concerning the nuclear energy, the author takes the state of the art about the uranium. He details the fuel needs, the reserves on the base of the today available techniques, the reserves on the base of the future techniques and concludes positively on the energy independence for the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  12. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  13. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  14. Structural design of easy-axis magnetic anisotropy and determination of anisotropic parameters of Ln(III)-Cu(II) single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Takashi; Nakano, Motohiro; Takahashi, Kohei; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2011-01-03

    Four dinuclear Ln(III)-Cu(II) complexes with Ln=Tb (1), Dy (2), Ho (3), and Er (4) were synthesized to investigate the relationship between their respective magnetic anisotropies and ligand-field geometries. These complexes were crystallographically isostructural, and a uni-axial ligand field was achieved by using three phenoxo oxygen groups. Complexes 1 and 2 displayed typical single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviors, of which the out-of-phase susceptibilities were observed in the temperature range of 1.8-5.0 K (1) and 1.8-20.0 K (2). The Cole-Cole plots exhibited a semicircular shape with α parameters in the range of 0.08-0.18 (2.6-4.0 K) and 0.07-0.24 (3.5-7.0 K). The energy barriers Δ/k(B) were estimated from the Arrhenius plots to be 32.9(4) K for 1 and 26.0(5) K for 2. Complex 3 displayed a slow magnetic relaxation below 3.0 K, whereas complex 4 did not show any frequency-dependent behavior for both in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibilities, which indicates that easy-axis anisotropy was absent. The temperature dependence of the dc susceptibilities for the field-aligned samples of 1-3 revealed that the χ(M) T value continuously increased as the temperature was lowered, which indicates the presence of low-lying Stark sublevels with the highest |J(z) | values. In contrast, complex 4 displayed a smaller and temperature-independent χ(M) T value, which also indicates that easy-axis anisotropy was absent. Simultaneous analyses were carried out for 1-3 to determine the magnetic anisotropy parameters on the basis of the Hamiltonian that considers B(2) (0) , B(4) (0) , and B(6) (0) .

  15. The electron density distribution in the hydrogen bond. A quantum chemical and crystallographic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feil, Dirk

    1990-01-01

    With the help of Hartree—Fock—Slater calculations in which very large basis sets are employed, the polarisation of the water molecule by an electric field is explored. The various features in the electron density distribution are encountered again in the long hydrogen bond in the water dimer, showin

  16. Metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc molecule adsorbed on the Au(111 surface: formation of a wide domain along a single lattice direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Komeda, Hironari Isshiki and Jie Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, we observed the bonding configuration of the metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc molecule adsorbed on the Au(111 surface. A local lattice formation started from a quasi-square lattice aligned to the close-packed directions of the Au(111 surface. Although we expected the lattice alignment to be equally distributed along the three crystallographically equivalent directions, the domain aligned normal to the ridge of the herringbone structure was missing in the STM images. We attribute this effect to the uniaxial contraction of the reconstructed Au(111 surface that can account for the formation of a large lattice domain along a single crystallographical direction.

  17. Small-Molecule Inhibition of BRDT for Male Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzuk, Martin M.; McKeown, Michael R.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Li, Qinglei; Ma, Lang; Agno, Julio E.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Picaud, Sarah; Yu, Richard N.; Qi, Jun; Knapp, Stefan; Bradner, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A pharmacologic approach to male contraception remains a longstanding challenge in medicine. Toward this objective, we explored the spermatogenic effects of a selective small-molecule inhibitor (JQ1) of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) subfamily of epigenetic reader proteins. Here, we report potent inhibition of the testis-specific member BRDT, which is essential for chromatin remodeling during spermatogenesis. Biochemical and crystallographic studies confirm that occupancy of the BRDT acetyl-lysine binding pocket by JQ1 prevents recognition of acetylated histone H4. Treatment of mice with JQ1 reduced seminiferous tubule area, testis size, and spermatozoa number and motility without affecting hormone levels. Although JQ1-treated males mate normally, inhibitory effects of JQ1 evident at the spermatocyte and round spermatid stages cause a complete and reversible contraceptive effect. These data establish a new contraceptive that can cross the blood:testis boundary and inhibit bromodomain activity during spermatogenesis, providing a lead compound targeting the male germ cell for contraception. PaperClip PMID:22901802

  18. Marketing Handbook for Independent Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarding Schools, Boston, MA.

    This publication is a resource to help independent schools attract more familites to their institutions and to increase the voluntary support by the larger community surrounding the school. The first chapter attempts to dispel misconceptions, define pertinent marketing terms, and relate their importance to independent schools. The rest of the book…

  19. Central bank independence and ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Farvaque, Etienne; Héricourt, Jérôme; Lagadec, Gaël

    2008-01-01

    We contrast the influence of demography and central bank independence on inflation. The recent demographic trends in developed countries are shown to weight more on inflation than central bank independence, while the contrary stands for the period from 1960 to 1979.

  20. Comparison of a homology model and the crystallographic structure of human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) in a structure-based identification of inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguet, Laurence; Zhang, Ziding; Barbier, Maryse; Grigorov, Martin G.

    2006-02-01

    Human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) catalyzes the interconversion of cortisone into active cortisol. 11βHSD1 inhibition is a tempting target for the treatment of a host of human disorders that might benefit from blockade of glucocorticoid action, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes type 2. Here, we report an in silico screening study aimed at identifying new selective inhibitors of human 11βHSD1 enzyme. In the first step, homology modeling was employed to build the 3D structure of 11βHSD1. Further, molecular docking was used to validate the predicted model by showing that it was able to discriminate between known 11βHSD1 inhibitors or substrates and non-inhibitors. The homology model was found to reproduce closely the crystal structure that became publicly available in the final stages of this work. Finally, we carried out structure-based virtual screening experiments on both the homology model and the crystallographic structure with a database of 114'000 natural molecules. Among these, 15 molecules were consistently selected as inhibitors based on both the model and crystal structures of the enzyme, implying a good quality for the homology model. Among these putative 11βHSD1 inhibitors, two were flavonone derivatives that have already been shown to be potent inhibitors of the enzyme.

  1. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makusu Tsutsui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule.

  2. When water molecules meet air

    OpenAIRE

    Hsie, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R. Kramer; Verde, Ana Vila; Bolhuis, Peter; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-01-01

    About 70% of our planet is covered in water. Most of that water exists as water in the bulk – the neighbors of water molecules are other water molecules – and only a small fraction of molecules are at the air-water interface. Despite the small relative abundance of interfacial water, it is of the utmost importance: it governs the chemistry involving the surface of oceans and seawater aerosols, or the small water droplets forming clouds. Reactions at the air-water interface are directly releva...

  3. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of Cu{sub 2}U-type hexaferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamishima, K., E-mail: kamisima@fms.saitama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Tajima, R.; Watanabe, K.; Kakizaki, K.; Fujimori, A.; Sakai, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Global Research Cluster, Collaboration Promotion Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, H. [Advanced Electronic Materials Center, National Institute of Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the synthesis conditions, and the magnetic properties of the Cu{sub 2}U-type hexagonal ferrite, Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 2}Fe{sub 36}O{sub 60}. The Cu{sub 2}U-type hexaferrite was synthesized at the sintering temperature of 1050 °C with the initial composition of Ba{sub 4.4}Cu{sub 2}Fe{sub 37.6}O{sub 62.8} (Cu{sub 2}U+0.2T-block). The saturation magnetizations at 300 K and 5 K are 46.8 A m{sup 2}/kg and 65.0 A m{sup 2}/kg, respectively. The Curie temperature is 420 °C which is lower than that of the M-type ferrite (450 °C) but higher than that of the Cu{sub 2}Y-type ferrite (320 °C). The amount of the nonmagnetic impurity in this sample is estimated to be about 10 wt% by the electron probe micro analysis. We estimated the expected saturation magnetization to be 65.2 A m{sup 2}/kg, by assuming the model of a Néel-type ferrimagnetic structure and the reduction of magnetization by the 10 wt% nonmagnetic impurity. This is consistent with the observed magnetization of 65.0 A m{sup 2}/kg at 5 K. - Highlights: • We have synthesized the crystallographic single-phase Cu{sub 2}U-type hexagonal ferrite. • M{sub S} is found to be 46.8 A·m{sup 2}/kg at 300 K and 65.0 A·m{sup 2}/kg at 5 K. • T{sub C} is 420°C. It is lower than T{sub C}{sup M-type} (450°C) but higher than T{sub C}{sup Cu2Y-type} (320°C). • The estimated saturation magnetization is consistent with experimental M{sub S} at 5 K.

  4. Crystallographic Characteristic of Intermetallic Compounds in Al-Si-Mg Casting Alloys Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yongzhi; XU Zhengbing; HE Juan; ZENG Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The Al-Si-Mg alloy which can be strengthened by heat treatment is widely applied to the key components of aerospace and aeronautics. Iron-rich intermetallic compounds are well known to be strongly influential on mechanical properties in Al-Si-Mg alloys. But intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si-Mg alloy intermetallics are often misidentified in previous metallurgical studies. It was described as many different compounds, such as AlFeSi, Al8Fe2Si, Al5(Fe, Mn)3Si2 and so on. For the purpose of solving this problem, the intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si alloys containing 0.5% Mg were investigated in this study. The iron-rich compounds in Al-Si-Mg casting alloys were characterized by optical microscope(OM), scanning electron microscope(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer(EDS), electron backscatter diffraction(EBSD) and X-ray powder diffraction(XRD). The electron backscatter diffraction patterns were used to assess the crystallographic characteristics of intermetallic compounds. The compound which contains Fe/Mg-rich particles with coarse morphologies was Al8FeMg3Si6 in the alloy by using EBSD. The compound belongs to hexagonal system, space group P2m, with the lattice parameter a=0.662 nm, c=0.792 nm. The β-phase is indexed as tetragonal Al3FeSi2, space group I4/mcm, a=0.607 nm and c=0.950 nm. The XRD data indicate that Al8FeMg3Si6 and Al3FeSi2 are present in the microstructure of Al-7Si-Mg alloy, which confirms the identification result of EBSD. The present study identified the iron-rich compound in Al-Si-Mg alloy, which provides a reliable method to identify the intermetallic compounds in short time in Al-Si-Mg alloy. Study results are helpful for identification of complex compounds in alloys.

  5. Hematite and Goethite (U-Th)/He/Ne ages interpretation using crystallographic data and diffusion parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautheron, Cécile; Balout, Hilal; Roques, Jérôme; Allard, Thierry; Morin, Guillaume; Tassan-Got, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    incorporated in this code in order to reproduce realistic crystallographic structure. Balout, H., Roques, J., Gautheron, C., Tassan-Got, L., Mbongo-Djimbi, D., submitted a. Helium diffusion in pure hematite (α-Fe2O3) for thermochronometric applications: a theoretical multi-scale study. Balout, H., Roques, J., Gautheron, C., Tassan-Got, L., submitted b. Computational investigation of the interstitial neon diffusion in pure hematite, α-Fe2O3. Gautheron, C., Tassan-Got, L., 2010. A Monte Carlo approach of diffusion applied to noble gas/helium thermochronology. Chemical Geology, 273: 212-224.

  6. In situ monitoring of crystallographic changes in Pd induced by diffusion of D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, E. F.; Hagans, P. L.; Qadri, S. B.; Dominguez, D. D.; Ehrlich, A. C.; Hu, J. Z.

