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Sample records for crystallographic fragment screening

  1. A binding hotspot in Trypanosoma cruzi histidyl-tRNA synthetase revealed by fragment-based crystallographic cocktail screens.

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    Koh, Cho Yeow; Siddaramaiah, Latha Kallur; Ranade, Ranae M; Nguyen, Jasmine; Jian, Tengyue; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2015-08-01

    American trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The chronic form of the infection often causes debilitating morbidity and mortality. However, the current treatment for the disease is typically inadequate owing to drug toxicity and poor efficacy, necessitating a continual effort to discover and develop new antiparasitic therapeutic agents. The structure of T. cruzi histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS), a validated drug target, has previously been reported. Based on this structure and those of human cytosolic HisRS, opportunities for the development of specific inhibitors were identified. Here, efforts are reported to identify small molecules that bind to T. cruzi HisRS through fragment-based crystallographic screening in order to arrive at chemical starting points for the development of specific inhibitors. T. cruzi HisRS was soaked into 68 different cocktails from the Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (MSGPP) fragment library and diffraction data were collected to identify bound fragments after soaking. A total of 15 fragments were identified, all bound to the same site on the protein, revealing a fragment-binding hotspot adjacent to the ATP-binding pocket. On the basis of the initial hits, the design of reactive fragments targeting the hotspot which would be simultaneously covalently linked to a cysteine residue present only in trypanosomatid HisRS was initiated. Inhibition of T. cruzi HisRS was observed with the resultant reactive fragments and the anticipated binding mode was confirmed crystallographically. These results form a platform for the development of future generations of selective inhibitors for trypanosomatid HisRS.

  2. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

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    Krystal Cole

    Full Text Available High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above, the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above, the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  3. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

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    Cole, Krystal; Roessler, Christian G; Mulé, Elizabeth A; Benson-Xu, Emma J; Mullen, Jeffrey D; Le, Benjamin A; Tieman, Alanna M; Birone, Claire; Brown, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Neff, Sherry; Williams, Daniel; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above), the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above), the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  4. Crystallographic analysis of TPP riboswitch binding by small-molecule ligands discovered through fragment-based drug discovery approaches.

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    Warner, Katherine Deigan; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are structured mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to metabolite or second-messenger binding and are promising targets for drug discovery. Fragment-based drug discovery methods have identified weakly binding small molecule "fragments" that bind a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch. However, these fragments require substantial chemical elaboration into more potent, drug-like molecules. Structure determination of the fragments bound to the riboswitch is the necessary next step. In this chapter, we describe the methods for co-crystallization and structure determination of fragment-bound TPP riboswitch structures. We focus on considerations for screening crystallization conditions across multiple crystal forms and provide guidance for building the fragment into the refined crystallographic model. These methods are broadly applicable for crystallographic analyses of any small molecules that bind structured RNAs.

  5. Fragment Screening of Human Aquaporin 1

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    Janet To

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are membrane proteins that enable water transport across cellular plasma membranes in response to osmotic gradients. Phenotypic analyses have revealed important physiological roles for AQPs, and the potential for AQP water channel modulators in various disease states has been proposed. For example, AQP1 is overexpressed in tumor microvessels, and this correlates with higher metastatic potential and aggressiveness of the malignancy. Chemical modulators would help in identifying the precise contribution of water channel activity in these disease states. These inhibitors would also be important therapeutically, e.g., in anti-cancer treatment. This perceived importance contrasts with the lack of success of high-throughput screens (HTS to identify effective and specific inhibitors of aquaporins. In this paper, we have screened a library of 1500 “fragments”, i.e., smaller than molecules used in HTS, against human aquaporin (hAQP1 using a thermal shift assay and surface plasmon resonance. Although these fragments may not inhibit their protein target, they bound to and stabilized hAQP1 (sub mM binding affinities (KD, with an temperature of aggregation shift ΔTagg of +4 to +50 °C in a concentration-dependent fashion. Chemically expanded versions of these fragments should follow the determination of their binding site on the aquaporin surface.

  6. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

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    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in 3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  7. Efficient exploration of chemical space by fragment-based screening.

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    Hall, Richard J; Mortenson, Paul N; Murray, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Screening methods seek to sample a vast chemical space in order to identify starting points for further chemical optimisation. Fragment based drug discovery exploits the superior sampling of chemical space that can be achieved when the molecular weight is restricted. Here we show that commercially available fragment space is still relatively poorly sampled and argue for highly sensitive screening methods to allow the detection of smaller fragments. We analyse the properties of our fragment library versus the properties of X-ray hits derived from the library. We particularly consider properties related to the degree of planarity of the fragments.

  8. Protein structure prediction provides comparable performance to crystallographic structures in docking-based virtual screening.

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    Du, Hongying; Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Structure based virtual screening has largely been limited to protein targets for which either an experimental structure is available or a strongly homologous template exists so that a high-resolution model can be constructed. The performance of state of the art protein structure predictions in virtual screening in systems where only weakly homologous templates are available is largely untested. Using the challenging DUD database of structural decoys, we show here that even using templates with only weak sequence homology (identity) structural models can be constructed by I-TASSER which achieve comparable enrichment rates to using the experimental bound crystal structure in the majority of the cases studied. For 65% of the targets, the I-TASSER models, which are constructed essentially in the apo conformations, reached 70% of the virtual screening performance of using the holo-crystal structures. A correlation was observed between the success of I-TASSER in modeling the global fold and local structures in the binding pockets of the proteins versus the relative success in virtual screening. The virtual screening performance can be further improved by the recognition of chemical features of the ligand compounds. These results suggest that the combination of structure-based docking and advanced protein structure modeling methods should be a valuable approach to the large-scale drug screening and discovery studies, especially for the proteins lacking crystallographic structures.

  9. Virtual fragment screening: an exploration of various docking and scoring protocols for fragments using Glide

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    Kawatkar, Sameer; Wang, Hongming; Czerminski, Ryszard; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery approaches allow for a greater coverage of chemical space and generally produce high efficiency ligands. As such, virtual and experimental fragment screening are increasingly being coupled in an effort to identify new leads for specific therapeutic targets. Fragment docking is employed to create target-focussed subset of compounds for testing along side generic fragment libraries. The utility of the program Glide with various scoring schemes for fragment docking is discussed. Fragment docking results for two test cases, prostaglandin D2 synthase and DNA ligase, are presented and compared to experimental screening data. Self-docking, cross-docking, and enrichment studies are performed. For the enrichment runs, experimental data exists indicating that the docking decoys in fact do not inhibit the corresponding enzyme being examined. Results indicate that even for difficult test cases fragment docking can yield enrichments significantly better than random.

  10. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

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    Niu Huang

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  11. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of mouse UPR responsive protein P58(IPK) TPR fragment.

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    Tao, Jiahui; Wu, Yunkun; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2008-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which can promote protein folding and misfolded protein degradation and attenuate protein translation and protein translocation into the ER. P58(IPK) has been proposed to function as a molecular chaperone to maintain protein-folding homeostasis in the ER under normal and stressed conditions. P58(IPK) contains nine TPR motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 2.5 A resolution using a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 83.53, b = 92.75, c = 84.32 A, alpha = 90.00, beta = 119.36, gamma = 90.00 degrees. There are two P58(IPK) molecules in the asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 60%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  12. Hitting the target: fragment screening with acoustic in situ co-crystallization of proteins plus fragment libraries on pin-mounted data-collection micromeshes.

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    Yin, Xingyu; Scalia, Alexander; Leroy, Ludmila; Cuttitta, Christina M; Polizzo, Gina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Roessler, Christian G; Campos, Olven; Ma, Millie Y; Agarwal, Rakhi; Jackimowicz, Rick; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2014-05-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is a powerful technology that supports crystallographic applications such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. A fragment-screening strategy is described that uses ADE to co-crystallize proteins with fragment libraries directly on MiTeGen MicroMeshes. Co-crystallization trials can be prepared rapidly and economically. The high speed of specimen preparation and the low consumption of fragment and protein allow the use of individual rather than pooled fragments. The Echo 550 liquid-handling instrument (Labcyte Inc., Sunnyvale, California, USA) generates droplets with accurate trajectories, which allows multiple co-crystallization experiments to be discretely positioned on a single data-collection micromesh. This accuracy also allows all components to be transferred through small apertures. Consequently, the crystallization tray is in equilibrium with the reservoir before, during and after the transfer of protein, precipitant and fragment to the micromesh on which crystallization will occur. This strict control of the specimen environment means that the crystallography experiments remain identical as the working volumes are decreased from the few microlitres level to the few nanolitres level. Using this system, lysozyme, thermolysin, trypsin and stachydrine demethylase crystals were co-crystallized with a small 33-compound mini-library to search for fragment hits. This technology pushes towards a much faster, more automated and more flexible strategy for structure-based drug discovery using as little as 2.5 nl of each major component.

  13. Hitting the target: fragment screening with acoustic in situ co-crystallization of proteins plus fragment libraries on pin-mounted data-collection micromeshes

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    Yin, Xingyu [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, NY 13902 (United States); Leroy, Ludmila [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Ministry of Education of Brazil, 70040-020 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 6627 Av. Antonio Carlos, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte-MG (Brazil); Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Polizzo, Gina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); St Joseph’s College, 155 West Roe Boulevard, East Patchogue, NY 11772 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Ma, Millie Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Comsewogue High School, 565 Bicycle Path, Port Jefferson Station, NY 11776 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Jackimowicz, Rick; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    A method is presented for screening fragment libraries using acoustic droplet ejection to co-crystallize proteins and chemicals directly on micromeshes with as little as 2.5 nl of each component. This method was used to identify previously unreported fragments that bind to lysozyme, thermolysin, and trypsin. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is a powerful technology that supports crystallographic applications such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. A fragment-screening strategy is described that uses ADE to co-crystallize proteins with fragment libraries directly on MiTeGen MicroMeshes. Co-crystallization trials can be prepared rapidly and economically. The high speed of specimen preparation and the low consumption of fragment and protein allow the use of individual rather than pooled fragments. The Echo 550 liquid-handling instrument (Labcyte Inc., Sunnyvale, California, USA) generates droplets with accurate trajectories, which allows multiple co-crystallization experiments to be discretely positioned on a single data-collection micromesh. This accuracy also allows all components to be transferred through small apertures. Consequently, the crystallization tray is in equilibrium with the reservoir before, during and after the transfer of protein, precipitant and fragment to the micromesh on which crystallization will occur. This strict control of the specimen environment means that the crystallography experiments remain identical as the working volumes are decreased from the few microlitres level to the few nanolitres level. Using this system, lysozyme, thermolysin, trypsin and stachydrine demethylase crystals were co-crystallized with a small 33-compound mini-library to search for fragment hits. This technology pushes towards a much faster, more automated and more flexible strategy for structure-based drug discovery using as little as 2.5 nl of each major component.

  14. Fragment-Based Screening for Enzyme Inhibitors Using Calorimetry.

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    Recht, Michael I; Nienaber, Vicki; Torres, Francisco E

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a sensitive and accurate means by which to study the thermodynamics of binding reactions. In addition, it enables label-free measurement of enzymatic reactions. The advent of extremely sensitive microcalorimeters have made it increasingly valuable as a tool for hit validation and characterization, but its use in primary screening is hampered by requiring large quantities of reagents and long measurement times. Nanocalorimeters can overcome these limitations of conventional ITC, particularly for screening libraries of 500-1000 compounds such as those encountered in fragment-based lead discovery. This chapter describes how nanocalorimetry and conventional microcalorimetry can be used to screen compound libraries for enzyme inhibitors. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

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    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  16. Virtual fragment screening for novel inhibitors of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase.

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    Ruda, Gian Filippo; Campbell, Gordon; Alibu, Vincent P; Barrett, Michael P; Brenk, Ruth; Gilbert, Ian H

    2010-07-15

    The enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is a potential drug target for the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, the causative organism of human African trypanosomiasis. This enzyme has a polar active site to accommodate the phosphate, hydroxyl and carboxylate groups of the substrate, 6-phosphogluconate. A virtual fragment screen was undertaken of the enzyme to discover starting points for the development of inhibitors which are likely to have appropriate physicochemical properties for an orally bioavailable compound. A virtual screening library was developed, consisting of compounds with functional groups that could mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, but which have a higher pKa. Following docking, hits were clustered and appropriate compounds purchased and assayed against the enzyme. Three fragments were identified that had IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good ligand efficiencies. Based on these initial hits, analogues were procured and further active compounds were identified. Some of the fragments identified represent potential starting points for a medicinal chemistry programme to develop potent drug-like inhibitors of the enzyme. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Small molecule inhibitors of the LEDGF site of human immunodeficiency virus integrase identified by fragment screening and structure based design.

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    Thomas S Peat

    Full Text Available A fragment-based screen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV integrase led to a number of compounds that bound to the lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF binding site of the integrase catalytic core domain. We determined the crystallographic structures of complexes of the HIV integrase catalytic core domain for 10 of these compounds and quantitated the binding by surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that the compounds inhibit the interaction of LEDGF with HIV integrase in a proximity AlphaScreen assay, an assay for the LEDGF enhancement of HIV integrase strand transfer and in a cell based assay. The compounds identified represent a potential framework for the development of a new series of HIV integrase inhibitors that do not bind to the catalytic site of the enzyme.

  18. Label free fragment screening using surface plasmon resonance as a tool for fragment finding - analyzing parkin, a difficult CNS target.

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    Karin Regnström

    Full Text Available Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR is rarely used as a primary High-throughput Screening (HTS tool in fragment-based approaches. With SPR instruments becoming increasingly high-throughput it is now possible to use SPR as a primary tool for fragment finding. SPR becomes, therefore, a valuable tool in the screening of difficult targets such as the ubiquitin E3 ligase Parkin. As a prerequisite for the screen, a large number of SPR tests were performed to characterize and validate the active form of Parkin. A set of compounds was designed and used to define optimal SPR assay conditions for this fragment screen. Using these conditions, more than 5000 pre-selected fragments from our in-house library were screened for binding to Parkin. Additionally, all fragments were simultaneously screened for binding to two off target proteins to exclude promiscuous binding compounds. A low hit rate was observed that is in line with hit rates usually obtained by other HTS screening assays. All hits were further tested in dose responses on the target protein by SPR for confirmation before channeling the hits into Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and other hit-confirmation assays.

  19. Fragment screening of cyclin G-associated kinase by weak affinity chromatography.

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    Meiby, Elinor; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M; Ohlson, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a new strategy for drug discovery where lead compounds are evolved from small molecules. These fragments form low affinity interactions (dissociation constant (K(D)) = mM - μM) with protein targets, which require fragment screening methods of sufficient sensitivity. Weak affinity chromatography (WAC) is a promising new technology for fragment screening based on selective retention of fragments by a drug target. Kinases are a major pharmaceutical target, and FBDD has been successfully applied to several of these targets. In this work, we have demonstrated the potential to use WAC in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for fragment screening of a kinase target-cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK). One hundred seventy fragments were selected for WAC screening by virtual screening of a commercial fragment library against the ATP-binding site of five different proteins. GAK protein was immobilized on a capillary HPLC column, and compound binding was characterized by frontal affinity chromatography. Compounds were screened in sets of 13 or 14, in combination with MS detection for enhanced throughput. Seventy-eight fragments (46 %) with K(D) twin peaks. This ability, in combination with the robustness, sensitivity, and simplicity of WAC makes it a new method for fragment screening of considerable potential.

  20. An Automated Microscale Thermophoresis Screening Approach for Fragment-Based Lead Discovery.

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    Linke, Pawel; Amaning, Kwame; Maschberger, Melanie; Vallee, Francois; Steier, Valerie; Baaske, Philipp; Duhr, Stefan; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Rak, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Fragment-based lead discovery has proved to be an effective alternative to high-throughput screenings in identifying chemical matter that can be developed into robust lead compounds. The search for optimal combinations of biophysical techniques that can correctly and efficiently identify and quantify binding can be challenging due to the physicochemical properties of fragments. In order to minimize the time and costs of screening, optimal combinations of biophysical techniques with maximal information content, sensitivity, and robustness are needed. Here we describe an approach utilizing automated microscale thermophoresis (MST) affinity screening to identify fragments active against MEK1 kinase. MST identified multiple hits that were confirmed by X-ray crystallography but not detected by orthogonal methods. Furthermore, MST also provided information about ligand-induced aggregation and protein denaturation. The technique delivered a large number of binders while reducing experimentation time and sample consumption, demonstrating the potential of MST to execute and maximize the efficacy of fragment screening campaigns.

  1. Fragment virtual screening based on Bayesian categorization for discovering novel VEGFR-2 scaffolds.

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    Zhang, Yanmin; Jiao, Yu; Xiong, Xiao; Liu, Haichun; Ran, Ting; Xu, Jinxing; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Pan, Jing; Qiao, Xin; Shi, Zhihao; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of novel scaffolds against a specific target has long been one of the most significant but challengeable goals in discovering lead compounds. A scaffold that binds in important regions of the active pocket is more favorable as a starting point because scaffolds generally possess greater optimization possibilities. However, due to the lack of sufficient chemical space diversity of the databases and the ineffectiveness of the screening methods, it still remains a great challenge to discover novel active scaffolds. Since the strengths and weaknesses of both fragment-based drug design and traditional virtual screening (VS), we proposed a fragment VS concept based on Bayesian categorization for the discovery of novel scaffolds. This work investigated the proposal through an application on VEGFR-2 target. Firstly, scaffold and structural diversity of chemical space for 10 compound databases were explicitly evaluated. Simultaneously, a robust Bayesian classification model was constructed for screening not only compound databases but also their corresponding fragment databases. Although analysis of the scaffold diversity demonstrated a very unevenly distribution of scaffolds over molecules, results showed that our Bayesian model behaved better in screening fragments than molecules. Through a literature retrospective research, several generated fragments with relatively high Bayesian scores indeed exhibit VEGFR-2 biological activity, which strongly proved the effectiveness of fragment VS based on Bayesian categorization models. This investigation of Bayesian-based fragment VS can further emphasize the necessity for enrichment of compound databases employed in lead discovery by amplifying the diversity of databases with novel structures.

  2. Screening for metronidazole-resistance associated gene fragments of H pylori by suppression subtractive hybridization

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    Ai-Qing Li; Ning Dai; Jie Yan; Yong-Liang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To screen for metronidazole (MTZ)-resistance associated gene fragments of H pylori by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).METHODS:Five MTZ-resistant (tester,T) and 1 MTZ-susceptible (driver,D) clinical H pylori isolates were selected. Genomic DMAs were prepared and submitted to Rsa I digestion. Then two different adaptors were ligated respectively to the 5'-end of two aliquots of the tester DNA fragments and SSH was made between the tester and driver DNAs. The specific inserts of tester strains were screened and MTZ-resistance related gene fragments were identified by dot blotting.RESULTS:Among the randomly selected 120 subtractive colonies,37 DNA fragments had a different number of DNA copies (≥2 times) in resistant and susceptible strains and 17 of them had a significantly different number of DNA copies (≥3 times). Among the sequences obtained from the 17 DNA fragments,new sequences were found in 10 DNA fragments and duplicated sequences in 7 DNA fragments,representing respectively the sequences of depeptide ABC transporter periplasmic dipeptide-binding protein (dppA),permease protein (dppB),ribosomal protein S4 (rps4),ribonuclease in (rnc),protease (pqqE),diaminopimelate epimerase (dapF),acetatekinase (ackA),H pylori plasmid pHPSl and H pylori gene 1334.CONCLUSION:Gene fragments specific to MTZ-resistant H pylori strains can be screened by SSH and may be associated with MTZ-resistant H pylori.

  3. Computer-aided design of fragment mixtures for NMR-based screening.

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    Xavier Arroyo

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery is widely applied both in industrial and in academic screening programs. Several screening techniques rely on NMR to detect binding of a fragment to a target. NMR-based methods are among the most sensitive techniques and have the further advantage of yielding a low rate of false positives and negatives. However, NMR is intrinsically slower than other screening techniques; thus, to increase throughput in NMR-based screening, researchers often assay mixtures of fragments, rather than single fragments. Herein we present a fast and straightforward computer-aided method to design mixtures of fragments taken from a library that have minimized NMR signal overlap. This approach enables direct identification of one or several active fragments without the need for deconvolution. Our approach entails encoding of NMR spectra into a computer-readable format that we call a fingerprint, and minimizing the global signal overlap through a Monte Carlo algorithm. The scoring function used favors a homogenous distribution of the global signal overlap. The method does not require additional experimental work: the only data required are NMR spectra, which are generally recorded for each compound as a quality control measure before its insertion into the library.

  4. Implications of promiscuous Pim-1 kinase fragment inhibitor hydrophobic interactions for fragment-based drug design.

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    Good, Andrew C; Liu, Jinyu; Hirth, Bradford; Asmussen, Gary; Xiang, Yibin; Biemann, Hans-Peter; Bishop, Kimberly A; Fremgen, Trisha; Fitzgerald, Maria; Gladysheva, Tatiana; Jain, Annuradha; Jancsics, Katherine; Metz, Markus; Papoulis, Andrew; Skerlj, Renato; Stepp, J David; Wei, Ronnie R

    2012-03-22

    We have studied the subtleties of fragment docking and binding using data generated in a Pim-1 kinase inhibitor program. Crystallographic and docking data analyses have been undertaken using inhibitor complexes derived from an in-house surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fragment screen, a virtual needle screen, and a de novo designed fragment inhibitor hybrid. These investigations highlight that fragments that do not fill their binding pocket can exhibit promiscuous hydrophobic interactions due to the lack of steric constraints imposed on them by the boundaries of said pocket. As a result, docking modes that disagree with an observed crystal structure but maintain key crystallographically observed hydrogen bonds still have potential value in ligand design and optimization. This observation runs counter to the lore in fragment-based drug design that all fragment elaboration must be based on the parent crystal structure alone.

  5. Design of a multi-purpose fragment screening library using molecular complexity and orthogonal diversity metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wan F; Withka, Jane M; Hepworth, David; Magee, Thomas V; Du, Yuhua J; Bakken, Gregory A; Miller, Michael D; Hendsch, Zachary S; Thanabal, Venkataraman; Kolodziej, Steve A; Xing, Li; Hu, Qiyue; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S; Love, Robert; Charlton, Maura E; Hughes, Samantha; van Hoorn, Willem P; Mills, James E

    2011-07-01

    Fragment Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) continues to advance as an efficient and alternative screening paradigm for the identification and optimization of novel chemical matter. To enable FBDD across a wide range of pharmaceutical targets, a fragment screening library is required to be chemically diverse and synthetically expandable to enable critical decision making for chemical follow-up and assessing new target druggability. In this manuscript, the Pfizer fragment library design strategy which utilized multiple and orthogonal metrics to incorporate structure, pharmacophore and pharmacological space diversity is described. Appropriate measures of molecular complexity were also employed to maximize the probability of detection of fragment hits using a variety of biophysical and biochemical screening methods. In addition, structural integrity, purity, solubility, fragment and analog availability as well as cost were important considerations in the selection process. Preliminary analysis of primary screening results for 13 targets using NMR Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) indicates the identification of uM-mM hits and the uniqueness of hits at weak binding affinities for these targets.

  6. Fragment-based discovery of hepatitis C virus NS5b RNA polymerase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonysamy, Stephen S.; Aubol, Brandon; Blaney, Jeff; Browner, Michelle F.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Harris, Seth F.; Hébert, Normand; Hendle, Jörg; Hopkins, Stephanie; Jefferson, Elizabeth; Kissinger, Charles; Leveque, Vincent; Marciano, David; McGee, Ethel; Nájera, Isabel; Nolan, Brian; Tomimoto, Masaki; Torres, Eduardo; Wright, Tobi (SGX); (Roche)

    2009-07-22

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HCV NS5b RNA polymerase were discovered by a fragment-based lead discovery approach, beginning with crystallographic fragment screening. The NS5b binding affinity and biochemical activity of fragment hits and inhibitors was determined by surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) and an enzyme inhibition assay, respectively. Crystallographic fragment screening hits with {approx}1-10 mM binding affinity (K{sub D}) were iteratively optimized to give leads with {approx}200 nM biochemical activity and low {micro}M cellular activity in a Replicon assay.

  7. Fragment-based whole cell screen delivers hits against M. tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Moreira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive multi-target ‘fragment drugs’ represent critical components of current tuberculosis regimens. These compounds, such as pyrazinamide, are old synthetic antimycobacterials that are activated inside Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and are smaller than the usual drug-like, single-target molecules. Based on the success of small ‘dirty’ drugs in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, we suggested previously that fragment-based whole cell screens should be introduced in our current antimycobacterial drug discovery efforts. Here, we carried out such a screen and characterized bactericidal activity, selectivity and spectrum of hits we obtained. A library of 1725 fragments was tested at a single concentration for growth inhibitory activity against M. bovis BCG as screening strain and 38 of 116 primary hits were confirmed in dose response analyses to be active against virulent M. tuberculosis. Bacterial kill experiments showed that most hits displayed bactericidal activity at their minimal inhibitory concentration. Cytotoxicity assays established that a large proportion of hits displayed a favorable selectivity index for mammalian cells. Importantly, one third of M. tuberculosis active fragments were also active against M. abscessus and M. avium, two emerging non-tuberculous mycobacterial pathogens, opening the opportunity to develop broad spectrum antimycobacterials. Activity determination against Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, as well as fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans showed only a small overlap indicating a generally narrow spectrum of these novel antimicrobial hits for mycobacteria. In conclusion, we carried out the first fragment-based whole cell screen against bacteria and identified a substantial number of hits with excellent physicochemical properties and dual activity against M. tuberculosis and

  8. Target Immobilization as a Strategy for NMR-Based Fragment Screening: Comparison of TINS, STD, and SPR for Fragment Hit Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; Retra, K.; Figaroa, F.; Hollander, J.G.; Ab, E.; Heetebrij, R.J.; Irth, H.; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely accepted tool that is complementary to high-throughput screening (HTS) in developing small-molecule inhibitors of pharmaceutical targets. Because a fragment campaign can only be as successful as the hit matter found, it is critical that the fi

  9. Identification of DNA primase inhibitors via a combined fragment-based and virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Stefan; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard; Richardson, Charles C.; Akabayov, Barak

    2016-11-01

    The structural differences between bacterial and human primases render the former an excellent target for drug design. Here we describe a technique for selecting small molecule inhibitors of the activity of T7 DNA primase, an ideal model for bacterial primases due to their common structural and functional features. Using NMR screening, fragment molecules that bind T7 primase were identified and then exploited in virtual filtration to select larger molecules from the ZINC database. The molecules were docked to the primase active site using the available primase crystal structure and ranked based on their predicted binding energies to identify the best candidates for functional and structural investigations. Biochemical assays revealed that some of the molecules inhibit T7 primase-dependent DNA replication. The binding mechanism was delineated via NMR spectroscopy. Our approach, which combines fragment based and virtual screening, is rapid and cost effective and can be applied to other targets.

  10. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F.; Tinetti, Ricky N.; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S.; Headey, Stephen J.; Chalmers, David K.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  11. A Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Method for Screening Disulfide Tethering Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallenbeck, Kenneth K; Davies, Julia L; Merron, Connie; Ogden, Pierce; Sijbesma, Eline; Ottmann, Christian; Renslo, Adam R; Wilson, Christopher; Arkin, Michelle R

    2017-09-01

    We report the refinement of a high-throughput, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based screening method for the identification of covalent small-molecule binders to proteins. Using a custom library of 1600 disulfide-capped fragments targeting surface cysteine residues, we optimize sample preparation, chromatography, and ionization conditions to maximize the reliability and flexibility of the approach. Data collection at a rate of 84 s per sample balances speed with reliability for sustained screening over multiple, diverse projects run over a 24-month period. The method is applicable to protein targets of various classes and a range of molecular masses. Data are processed in a custom pipeline that calculates a percent bound value for each compound and identifies false positives by calculating significance of detected masses (signal significance). An example pipeline is available through Biovia's ScienceCloud Protocol Exchange. Data collection and analysis methods for the screening of covalent adducts of intact proteins are now fast enough to screen the largest covalent compound libraries in 1 to 2 days.

  12. Identification of B. anthracis N(5)-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase (PurE) active site binding compounds via fragment library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hao; Jones, Christopher; Zhu, Tian; Patel, Kavankumar; Wolf, Nina M; Fung, Leslie W-M; Lee, Hyun; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-02-15

    The de novo purine biosynthesis pathway is an attractive target for antibacterial drug design, and PurE from this pathway has been identified to be crucial for Bacillus anthracis survival in serum. In this study we adopted a fragment-based hit discovery approach, using three screening methods-saturation transfer difference nucleus magnetic resonance (STD-NMR), water-ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY) NMR, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), against B. anthracis PurE (BaPurE) to identify active site binding fragments by initially testing 352 compounds in a Zenobia fragment library. Competition STD NMR with the BaPurE product effectively eliminated non-active site binding hits from the primary hits, selecting active site binders only. Binding affinities (dissociation constant, KD) of these compounds varied between 234 and 301μM. Based on test results from the Zenobia compounds, we subsequently developed and applied a streamlined fragment screening strategy to screen a much larger library consisting of 3000 computationally pre-selected fragments. Thirteen final fragment hits were confirmed to exhibit binding affinities varying from 14μM to 700μM, which were categorized into five different basic scaffolds. All thirteen fragment hits have ligand efficiencies higher than 0.30. We demonstrated that at least two fragments from two different scaffolds exhibit inhibitory activity against the BaPurE enzyme.

  13. Probing conformational states of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase by fragment screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begley, Darren W.; Davies, Douglas R.; Hartley, Robert C.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Rychel, Amanda L.; Myler, Peter J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J. (Emerald)

    2014-10-02

    Glutaric acidemia type 1 is an inherited metabolic disorder which can cause macrocephaly, muscular rigidity, spastic paralysis and other progressive movement disorders in humans. The defects in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) associated with this disease are thought to increase holoenzyme instability and reduce cofactor binding. Here, the first structural analysis of a GCDH enzyme in the absence of the cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is reported. The apo structure of GCDH from Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals a loss of secondary structure and increased disorder in the FAD-binding pocket relative to the ternary complex of the highly homologous human GCDH. After conducting a fragment-based screen, four small molecules were identified which bind to GCDH from B. pseudomallei. Complex structures were determined for these fragments, which cause backbone and side-chain perturbations to key active-site residues. Structural insights from this investigation highlight differences from apo GCDH and the utility of small-molecular fragments as chemical probes for capturing alternative conformational states of preformed protein crystals.