    1998-12-01

    Crystallographic changes in a palladium wire cathode were monitored in situ, as deuterium was electrochemically deposited on the surface and diffused radially into the wire. Initially, the wire was pure Pd. A constant electrolysis current density of 1 mA/cm2 was maintained and D slowly diffused into the wire. As the D concentration increased, the wire transformed from pure Pd, to the α phase, and finally into the β phase. This reversible phase transformation begins on the surface and progresses radially inward. During the experiment, x-ray-diffraction data were collected from a volume element of about 180 pl. This volume element was systematically moved in 50-μm steps from the edge to the center of a 1.0 mm diameter Pd wire. Throughout the course of the experiment, the bulk value of x in PdDx, as determined from simultaneous measurements of the electrical resistivity, increased from 0 to ~0.72. For each setting of the volume element, a monotonic increase in the volume of the α phase was observed, until the material entered the two-phase region. Once the β phase appeared, the volumes of both phases decreased slightly with continued loading. The integrated intensities of diffraction peaks from each phase were used in conjunction with the known phase diagram to estimate the rate of compositional change within the volume element. The diffusion rate for the solute atoms was estimated to be 57+/-8 nm/s, based on the temporal and spatial dependence of the integrated intensities of the diffraction peaks from each phase. These data also were used to evaluate the time dependence of the concentration of the solute atoms ∂c/∂t and their diffusivity D. The value of ∂c/∂t increased linearly from 6.2×10-5 s-1 at the surface, to 7.6×10-5 s-1 midway into the wire. D was computed to be (3.1+/-1.0)×10-11 m2/s when the transition began at r=250 μm 2 ks later it had decreased to (2.1+/-0.3)×10-11 m2/s. This may be due to the fact that the volume of the β lattice also

  7. Mineralogical, crystallographic and redox features of the earliest stages of fluid alteration in CM chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Isabella; Marrocchi, Yves; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Bourdelle, Franck; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2017-07-01

    The CM chondrites represent the largest group of hydrated meteorites and span a wide range of conditions, from less altered (i.e., CM2) down to heavily altered (i.e., CM1). The Paris chondrite is considered the least altered CM and thus enables the earliest stages of aqueous alteration processes to be deciphered. Here, we report results from a nanoscale study of tochilinite/cronstedtite intergrowths (TCIs) in Paris-TCIs being the emblematic secondary mineral assemblages of CM chondrites, formed from the alteration of Fe-Ni metal beads (type-I TCIs) and anhydrous silicates (type-II TCIs). We combined high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and electron diffraction tomography to characterize the crystal structure, crystal chemistry and redox state of TCIs. The data obtained are useful to reconstruct the alteration conditions of Paris and to compare them with those of other meteorites. Our results show that tochilinite in Paris is characterized by a high hydroxide layer content (n = 2.1-2.2) regardless of the silicate precursors. When examined alongside other CMs, it appears that the hydroxide layer and iron contents of tochilinites correlate with the degree of alteration experienced by the chondrites. The Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of TCIs are high: 8-15% in tochilinite, 33-60% in cronstedtite and 70-80% in hydroxides. These observations suggest that alteration of CM chondrites took place under oxidizing conditions that could have been induced by significant H2 release during serpentinization. Similar results were recently reported in CR chondrites (Le Guillou et al., 2015), suggesting that the process(es) controlling the redox state of the secondary mineral assemblages were quite similar in the CM and CR parent bodies despite the different alteration conditions. According to our mineralogical and crystallographic survey, the formation of TCIs in Paris occurred at temperatures lower than 100 °C, under neutral, slightly alkaline

  8. Crystallographically Oriented Cobalt Chromium Tantalum Thin-Film Media for High Areal Density Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youping

    In order to develop the techniques for increasing recording areal density, microstructural, magnetic and recording properties of crystallographically-oriented CoCrTa thin-films were investigated. The oriented films included bi-crystal and quad-crystal CoCrTa thin films, which were prepared by sputtering on (100) and (110) single crystal Cr substrates, respectively. A theoretical model was developed to calculate the in-plane torque curves of the oriented films. Based on this model, experimental investigations were conducted on the quad-crystal CoCrTa films. It was found that, by fitting the measured in-plane torque curves of the quad -crystal CoCrTa film, it was possible to determine the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constants (K_{rm u1 } and K_{rm u2}) of the CoCrTa film. The torque curves of quad -crystal films were also found to be indicative of the grain isolation and could be used to optimize the sputtering conditions. Substrate bias changed the film composition and lowered M_{rm s} and K_{rm u1}, while improving grain isolation. A more realistic micromagnetic model, which used the measured values of M_ {rm s} and K_{ rm u1} and took the film's grain-cluster microstructure into account, was developed for the bi-crystal films. The simulation results fitted well with the experimental data. A low-speed contact-recording spin-stand, which utilized a magnetoresistive head, was set up for recording studies on the oriented thin-film media and an isotropic thin-film medium prepared on a NiP/Al substrate. The readback signal from the MR head appeared to have some correlation with the medium anisotropy. The recorded patterns were imaged by magnetic force microscopy. It was found that erased bands formed on the quad-crystal and isotropic thin -film media. On the bi-crystal thin-film media, however, clear erased bands were not observed possibly due to the large head-disk distance.

  9. An independent pair-link model of simple fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneville, Richard

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to thermodynamics of simple fluids is presented. The partition function is first expressed in the reciprocal space, it is argued that the links (p,q) between 2 molecules can reasonably in the thermodynamical limit be considered as a set nearly independent objects characterized by the dynamical variables . It is then possible to derive an expression of the pair correlation function. The results, which are independent of the exact shape of the intermolecular potential, are applied to the simple case of hard sphere fluids.

  10. Absorption characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H K T Kumar; K Appaji Gowda

    2000-03-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin molecule absorbs light and undergoes a series of structural transformation following a well-defined photocycle. The complex photocycle is transformed to an equivalent level diagram by considering the lifetime of the intermediate states. Assuming that only and states are appreciably populated at any instant of time, the level diagram is further simplified to two-level system. Based on the rate equations for two-level system, an analytic expression for the absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin molecule is derived. It is applied to study the behaviour of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film in the visible wavelength region of 514 nm. The dependence of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film on the thickness of the film, total number density of active molecules and initial number density of molecules in -state is presented in the graphical form.

  11. Cell adhesion molecules and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Emma Kate; Ballester Roig, Maria Neus; Mongrain, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play essential roles in the central nervous system, where some families are involved in synaptic development and function. These synaptic adhesion molecules (SAMs) are involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, and the formation of neuronal networks. Recent findings from studies examining the consequences of sleep loss suggest that these molecules are candidates to act in sleep regulation. This review highlights the experimental data that lead to the identification of SAMs as potential sleep regulators, and discusses results supporting that specific SAMs are involved in different aspects of sleep regulation. Further, some potential mechanisms by which SAMs may act to regulate sleep are outlined, and the proposition that these molecules may serve as molecular machinery in the two sleep regulatory processes, the circadian and homeostatic components, is presented. Together, the data argue that SAMs regulate the neuronal plasticity that underlies sleep and wakefulness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Special Issue: Single Molecule Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans H. Gorris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in the detection and manipulation of single molecules have enabled new insights into the function, structure and interactions of biomolecules. This Special Issue was launched to account for the rapid progress in the field of “Single Molecule Techniques”. Four original research articles and seven review articles provide an introduction, as well as an in-depth discussion, of technical developments that are indispensable for the characterization of individual biomolecules. Fluorescence microscopy takes center stage in this Special Issue because it is one of the most sensitive and flexible techniques, which has been adapted in many variations to the specific demands of single molecule analysis. Two additional articles are dedicated to single molecule detection based on atomic force microscopy.

  13. Quantum Transport Through Heterocyclic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    We explore electron transport properties in molecular wires made of heterocyclic molecules (pyrrole, furan and thiophene) by using the Green's function technique. Parametric calculations are given based on the tight-binding model to describe the electron transport in these wires. It is observed that the transport properties are significantly influenced by (a) the heteroatoms in the heterocyclic molecules and (b) the molecule-to-electrodes coupling strength. Conductance (g) shows sharp resonance peaks associated with the molecular energy levels in the limit of weak molecular coupling, while they get broadened in the strong molecular coupling limit. These resonances get shifted with the change of the heteroatoms in these heterocyclic molecules. All the essential features of the electron transfer through these molecular wires become much more clearly visible from the study of our current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, and they provide several key information in the study of molecular transport.

  14. Dipole Moment and Binding Energy of Water in Proteins from Crystallographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozenko, A; Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2014-10-14

    The energetics of water molecules in proteins is studied using the water placement software Dowser. We compared the water position predictions for 14 high-resolution crystal structures of oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) containing a large number of resolved internal water molecules. From the analysis of the outputs of Dowser with variable parameters and comparison with experimental X-ray data, we derived an estimate of the average dipole moment of water molecules located in the internal cavities of the protein and their binding energies. The water parameters thus obtained from the experimental data are then analyzed within the framework of charge-scaling theory developed recently by this group; the parameters are shown to be in good agreement with the predictions that the theory makes for the dipole moment in a protein environment. The water dipole in the protein environment is found to be much different from that in the bulk and in such models as SPC or TIPnP. The role of charge scaling due to electronic polarizability of the protein is discussed.

  15. Dissolution of quartz in aqueous basic solution, 106-236 C - Surface kinetics of 'perfect' crystallographic faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Bird, Peter; Quiro, Glenn B.

    1990-01-01

    A highly accurate method, called the negative crystal method, for determining the rate of dissolution on specific crystallographic faces of crystals was developed, in which the dissolution rates of nominally perfect crystal faces are obtained by measuring the size of individual negative crystals during a sequence of dissolution steps. The method was applied to determine the apparent activation energy and rate constants for the dissolution of quartz in 0.01 M KOH solutions at temperatures from 106 to 236 C. Also investigated were the effects of hydroxyl activity and ionic strength. The apparent activation energies for the dissolution of the prism and of the rhomb were determined.

  16. phenix.model_vs_data: a high-level tool for the calculation of crystallographic model and data statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonine, Pavel V; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Chen, Vincent B; Headd, Jeffrey J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Richardson, Jane S; Richardson, David C; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Zwart, Peter H; Adams, Paul D

    2010-08-01

    phenix.model_vs_data is a high-level command-line tool for the computation of crystallographic model and data statistics, and the evaluation of the fit of the model to data. Analysis of all Protein Data Bank structures that have experimental data available shows that in most cases the reported statistics, in particular R factors, can be reproduced within a few percentage points. However, there are a number of outliers where the recomputed R values are significantly different from those originally reported. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed.

  17. Crystallographic analysis of the solid-state dewetting of polycrystalline gold film using automated indexing in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, S. A.; Lee, H. J.; Oh, Y. J., E-mail: yjoh@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanbat National University, 125, Dongseo-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Thompson, C. V.; Ross, C. A., E-mail: caross@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the effect of crystallographic anisotropy on the morphological evolution of a 12-nm-thick gold film during solid-state dewetting at high temperatures using automated indexing tool in a transmission electron microscopy. Dewetting initiated at grain-boundary triple junctions adjacent to large grains resulting from abnormal grain growth driven by (111) texture development. Voids at the junctions developed shapes with faceted edges bounded by low-index crystal planes. The kinetic mobility of the edges varied with the crystal orientation normal to the edges, with a predominance of specific edges with the slowest retraction rates as the annealing time was increased.

  18. Novel GaN-based vertical heterostructure field effect transistor structures using crystallographic KOH etching and overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, H.; Lee, K. B.; Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Novikov, S. V.; Guiney, I.; Zaidi, Z. H.; Jiang, S.; Wallis, D. J.; Foxon, C. T.; Humphreys, C. J.; Houston, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    A novel V-groove vertical heterostructure field effect transistor structure is proposed using semi-polar (11-22) GaN. A crystallographic potassium hydroxide self-limiting wet etching technique was developed to enable a damage-free V-groove etching process. An AlGaN/GaN HFET structure was successfully regrown by molecular beam epitaxy on the V-groove surface. A smooth AlGaN/GaN interface was achieved which is an essential requirement for the formation of a high mobility channel.

  19. Crystallographic information of intermediate phases in binary Mg–X (X=Sn, Y, Sc, Ag alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The compositions and structures of thermodynamically stable or metastable precipitations in binary Mg-X (X=Sn, Y, Sc, Ag alloys are predicted using ab-initio evolutionary algorithm. The geometry optimizations of the predicted intermetallic compounds are carried out in the framework of density functional theory (DFT [1]. A complete list of the optimized crystallographic information (in cif format of the predicted intermetallic phases is presented here. The data is related to “Predictions on the compositions, structures, and mechanical properties of intermediate phases in binary Mg–X (X=Sn, Y, Sc, Ag alloys” by Liu et al. [2].

  20. Guidance molecules in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nasarre, Patrick; Potiron, Vincent; Drabkin, Harry; Roche, Joëlle

    2010-01-01

    Guidance molecules were first described in the nervous system to control axon outgrowth direction. They are also widely expressed outside the nervous system where they control cell migration, tissue development and establishment of the vascular network. In addition, they are involved in cancer development, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. This review is primarily focused on their functions in lung cancer and their involvement in lung development is also presented. Five guidance molecule fam...

  1. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, V V

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  2. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-11-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for the construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  3. Optofluidic single molecule flow proteometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Nan; Chou, Chao-Kai; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2009-02-01

    A microfluidic single molecule fluorescence-based detection scheme is developed to identify target protein direct from cell lysate by using polyclonal antibody. Relative concentration of target protein in solution is determined by twodimensional (2D) photon burst analysis. Compared to conventional ensemble measurement assays, this microfluidic single molecule approach combines the advantages of higher sensitivity, fast processing time, small sample consumption and high resolution quantitative analysis.

  4. Independent Innovation Is a Must

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The importance of independent innovation has been recognized by the Chinese Government and the public. The 11 th Five-Year Plan (2006-10) sets the enhancement of China's capability of independent innovation and the creation of an innovation-driven growth mode as the national strategy that is required to be integrated into every aspect of society. "Independent innovation" was also a key word in Premier Wen Jiabao's report on government work at the recent session of the National People's Congress, the top ...

  5. A procedure to analyze surface profiles of the protein molecules visualized by quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka [Division of Biomolecular Imaging, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Bioscience and Bioinformatics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Oguchi, Yosuke [Department of Electric Engineering, Kogakuin University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Ichise, Norihiko [Department of Visual Communication, Komazawa Women' s University, Inagi, Tokyo 206-8511 (Japan); Baba, Norio [Department of Electric Engineering, Kogakuin University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Katayama, Eisaku [Division of Biomolecular Imaging, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)]. E-mail: ekatayam@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-01-15

    Quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy gives high contrast snapshots of individual protein molecules under physiological conditions in vitro or in situ. The images show delicate internal pattern, possibly reflecting the rotary-shadowed surface profile of the molecule. As a step to build the new system for the 'Structural analysis of single molecules', we propose a procedure to quantitatively characterize the structural property of individual molecules; e.g. conformational type and precise view-angle of the molecules, if the crystallographic structure of the target molecule is available. This paper presents a framework to determine the observed face of the protein molecule by analyzing the surface profile of individual molecules visualized in freeze-replica specimens. A comprehensive set of rotary-shadowed views of the protein molecule was artificially generated from the available atomic coordinates using light-rendering software. Exploiting new mathematical morphology-based image filter, characteristic features were extracted from each image and stored as template. Similar features were extracted from the true replica image and the most likely projection angle and the conformation of the observed particle were determined by quantitative comparison with a set of archived images. The performance and the robustness of the procedure were examined with myosin head structure in defined configuration for actual application.

  6. A procedure to analyze surface profiles of the protein molecules visualized by quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka; Oguchi, Yosuke; Ichise, Norihiko; Baba, Norio; Katayama, Eisaku

    2007-01-01

    Quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy gives high contrast snapshots of individual protein molecules under physiological conditions in vitro or in situ. The images show delicate internal pattern, possibly reflecting the rotary-shadowed surface profile of the molecule. As a step to build the new system for the "Structural analysis of single molecules", we propose a procedure to quantitatively characterize the structural property of individual molecules; e.g. conformational type and precise view-angle of the molecules, if the crystallographic structure of the target molecule is available. This paper presents a framework to determine the observed face of the protein molecule by analyzing the surface profile of individual molecules visualized in freeze-replica specimens. A comprehensive set of rotary-shadowed views of the protein molecule was artificially generated from the available atomic coordinates using light-rendering software. Exploiting new mathematical morphology-based image filter, characteristic features were extracted from each image and stored as template. Similar features were extracted from the true replica image and the most likely projection angle and the conformation of the observed particle were determined by quantitative comparison with a set of archived images. The performance and the robustness of the procedure were examined with myosin head structure in defined configuration for actual application.

  7. Independent EEG sources are dipolar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delorme, Arnaud; Palmer, Jason; Onton, Julie; Oostenveld, Robert; Makeig, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) and blind source separation (BSS) methods are increasingly used to separate individual brain and non-brain source signals mixed by volume conduction in electroencephalographic (EEG...

  8. Logical independence and quantum randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterek, T; Kofler, J; Aspelmeyer, M; Zeilinger, A; Brukner, C [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prevedel, R; Klimek, P [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: tomasz.paterek@univie.ac.at

    2010-01-15

    We propose a link between logical independence and quantum physics. We demonstrate that quantum systems in the eigenstates of Pauli group operators are capable of encoding mathematical axioms and show that Pauli group quantum measurements are capable of revealing whether or not a given proposition is logically dependent on the axiomatic system. Whenever a mathematical proposition is logically independent of the axioms encoded in the measured state, the measurement associated with the proposition gives random outcomes. This allows for an experimental test of logical independence. Conversely, it also allows for an explanation of the probabilities of random outcomes observed in Pauli group measurements from logical independence without invoking quantum theory. The axiomatic systems we study can be completed and are therefore not subject to Goedel's incompleteness theorem.

  9. Provisional coverage for independent workers

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Luis Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The study examines how, from the traditional work of the independent artisan, we have moved to autonomous work integrated within networks of specialized businesses. This modality is owed not only to the manner in which labor is organized today, to government stimuli, to actions of multilaterals, but also to unemployment. With the purpose of humanizing independent work and rationalizing business costs, an intermediate category of autonomous worker has been created; the semi-dependent who...

  10. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen bonding between water and platinum(II): an atom in molecule (AIM) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Guiqiu; Chen, Dezhan

    2012-02-01

    Recently, Rizzato et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 7440 (2010)] [1] reported a hydrogen-bonding-like interaction between a water molecule and a d8 metal ion (PtII) based on neutron diffraction, and provided the first crystallographic evidence for this interaction. We studied the hydrogen bonding of the O-H ... Pt interaction theoretically using atoms in molecule (AIM) and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) in the crystallographic geometries. The method used density functional theory (DFT) with the hybrid B3LYP function. For platinum atoms, we used the Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-Double-Zeta (LANL2DZ) basis set, and for the other atoms we used 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Criteria based on a topological analysis of the electron density were used in order to characterize the nature of interactions in the complexes. The main purpose of the present work is to provide an answer to the following questions: Why can a filled d orbital of square-planar d8 metal ions such as platinum(II) also act as hydrogen-bond acceptors? Can a study based on the electron charge density answer this question? A good correlation between the density at the intermolecular bond critical point and the energy interaction was found. The interaction is mainly closed-shell and there is some charge transfer in this system.

  11. Different approaches toward an automatic structural alignment of drug molecules: Applications to sterol mimics, thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Gerhard; Mietzner, Thomas; Weber, Frank

    1994-12-01

    A relative comparison of the binding properties of different drug molecules requires their mutual superposition with respect to various alignment criteria. In order to validate the results of different alignment methods, the crystallographically observed binding geometries of ligands in the pocket of a common protein receptor have been used. The alignment function in the program SEAL that calculates the mutual superposition of molecules has been optimized with respect to these references. Across the reference data set, alignments could be produced that show mean rms deviations of approximately 1 Å compared to the experimental situation. For structures with obvious skeletal similarities a multiple-flexible fit, linking common pharmacophoric groups by virtual springs, has been incorporated into the molecular mechanics program MOMO. In order to combine conformational searching with comparative alignments, the optimized SEAL approach has been applied to sets of conformers generated by MIMUMBA, a program for conformational analysis. Multiple-flexible fits have been calculated for inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis. Sets of different thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors have been conformationally analyzed and subsequently aligned by a combined MIMUMBA/SEAL approach. Since for these examples crystallographic data on their mutual alignment are available, an objective assessment of the computed results could be performed. Among the generated conformers, one geometry could be selected for the thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors that approached reasonably well the experimentally observed alignment.

  12. Crystallographic Analysis of Martensite in 0.2C-2.0Mn-1.5Si-0.6Cr Steel using EBSD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pasi P. Suikkanen; Cyril Cayron; Anthony J. DeArdo; L Pentti Karjalainen

    2011-01-01

    The crystallography of martensite formed in 0.2C-2.0Mn-1,5Si-0.6Cr steel was studied using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The results showed that the observed orientation relationship (OR) was closer to that of Nishiyama-Wassermann (N-W) than Kurdjumov-Sachs. The martensite consisted of parallel laths forming morphological packets. Typically, there were three different lath orientations in a morphological packet consisting of three specific N-W OR variants sharing the same {111} austenite plane. A packet of martensite laths with a common {111} austenite plane was termed a crystallographic packet. Generally, the crystallographic packet size corresponded to the morphological packet size, but occasionally the morphological packet was found to consist of two or more crystallographic packets. Therefore, the crystallographic packet size appeared to be finer than the morphological packet size. The relative orientation between the variants in crystallographic packets was found to be near 60°〈110〉, which explains the strong peak observed near 60° in the grain boundary misorientation distribution. Martensite also contained a high fraction of boundaries with a misorientation in the range 2.5-8°. Typically these boundaries were found to be located inside the martensite laths forming sub-laths.

  13. Signaling Molecules and Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Widbiller, Matthias; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-09-01

    Signaling molecules play an essential role in tissue engineering because they regulate regenerative processes. Evidence exists from animal studies that single molecules such as members of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and factors that induce the growth of blood vessels (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerves (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), or fibroblasts (fibroblast growth factor) may induce reparative dentin formation. Mainly the formation of atubular dentin (osteodentin) has been described after the application of single molecules or combinations of recombinant growth factors on healthy exposed pulps or in pulp regeneration. Generally, such preparations have not received regulatory approval on the market so far. Only the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors together with cell transplantation is presently tested clinically. Besides approaches with only 1 or few combined molecules, the exploitation of tissue-derived growth factors depicts a third promising way in dental pulp tissue engineering. Preparations such as platelet-rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin provide a multitude of endogenous signaling molecules, and special regulatory approval for the market does not seem necessary. Furthermore, dentin is a perfect reservoir of signaling molecules that can be mobilized by treatment with demineralizing agents such as EDTA. This conditions the dentin surface and allows for contact differentiation of pulp stem cells into odontoblastlike cells, protects dentin from resorption, and enhances cell growth as well as attachment to dentin. By ultrasonic activation, signaling molecules can be further released from EDTA pretreated dentin into saline, thus avoiding cytotoxic EDTA in the final preparation. The use of dentin-derived growth factors offers a number of advantages because they are locally available and presumably are most fit to induce signaling processes in dental pulp. However, better characterization and standardization of the

  14. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-09

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules.

  15. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Rohde, Bernhard

    2012-07-06

    Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach "Molecule Cloud". The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large data sets, including PubChem, ChEMBL and ZINC databases using

  16. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  17. I19, the small-molecule single-crystal diffraction beamline at Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Harriott; Barnett, Sarah A; Christensen, Kirsten E; Teat, Simon J; Allan, David R

    2012-05-01

    The dedicated small-molecule single-crystal X-ray diffraction beamline (I19) at Diamond Light Source has been operational and supporting users for over three years. I19 is a high-flux tunable-wavelength beamline and its key details are described in this article. Much of the work performed on the beamline involves structure determination from small and weakly diffracting crystals. Other experiments that have been supported to date include structural studies at high pressure, studies of metastable species, variable-temperature crystallography, studies involving gas exchange in porous materials and structural characterizations that require analysis of the diffuse scattering between Bragg reflections. A range of sample environments to facilitate crystallographic studies under non-ambient conditions are available as well as a number of options for automation. An indication of the scope of the science carried out on the beamline is provided by the range of highlights selected for this paper.