  14. Virtual Screening of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Fragments Targeted to Inhibit Bacterial Dithiol Oxidase DsbA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilko Duprez

    Full Text Available Antibacterial drugs with novel scaffolds and new mechanisms of action are desperately needed to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. The periplasmic oxidative folding system in Gram-negative bacteria represents a possible target for anti-virulence antibacterials. By targeting virulence rather than viability, development of resistance and side effects (through killing host native microbiota might be minimized. Here, we undertook the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting the interaction between the two key enzymes of oxidative folding, DsbA and DsbB, with the ultimate goal of preventing virulence factor assembly. Structures of DsbB--or peptides--complexed with DsbA revealed key interactions with the DsbA active site cysteine, and with a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site. The present work aimed to discover peptidomimetics that target the hydrophobic groove to generate non-covalent DsbA inhibitors. The previously reported structure of a Proteus mirabilis DsbA active site cysteine mutant, in a non-covalent complex with the heptapeptide PWATCDS, was used as an in silico template for virtual screening of a peptidomimetic fragment library. The highest scoring fragment compound and nine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for DsbA binding and inhibition. These experiments discovered peptidomimetic fragments with inhibitory activity at millimolar concentrations. Although only weakly potent relative to larger covalent peptide inhibitors that interact through the active site cysteine, these fragments offer new opportunities as templates to build non-covalent inhibitors. The results suggest that non-covalent peptidomimetics may need to interact with sites beyond the hydrophobic groove in order to produce potent DsbA inhibitors.

  15. Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of Statin-Induced APP C-terminal Toxic Fragment Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poksay, Karen S; Sheffler, Douglas J; Spilman, Patricia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Descamps, Olivier; Gorostiza, Olivia; Matalis, Alex; Mullenix, Michael; Bredesen, Dale E; Cosford, Nicholas D P; John, Varghese

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss. One process that could contribute to this loss is the intracellular caspase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in release of the toxic C-terminal 31-amino acid peptide APP-C31 along with the production of APPΔC31, full-length APP minus the C-terminal 31 amino acids. We previously found that a mutation in APP that prevents this caspase cleavage ameliorated synaptic loss and cognitive impairment in a murine AD model. Thus, inhibition of this cleavage is a reasonable target for new therapeutic development. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit the generation of APP-C31, we first used an APPΔC31 cleavage site-specific antibody to develop an AlphaLISA to screen several chemical compound libraries for the level of N-terminal fragment production. This antibody was also used to develop an ELISA for validation studies. In both high throughput screening (HTS) and validation testing, the ability of compounds to inhibit simvastatin- (HTS) or cerivastatin- (validation studies) induced caspase cleavage at the APP-D720 cleavage site was determined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with wildtype (wt) human APP (CHO-7W). Several compounds, as well as control pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh, inhibited APPΔC31 production (measured fragment) and rescued cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The effective compounds fell into several classes including SERCA inhibitors, inhibitors of Wnt signaling, and calcium channel antagonists. Further studies are underway to evaluate the efficacy of lead compounds - identified here using cells and tissues expressing wt human APP - in mouse models of AD expressing mutated human APP, as well as to identify additional compounds and determine the mechanisms by which they exert their effects.

  16. Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of Statin-Induced APP C-terminal Toxic Fragment Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poksay, Karen S.; Sheffler, Douglas J.; Spilman, Patricia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Descamps, Olivier; Gorostiza, Olivia; Matalis, Alex; Mullenix, Michael; Bredesen, Dale E.; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.; John, Varghese

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss. One process that could contribute to this loss is the intracellular caspase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in release of the toxic C-terminal 31-amino acid peptide APP-C31 along with the production of APPΔC31, full-length APP minus the C-terminal 31 amino acids. We previously found that a mutation in APP that prevents this caspase cleavage ameliorated synaptic loss and cognitive impairment in a murine AD model. Thus, inhibition of this cleavage is a reasonable target for new therapeutic development. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit the generation of APP-C31, we first used an APPΔC31 cleavage site-specific antibody to develop an AlphaLISA to screen several chemical compound libraries for the level of N-terminal fragment production. This antibody was also used to develop an ELISA for validation studies. In both high throughput screening (HTS) and validation testing, the ability of compounds to inhibit simvastatin- (HTS) or cerivastatin- (validation studies) induced caspase cleavage at the APP-D720 cleavage site was determined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with wildtype (wt) human APP (CHO-7W). Several compounds, as well as control pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh, inhibited APPΔC31 production (measured fragment) and rescued cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The effective compounds fell into several classes including SERCA inhibitors, inhibitors of Wnt signaling, and calcium channel antagonists. Further studies are underway to evaluate the efficacy of lead compounds – identified here using cells and tissues expressing wt human APP – in mouse models of AD expressing mutated human APP, as well as to identify additional compounds and determine the mechanisms by which they exert their effects.

  17. Identification of Two Secondary Ligand Binding Sites in 14-3-3 Proteins Using Fragment Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijbesma, Eline; Skora, Lukasz; Leysen, Seppe; Brunsveld, Luc; Koch, Uwe; Nussbaumer, Peter; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-08-01

    Proteins typically interact with multiple binding partners, and often different parts of their surfaces are employed to establish these protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Members of the class of 14-3-3 adapter proteins bind to several hundred other proteins in the cell. Multiple small molecules for the modulation of 14-3-3 PPIs have been disclosed; however, they all target the conserved phosphopeptide binding channel, so that selectivity is difficult to achieve. Here we report on the discovery of two individual secondary binding sites that have been identified by combining nuclear magnetic resonance-based fragment screening and X-ray crystallography. The two pockets that these fragments occupy are part of at least three physiologically relevant and structurally characterized 14-3-3 PPI interfaces, including those with serotonin N-acetyltransferase and plant transcription factor FT. In addition, the high degree of conservation of the two sites implies their relevance for 14-3-3 PPIs. This first identification of secondary sites on 14-3-3 proteins bound by small molecule ligands might facilitate the development of new chemical tool compounds for more selective PPI modulation.

  18. Repositioning the substrate activity screening (SAS) approach as a fragment-based method for identification of weak binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Cleenewerck, Matthias; Joossens, Jurgen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2014-10-13

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has evolved into an established approach for "hit" identification. Typically, most applications of FBDD depend on specialised cost- and time-intensive biophysical techniques. The substrate activity screening (SAS) approach has been proposed as a relatively cheap and straightforward alternative for identification of fragments for enzyme inhibitors. We have investigated SAS for the discovery of inhibitors of oncology target urokinase (uPA). Although our results support the key hypotheses of SAS, we also encountered a number of unreported limitations. In response, we propose an efficient modified methodology: "MSAS" (modified substrate activity screening). MSAS circumvents the limitations of SAS and broadens its scope by providing additional fragments and more coherent SAR data. As well as presenting and validating MSAS, this study expands existing SAR knowledge for the S1 pocket of uPA and reports new reversible and irreversible uPA inhibitor scaffolds.

  19. Automated NMR fragment based screening identified a novel interface blocker to the LARG/RhoA complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Gao

    Full Text Available The small GTPase cycles between the inactive GDP form and the activated GTP form, catalyzed by the upstream guanine exchange factors. The modulation of such process by small molecules has been proven to be a fruitful route for therapeutic intervention to prevent the over-activation of the small GTPase. The fragment based approach emerging in the past decade has demonstrated its paramount potential in the discovery of inhibitors targeting such novel and challenging protein-protein interactions. The details regarding the procedure of NMR fragment screening from scratch have been rarely disclosed comprehensively, thus restricts its wider applications. To achieve a consistent screening applicable to a number of targets, we developed a highly automated protocol to cover every aspect of NMR fragment screening as possible, including the construction of small but diverse libray, determination of the aqueous solubility by NMR, grouping compounds with mutual dispersity to a cocktail, and the automated processing and visualization of the ligand based screening spectra. We exemplified our streamlined screening in RhoA alone and the complex of the small GTPase RhoA and its upstream guanine exchange factor LARG. Two hits were confirmed from the primary screening in cocktail and secondary screening over individual hits for LARG/RhoA complex, while one of them was also identified from the screening for RhoA alone. HSQC titration of the two hits over RhoA and LARG alone, respectively, identified one compound binding to RhoA.GDP at a 0.11 mM affinity, and perturbed the residues at the switch II region of RhoA. This hit blocked the formation of the LARG/RhoA complex, validated by the native gel electrophoresis, and the titration of RhoA to ¹⁵N labeled LARG in the absence and presence the compound, respectively. It therefore provides us a starting point toward a more potent inhibitor to RhoA activation catalyzed by LARG.

  20. Automated NMR fragment based screening identified a novel interface blocker to the LARG/RhoA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jia; Ma, Rongsheng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Na; Sasaki, Ryan; Snyderman, David; Wu, Jihui; Ruan, Ke

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase cycles between the inactive GDP form and the activated GTP form, catalyzed by the upstream guanine exchange factors. The modulation of such process by small molecules has been proven to be a fruitful route for therapeutic intervention to prevent the over-activation of the small GTPase. The fragment based approach emerging in the past decade has demonstrated its paramount potential in the discovery of inhibitors targeting such novel and challenging protein-protein interactions. The details regarding the procedure of NMR fragment screening from scratch have been rarely disclosed comprehensively, thus restricts its wider applications. To achieve a consistent screening applicable to a number of targets, we developed a highly automated protocol to cover every aspect of NMR fragment screening as possible, including the construction of small but diverse libray, determination of the aqueous solubility by NMR, grouping compounds with mutual dispersity to a cocktail, and the automated processing and visualization of the ligand based screening spectra. We exemplified our streamlined screening in RhoA alone and the complex of the small GTPase RhoA and its upstream guanine exchange factor LARG. Two hits were confirmed from the primary screening in cocktail and secondary screening over individual hits for LARG/RhoA complex, while one of them was also identified from the screening for RhoA alone. HSQC titration of the two hits over RhoA and LARG alone, respectively, identified one compound binding to RhoA.GDP at a 0.11 mM affinity, and perturbed the residues at the switch II region of RhoA. This hit blocked the formation of the LARG/RhoA complex, validated by the native gel electrophoresis, and the titration of RhoA to ¹⁵N labeled LARG in the absence and presence the compound, respectively. It therefore provides us a starting point toward a more potent inhibitor to RhoA activation catalyzed by LARG.

  1. Lead identification for the K-Ras protein: virtual screening and combinatorial fragment-based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan AAK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Akbar Ali Khan Pathan,1,2,* Bhavana Panthi,3,* Zahid Khan,1 Purushotham Reddy Koppula,4–6 Mohammed Saud Alanazi,1 Sachchidanand,3 Narasimha Reddy Parine,1 Mukesh Chourasia3,* 1Genome Research Chair (GRC, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, 2Integrated Gulf Biosystems, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Pharmacoinformatics, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Hajipur, India; 4Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, 5Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Affairs Hospital, 6Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Kirsten rat sarcoma (K-Ras protein is a member of Ras family belonging to the small guanosine triphosphatases superfamily. The members of this family share a conserved structure and biochemical properties, acting as binary molecular switches. The guanosine triphosphate-bound active K-Ras interacts with a range of effectors, resulting in the stimulation of downstream signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Efforts to target K-Ras have been unsuccessful until now, placing it among high-value molecules against which developing a therapy would have an enormous impact. K-Ras transduces signals when it binds to guanosine triphosphate by directly binding to downstream effector proteins, but in case of guanosine diphosphate-bound conformation, these interactions get disrupted. Methods: In the present study, we targeted the nucleotide-binding site in the “on” and “off” state conformations of the K-Ras protein to find out suitable lead compounds. A structure-based virtual screening approach has been used to screen compounds from different databases, followed by a combinatorial fragment-based approach to design the apposite lead for the K-Ras protein. Results: Interestingly, the designed compounds exhibit a binding preference for the

  2. Multiple ligand detection and affinity measurement by ultrafiltration and mass spectrometry analysis applied to fragment mixture screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; Fu, Xu; Shen, Jie; Chen, Xin; Wang, Quan; Bi, Xin; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Lixin; Liang, Guangxin; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-07-30

    Binding affinity of a small molecule drug candidate to a therapeutically relevant biomolecular target is regarded the first determinant of the candidate's efficacy. Although the ultrafiltration-LC/MS (UF-LC/MS) assay enables efficient ligand discovery for a specific target from a mixed pool of compounds, most previous analysis allowed for relative affinity ranking of different ligands. Moreover, the reliability of affinity measurement for multiple ligands with UF-LC/MS has hardly been strictly evaluated. In this study, we examined the accuracy of K(d) determination through UF-LC/MS by comparison with classical ITC measurement. A single-point K(d) calculation method was found to be suitable for affinity measurement of multiple ligands bound to the same target when binding competition is minimized. A second workflow based on analysis of the unbound fraction of compounds was then developed, which simplified sample preparation as well as warranted reliable ligand discovery. The new workflow implemented in a fragment mixture screen afforded rapid and sensitive detection of low-affinity ligands selectively bound to the RNA polymerase NS5B of hepatitis C virus. More importantly, ligand identification and affinity measurement for mixture-based fragment screens by UF-LC/MS were in good accordance with single ligand evaluation by conventional SPR analysis. This new approach is expected to become a valuable addition to the arsenal of high-throughput screening techniques for fragment-based drug discovery.

  3. Influence of atomic screening on fragmentation of ultrarelativistic lead ions in LHC collimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan C.; Sørensen, Allan H.

    2009-01-01

    When a lead beam is collimated in the CERN LHC some of the ions fragment in the collimators causing problems downstream. For design purposes the fragmentation probability needs to be assessed. At LHC energies ( γ 3000 ; the Lorentz-factor γ is the total energy of an ion in units of its rest energ...... case for various collimator materials and find a significant effect for tungsten, the heaviest candidate planned for use....

  4. Discovery of structurally-diverse inhibitor scaffolds by high-throughput screening of a fragment library with dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Thomas W; Fast, Walter

    2012-09-15

    Potent and selective inhibitors of the enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) are useful as molecular probes to better understand cellular regulation of nitric oxide. Inhibitors are also potential therapeutic agents for treatment of pathological states associated with the inappropriate overproduction of nitric oxide, such as septic shock, selected types of cancer, and other conditions. Inhibitors with structures dissimilar to substrate may overcome limitations inherent to substrate analogs. Therefore, to identify structurally-diverse inhibitor scaffolds, high-throughput screening (HTS) of a 4000-member library of fragment-sized molecules was completed using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa DDAH and human DDAH-1 isoforms. Use of a substrate concentration equal to its K(M) value during the primary screen allowed for the detection of inhibitors with different modes of inhibition. A series of validation tests were designed and implemented in the identification of four inhibitors of human DDAH-1 that were unknown prior to the screen. Two inhibitors share a 4-halopyridine scaffold and act as quiescent affinity labels that selectively and covalently modify the active-site Cys residue. Two inhibitors are benzimidazole-like compounds that reversibly and competitively inhibit human DDAH-1 with Ligand Efficiency values ≥0.3 kcal/mol/heavy (non-hydrogen) atom, indicating their suitability for further development. Both inhibitor scaffolds have available sites to derivatize for further optimization. Therefore, use of this fragment-based HTS approach is demonstrated to successfully identify two novel scaffolds for development of DDAH-1 inhibitors.

  5. Fluorescent SSCP of overlapping fragments (FSSCP-OF): a highly sensitive method for the screening of mitochondrial DNA variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salas, A; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Lareu, M V

    2001-01-01

    of mtDNA sequencing implies a great lab effort when a high number of samples must be analyzed.The present work introduces a novel and reliable method for the screening of mtDNA variation in the first and second hypervariables (HV1 and HV2) regions which we have denominated fluorescent single strand...... conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of overlapping fragments (FSSCP-OF). FSSCP-OF is based on the basic theory of SSCP analysis and combines two complementary strategies: the use of PCR amplified overlapping fragments and fluorescent detection technology. The overlap region contains a high percentage (50......%) of the d-loop mtDNA variation and for this reason, the probability to detect a polymorphic position by SSCP analysis is clearly increased in comparison to conventional SSCP methods due to the fact that the same polymorphic position is usually placed in a different "relative" position in the two overlapped...

  6. Automated high-accuracy mutation screening with the WAVE nucleic acid fragment analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Karl H.

    2002-06-01

    The analysis of DNA fragments by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on an alkylated, nonporous poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) matrix (DNA Cartridge) using the WAVE Nucleic Acid Fragment Analysis System is a powerful and versatile tool for DNA analysis. Resolution of DNA fragments is based on two principles, size-dependent retention of double-stranded (ds) DNA and differential retention of ds vs. single-stranded (ss) DNA. Temperature Modulated Heteroduplex Analysis utilizes both principles of separation to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and short insertions/deletions. At a given temperature the difference in the melting between homo- and heteroduplexes is revealed by differences in retention times. The temperature at which differential melting occurs is sequence dependent and is predicated accurately using either WAVEMAKER or WAVE Navigator software, which use a modified Fixman-Friere algorithm. Detection of known and unknown sequence variations can be performed on DNA fragments of up to 1,000 base pairs with high sensitivity and specificity. The use of fluorescent labels is compatible with the technology and increases sensitivity. Retention times are increased and resolution is not affected. Fluorescent labeling significantly increases sensitivity.

  7. Ligand Discovery for a Peptide-Binding GPCR by Structure-Based Screening of Fragment- and Lead-Like Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Anirudh; Heine, Philipp; Rudling, Axel; Plückthun, Andreas; Kummer, Lutz; Carlsson, Jens

    2017-03-17

    Peptide-recognizing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are promising therapeutic targets but often resist drug discovery efforts. Determination of crystal structures for peptide-binding GPCRs has provided opportunities to explore structure-based methods in lead development. Molecular docking screens of two chemical libraries, containing either fragment- or lead-like compounds, against a neurotensin receptor 1 crystal structure allowed for a comparison between different drug development strategies for peptide-binding GPCRs. A total of 2.3 million molecules were screened computationally, and 25 fragments and 27 leads that were top-ranked in each library were selected for experimental evaluation. Of these, eight fragments and five leads were confirmed as ligands by surface plasmon resonance. The hit rate for the fragment screen (32%) was thus higher than for the lead-like library (19%), but the affinities of the fragments were ∼100-fold lower. Both screens returned unique scaffolds and demonstrated that a crystal structure of a stabilized peptide-binding GPCR can guide the discovery of small-molecule agonists. The complementary advantages of exploring fragment- and lead-like chemical space suggest that these strategies should be applied synergistically in structure-based screens against challenging GPCR targets.

  8. Urinary antihypertensive drug metabolite screening using molecular networking coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mass spectrometry is the current technique of choice in studying drug metabolism. High-resolution mass spectrometry in combination with MS/MS gas-phase experiments has the potential to contribute to rapid advances in this field. However, the data emerging from such fragmentation spectral files pose challenges to downstream analysis, given their complexity and size. Objectives This study aims to detect and visualize antihypertensive drug metabolites in untargeted metabolomics expe...

  9. Screening of Human Antibody Fab Fragment against HBsAg and the Construction of its dsFv Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Jia, Jiyun Yu, Hongbin Song, Xuelin Liu, Weina Ma, Yuanyong Xu, Chuanfu Zhang, Shicun Dong, Qiao Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to pursue the techniques involving the screening of the human antibody Fab fragment against hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg and the construction of its disulfide-stabilized Fv fragment (dsFv. The phage antibody Fab fragments against HBsAg were screened from the human combinatorial immunoglobulin library. Sequence analysis revealed that its heavy chain gene was complete, but the light chain gene was lost. To improve the affinity of the antibody by chain shuffling, a human antibody light chain gene repertoire was generated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR from the human peripheral blood lymphocytes. A phage antibody sub-library was then constructed by inserting the light chain gene repertoire into the phagmid that contained the Fd gene. Five clones with appreciably higher absorbance than that of the original clone were obtained, which indicated that the affinity of the light chain-shuffled phage antibodies was improved. Then, the mutated genes of dsFv against HBsAg were constructed by using PCR-based point mutagenesis method. Purified VH and VL proteins were folded into a 25-kDa protein, designated as anti-HBsAg dsFv. ELISA and competition ELISA revealed that the dsFv maintained the specificity of the Fab by binding to HBsAg, even through with a lower binding activity. These results have facilitated the undertaking of further functional analyses of the constructed dsFv, and may therefore provide an improved technique for the production and application of dsFvs against HBsAg.

  10. Crystallographic Information Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic information provides the fundamental basis for understanding the properties and behavior of materials. This data, such as chemical composition, unit cell dimensions, space group, and atomic positions, derives from the primary literature--that is, from published experimental measurement or theoretical calculation. Although the…

  11. Fragment Screening of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase for Lead Generation-Structure-Based Hit Evaluation and Chemistry Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yafeng; Olsson, Thomas; Johansson, Carina A; Öster, Linda; Beisel, Hans-Georg; Rohman, Mattias; Karis, David; Bäckström, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is involved in the regulation of many biological processes by metabolizing the key bioactive lipid mediator, epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. For the development of sEH inhibitors with improved physicochemical properties, we performed both a fragment screening and a high-throughput screening aiming at an integrated hit evaluation and lead generation. Followed by a joint dose-response analysis to confirm the hits, the identified actives were then effectively triaged by a structure-based hit-classification approach to three prioritized series. Two distinct scaffolds were identified as tractable starting points for potential lead chemistry work. The oxoindoline series bind at the right-hand side of the active-site pocket with hydrogen bonds to the protein. The 2-phenylbenzimidazole-4-sulfonamide series bind at the central channel with significant induced fit, which has not been previously reported. On the basis of the encouraging initial results, we envision that a new lead series with improved properties could be generated if a vector is found that could merge the cyclohexyl functionality of the oxoindoline series with the trifluoromethyl moiety of the 2-phenylbenzimidazole-4-sulfonamide series.

  12. Distinguishing binders from false positives by free energy calculations: fragment screening against the flap site of HIV protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Forli, Stefano; He, Peng; Perryman, Alex; Wickstrom, Lauren; Vijayan, R S K; Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Stout, David; Gallicchio, Emilio; Olson, Arthur J; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-01-22

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool used in drug discovery and structural biology for predicting the structures of ligand-receptor complexes. However, the accuracy of docking calculations can be limited by factors such as the neglect of protein reorganization in the scoring function; as a result, ligand screening can produce a high rate of false positive hits. Although absolute binding free energy methods still have difficulty in accurately rank-ordering binders, we believe that they can be fruitfully employed to distinguish binders from nonbinders and reduce the false positive rate. Here we study a set of ligands that dock favorably to a newly discovered, potentially allosteric site on the flap of HIV-1 protease. Fragment binding to this site stabilizes a closed form of protease, which could be exploited for the design of allosteric inhibitors. Twenty-three top-ranked protein-ligand complexes from AutoDock were subject to the free energy screening using two methods, the recently developed binding energy analysis method (BEDAM) and the standard double decoupling method (DDM). Free energy calculations correctly identified most of the false positives (≥83%) and recovered all the confirmed binders. The results show a gap averaging ≥3.7 kcal/mol, separating the binders and the false positives. We present a formula that decomposes the binding free energy into contributions from the receptor conformational macrostates, which provides insights into the roles of different binding modes. Our binding free energy component analysis further suggests that improving the treatment for the desolvation penalty associated with the unfulfilled polar groups could reduce the rate of false positive hits in docking. The current study demonstrates that the combination of docking with free energy methods can be very useful for more accurate ligand screening against valuable drug targets.

  13. Fragment library screening reveals remarkable similarities between the G protein-coupled receptor histamine H₄ and the ion channel serotonin 5-HT₃A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Mark H P; de Graaf, Chris; de Kloe, Gerdien E; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Vischer, Henry F; Smits, Rogier A; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Hulscher, Saskia; Silvestri, Linda; Thompson, Andrew J; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E; Lummis, Sarah C R; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2011-09-15

    A fragment library was screened against the G protein-coupled histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) and the ligand-gated ion channel serotonin 5-HT(3A) (5-HT(3A)R). Interestingly, significant overlap was found between H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R hit sets. The data indicates that dual active H(4)R and 5 HT(3A)R fragments have a higher complexity than the selective compounds which has important implications for chemical genomics approaches. The results of our fragment-based library screening study illustrate similarities in ligand recognition between H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R and have important consequences for selectivity profiling in ongoing drug discovery efforts on H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R. The affinity profiles of our fragment screening studies furthermore match the chemical properties of the H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R binding sites and can be used to define molecular interaction fingerprints to guide the in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions and structure.

  14. Macromolecular crystallographic estructure refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonine, Pavel V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Model refinement is a key step in crystallographic structure determination that ensures final atomic structure of macromolecule represents measured diffraction data as good as possible. Several decades have been put into developing methods and computational tools to streamline this step. In this manuscript we provide a brief overview of major milestones of crystallographic computing and methods development pertinent to structure refinement.El refinamiento es un paso clave en el proceso de determinación de una estructura cristalográfica al garantizar que la estructura atómica de la macromolécula final represente de la mejor manera posible los datos de difracción. Han hecho falta varias décadas para poder desarrollar nuevos métodos y herramientas computacionales dirigidas a dinamizar esta etapa. En este artículo ofrecemos un breve resumen de los principales hitos en la computación cristalográfica y de los nuevos métodos relevantes para el refinamiento de estructuras.

  15. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  16. Discovery of potent, selective chymase inhibitors via fragment linking strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven J; Padyana, Anil K; Abeywardane, Asitha; Liang, Shuang; Hao, Ming-Hong; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Proudfoot, John; Farmer, Bennett S; Li, Xiang; Collins, Brandon; Martin, Leslie; Albaugh, Daniel R; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Pullen, Steven S; Takahashi, Hidenori

    2013-06-13

    Chymase plays an important and diverse role in the homeostasis of a number of cardiovascular processes. Herein, we describe the identification of potent, selective chymase inhibitors, developed using fragment-based, structure-guided linking and optimization techniques. High-concentration biophysical screening methods followed by high-throughput crystallography identified an oxindole fragment bound to the S1 pocket of the protein exhibiting a novel interaction pattern hitherto not observed in chymase inhibitors. X-ray crystallographic structures were used to guide the elaboration/linking of the fragment, ultimately leading to a potent inhibitor that was >100-fold selective over cathepsin G and that mitigated a number of liabilities associated with poor physicochemical properties of the series it was derived from.

  17. Design of Potent and Druglike Nonphenolic Inhibitors for Catechol O-Methyltransferase Derived from a Fragment Screening Approach Targeting the S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Christian; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Buettelmann, Bernd; Ehler, Andreas; Rudolph, Markus; Rodríguez Sarmiento, Rosa María

    2016-11-23

    A fragment screening approach designed to target specifically the S-adenosyl-l-methionine pocket of catechol O-methyl transferase allowed the identification of structurally related fragments of high ligand efficiency and with activity on the described orthogonal assays. By use of a reliable enzymatic assay together with X-ray crystallography as guidance, a series of fragment modifications revealed an SAR and, after several expansions, potent lead compounds could be obtained. For the first time nonphenolic and small low nanomolar potent, SAM competitive COMT inhibitors are reported. These compounds represent a novel series of potent COMT inhibitors that might be further optimized to new drugs useful for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, as adjuncts in levodopa based therapy, or for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  18. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Bauman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  19. Phaser crystallographic software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Airlie J; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Adams, Paul D; Winn, Martyn D; Storoni, Laurent C; Read, Randy J

    2007-08-01

    Phaser is a program for phasing macromolecular crystal structures by both molecular replacement and experimental phasing methods. The novel phasing algorithms implemented in Phaser have been developed using maximum likelihood and multivariate statistics. For molecular replacement, the new algorithms have proved to be significantly better than traditional methods in discriminating correct solutions from noise, and for single-wavelength anomalous dispersion experimental phasing, the new algorithms, which account for correlations between F(+) and F(-), give better phases (lower mean phase error with respect to the phases given by the refined structure) than those that use mean F and anomalous differences DeltaF. One of the design concepts of Phaser was that it be capable of a high degree of automation. To this end, Phaser (written in C++) can be called directly from Python, although it can also be called using traditional CCP4 keyword-style input. Phaser is a platform for future development of improved phasing methods and their release, including source code, to the crystallographic community.

  20. Crystallographic topology and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.K.; Burnett, M.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, W.D. [Simon`s Rock Coll., Great Barrington, MA (United States). Div. of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

    1996-10-01

    Geometric topology and structural crystallography concepts are combined to define a new area we call Structural Crystallographic Topology, which may be of interest to both crystallographers and mathematicians. In this paper, we represent crystallographic symmetry groups by orbifolds and crystal structures by Morse - functions. The Morse function uses mildly overlapping Gaussian thermal-motion probability density functions centered on atomic sites to form a critical net with peak, pass, pale, and pit critical points joined into a graph by density gradient-flow separatrices. Critical net crystal structure drawings can be made with the ORTEP-III graphics pro- An orbifold consists of an underlying topological space with an embedded singular set that represents the Wyckoff sites of the crystallographic group. An orbifold for a point group, plane group, or space group is derived by gluing together equivalent edges or faces of a crystallographic asymmetric unit. The critical-net-on-orbifold model incorporates the classical invariant lattice complexes of crystallography and allows concise quotient-space topological illustrations to be drawn without the repetition that is characteristic of normal crystal structure drawings.

  1. CIF (Crystallographic Information File): A Standard for Crystallographic Data Interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. D.

    1996-01-01

    The Crystallographic Information File (CIF) uses the self-defining STAR file structure. This requires the creation of a dictionary of data names and definitions. A basic dictionary of terms needed to describe the crystal structures of small molecules was approved in 1991 and is currently used for the submission of papers to Acta Crystallographica C. A number of extensions to this dictionary are in preparation. By storing the dictionary itself as a STAR file, the definitions and relationships in the CIF dictionary become computer interpretable. This offers many possibilities for the automatic handling of crystallographic information. PMID:27805170

  2. The birth of the European Crystallographic Committee (ECC) and of the European Crystallographic Meetings (ECMs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the circumstances of the establishment of the European Crystallographic Committee, now the European Crystallographic Association, a regional associate of the IUCr, and of the European Crystallographic Meetings.

  3. Screening and identification of male-specific DNA fragments in common carps Cyprinus carpio using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J J; Du, Q Y; Yue, Y Y; Dang, B J; Chang, Z J

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a sex subtractive genomic DNA library was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between male and female Cyprinus carpio. Twenty-two clones with distinguishable hybridization signals were selected and sequenced. The specific primers were designed based on the sequence data. Those primers were then used to amplify the sex-specific fragments from the genomic DNA of male and female carp. The amplified fragments from two clones showed specificity to males but not to females, which were named as Ccmf2 [387 base pairs (bp)] and Ccmf3 (183 bp), respectively. The sex-specific pattern was analysed in a total of 40 individuals from three other different C. carpio. stocks and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella using Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 as dot-blotting probes. The results revealed that the molecular diversity exists on the Y chromosome of C. carpio. No hybridization signals, however, were detected from individuals of C. idella, suggesting that the two sequences are specific to C. carpio. No significant homologous sequences of Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 were found in GenBank. Therefore, it was interpreted that the results as that Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 are two novel male-specific sequences; and both fragments could be used as markers to rapidly and accurately identify the genetic sex of part of C. carpio. This may provide a very efficient selective tool for practically breeding monosex female populations in aquacultural production.

  4. The Crystallographic Information File (CIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I D Brown

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The Crystallographic Information File (CIF, owned by the International Union of Crystallography, is a file structure based on tag-value ASCII pairs with tags defined in machine-readable dictionaries. The crystallographic community publishes and archives large quantities of numeric information generated by crystal structure determinations, and CIF's acceptance was assured by its adoption as the submission format for Acta Crystallographica and by the obvious needs of the community. CIF's strength lies in its dictionaries, which define most of the concepts of crystallography; its weakness is the difficulty of writing software that exploits its full potential.

  5. Screening of cytoplasmic DNA diversity between and within Lupinus mutabilis Sweet and Lupinus albus sensu lato by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, T; Rurek, M; Jańska, H; Augustyniak, H; Sawicka-Sienkiewicz, E J

    2001-01-01

    Seven populations and five mutant lines of the Andean lupin and four species from the section Albus were screened for their mitochondrial and chloroplast polymorphisms. For this purpose the RFLP method with EcoRI as a restriction enzyme was used. Lupinus luteus, Lupinus albus and Phaseolus vulgaris organellar clones as well as amplified fragments were used as probes. We found that mitochondrial probes were more suitable than chloroplast probes for identification of inter- and intra-specific variations within the examined material. Most mitochondrial probes differentiate the two species investigated. A high level of mitochondrial polymorphism was observed among the populations of L. mutabilis in contrast to monomorphism among the species in the section Albus. A limited polymorphism was detected between the mutant lines of L. mutabilis. We conclude from this study that the mitochondrial RFLP analysis is a valuable tool for identification of variability among Andean lupin populations.

  6. Mycobacterium avium restriction fragment lenght polymorphism-IS IS1245 and the simple double repetitive element polymerase chain reaction typing method to screen genetic diversity in Brazilian strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Carvalho de Sequeira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Simple double repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (MaDRE-PCR and Pvu II-IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing methods were used to type 41 Mycobacterium avium isolates obtained from 14 Aids inpatients and 10 environment and animals specimens identified among 53 mycobacteria isolated from 237 food, chicken, and pig. All environmental and animals strains showed orphan patterns by both methods. By MaDRE-PCR four patients, with multiple isolates, showed different patterns, suggesting polyclonal infection that was confirmed by RFLP in two of them. This first evaluation of MaDRE-PCR on Brazilian M. avium strains demonstrated that the method seems to be useful as simple and less expensive typing method for screening genetic diversity in M. avium strains on selected epidemiological studies, although with limitation on analysis identical patterns except for one band.

  7. Novel isoquinolone PDK1 inhibitors discovered through fragment-based lead discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. Catherine; Hu, Qiyue; Lingardo, Laura; Ferre, Rose Ann; Greasley, Samantha; Yan, Jiangli; Kath, John; Chen, Ping; Ermolieff, Jacques; Alton, Gordon

    2011-07-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) is a critical enzyme in the PI3K/AKT pathway and to the activation of AGC family protein kinases, including S6K, SGK, and PKC. Dysregulation of this pathway plays a key role in cancer cell growth, survival and tumor angiogenesis. As such, inhibitors of PDK1 offer the promise of a new therapeutic modality for cancer treatment. Fragment based drug screening has recently become a viable entry point for hit identification. In this work, NMR spectroscopy fragment screening of PDK1 afforded novel chemotypes as orthogonal starting points from HTS screening hits. Compounds identified as hits by NMR spectroscopy were tested in a biochemical assay, and fragments with activity in both assays were clustered. The Pfizer compound file was mined via substructure and 2D similarity search, and the chemotypes were prioritized by ligand efficiency (LE), SAR mining, chemical attractiveness, and chemical enablement of promising vectors. From this effort, an isoquinolone fragment hit, 5 (IC50 870 μM, LE = 0.39), was identified as a novel, ligand efficient inhibitor of PDK1 and a suitable scaffold for further optimization. Initially in the absence of crystallographic data, a fragment growing approach efficiently explored four vectors of the isoquinolone scaffold via parallel synthesis to afford a compound with crystallographic data, 16 (IC50 41.4 μM, LE = 0.33). Subsequent lead optimization efforts provided 24 (IC50 1.8 μM, LE = 0.42), with greater than fivefold selectivity against other key pathway kinases.

  8. Triboluminescence dominated by crystallographic orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuifang; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Wen, Shizhu; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-05-01

    Triboluminescence (TL) is an optical phenomenon that has a long and varied history with broad applications, such as damage detection, X-ray source, and mass health monitoring sensor. So far, the properties and mechanisms of TL remain not completely understood. The TL properties emitted during the sliding contact between Al2O3 and SiO2 surfaces were studied along different crystallographic orientations. In this study, the TL intensity of Al2O3 was significantly enhanced as Al2O3 surface was along a particular crystallographic orientation, which is an unconventional phenomenon. TL enhancement of Al2O3 was not affected by air atmosphere and atomic stocking mode of Al2O3. The enhancement mechanism of Al2O3 may be influenced by the surface state of Al2O3. This work provides a new method to control the intensity of TL and novel ideas to elucidate the TL mechanism.

  9. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  10. Application of Fragment Ion Information as Further Evidence in Probabilistic Compound Screening Using Bayesian Statistics and Machine Learning: A Leap Toward Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldegebriel, Michael; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G J; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel

    2016-08-02

    In this work, we introduce an automated, efficient, and elegant model to combine all pieces of evidence (e.g., expected retention times, peak shapes, isotope distributions, fragment-to-parent ratio) obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS/MS) data for screening purposes. Combining all these pieces of evidence requires a careful assessment of the uncertainties in the analytical system as well as all possible outcomes. To-date, the majority of the existing algorithms are highly dependent on user input parameters. Additionally, the screening process is tackled as a deterministic problem. In this work we present a Bayesian framework to deal with the combination of all these pieces of evidence. Contrary to conventional algorithms, the information is treated in a probabilistic way, and a final probability assessment of the presence/absence of a compound feature is computed. Additionally, all the necessary parameters except the chromatographic band broadening for the method are learned from the data in training and learning phase of the algorithm, avoiding the introduction of a large number of user-defined parameters. The proposed method was validated with a large data set and has shown improved sensitivity and specificity in comparison to a threshold-based commercial software package.

  11. Screening for JH1 genetic defect carriers in Jersey cattle by a polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Guo, Gang; Huang, Hetian; Lu, Lu; Wang, Lijie; Fang, Lingzhao; Liu, Lin; Wang, Yachun; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-09-01

    An autosomal recessive genetic defect termed JH1 has been associated with early embryonic loss in the Jersey cattle breed. The genetic basis has been identified as a cytosine to thymine mutation in the CWC15 gene that changes an amino acid from arginine to a stop code. To screen for JH1 carriers in an imported Jersey population in China, a method based on a polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay (PCR-RFLP) was developed for the accurate diagnosis of the JH1 allele. A total of 449 randomly chosen cows were examined with the PCR-RFLP assay, and 31 were identified as JH1 carriers, corresponding to a carrier frequency of 6.9%. The PCR-RFLP method was validated by DNA sequencing of 8 positive and 13 negative samples, with all 21 samples giving the expected DNA sequence. In addition, 3 negative and 3 positive samples were confirmed by a commercial microarray-based single nucleotide polymorphism assay. Finally, samples from 9 bulls in the United States of known status were correctly identified as carriers (5 bulls) or noncarriers (4 bulls). As the JH1 defect has most likely spread worldwide, implementing routine screening is necessary to avoid the risk of carrier-to-carrier matings and to gradually eradicate the deleterious gene.

  12. Screening, expression, and characterization of an anti-human oxidized low-density lipoprotein single-chain variable fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano-Kuramochi, Miyuki; Fujimura, Takashi; Komba, Shiro; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Machida, Sachiko

    2016-09-01

    Increased levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) in the blood circulation are correlated with atherosclerosis. Monoclonal antibody-based detection systems have been reported for OxLDL. We identified novel single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) having affinity for human OxLDL and related ligands. We constructed an scFv library from nonimmunized human spleen mRNA. Two types (γ+κ and μ+λ) of scFv phage libraries were enriched by biopanning, and five scFv clones with affinity for OxLDL were identified. The γκ5 scFv, which showed the highest affinity for OxLDL, was cloned into pET-22b(+) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). γκ5, expressed as an inclusion body in BL21(DE3), was refolded and purified. The specificity and sensitivity of γκ5 were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The γκ5 scFv showed affinity for OxLDL and acetylated LDL. The sensitivity of γκ5 to low concentrations (1-2 μg/mL) of OxLDL was higher than that to AcLDL and LDL. Finally, we developed a sandwich ELISA using γκ5 and CTLD14 (a lectin-like OxLDL receptor-1 ligand recognition region), which allowed specific detection of OxLDL at a level below 0.1 μg/mL. Our results indicated that the γκ5 scFv was a promising molecule for the detection of modified LDL at very low concentrations.

  13. Screening and identification of human ZnT8-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) from type 1 diabetes phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Yong; Zhang, Xiao; Qin, Yao; Chen, Heng; Xu, Xinyu; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) is a major autoantigen and a predictive marker in type 1 diabetes (T1D). To investigate ZnT8-specific antibodies, a phage display library from T1D was constructed and single-chain antibodies against ZnT8 were screened and identified. Human T1D single-chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display library consists of approximately 1×10(8) clones. After four rounds of bio-panning, seven unique clones were positive by phage ELISA. Among them, C27 and C22, which demonstrated the highest affinity to ZnT8, were expressed in Escherichia coli Top10F' and then purified by affinity chromatography. C27 and C22 specifically bound ZnT8 N/C fusion protein and ZnT8 C terminal dimer with one Arg325Trp mutation. The specificity to human islet cells of these scFvs were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, we have successfully constructed a T1D phage display antibody library and identified two ZnT8-specific scFv clones, C27 and C22. These ZnT8-specific scFvs are potential agents in immunodiagnostic and immunotherapy of T1D.

  14. Internet Based Open Access Crystallographic Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Girish; Seipel, Bjoern; Harvey, Morgan; Garrick, Will; Moeck, Peter

    2006-05-01

    Two freely accessible crystallographic databases are discussed: the Crystallographic Open Database (COD, http://crystallography.net) which contains over 37,000 crystal structures, and the Nano-Crystallography Database (NCD, http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu) which we recently started to support image-based nanocrystallography and (nano) materials science education. Both databases collect crystallographic relevant information in a standardized format; the Crystallographic Information File (CIF). CIF is the standard file format adopted by the International Union of Crystallography (http://iucr.org) for the archiving and distribution of crystallographic information. A subset of the COD, the Predicted Crystallographic Online Database, allows for 3D structural displays of structural polyhedra and wireframes of approximately 2,600 entries. Since electron microscopist are interested in simple, yet technologically important materials, the crystallographic information for those materials will be included in our database. At our NCD site, entries in the COD and the NCD can be visualized in three dimensions (3D) along with (2D) lattice fringe fingerprints plots. The latter supports the identification of unknown nanocrystal phases from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images. Morphological crystal information from the database ``Bestimmungstabellen f"ur Kristalle/ ???????????? ??????????,'' (A.K. Boldyrew and W.W. Doliwo-Dobrowolsky, Zentrales Wissenschaftlichers Institute der Geologie und Sch"urfung, Leningrad/ Moscow, 1937/1939) will also be included in the NCD to support image-based nanocrystallography in 3D.

  15. The New NRL Crystallographic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Michael; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hicks, David; Toher, Cormac; Levy, Ohad; Hart, Gus

    For many years the Naval Research Laboratory maintained an online graphical database of crystal structures for a wide variety of materials. This database has now been redesigned, updated and integrated with the AFLOW framework for high throughput computational materials discovery (http://materials.duke.edu/aflow.html). For each structure we provide an image showing the atomic positions; the primitive vectors of the lattice and the basis vectors of every atom in the unit cell; the space group and Wyckoff positions; Pearson symbols; common names; and Strukturbericht designations, where available. References for each structure are provided, as well as a Crystallographic Information File (CIF). The database currently includes almost 300 entries and will be continuously updated and expanded. It enables easy search of the various structures based on their underlying symmetries, either by Bravais lattice, Pearson symbol, Strukturbericht designation or commonly used prototypes. The talk will describe the features of the database, and highlight its utility for high throughput computational materials design. Work at NRL is funded by a Contract with the Duke University Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  16. Defining the Crystallographic Fingerprint of Extraterrestrial Treasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, L. V.; Bland, P. A.; Timms, N. E.; Daly, L.; Benedix, G. K.; Trimby, P. W.

    2016-08-01

    An approach to determine the crystallographic fingerprint of chondritic matrix grains, which is complimentary to the geochemical signature commonly identified to constrain some aspects of the petrogenesis of a sample.

  17. Quantum fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1993-01-01

    Phenomenological and theoretical aspects of fragmentation for elementary particles (resp. nuclei) are discussed. It is shown that some concepts of classical fragmentation remain relevant in a microscopic framework, exhibiting non-trivial properties of quantum relativistic field theory (resp. lattice percolation). Email contact: pesch@amoco.saclay.cea.fr

  18. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites forin silicoscreening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  19. Fragmented Authoritarianism or Integrated Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    of these business leaders prompts the question of whether we are seeing the development of distinct interest groups that could challenge Party and state authority and create a fragmented polity. However, through the nomenklatura system the Party has an important instrument of control to wield over business groups...... and the Party-state, I suggest the notion of integrated fragmentation....

  20. Nexus, crystallographic computing all around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranswick, Lachlan Michael David; Bisson, William; Cockcroft, Jeremy Karl

    2008-01-01

    Crystallographic Nexus CD-ROMs, containing a range of free crystallographic software for single-crystal and powder diffraction available on the Internet, have been distributed on request since 1996. The free CD is made in the form of a ;virtual Internet' with the main intent of benefiting crystallographers with inadequate Internet access. The IUCr funds an annual/biennial update which is distributed to known previous recipients. Feedback from current recipients indicates the CD is still useful. The most current IUCr-funded CD is being produced by the CCP14 project at University College London and The Royal Institution UK for distribution to the ECM 2007 and AsCA 2007 conferences.

  1. Carbonic Anhydrase II: A Model System for Artificial Copper Center Design, Protein-guided Cycloadditions, Tethering Screenings and Fragment-based Lead Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze Wischeler, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis a variety of quite different fragment-based lead discovery approaches have been applied to the target protein carbonic anhydrase II. The different projects were strongly supported and methodologically tailored towards protein crystallography; a method which is currently emerging as a routine analytical tool. This maturation mainly results from improved radiation sources and enhanced computing power. About 200-250 da...

  2. Non-Crystallographic Symmetry in Packing Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery G. Rau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the following, isomorphism of an arbitrary finite group of symmetry, non-crystallographic symmetry (quaternion groups, Pauli matrices groups, and other abstract subgroups, in addition to the permutation group, are considered. Application of finite groups of permutations to the packing space determines space tilings by policubes (polyominoes and forms a structure. Such an approach establishes the computer design of abstract groups of symmetry. Every finite discrete model of the real structure is an element of symmetry groups, including non-crystallographic ones. The set packing spaces of the same order N characterizes discrete deformation transformations of the structure.

  3. Magma Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  4. Framing Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    , contain distinctive architectural traits, not only based on rational repetition, but also supporting composition and montage as dynamic concepts. Prefab architecture is an architecture of fragmentation, individualization and changeability, and this sets up new challenges for the architect. This paper...... into separate parts or systems: skeleton, skin, services, internal cladding, etc. Each building part/system is being conceived, produced, delivered and maintained by different construction companies. Basically the building is being fragmented into separate parts living their separate lives. The architect has...... to create architectural meaning and give character to an architecture of fragmentation. Layers are both seen as conceptual as well as material frames which define certain strong properties or meanings in the architectural work. Defining layers is a way of separating and organizing; it both defines...

  5. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Wall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  6. Crystallographic theory of the martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The martensitic transformation is one of the most researched topics in the materials science during the 20th century. The second half of this century was mainly remembered by the development of several theories related with the kinetics of phase transformation, the mechanisms involved in the nucleation phenomenon, and the way as the crystallographic change is produced. In this paper are described the fundamental concepts that are defined in the crystallographic framework of the martensitic transformation. The study is focused on the application of the most outstanding crystallographic models: the Bain; the Wechsler, Lieberman & Read; and the Bowles & Mackenzie. The topic is presented based upon the particular features of the martensitic transformation, such as its non-diffusional character, type of interface between parent (austenite and product (martensite phases, the formation of substructural defects, and the shape change; all of these features are mathematically described by equations aimed to predict how the transformation will take place rather than to explain the actual movement of the atoms within the structure. This mathematical development is known as the Phenomenological Theory of Martensite Crystallography (PTMC.

  7. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Susana C. M. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Leal, Ricardo M. F. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Mitchell, Edward P. [EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Forsyth, V. Trevor, E-mail: tforsyth@ill.fr [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  8. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  9. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement. PMID:27437111

  10. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic characterization of FlhF from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bange, Gert; Petzold, Georg; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Centre (BZH), INF 328, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-05-01

    Preliminary crystallographic data are reported for the third SRP GTPase FlhF from Bacillus subtilis. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis contains three proteins belonging to the signal recognition particle (SRP) type GTPase family. The well characterized signal sequence-binding protein SRP54 and the SRP receptor protein FtsY are universally conserved components of the SRP system of protein transport. The third member, FlhF, has been implicated in the placement and assembly of polar flagella. This article describes the overexpression and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of an FlhF fragment that corresponds to the well characterized GTPase domains in SRP54 and FtsY. Three crystal forms are reported with either GDP or GMPPNP and diffract to a resolution of about 3 Å.

  11. Virtual screening with AutoDock Vina and the common pharmacophore engine of a low diversity library of fragments and hits against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase: participation in the SAMPL4 protein-ligand binding challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, Alexander L; Santiago, Daniel N; Forli, Stefano; Martins, Diogo Santos; Olson, Arthur J

    2014-04-01

    To rigorously assess the tools and protocols that can be used to understand and predict macromolecular recognition, and to gain more structural insight into three newly discovered allosteric binding sites on a critical drug target involved in the treatment of HIV infections, the Olson and Levy labs collaborated on the SAMPL4 challenge. This computational blind challenge involved predicting protein-ligand binding against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase (IN), a viral enzyme for which two drugs (that target the active site) have been approved by the FDA. Positive control cross-docking experiments were utilized to select 13 receptor models out of an initial ensemble of 41 different crystal structures of HIV IN. These 13 models of the targets were selected using our new "Rank Difference Ratio" metric. The first stage of SAMPL4 involved using virtual screens to identify 62 active, allosteric IN inhibitors out of a set of 321 compounds. The second stage involved predicting the binding site(s) and crystallographic binding mode(s) for 57 of these inhibitors. Our team submitted four entries for the first stage that utilized: (1) AutoDock Vina (AD Vina) plus visual inspection; (2) a new common pharmacophore engine; (3) BEDAM replica exchange free energy simulations, and a Consensus approach that combined the predictions of all three strategies. Even with the SAMPL4's very challenging compound library that displayed a significantly lower amount of structural diversity than most libraries that are conventionally employed in prospective virtual screens, these approaches produced hit rates of 24, 25, 34, and 27 %, respectively, on a set with 19 % declared binders. Our only entry for the second stage challenge was based on the results of AD Vina plus visual inspection, and it ranked third place overall according to several different metrics provided by the SAMPL4 organizers. The successful results displayed by these approaches highlight the utility of the computational

  12. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The Ph.D. -project Bespoke Fragments seeks to explore and utilise the space emerging between the potentials of digital drawing and fabrication and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Within this span, the project is situated in a shuttling between the virtual and the actual......, the emergence of virtual space is no longer limited to the computer's digital world, but extends into the materials' world. Creation and uncertainty are allowed as virtual parameters in both the digital and reality. Based on this notion the project suggests utilising that exact potential to develop...

  13. World directory of crystallographers and of other scientists employing crystallographic methods

    CERN Document Server

    Filippini, G; Hashizume, H; Torriani, I; Duax, W

    1995-01-01

    The 9th edition of the World Directory of Crystallographers and of Other Scientists Employing Crystallographic Methods, which contains 7907 entries embracing 72 countries, differs considerably from the 8th edition, published in 1990. The content has been updated, and the methods used to acquire the information presented and to produce this new edition of the Directory have involved the latest advances in technology. The Directory is now also available as a regularly updated electronic database, accessible via e-mail, Telnet, Gopher, World-Wide Web, and Mosaic. Full details are given in an Appendix to the printed edition.

  14. Crystallographic Analysis of Tapering of ADP Crystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of crystallographic characteristics of ADP (ammonium dihydrogen phosphate) crystals and the selected growth conditions, the growth habit of ADP crystals was studied. In comparison with pyramidal planes, the growth rate of prismatic faces is slower and more sensitive to the additives and impurities for ADP crystals. When the supersaturation is low, the advance of growth steps on prismatic face can be blocked by ethanol or impurities, the crystal morphology is changed from the tetragonal prism to shuttle (i.e., the tapered shape). The tapering formation of ADP crystallites was structurally studied in a novel view.

  15. Orbits of crystallographic embedding of non-crystallographic groups and applications to virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarock, Reidun; Valiunas, Motiejus; Zappa, Emilio

    2015-11-01

    The architecture of infinite structures with non-crystallographic symmetries can be modelled via aperiodic tilings, but a systematic construction method for finite structures with non-crystallographic symmetry at different radial levels is still lacking. This paper presents a group theoretical method for the construction of finite nested point sets with non-crystallographic symmetry. Akin to the construction of quasicrystals, a non-crystallographic group G is embedded into the point group P of a higher-dimensional lattice and the chains of all G-containing subgroups are constructed. The orbits of lattice points under such subgroups are determined, and it is shown that their projection into a lower-dimensional G-invariant subspace consists of nested point sets with G-symmetry at each radial level. The number of different radial levels is bounded by the index of G in the subgroup of P. In the case of icosahedral symmetry, all subgroup chains are determined explicitly and it is illustrated that these point sets in projection provide blueprints that approximate the organization of simple viral capsids, encoding information on the structural organization of capsid proteins and the genomic material collectively, based on two case studies. Contrary to the affine extensions previously introduced, these orbits endow virus architecture with an underlying finite group structure, which lends itself better to the modelling of dynamic properties than its infinite-dimensional counterpart.

  16. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues.

  17. Crystallization screening: the influence of history on current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Joseph R; Newman, Janet; Snell, Edward H

    2014-07-01

    While crystallization historically predates crystallography, it is a critical step for the crystallographic process. The rich history of crystallization and how that history influences current practices is described. The tremendous impact of crystallization screens on the field is discussed.

  18. X-ray crystallographic studies of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbeda, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox active metals and to the complication of structural changes that may be induced by X-ray irradiation of protein crystals.

  19. Fragment and Similarity based on Virtual Screening for Anti-asthma Traditional Chinese Medicine%基于片段搜索和相似性搜索的抗哮喘中药发现研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔连生; 郭亦然; 张燕玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To obtain new potential active traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compounds for the prevention and treatment of asthma.Method:The drugs with anti-asthma activity were collected from Drugbank database.Two virtual screening methods,active fragment-based and structural similarity-based,were used respectively for the screening of potential active TCM compounds from traditional Chinse medicine database (TCMD 2009).Combined the principles and methods of TCM,the source TCM of the hit compounds were then traced for the formulating prescription against asthma.Result:Thirty-six drugs with the action on eight targets were obtained from the Drugbank database.Seventy-two potential active compounds,which come from 39 commonly used TCM,were hit by virtual screening.Some of the source TCM have been demonstrated to have the anti-asthma effect,such as ephedra,pinellia,asarum,ginger,earthworm,licorice,ophiopogon,aster,evodia and so on.The principle of clearing lung-heat and removing phlegm for lowering adverse qi is always used for the treatment of thermal asthma,while the warming lung for dispelling cold and removing phlegm is for cold asthma.Two prescriptions were discussed for thermal and cold asthma respectively.The prescription consisted by ephedra,pinellia,ginger,licorice was discussed for cold asthma,while the prescription of ephedra,earthworm,licorice for thermal asthma.Conclusion:The results showed that the application of fragment-based search and similarity search methods are feasible for the discovery of Chinese medicine.%目的:探讨利用防治哮喘的常用化学药物结构信息筛选活性中药.方法:以Drugbank数据库中具有明确治疗哮喘的活性化学药物为基础,以活性片段搜索和结构相似性搜索为筛选方法,获得具有防治哮喘的中药成分;追溯活性成分的来源中药,并结合中医防治哮喘的治法治则,探讨进行组方.结果:以36个作用于8个靶点的化学药物为基础,

  20. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  1. Rapid Creation of Three-Dimensional, Tactile Models from Crystallographic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan B. Fisher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the conversion of crystallographic information framework (CIF files to stereo lithographic data files suitable for printing on three-dimensional printers is presented. Crystallographic information framework or CIF files are capable of being manipulated in virtual space by a variety of computer programs, but their visual representations are limited to the two-dimensional surface of the computer screen. Tactile molecular models that demonstrate critical ideas, such as symmetry elements, play a critical role in enabling new students to fully visualize crystallographic concepts. In the past five years, major developments in three-dimensional printing has lowered the cost and complexity of these systems to a level where three-dimensional molecular models may be easily created provided that the data exists in a suitable format. Herein a method is described for the conversion of CIF file data using existing free software that allows for the rapid creation of inexpensive molecular models. This approach has numerous potential applications in basic research, education, visualization, and crystallography.

  2. Fragment library design: using cheminformatics and expert chemists to fill gaps in existing fragment libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchukian, Peter S; So, Sung-Sau; Fischer, Christian; Waller, Chris L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment based screening (FBS) has emerged as a mainstream lead discovery strategy in academia, biotechnology start-ups, and large pharma. As a prerequisite of FBS, a structurally diverse library of fragments is desirable in order to identify chemical matter that will interact with the range of diverse target classes that are prosecuted in contemporary screening campaigns. In addition, it is also desirable to offer synthetically amenable starting points to increase the probability of a successful fragment evolution through medicinal chemistry. Herein we describe a method to identify biologically relevant chemical substructures that are missing from an existing fragment library (chemical gaps), and organize these chemical gaps hierarchically so that medicinal chemists can efficiently navigate the prioritized chemical space and subsequently select purchasable fragments for inclusion in an enhanced fragment library.

  3. Crystallographic orientation dependent etching of graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemes-Incze, Peter; Biro, Laszlo Peter [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, PO. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Magda, Gabor [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), PO Box 91, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Kamaras, Katalin [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, PO Box 49, 1525, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-04-15

    Graphene has gripped the scientific community ever since its discovery in 2004, with very promising electronic properties and hopes to integrate graphene into nanoelectronic devices. For graphene to make its way into electronic devices, two major obstacles have to be overcome: reproducible preparation of large area graphene samples and patterning techniques to obtain functional components. In this paper we present a graphene etching technique, which is crystallographic orientation selective and allows for the patterning of graphene layers using a chemical reduction process. The process involves the reduction of the SiO{sub 2} support by the carbon in the graphene itself. This reaction only occurs at the sample edges and does not result in the degradation of the graphene crystal lattice itself. However, we have observed evidence of strong hole doping in our etched samples. This etching technique opens up new possibilities in graphene patterning and modification. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Determination of crystallographic intensities from sparse data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Ayyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray serial microcrystallography involves the collection and merging of frames of diffraction data from randomly oriented protein microcrystals. The number of diffracted X-rays in each frame is limited by radiation damage, and this number decreases with crystal size. The data in the frame are said to be sparse if too few X-rays are collected to determine the orientation of the microcrystal. It is commonly assumed that sparse crystal diffraction frames cannot be merged, thereby setting a lower limit to the size of microcrystals that may be merged with a given source fluence. The EMC algorithm [Loh & Elser (2009, Phys. Rev. E, 80, 026705] has previously been applied to reconstruct structures from sparse noncrystalline data of objects with unknown orientations [Philipp et al. (2012, Opt. Express, 20, 13129–13137; Ayyer et al. (2014, Opt. Express, 22, 2403–2413]. Here, it is shown that sparse data which cannot be oriented on a per-frame basis can be used effectively as crystallographic data. As a proof-of-principle, reconstruction of the three-dimensional diffraction intensity using sparse data frames from a 1.35 kDa molecule crystal is demonstrated. The results suggest that serial microcrystallography is, in principle, not limited by the fluence of the X-ray source, and collection of complete data sets should be feasible at, for instance, storage-ring X-ray sources.

  5. Crystallographic interpretation of Galois symmetries for magnetic pentagonal ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, J.; Lulek, T.; Łabuz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Galois symmetry of exact Bethe Ansatz eigenstates for the magnetic pentagonal ring within the XXX model are investigated by a comparison with crystallographic constructions of space groups. It follows that the arithmetic symmetry of Bethe parameters for the interior of the Brillouin zone admits crystallographic interpretation, in terms of the periodic square Z2 ×Z2 , that is the two-dimensional crystal lattice with Born-Karman period two in both directions.

  6. Fragment-based approaches to enzyme inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Ciulli, Alessio; Abell, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Fragment-based approaches have provided a new paradigm for small-molecule drug discovery. The methodology is complementary to high-throughput screening approaches, starting from fragments of low molecular complexity and high ligand efficiency, and building up to more potent inhibitors. The approach, which depends heavily on a number of biophysical techniques, is now being taken up by more groups in both industry and academia. This article describes key aspects of the process and highlights re...

  7. Crystallographic analysis of small ribozymes and riboswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Geoffrey M; Liberman, Joseph A; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Krucinska, Jolanta; Salim, Mohammad; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Ribozymes and riboswitches are RNA motifs that accelerate biological reactions and regulate gene expression in response to metabolite recognition, respectively. These RNA molecules gain functionality via complex folding that cannot be predicted a priori, and thus requires high-resolution three-dimensional structure determination to locate key functional attributes. Herein, we present an overview of the methods used to determine small RNA structures with an emphasis on RNA preparation, crystallization, and structure refinement. We draw upon examples from our own research in the analysis of the leadzyme ribozyme, the hairpin ribozyme, a class I preQ(1) riboswitch, and variants of a larger class II preQ(1) riboswitch. The methods presented provide a guide for comparable investigations of noncoding RNA molecules including a 48-solution, "first choice" RNA crystal screen compiled from our prior successes with commercially available screens.

  8. Research on the photoelectric measuring method of warhead fragment velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-01

    The velocity of warhead fragment is the key criteria to determine its mutilation efficiency. But owing to the small size, larger quantity, irregular shape, high speed, arbitrary direction, large dispersion of warhead fragment and adverse environment, the test of fragment velocity parameter is very difficult. The paper designed an optoelectronic system to measure the average velocity of warhead fragments accurately. The apparatus included two parallel laser screens spaced apart at a known fixed distance for providing time measurement between start and stop signals. The large effective screen area was composed of laser source, retro-reflector and large area photo-diode. Whenever a moving fragment interrupted two optical screens, the system would generate a target signal. Due to partial obscuration of the incident energy and the poor test condition of the explosion, fragment target signal is easily disturbed. Therefore, fragments signal processing technology has become a key technology of the system. The noise of signal was reduced by employing wavelet decomposition and reconstruction. The time of fragment passing though the target was obtained by adopting peak detection algorithm. Based on the method of search peak in different width scale and waveform trend by using optima wavelet, the problem of rolling waveform was solved. Lots of fragments experiments of the different types of the warheads were conducted. Experimental results show that: warhead fragments capture rate of system is better than 98%, which can give velocity of each fragment in the density of less than 20 pieces per m2.