  18. Development of olivine crystallographic preferred orientation in response to strain-induced fabric geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Cohen, Shaina M.; Medaris, L. Gordon, Jr.; Withers, Anthony C.; Bagley, Brian

    2016-04-01

    The effect of finite strain ellipsoid geometry on crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is well known for crustal minerals (e.g., quartz, calcite, biotite, and hornblende). In the upper mantle, however, it remains poorly constrained how strain and fabric may affect olivine CPO. We present data from a suite of 40 spinel peridotite xenoliths from Marie Byrd Land (west Antarctica), which support an interpretation that fabric geometry rather than deformation conditions control the development of olivine CPO. We use X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) to quantitatively determine spinel fabric (orientation and geometry). Olivine CPOs, determined by Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD), are plotted with respect to the XRCT-derived spinel foliation and lineation; this approach allows for the accurate, and unbiased, identification of CPO symmetries and types in mantle xenoliths. The combined XRCT and EBSD data show that the xenoliths are characterized by a range of fabric geometries (from oblate to prolate) and olivine CPO patterns; we recognize the A-type, axial-[010], axial-[100], and B-type patterns. The mantle xenoliths equilibrated at temperatures 779-1198 oC, as determined by 2-Px geothermometry. Using a geotherm consistent with the stability of spinel in all xenoliths, the range of equilibration temperatures occurs at depths between 39 and 72 km. Olivine recrystallized grain size piezometry reveals differential stresses ranging 2-60 MPa. Analysis of low-angle misorientation axes show a wide range in the distribution of rotation axes, with dominant {0kl}[100] slip. We use Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to estimate the water content in the xenolith with the B-type CPO pattern. FTIR analysis shows that the equilibrium H concentration in olivine is low (4-13 ppm H2O). Combining these data, we observe that olivine CPO symmetry is controlled neither by the deformation conditions (stress, temperature, pressure, water content) for the range of

  19. Chemical, crystallographic and stable isotopic properties of alunite and jarosite from acid-Hypersaline Australian lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Nordstrom, D.K.; White, L.D.; King, B.-S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical, crystallographic and isotopic analyses were made on samples containing alunite and jarosite from the sediments of four acid, hypersaline lakes in southeastern and southwestern Australia. The alunite and jarosite are K-rich with relatively low Na contents based on chemical analysis and determination of unit cell dimensions by powder X-ray diffraction. Correcting the chemical analyses of fine-grained mineral concentrates from Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, for the presence of halite, silica and poorly crystalline aluminosilicates, the following formulas indicate best estimates for solid-solution compositions: for alunite, K0.87Na0.04(H3O)0.09(Al 0.92Fe0.08)3(SO4)2(OH) 6 and for jarosite, K0.89Na0.07(H3O)0.04(Fe 0.80Al0.20)3(SO4)2(OH) 6. The ??D-values of alunite are notably larger than those for jarosite from Lake Tyrrell and it appears that the minerals have closely approached hydrogen isotope equilibrium with the acidic regional groundwaters. The ??D results are consistent with a fractionation ???60-70??? between alunite and jarosite observed in other areas. However, interpretation of ??D results is complicated by large variability in fluid ??DH2O from evaporation, mixing and possible ion hydration effects in the brine. ??D-values of water derived from jarosite by step-wise heating tend to be smaller at 250??C, at which temperature hydronium and other non-hydroxyl water is liberated, than at 550??C, where water is derived from the hydroxyl site, but the differences are not sufficiently different to invalidate measurements of total ??D obtained by conventional, single-step heating methods. ??34S-values for alunite and jarosite from the four lakes (+19.7 to +21.2??? CDT) and for aqueous sulfate from Lake Tyrrell (+18.3 to +19.8???) are close to the values for modern evaporites (+21.5 ??0.3???) and seawater (+20??0.5???) and are probably typical of seawater-derived aerosols in arid coastal environments. ??34-S-values slightly smaller than that for seawater may

  20. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.;

    2012-01-01

    on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...... atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...

  1. Development of (1 0 0) crystallographic texture in magnetostrictive Fe-Ga wires using a modified Taylor wire method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, S P; Quigley, P E; Avery, K J [Defence R and D Canada-Atlantic, 9 Grove Street, Dartmouth, NS, B2Y 3Z7 (Canada); Hatchard, T D; Flynn, S E; Dunlap, R A, E-mail: shannonfarrell@drdc-rddc.gc.c [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2009-07-07

    Magnetostrictive Fe-Ga wires 1-3 mm in diameter have been prepared using an innovative cost-effective approach-based on the Taylor wire method-that couples the advantages of high-temperature directional solidification and selective grain growth. Strict control of drawing processes has been shown to enable the introduction of desirable texture that is critical for achieving large magnetostriction in these polycrystalline Fe-Ga alloys. The procedure for fabricating highly textured (1 0 0) magnetostrictive wires is discussed and the wires are evaluated in terms of microstructure and crystallographic texture. Magnetostriction measurements, in the absence of pre-stress and stress-annealing treatments, indicated a maximum magnetostriction of approx170 ppm in a saturation field less than 60 mT. A mechanism for texture evolution is proposed. It is speculated that the resultant (1 0 0) texture of the Fe-Ga wires is due to directional solidification and abnormal grain growth resulting from surface effects. The unique properties of wires made with the Taylor-based approach coupled with the low fabrication cost make this an attractive approach for the production of Fe-Ga wire with a specific crystallographic texture.

  2. Isolation, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of chitinase from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Dipak N; Datta, Manali; Chaudhary, Anshul; Tomar, Shailly; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-04-01

    A protein with chitinase activity has been isolated and purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis of this protein confirmed it to be an approximately 34 kDa endochitinase which belongs to the acidic class III chitinase family. The protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1), with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.6 A.

  3. Two-dimensional crystallization and preliminary electron crystallographic result of partially purified Fo from porcine mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    After removal of cytoplasmic sector F1 from submitochondrial particles of FoF1-ATP synthase complex with guanidine hydrochloride, the transmembrane sector Fo was specifically extracted from the stripped membranes in the presence of detergent CHAPS and partially purified.Two-dimensional crystals were produced by the reconstitution of the partially purified Fo into asolectin and microdialysis. The obtained crystals are able to diffract to 2 nm. The projection map of the negatively stained crystal shows that the crystal has p4212 symmetry, lattice constant, a = b = 14.4nm. A unit cell contains four Fo molecules.

  4. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of recombinant chicken liver fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包素锦; 万柱礼; 常文瑞; 桂璐璐; 梁栋材; 凌嵩; 李林; 许根俊; Simon J. Pilkis

    1996-01-01

    The bisphosphatase domain of chicken liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphos-phosphatase was expressed in high yield Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Single crystals of chicken liver bisphophatase domain suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals belong to tetragonal space group P41212 or P43213 with two molecules per asymmetric unit. The determined cell dimensions are: a=b= 10.02 nm, c= 13.98 nm, α=β=г=90°. EHffraction data were collected on Weissenberg camera with synchrotron radiation at 0.32nm resolution.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of cathepsin D inhibitor from potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudys, M; Ghosh, M; Harlos, K; Mares, M; Fusek, M; Kostka, V; Blake, C C

    1991-03-05

    Single crystals of the glycosylated inhibitor of cathepsin D and trypsin isolated from potato tubers were obtained using the hanging drop vapor diffusion method and ammonium nitrate as precipitant. The crystals exhibit strong F222 pseudo symmetry but belong to the orthorhombic space group C222 or C222(1), with cell parameters a = 73.8 A, b = 119.9 A and c = 133.2 A with two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.4 A.

  6. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Electric Deflection of Rotating Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gershnabel, E

    2010-01-01

    We provide a theory of the deflection of polar and non-polar rotating molecules by inhomogeneous static electric field. Rainbow-like features in the angular distribution of the scattered molecules are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, we demonstrate that one may efficiently control the deflection process with the help of short and strong femtosecond laser pulses. In particular the deflection process may by turned-off by a proper excitation, and the angular dispersion of the deflected molecules can be substantially reduced. We study the problem both classically and quantum mechanically, taking into account the effects of strong deflecting field on the molecular rotations. In both treatments we arrive at the same conclusions. The suggested control scheme paves the way for many applications involving molecular focusing, guiding, and trapping by inhomogeneous fields.

  8. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  9. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Borri, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results in high-resolution spectroscopy on cold molecules. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules addresses issues of symmetry violation, like in the search for the electric dipole moment of the electron and the studies on energy differences in enantiomers of chiral species; tries to improve the precision to which fundamental physical constants are known and tests for their possible variation in time and space; tests quantum electrodynamics, and searches for a fifth force. Further, we briefly review the recent technological progresses in the fields of cold molecules and mid-infrared lasers, which are the tools that mainly set the limits for the resolution that is currently attainable in the measurements.

  10. Independent Research and Independent Exploratory Development FY 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    complexity and cerebral sensory interaction. Personality and Individual Differences , 6(2), 253-261. Federico, P-A (1985). Individual differences in concept...learning and brain event-related potentials. Personality and Individual Differences , 6(2), 243-252. INDEPENDENT EXPLORATORY DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS

  11. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal...

  12. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  13. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  14. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  15. Recoiling DNA Molecule Simulation & Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, J C; Mesquita, O N; Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Many recent experiments with single DNA molecules are based on force versus extension measurements and involve tethering a microsphere to one of its extremities and the other to a microscope coverglass. In this work we show that similar results can also be obtained by studying the recoil dynamics of the tethered microspheres. Computer simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation indicate which assumptions are required for a reliable analysis of the experimental recoil curves. We have measured the persistence length A of single naked DNA molecules and DNA-Ethidium Bromide complexes using this approach.

  16. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  17. Introduction to algebraic independence theory

    CERN Document Server

    Philippon, Patrice

    2001-01-01

    In the last five years there has been very significant progress in the development of transcendence theory. A new approach to the arithmetic properties of values of modular forms and theta-functions was found. The solution of the Mahler-Manin problem on values of modular function j(tau) and algebraic independence of numbers pi and e^(pi) are most impressive results of this breakthrough. The book presents these and other results on algebraic independence of numbers and further, a detailed exposition of methods created in last the 25 years, during which commutative algebra and algebraic geometry exerted strong catalytic influence on the development of the subject.

  18. Electronegativity Equalization Method: Parameterization and Validation for Large Sets of Organic, Organohalogene and Organometal Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Koca

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The Electronegativity Equalization Method (EEM is a fast approach for chargecalculation. A challenging part of the EEM is the parameterization, which is performedusing ab initio charges obtained for a set of molecules. The goal of our work was to performthe EEM parameterization for selected sets of organic, organohalogen and organometalmolecules. We have performed the most robust parameterization published so far. The EEMparameterization was based on 12 training sets selected from a database of predicted 3Dstructures (NCI DIS and from a database of crystallographic structures (CSD. Each setcontained from 2000 to 6000 molecules. We have shown that the number of molecules inthe training set is very important for quality of the parameters. We have improved EEMparameters (STO-3G MPA charges for elements that were already parameterized,specifically: C, O, N, H, S, F and Cl. The new parameters provide more accurate chargesthan those published previously. We have also developed new parameters for elements thatwere not parameterized yet, specifically for Br, I, Fe and Zn. We have also performedcrossover validation of all obtained parameters using all training sets that included relevantelements and confirmed that calculated parameters provide accurate charges.

  19. Molecular cloning, expression, purification and crystallographic analysis of PRRSV 3CL protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Xinsheng; Feng, Youjun [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate University, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, Tiezhu [China Animal Disease Control Center, Beijing 100094 (China); Peng, Hao; Yan, Jinghua [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Qi, Jianxun [Graduate University, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Jiang, Fan [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Tian, Kegong, E-mail: tiankg@263.net [China Animal Disease Control Center, Beijing 100094 (China); Gao, Feng, E-mail: tiankg@263.net [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2007-08-01

    Recombinant PRRSV 3CL protease was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. 3CL protease, a viral chymotrypsin-like proteolytic enzyme, plays a pivotal role in the transcription and replication machinery of many RNA viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). In this study, the full-length 3CL protease from PRRSV was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystallization experiments yielded crystals that diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 112.31, b = 48.34, c = 42.88 Å, β = 109.83°. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were calculated to be 2.49 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and 50.61%, respectively, for one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  20. Ethyl 2,6-Dimethoxybenzoate: Synthesis, Spectroscopic and X-ray Crystallographic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. White

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The acid catalyzed esterification of 2,6-dimethoxybenzoic acid (1 in the presence of absolute ethanol afforded ethyl 2, 6-dimethoxybenzoate (2. The structure of the resulting compound was supported by spectroscopic data and unambiguously confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The title compound crystallized in the triclinic space group P ī with unit cell parameters a = 8.5518(3 Å, b = 10.8826(8 Å, c = 11.9939(6 Å, α = 101.273(5°, β = 98.287(3°, γ = 94.092(4°, V = 1077.54(10 Å3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.296 Mg/m3, F(000 = 448 and μ = 0.098 mm−1. Compound (2 crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit with similar conformations.

  1. Charge-assisted triel bonding interactions in solid state chemistry: A combined computational and crystallographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauzá, Antonio; García-Llinás, Xavier; Frontera, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    A combined energetic and geometric study of a series of triel bond complexes involving haloborane salts has been carried out at the M06-2X/def2-QZVPD level of theory. We have used 1-(dihaloboranyl)pyridin-1-ium compounds Py+BX2 (X = Cl, Br and I) as triel bond donors and Cl-, Br-, HCO2-, BF4- and ClO4- as electron donor moieties. In addition we have used Bader's theory of 'atoms in molecules' to further characterize the noncovalent interactions described herein. Finally, several examples were retrieved from the CSD (Cambridge Structural Database) in order to provide experimental support to the results presented in this work.