  9. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  10. Crystallographic orientation and concentric layers in spicules of calcareous sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, André Linhares; Ribeiro, Bárbara; Lemos, Moara; Werckmann, Jacques; Borojevic, Radovan; Fromont, Jane; Klautau, Michelle; Farina, Marcos

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the crystallography of calcareous sponges (Porifera) spicules and the organization pattern of the concentric layers present in their inner structure were investigated in 10 species of the subclass Calcaronea and three species of the subclass Calcinea. Polished spicules had specific concentric patterns that varied depending on the plane in which the spicules were sectioned. A 3D model of the concentric layers was created to interpret these patterns and the biomineralization process of the triactine spicules. The morphology of the spicules was compared with the crystallographic orientation of the calcite crystals by analyzing the Kikuchi diffraction patterns using a scanning electron microscope. Triactine spicules from the subclass Calcinea had actines (rays) elongated in the 〈210〉 direction, which is perpendicular to the c-axis. The scale spicules of the hypercalcified species Murrayona phanolepis presented the c-axis perpendicular to the plane of the scale, which is in accordance with the crystallography of all other Calcinea. The triactine spicules of the calcaronean species had approximately the same crystallographic orientation with the unpaired actine elongated in the ∼[211] direction. Only one Calcaronea species, whose triactine was regular, had a different orientation. Three different crystallographic orientations were found in diactines. Spicules with different morphologies, dimensions and positions in the sponge body had similar crystallographic directions suggesting that the crystallographic orientation of spicules in calcareous sponges is conserved through evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fragment growing exploiting dynamic combinatorial chemistry of inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mondal, Milon; Groothuis, Daphne E.; Hirsch, Anna K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has emerged as an efficient hit-identification and/or-optimization strategy with a higher hit rate than high-throughput screening (HTS). Whereas fragment linking is more challenging, fragment growing has become the preferred fragment-optimization strategy, requiring

  12. Crystallographic Topology 2: Overview and Work in Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    This overview describes an application of contemporary geometric topology and stochastic process concepts to structural crystallography. In this application, crystallographic groups become orbifolds, crystal structures become Morse functions on orbifolds, and vibrating atoms in a crystal become vector valued Gaussian measures with the Radon-Nikodym property. Intended crystallographic benefits include new methods for visualization of space groups and crystal structures, analysis of the thermal motion patterns seen in ORTEP drawings, and a classification scheme for crystal structures based on their Heegaard splitting properties.

  13. The importance of hydration thermodynamics in fragment-to-lead optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Osamu; Shimada, Yuzo; Yoshidome, Daisuke

    2014-12-01

    Using a computational approach to assess changes in solvation thermodynamics upon ligand binding, we investigated the effects of water molecules on the binding energetics of over 20 fragment hits and their corresponding optimized lead compounds. Binding activity and X-ray crystallographic data of published fragment-to-lead optimization studies from various therapeutically relevant targets were studied. The analysis reveals a distinct difference between the thermodynamic profile of water molecules displaced by fragment hits and those displaced by the corresponding optimized lead compounds. Specifically, fragment hits tend to displace water molecules with notably unfavorable excess entropies-configurationally constrained water molecules-relative to those displaced by the newly added moieties of the lead compound during the course of fragment-to-lead optimization. Herein we describe the details of this analysis with the goal of providing practical guidelines for exploiting thermodynamic signatures of binding site water molecules in the context of fragment-to-lead optimization.

  14. Crystal structure refinement a crystallographers guide to SHELXL

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A crystallographers guide to SHELXL, covering various aspects of practical crystal structure refinement, from the treatment of hydrogen atoms to the assignment of atom types, and more. After an introduction to SHELXL, a brief survey of crystal structure refinement is provided.

  15. Recovery of crystallographic texture in remineralized dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Samera; Anderson, Paul; Al-Jawad, Maisoon

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) and position of the (002) Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected enamel to regain

  16. Crystallographic Mapping of Guided Nanowires by Second Harmonic Generation Polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeman, Lior; Ben-Zvi, Regev; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Oron, Dan; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-02-08

    The growth of horizontal nanowires (NWs) guided by epitaxial and graphoepitaxial relations with the substrate is becoming increasingly attractive owing to the possibility of controlling their position, direction, and crystallographic orientation. In guided NWs, as opposed to the extensively characterized vertically grown NWs, there is an increasing need for understanding the relation between structure and properties, specifically the role of the epitaxial relation with the substrate. Furthermore, the uniformity of crystallographic orientation along guided NWs and over the substrate has yet to be checked. Here we perform highly sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) polarimetry of polar and nonpolar guided ZnO NWs grown on R-plane and M-plane sapphire. We optically map large areas on the substrate in a nondestructive way and find that the crystallographic orientations of the guided NWs are highly selective and specific for each growth direction with respect to the substrate lattice. In addition, we perform SHG polarimetry along individual NWs and find that the crystallographic orientation is preserved along the NW in both polar and nonpolar NWs. While polar NWs show highly uniform SHG along their axis, nonpolar NWs show a significant change in the local nonlinear susceptibility along a few micrometers, reflected in a reduction of 40% in the ratio of the SHG along different crystal axes. We suggest that these differences may be related to strain accumulation along the nonpolar wires. We find SHG polarimetry to be a powerful tool to study both selectivity and uniformity of crystallographic orientations of guided NWs with different epitaxial relations.

  17. Recovery of crystallographic texture in remineralized dental enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samera Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture and position of the (002 Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected

  18. Mechanisms in Impact Fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Wittel, Falk K.; Carmona, Humberto A.; Kun, Ferenc; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    The brittle fragmentation of spheres is studied numerically by a 3D Discrete Element Model. Large scale computer simulations are performed with models that consist of agglomerates of many spherical particles, interconnected by beam-truss elements. We focus on a detailed description of the fragmentation process and study several fragmentation mechanisms involved. The evolution of meridional cracks is studied in detail. These cracks are found to initiate in the inside of the specimen with quasi...

  19. DNA fragmentation in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cleavage of chromosomal DNA into oligonucleosomal size fragments is an integral part of apoptosis. Elegant biochemical work identified the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) as a major apoptotic endonuclease for DNA fragmentation in vitro. Genetic studies in mice support the importance of DFF in DNA fragmentation and possibly in apoptosis in vivo. Recent work also suggests the existence of additional endonucleases for DNA degradation. Understanding the roles of individual endonucleases in apoptosis, and how they might coordinate to degrade DNA in different tissues during normal development and homeostasis, as well as in various diseased states, will be a major research focus in the near future.

  20. An improved model for fragment-based lead generation at AstraZeneca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Nathan; Spadola, Loredana; Cowen, Scott; Patel, Joe; Schönherr, Heike; Cao, Qing; McKenzie, Andrew; Edfeldt, Fredrik; Rabow, Al; Goodnow, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Modest success rates in fragment-based lead generation (FBLG) projects at AstraZeneca (AZ) prompted operational changes to improve performance. In this review, we summarize these changes, emphasizing the construction and composition of the AZ fragment library, screening practices and working model. We describe the profiles of the screening method for specific fragment subsets and statistically assess our ability to follow up on fragment hits through near-neighbor selection. Performance analysis of our second-generation fragment library (FL2) in screening campaigns illustrates the complementary nature of flat and 3D fragments in exploring protein-binding pockets and highlights our ability to deliver fragment hits using multiple screening techniques for various target classes. The new model has had profound impact on the successful delivery of lead series to drug discovery projects.

  1. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  2. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Henriques

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  3. A crystallographic perspective on sharing data and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Ian J; Groom, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    The crystallographic community is in many ways an exemplar of the benefits and practices of sharing data. Since the inception of the technique, virtually every published crystal structure has been made available to others. This has been achieved through the establishment of several specialist data centres, including the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, which produces the Cambridge Structural Database. Containing curated structures of small organic molecules, some containing a metal, the database has been produced for almost 50 years. This has required the development of complex informatics tools and an environment allowing expert human curation. As importantly, a financial model has evolved which has, to date, ensured the sustainability of the resource. However, the opportunities afforded by technological changes and changing attitudes to sharing data make it an opportune moment to review current practices.

  4. Recent developments in crystallographic investigation of martensitic transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Nanju; DONG Guixia; LIN Xiaoping; WANG Baoqi; MA Xiaoli

    2004-01-01

    The results and new knowledge obtained in recent years by using an atom force microscope (AFM) to investigate the surface relieves and to reveal the lattice deformation characteristics in martensitic transformation (MT) are summarized. All-round analysis and research about crystallography and morphology of MT have been done based on our "displacement vector" theory. New viewpoints that the "invariant-plane-strain" criterion have no universality and that the large rotation of habit-planes takes place in {557} lath and {225} plate martensites are put forward. Thereby, the formation mode of {557} martensite is established, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, according to the self-accommodation principle between variants crystallographic calculations of twin and multi-variant martensites in shape memory alloys have been carried out. The calculation method greatly simplifies the crystallographic calculation process of phenomenological theory. And the calculated results are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  5. Fragment-based lead discovery: leads by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Robin A E; Congreve, Miles; Murray, Christopher W; Rees, David C

    2005-07-15

    Fragment-based lead discovery (also referred to as needles, shapes, binding elements, seed templates or scaffolds) is a new lead discovery approach in which much lower molecular weight (120-250 Da) compounds are screened relative to HTS campaigns. Fragment-based hits are typically weak inhibitors (10 microM-mM), and therefore need to be screened at higher concentration using very sensitive biophysical detection techniques such as protein crystallography and NMR as the primary screening techniques, rather than bioassays. Compared with HTS hits, these fragments are simpler, less functionalized compounds with correspondingly lower affinity. However, fragment hits typically possess high 'ligand efficiency' (binding affinity per heavy atom) and so are highly suitable for optimization into clinical candidates with good drug-like properties.

  6. Fragment-based activity space: smaller is better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesterkamp, Thomas; Whittaker, Mark

    2008-06-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has the potential to supersede traditional high throughput screening based drug discovery for molecular targets amenable to structure determination. This is because the chemical diversity coverage is better accomplished by a fragment collection of reasonable size than by larger HTS collections. Furthermore, fragments have the potential to be efficient target binders with higher probability than more elaborated drug-like compounds. The selection of the fragment screening technique is driven by sensitivity and throughput considerations, and we advocate in the present article the use of high concentration bioassays in conjunction with NMR-based hit confirmation. Subsequent ligand X-ray structure determination of the fragment ligand in complex with the target protein by co-crystallisation or crystal soaking can focus on confirmed binders.

  7. String fragmentation; La fragmentation des cordes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees - SUBATECH, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-10-01

    The classical string model is used in VENUS as a fragmentation model. For the soft domain simple 2-parton strings were sufficient, whereas for higher energies up to LHC, the perturbative regime of the QCD gives additional soft gluons, which are mapped on the string as so called kinks, energy singularities between the leading partons. The kinky string model is chosen to handle fragmentation of these strings by application of the Lorentz invariant area law. The `kinky strings` model, corresponding to the perturbative gluons coming from pQCD, takes into consideration this effect by treating the partons and gluons on the same footing. The decay law is always the Artru-Menessier area law which is the most realistic since it is invariant to the Lorentz and gauge transformations. For low mass strings a manipulation of the rupture point is necessary if the string corresponds already to an elementary particle determined by the mass and the flavor content. By means of the fragmentation model it will be possible to simulate the data from future experiments at LHC and RHIC 3 refs.

  8. Fragmentation trees reloaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, Sebastian; Dührkop, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics commonly uses liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to measure abundances of metabolites; subsequent tandem mass spectrometry is used to derive information about individual compounds. One of the bottlenecks in this experimental setup is the interpretation of fragmentation spectra to accurately and efficiently identify compounds. Fragmentation trees have become a powerful tool for the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data of small molecules. These trees are determined from the data using combinatorial optimization, and aim at explaining the experimental data via fragmentation cascades. Fragmentation tree computation does not require spectral or structural databases. To obtain biochemically meaningful trees, one needs an elaborate optimization function (scoring). We present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees, transforming the combinatorial optimization into a Maximum A Posteriori estimator. We demonstrate the superiority of the new scoring for two tasks: both for the de novo identification of molecular formulas of unknown compounds, and for searching a database for structurally similar compounds, our method SIRIUS 3, performs significantly better than the previous version of our method, as well as other methods for this task. SIRIUS 3 can be a part of an untargeted metabolomics workflow, allowing researchers to investigate unknowns using automated computational methods.Graphical abstractWe present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees from tandem mass spectrometry data based on Bayesian statistics. The best scoring fragmentation tree most likely explains the molecular formula of the measured parent ion.

  9. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E. [ETSIT-ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M. [Dept. Química Inorgánica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  10. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gačević, Ž.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M.; Calleja, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  11. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  12. Embedded Fragments Registry (EFR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — In 2009, the Department of Defense estimated that approximately 40,000 service members who served in OEF/OIF may have embedded fragment wounds as the result of small...

  13. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  14. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  15. Fragmentation Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The fragmentation model combines patch size and patch continuity with diversity of vegetation types per patch and rarity of vegetation types per patch. A patch was...

  16. Thermodynamics of fragment binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczy, György G; Keserű, György M

    2012-04-23

    The ligand binding pockets of proteins have preponderance of hydrophobic amino acids and are typically within the apolar interior of the protein; nevertheless, they are able to bind low complexity, polar, water-soluble fragments. In order to understand this phenomenon, we analyzed high resolution X-ray data of protein-ligand complexes from the Protein Data Bank and found that fragments bind to proteins with two near optimal geometry H-bonds on average. The linear extent of the fragment binding site was found not to be larger than 10 Å, and the H-bonding region was found to be restricted to about 5 Å on average. The number of conserved H-bonds in proteins cocrystallized with multiple different fragments is also near to 2. These fragment binding sites that are able to form limited number of strong H-bonds in a hydrophobic environment are identified as hot spots. An estimate of the free-energy gain of H-bond formation versus apolar desolvation supports that fragment sized compounds need H-bonds to achieve detectable binding. This suggests that fragment binding is mostly enthalpic that is in line with their observed binding thermodynamics documented in Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) data sets and gives a thermodynamic rationale for fragment based approaches. The binding of larger compounds tends to more rely on apolar desolvation with a corresponding increase of the entropy content of their binding free-energy. These findings explain the reported size-dependence of maximal available affinity and ligand efficiency both behaving differently in the small molecule region featured by strong H-bond formation and in the larger molecule region featured by apolar desolvation.

  17. Searching Fragment Spaces with feature trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessel, Uta; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Lilienthal, Markus; Claussen, Holger

    2009-02-01

    Virtual combinatorial chemistry easily produces billions of compounds, for which conventional virtual screening cannot be performed even with the fastest methods available. An efficient solution for such a scenario is the generation of Fragment Spaces, which encode huge numbers of virtual compounds by their fragments/reagents and rules of how to combine them. Similarity-based searches can be performed in such spaces without ever fully enumerating all virtual products. Here we describe the generation of a huge Fragment Space encoding about 5 * 10(11) compounds based on established in-house synthesis protocols for combinatorial libraries, i.e., we encode practically evaluated combinatorial chemistry protocols in a machine readable form, rendering them accessible to in silico search methods. We show how such searches in this Fragment Space can be integrated as a first step in an overall workflow. It reduces the extremely huge number of virtual products by several orders of magnitude so that the resulting list of molecules becomes more manageable for further more elaborated and time-consuming analysis steps. Results of a case study are presented and discussed, which lead to some general conclusions for an efficient expansion of the chemical space to be screened in pharmaceutical companies.

  18. Method for Measuring Velocity of Warhead Fragments Based on Photoelectric Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For measuring velocity and impacting position of single fragment of warhead, a non-contact measuring method is proposed, in which a six-light-screen array, a position indicator, a multi-channel chronograph and a computer are used.The principle of measurement is described. The key device of the system is a light screen array sensor which consists of six light screens allocated with certain geometrical parameters. When the fragment flies through the light screen array, the time of passing through each of the screens is recorded by the multi-channel chronograph. According to the time data and the geometrical parameters of the array, the velocity vector and the location of the fragment can be calculated immediately. The presented method can be used to locate the fragment and to measure the real velocity on its flying direction. It can also be used to measure the velocity of a fragment swarm after the system is engineered further.

  19. Crystallographic B factor of critical residues at enzyme active site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海龙; 宋时英; 林政炯

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-seven sets of crystallographic enzyme data were selected from Protein Data Bank (PDB, 1995). The average temperature factors (B) of the critical residues at the active site and the whole molecule of those enzymes were calculated respectively. The statistical results showed that the critical residues at the active site of most of the enzymes had lower B factors than did the whole molecules, indicating that in the crystalline state the critical residues at the active site of the natural enzymes possess more stable conformation than do the whole molecules. The flexibility of the active site during the unfolding by denaturing was also discussed.

  20. Identification, SAR studies, and X-ray co-crystallographic analysis of a novel furanopyrimidine aurora kinase A inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj; Tsai, Ming-Tsung; Chu, Chang-Ying; Uang, Biing-Jiun; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chang, Chun-Yu; Chang, Teng-Yuan; Leou, Jiun-Shyang; Teng, Chi-Huang; Wu, Jian-Sung; Fang, Ming-Yu; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Hsu, John T-A; Wu, Su-Ying; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang

    2010-02-01

    Herein we reveal a simple method for the identification of novel Aurora kinase A inhibitors through substructure searching of an in-house compound library to select compounds for testing. A hydrazone fragment conferring Aurora kinase activity and heterocyclic rings most frequently reported in kinase inhibitors were used as substructure queries to filter the in-house compound library collection prior to testing. Five new series of Aurora kinase inhibitors were identified through this strategy, with IC(50) values ranging from approximately 300 nM to approximately 15 microM, by testing only 133 compounds from a database of approximately 125,000 compounds. Structure-activity relationship studies and X-ray co-crystallographic analysis of the most potent compound, a furanopyrimidine derivative with an IC(50) value of 309 nM toward Aurora kinase A, were carried out. The knowledge gained through these studies could help in the future design of potent Aurora kinase inhibitors.

  1. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurationa...

  2. Fragments of Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    Time travel films necessarily fragment linear narratives, as scenes are revisited with differences from the first time we saw it. Popular films such as Back to the Future mine comedy from these visitations, but there are many different approaches. One extreme is Chris Marker's La Jetée - a film...... made almost completely of still images, recounting the end of the world. These stills can be viewed as fragments that have survived the end of the world and now provide the only access to the events that occured. Shane Carruth's Primer has a different approach to time travel, the narrative diegesis...

  3. The Serendipity of Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leixnering, Stephan; Meyer, Renate E.

    , it was the central government’s task to coordinate, steer and control the newly emerged decentralized organizations. This raises questions about the overall design of the public sector at present. Our paper engages with the prevalent public governance phenomenon of fragmentation from a design perspective in order...... form of organizing between networks and formal organization: lacking a single center and featuring multiplex and multifaceted relations within the politico-administrative apparatus and between government and PSOs, high fragmentation, local and robust action, but latent structures of significant formal...

  4. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  5. Crystallization screening: the influence of history on current practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Joseph R.; Newman, Janet; Snell, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    While crystallization historically predates crystallography, it is a critical step for the crystallographic process. The rich history of crystallization and how that history influences current practices is described. The tremendous impact of crystallization screens on the field is discussed. PMID:25005076

  6. Crystallographic Orientation Effect on Electromigration in Ni-Sn Microbump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-09-01

    This article addresses the reliability challenges regarding electromigration in developing three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-ICs). The line-type sandwich structure of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was used to simulate microbumps to examine the reliability of electromigration in 3D-IC technology. The solder strip of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was stressed with a current density of 1.0 × 104 A/cm2 at 150°C. The current stressing enhanced the reaction between the solder and Ni to form Ni3Sn4, which occupied the entire joint and transformed into a Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni structure when the solder was completely consumed. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to analyze the crystallographic characteristics of Sn and Ni3Sn4 as related to the electromigration effect. The results indicated that the crystallographic orientation of Sn plays a significant role in the Ni/Sn3.5Ag/Ni, whereas the orientation of Ni3Sn4 is the dominant factor of diffusion behavior in the Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni.

  7. Crystallographic properties of magnetron sputtered barium ferrite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capraro, S. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: stephane.capraro@univ-st-etienne.fr; Berre, M. Le [LPM, UMR 5511, INSA Lyon, 7 av. Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chatelon, J.P. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France); Bayard, B. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France); Joisten, H. [CEA-LETI, 17 rue des martyrs, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Canut, C. [LPMCN, University Lyon I, 43 Bvd. du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villerbanne, Cedex (France); Barbier, D. [LPM, UMR 5511, INSA Lyon, 7 av. Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Rousseau, J.J. [Laboratoire DIOM, University of Saint-Etienne, 23 rue Michelon, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex (France)

    2004-09-15

    The development of devices combining a ferrite with a semiconductor chip is a major focus of current research. Barium hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} or BaM) thick films are deposited here using a RF magnetron sputtering system. Films are amorphous and non magnetic after deposition. Post-deposition thermal annealing is employed to make the films crystallize. The effects of the substrate, thermal annealing process, thickness, substrate temperature on crystallographic properties and stoichiometry are studied using a X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Rutherford back-scattering (RBS). The in-depth homogeneity of Ba, Fe and O is evaluated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The study shows a good crystallization of BaM films and there is a preferential orientation among the crystallographic planes (1 0 1), (2 0 0), (2 0 3), (1 0 2), (1 1 0) and (2 0 5) when BaM films are prepared at low RF power and when the substrate is heated. For several elaboration parameters, grains size is in the range of 25 and 40 nm and BaM films are stoichiometric with regard to the target stoichiometry.

  8. Crystallographic Orientation Effect on Electromigration in Ni-Sn Microbump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses the reliability challenges regarding electromigration in developing three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-ICs). The line-type sandwich structure of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was used to simulate microbumps to examine the reliability of electromigration in 3D-IC technology. The solder strip of Ni/Sn3.5Ag(15 μm)/Ni was stressed with a current density of 1.0 × 104 A/cm2 at 150°C. The current stressing enhanced the reaction between the solder and Ni to form Ni3Sn4, which occupied the entire joint and transformed into a Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni structure when the solder was completely consumed. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to analyze the crystallographic characteristics of Sn and Ni3Sn4 as related to the electromigration effect. The results indicated that the crystallographic orientation of Sn plays a significant role in the Ni/Sn3.5Ag/Ni, whereas the orientation of Ni3Sn4 is the dominant factor of diffusion behavior in the Ni/Ni3Sn4/Ni.

  9. Crystallographic alignment of high-density gallium nitride nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Zhang, Yanfeng; Goldberger, Joshua; Sirbuly, Donald; Denlinger, Jonathan; Yang, Peidong

    2004-08-01

    Single-crystalline, one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are considered to be one of the critical building blocks for nanoscale optoelectronics. Elucidation of the vapour-liquid-solid growth mechanism has already enabled precise control over nanowire position and size, yet to date, no reports have demonstrated the ability to choose from different crystallographic growth directions of a nanowire array. Control over the nanowire growth direction is extremely desirable, in that anisotropic parameters such as thermal and electrical conductivity, index of refraction, piezoelectric polarization, and bandgap may be used to tune the physical properties of nanowires made from a given material. Here we demonstrate the use of metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and appropriate substrate selection to control the crystallographic growth directions of high-density arrays of gallium nitride nanowires with distinct geometric and physical properties. Epitaxial growth of wurtzite gallium nitride on (100) gamma-LiAlO(2) and (111) MgO single-crystal substrates resulted in the selective growth of nanowires in the orthogonal [1\\[Evec]0] and [001] directions, exhibiting triangular and hexagonal cross-sections and drastically different optical emission. The MOCVD process is entirely compatible with the current GaN thin-film technology, which would lead to easy scale-up and device integration.

  10. Diffusion-equation method for crystallographic figure of merits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvardsen, Anders J; David, William I F

    2010-09-01

    Global optimization methods play a significant role in crystallography, particularly in structure solution from powder diffraction data. This paper presents the mathematical foundations for a diffusion-equation-based optimization method. The diffusion equation is best known for describing how heat propagates in matter. However, it has also attracted considerable attention as the basis for global optimization of a multimodal function [Piela et al. (1989). J. Phys. Chem. 93, 3339-3346]. The method relies heavily on available analytical solutions for the diffusion equation. Here it is shown that such solutions can be obtained for two important crystallographic figure-of-merit (FOM) functions that fully account for space-group symmetry and allow the diffusion-equation solution to vary depending on whether atomic coordinates are fixed or not. The resulting expression is computationally efficient, taking the same order of floating-point operations to evaluate as the starting FOM function measured in terms of the number of atoms in the asymmetric unit. This opens the possibility of implementing diffusion-equation methods for crystallographic global optimization algorithms such as structure determination from powder diffraction data.

  11. Crystallographic studies of gas sorption in metal–organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Elliot J.; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Brammer, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous crystalline materials of modular design. One of the primary applications of these materials is in the adsorption and separation of gases, with potential benefits to the energy, transport and medical sectors. In situ crystallography of MOFs under gas atmospheres has enabled the behaviour of the frameworks under gas loading to be investigated and has established the precise location of adsorbed gas molecules in a significant number of MOFs. This article reviews progress in such crystallographic studies, which has taken place over the past decade, but has its origins in earlier studies of zeolites, clathrates etc. The review considers studies by single-crystal or powder diffraction using either X-rays or neutrons. Features of MOFs that strongly affect gas sorption behaviour are discussed in the context of in situ crystallographic studies, specifically framework flexibility, and the presence of (organic) functional groups and unsaturated (open) metal sites within pores that can form specific interactions with gas molecules. PMID:24892587

  12. Fragment-based cocktail crystallography by the Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinde, Christophe L.M.J.; Fan, Erkang; Shibata, Sayaka; Zhang, Zongsheng; Sun, Zhihua; Deng, Wei; Ross, Jennifer; Kim, Jessica; Xiao, Liren; Arakaki, Tracy L.; Bosch, Jürgen; Caruthers, Jonathan M.; Larson, Eric T.; LeTrong, Isolde; Napuli, Alberto; Kelly, Angela; Mueller, Natasha; Zucker, Frank; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Merritt, Ethan A.; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-01-01

    The history of fragment-based drug discovery, with an emphasis on crystallographic methods, is sketched, illuminating various contributions, including our own, which preceded the industrial development of the method. Subsequently, the creation of the BMSC fragment cocktails library is described. The BMSC collection currently comprises 68 cocktails of 10 compounds that are shape-wise diverse. The utility of these cocktails for initiating lead discovery in structure-based drug design has been explored by soaking numerous protein crystals obtained by our MSGPP (Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa) consortium. Details of the fragment selection and cocktail design procedures, as well as examples of the successes obtained are given. The BMSC Fragment Cocktail recipes are available free of charge and are in use in over 20 academic labs. PMID:19929835

  13. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  14. Picking Up (On) Fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Phil

    2015-01-01

    abstractThis article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative p

  15. Fragments of the Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Szende

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With travel being made more accessible throughout the decades, the hospitality industry constantly evolved their practices as society and technology progressed. Hotels looked for news ways up service their customers, which led to the invention of the Servidor in 1918. Once revolutionary innovations have gone extinct, merely becoming fragments of the past.

  16. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (Pcoral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (Pcoral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (Pcoral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (Pcoral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Picking Up (On) Fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Phil

    2015-01-01

    abstractThis article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative p

  18. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  19. Crystallographic shear mechanisms in Rh one-dimensional oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, María; Boulahya, Khalid; Parras, Marina; González-Calbet, José M.

    2005-02-01

    Electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy have been used to characterize two new one-dimensional superstructures in the A sbnd Rh sbnd O system (A = Ca, Sr) related to the 2H-ABO 3-type. They are formed by the intergrowth of n A 3A'BO 6 blocks, showing the Sr 4RhO 6-type, with A 12A' 2B 8O 30 blocks, constituted by two A 3O 9 and two A 3A'O 6 layers alternating in the stacking sequence 1:1, leading to the A 27A' 7B 13O 60 ( n=5) and A 30A' 8B 14O 66 ( n=6) compositions. A crystallographic shear mechanism is proposed to describe the structural relationship between Sr 4RhO 6 (A 3A'BO 6-type) and the new superstructures.

  20. 3D characterization of crystallographic orientation in polycrystals via EBSD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefan ZAEFFERER; Stuart I. WRIGHT

    2007-01-01

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has been used in conjunction with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) combined with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain three dimensional (3D) high resolution characterizations of crystalline microstructures. This work reports on continued development that has proceeded on this technique. The technique is based on automated in-situ serial sectioning using the FIB and characterization of the sections using automated EBSD or orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The technique extends the powerful features of two dimensional OIM into the third spatial dimension. This allows additional descriptive microstructural parameters to be obtained, for example the morphology and the crystallographic indices of interface planes. This paper provides an overview of the technique and shows results from two different samples: pearlite colonies in a high carbon steel and twin related grain triplets in a NiCo thin film.

  1. Crystallographic texturing in Nb3Sn multifilamentary superconducting composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rose, Robert M.

    1980-03-01

    Crystallographic texturing in Nb3Sn composites, fabricated by both the external diffusion and the commercial bronze processes, has been investigated. In the external-diffusion-processed composite the as-drawn texture of the copper matrix contained ca. 55% and 45% ; after recrystallization at 650 °C for 16 h this changed to 70% and 30% . Tin plating and reaction heat treatment for 40 h at 650 °C eliminated most of the texturing. In a commercial bronze-processed composite a or texture was obtained in the as-drawn bronze matrix, and after a reaction heat treatment at 700 °C for 30 h a diffuse texture was developed. In both composites the Nb3Sn reaction layer exhibited no preferred orientation.