  2. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of a vicilin-type seed storage protein from Pinus koraiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tengchuan; Fu, Tong Jen; Kothary, Mahendra H; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The cupin superfamily of proteins includes the 7S and 11S seed storage proteins. Many members of this family of proteins are known allergens. In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method in hanging drops. The crystals belong to the primitive cubic space group P2(1)3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 148.174 A. Two vicilin molecules were present in the asymmetric unit and the Matthews coefficient was determined to be 2.90 A(3) Da(-1), with a corresponding solvent content of approximately 58%. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained using the program Phaser. Refinement of the structure is currently under way.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the caspase-recruitment domain of human Nod1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srimathi, Thiagarajan; Robbins, Sheila L.; Dubas, Rachel L. [Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Seo, Jang-Hoon [Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Shinheung College, Uijeongbu, Kyungki-Do 480-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Chul, E-mail: young.park@fccc.edu [Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The caspase-recruitment domain of the cytosolic pathogen receptor Nod1 was crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) is known to play an important role in apoptosis and inflammation as an essential protein–protein interaction domain. The CARD of the cytosolic pathogen receptor Nod1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. The purified CARD was crystallized at 277 K using the microseeding method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1} or P3{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.1, c = 80.9 Å. Preliminary analysis indicates that there is one dimeric CARD molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  4. Preliminary neutron and X-ray crystallographic studies of equine cyanomethemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalevsky, A.Y.; Fisher, S.Z.; Seaver, S.; Mustyakimov, M.; Sukumar, N.; Langan, P.; Mueser, T.C.; Hanson, B.L. (Toledo); (Cornell); (LANL)

    2010-08-18

    Room-temperature and 100 K X-ray and room-temperature neutron diffraction data have been measured from equine cyanomethemoglobin to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution using a home source, to 1.6 {angstrom} resolution on NE-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source and to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution on the PCS at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, respectively. The cyanomethemoglobin is in the R state and preliminary room-temperature electron and neutron scattering density maps clearly show the protonation states of potential Bohr groups. Interestingly, a water molecule that is in the vicinity of the heme group and coordinated to the distal histidine appears to be expelled from this site in the low-temperature structure.

  5. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update o

  6. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  7. WHAT ARE THE MOLECULES DOING?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Johnstone's identification of teaching and learning difficulties derived from the three levels of description in .... and in aqueous solution the molecules (say HA) dissociate into a hydrogen ion, H+ (aq) and an anion, A-(aq). This is a chemical ...

  8. Small Molecules Target Carcinogenic Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    An ingenious cellular mechanism of effecting protein localization is prenylation: the covalent attachment of a hydrophobic prenyl group to a protein that facilitates protein association with cell membranes. Fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate whether the oncogenic Stat3 protein can undergo artificial prenylation via high-affinity prenylated small-molecule binding agents and thus be rendered inactive by localization at the plasma membrane instead of nucleus. The measurements were performed on a home-built instrument capable of recording simultaneously several optical parameters (lifetime, polarization, color, etc) and with single-molecule sensitivity. A pH-invariant fluorescein derivative with double moiety was designed to bridge a prenyl group and a small peptide that binds Stat3 with high affinity. Confocal fluorescence images show effective localization of the ligand to the membrane of liposomes. Stat3 predominantly localizes at the membrane only in the presence of the prenylated ligand. Single-molecule FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) between donor-labeled prenylated agents and acceptor-labeled, surface tethered Stat3 protein is used to determine the dynamic heterogeneity of the protein-ligand interaction and follow individual binding-unbinding events in real time. The data indicates that molecules can effect protein localization, validating a therapeutic design that influences protein activity via induced localization.

  9. Synthesis, X-ray crystallographic, spectroscopic and computational studies of aminothiazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeel, Muhammad; Braga, Ataualpa A. C.; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Haq, Fazal; Khalid, Muhammad; Halim, Mohammad A.

    2017-03-01

    Aminothiazole organic compounds have diverse biological applications. Herein we report the synthesis of two aminothiazole derivatives: 4-(biphenyl-4-yl)thiazol-2-amine (1) and 4-(2‧,4‧-difluorobiphenyl-4-yl)thiazol-2-amine (2) via Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction. The chemical structures of 1 and 2 are confirmed using 1HNMR, 13CNMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis and single crystal x-ray studies. The XRD study reveals that the both solid state structures (1) and (2) are diffused to form poly chain structures due to presence of intra molecular hydrogen bonding (H.B). Furthermore, these compounds were analysed by density functional theory (DFT) at M06-2X/6-311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31G(d) B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311G(2d,p) level of theories to obtain optimized geometry, electronic and spectroscopic properties. DFT optimized geometry supports the experimental XRD parameters. Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculation predicted the hyper conjugative interaction and hydrogen bonding in all derivatives. The FT-IR and thermodynamic studies also confirm the presence of hydrogen bonding network in the dimers which agrees well with the XRD results. Moreover, UV-Vis analysis reveals that maximum excitations take place in 1 and 2 due to HOMO → LUMO(98%) and HOMO → LUMO(97%) respectively which show good agreement to experimental data. The first order hyperpolarizability of both molecules is remarkably greater than the value of urea. The global reactivity parameters which are obtained by frontier molecular orbitals disclose that the molecules might be bioactive.

  10. Strong sequences and independent sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jureczko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A family $\\mathcal{S} \\in \\mathcal{P}(\\omega$ is \\textit{an independent family} if for each pair $\\mathcal{A, B}$ of disjoint finite subsets of $\\mathcal{S}$ the set $\\bigcap \\mathcal{A} \\cap (\\omega \\setminus \\bigcup \\mathcal{B}$ is nonempty. The fact that there is an independent family on $\\omega$ of size continuum was proved by Fichtenholz and Kantorowicz in \\cite{FK}. If we substitute $\\mathcal{P}(\\omega$ by a set $(X, r$ with arbitrary relation \\textit{r} it is natural question about existence and length of an independent set on $(X, r$. In this paper special assumptions of such existence will be considered. On the other hand in 60s' of the last century the strong sequences method was introduced by Efimov. He used it for proving some famous theorems in dyadic spaces like: Marczewski theorem on cellularity, Shanin theorem on a calibre, Esenin-Volpin theorem and others. In this paper there will be considered: length of strong sequences, the length of independent sets and other well known cardinal invariants and there will be examined inequalities among them.

  11. Boston: Cradle of American Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community College Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2005 American Association of Community Colleges Annual Convention will be held April 6-9 in Boston. While thoroughly modern, the iconic city's identity is firmly rooted in the past. As the cradle of American independence, Boston's long history is an integral part of the American fabric. Adams, Revere, Hancock are more than historical figures;…

  12. Background Independent String Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bars, Itzhak

    2014-01-01

    We develop a new background independent Moyal star formalism in bosonic open string field theory. The new star product is formulated in a half-phase-space, and because phase space is independent of any background fields, the interactions are background independent. In this basis there is a large amount of symmetry, including a supersymmetry OSp(d|2) that acts on matter and ghost degrees of freedom, and simplifies computations. The BRST operator that defines the quadratic kinetic term of string field theory may be regarded as the solution of the equation of motion A*A=0 of a purely cubic background independent string field theory. We find an infinite number of non-perturbative solutions to this equation, and are able to associate them to the BRST operator of conformal field theories on the worldsheet. Thus, the background emerges from a spontaneous-type breaking of a purely cubic highly symmetric theory. The form of the BRST field breaks the symmetry in a tractable way such that the symmetry continues to be us...

  13. Cobordism Independence of Grassmann Manifolds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish Kumar Das

    2004-02-01

    This note proves that, for $F=\\mathbb{R},\\mathbb{C}$ or $\\mathbb{H}$, the bordism classes of all non-bounding Grassmannian manifolds $G_k(F^{n+k})$, with < and having real dimension , constitute a linearly independent set in the unoriented bordism group $\\mathfrak{N}_d$ regarded as a $\\mathbb{Z}_2$-vector space.

  14. Testing bivariate independence and normality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, W.C.M.; Ledwina, Teresa; Rafajlowicz, Ewaryst

    1997-01-01

    In many statistical studies the relationship between two random variables X and Y is investigated and in particular the question whether X and Y are independent and normally distributed is of interest. Smooth tests may be used for testing this. They consist of several components, the first measuring

  15. Nanomanipulation of single RNA molecules by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William; Wan, Gorby; Tenenbaum, Scott A; Li, Pan T X

    2014-08-20

    A large portion of the human genome is transcribed but not translated. In this post genomic era, regulatory functions of RNA have been shown to be increasingly important. As RNA function often depends on its ability to adopt alternative structures, it is difficult to predict RNA three-dimensional structures directly from sequence. Single-molecule approaches show potentials to solve the problem of RNA structural polymorphism by monitoring molecular structures one molecule at a time. This work presents a method to precisely manipulate the folding and structure of single RNA molecules using optical tweezers. First, methods to synthesize molecules suitable for single-molecule mechanical work are described. Next, various calibration procedures to ensure the proper operations of the optical tweezers are discussed. Next, various experiments are explained. To demonstrate the utility of the technique, results of mechanically unfolding RNA hairpins and a single RNA kissing complex are used as evidence. In these examples, the nanomanipulation technique was used to study folding of each structural domain, including secondary and tertiary, independently. Lastly, the limitations and future applications of the method are discussed.

  16. Coupling of bias-induced crystallographic shear planes with charged domain walls in ferroelectric oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Myung-Geun; Garlow, Joseph A.; Bugnet, Matthieu; Divilov, Simon; Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Wu, Lijun; Dawber, Matthew; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-09-01

    Polar discontinuity at interfaces plays deterministic roles in charge transport, magnetism, and even superconductivity of functional oxides. To date, most polar discontinuity problems have been explored in heterointerfaces between two dissimilar materials. Here, we show that charged domain walls (CDWs) in epitaxial thin films of ferroelectric PbZ r0.2T i0.8O3 are strongly coupled to polar interfaces through the formation of 1/2 {h 0 l } - type crystallographic shear planes (CSPs). Using atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy we illustrate that the CSPs consist of both conservative and nonconservative segments when coupled to the CDWs where necessary compensating charges for stabilizing the CDWs are associated with vacancies at the CSPs. The CDW/CSP coupling yields an atomically narrow domain wall, consisting of a single atomic layer of oxygen. This study shows that the CDW/CSP coupling is a fascinating venue to develop emergent material properties.

  17. Mechanical Properties, Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture of Magnesium AZ91-D Alloy Welded by Friction Stir Welding (FSW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouadri-Henni, A.; Barrallier, L.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize the properties of a magnesium alloy welded by friction stir welding. The results led to a better understanding of the relationship between this process and the microstructure and anisotropic properties of alloy materials. Welding principally leads to a large reduction in grain size in welded zones due to the phenomenon of dynamic recrystallization. The most remarkable observation was that crystallographic textures appeared from a base metal without texture in two zones: the thermo-mechanically affected and stir-welded zones. The latter zone has the peculiarity of possessing a marked texture with two components on the basal plane and the pyramidal plane. These characteristics disappeared in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), which had only one component following the basal plane. These modifications have been explained by the nature of the plastic deformation in these zones, which occurs at a moderate temperature in the TMAZ and high temperature in the SWZ.

  18. Crystallographic features related to a van der Waals coupling in the layered chalcogenide FePS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Chisato; Okabe, Momoko; Urushihara, Daisuke; Asaka, Toru; Fukuda, Koichiro; Isobe, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Matsushita, Yoshitaka

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the crystallographic structure of FePS3 with a layered structure using transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. We found that FePS3 forms a rotational twin structure with the common axis along the c*-axis. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the twin boundaries were positioned at the van der Waals gaps between the layers. The narrow bands of dark contrast were observed in the bright-field transmission electron microscopy images below the antiferromagnetic transition temperature, TN ≈ 120 K. Low-temperature X-ray diffraction showed a lattice distortion; the a- and b-axes shortened and lengthened, respectively, as the temperature decreased below TN. We propose that the narrow bands of dark contrast observed in the bright-field transmission electron microscopy images are caused by the directional lattice distortion with respect to each micro-twin variant in the antiferromagnetic phase.

  19. Identification, SAR studies, and X-ray co-crystallographic analysis of a novel furanopyrimidine aurora kinase A inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj; Tsai, Ming-Tsung; Chu, Chang-Ying; Uang, Biing-Jiun; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chang, Chun-Yu; Chang, Teng-Yuan; Leou, Jiun-Shyang; Teng, Chi-Huang; Wu, Jian-Sung; Fang, Ming-Yu; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Hsu, John T-A; Wu, Su-Ying; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang

    2010-02-01

    Herein we reveal a simple method for the identification of novel Aurora kinase A inhibitors through substructure searching of an in-house compound library to select compounds for testing. A hydrazone fragment conferring Aurora kinase activity and heterocyclic rings most frequently reported in kinase inhibitors were used as substructure queries to filter the in-house compound library collection prior to testing. Five new series of Aurora kinase inhibitors were identified through this strategy, with IC(50) values ranging from approximately 300 nM to approximately 15 microM, by testing only 133 compounds from a database of approximately 125,000 compounds. Structure-activity relationship studies and X-ray co-crystallographic analysis of the most potent compound, a furanopyrimidine derivative with an IC(50) value of 309 nM toward Aurora kinase A, were carried out. The knowledge gained through these studies could help in the future design of potent Aurora kinase inhibitors.