  2. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  3. Ocean acidification reduces the crystallographic control in juvenile mussel shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzer, Susan C; Cusack, Maggie; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    Global climate change threatens the oceans as anthropogenic carbon dioxide causes ocean acidification and reduced carbonate saturation. Future projections indicate under saturation of aragonite, and potentially calcite, in the oceans by 2100. Calcifying organisms are those most at risk from such ocean acidification, as carbonate is vital in the biomineralisation of their calcium carbonate protective shells. This study highlights the importance of multi-generational studies to investigate how marine organisms can potentially adapt to future projected global climate change. Mytilus edulis is an economically important marine calcifier vulnerable to decreasing carbonate saturation as their shells comprise two calcium carbonate polymorphs: aragonite and calcite. M. edulis specimens were cultured under current and projected pCO2 (380, 550, 750 and 1000μatm), following 6months of experimental culture, adults produced second generation juvenile mussels. Juvenile mussel shells were examined for structural and crystallographic orientation of aragonite and calcite. At 1000μatm pCO2, juvenile mussels spawned and grown under this high pCO2 do not produce aragonite which is more vulnerable to carbonate under-saturation than calcite. Calcite and aragonite were produced at 380, 550 and 750μatm pCO2. Electron back scatter diffraction analyses reveal less constraint in crystallographic orientation with increased pCO2. Shell formation is maintained, although the nacre crystals appear corroded and crystals are not so closely layered together. The differences in ultrastructure and crystallography in shells formed by juveniles spawned from adults in high pCO2 conditions may prove instrumental in their ability to survive ocean acidification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transuranic Hybrid Materials: Crystallographic and Computational Metrics of Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surbella, Robert G. [Department; Ducati, Lucas C. [Department; Pellegrini, Kristi L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Autschbach, Jochen [Department; Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Cahill, Christopher L. [Department

    2017-07-26

    A family of twelve supramolecular [AnO2Cl4]2- (An = U, Np, Pu) containing compounds assembled via hydrogen and halogen bonds donated by substituted 4-X-pyridinium cations (X = H, Cl, Br, I) is reported. These materials were prepared from a room-temperature synthesis wherein crystallization of unhydrolyzed and valence pure [An(VI)O2Cl4]2- (An = U, Np, Pu) tectons are the norm. We present a hierarchy of assembly criteria based on crystallographic observations, and subsequently quantify the strengths of the non-covalent interactions using Kohn-Sham density functional calculations. We provide, for the first time, a detailed description of the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) of the actinyl tetrahalide dianions and reconcile crystallographically observed structural motifs and non-covalent interaction (NCI) acceptor-donor pairings. Our findings indicate that the average electrostatic potential across the halogen ligands (the acceptors) changes by only ~2 kJ mol-1 across the AnO22+ series, indicating the magnitude of the potential is independent of the metal center. The role of the cation is therefore critical in directing structural motifs and dictating the resulting hydrogen and halogen bond strengths, the former being stronger due to the positive charge centralized on the pyridyl nitrogen N-H+. Subsequent analyses using the Quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches support this conclusion and highlight the structure directing role of the cations. Whereas one can infer that the 2 Columbic attraction is the driver for assembly, the contribution of the non-covalent interaction is to direct the molecular-level arrangement (or disposition) of the tectons.

  5. Vision Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision Screening Vision Screening Recommendations Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye ...

  6. Heavy meson fragmentation at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gomshi Nobary

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available   Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN will provide excellent opportunity to study the production and decay of heavy mesons and baryons with high statistics. We aim at the heavy mesons in this work and calculate their fragmentation functions consistent with this machine and present their total fragmentation probabilities and average fragmentation parameters.

  7. SCALING AND 4-QUARK FRAGMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O; BOSVELD, GD

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed- The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  8. Picking Up (On Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Ellis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative potential to re-think and re-examine past media historical events through a media archaeological approach to reenactment. The article contains images and links to videos from the final reenactment artworks as well as from rehearsals in Vienna and Bradford.

  9. An Archeology of Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald L. Bruns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a short (fragmentary history of fragmentary writing from the German Romantics (F. W. Schlegel, Friedrich Hölderlin to modern and contemporary concrete or visual poetry. Such writing is (often deliberately a critique of the logic of subsumption that tries to assimilate whatever is singular and irreducible into totalities of various categorical or systematic sorts. Arguably, the fragment (parataxis is the distinctive feature of literary Modernism, which is a rejection, not of what precedes it, but of what Max Weber called “the rationalization of the world” (or Modernity whose aim is to keep everything, including all that is written, under surveillance and control.

  10. Identification of Genes Affecting Vacuole Membrane Fragmentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaillat, Lydie; Mayer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium of membrane fusion and fission influences the volume and copy number of organelles. Fusion of yeast vacuoles has been well characterized but their fission and the mechanisms determining vacuole size and abundance remain poorly understood. We therefore attempted to systematically characterize factors necessary for vacuole fission. Here, we present results of an in vivo screening for deficiencies in vacuolar fragmentation activity of an ordered collection deletion mutants, representing 4881 non-essential genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen identified 133 mutants with strong defects in vacuole fragmentation. These comprise numerous known fragmentation factors, such as the Fab1p complex, Tor1p, Sit4p and the V-ATPase, thus validating the approach. The screen identified many novel factors promoting vacuole fragmentation. Among those are 22 open reading frames of unknown function and three conspicuous clusters of proteins with known function. The clusters concern the ESCRT machinery, adaptins, and lipases, which influence the production of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. A common feature of these factors of known function is their capacity to change membrane curvature, suggesting that they might promote vacuole fragmentation via this property. PMID:23383298

  11. Generic behaviours in impact fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sator, N.; Mechkov, S.; Sausset, F. [Paris-6 Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Lab. de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, UMR CNRS 7600, 75 - Paris (France); Mechkov, S. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Lab. de Physique Statistique, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-02-15

    From atomic nuclei to supernovae, including plates and rocks, every cohesive system can be broken into fragments, provided that the deposited energy is sufficiently large compared to its cohesive energy. We present a simple numerical model for investigating the general properties of fragmentation. By use of molecular dynamics simulations, we study the impact fragmentation of a solid disk of interacting particles with a wall. Regardless of the particular form of the interaction potential, the fragment size distribution exhibits a power law behaviour with an exponent that increases logarithmically with the energy deposited in the system, in agreement with experiments. We expect this behaviour to be generic in fragmentation phenomena. (authors)

  12. Discovery of Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase Inhibitors Using Metabolomics Biased Fragment Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D.; Mamat, B; Magnusson, O; Christensen, J; Haraldsson, M; Mishra, R; Pease, B; Hansen, E; Singh, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel fragment library termed fragments of life (FOL) for structure-based drug discovery. The FOL library includes natural small molecules of life, derivatives thereof, and biaryl protein architecture mimetics. The choice of fragments facilitates the interrogation of protein active sites, allosteric binding sites, and protein-protein interaction surfaces for fragment binding. We screened the FOL library against leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) by X-ray crystallography. A diverse set of fragments including derivatives of resveratrol, nicotinamide, and indole were identified as efficient ligands for LTA4H. These fragments were elaborated in a small number of synthetic cycles into potent inhibitors of LTA4H representing multiple novel chemotypes for modulating leukotriene biosynthesis. Analysis of the fragment-bound structures also showed that the fragments comprehensively recapitulated key chemical features and binding modes of several reported LTA4H inhibitors.

  13. Targeting metalloproteins by fragment-based lead discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sherida; Barile, Elisa; Farina, Biancamaria; Purves, Angela; Wei, Jun; Chen, Li-Hsing; Shiryaev, Sergey; Zhang, Ziming; Rodionova, Irina; Agrawal, Arpita; Cohen, Seth M; Osterman, Andrei; Strongin, Alex; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    It has been estimated that nearly one-third of functional proteins contain a metal ion. These constitute a wide variety of possible drug targets including metalloproteinases, dehydrogenases, oxidoreductases, hydrolases, deacetylases, or many others in which the metal ion is either of catalytic or of structural nature. Despite the predominant role of a metal ion in so many classes of drug targets, current high-throughput screening techniques do not usually produce viable hits against these proteins, likely due to the lack of proper metal-binding pharmacophores in the current screening libraries. Herein, we describe a novel fragment-based drug discovery approach using a metal-targeting fragment library that is based on a variety of distinct classes of metal-binding groups designed to reliably anchor the fragments at the target's metal ions. We show that the approach can effectively identify novel, potent and selective agents that can be readily developed into metalloprotein-targeted therapeutics.

  14. Application of Fragment-Based NMR Screening, X-ray Crystallography, Structure-Based Design, and Focused Chemical Library Design to Identify Novel [mu]M Leads for the Development of nM BACE-1 ([beta]-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1) Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu-Sen; Strickland, Corey; Voigt, Johannes H.; Kennedy, Matthew E.; Beyer, Brian M.; Senior, Mary M.; Smith, Elizabeth M.; Nechuta, Terry L.; Madison, Vincent S.; Czarniecki, Michael; McKittrick, Brian A.; Stamford, Andrew W.; Parker, Eric M.; Hunter, John C.; Greenlee, William J.; Wyss, Daniel F. (SPRI)

    2010-10-18

    Fragment-based NMR screening, X-ray crystallography, structure-based design, and focused chemical library design were used to identify novel inhibitors for BACE-1. A rapid optimization of an initial NMR hit was achieved by a combination of NMR and a functional assay, resulting in the identification of an isothiourea hit with a K{sub d} of 15 {micro}M for BACE-1. NMR data and the crystal structure revealed that this hit makes H-bond interactions with the two catalytic aspartates, occupies the nonprime side region of the active site of BACE-1, and extends toward the S3 subpocket (S3sp). A focused NMR-based search for heterocyclic isothiourea isosteres resulted in several distinct classes of BACE-1 active site directed compounds with improved chemical stability and physicochemical properties. The strategy for optimization of the 2-aminopyridine lead series to potent inhibitors of BACE-1 was demonstrated. The structure-based design of a cyclic acylguanidine lead series and its optimization into nanomolar BACE-1 inhibitors are the subject of the companion paper (J. Med. Chem. 2010, 53, DOI:10.1021/jm901408p).

  15. An introduction to the tools hosted in the Bilbao Crystallographic Server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroyo M.I.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The programs hosted in the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (http://www.cryst.ehu.es are briefly explained along with worked examples on various cases related to different fields of applications. It is our aim to have this text acting as a primer on the various usage of the crystallographic tools in conjunction with each other due to the modular structure of the server. For this reason, diverse topics such as crystallographic groups and their subgroups, pseudosymmetry, extinction conditions, k-vectors and irreducible representations have been discussed in the context.

  16. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Ringe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR, the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask `how are nanoshapes created?', `how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', `how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  17. Pulsed neutron spectroscopic imaging for crystallographic texture and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Hirotaka, E-mail: hakuryu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kamiyama, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Iwase, Kenji; Ishigaki, Toru [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    A time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopic neutron imaging at a pulsed neutron source is expected to be a new material analysis tool because this method can non-destructively investigate the spatial dependence of the crystallographic and metallographic information in a bulk material. For quantitative evaluation of such information, a spectral analysis code for the transmission data is necessary. Therefore, we have developed a Rietveld-like analysis code, RITS. Furthermore, we have applied the RITS code to evaluation of the position dependence of the crystal orientation anisotropy, the preferred orientation and the crystallite size of a welded {alpha}-iron plate, and we successfully obtained the information on the texture and the microstructure. However, the reliability of the values given by the RITS code has not been evaluated yet in detail. For this reason, we compared the parameters provided by the RITS code with the parameters obtained by the neutron TOF powder diffractometry and its Rietveld analysis. Both the RITS code and the Rietveld analysis software indicated values close to each other, but there were systematic differences on the preferred orientation and the crystallite size.

  18. Crystallographic structure of ubiquitin in complex with cadmium ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitination plays a critical role in regulating many cellular processes, from DNA repair and gene transcription to cell cycle and apoptosis. It is catalyzed by a specific enzymatic cascade ultimately leading to the conjugation of ubiquitin to lysine residues of the target protein that can be the ubiquitin molecule itself and to the formation of poly-ubiquitin chains. Findings We present the crystal structure at 3.0 Å resolution of bovine ubiquitin crystallized in presence of cadmium ions. Two molecules of ubiquitin are present in the asymmetric unit. Interestingly this non-covalent dimeric arrangement brings Lys-6 and Lys-63 of each crystallographically-independent monomer in close contact with the C-terminal ends of the other monomer. Residues Leu-8, Ile-44 and Val-70 that form a hydrophobic patch at the surface of the Ub monomer are trapped at the dimer interface. Conclusions The structural basis for signalling by poly-Ub chains relies on a visualization of conformations of alternatively linked poly-Ub chains. This arrangement of ubiquitin could illustrate how linkages involving Lys-6 or Lys-63 of ubiquitin are produced in the cell. It also details how ubiquitin molecules can specifically chelate cadmium ions.

  19. Cassia grandis Linn. f. seed galactomannan: structural and crystallographical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harsha; Kapoor, Virendra P

    2003-09-01

    Cassia grandis is a small or medium sized tree, found in abundance throughout India. The seeds contain about 50% endosperm gum and possess the characteristics of becoming a potential source of seed gum. The purified polysaccharide has been characterized as a pure galactomannan having a mannose-galactose ratio of 3.15; molecular weight (Mw) 80,200; polydispersity (Mw/Mn), 1.35 and intrinsic viscosity [eta], 848 mL/g. Methylation, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation and 13C NMR studies confirm that the polysaccharide has the basic structure of legume galactomannans consisting of a beta-(1-->4)-linked main mannan backbone to which galactose units are attached at O-6. The orthorhombic lattice constants of the hydrated gum are as follows: a=9.00, b=24.81, c=10.30 A. The crystallographic data establish that the probable space group symmetry of the unit cell is P2(1)2(1)2. The results are in contradiction to earlier reports (Indian J. Chem. 16B (1978) 966; J. Indian Chem. Soc. 55 (1978) 1216) in which a non-galactomannan polysaccharide structure has been assigned having a main chain of (1-->4)-linked galactose and mannose units in the molar ratio 6:3, where 50% of the galactose units branched with two galactose and one mannose through 1-->3 linkage.

  20. Crystallographic analysis of amorphization caused by ion irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, S T; Ono, T; Hada, Y; Betz, G

    2003-01-01

    Ion irradiation often causes amorphization in a crystal. We have presented a new crystallographic analysis that defines a new type of order parameter, which we call pixel mapping (PM). PM can describe algebraically to what extent and how the crystallinity has changed under ion bombardment. In other words, PM describes the long-range-order (LRO) interactions, based on the crystallography. PM can be effectively used, when it is incorporated in a classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculation. In the case of B ions implanted into a Si crystal, we observed crystal to amorphous (CA) transitions under energetic ion bombardment at low temperature. The PM profiling was more effective to reveal the CA transition than other atomistic methods of analyses as radial distribution function g(r) or vacancy mapping N sub v. PM could distinguish between perfect crystalline states, transition states, and random states. Moreover, PM revealed that the lattice reaction was cooperative even in a mesoscopic volume, e.g. in a cube of ...

  1. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  2. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of recombinant human galectin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222 (Australia); Scott, Ken [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222 (Australia)

    2007-11-01

    Human galectin-1 has been cloned, expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of both lactose (ligand) and β-mercaptoethanol under six different conditions. The X-ray diffraction data obtained have enabled the assignment of unit-cell parameters for two novel crystal forms of human galectin-1. Galectin-1 is considered to be a regulator protein as it is ubiquitously expressed throughout the adult body and is responsible for a broad range of cellular regulatory functions. Interest in galectin-1 from a drug-design perspective is founded on evidence of its overexpression by many cancers and its immunomodulatory properties. The development of galectin-1-specific inhibitors is a rational approach to the fight against cancer because although galectin-1 induces a plethora of effects, null mice appear normal. X-ray crystallographic structure determination will aid the structure-based design of galectin-1 inhibitors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of human galectin-1 crystals generated under six different conditions is reported. X-ray diffraction data enabled the assignment of unit-cell parameters for crystals grown under two conditions, one belongs to a tetragonal crystal system and the other was determined as monoclinic P2{sub 1}, representing two new crystal forms of human galectin-1.

  4. Phormidium phycoerythrin forms hexamers in crystals: a crystallographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Sharma, Mahima; Gupta, Gagan Deep; Kumar, Vinay; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-08-01

    The crystallographic analysis of a marine cyanobacterium (Phormidium sp. A09DM) phycoerythrin (PE) that shows distinct sequence features compared with known PE structures from cyanobacteria and red algae is reported. Phormidium PE was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Diffraction data were collected on the protein crystallography beamline at the Indus-2 synchrotron. The crystals diffracted to about 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals, with an apparent hexagonal morphology, belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 108.3, b = 108.4 Å, c = 116.6 Å, α = 78.94, β = 82.50, γ = 60.34°. The molecular-replacement solution confirmed the presence of 12 αβ monomers in the P1 cell. The Phormidium PE elutes as an (αβ)3 trimer of αβ monomers from a molecular-sieve column and exists as [(αβ)3]2 hexamers in the crystal lattice. Unlike red algal PE proteins, the hexamers of Phormidium PE do not form higher-order structures in the crystals. The existence of only one characteristic visual absorption band at 564 nm suggests the presence of phycoerythrobilin chromophores, and the absence of any other types of bilins, in the Phormidium PE assembly.

  5. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-03-14

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  6. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  7. Stone fragmentation by ultrasound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2004-08-01

    The presence of kidney stone in the kidney causes discomfort to patients. Hence, removal of such stones is important which is commonly done these days, non-destructively, with lithotripters without surgery. Commercially, lithotripters like extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripters (ESWL) made by Siemens etc are in routine use. These methods are very cumbersome and expensive. Treatment of the patients also takes comparatively more time because of more number of sittings. Some delicate nerves and fibres in the surrounding areas of the stones present in the kidney are also damaged by high ultrasonic intensity used in such systems. In the present work, enhancement of the kidney stone fragmentation by using ultrasound is studied. The cavitation bubbles are found to implode faster, with more disintegration efficiency of the lithotripters, which give better treatment to the patients.

  8. Hot spot analysis for driving the development of hits into leads in fragment based drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, David R.; Ngan, Chi Ho; Zerbe, Brandon S.; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor

    2011-01-01

    Fragment based drug design (FBDD) starts with finding fragment-sized compounds that are highly ligand efficient and can serve as a core moiety for developing high affinity leads. Although the core-bound structure of a protein facilitates the construction of leads, effective design is far from straightforward. We show that protein mapping, a computational method developed to find binding hot spots and implemented as the FTMap server, provides information that complements the fragment screening...

  9. CONTROL OF FRAGMENTATION BY BLASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The degree of fragmentation influences the economy of the excavation operations. Characteristics of blasted rock such as fragment size, volume and mass are fundamental variables effecting the economics of a mining operation and are in effect the basis for evaluating the quality of a blast. The properties of fragmentation, such as size and shape, are very important information for the optimization of production. Three factors control the fragment size distribution: the rock structure, the quantity of explosive and its distribution within the rock mass. Over the last decade there have been considerable advances in our ability to measure and analyze blasting performance. These can now be combined with the continuing growth in computing power to develop a more effective description of rock fragmentation for use by future blasting practitioners. The paper describes a view of the fragmentation problem by blasting and the need for a new generation of engineering tools to guide the design and implementation of blasting operations.

  10. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  11. Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Prasad

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer screening is a means to detect cancer early with the goal of decreasing morbidity and mortality. At present, there is a reasonable consensus regarding screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cances and the role of screening is under trial in case of cancers of the lung,  ovaries and prostate. On the other hand, good screening tests are not available for some of the commonest cancers in India like the oral, pharyngeal, esophageal and stomach cancers.

  12. Cancer Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Prasad

    2004-01-01

    Cancer screening is a means to detect cancer early with the goal of decreasing morbidity and mortality. At present, there is a reasonable consensus regarding screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cances and the role of screening is under trial in case of cancers of the lung,  ovaries and prostate. On the other hand, good screening tests are not available for some of the commonest cancers in India like the oral, pharyngeal, esophageal and stomach cancers.

  13. Variations in Reactivity on Different Crystallographic Orientations of Cerium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, David R [ORNL; Albrecht, Peter M [ORNL; Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide is a principal component in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. One of its key characteristics is the ability to provide or remove oxygen in chemical reactions. The different crystallographic faces of ceria present significantly different surface structures and compositions that may alter the catalytic reactivity. The structure and composition determine the number of coordination vacancies surrounding surface atoms, the availability of adsorption sites, the spacing between adsorption sites and the ability to remove O from the surface. To investigate the role of surface orientation on reactivity, CeO2 films were grown with two different orientations. CeO2(100) films were grown ex situ by pulsed laser deposition on Nb-doped SrTiO3(100). CeO2(111) films were grown in situ by thermal deposition of Ce metal onto Ru(0001) in an oxygen atmosphere. The chemical reactivity was characterized by the adsorption and decomposition of various molecules such as alcohols, aldehydes and organic acids. In general the CeO2(100) surface was found to be more active, i.e. molecules adsorbed more readily and reacted to form new products, especially on a fully oxidized substrate. However the CeO2(100) surface was less selective with a greater propensity to produce CO, CO2 and water as products. The differences in chemical reactivity are discussed in light of possible structural terminations of the two surfaces. Recently nanocubes and nano-octahedra have been synthesized that display CeO2(100) and CeO2(111) faces, respectively. These nanoparticles enable us to correlate reactions on high surface area model catalysts at atmospheric pressure with model single crystal films in a UHV environment.

  14. Shape and crystallographic orientation of nanodiamonds for quantum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, S Y; Chipaux, M; Nagl, A; Schirhagl, R

    2017-01-23

    Nanodiamonds with dimensions down to a few tens of nanometers containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers have revealed their potential as powerful and versatile quantum sensors with a unique combination of spatial resolution and sensitivity. The NV centers allow transducing physical properties, such as strain, temperature, and electric or magnetic field, to an optical transition that can be detected in the single photon range. For example, this makes it possible to sense a single electron spin or a few nuclear spins by detecting their magnetic resonance. The location and orientation of these defects with respect to the diamond surface play a crucial role in interpreting the data and predicting their sensitivities. Despite its relevance, the geometry of these nanodiamonds has never been thoroughly investigated. Without accurate data, spherical models have been applied to interpret or predict results in the past. With the use of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), we investigated nanodiamonds with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 25 nm (the most common type for quantum sensing) and found a flake-like geometry, with 23.2 nm and 4.5 nm being the average lateral and vertical dimensions. We have also found evidence for a preferred crystallographic orientation of the main facet in the (110) direction. Furthermore, we discuss the consequences of this difference in geometry on diamond-based applications. Shape not only influences the creation efficiency of nitrogen-vacancy centers and their quantum coherence properties (and thus sensing performance), but also the optical properties of the nanodiamonds, their interaction with living cells, and their surface chemistry.

  15. Calculation of Crystallographic Texture of BCC Steels During Cold Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arpan

    2017-05-01

    BCC alloys commonly tend to develop strong fibre textures and often represent as isointensity diagrams in φ 1 sections or by fibre diagrams. Alpha fibre in bcc steels is generally characterised by crystallographic axis parallel to the rolling direction. The objective of present research is to correlate carbon content, carbide dispersion, rolling reduction, Euler angles (ϕ) (when φ 1 = 0° and φ 2 = 45° along alpha fibre) and the resulting alpha fibre texture orientation intensity. In the present research, Bayesian neural computation has been employed to correlate these and compare with the existing feed-forward neural network model comprehensively. Excellent match to the measured texture data within the bounding box of texture training data set has been already predicted through the feed-forward neural network model by other researchers. Feed-forward neural network prediction outside the bounds of training texture data showed deviations from the expected values. Currently, Bayesian computation has been similarly applied to confirm that the predictions are reasonable in the context of basic metallurgical principles, and matched better outside the bounds of training texture data set than the reported feed-forward neural network. Bayesian computation puts error bars on predicted values and allows significance of each individual parameters to be estimated. Additionally, it is also possible by Bayesian computation to estimate the isolated influence of particular variable such as carbon concentration, which exactly cannot in practice be varied independently. This shows the ability of the Bayesian neural network to examine the new phenomenon in situations where the data cannot be accessed through experiments.

  16. Crystallographic control on the substructure of nacre tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio G; Mutvei, Harry; Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio J; Bonarski, Jan T; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Pina, Carlos M; Rousseau, Marthe; Macías-Sánchez, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Nacre tablets of mollusks develop two kinds of features when either the calcium carbonate or the organic portions are removed: (1) parallel lineations (vermiculations) formed by elongated carbonate rods, and (2) hourglass patterns, which appear in high relief when etched or in low relief if bleached. In untreated tablets, SEM and AFM data show that vermiculations correspond to aligned and fused aragonite nanogloblules, which are partly surrounded by thin organic pellicles. EBSD mapping of the surfaces of tablets indicates that the vermiculations are invariably parallel to the crystallographic a-axis of aragonite and that the triangles are aligned with the b-axis and correspond to the advance of the {010} faces during the growth of the tablet. According to our interpretation, the vermiculations appear because organic molecules during growth are expelled from the a-axis, where the Ca-CO3 bonds are the shortest. In this way, the subunits forming nacre merge uninterruptedly, forming chains parallel to the a-axis, whereas the organic molecules are expelled to the sides of these chains. Hourglass patterns would be produced by preferential adsorption of organic molecules along the {010}, as compared to the {100} faces. A model is presented for the nanostructure of nacre tablets. SEM and EBSD data also show the existence within the tablets of nanocrystalline units, which are twinned on {110} with the rest of the tablet. Our study shows that the growth dynamics of nacre tablets (and bioaragonite in general) results from the interaction at two different and mutually related levels: tablets and nanogranules.

  17. Crystallographic control on early stages of cataclasis in carbonate fault gouges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Smith, Steven A. F.; Fondriest, Michele; Spagnuolo, Elena; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Carbonates are a recurring lithology in most of active seismic areas worldwide, such as the Apennines (Italy). Here, typical fault products are gouges and cataclasites made of mixtures of carbonate minerals (i.e., calcite and dolomite) that occasionally exhibit a foliation. Natural fault gouges often contain minerals with strong anisotropies, such as cleavage surfaces in phyllosilicates and carbonates. Therefore, the understanding of the role of such anisotropies during shearing is important to develop realistic microphysical models of brittle fragmentation and grain size reduction. Here we present results of microstructural and coupled EDS-EBSD (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy - Electron Backscattered Diffraction) analysis on mixtures (50/50wt%) of calcite-dolomite gouges deformed experimentally in a rotary shear apparatus (SHIVA, INGV-Rome) at room temperature under constant normal stress of 17.5 MPa and slip rates of 30 µm/s to 1 m/s. The EDS-EBSD analysis was focused on the gouge layer underlying the slip zone, which has been previously demonstrated to accommodate low finite shear strain during deformation. At all investigated slip rates, calcite develops a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) on the (0001) plane, with the c-axis inclined subparallel to the principal stress and the [-1-120] direction forming a girdle perpendicular to it. Texture strength typically increases with slip rate and appears not to be influenced by the presence of water or foliation development in the gouge during deformation. Misorientation analysis suggests twinning as the principal crystallographic active deformation mechanism. Instead, dolomite grains do not develop a CPO. Microfractures are closely spaced, mainly oriented subparallel to the principal stress and rarely exploit calcite twin planes. The latter typically occur at high angle with respect to fractures, are oriented consistently with the sense of shear and almost orthogonal to the principal stress. Calcite grains

  18. Impact of habitat fragmentation on tsetse populations and trypanosomosis risk in Eastern Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mweempwa, Cornelius; Marcotty, Tanguy; De Pus, Claudia; Penzhorn, Barend Louis; Dicko, Ahmadou Hamady; Bouyer, Jérémy; De Deken, Reginald

    2015-08-04

    Fragmentation of tsetse habitat in eastern Zambia is largely due to encroachments by subsistence farmers into new areas in search of new agricultural land. The impact of habitat fragmentation on tsetse populations is not clearly understood. This study was aimed at establishing the impact of habitat fragmentation on physiological and demographic parameters of tsetse flies in order to enhance the understanding of the relationship between fragmentation and African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) risk. A longitudinal study was conducted to establish the age structure, abundance, proportion of females and trypanosome infection rate of Glossina morsitans morsitans Westwood (Diptera: Glossinidae) in areas of varying degrees of habitat fragmentation in Eastern Zambia. Black screen fly rounds were used to sample tsetse populations monthly for 1 year. Logistic regression was used to analyse age, proportion of females and infection rate data. Flies got significantly older as fragmentation increased (p fragmented site (Lusandwa) to 74.2% (CI 56.8-86.3) at the highly fragmented site (Chisulo). In the most fragmented area (Kasamanda), tsetse flies had almost disappeared. In the highly fragmented area a significantly higher trypanosome infection rate in tsetse (P fragmentation was observed. Consequently a comparatively high trypanosomosis incidence rate in livestock was observed there despite lower tsetse density (p fragmentation reduced. The proportion increased from 0.135 (CI 0.10-0.18) to 0.285 (CI 0.26-0.31) at the highly and least fragmented sites, respectively. Habitat fragmentation creates conditions to which tsetse populations respond physiologically and demographically thereby affecting tsetse-trypanosome interactions and hence influencing trypanosomosis risk. Temperature rise due to fragmentation coupled with dominance of old flies in populations increases infection rate in tsetse and hence creates high risk of trypanosomosis in fragmented areas. Possibilities of how

  19. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  20. Thermodynamical String Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from...

  1. Fragmentation Considered Poisonous

    CERN Document Server

    Herzberg, Amir

    2012-01-01

    We present practical poisoning and name-server block- ing attacks on standard DNS resolvers, by off-path, spoofing adversaries. Our attacks exploit large DNS responses that cause IP fragmentation; such long re- sponses are increasingly common, mainly due to the use of DNSSEC. In common scenarios, where DNSSEC is partially or incorrectly deployed, our poisoning attacks allow 'com- plete' domain hijacking. When DNSSEC is fully de- ployed, attacker can force use of fake name server; we show exploits of this allowing off-path traffic analy- sis and covert channel. When using NSEC3 opt-out, attacker can also create fake subdomains, circumvent- ing same origin restrictions. Our attacks circumvent resolver-side defenses, e.g., port randomisation, IP ran- domisation and query randomisation. The (new) name server (NS) blocking attacks force re- solver to use specific name server. This attack allows Degradation of Service, traffic-analysis and covert chan- nel, and also facilitates DNS poisoning. We validated the attac...

  2. Double screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratia, Pierre [Department of Physics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hu, Wayne [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Enrico Fermi Institute and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Joyce, Austin [Enrico Fermi Institute and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ribeiro, Raquel H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London,Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Attempts to modify gravity in the infrared typically require a screening mechanism to ensure consistency with local tests of gravity. These screening mechanisms fit into three broad classes; we investigate theories which are capable of exhibiting more than one type of screening. Specifically, we focus on a simple model which exhibits both Vainshtein and kinetic screening. We point out that due to the two characteristic length scales in the problem, the type of screening that dominates depends on the mass of the sourcing object, allowing for different phenomenology at different scales. We consider embedding this double screening phenomenology in a broader cosmological scenario and show that the simplest examples that exhibit double screening are radiatively stable.

  3. An Algebra for Program Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    1985-01-01

    Program fragments are described either by strings in the concrete syntax or by constructor applications in the abstract syntax. By defining conversions between these forms, both may be intermixed. Program fragments are constructed by terminal and nonterminal symbols from the grammar and by variab...

  4. Complete axiomatizations for XPath fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, B.; Litak, T.; Marx, M.

    2010-01-01

    We provide complete axiomatizations for several fragments of Core XPath, the navigational core of XPath 1.0 introduced by Gottlob, Koch and Pichler. A complete axiomatization for a given fragment is a set of equivalences from which every other valid equivalence is derivable; equivalences can be thou

  5. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  6. Computational fragment-based binding site identification by ligand competitive saturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgun Guvench

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery using NMR and x-ray crystallographic methods has proven utility but also non-trivial time, materials, and labor costs. Current computational fragment-based approaches circumvent these issues but suffer from limited representations of protein flexibility and solvation effects, leading to difficulties with rigorous ranking of fragment affinities. To overcome these limitations we describe an explicit solvent all-atom molecular dynamics methodology (SILCS: Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation that uses small aliphatic and aromatic molecules plus water molecules to map the affinity pattern of a protein for hydrophobic groups, aromatic groups, hydrogen bond donors, and hydrogen bond acceptors. By simultaneously incorporating ligands representative of all these functionalities, the method is an in silico free energy-based competition assay that generates three-dimensional probability maps of fragment binding (FragMaps indicating favorable fragment:protein interactions. Applied to the two-fold symmetric oncoprotein BCL-6, the SILCS method yields two-fold symmetric FragMaps that recapitulate the crystallographic binding modes of the SMRT and BCOR peptides. These FragMaps account both for important sequence and structure differences in the C-terminal halves of the two peptides and also the high mobility of the BCL-6 His116 sidechain in the peptide-binding groove. Such SILCS FragMaps can be used to qualitatively inform the design of small-molecule inhibitors or as scoring grids for high-throughput in silico docking that incorporate both an atomic-level description of solvation and protein flexibility.