  20. Discovery of Pyrrolopyridine−Pyridone Based Inhibitors of Met Kinase: Synthesis, X-ray Crystallographic Analysis, and Biological Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Soon; Zhang, Liping; Schmidt, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Williams, David K.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Trainor, George L.; Xie, Dianlin; Zhang, Yaquan; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Tokarski, John S.; Darienzo, Celia; Kamath, Amrita; Marathe, Punit; Zhang, Yueping; Lippy, Jonathan; Jeyaseelan, Sr., Robert; Wautlet, Barri; Henley, Benjamin; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Manne, Veeraswamy; Hunt, John T.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M. (BMS)

    2008-10-02

    Conformationally constrained 2-pyridone analogue 2 is a potent Met kinase inhibitor with an IC50 value of 1.8 nM. Further SAR of the 2-pyridone based inhibitors of Met kinase led to potent 4-pyridone and pyridine N-oxide inhibitors such as 3 and 4. The X-ray crystallographic data of the inhibitor 2 bound to the ATP binding site of Met kinase protein provided insight into the binding modes of these inhibitors, and the SAR of this series of analogues was rationalized. Many of these analogues showed potent antiproliferative activities against the Met dependent GTL-16 gastric carcinoma cell line. Compound 2 also inhibited Flt-3 and VEGFR-2 kinases with IC{sub 50} values of 4 and 27 nM, respectively. It possesses a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in mice and demonstrates significant in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  1. Crystallographic and functional analyses of J-domain of JAC1 essential for chloroplast photorelocation movement in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Akira; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu; Kohda, Daisuke

    2010-08-01

    An auxilin-like J-domain-containing protein, JAC1, is necessary for chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana, to capture photosynthetic light efficiently under weak light conditions. Here, we performed crystallographic and functional analyses of the J-domain of JAC1. The crystal structure of the J-domain is quite similar to that of bovine auxilin, and possesses a similar positively charged surface, which probably forms the interface with the Hsp70 chaperone. The mutation of the highly conserved HPD motif of the JAC1 J-domain abrogated the chloroplast photorelocation response. These results suggest that the requirement of JAC1 in chloroplast photorelocation movement is attributable to the J-domain's cochaperone activity.

  2. The Effect of Excess Carbon on the Crystallographic, Microstructural, and Mechanical Properties of CVD Silicon Carbide Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, J V; Croft, W J; Staples, R J; MoberlyChan, W J

    2006-12-05

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fibers made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are of interest for organic, ceramic, and metal matrix composite materials due their high strength, high elastic modulus, and retention of mechanical properties at elevated processing and operating temperatures. The properties of SCS-6{trademark} silicon carbide fibers, which are made by a commercial process and consist largely of stoichiometric SiC, were compared with an experimental carbon-rich CVD SiC fiber, to which excess carbon was added during the CVD process. The concentration, homogeneity, and distribution of carbon were measured using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The effect of excess carbon on the tensile strength, elastic modulus, and the crystallographic and microstructural properties of CVD silicon carbide fibers was investigated using tensile testing, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  3. Angular distribution of the emission from ultrarelativistic electrons moving near crystallographic axes in diamond and tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleinik, A.N.; Vorobev, S.A.; Kalinin, B.N.; Kurkov, A.A.; Potylitsyn, A.P.

    1986-07-01

    Data on the angular distribution of the emission from ultrarelativistic electrons moving near crystallographic axes in diamond and tungsten crystals are reviewed. A graph is presented of the orientational dependence of soft gamma rays measured by a thin-walled ionization chamber sensitive to gamma rays with energies greater than 0.3 MeV and a radiative loss measured by a total-absorption Gauss quantometer with a threshold of about 5 MeV at an angle to the primary electron-beam direction of motion. It is concluded that knowledge of the scattering processes of ultrarelativistic electrons near crytal axes makes it easier to choose the optimum type and thickness of a crystal to achieve the maximum yield of gamma radiation into a given solid angle. 8 references.

  4. Crystallographic investigation of aluminium nitride thin films on stainless steel foil for highly efficient piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, N.; Minh, L. V.; Ohigashi, R.; Shimada, O.; Kitayoshi, H.; Kuwano, H.

    2016-11-01

    This study reports piezoelectric properties and crystallographic microstructures of aluminium nitride (AlN, wurtzite structure) thin films on 50 μm thick stainless steel foil. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d31f and e31f of 10 pm thick AlN films were estimated as -1.42 ± 0.08 μm/V and -0.48 ± 0.03 C/m2 from a tip displacement of the piezoelectric cantilevers. Dielectric constant s33 was measured as 10.5 ± 1.0. An electron beam diffraction pattern by a high-resolution transmission electron microscope and x-ray diffraction pattern showed that abundance ratio of the orientation such as , and of AlN crystal on stainless steel foils increased with increasing thickness.

  5. Electrical properties of NiAs-type MnTe films with preferred crystallographic plane of (110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.; Wang, Z. H., E-mail: zhwang@imr.ac.cn; Zhang, Z. D. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-01-28

    NiAs-type manganese telluride (MnTe) films with preferred crystallographic plane of (110) were prepared on Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the films was studied at different temperatures. The XRD peak of MnTe (110) films shifts to higher angle with decreasing temperature, showing the decrease of the lattice parameter. Resistivity of the films was studied in the temperature range of 2–350 K. The bump between 150 and 250 K was observed in the films, which may be related to the special s-d and p-d overlaps induced by the compressed lattice. The magnon drag effect near its Néel temperature T{sub N} and enlarged magnetic-elastic coupling below 100 K were observed and analyzed in details.

  6. Synthesis, crystallographic characterization and electrochemical property of a copper(II) complex of the anticancer agent elesclomol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nha Huu; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hanko, Jason; Yun, Tong; Bloom, Steve; Shen, Jianhua; Koya, Keizo; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Shoujun

    2014-01-01

    Elesclomol is a novel anticancer agent that has been evaluated in a number of late stage clinical trials. A new and convenient synthesis of elesclomol and its copper complex is described. X-ray crystallographic characterization and the electrochemical properties of the elesclomol copper(II) complex are discussed. The copper(II) cation is coordinated in a highly distorted square-planar geometry to each of the sulphur and amide nitrogen atoms of elesclomol. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the complex undergoes a reversible one-electron reduction at biologically accessible potentials. In contrast the free elesclomol is found electrochemically inactive. This evidence is in strong support of the mechanism of action we proposed for the anticancer activity of elesclomol.

  7. Crystallographic origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoPt film: polarized x-ray absorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, K [National University of Singapore; Chen, J [National University of Singapore; Liu, T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sun, C [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source; Chow, G [National University of Singapore

    2009-01-01

    Crystallographic structure, growth induced miscibility gap and strain in Ta/Co100 xPtx (0 x 43 at%)/Ru/Ta/glass films deposited at ambient temperature were investigated using polarized x-ray absorption spectroscopy to clarify the origin of observed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in Co72Pt28 film. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy data at Co K-edge showed that Co has a similar local atomic environment and averaged interatomic distance in the in-plane and out-of-plane polarization geometries for Co72Pt28, ruling out the contribution of magneto-elastic anisotropy and growth induced structural anisotropy as the origin of PMA. A large PMA in Co72Pt28 film was attributed to the preferred hexagonal close-packed stacking as observed using the x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy.

  8. Selective export of MHC class I molecules from the ER after their dissociation from TAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotis, E T; Manley, H; Osorio, M; Zúñiga, M C; Edidin, M

    2000-12-01

    It has been assumed that upon dissociation from TAP, MHC class I molecules exit the ER by nonselective bulk flow. We now show that exit must occur by association with cargo receptors. Inconsistent with exit by bulk flow, loading of MHC class I molecules with high-affinity peptides triggers dissociation from TAP but has no effect on rates of ER-to-Golgi transport. Moreover, peptide-loaded MHC class I molecules accumulate at ER exit sites from which TAP molecules are excluded. Consistent with receptor-mediated exit, ER-to-Golgi transport of MHC class I molecules is independent of their cytoplasmic tails, which themselves lack ER export motifs. In addition, we show that MHC class I molecules associate with the putative cargo receptor BAP31.

  9. Dynamic quantification of antigen molecules with flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, A.E.; Chernyshev, A.V.; Yurkin, M.A.; Nekrasov, V.M.; Polshchitsin, A.A.; Parks, D.R.; Moore, W.A.; Herzenberg, L.A.; Filatenkov, A.; Maltsev, V.P.; Orlova, D.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating the number of expressed molecules, based on the detection of target antigens bound with fluorescently labeled antibodies, assume that the antigen-antibody reaction reaches equilibrium. A calibration procedure is used to convert the intensity of the fluorescence signal to the number of target molecules. Along with the different limitations of every calibration system, this substantially limits the applicability of the traditional approaches especially in the case of low affinity antibodies. We address this problem here with studies in which we demonstrate a new approach to the antigen molecule quantification problem. Instead of using a static calibration system, we analyzed mean fluorescence values over time by flow cytometry during antibody-antigen binding. Experimental data obtained with an LSRII cytometer were fitted by a diffusion-reaction mathematical model using the Levenberg–Marquardt nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm in order to obtain the number of target antigen molecules per cell. Results were compared with the Quanti-BRITE calibration system. We conclude that, instead of using experiment-specific calibration, the value of the binding rate constant for each particular antibody-antigen reaction can be used to quantify antigen molecules with flow cytometry. The radius of CD8 antibody molecule binding site was found, that allows recalculating the binding rate constant for other conditions (different sizes of reagent molecules, fluorescent label, medium viscosity and temperature). This approach is independent of specially prepared calibration beads, antibody reagents and the specific dye and can be applied to both low and high affinity antibodies, under both saturating and non-saturating binding conditions. The method was demonstrated on a human blood sample dataset investigating CD8α antigen on T cells in stable binding conditions. PMID:25687877

  10. Formation of Fast-Spread Ocean Crust : Crystallographic Preferred Orientations From a Reference Lower Crust Section in the Oman Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildefonse, B.; Mueller, T.; Mock, D.; Koepke, J.

    2016-12-01

    About 20 years ago, two competing models were proposed for the formation of the lower, gabbroic crust at fast-spreading ridges. The lower crust is either formed by downward flow of mushy material from the shallow axial melt lens (gabbro glacier), or by sill intrusions (sheeted sills). To further test these end-member models, we characterized the vertical distribution of Crystallographic Preferred Orientations (CPO) in Wadi Gideah gabbro section (Sumail ophiolite, Sultanate Oman), using the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique. CPO were measured on 67 gabbro samples, documenting a 5 km thick section, with an average interval of 80 m between samples. EBSD data sets were processed using MTEX, a free Matlab toolbox. Average misorientation in grains (angle between each pixel orientation and mean orientation of the grain) is very low ( 0.25°). This is consistent with magmatic flow in these rocks, and the paucity of crystal-plastic overprint. The strength (J index) of plagioclase CPO increases down-section, with a more pronounced variability in the layered gabbros. For clinopyroxene, the difference between upper (foliated) and lower (layered) gabbros is stronger, with low J in upper gabbros, and higher and more variable J in lower gabbros. In upper gabbros the symmetry of plagioclase and clinopyroxene CPO progressively evolves downward to progressively more oblate. Continuing down-section, the trend reverses, with progressively more prolate CPO in lower gabbros. The crystallographic fabric variability in the lower crust section calls for distinct formation mechanisms in the upper and lower gabbros. It is consistent with a hybrid model for crustal formation (Boudier et al., 1996, doi:10.1016/0012-821X(96)00167-7). The genesis of the upper foliated gabbro can be at least partly explained by the gabbro glacier model, while the continuous emplacement of sheeted sills at various depths is a more plausible model for the lower layered gabbro section.