  7. Fragment-based structure-guided drug discovery: strategy, process, and lessons from human protein kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burley, Stephen K.; Hirst, Gavin; Sprengeler, Paul; Reich, Siegfried

    2012-04-24

    The experimental roots of fragment-based drug discovery can be found in the work of Petsko, Ringe, and coworkers, who were the first to report flooding of protein crystals with small organic solutes (e.g., compounds such as benzene with ten or fewer nonhydrogen atoms) to identify bound functional groups that might ultimately be transformed into targeted ligands. The concept of linking fragments together to increase binding affinity was described as early as 1992 by Verlinde et al. Computational screening of fragments, using tools such as DOCK or MCSS, was also described in the early 1990s. Pharmaceutical industry application of fragment screening began at Abbott Laboratories, where Fesik and coworkers pioneered 'SAR by NMR' (structure/activity relationship by nuclear magnetic resonance). In this spectroscopic approach, bound fragments are detected by NMR screening and subsequently linked together to increase affinity, as envisaged by Verlinde and coworkers. Application of x-ray crystallography to detect and identify fragment hits was also pursued at Abbott. Fragment-based drug discovery has now been under way for more than a decade. Although Fesik and coworkers popularized the notion of linking fragments (as in their highly successful BCL-2 program), tactical emphasis appears to have largely shifted from fragment condensation to fragment engineering (or growing the fragment) to increase binding affinity and selectivity. Various biotechnology companies, including SGX Pharmaceuticals, Astex, and Plexxikon, have recently demonstrated that fragment-based approaches can indeed produce development candidates suitable for Phase I studies of safety and tolerability in patients (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

  8. The multiple roles of computational chemistry in fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Richard; Barker, Oliver; Barker, John J; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Godemann, Robert; Andersen, Ole; Fryatt, Tara; Courtney, Steve; Hallett, Dave; Whittaker, Mark

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a change in strategy from the screening of molecules with higher molecular weights and physical properties more akin to fully drug-like compounds, to the screening of smaller, less complex molecules. This is because it has been recognised that fragment hit molecules can be efficiently grown and optimised into leads, particularly after the binding mode to the target protein has been first determined by 3D structural elucidation, e.g. by NMR or X-ray crystallography. Several studies have shown that medicinal chemistry optimisation of an already drug-like hit or lead compound can result in a final compound with too high molecular weight and lipophilicity. The evolution of a lower molecular weight fragment hit therefore represents an attractive alternative approach to optimisation as it allows better control of compound properties. Computational chemistry can play an important role both prior to a fragment screen, in producing a target focussed fragment library, and post-screening in the evolution of a drug-like molecule from a fragment hit, both with and without the available fragment-target co-complex structure. We will review many of the current developments in the area and illustrate with some recent examples from successful FBDD discovery projects that we have conducted.

  9. The multiple roles of computational chemistry in fragment-based drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Richard; Barker, Oliver; Barker, John J.; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Godemann, Robert; Andersen, Ole; Fryatt, Tara; Courtney, Steve; Hallett, Dave; Whittaker, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a change in strategy from the screening of molecules with higher molecular weights and physical properties more akin to fully drug-like compounds, to the screening of smaller, less complex molecules. This is because it has been recognised that fragment hit molecules can be efficiently grown and optimised into leads, particularly after the binding mode to the target protein has been first determined by 3D structural elucidation, e.g. by NMR or X-ray crystallography. Several studies have shown that medicinal chemistry optimisation of an already drug-like hit or lead compound can result in a final compound with too high molecular weight and lipophilicity. The evolution of a lower molecular weight fragment hit therefore represents an attractive alternative approach to optimisation as it allows better control of compound properties. Computational chemistry can play an important role both prior to a fragment screen, in producing a target focussed fragment library, and post-screening in the evolution of a drug-like molecule from a fragment hit, both with and without the available fragment-target co-complex structure. We will review many of the current developments in the area and illustrate with some recent examples from successful FBDD discovery projects that we have conducted.

  10. Energetic, crystallographic and diffusion characteristics of hydrogen isotopes in iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivak, A.B., E-mail: sivak_ab@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenina pr., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Sivak, P.A., E-mail: sivak_pa@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Romanov, V.A., E-mail: romanov-ippe@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenina pr., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); A.I. Leypunski Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), 1, Bondarenko pl., Obninsk, Kaluga reg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Chernov, V.M., E-mail: vmchernov@bochvar.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenina pr., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); A.A. Bochvar High-technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (JSC “VNIINM”), 5-a, Rogova ul., PoB 369, Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, 31, Kashirskoye sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • H isotopes properties in Fe were calculated by molecular statics and dynamics methods. • The binding energies of complexes “H atoms – self-defects” were calculated. • Temperature dependencies of H isotopes diffusivities have parabolic form at T > 250 K. • There is a good agreement between MD and experimental data for protium diffusivity. • H isotopes diffusivities are within 10% at 293 K. Isotope effect increases with temperature. - Abstract: Energetic, crystallographic and diffusion characteristics of various interstitial configurations of H atoms and their complexes with self-point defects (SIA – self-interstitial atom, V – vacancy) in bcc iron have been calculated by molecular statics and molecular dynamics using Fe–H interatomic interaction potential developed by Ramasubramaniam et al. (2009) and modified by the authors of the present work and Fe–Fe matrix potential M07 developed by Malerba et al. (2010). The most energetically favorable configuration of an interstitial H atom is tetrahedral configuration. The energy barrier for H atom migration is 0.04 eV. The highest binding energy of all the considered complexes “vacancy – H atom” and “SIA – H atom” is 0.54 and 0.15 eV, respectively. The binding energy of H atom with edge dislocations in slip systems 〈1 1 1〉{1 1 0}, 〈1 1 1〉{1 1 2}, 〈1 0 0〉{1 0 0}, 〈1 0 0〉{1 1 0} is 0.32, 0.30, 0.45, 0.54 eV, respectively. The binding energy of H atom in VH{sub n} complexes (n = 1 … 15) decreases from 0.54 to 0.35 eV with increasing of n from 1 to 6. At n > 6, it decreases to ∼0.1 eV. The temperature dependences of hydrogen isotopes (P, D, T) diffusivities have been calculated for the temperature range 70–1800 K. Arrhenius-type dependencies describe the calculated data at temperatures T < 100 K. At T > 250 K, the temperature dependencies of the diffusivities D{sup P}, D{sup D}, D{sup T} have a parabolic form. The diffusivities of H isotopes are within 10

  11. Crystallographic transformation of limestone during calcination under CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Medina, Santiago

    2015-09-14

    The calcination reaction of limestone (CaCO3) to yield lime (CaO) is at the heart of many industrial applications as well as natural processes. In the recently emerged calcium-looping technology, CO2 capture is accomplished by the carbonation of CaO in a gas-solid reactor (carbonator). CaO is derived by the calcination of limestone in a calciner reactor under necessarily high CO2 partial pressure and high temperature. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been employed in this work to gain further insight into the crystallographic transformation that takes place during the calcination of limestone under CO2, at partial pressures (P) close to the equilibrium pressure (Peq) and at high temperature. Calcination under these conditions becomes extremely slow. The in situ XRD analysis presented here suggests the presence of an intermediate metastable CaO* phase stemming from the parent CaCO3 structure. According to the reaction mechanism proposed elsewhere, the exothermicity of the CaO* → CaO transformation and high values of P/Peq inhibit the nucleation of CaO at high temperatures. The wt% of CaO* remains at a relatively high level during slow calcination. Two diverse stages have been identified in the evolution of CaO crystallite size, L. Initially, L increases with CaCO3 conversion, following a logarithmic law. Slow calcination allows the crystallite size to grow up from a few nanometers at nucleation up to around 100 nm near the end of conversion. Otherwise, quick calcination at relatively lower CO2 concentrations limits CaO crystallite growth. Once calcination reaches an advanced state, the presence of CaO* drops to zero and the rate of increase of the CaO crystallite size is significantly hindered. Arguably, the first stage in CaO crystallite growth is driven by aggregation of the metastable CaO* nanocrystals, due to surface attractive forces, whereas the second one is consistent with sintering of the aggregated CaO crystals, and persists with time after full

  12. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  13. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A log-likelihood-gain intensity target for crystallographic phasing that accounts for experimental error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Randy J; McCoy, Airlie J

    2016-03-01

    The crystallographic diffraction experiment measures Bragg intensities; crystallographic electron-density maps and other crystallographic calculations in phasing require structure-factor amplitudes. If data were measured with no errors, the structure-factor amplitudes would be trivially proportional to the square roots of the intensities. When the experimental errors are large, and especially when random errors yield negative net intensities, the conversion of intensities and their error estimates into amplitudes and associated error estimates becomes nontrivial. Although this problem has been addressed intermittently in the history of crystallographic phasing, current approaches to accounting for experimental errors in macromolecular crystallography have numerous significant defects. These have been addressed with the formulation of LLGI, a log-likelihood-gain function in terms of the Bragg intensities and their associated experimental error estimates. LLGI has the correct asymptotic behaviour for data with large experimental error, appropriately downweighting these reflections without introducing bias. LLGI abrogates the need for the conversion of intensity data to amplitudes, which is usually performed with the French and Wilson method [French & Wilson (1978), Acta Cryst. A35, 517-525], wherever likelihood target functions are required. It has general applicability for a wide variety of algorithms in macromolecular crystallography, including scaling, characterizing anisotropy and translational noncrystallographic symmetry, detecting outliers, experimental phasing, molecular replacement and refinement. Because it is impossible to reliably recover the original intensity data from amplitudes, it is suggested that crystallographers should always deposit the intensity data in the Protein Data Bank.

  15. Transforming fragments into candidates: small becomes big in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloe, Gerdien E; Bailey, David; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2009-07-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a logical and efficient approach to lead discovery and optimisation. It can draw on structural, biophysical and biochemical data, incorporating a wide range of inputs, from precise mode-of-binding information on specific fragments to wider ranging pharmacophoric screening surveys using traditional HTS approaches. It is truly an enabling technology for the imaginative medicinal chemist. In this review, we analyse a representative set of 23 published FBDD studies that describe how low molecular weight fragments are being identified and efficiently transformed into higher molecular weight drug candidates. FBDD is now becoming warmly endorsed by industry as well as academia and the focus on small interacting molecules is making a big scientific impact.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy induced by crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment in directionally-solidified eutectic Mn-Sb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chang-Sheng; Liu, Tie; Dong, Meng; Wu, Chun; Shao, Jian-Guo; Wang, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    The influences of the crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of polycrystalline materials were investigated. Microstructures obtained in eutectic Mn-Sb alloys via directional solidification simultaneously displayed crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment. Both the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment were able to induce magnetic anisotropy in the alloys, wherein the influence of the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of the alloys strongly depended upon their directions and exhibited either mutual promotion or competition. These findings may provide useful guidance for the fabrication design of functional magnetic materials.

  17. Screening CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramírez, A.; Hagedoorn, S.; Kramers, L.; Wildenborg, T.; Hendriks, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a methodology to screen and rank Dutch reservoirs suitable for long-term large scale CO2 storage. The screening focuses on off- and on-shore individual aquifers, gas and oil fields. In total 176 storage reservoirs have been taken int

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yanquan; Zhang, Junjie; Yan, Yongda; Yu, Bowen; Geng, Lin; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations. PMID:26147506

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanquan Geng

    Full Text Available In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations.

  20. Evolution of the preferred crystallographic orientation across the thickness of nickel electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Somers, Marcel A. J.;

    Numerous industrial applications of nickel electrodeposits, like for example as microcomponents, essentially depend on their preferred crystallographic orientation. As a function of the electrodeposition conditions, the microstructure can be tailored with respect to the size, shape...... for such advanced investigations. The present work reports on the evolution of the preferred crystallographic orientation on the example of various fiber textured nickel electrodeposits. Tailored electrodeposition provided nickel deposits with different fibre textures being , , and ... and crystallographic orientation of grains. Thorough microstructure characterization, however, is not straightforward, because the microstructure of electrodeposits often changes across the thickness of the deposits and numerous twin orientations even with nano-size dimensions can evolve during growth of the deposits...

  1. Advanced yield strength of interconnector ribbon for photovoltaic module using crystallographic texture control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byungjun; Park, Nochang; Tark, Sung Ju; Oh, Won Wook; Park, Sungeun; Kim, Young Do; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports a study on reducing the yield strength of Cu ribbon wire used for Si solar cell interconnections in solar panels. Low yield strength Cu core should be used as the interconnector ribbon to minimize the fracture of Si solar cells during the tabbing process. We lowered the yield strength of Cu ribbon by controlling the crystallographic texture without increasing the annealing time and temperature. The crystallographic texture was controlled by lubrication in a cold rolling process. The crystallographic texture was observed by scanning electron microscopy with electron back scattered diffraction. A tensile test was performed for the comparison of the mechanical properties of Cu with and without lubrication. The average yield strength was 91.2 MPa with lubrication whereas the yield strength was 99.6 MPa without lubrication. The lower value of the lubricated samples seemed to be caused by the higher cube texture intensity than that of the samples without lubrication.

  2. Screening of tissues pooled cDNA library using probes by restricted fragments of BAC positive clones of ovine MHC%以绵羊MHC 区段BAC 克隆酶切片段为探针杂交筛选绵羊混合组织cDNA 文库

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨小亮; 白大章; 邱巍; 董慧芹; 李大全; 陈芳; 马润林; Hugh T Blair; 高剑峰

    2012-01-01

    Under the premise what we have known bacterial artificial chromosome(BAC) clone sequence information and gene annotation predicted in the Chinese Merino sheep major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, the digested fragments from 6 BAC clones that were located in the MHC region of the Chinese Merino sheep genome BAC library, which were used to screen the cDNA library using plaque in situ hybridization as probes. The full length of positive cDNA clones (sequences) isolated were completely sequenced, and the sequences obtained were aligned with the corresponding known sequence information and the BAC clones with gene annotation. Meanwhile, the sequence similarity was searched in NCBI Blastn database. This work aimed at verification of accuracy of the gene annotation results and initial analysis of gene (sequence) function. At last, 27 positive cDNA clones (sequences) in total were screened through two runs of hybridization. It was also found that these sequences could be positioned in the corresponding BAC clones, and 25 sequences were located in exon area of the annotated gene. It was verified that 23 sequences had the highest sequence similarity with those in the Bos taurus by searching against the NCBI Blastn database; moreover, the function of these sequences were closely relate to immunology.%在已知中国美利奴羊MHC(Major histocompatibility complex)区段BAC(Bacterial artificial chromosome)克隆序列信息和预测的基因注释前提下,用位于中国美利奴羊基因组BAC 文库MHC 区段的6 个BAC 克隆酶切片段为探针,以噬菌斑原位杂交筛选法筛选中国美利奴羊混合组织cDNA 文库(库库杂交),对分离到的cDNA阳性克隆进行全序列测定,并与相应的已知序列信息和基因注释的BAC 克隆比对以及在NCBI Blastn 数据库中序列相似性检索,旨在验证基因注释结果的准确性和对基因(序列)功能的初步分析.实验中,经过两轮杂交共筛选出27 个cDNA 阳性克隆(序

  3. The Ultrasonic Measurement of Crystallographic Orientation for Imaging Anisotropic Components with 2d Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Dunhill, A. K.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    Single crystal components are used widely in the gas-turbine industry. However, these components are elastically anisotropic which causes difficulties when performing NDE inspections with ultrasound. Recently an ultrasonic algorithm for a 2D array has been corrected to perform the reliable volumetric inspection of single crystals. For the algorithm to be implemented the crystallographic orientation of the components must be known. This paper, therefore, develops and reviews crystallographic orientation methods using 2D ultrasonic arrays. The methods under examination are based on the anisotropic propagation of surface and bulk waves and an image-based orientation method is also considered.

  4. Elasto-Plastic Behavior of High RRR Niobium: Effects of Crystallographic Texture, Microstructure and Hydrogen Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.R. Myneni; S.R. Agnew

    2002-11-01

    Conventional assessments of the mechanical properties of polycrystalline high RRR niobium via tensile testing have revealed unusually low apparent Young's moduli and yield strength in annealed samples. These observations motivated the current investigation of a variety of possible contributors: crystallographic texture, grain size, and impurity concentration. It is shown that the crystallographic textures of a single lot of niobium are essentially unchanged by post-recrystallization anneals at temperatures up to 800 C. Ultrasonic measurements reveal that the elastic response is not degraded by annealing. Rather, the material's extremely low yield point gives the impression of a low elastic modulus during tensile testing.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of manganese lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennman, Anneli; Oliw, Ernst H; Karkehabadi, Saeid

    2014-04-01

    Lipoxygenases constitute a family of nonhaem metal enzymes with catalytic iron or, occasionally, catalytic manganese. Lipoxygenases oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids with position specificity and stereospecificity to hydroperoxides, which contribute to inflammation and the development of cancer. Little is known about the structural differences between lipoxygenases with Fe or Mn and the metal-selection mechanism. A Pichia pastoris expression system was used for the production of the manganese lipoxygenase of the take-all fungus of wheat, Gaeumannomyces graminis. The active enzyme was treated with α-mannosidase, purified to apparent homogeneity and subjected to crystal screening and X-ray diffraction. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 226.6, b = 50.6, c = 177.92 Å, β = 91.70°.

  6. Crystallographic preferred orientation and deformation of deep Earth minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaercher, Pamela Michelle

    This thesis aims to provide further insight into crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and deformation mechanisms active at high pressure. Preferred orientation of iron-rich magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O, a major mantle mineral phase, stishovite (SiO2), the high pressure polymorph of quartz that is likely present in the lower crust and mantle, and in NaMgF3 + NaCl, an analog system to lower mantle minerals MgSiO3 + MgO, have been examined with synchrotron X-ray diffraction while at high pressure in either a diamond anvil cell or a multianvil press. Magnesiowustite, (Mg0.08Fe0.88)O, and wustite, Fe0.94O, were compressed up to 37 GPa at ambient temperature in diamond anvil cells (DAC) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray diffraction patterns were taken in situ in radial geometry in order to study the evolution of CPO through the cubic-to-rhombohedral phase transition. Under uniaxial stress in the DAC, cubic texture developed (i.e. {100} c planes aligned perpendicular to the compression direction). Variant selection of preferred orientation was observed immediately following the transition to the rhombohedral phase. Upon decompression in the DAC, FeO reverted back to cubic symmetry and the cubic texture reappeared, demonstrating that the transition is reversible and has texture memory. The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, but little is known about texture development during deformation, which provides information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Radial DAC experiments were done at the ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) while collecting X-ray diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of CPO. Starting pressure in the sample chamber was still in the quartz stability field, and compression of quartz produced a weak texture, likely due to Dauphine twinning. Following compression of quartz into the stishovite stability field

  7. Dissection of SARS Coronavirus Spike Protein into Discrete Folded Fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuang; CAI Zhen; CHEN Yong; LIN Zhanglin

    2006-01-01

    The spike protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) mediates cell fusion by binding to target cell surface receptors. This paper reports a simple method for dissecting the viral protein and for searching for foldable fragments in a random but systematic manner. The method involves digestion by DNase I to generate a pool of short DNA segments, followed by an additional step of reassembly of these segments to produce a library of DNA fragments with random ends but controllable lengths. To rapidly screen for discrete folded polypeptide fragments, the reassembled gene fragments were further cloned into a vector as N-terminal fusions to a folding reporter gene which was a variant of green fluorescent protein. Two foldable fragments were identified for the SARS-CoV spike protein, which coincide with various anti-SARS peptides derived from the hepated repeat (HR) region 2 of the spike protein. The method should be applicable to other viral proteins to isolate antigen or vaccine candidates, thus providing an alternative to the full-length proteins (subunits) or linear short peptides.

  8. Quadruple screen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quad screen; Multiple marker screening; AFP plus; Triple screen test; AFP maternal; MSAFP; 4-marker screen; Down syndrome - quadruple; Trisomy 21 - quadruple; Turner syndrome - quadruple; Spina bifida - ...

  9. Toxicology screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicology screening is most often done using a blood or urine sample. However, it may be done soon after the person swallowed the medication, using stomach contents taken through gastric lavage (stomach pumping) or after vomiting.

  10. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  11. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  12. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Tsang, M B; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  13. Hands as markers of fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barnard

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Atwood is an internationally read, translated, and critiqued writer whose novels have established her as one of the most esteemed authors in English (McCombs & Palmer, 1991:1. Critical studies of her work deal mainly with notions of identity from psychoanalytical perspectives. This study has identified a gap in current critical studies on Atwood’s works, namely the challenging of textual unity which is paralleled in the challenging of the traditional (single narrative voice. The challenging of textual unity and the single narrative voice brings about the fragmentation of both. This article will focus on the role that hands play as markers of fragmentation in “The Blind Assassin” (2000. In the novel, the writing hand destabilises the narrative voice, since it is not connected to the voice of a single author. If the author of the text – the final signified – is eliminated, the text becomes fragmentary and open, inviting the reader to contribute to the creation of meaning. Hands play a signficant role in foregrounding the narrator’s fragmented identity, and consequently, the fragmentation of the text. We will investigate this concept in the light of Roland Barthes’ notion of the scriptor, whose hand is metaphorically severed from his or her “voice”. Instead of the text being a unified entity, it becomes unstable and it displays the absence of hierarchical textual levels. Based mainly on Barthes’ writings, this article concludes that hands foreground the narrator’s fragmented identity, which is paralleled in the fragmented text.

  14. Phenomenology of Dihadron Fragmentation Function

    CERN Document Server

    Courtoy, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the phenomenological results obtained through Dihadron Fragmentation Functions related processes. In 2015, an update on the fitting techniques for the Dihadron Fragmentation Functions has led to an improved extraction of the transversity PDF and, as a consequence, the nucleon tensor charge. We discuss the impact of the determination of the latter on search for physics Beyond the Standard Model, focusing on the error treatment. We also comment on the future of the extraction of the subleading-twist PDF $e(x)$ from JLab soon-to-be-released Beam Spin Asymmetry data.

  15. Transversity and dihadron fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bacchetta, A; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Radici, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the quark transversity distribution requires another soft object sensitive to the quark's transverse spin. Dihadron fragmentation functions represent a convenient tool to analyze partonic spin, which can influence the angular distribution of the two hadrons. In particular, the so-called interference fragmentation functions can be used to probe transversity both in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering as well as proton-proton collisions. We discuss two single-spin asymmetries sensitive to transversity in the these two processes, at leading twist and leading order in alpha_S.

  16. RIA Fragmentation Line Beam Dumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, W

    2003-08-08

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator project involves generating heavy-element ion beams for use in a fragmentation target line to produce beams for physics research. The main beam, after passing through the fragmentation target, may be dumped into a beam dump located in the vacuum cavity of the first dipole magnet. For a dump beam power of 100 kW, cooling is required to avoid excessive high temperatures. The proposed dump design involves rotating cylinders to spread out the energy deposition and turbulent subcooled water flow through internal water cooling passages to obtain high, nonboiling, cooling rates.

  17. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations...

  18. Interpretation of quantitative crystallographic texture in copper electrodeposits on amorphous substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Jensen, Jens Arne Dahl; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallographic texture and morphology in Cu electrodeposits was studied in relation to the current density and the content of the organic levelling additive 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate. The substrate onto which Cu was electrodeposited consisted of amorphous Ni-P in order to allow substrate...

  19. Crystallographic structural organization of human rhinovirus serotype 16, 14, 3, 2 and 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, A.

    2006-07-01

    The capsid of the icosahedral virion is encapsulated between two polyhedra scaled according to the golden mean, each being composed of an icosahedron and a dodecahedron. Structural units of the coat proteins are enclosed into forms whose projections along the icosahedral symmetry axes obey the crystallographic law of rational indices.

  20. A thermodynamic theory of dynamic fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew, Ching H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Taylor, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    We present a theory of dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials based on thermodynamic arguments. We recover the expressions for average fragment size and number as originally derived by Grady. We extend the previous work by obtaining descriptions of fragment size distribution and compressibility change due to the fragmentation process. The size distribution is assumed to be proportional to the spectral power of the strain history and a sample distribution is presented for a fragmentation process corresponding to a constant rate strain history. The description of compressibility change should be useful in computational studies of fragmentation. These results should provide insight into the process of fragmentation of brittle materials from hypervelocity impact.

  1. HCC screening; HCC-Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, T. [Charite-Unversitaetsmedizin,Freie Universitaet und Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Klinik und Hochschulambulanz fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin,Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed tumour diseases throughout the world. In the vast majority of cases those affected are high-risk patients with chronic viral hepatitis and/or liver cirrhosis, which means there is a clearly identifiable target group for HCC screening. With resection, transplantation, and interventional procedures for local ablation, following early diagnosis curative treatment options are available with which 5-year survival rates of over 60% can be reached. Such early diagnosis is a reality only in a minority of patients, however, and in the majority of cases the disease is already in an advanced stage at diagnosis. One of the objects of HCC screening is diagnosis in an early stage when curative treatment is still possible. Precisely this is achieved by screening, so that the proportion of patients treated with curative intent is decisively higher. There is not yet any clear evidence as to whether this leads to a lowering of the mortality of HCC. As lower mortality is the decisive indicator of success for a screening programme the benefit of HCC screening has so far been neither documented nor refuted. Nonetheless, in large regions of the world it is the practice for high-risk patients to undergo HCC screening in the form of twice-yearly ultrasound examination and determination of AFP. (orig.) [German] Das hepatozellulaere Karzinom (HCC) ist eine der weltweit haeufigsten Tumorerkrankungen. Es tritt in der grossen Mehrzahl der Faelle bei Hochrisikopatienten mit chronischer Virushepatitis bzw. Leberzirrhose auf, woraus sich eine klar identifizierbare Zielgruppe fuer das HCC-Screening ergibt. Mit der Resektion, der Transplantation und interventionellen lokal ablativen Verfahren stehen bei rechtzeitiger Diagnosestellung kurative Therapieoptionen zur Verfuegung, die 5-Jahres-Ueberlebensraten von >60% erreichen. Diese rechtzeitige Diagnosestellung erfolgt jedoch nur bei einer Minderzahl der Patienten, waehrend die

  2. Population pressure and farm fragmentation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    small but farms are further fragmented into diminutive size fields due to ... terms of household characteristics; land use and performance indicators; technology adoption .... 'best' unit of measurement of farm size, and size of enterprises within farms will ..... less common, accounting for 18 percent (3 percent) and 10 percent (7.

  3. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Souza, S.R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsang, M.B. [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U are around 0.7–0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  4. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  5. The Fragmentation of Literary Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Syllabi from some 20 colleges and universities were reviewed with prominent English and literature departments and a discussion was held with a number of professors who teach literary theory. It is suggested that devolution and fragmentation of theory might be a survival strategy, an adaptation to the new realties of academic institutions.

  6. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  7. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  8. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  9. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  10. Fragment-based discovery of 6-azaindazoles as inhibitors of bacterial DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven; Amin, Nader; Benowitz, Andrew B; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Cui, Haifeng; Deng, Xiaodong; Heightman, Tom D; Holmes, David J; Hopkins, Anna; Huang, Jianzhong; Jin, Qi; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Martin, Agnes C L; Massey, Frances; McCloskey, Lynn; Mortenson, Paul N; Pathuri, Puja; Tisi, Dominic; Williams, Pamela A

    2013-12-12

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase.

  11. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, M. O.; Bryś, T.; Gamboni, Th.; Geerts, W.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Borcea, R.

    2013-12-01

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD) show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  12. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  13. Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Prevention Esophageal Cancer Screening Research Esophageal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go to ... the esophagus and the stomach). Being overweight . Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for ...

  14. Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  15. Identification of non-peptidic cysteine reactive fragments as inhibitors of cysteine protease rhodesain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShan, Danielle; Kathman, Stefan; Lowe, Brittiney; Xu, Ziyang; Zhan, Jennifer; Statsyuk, Alexander; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor

    2015-10-15

    Rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease in the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is a well-validated drug target. In this work, we used a fragment-based approach to identify inhibitors of this cysteine protease, and identified inhibitors of T. brucei. To discover inhibitors active against rhodesain and T. brucei, we screened a library of covalent fragments against rhodesain and conducted preliminary SAR studies. We envision that in vitro enzymatic assays will further expand the use of the covalent tethering method, a simple fragment-based drug discovery technique to discover covalent drug leads.

  16. Fragment-Based Discovery of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher R; Dougan, Douglas R; Komandla, Mallareddy; Kanouni, Toufike; Knight, Beverly; Lawson, J David; Sabat, Mark; Taylor, Ewan R; Vu, Phong; Wyrick, Corey

    2015-07-23

    The discovery and optimization of a series of 4-aminocinnoline-3-carboxamide inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase are reported. A fragment-based screening approach incorporating X-ray co-crystallography was used to identify a cinnoline fragment and characterize its binding mode in the ATP binding site of Btk. Optimization of the fragment hit resulted in the identification of a lead compound which reduced paw swelling in a dose- and exposure-dependent fashion in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis.

  17. Efficient and accurate fragmentation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Spencer R; Bertoni, Colleen; Brorsen, Kurt R; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Three novel fragmentation methods that are available in the electronic structure program GAMESS (general atomic and molecular electronic structure system) are discussed in this Account. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method can be combined with any electronic structure method to perform accurate calculations on large molecular species with no reliance on capping atoms or empirical parameters. The FMO method is highly scalable and can take advantage of massively parallel computer systems. For example, the method has been shown to scale nearly linearly on up to 131 000 processor cores for calculations on large water clusters. There have been many applications of the FMO method to large molecular clusters, to biomolecules (e.g., proteins), and to materials that are used as heterogeneous catalysts. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is a model potential approach that is fully derived from first principles and has no empirically fitted parameters. Consequently, an EFP can be generated for any molecule by a simple preparatory GAMESS calculation. The EFP method provides accurate descriptions of all types of intermolecular interactions, including Coulombic interactions, polarization/induction, exchange repulsion, dispersion, and charge transfer. The EFP method has been applied successfully to the study of liquid water, π-stacking in substituted benzenes and in DNA base pairs, solvent effects on positive and negative ions, electronic spectra and dynamics, non-adiabatic phenomena in electronic excited states, and nonlinear excited state properties. The effective fragment molecular orbital (EFMO) method is a merger of the FMO and EFP methods, in which interfragment interactions are described by the EFP potential, rather than the less accurate electrostatic potential. The use of EFP in this manner facilitates the use of a smaller value for the distance cut-off (Rcut). Rcut determines the distance at which EFP interactions replace fully quantum

  18. SCREEN CUISINE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heather Baysa

    2010-01-01

    ... from the legendary restaurant; the World's First FoodTruck Drive-In Movie on Saturday, where the city's finest food-truck vendors park for the screenings; and the Brooklyn Burger W Beer Garden on Sunday, serving up hearty burgers and brews while you watch Anat Baron's Beer Wars. Tonight at 7, Water Taxi Beach, South Street Seaport.fest...

  19. Airport Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... must be limited to a safe level. An American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society industry standard states that the maxi- mum ... that does not directly damage DNA. 2 References American National ... Physics Society. Radiation safety for personnel security screening systems ...

  20. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with short peptide fragments from class IIa bacteriocins as recognition elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Sarfuddin; Jiang, Keren; Stiles, Michael; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-03-09

    We employed a direct peptide-bacteria binding assay to screen peptide fragments for high and specific binding to Listeria monocytogenes. Peptides were screened from a peptide array library synthesized on cellulose membrane. Twenty four peptide fragments (each a 14-mer) were derived from three potent anti-listerial peptides, Leucocin A, Pediocin PA1, and Curvacin A, that belong to class IIa bacteriocins. Fragment Leu10 (GEAFSAGVHRLANG), derived from the C-terminal region of Leucocin A, displayed the highest binding among all of the library fragments toward several pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, including L. monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The specific binding of Leu10 to L. monocytogenes was further validated using microcantilever (MCL) experiments. Microcantilevers coated with gold were functionalized with peptides by chemical conjugation using a cysteamine linker to yield a peptide density of ∼4.8×10(-3) μmol/cm2 for different peptide fragments. Leu10 (14-mer) functionalized MCL was able to detect Listeria with same sensitivity as that of Leucocin A (37-mer) functionalized MCL, validating the use of short peptide fragments in bacterial detection platforms. Fragment Leu10 folded into a helical conformation in solution, like that of native Leucocin A, suggesting that both Leu10 and Leucocin A may employ a similar mechanism for binding target bacteria. The results show that peptide-conjugated microcantilevers can function as highly sensitive platforms for Listeria detection and hold potential to be developed as biosensors for pathogenic bacteria.

  1. Mass spectrometric detection, identification, and fragmentation of arseno-phytochelatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied-Tobies, Maria I H; Arroyo-Abad, Uriel; Mattusch, Jürgen; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    Phytochelatins (PC) are cystein-rich oligopeptides in plants for coordination with toxic metals and metalloids via their thiol groups. The composition, structure, and mass spectrometric fragmentation of arseno-PC (As-PC) with PC of different degree of oligomerization (PC2-PC5) in solution were studied using liquid chromatography coupled in parallel to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. As-PC were detected from As(PC2) to As(PC5) with an increasing number of isomers that differ in the position of thiol groups bound to As. Thermodynamic modeling supported the identification process in case of these isomers. Mass spectrometric fragmentation of the As-PC does not follow the established pattern of peptides but is governed by the formation of series of As-containing annular cations, which coordinate to As via S, N, or O. Structure proposals for 30 As-PC fragment ions in the range m/z 147.92 to m/z 1290.18 are elaborated. Many of these fragment ions are characteristic to several As-PC and may be suited for a screening for As-PC in plant extracts. The mass spectrometric data offer the perspective for a future more sensitive determination of As-PC by means of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring.

  2. Fragmentation in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Andrew D; Varela, Francisco E

    2017-02-01

    The large number of biopharmaceutical mergers and acquisitions (M&A) that occurred over the past decade has generated questions about whether the industry is consolidating around too-few players, negatively impacting both the number of medicines developed and overall innovation. However, closer examination of the level of biopharmaceutical consolidation by prescription sales shows that the industry was more fragmented in 2015 than in 2003. The trend towards increasing fragmentation is also observed across noncommercial and independent metrics over the same time period. The number and size of M&A deals has masked an active and competitive marketplace in which market growth and the number of companies entering the market exceeded the apparent reduction in the number of players caused by acquisitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Laura, E-mail: bandura@anl.gov [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Erdelyi, Bela [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Hausmann, Marc [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Kubo, Toshiyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Nolen, Jerry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Portillo, Mauricio [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Sherrill, Bradley M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  4. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, L.; Erdelyi, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kubo, T.; Nolen, J.; Portillo, M.; Sherrill, B.M. (Physics); (MSU); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (RIKEN)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  5. Fragment correlations from NAUTILUS multidetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizard, G. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    1995-12-31

    It is shown on a few examples how heavy fragment correlations, induced either by conservation laws or by Coulomb interaction can bring physical information on nuclear reactions. All the experimental data discussed have been obtained at GANIL using the NAUTILUS gaseous multi detectors DELF and XYZT, which - due to their good spatial and time resolution and their large solid angle coverage - have proved to be efficient tools for multifragment correlation studies. Different reactions of Ar, Kr, Xe, and Pb beams on Au targets are discussed. It is shown that velocity and angular correlations between fragments provide a powerful clock to scrutinize the details of the hot nuclei decay history. (K.A.). 18 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Fragmentation in filamentary molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Recent surveys of dust continuum emission at sub-mm wavelengths have shown that filamentary molecular clouds are ubiquitous along the Galactic plane. These structures are inhomogeneous, with over-densities that are sometimes associated with infrared emission and active of star formation. To investigate the connection between filaments and star formation, requires an understanding of the processes that lead to the fragmentation of filaments and a determination of the physical properties of the over-densities (clumps). In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength study of five filamentary molecular clouds, containing several clumps in different evolutionary stages of star formation. We analyse the fragmentation of the filaments and derive the physical properties of their clumps. We find that the clumps in all filaments have a characteristic spacing consistent with the prediction of the `sausage' instability theory, regardless of the complex morphology of the filaments or their evolutionary stage. We also find t...

  7. Fragmentering og korridorer i landskabet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøj, M.; Madsen, A. B.

    , at fragmentering af habitater resulterer i en reduktion og isolering af mange plante- og dyrepopulationer. Det er desuden vist, at korridorer har en funktion som habitater, hvilket er medvirkende til, at et område med korridorer kan huse flere arter og individer end et tilsvarende område uden korridorer. Der......Rapporten indeholder en litteraturudredning, der er baseret på en bearbejdning af den tilgængelige nationale og internationale litteratur omhandlende fragmentering og korridorer på det botaniske og zoologiske område. I alt 1.063 titler ligger til grund for udredningen. Udredningen har vist...... mangler dog entydige beviser for, at korridorer kan være af afgørende betydning for rekolonisering af habitater, i hvilke en given art er forsvundet. Afslutningsvis gives en liste med forskningsbehov samt en række anbefalinger....

  8. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  9. The fragmentation of Kosmos 2163

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    On 6 Dec. 1991 Kosmos 2163, a maneuverable Soviet spacecraft which had been in orbit for 58 days, experienced a major breakup at an altitude of approximately 210 km. Although numerous pieces of debris were created, the fragments decayed rapidly leaving no long-term impact on the near-Earth environment. The assessed cause of the event is the deliberate detonation of an explosive device. Details of this event are presented.

  10. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  11. Is magnetic resonance imaging safe for patients with retained metal fragments from combat and terrorist attacks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris; Kushnir, Tamar; Shabshin, Noga; Konen, Eli (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical center, Tel Hashomer, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel)), e-mail: iris.eshed@sheba.health.gov.il

    2010-03-15

    Background: Increasing numbers of military confrontations and terrorist attacks have led to increasing reports of retained metal fragments among patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The potential hazard of retained metal fragments for patients undergoing MRI has been studied among patients with retained metal fragments from domestic violence but not from combat and terrorist attacks. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety of MRI in patients with subcutaneous warfare-metal fragments. Material and Methods: 10,322 consecutive metal screening forms of patients scheduled for 1.5 Tesla (T) MR examination were retrospectively reviewed. All patients reported to have retained metal fragments were contacted by telephone and asked to describe the event in which they were exposed to the fragments and for any adverse sequelae or sensations during and after MRI. Their radiographs were evaluated for the number and size of the fragments. The data were analyzed for correlations between these factors. Results: Seven of the 24 patients who reported retained metal fragments were excluded, since there was no validating evidence of their presence. Fragments in the remaining 17 patients (18 MRI examinations) were inflicted by military or terrorist attacks that occurred 2-39 years prior to the MRI. The fragment size ranged between 1 and 10 mm. One patient reported a superficial migration of a 10-mm fragment after MRI. No other adverse reactions were reported. Conclusion: Conducting 1.5T MRI examinations is safe in patients with retained metal fragments from combat and terrorist attacks not in the vicinity of vital organs. However, caution is advised.

  12. Fragmentation measurement using image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Sereshki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, first of all, the existing problems in fragmentation measurement are reviewed for the sake of its fast and reliable evaluation. Then, the available methods used for evaluation of blast results are mentioned. The produced errors especially in recognizing the rock fragments in computer-aided methods, and also, the importance of determination of their sizes in the image analysis methods are described. After reviewing the previous work done, an algorithm is proposed for the automated determination of rock particles’ boundary in the Matlab software. This method can determinate automatically the particles boundary in the minimum time. The results of proposed method are compared with those of Split Desktop and GoldSize software in two automated and manual states. Comparing the curves extracted from different methods reveals that the proposed approach is accurately applicable in measuring the size distribution of laboratory samples, while the manual determination of boundaries in the conventional software is very time-consuming, and the results of automated netting of fragments are very different with the real value due to the error in separation of the objects.

  13. Residual Fragments after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Özdedeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs are described as asymptomatic, noninfectious and nonobstructive stone fragments (≤4 mm remaining in the urinary system after the last session of any intervention (ESWL, URS or PCNL for urinary stones. Their insignificance is questionable since CIRFs could eventually become significant, as their presence may result in recurrent stone growth and they may cause pain and infection due to urinary obstruction. They may become the source of persistent infections and a significant portion of the patients will have a stone-related event, requiring auxilliary interventions. CT seems to be the ultimate choice of assessment. Although there is no concensus about the timing, recent data suggests that it may be performed one month after the procedure. However, imaging can be done in the immediate postoperative period, if there are no tubes blurring the assessment. There is some evidence indicating that selective medical therapy may have an impact on decreasing stone formation rates. Retrograde intrarenal surgery, with its minimally invasive nature, seems to be the best way to deal with residual fragments.

  14. The relation between microstructure and crystallographic orientation in rolled copper and brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, H.; Leffers, Torben

    2002-01-01

    The relation between microstructure and crystallographic orientation is investigated in rolled copper and brass. For the two main types of microstructure in copper (the high wall density and the low wall density structure) there is a certain relation: theorientations corresponding to a specific...... type tend to cluster in certain regions of orientation space. However, the clustering is not very pronounced (there is a lot of overlap), and it cannot be related to any model. There is also a certain grain-sizeeffect: the average grain with high wall density structure is larger than the average grain...... with low wall density structure. For a third type of microstructure (to be described) there is a very clear relation to the crystallographic orientation. For brassthe distinction is between grains with and grains without deformation twins. There is a clear trend for the grains with twins to cluster...

  15. The X-ray system of crystallographic programs for any computer having a PIDGIN FORTRAN compiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J. M.; Kruger, G. J.; Ammon, H. L.; Dickinson, C.; Hall, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    A manual is presented for the use of a library of crystallographic programs. This library, called the X-ray system, is designed to carry out the calculations required to solve the structure of crystals by diffraction techniques. It has been implemented at the University of Maryland on the Univac 1108. It has, however, been developed and run on a variety of machines under various operating systems. It is considered to be an essentially machine independent library of applications programs. The report includes definition of crystallographic computing terms, program descriptions, with some text to show their application to specific crystal problems, detailed card input descriptions, mass storage file structure and some example run streams.

  16. Crystallographic dependence of CO activation on cobalt catalysts: HCP versus FCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Xun; Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Da-Peng; Zhang, Bing-Yan; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-11-06

    Identifying the structure sensitivity of catalysts in reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H2 over cobalt catalysts, is an important yet challenging issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Based on a first-principles kinetic study, we find for the first time that CO activation on hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co not only has much higher intrinsic activity than that of face centered-cubic (FCC) Co but also prefers a different reaction route, i.e., direct dissociation with HCP Co but H-assisted dissociation on the FCC Co. The origin is identified from the formation of various denser yet favorable active sites on HCP Co not available for FCC Co, due to their distinct crystallographic structure and morphology. The great dependence of the activity on the crystallographic structure and morphology of the catalysts revealed here may open a new avenue for better, stable catalysts with maximum mass-specific reactivity.

  17. Novel Kac-Moody-type affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Twarock, Reidun

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent results in mathematical virology, we present novel asymmetric Z[tau]-integer-valued affine extensions of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H_2, H_3 and H_4 derived in a Kac-Moody-type formalism. In particular, we show that the affine reflection planes which extend the Coxeter group H_3 generate (twist) translations along 2-, 3- and 5-fold axes of icosahedral symmetry and classify these translations in terms of Fibonacci recursion relations, thus providing a framework to explain results of Keef et al and Wardman at the group level. Finally, we extend this classification to the case of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H_2 and H_4. These results should have applications in physics (quasicrystals), biology (viruses) and chemistry (fullerenes).

  18. Determination of crystallographic and macroscopic orientation of planar structures in TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, X.; Liu, Q.

    1998-01-01

    With the aid of a double-tilt holder in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), simple methods are described for determination of the crystallographic orientation of a planar structure and for calculation of the macroscopic orientation of the planar structure. The correlation between a planar s...... taken at tilted positions, can be transformed to the real macroscopic orientation of the planar structures with estimated error of about +/- 2 degrees. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....... structure and a crystallographic plane can be found by comparing the differences in their trace directions on the projection plane and inclination angles with respect to that plane. The angles between the traces of planar structures and the sample axis measured from the TEM micrographs, which have been...

  19. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeudy, Sandra; Coutard, Bruno; Lebrun, Régine; Abergel, Chantal

    2005-06-01

    The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004), Science, 306, 1344-1350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005), Acta Cryst. F61, 212-215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P2(1)3, with unit-cell parameter 99.425 A. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities.

  20. Preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice I ← II transformation and the flow of ice II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, K.; Wenk, H.-R.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The preferred crystallographic orientation developed during the ice I ← II transformation and during the plastic flow of ice II was measured in polycrystalline deuterium oxide (D2O) specimens using low-temperature neutron diffraction. Samples partially transformed from ice I to II under a non-hydrostatic stress developed a preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice II. Samples of pure ice II transformed from ice I under a hydrostatic stress and then when compressed axially, developed a strong preferred orientation of compression axes parallel to (1010). A match to the observed preferred orientation using the viscoplastic self-consistent theory was obtained only when (1010) [0001] was taken as the predominant slip system in ice II.

  1. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of natural kaolins from the Ivory Coast (West Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, J.; Morato, F.; Kra, G.; Staunton, S.; Quiquampoix, H.; Jumas, J. C.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen clay samples from four deposits in the Ivory Coast (West Africa) were studied using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and chemical analysis. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of these samples are given. Kaolinite is the principal mineral but other minerals are present in small quantities: illite, quartz, anatase and iron oxides (oxides and oxyhydroxides). The crystallographic, morphological and surface characteristics are influenced by the presence of these impurities. In particular, the presence of iron oxides was associated with reduced structural ordering and thermal stability of kaolinite and increased specific surface area. These clays could be used in the ceramics industry to make tiles and bricks, and also in agronomy as supports for chemical fertilizers or for environmental protection by immobilising potentially toxic waste products.

  2. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang; Wu, Guilin; Liu, Qing; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations. It is found that indentations are preferential nucleation sites. The crystallographic orientations of the deformed grains affect the hardness and the nucleation potentials at the indentations. Higher hardness gives increased nucleation probabilities. Orientation relationships between nuclei developed at different indentations within one original grain are analyzed and it is found that the orientation distribution of the nuclei is far from random. It is suggested that it relates to the orientations present near the indentation tips which in turn depend on the orientation of the selected grain in which they form. Finally, possible nucleation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  3. Crystallographic orientation and induced potential effects in photoelectron emission from metal surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiano, C A Rios; Mitnik, D M; Silkin, V M; Gravielle, M S

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the crystallographic orientation of a typical metal surface, like aluminum, on electron emission spectra produced by grazing incidence of ultrashort laser pulses is investigated by using the band-structure-based-Volkov (BSB-V) approximation. The present version of the BSB-V approach includes not only a realistic description of the surface interaction, accounting for band structure effects, but also effects due to the induced potential that originates from the collective response of valence-band electrons to the external electromagnetic field. The model is applied to evaluate differential electron emission probabilities from the valence band of Al(100) and Al(111). For both crystallographic orientations, the contribution of partially occupied surface electronic states and the influence of the induced potential are separately analyzed as a function of the laser carrier frequency. We found that the induced potential strongly affects photoelectron emission distributions, opening a window to scrut...

  4. Crystallographic similarity between the lath martensite and lower bainite in medium-carbon alloy steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiangwen; LUO Chengping; WU Dongxiao

    2005-01-01

    Progress in the crystallography of lath martensitic and lower bainitic transformations is briefly reviewed, followed by a presentation of the experimentally measured crystallographic characteristics of both lath martensite and lower bainite formed in mediumcarbon steels containing Si, Mn and Mo. It is found that the bainite plates relate to each other by a relative rotation of 54.7°or 60°about the normal to their common close-packed planes {110} b, which ensures a pseudo- {112}b twin relationship between two adjacent plates,and that all bainite variants formed in a single packet keep a unique G-T orientation relationship with the austenite matrix. These two types of OR of lower bainite are similar to that of the lath martensite, respectively. Furthermore, the measured habit planes of both the lower bainite and lath martensite are all {335} f type, which can verify the crystallographic similarity between the lath martensite and lower bainite.

  5. Augmenting Tractable Fragments of Abstract Argumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Ordyniak, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    We present a new and compelling approach to the efficient solution of important computational problems that arise in the context of abstract argumentation. Our approach makes known algorithms defined for restricted fragments generally applicable, at a computational cost that scales with the distance from the fragment. Thus, in a certain sense, we gradually augment tractable fragments. Surprisingly, it turns out that some tractable fragments admit such an augmentation and that others do not. More specifically, we show that the problems of credulous and skeptical acceptance are fixed-parameter tractable when parameterized by the distance from the fragment of acyclic argumentation frameworks. Other tractable fragments such as the fragments of symmetrical and bipartite frameworks seem to prohibit an augmentation: the acceptance problems are already intractable for frameworks at distance 1 from the fragments. For our study we use a broad setting and consider several different semantics. For the algorithmic results...

  6. Microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA2017A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.M.Z., E-mail: mohamed_ahmed4@s-petrol.suez.edu.eg [Institute for Microstructural and Mechanical Processing Engineering, University of Sheffield (IMMPETUS), Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Suez Canal University, Suez 43721 (Egypt); Wynne, B.P.; Rainforth, W.M. [Institute for Microstructural and Mechanical Processing Engineering, University of Sheffield (IMMPETUS), Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Threadgill, P.L. [TWI LTD, Granta Park, Great Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    In this study a thick section (20 mm) friction stir welded AA2017A-T451 has been characterized in terms of microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties. For microstructural analysis both optical and scanning electron microscopes have been used. A detailed crystallographic texture analysis has been carried out using the electron back scattering diffraction technique. Crystallographic texture has been examined in both shoulder and probe affected regions of the weld NG. An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region which is mainly explained by the effect of the sequential multi pass deformation experienced by both tool probe and tool shoulder. The texture in the probe dominated region at the AS side of the weld is relatively weak but still assembles the simple shear texture of FCC metals with B/B{sup Macron} and C components existing across the whole map. However, the texture is stronger at the RS than at the AS of the weld, mainly dominated byB/B{sup Macron} components and with C component almost absent across the map. An alternating bands between (B) components and (B{sup Macron }) component are observed only at the AS side of the weld. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed investigation of microstructure and crystallographic texture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grain size is varied from the top to the bottom of the NG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The texture in the probe affected region is dominated by simple shear texture.

  7. Crystallographic orientation-dependent pattern replication in direct imprint of aluminum nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations corroborated by experimental validations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single-crystalline aluminum under direct imprint using a rigid silicon master. We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the microscopic deformation behavior of the substrate materials and its correlation with the macroscopic pattern replications. Furthermore, the surface mechanical properties of the patterned struc...

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined....

  9. Crystallographic mechanism of inverse twinning in ordered β′-CuZn alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛卫民

    2000-01-01

    The basic process of mechanical twinning in β’-CuZn phase, as an example of B2 structured metals, has been analyzed under the rolling stresses. The behavior of inverse twinning in B2 structured metals is discussed in terms of mechanics and crystallographic stability. It is shown that the inverse twinning could remain the B2 structure, and the resulting strains will have the lowest resistance during the rolling deformation of the polycrystalline.

  10. Crystallographic mechanism of inverse twinning in ordered β'-CuZn alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The basic process of mechanical twinning in β'-CuZn phase, as an example of B2 structured metals, has been analyzed under the rolling stresses. The behavior of inverse twinning in B2 structured metals is discussed in terms of mechanics and crystallographic stability. It is shown that the inverse twinning could remain the B2 structure, and the resulting strains will have the lowest resistance during the rolling deformation of the polycrystalline.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of an SH3 domain from the IB1 scaffold protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dar, Imran; Bonny, Christophe; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2003-01-01

    with unmodified protein and deliberately oxidized protein have led to different crystal forms. X-ray data have been collected to 3.0 A resolution from a crystal form with rectangular prism morphology. These crystals are orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2(1)), with unit-cell parameters a = 45.9, b = 57.0, c = 145.5 A....... These are the first crystallographic data on a scaffold molecule such as IB1 to be reported....

  12. Keep it together: restraints in crystallographic refinement of macromolecule–ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Roberto A.; Tucker, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    A short introduction is provided to the concept of restraints in macromolecular crystallographic refinement. A typical ligand restraint-generation process is then described, covering types of input, the methodology and the mechanics behind the software in general terms, how this has evolved over recent years and what to look for in the output. Finally, the currently available restraint-generation software is compared, concluding with some thoughts for the future. PMID:28177305

  13. Affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups induced by projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; BÅ`hm, Céline; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we show that affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups can be derived via Coxeter-Dynkin diagram foldings and projections of affine extended versions of the root systems E8, D6, and A4. We show that the induced affine extensions of the non-crystallographic groups H4, H3, and H2 correspond to a distinguished subset of those considered in [P.-P. Dechant, C. Bœhm, and R. Twarock, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 285202 (2012)]. This class of extensions was motivated by physical applications in icosahedral systems in biology (viruses), physics (quasicrystals), and chemistry (fullerenes). By connecting these here to extensions of E8, D6, and A4, we place them into the broader context of crystallographic lattices such as E8, suggesting their potential for applications in high energy physics, integrable systems, and modular form theory. By inverting the projection, we make the case for admitting different number fields in the Cartan matrix, which could open up enticing possibilities in hyperbolic geometry and rational conformal field theory.

  14. Electron diffraction study of {alpha}-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-06-01

    The structure of crystalline {alpha}-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes, allowing the space group symmetry to be studied. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pm3-bar were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for very thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. The structural basis of the Pm3-bar to Im3-bar transformation may be understood in terms of an analysis of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns is described. An electron diffraction pattern of the 5-fold axis of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi is also included; this is compared with the experimental results and calculations for the [0{tau}1] axis of Pm3-bar and Im3-bar crystalline phases. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  15. Energy-loss distributions of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidovich, N.N.; Nakhutin, I.E.; Shatunov, V.G.

    1976-03-05

    The f-f coincidence method was used to investigate the change in the form of the energy-loss distributions of Cf/sup 252/ fission fragments in air, down to fragment energies approx.0.8 MeV. A theoretical model is considered for the estimate of the mean-squared deviations of the fragment energy-loss distributions. (AIP)

  16. Self-organized criticality in fragmenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, L.; Dimon, P.; Bohr, J.

    1993-01-01

    The measured mass distributions of fragments from 26 fractured objects of gypsum, soap, stearic paraffin, and potato show evidence of obeying scaling laws; this suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmenting. The probability of finding a fragment scales inversely to a power...

  17. Low pressure microfluidic-based DNA fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Bomer, Johan G.; Jin, Mingliang; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We report a low-pressure microfluidic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation device based on a combination of me-chanical hydrodynamic shearing and low temperature sample heating. Conventional DNA fragmentation based on hydrody-namic shearing is capable of achieving fragment lengths (FL) < 10k bp

  18. Scaling and four-quark fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Bosveld, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed. The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  19. Probing mesitylborane and mesitylborate ligation within the coordination sphere of Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr3)+: a combined synthetic, X-ray crystallographic, and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesp, Kevin D; Kannemann, Felix O; Rankin, Matthew A; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Stradiotto, Mark

    2011-03-21

    The reaction of Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))Cl (1) with MesBH(2) (Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) afforded the mesitylborate complex Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))(BH(2)MesCl) (2, 66%). Exposure of 2 to the chloride abstracting agent LiB(C(6)F(5))(4)·2.5OEt(2) provided [Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))(BH(2)Mes)](+)B(C(6)F(5))(4)(-) (3, 54%), which features an unusual η(2)-B-H monoborane ligand. The related borate complex Cp*Ru(P(i)Pr(3))(BH(3)Mes) (5, 65%) was prepared from 1 and LiH(3)BMes. Attempts to effect the insertion of unsaturated organic substrates into the B-H bonds of 3 were unsuccessful, and efforts to dehydrohalogenate 2 using KO(t)Bu instead afforded the mesitylborate complex Cp*(P(i)Pr(3))Ru(BH(2)MesOH) (6, 48%). Treatment of 1 with benzyl potassium generated an intermediate hydridoruthenium complex (7) resulting from dehydrogenation of a P(i)Pr fragment, which in turn was observed to react with MesBH(2) to afford the mesitylborate complex Cp*(P((i)Pr)(2)(CH(3)CCH(2)))Ru(BH(3)Mes) (8, 47%). Crystallographic characterization data are provided for 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8. A combined X-ray crystallographic and density functional theory (DFT) investigation of 3 and 5, using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) analysis, revealed that 3 and 5 are best described as donor-acceptor complexes between a Cp*(P(i)Pr(3))Ru(+) fragment and a bis(η(2)-B-H) coordinating mesitylborane(borate) ligand. Significant σ-donation from the B-H bonds into the Ru(II) center exists as evidenced by the NBO populations, bond orders, and AIM delocalization indices. In the case of 3, the vacant p orbital on boron is stabilized by Ru→B π back-donation as well as by resonance with the mesityl group.

  20. Crystallographic groups and topology in Escher. (Spanish:Grupos cristalográficos y topología en Escher).

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos Amilibia, José María

    2010-01-01

    In the late 19th century Fedorov, Schoenflies, and Barlow classified the seventeen wallpaper groups (two-dimensional crystallographic groups, five of them direct movements and twelve of them inverse movements) and the 320 three-dimensional crystallographic groups. In order to get the lists of groups, they all used the same geometric strategy: to combine all possible movements and study them case by case. Later on, Zassenhaus developed a purely algebraic algorithm which allowed him to u...

  1. Isoscaling of projectile-like fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Chen; Chen Jin-Hui; Guo Wei; Ma Chun-Wang; Ma Guo-Liang; Su Qian-Min; Yan Ting-Zhi; Zuo Jia-Xu; Ma Yu-Gang; Fang De-Qing; Cai Xiang-Zhou; Chen Jin-Gen; Shen Wen-Qing; Tian Wen-Dong; Wang Kun; Wei Yi-Bin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the isotopic and isotonic distributions of projectile fragmentation products have been simulated by a modified statistical abrasion-ablation model and the isoscaling behaviour of projectile-like fragments has been discussed. The isoscaling parameters α andβ have been extracted respectively, for hot fragments before evaporation and cold fragments after evaporation. It looks that the evaporation has stronger effect on α than β. For cold fragments,a monotonic increase of α and |β| with the increase of Z and N is observed. The relation between isoscaling parameter and the change of isospin content is discussed.

  2. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  3. Phage-display libraries of murine and human antibody Fab fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Andersen, P S; Nielsen, L K

    1996-01-01

    We provide efficient and detailed procedures for construction, expression, and screening of comprehensive libraries of murine or human antibody Fab fragments displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. In addition, protocols for producing and using ultra-electrocompetent cells, for producing Fab...

  4. Triggered fragmentation in gravitationally unstable discs: forming fragments at small radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meru Farzana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We carry out three dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations of gravitationally unstable discs using to explore the movement of mass in a disc following its fragmentation. Compared to a more quiescent state before it fragments, the radial velocity of the gas increases by up to a factor of ≈ 2 – 3 after fragmentation. While the mass movement occurs both inwards and outwards, the inwards motion can cause the inner spirals to be suciently dense that they may become unstable and potentially fragment. Consequently, the dynamical behaviour of fragmented discs may cause subsequent fragmentation at smaller radii after an initial fragment has formed in the outer disc.

  5. Analysis of Transmissions Scheduling with Packet Fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Menakerman

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a scheduling problem in which packets, or datagrams, may be fragmented. While there are a few applications to scheduling with datagram fragmentation, our model of the problem is derived from a scheduling problem present in data over CATV networks. In the scheduling problem datagrams of variable lengths must be assigned (packed into fixed length time slots. One of the capabilities of the system is the ability to break a datagram into several fragments. When a datagram is fragmented, extra bits are added to the original datagram to enable the reassembly of all the fragments. We convert the scheduling problem into the problem of bin packing with item fragmentation, which we define in the following way: we are asked to pack a list of items into a minimum number of unit capacity bins. Each item may be fragmented in which case overhead units are added to the size of every fragment. The cost associated with fragmentation renders the problem NP-hard, therefore an approximation algorithm is needed. We define a version of the well-known Next-Fit algorithm, capable of fragmenting items, and investigate its performance. We present both worst case and average case results and compare them to the case where fragmentation is not allowed.

  6. Impact of numerical models on fragmentation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Gezahengn, Belien; Abbas, Micheline; Bourgeois, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Simulated fragmentation process in granular assemblies is a challenging problem which date back the beginning of the 90'. If first approaches have focus on the fragmentation on a single particle, with the development of robust, fast numerical method is is possible today to simulated such process in a large collection of particles. But the question of the fragmentation problem is still open: should the fragmentation be done dynamically (one particle becoming two fragments) and according which criterion or should the fragment paths be defined initially and which is the impact of the discretization and the model of fragments? The present contribution proposes to investigate the second aspect i.e. the impact of fragment modeling on the fragmentation processes. First to perform such an analysis, the geometry of fragments (disks/sphere or polygon/polyhedra), their behavior (rigid/deformable) and the law governing their interactions are investigated. Then such model will be used in a grinding application where the evolution of fragments and impact on the behavior of the whole packing are investigate.