  11. Erbium-ion implantation into various crystallographic cuts of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekvindova, P. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Cajzl, J.; Svecova, B. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Oswald, J. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague (Czech Republic); Wilhelm, R.A. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    This paper reports on the importance of crystallographic cuts with a different orientation on the luminescent properties and structural changes of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} implanted with Er{sup +} ions at 190 keV and with a fluence of 1.0 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. Post-implantation annealing at 1000 °C in oxygen atmosphere was also done. The chemical compositions and erbium concentration-depth profiles of implanted layers were studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and compared to SRIM simulations. The same value of the maximum erbium concentration (up to 2 at.%) was observed at a depth of about 40 nm for all crystallographic cuts. The structural properties of the prepared layers were characterised by RBS/channelling. The relative amount of disordered atoms of 70–80% was observed in the prepared implanted layers and discussed for various cuts. It has been found that erbium is positioned randomly in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystalline matrix, and no preferential positions appeared even after the annealing procedure. Erbium luminescence properties were measured in the wavelength range of 1440–1650 nm for all samples. As-implanted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples had a significant luminescence band at 1530 nm. The best luminescence was repeatedly observed in the 〈0 0 0 1〉 cut of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The annealing procedure significantly improved the luminescent properties.

  12. Enol-enamine tautomerism in crystals of 1,3-bis(pyridin-2-yl) propan-2-one: a combined crystallographic and quantum-chemical investigation of the effect of packing on tautomerization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsi, Oded; Turner, Boaz; Suwinska, Kinga; Peskin, Uri; Eichen, Yoav

    2004-10-20

    The enolpyridine, OH-ketoenamime, NH equilibrium in crystals of 1,3-bis(pyridin-2-yl)propan-2-one was studied using temperature-dependent single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The relative population of the different tautomers was found to be sensitive to the temperature in the range of 100-300 K, illustrating the small thermodynamic difference between these two tautomers. This energy resemblance is partially attributed to the molecular packing in the crystal, where the molecules are arranged in the form of dimers. Ab initio electronic energy calculations (HF/6-31G** and MP2/6-31G**) reveal the effect of dimerization in the crystal on the electronic energy levels. Several tautomeric states were identified in the dimer of 1,3-bis(pyridin-2-yl)propan-2-one. A model is proposed in which four of these dimer states are populated in the crystal at ambient temperatures. The crystallographic data were treated according to this four-state dimer model, suggesting that the free energy of the OH-NH dimers is higher than that of the OH-OH dimers by 120 +/- 10 cal mol(-1) and that the NH-NH dimers are yet higher in free energy by 50 +/- 10 cal mol(-1).

  13. Calixarenes: Versatile molecules as molecular sensors for ion recognition study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Patra; Debdeep Maity; Ravi Gunupuru; Pragati Agnihotri; Parimal Paul

    2012-11-01

    This article presents a brief account on designing of calixarene-based molecular sensor for recognition of various metal ions and anions and also different analytical techniques to monitor the recognition event. This review focuses only on calix[4]arene derivatives, in which mainly the lower rim is modified incorporating either crown moiety to make calix-crown hybrid ionophore to encapsulate metal ions or some fluoregenic inorganic and organic moieties to use it as signalling unit. In order to investigate effect of conformation of the calixarene unit and steric crowding on ion selectivity, designing of these molecules have been made using both the cone and 1,3-alternate conformations of the calixarene unit and also incorporating bulky tert-butyl group in few cases to impose controlled steric crowding. Among various ions, here focuses are mainly on biologically and commercially important alkali metal ion such as K+, toxic metal ions such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, important transition metal ion such as Cu2+ and toxic anion like F−. The techniques used to monitor the recognition event and also to determine binding constants with strongly interacting ions are fluorescence, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Most of the ionophores reported in this review have been characterized crystallographically, however no structural information (except one case) are incorporated in this article, as it will occupy space without significant enhancement of chemistry part. Different factors such as size of the ionophore cavity, size of metal ion, coordination sites/donor atoms, steric crowding and solvents, which determine selectivity have been discussed. Response of ion recognition process to different analytical techniques is another interesting factor discussed in this article.

  14. Non-Crystallographic Layer Lattice Restrictions in Order-Disorder (OD Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthold Stöger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry operations of layers periodic in two dimensions restrict the geometry the lattice according to the five two-dimensional Bravais types of lattices. In order-disorder (OD structures, the operations relating equivalent layers generally leave invariant only a sublattice of the layers. The thus resulting restrictions can be expressed in terms of linear relations of the a2, b2 and a · b scalar products of the lattice basis vectors with rational coefficients. To characterize OD families and to check their validity, these lattice restrictions are expressed in the bases of different layers and combined. For a more familiar notation, they can be expressed in terms of the lattice parameters a, b and . Alternatively, the description of the lattice restrictions may be simplified by using centered lattices. The representation of the lattice restrictions in terms of scalar products is dependent on the chosen basis. A basis-independent classification of the lattice restrictions is outlined.

  15. The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is distinct from the N-CAM related group of surface antigens BSP-2 and D2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faissner, A; Kruse, J; Goridis, C

    1984-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and the group of N-CAM related molecules, BSP-2 and D2 antigen, are immunochemically distinct molecular species. The two groups of surface molecules are also functionally distinct entities, since inhibition of Ca2+-independent adhesion among early post...

  16. Ballonet String Model of Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavril NIAC

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Strings of ballonets, modelling rows of orbitals, are assembled to molecule models by crossing them properly. The ballonets at the ends of the strings of 2, 3, 4 or 5 spheres represent bonding orbitals of hydrogen with other elements like C, N or O (the proton being inside the sphere, as well as nonbonding orbitals. The ballonets between them are modelling bonding orbitals among elements other than hydrogen - except the double bond in diborane, the atomic cores laying at the junction of two or more spheres.Advantages of elastic sphere models range from self-adjusting bond angles to resistance when closing cycles like cyclopropane or modeling double bonds.Examples comprise alkanes, including platonic hydrocarbons, ethene, acetylene, and some inorganic molecules.

  17. Similar quartz crystallographic textures in rocks of continental earth's crust (by neutron diffraction data): II. Quartz textures in monophase rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, A. N., E-mail: nikitin@nf.jinr.ru; Ivankina, T. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ullemeyer, K. [Universitaet Kiel, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften (Germany); Vasin, R. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-15

    The types of quartz textures found in a large collection of multiphase rocks from different regions of the earth are analyzed. Crystallographic textures of granulite, amphibolite, slate, and gneiss samples are measured, classified, and compared with the similar textures of monomineral rocks.

  18. Software developments in automated structure solution and crystallographic studies of the Sso10a2 and human C1 inhibitor protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterreus, Willem-Jan

    2013-01-01

    CRANK is a suite that links different macromolecular X-ray crystallographic programs to solve macromolecular crystal structures automatically from experimental phasing data. In chapter 2, several new algorithms implemented within CRANK increase the robustness and speed of the structure solution proc

  19. Crystallographic dependent in-situ CBr4 selective nano-area etching and local regrowth of InP/InGaAs by MOVPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsova, Nadezda; Kulkova, Irina; Semenova, Elizaveta;

    2014-01-01

    Selective area etching and growth in the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor on nano-scale structures have been examined. Using different mask orientations, crystallographic dependent etching of InP can be observed when carbon tetrabromide (CBr4) is used as an etchant. Scanning Elect...

  20. Crystallographic Analysis of Isothermally Transformed Bainite in 0.2C-2.0Mn-1.5Si-0.6Cr Steel Using EBSD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pasi P.Suikkanen; Cyril Cayron; Anthony J.DeArdo; L.Pentti Karjalainen

    2013-01-01

    The crystallography of bainite,transformed isothermally at 450 ℃ in 0.2C-2.0Mn-1.5Si-O.6Cr steel,was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis.The orientation relationship (OR) was found to be closer to Nishiyama-Wassermann (N-W) than Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship.Bainite microstructure consisted of parallel laths forming a morphological packet structure.Typically,there were three different lath orientations in a morphological packet.These orientations were dictated by a three specific N-W OR variants sharing the same {111} austenite plane.A packet of bainite laths with common {111}austenite plane was termed as crystallographic packet.Generally,the crystallographic packet size corresponded to the morphological packet size.Locally,crystallographic packets with only two dominant orientations were observed.This indicates strong local variant selection during isothermal bainite transformation.The relative orientation between the variants in crystallographic packets was found to be near 60°/<110>.This appears to explain the strong peak observed in the grain boundary misorientation distribution near 60°.Bainite also contained pronounced fraction of boundaries with their misorientation in the range of 2.5°-8° with quite widely dispersed rotation angles.Spatially these boundaries were found to locate inside the bainite laths,forming lath-like sub-grains.

  1. Thermodynamics of Condensed Phases: Formula Unit Volume, "V[subscript m]", and the Determination of the Number of Formula Units, "Z", in a Crystallographic Unit Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Formula unit (or molecular) volume, "V[subscript m]", is related to many thermodynamic and physical properties of materials, so that knowledge of "V[subscript m]" is useful in prediction of such properties for known and even hypothetical materials. The symbol "Z" represents the number of formula units in a crystallographic unit cell; "Z" thus…

  2. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of mouse UPR responsive protein P58(IPK) TPR fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiahui; Wu, Yunkun; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2008-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which can promote protein folding and misfolded protein degradation and attenuate protein translation and protein translocation into the ER. P58(IPK) has been proposed to function as a molecular chaperone to maintain protein-folding homeostasis in the ER under normal and stressed conditions. P58(IPK) contains nine TPR motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 2.5 A resolution using a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 83.53, b = 92.75, c = 84.32 A, alpha = 90.00, beta = 119.36, gamma = 90.00 degrees. There are two P58(IPK) molecules in the asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 60%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of yeast NAD{sup +}-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Gang [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Taylor, Alexander B. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); X-ray Crystallography Core Laboratory, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); McAlister-Henn, Lee [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Hart, P. John, E-mail: pjhart@biochem.uthscsa.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); X-ray Crystallography Core Laboratory, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Yeast NAD{sup +}-isocitrate dehydrogenase has been purified and crystallized using sodium citrate, a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme, as a precipitant. Preliminary X-ray analyses indicate the molecular boundaries of the molecule and large continuous solvent channels in the crystal. NAD{sup +}-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH; EC 1.1.1.41) is a complex allosterically regulated enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Yeast IDH is believed to be an octamer containing four catalytic IDH2 and four regulatory IDH1 subunits. Crystals of yeast IDH have been obtained and optimized using sodium citrate, a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme, as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 302.0, c = 112.1 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å from a native crystal and to 4.0 Å using multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) methods from an osmium derivative. Initial electron-density maps reveal large solvent channels and the molecular boundaries of the allosteric IDH multimer.

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human Pim-1 kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Kevin C., E-mail: kqian@rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc., Research and Development, 175 Briar Ridge Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877 (United States); Studts, Joey; Wang, Lian; Barringer, Kevin; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Peng, Charline; Baptiste, Alistair; LaFrance, Roger; Mische, Sheenah [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc., Research and Development, 175 Briar Ridge Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877 (United States); Farmer, Bennett [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc., Research and Development, 175 Briar Ridge Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Pim kinases, belong to a distinctive serine/threonine protein-kinase family and are involved in cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. Human Pim-1 kinase has been cloned, expressed and crystallized Pim kinases, including Pim-1, Pim-2 and Pim-3, belong to a distinctive serine/threonine protein-kinase family. They are involved in cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. Their kinase domains are highly homologous to one another, but share low sequence identity to other kinases. Specifically, there are two proline residues in the conserved hinge-region sequence ERPXPX separated by a residue that is non-conserved among Pim kinases. Full-length human Pim-1 kinase (1–313) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a GST-fusion protein and truncated to Pim-1 (14–313) by thrombin digestion during purification. The Pim-1 (14–313) protein was purified to high homogeneity and monodispersity. This protein preparation yielded small crystals in the initial screening and large crystals after optimization. The large crystals of apo Pim-1 enzyme diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and belong to space group P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 95.9, c = 80.0 Å, β = 120° and one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  5. Crystallographic polarity effect of ZnO on thin film growth of pentacene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuru; Nagata, Takahiro; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Oh, Seungjun; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Fujimura, Norifumi; Wakayama, Yutaka

    2017-04-01

    The spontaneous polarization effect of ZnO on the thin film growth of pentacene, which is a typical π conjunction organic semiconductor, was investigated. Pentacene thin films were grown on polar ZnO surfaces by ultraslow organic film physical vapor deposition to obtain layer-by-layer growth. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that pentacene molecules stand upright on polar ZnO surfaces, and that the films consist of two polymorphs, namely, the thin-film and bulk phases. The thin-film phases of pentacene were observed regardless of the polarity of the ZnO substrate at a thickness of less than six molecular layers. However, pentacene on a Zn-polar ZnO substrate gradually changed to the bulk phase unlike that on an O-polar ZnO substrate. Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements revealed that the surface potential of pentacene becomes more positive with increasing pentacene thickness at less than two molecular layers. The variation in the potential of pentacene on the Zn-polar ZnO substrate was larger than that of pentacene on the O-polar ZnO substrate. These findings indicate that the polarity of the semiconductor can control the growth and electronic state of the inorganic/organic semiconductor interface.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Li, Lan-Fen [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tang, De-Wei [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liu, Xiang-Yu [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, Xiaojun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  7. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Enterococcus faecalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Yong; Lee, Hyung Ho; Yoon, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-01

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from En. faecalis was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.70 Å resolution. Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase, an essential enzyme in the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the reversible transfer of an adenylyl group from ATP to 4′-phosphopantetheine, yielding 3′-dephospho-CoA and pyrophosphate. Enterococcus faecalis PPAT has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with a C-terminal purification tag and crystallized at 297 K using a reservoir solution consisting of 0.1 M sodium HEPES pH 7.5, 0.8 M sodium dihydrogen phosphate and 0.8 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.70 Å at 100 K. The crystals belong to the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 160.81, c = 225.68 Å. Four copies of the hexameric molecule are likely to be present in the asymmetric unit, giving a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 3.08 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 60.1%.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio [Departamento de Química Física, Bioquímica y Química Inorgánica, Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Edificio CITE I, Universidad de Almería (Spain); González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalográficos-IACT, CSIC-UGRA, P. T. Ciencias de la Salud, Granada 18100 (Spain); Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier [Departamento de Química Física, Bioquímica y Química Inorgánica, Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Edificio CITE I, Universidad de Almería (Spain); Gavira, Jose A.; García-Ruíz, Juan Manuel, E-mail: jmgruiz@ugr.es [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalográficos-IACT, CSIC-UGRA, P. T. Ciencias de la Salud, Granada 18100 (Spain); Departamento de Química Física, Bioquímica y Química Inorgánica, Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Edificio CITE I, Universidad de Almería (Spain)

    2006-12-01

    The dihydropyrimidinase from S. meliloti CECT4114, with activity towards both hydantoin and dihydrouracil substrates, was crystallized, and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 Å resolution. Dihydropyrimidinases are involved in the reductive pathway of pyrimidine degradation, catalysing the hydrolysis of 5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydrothymine to the corresponding N-carbamoyl β-amino acids. This enzyme has often been referred to as hydantoinase owing to its industrial application in the production of optically pure amino acids starting from racemic mixtures of 5-monosubstituted hydantoins. Recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114 (SmelDhp) has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed using the counter-diffusion method with capillaries of 0.3 mm inner diameter. Crystals of SmelDhp suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown in the presence of agarose at 0.1%(w/v) in order to ensure mass transport controlled by diffusion. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 1.85 Å. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.89, b = 126.28, c = 196.10 Å and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been determined and refinement is in progress.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from Rubrobacter xylanophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sá-Moura, Bebiana [IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Albuquerque, Luciana; Empadinhas, Nuno [Centro de Neurociências e Biologia Celular, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Costa, Milton S. da [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra, E-mail: sribeiro@ibmc.up.pt [IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2008-08-01

    The enzyme mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from R. xylanophilus has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22 and diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Rubrobacter xylanophilus is the only Gram-positive bacterium known to synthesize the compatible solute mannosylglycerate (MG), which is commonly found in hyperthermophilic archaea and some thermophilic bacteria. Unlike the salt-dependent pattern of accumulation observed in (hyper)thermophiles, in R. xylanophilus MG accumulates constitutively. The synthesis of MG in R. xylanophilus was tracked from GDP-mannose and 3-phosphoglycerate, but the genome sequence of the organism failed to reveal any of the genes known to be involved in this pathway. The native enzyme was purified and its N-terminal sequence was used to identify the corresponding gene (mpgS) in the genome of R. xylanophilus. The gene encodes a highly divergent mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) without relevant sequence homology to known mannosylphosphoglycerate synthases. In order to understand the specificity and enzymatic mechanism of this novel enzyme, it was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals thus obtained belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22 and contained two protein molecules per asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by SIRAS using a mercury derivative.

  10. Purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of β-microseminoprotein from human seminal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Roske, Yvette; Singh, Nagendra; Heinemann, Udo; Singh, Tej P.; Yadav, Savita

    2009-01-01

    β-Microseminoprotein (β-MSP) is a small cysteine-rich protein with a molecular mass of 10 kDa. It was first isolated from human seminal plasma and has subsequently been identified from several species. Comparison of the amino-acid sequences of β-MSP proteins suggests that the protein is a rapidly evolving protein. The function of β-MSP is poorly understood. Furthermore, no crystal structure has been reported of any β-MSP; therefore, determination of the crystal structure of β-MSP is the foremost task in order to understand the function of this protein completely. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of β-MSP from human seminal plasma are described. The protein was purified using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography and the purified protein was crystallized using 0.1 M ammonium sulfate, 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.0 and 20%(w/v) PEG 3350. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4322 and contained three β-MSP molecules in the asymmetric unit. X-ray intensity data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. PMID:19407392

  11. Electrondriven processes in polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKoy, Vincent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This project developed and applied scalable computational methods to obtain information about low-energy electron collisions with larger polyatomic molecules. Such collisions are important in modeling radiation damage to living systems, in spark ignition and combustion, and in plasma processing of materials. The focus of the project was to develop efficient methods that could be used to obtain both fundamental scientific insights and data of practical value to applications.

  12. Small Molecules-Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter

    2016-11-17

    Quantum mechanics builds large-scale graphs (networks): the vertices are the discrete energy levels the quantum system possesses, and the edges are the (quantum-mechanically allowed) transitions. Parts of the complete quantum mechanical networks can be probed experimentally via high-resolution, energy-resolved spectroscopic techniques. The complete rovibronic line list information for a given molecule can only be obtained through sophisticated quantum-chemical computations. Experiments as well as computations yield what we call spectroscopic networks (SN). First-principles SNs of even small, three to five atomic molecules can be huge, qualifying for the big data description. Besides helping to interpret high-resolution spectra, the network-theoretical view offers several ideas for improving the accuracy and robustness of the increasingly important information systems containing line-by-line spectroscopic data. For example, the smallest number of measurements necessary to perform to obtain the complete list of energy levels is given by the minimum-weight spanning tree of the SN and network clustering studies may call attention to "weakest links" of a spectroscopic database. A present-day application of spectroscopic networks is within the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) approach, whereby the transitions information on a measured SN is turned into experimental energy levels via a weighted linear least-squares refinement. MARVEL has been used successfully for 15 molecules and allowed to validate most of the transitions measured and come up with energy levels with well-defined and realistic uncertainties. Accurate knowledge of the energy levels with computed transition intensities allows the realistic prediction of spectra under many different circumstances, e.g., for widely different temperatures. Detailed knowledge of the energy level structure of a molecule coming from a MARVEL analysis is important for a considerable number of modeling

  13. Physics of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bransden, B H

    2003-01-01

    New edition of a well-established second and third year textbook for Physics degree students, covering the physical structure and behaviour of atoms and molecules. The aim of this new edition is to provide a unified account of the subject within an undergraduate framework, taking the opportunity to make improvements based on the teaching experience of users of the first edition, and cover important new developments in the subject.

  14. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  15. Dissecting contact mechanics from quantum interference in single-molecule junctions of stilbene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Meisner, Jeffrey S; Krikorian, Markrete; Ahn, Seokhoon; Parameswaran, Radha; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2012-03-14

    Electronic factors in molecules such as quantum interference and cross-conjugation can lead to dramatic modulation and suppression of conductance in single-molecule junctions. Probing such effects at the single-molecule level requires simultaneous measurements of independent junction properties, as conductance alone cannot provide conclusive evidence of junction formation for molecules with low conductivity. Here, we compare the mechanics of the conducting para-terminated 4,4'-di(methylthio)stilbene and moderately conducting 1,2-bis(4-(methylthio)phenyl)ethane to that of insulating meta-terminated 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene single-molecule junctions. We simultaneously measure force and conductance across single-molecule junctions and use force signatures to obtain independent evidence of junction formation and rupture in the meta-linked cross-conjugated molecule even when no clear low-bias conductance is measured. By separately quantifying conductance and mechanics, we identify the formation of atypical 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene molecular junctions that are mechanically stable but electronically decoupled. While theoretical studies have envisaged many plausible systems where quantum interference might be observed, our experiments provide the first direct quantitative study of the interplay between contact mechanics and the distinctively quantum mechanical nature of electronic transport in single-molecule junctions.

  16. Photochemistry of RuII 4,4'-bi-1,2,3-triazolyl (btz) complexes: crystallographic characterization of the photoreactive ligand-loss intermediate trans-[Ru(bpy)(κ2-btz)(κ1-btz)(NCMe)]2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welby, Christine E; Armitage, Georgina K; Bartley, Harry; Wilkinson, Aaron; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Uppal, Baljinder S; Rice, Craig R; Elliott, Paul I P

    2014-07-01

    We report the unprecedented observation and unequivocal crystallographic characterization of the meta-stable ligand loss intermediate solvento complex trans-[Ru(bpy)(κ(2) -btz)(κ(1) -btz)(NCMe)](2+) (1 a) that contains a monodentate chelate ligand. This and analogous complexes can be observed during the photolysis reactions of a family of complexes of the form [Ru({NN})(btz)(2)](2+) (1 a-d: btz=1,1'-dibenzyl-4,4'-bi-1,2,3-triazolyl; {NN}=a) 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy), b) 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridyl (dmbpy), c) 4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridyl (dmeobpy), d) 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)). In acetonitrile solutions, 1 a-d eventually convert to the bis-solvento complexes trans-[Ru({NN})(btz)(NCMe)(2)](2+) (3 a-d) along with one equivalent of free btz, in a process in which the remaining coordinated bidentate ligands undergo a new rearrangement such that they become coplanar. X-ray crystal structure of 3 a and 3 d confirmed the co-planar arrangement of the {NN} and btz ligands and the trans coordination of two solvent molecules. These conversions proceed via the observed intermediate complexes 2 a-d, which are formed quantitatively from 1 a-d in a matter of minutes and to which they slowly revert back on being left to stand in the dark over several days. The remarkably long lifetime of the intermediate complexes (>12 h at 40 °C) allowed the isolation of 2 a in the solid state, and the complex to be crystallographically characterized. Similarly to the structures adopted by complexes 3 a and d, the bpy and κ(2) -btz ligands in 2 a coordinate in a square-planar fashion with the second monodentate btz ligand coordinated trans to an acetonitrile ligand.

  17. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  18. Beeping a Maximal Independent Set

    OpenAIRE

    Afek, Yehuda; Alon, Noga; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Cornejo, Alejandro; Haeupler, Bernhard; Kuhn, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of computing a maximal independent set (MIS) in an extremely harsh broadcast model that relies only on carrier sensing. The model consists of an anonymous broadcast network in which nodes have no knowledge about the topology of the network or even an upper bound on its size. Furthermore, it is assumed that an adversary chooses at which time slot each node wakes up. At each time slot a node can either beep, that is, emit a signal, or be silent. At a particular time slot...

  19. Small Molecule Organic Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nathan

    Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing 'small molecule' thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical

  20. Localization microscopy: mapping cellular dynamics with single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A J; Hess, S T

    2014-04-01

    Resolution describes the smallest details within a sample that can be recovered by a microscope lens system. For optical microscopes detecting visible light, diffraction limits the resolution to ∼200-250 nm. In contrast, localization measures the position of an isolated object using its image. Single fluorescent molecules can be localized with an uncertainty of a few tens of nanometres, and in some cases less than one nanometre. Superresolution fluorescence localization microscopy (SRFLM) images and localizes fluorescent molecules in a sample. By controlling the visibility of the fluorescent molecules with light, it is possible to cause a sparse subset of the tags to fluoresce and be spatially separated from each other. A movie is acquired with a camera, capturing images of many sets of visible fluorescent tags over a period of time. The movie is then analysed by a computer whereby all of the single molecules are independently measured, and their positions are recorded. When the coordinates of a sufficient number of molecules are collected, an image can be rendered by plotting the coordinates of the localized molecules. The spatial resolution of these rendered images can be better than 20 nm, roughly an order of magnitude better than the diffraction limited resolution. The invention of SRFLM has led to an explosion of related techniques. Through the use of specialized optics, the fluorescent signal can be split into multiple detection channels. These channels can capture additional information such as colour (emission wavelength), orientation and three-dimensional position of the detected molecules. Measurement of the colour of the detected fluorescence can allow researchers to distinguish multiple types of fluorescent tags and to study the interaction between multiple molecules of interest. Three-dimensional imaging and determination of molecular orientations offer insight into structural organization of the sample. SRFLM is compatible with living samples and