  7. Sperm DNA fragmentation abnormalities in men from couples with a history of recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Mikaela; Aitken, Robert J; Sacks, Gavin

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have described an association between sperm with DNA damage and a history of recurrent miscarriage (RM), although it is not clear whether there is benefit in screening for sperm DNA fragmentation and to what extent DNA fragmentation impacts upon RM. To identify what proportion of couples experiencing RM are affected by DNA fragmentation abnormalities. In this retrospective study, between 2008 and 2013, couples with a history of recurrent miscarriage (≥3 first trimester miscarriages) were investigated comprehensively for known causes (karyotype, uterine, antiphospholipid syndrome, thrombophilia) and also by semen analysis, including DNA fragmentation [sperm chromatin structure analysis (SCSA)]. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS software with significance taken as P fragmentation index (DFI) of 9.50%. Normal levels were found in 70.5% of men (DFI 30%). Couples with otherwise unexplained recurrent miscarriage had significantly higher DFI than those with other causes identified on routine screening (P = 0.012). In couples experiencing RM, 30% (32/108) of men had sperm with high levels of DNA fragmentation (DFI > 15%). This may be a contributing factor to the clinical syndrome of RM, and future clinical trials of therapies for these couples are warranted. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. Expression, limited proteolysis and preliminary crystallographic analysis of IpaD, a component of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Steven [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Roversi, Pietro [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Espina, Marianela [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Deane, Janet E. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Birket, Susan; Picking, William D. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Blocker, Ariel [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Picking, Wendy L. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Lea, Susan M., E-mail: susan.lea@path.ox.ac.uk [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the S. flexneri type III secretion system, has been crystallized in a variety of crystal forms using in-drop proteolysis. Native and selenomethionine-labelled data collection and preliminary analyses are reported. IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system, has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of the native protein in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.9, b = 100.7, c = 112.0 Å, and data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak at 50% of the origin on the Harker section v = 0.5, suggesting twofold non-crystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. As attempts to derivatize or grow selenomethionine-labelled protein crystals failed, in-drop proteolysis was used to produce new crystal forms. A trace amount of subtilisin Carlsberg was added to IpaD before sparse-matrix screening, resulting in the production of several new crystal forms. This approach produced SeMet-labelled crystals and diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The SeMet crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 139.4, b = 45.0, c = 99.5 Å, β = 107.9°. An anomalous difference Patterson map revealed peaks on the Harker section v = 0, while the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold noncrystallographic symmetry axis, which is consistent with two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  9. The formation of planets by disc fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatellos Dimitris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the role that disc fragmentation plays in the formation of gas giant and terrestrial planets, and how this relates to the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars, and ultimately to the process of star formation. Protostellar discs may fragment, if they are massive enough and can cool fast enough, but most of the objects that form by fragmentation are brown dwarfs. It may be possible that planets also form, if the mass growth of a proto-fragment is stopped (e.g. if this fragment is ejected from the disc, or suppressed and even reversed (e.g by tidal stripping. I will discuss if it is possible to distinguish whether a planet has formed by disc fragmentation or core accretion, and mention of a few examples of observed exoplanets that are suggestive of formation by disc fragmentation.

  10. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services.

  11. Extraction of 16th Century Calender Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jakob Povl; Etheridge, Christian

    at the Cultural Heritage & Archaeometric Research Team, SDU. Upon finding medieval manuscript fragments in the university library’s special collections, scholars at the Centre for Medieval Literature are consulted. In most cases, digital pictures of the finds will circulate in the international community...... of medieval scholars. Thousands of 16th and 17th Century books are stored in the University Library of Southern Denmark. One out of five of these books is expected to contain medieval manuscript fragments or fragments of rare prints, e.g. incunabula....... fragments may require extensive use of Big Data and other forms of analysis in order to be identified. Usually, the university library prefers not to remove the fragments from their “fragment carriers”. In order to read fragments that are only partially visible or invisible, x-ray technology may be deployed...

  12. Dihadron Fragmentation Functions and Transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Radici, Marco; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results for an updated extraction of the transversity parton distribution based on the analysis of pion-pair production in deep-inelastic scattering off transversely polarized targets in collinear factorization. Data for proton and deuteron targets by HERMES and COMPASS allow for a flavor separation of the valence components of transversity, while di-hadron fragmentation functions are taken from the semi-inclusive production of two pion pairs in back-to-back jets in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation. The latter data from Belle have been reanalyzed using the replica method and a more realistic estimate of the uncertainties on the chiral-odd interference fragmentation function has been obtained. After encoding this piece of information into the deep-inelastic scattering cross section, the transversity has been re-extracted by using the most recent and more precise COMPASS data for proton target. This picture represents the current most realistic estimate of the uncertainties on our knowledge of tran...

  13. Dihadron Fragmentation Functions and Transversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radici Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present preliminary results for an updated extraction of the transversity parton distribution based on the analysis of pion-pair production in deep-inelastic scattering off transversely polarized targets in collinear factorization. Data for proton and deuteron targets by HERMES and COMPASS allow for a flavor separation of the valence components of transversity, while di-hadron fragmentation functions are taken from the semi-inclusive production of two pion pairs in back-to-back jets in e+e− annihilation. The latter data from Belle have been reanalyzed using the replica method and a more realistic estimate of the uncertainties on the chiral-odd interference fragmentation function has been obtained. After encoding this piece of information into the deep-inelastic scattering cross section, the transversity has been re-extracted by using the most recent and more precise COMPASS data for proton target. This picture represents the current most realistic estimate of the uncertainties on our knowledge of transversity. The preliminary results indicate that the valence up component seems smaller and with a narrower error band than in previous extraction.

  14. Discovery of a Potent Class I Protein Arginine Methyltransferase Fragment Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Freitas, Renato; Eram, Mohammad S; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Steuber, Holger; Smil, David; Wu, Hong; Li, Fengling; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dong, Aiping; Brown, Peter J; Hitchcock, Marion; Moosmayer, Dieter; Stegmann, Christian M; Egner, Ursula; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-02-11

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) are a promising target class in oncology and other disease areas. They are composed of SET domain methyltransferases and structurally unrelated Rossman-fold enzymes that include protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). In the absence of a well-defined medicinal chemistry tool-kit focused on PMTs, most current inhibitors were identified by screening large and diverse libraries of leadlike molecules. So far, no successful fragment-based approach was reported against this target class. Here, by deconstructing potent PRMT inhibitors, we find that chemical moieties occupying the substrate arginine-binding site can act as efficient fragment inhibitors. Screening a fragment library against PRMT6 produced numerous hits, including a 300 nM inhibitor (ligand efficiency of 0.56) that decreased global histone 3 arginine 2 methylation in cells, and can serve as a warhead for the development of PRMT chemical probes.

  15. RAY TRACING RENDER MENGGUNAKAN FRAGMENT ANTI ALIASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Rendering is generating surface and three-dimensional effects on an object displayed on a monitor screen. Ray tracing as a rendering method that traces ray for each image pixel has a drawback, that is, aliasing (jaggies effect. There are some methods for executing anti aliasing. One of those methods is OGSS (Ordered Grid Super Sampling. OGSS is able to perform aliasing well. However, this method requires more computation time since sampling of all pixels in the image will be increased. Fragment Anti Aliasing (FAA is a new alternative method that can cope with the drawback. FAA will check the image when performing rendering to a scene. Jaggies effect is only happened at curve and gradient object. Therefore, only this part of object that will experience sampling magnification. After this sampling magnification and the pixel values are computed, then downsample is performed to retrieve the original pixel values. Experimental results show that the software can implement ray tracing well in order to form images, and it can implement FAA and OGSS technique to perform anti aliasing. In general, rendering using FAA is faster than using OGSS

  16. An integrated restriction fragment length polymorphism--amplified fragment length polymorphism linkage map for cultivated sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedil, M A; Wye, C; Berry, S; Segers, B; Peleman, J; Jones, R; Leon, A; Slabaugh, M B; Knapp, S J

    2001-04-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) maps have been constructed for cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) using three independent sets of RFLP probes. The aim of this research was to integrate RFLP markers from two sets with RFLP markers for resistance gene candidate (RGC) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Genomic DNA samples of HA370 and HA372, the parents of the F2 population used to build the map, were screened for AFLPs using 42 primer combinations and RFLPs using 136 cDNA probes (RFLP analyses were performed on DNA digested with EcoRI, HindIII, EcoRV, or DraI). The AFLP primers produced 446 polymorphic and 1101 monomorphic bands between HA370 and HA372. The integrated map was built by genotyping 296 AFLP and 104 RFLP markers on 180 HA370 x HA372 F2 progeny (the AFLP marker assays were performed using 18 primer combinations). The HA370 x HA372 map comprised 17 linkage groups, presumably corresponding to the 17 haploid chromosomes of sunflower, had a mean density of 3.3 cM, and was 1326 cM long. Six RGC RFLP loci were polymorphic and mapped to three linkage groups (LG8, LG13, and LG15). AFLP markers were densely clustered on several linkage groups, and presumably reside in centromeric regions where recombination is reduced and the ratio of genetic to physical distance is low. Strategies for targeting markers to euchromatic DNA need to be tested in sunflower. The HA370 x HA372 map integrated 14 of 17 linkage groups from two independent RFLP maps. Three linkage groups were devoid of RFLP markers from one of the two maps.

  17. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian;

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the building of pharmacophores for G protein-coupled receptors, a major drug target family. The method is a combination of the ligand- and target-based pharmacophore methods and founded on the extraction of structural fragments, interacting ligand moiety...... for new targets. A validating retrospective virtual screening of histamine H1 and H3 receptor pharmacophores yielded area-under-the-curves of 0.88 and 0.82, respectively. The fragment-based method has the unique advantage that it can be applied to targets for which no (homologous) crystal structures...... or ligands are known. 47% of the class A G protein-coupled receptors can be targeted with at least four-element pharmacophores. The fragment libraries can also be used to grow known ligands or for rotamer refinement of homology models. Researchers can download the complete fragment library or a subset...

  18. Fragment-Based Discovery of 5-Arylisatin-Based Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 and 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agamennone, Mariangela; Belov, Dmitry S; Laghezza, Antonio; Ivanov, Vladimir N; Novoselov, Anton M; Andreev, Ivan A; Ratmanova, Nina K; Altieri, Andrea; Tortorella, Paolo; Kurkin, Alexander V

    2016-09-06

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are well-established targets for several pathologies. In particular, MMP-2 and MMP-13 play a prominent role in cancer progression. In this study, a structure-based screening campaign was applied to prioritize metalloproteinase-oriented fragments. This computational model was applied to a representative fragment set from the publically available EDASA Scientific compound library. These fragments were prioritized, and the top-ranking hits were tested in a biological assay to validate the model. Two scaffolds showed consistent activity in the assay, and the isatin-based compounds were the most interesting. These latter fragments have significant potential as tools for the design and realization of novel MMP inhibitors. In addition to their micromolar activity, the chemical synthesis affords flexible and creative access to their analogues.

  19. Fragment-based discovery of DNA gyrase inhibitors targeting the ATPase subunit of GyrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesleh, Michael F; Cross, Jason B; Zhang, Jing; Kahmann, Jan; Andersen, Ole A; Barker, John; Cheng, Robert K; Felicetti, Brunella; Wood, Michael; Hadfield, Andrea T; Scheich, Christoph; Moy, Terence I; Yang, Qingyi; Shotwell, Joseph; Nguyen, Kien; Lippa, Blaise; Dolle, Roland; Ryan, M Dominic

    2016-02-15

    Inhibitors of the ATPase function of bacterial DNA gyrase, located in the GyrB subunit and its related ParE subunit in topoisomerase IV, have demonstrated antibacterial activity. In this study we describe an NMR fragment-based screening effort targeting Staphylococcus aureus GyrB that identified several attractive and novel starting points with good ligand efficiency. Fragment hits were further characterized using NMR binding studies against full-length S. aureus GyrB and Escherichia coli ParE. X-ray co-crystal structures of select fragment hits confirmed binding and suggested a path for medicinal chemistry optimization. The identification, characterization, and elaboration of one of these fragment series to a 0.265 μM inhibitor is described herein.

  20. Single chain Fab (scFab fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Mariam

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The connection of the variable part of the heavy chain (VH and and the variable part of the light chain (VL by a peptide linker to form a consecutive polypeptide chain (single chain antibody, scFv was a breakthrough for the functional production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli. Being double the size of fragment variable (Fv fragments and requiring assembly of two independent polypeptide chains, functional Fab fragments are usually produced with significantly lower yields in E. coli. An antibody design combining stability and assay compatibility of the fragment antigen binding (Fab with high level bacterial expression of single chain Fv fragments would be desirable. The desired antibody fragment should be both suitable for expression as soluble antibody in E. coli and antibody phage display. Results Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of a polypeptide linker between the fragment difficult (Fd and the light chain (LC, resulting in the formation of a single chain Fab fragment (scFab, can lead to improved production of functional molecules. We tested the impact of various linker designs and modifications of the constant regions on both phage display efficiency and the yield of soluble antibody fragments. A scFab variant without cysteins (scFabΔC connecting the constant part 1 of the heavy chain (CH1 and the constant part of the light chain (CL were best suited for phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. Beside the expression system E. coli, the new antibody format was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Monovalent and divalent fragments (DiFabodies as well as multimers were characterised. Conclusion A new antibody design offers the generation of bivalent Fab derivates for antibody phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. This antibody format is of particular value for high throughput proteome binder generation projects, due to the avidity effect and the possible use of

  1. Fluid fragmentation from hospital toilets

    CERN Document Server

    Traverso, G; Lu, C -C; Maa, R; Langer, R; Bourouiba, L

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections represent significant health and financial burdens to society. Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a particularly challenging bacteria with the potential to cause severe diarrhea and death. One mode of transmission for C. difficile, as well as other pathogens, which has received little attention is the potential air contamination by pathogen-bearing droplets emanating from toilets. In the fluid dynamics video submitted to the APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion 2013, we present flow visualizations via high-speed recordings showing the capture of the product of the fluid fragmentation generated by hospital toilet high-pressure flushes. Important quantities of both large and small droplets are observed. We illustrate how high-pressure flushes and cleaning products currently used in hospital toilets result in aggravating, rather than alleviating, the suspension and recirculation of tenacious airborne pathogen-bearing droplets.

  2. Fragmentation in Carbon Therapy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Charara, Y M

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art Monte Carlo code HETC-HEDS was used to simulate spallation products, secondary neutron, and secondary proton production in A-150 Tissue Equivalent Plastic phantoms to investigate fragmentation of carbon therapy beams. For a 356 MeV/Nucleon carbon ion beam, production of charged particles heavier than protons was 0.24 spallation products per incident carbon ion with atomic numbers ranging from 1 through 5 (hydrogen to boron). In addition, there were 4.73 neutrons and 2.95 protons produced per incident carbon ion. Furthermore, as the incident energy increases, the neutron production rate increases at a rate of 20% per 10 MeV/nucleon. Secondary protons were created at a rate between 2.62-2.87 per carbon ion, while spallation products were created at a rate between 0.20-0.24 per carbon ion.

  3. Nonlinear Inflaton Fragmentation after Preheating

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G N; Felder, Gary N.; Kofman, Lev

    2007-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear dynamics of inflaton fragmentation during and after preheating in the simplest model of chaotic inflation. While the earlier regime of parametric resonant particle production and the later turbulent regime of interacting fields evolving towards equilibrium are well identified and understood, the short intermediate stage of violent nonlinear dynamics remains less explored. Lattice simulations of fully nonlinear preheating dynamics show specific features of this intermediate stage: occupation numbers of the scalar particles are peaked, scalar fields become significantly non-gaussian and the field dynamics become chaotic and irreversible. Visualization of the field dynamics in configuration space reveals that nonlinear interactions generate non-gaussian inflaton inhomogeneities with very fast growing amplitudes. The peaks of the inflaton inhomogeneities coincide with the peaks of the scalar field(s) produced by parametric resonance. When the inflaton peaks reach their maxima, they stop ...

  4. Debye screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydges, David C.; Federbush, Paul

    1980-10-01

    The existence and exponential clustering of correlation functions for a classical coulomb system at low density or high temperature are proven using methods from constructive quantum field theory, the sine gordon transformation and the Glimm, Jaffe, Spencer expansion about mean field theory. This is a vindication of a belief of long standing among physicists, known as Debye screening. That is, because of special properties of the coulomb potential, the configurations of significant probability are those in which the long range parts of r -1 are mostly cancelled, leaving an effective exponentially decaying potential acting between charge clouds. This paper generalizes a previous paper of one of the authors in which these results were obtained for a special lattice system. The present treatment covers the continuous mechanics situation, with essentially arbitrary short range forces and charge species. Charge symmetry is not assumed.

  5. Immunogenic properties of Streptococcus agalactiae FbsA fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Papasergi

    Full Text Available Several species of Gram-positive bacteria can avidly bind soluble and surface-associated fibrinogen (Fng, a property that is considered important in the pathogenesis of human infections. To gain insights into the mechanism by which group B Streptococcus (GBS, a frequent neonatal pathogen, interacts with Fng, we have screened two phage displayed genomic GBS libraries. All of the Fng-binding phage clones contained inserts encoding fragments of FbsA, a protein displaying multiple repeats. Since the functional role of this protein is only partially understood, representative fragments were recombinantly expressed and analyzed for Fng binding affinity and ability to induce immune protection against GBS infection. Maternal immunization with 6pGST, a fragment containing five repeats, significantly protected mouse pups against lethal GBS challenge and these protective effects could be recapitulated by administration of anti-6pGST serum from adult animals. Notably, a monoclonal antibody that was capable of neutralizing Fng binding by 6pGST, but not a non-neutralizing antibody, could significantly protect pups against lethal GBS challenge. These data suggest that FbsA-Fng interaction promotes GBS pathogenesis and that blocking such interaction is a viable strategy to prevent or treat GBS infections.

  6. High yield DNA fragmentation using cyclical hydrodynamic shearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Spang, Peter; Roeser, Tina; Nieto, Benjamin; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We report a new DNA fragmentation technique that significantly simplifies conventional hydrodynamic shearing fragmentation by eliminating the need for sample recirculation while maintaining high fragmentation yield and low fragment length variation, and therefore, reduces instrument complexity and c

  7. High yield DNA fragmentation using cyclical hydrodynamic shearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Spang, Peter; Roeser, Tina; Nieto, Benjamin; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We report a new DNA fragmentation technique that significantly simplifies conventional hydrodynamic shearing fragmentation by eliminating the need for sample recirculation while maintaining high fragmentation yield and low fragment length variation, and therefore, reduces instrument complexity and

  8. Self-assembled ultra-nanocrystalline silicon films with preferred crystallographic orientation for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Das, Debajyoti

    2015-03-01

    Using low-pressure planar inductively coupled plasma CVD at 87% H2-dilution to the SiH4 plasma, nc-Si:H films are prepared that possess preferential growth along crystallographic orientation with I220/I111 > 1.2, bonded H-content of ∼5.5 at.%, a low microstructure factor of ∼0.56, along with a reasonably high σD ∼ 5.2 × 10-4 S cm-1, ΔE ∼ 143 meV and σPh ∼ 1.4 × 10-3 S cm-1. The growth of the nc-Si:H network has been optimized to a moderately high nanocrystallinity (∼68%), with an average grain size of ∼8 nm. The overall network comprises a significant fraction of ultra-nanocrystalline component, Xunc/Xnc ∼ 0.47, which are dominantly inhabited by the thermodynamically preferred crystallographic orientation that provides convenient electrical transport perpendicular to the film surface and subsequently could facilitate photovoltaic performance. The cross-sectional view of the fracture surface demonstrates columnar structures, closely correlated to the favored growth of the nanocrystallites along crystallographic orientation that retains direction perpendicular to the substrate surface. The underlying phenomena could be demonstrated as a consequence of preferential growth induced by high atomic H density present in the planar inductively coupled SiH4 plasma obtained via much lower H2-dilution compared to that realized in conventional capacitively coupled plasma-CVD. The nc-Si:H films with precise material properties as well as the allied low-pressure ICP-CVD growth process could be of significant use in further progress of nc-Si solar cells.

  9. Trapping of Oxygen Vacancies at Crystallographic Shear Planes in Acceptor-Doped Pb-Based Ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Hadermann, Joke; Abakumov, Artem M

    2015-12-01

    The defect chemistry of the ferroelectric material PbTiO3 after doping with Fe(III) acceptor ions is reported. Using advanced transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray and neutron diffraction, we demonstrate that even at concentrations as low as circa 1.7% (material composition approximately ABO2.95), the oxygen vacancies are trapped into extended planar defects, specifically crystallographic shear planes. We investigate the evolution of these defects upon doping and unravel their detailed atomic structure using the formalism of superspace crystallography, thus unveiling their role in nonstoichiometry in the Pb-based perovskites.

  10. Crystallographic dependence of photocatalytic activity of WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Varga, Tamas; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Chongmin; Chambers, Scott A; Du, Yingge

    2015-06-21

    We investigated the impact of crystallographic orientation on the photocatalytic activity of single crystalline WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB). A clear effect is observed, with (111) being the most reactive surface, followed by (110) and (001). Photoreactivity is directly correlated with the surface free energy determined by density functional theory calculations. The RhB photodegradation mechanism is found to involve hydroxyl radicals in solution formed from photo-generated holes and differs from previous studies performed on nanoparticles and composites.

  11. Regularities of crystallographic texture formation in cladding tubes from Zr-based alloys during their production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaenkova, M.; Perlovich, Yu; Fesenko, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes researches of the authors, which are directed on the development of the methodological basis of X-ray studies in the materials science of zirconium and on the systematization of new experimental results obtained using developed methods. The paper describes regularities of the formation of the crystallographic texture and the substructure inhomogeneity of cladding tubes from zirconium alloys at various stages of their manufacturing, i.e. during hot and cold deformation, recrystallization, phase transformations and interactions of the above processes.

  12. (Fundamental studies of new magnetic heterostructures: Their growth, crystallographic structure, magnetic and electronic properties)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onellion, M. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Physics); Dowben, P.A. (Syracuse Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    As part of our request for renewal of our grant, we include this progress report on the significant results obtained under grant number FG02-89ER45319, Fundamental Studies of New Magnetic Heterostructures: Their Growth, Crystallographic Structure, Magnetic and Electronic Properties,'' since the inception of the grant. The results include the scientific accomplishments, the instrumentation developed, and the technological applications of our work. Each area is discussed separately and an initial summary of all areas is provided before the detailed discussion.

  13. Use of Bayesian Inference in Crystallographic Structure Refinement via Full Diffraction Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Chris M.; Han, Zhen; Levin, Igor; Page, Katharine; Reich, Brian J.; Smith, Ralph C.; Wilson, Alyson G.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian inference method for refining crystallographic structures is presented. The distribution of model parameters is stochastically sampled using Markov chain Monte Carlo. Posterior probability distributions are constructed for all model parameters to properly quantify uncertainty by appropriately modeling the heteroskedasticity and correlation of the error structure. The proposed method is demonstrated by analyzing a National Institute of Standards and Technology silicon standard reference material. The results obtained by Bayesian inference are compared with those determined by Rietveld refinement. Posterior probability distributions of model parameters provide both estimates and uncertainties. The new method better estimates the true uncertainties in the model as compared to the Rietveld method. PMID:27550221

  14. Morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in Fe-0.15C binary alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Terasaki, Hidenori; Komizo, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an in situ observation method, combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron backscattering diffraction, was used to investigate the morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in a Fe-0.15C binary alloy. The nucleation at a grain boundary and inclusions, sympathetic nucleation, and impingement event of bainitic ferrite were directly shown in real time. The variant evolution during bainite transformation and misorientation between bainitic ferrites were clarified. Strong variant selection was observed during sympathetic nucleation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Generalized fragmentation functions for fractal jet observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Benjamin T.; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating cross sections involving identified final-state hadrons. Fragmentation functions are fundamentally nonperturbative, but have a calculable renormalization group evolution. Unlike ordinary fragmentation functions, generalized fragmentation functions exhibit nonlinear evolution, since fractal observables involve correlated subsets of hadrons within a jet. Some special cases of generalized fragmentation functions are reviewed, including jet charge and track functions. We then consider fractal jet observables that are based on hierarchical clustering trees, where the nonlinear evolution equations also exhibit tree-like structure at leading order. We develop a numeric code for performing this evolution and study its phenomenological implications. As an application, we present examples of fractal jet observables that are useful in discriminating quark jets from gluon jets.

  16. Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

  17. Fragmentation processes during explosion welding (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Antonova, O. V.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Tolmachev, T. P.

    2013-10-01

    The fragmentation during explosion welding is briefly reviewed. Fragmentation of partitioning type (FPT), which consists in partitioning into particles that either fly away or join each other, is detected. FPT is an analog of the fragmentation during an explosion that was studied by Mott. In both cases, the flight of particles (fragments) takes place, and the integrity of the material is retained in FPT. FPT is a powerful channel for the dissipation of supplied energy, since the surface of flying particles has a large total area.

  18. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  19. A Note on Convex Renorming and Fragmentability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mirmostafaee

    2005-05-01

    Using the game approach to fragmentability, we give new and simpler proofs of the following known results: (a) If the Banach space admits an equivalent Kadec norm, then its weak topology is fragmented by a metric which is stronger than the norm topology. (b) If the Banach space admits an equivalent rotund norm, then its weak topology is fragmented by a metric. (c) If the Banach space is weakly locally uniformly rotund, then its weak topology is fragmented by a metric which is stronger than the norm topology.

  20. Substrate Activity Screening (SAS) and Related Approaches in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2016-03-04

    Substrate activity screening (SAS) was presented a decade ago by Ellman and co-workers as a straightforward methodology for the identification of fragment-sized building blocks for enzyme inhibitors. Ever since, SAS and variations derived from it have been successfully applied to the discovery of inhibitors of various families of enzymatically active drug targets. This review covers key achievements and challenges of SAS and related methodologies, including the modified substrate activity screening (MSAS) approach. Special attention is given to the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of these methodologies, as a thorough understanding thereof is crucial for successfully transforming the identified fragment-sized hits into potent inhibitors.

  1. Design Principles for Fragment Libraries: Maximizing the Value of Learnings from Pharma Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) Programs for Use in Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keserű, György M; Erlanson, Daniel A; Ferenczy, György G; Hann, Michael M; Murray, Christopher W; Pickett, Stephen D

    2016-09-22

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is well suited for discovering both drug leads and chemical probes of protein function; it can cover broad swaths of chemical space and allows the use of creative chemistry. FBDD is widely implemented for lead discovery in industry but is sometimes used less systematically in academia. Design principles and implementation approaches for fragment libraries are continually evolving, and the lack of up-to-date guidance may prevent more effective application of FBDD in academia. This Perspective explores many of the theoretical, practical, and strategic considerations that occur within FBDD programs, including the optimal size, complexity, physicochemical profile, and shape profile of fragments in FBDD libraries, as well as compound storage, evaluation, and screening technologies. This compilation of industry experience in FBDD will hopefully be useful for those pursuing FBDD in academia.

  2. Magnetic transition temperatures follow crystallographic symmetry in samarium under high-pressures and low-temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig R.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal samarium (Sm) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to high-pressure up to 47 GPa and low-temperature to 10 K. The two magnetic transitions at 106 K and 14 K in the α-Sm phase, attributed to antiferromagnetic ordering on hexagonal and cubic layers respectively, collapse in to one magnetic transition near 10 GPa when Sm assumes a double hexagonal close packed (dhcp) phase. On further increase in pressure above 34 GPa, the magnetic transitions split again as Sm adopts a hexagonal-hP3 structure indicating different magnetic transition temperatures for different crystallographic sites. A model for magnetic ordering for the hexagonal-hP3 phase in samarium has been proposed based on the experimental data. The magnetic transition temperatures closely follow the crystallographic symmetry during α-Sm  →  dhcp  →  fcc/dist.fcc  →  hP3 structure sequence at high-pressures and low-temperatures.

  3. Erbium-ion implantation into various crystallographic cuts of Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvindova, P.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Cajzl, J.; Svecova, B.; Oswald, J.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the importance of crystallographic cuts with a different orientation on the luminescent properties and structural changes of Al2O3 implanted with Er+ ions at 190 keV and with a fluence of 1.0 × 1016 cm-2. Post-implantation annealing at 1000 °C in oxygen atmosphere was also done. The chemical compositions and erbium concentration-depth profiles of implanted layers were studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and compared to SRIM simulations. The same value of the maximum erbium concentration (up to 2 at.%) was observed at a depth of about 40 nm for all crystallographic cuts. The structural properties of the prepared layers were characterised by RBS/channelling. The relative amount of disordered atoms of 70-80% was observed in the prepared implanted layers and discussed for various cuts. It has been found that erbium is positioned randomly in the Al2O3 crystalline matrix, and no preferential positions appeared even after the annealing procedure. Erbium luminescence properties were measured in the wavelength range of 1440-1650 nm for all samples. As-implanted Al2O3 samples had a significant luminescence band at 1530 nm. The best luminescence was repeatedly observed in the cut of Al2O3. The annealing procedure significantly improved the luminescent properties.

  4. Crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating on the affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yaw-Jen; Chen, Sheng-Zheng; Ho, Ching-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The principle of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been recently implemented for protein microarrays for the study of protein abundance and function. Ni-Co film fabricated by electrodeposition is a novel microarray surface in an alloy type for immobilizing histidine-tagged proteins based on IMAC. In this paper, the effects of crystallographic structures and surface properties of Ni-Co coatings, with and without the annealing process, on the immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins were systematically investigated. The experimental results reveal that the stronger hcp texture, due to a higher Co content, results in better affinity adsorption for histidine-tagged biotin. Nevertheless, the allotropic phase transformation from hcp to fcc, due to the annealing process, leads to the decrease of affinity adsorption. The wettability property and the surface roughness of Ni-Co coating are, however, not important factors. Obviously, the crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating is the dominant factor for the specific affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein.

  5. Crystallographic superstructure in R2PdSi3 compounds (R=heavy rare earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fei; Frontzek, Matthias; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Leisegang, Tilmann; Zschornak, Matthias; Mietrach, Robert; Hoffmann, Jens-Uwe; Löser, Wolfgang; Gemming, Sibylle; Meyer, Dirk C.; Loewenhaupt, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The R2PdSi3 intermetallic compounds have been reported to crystallize in a hexagonal AlB2-derived structure, with the rare earth atoms on the Al sites and Pd and Si atoms randomly distributed on the B sites. However, the intricate magnetic properties observed in the series of compounds have always suggested complications to the assumed structure. To clarify the situation, x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements were performed on the heavy rare earth compounds with R=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, which revealed the existence of a crystallographic superstructure. The superstructure features a doubled unit cell in the hexagonal basal plane and an octuplication along the perpendicular c direction with respect to the primitive cell. No structural transition was observed between 300 and 1.5 K. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations were utilized to investigate the local environments of the respective atoms. In this paper the various experimental results will be presented and it will be shown that the superstructure is mainly due to the Pd-Si order on the B sites. A structure model will be proposed to fully describe the superstructure of Pd-Si order in R2PdSi3. The connection between the crystallographic superstructure and the magnetic properties will be discussed in the framework of the presented model.

  6. Reaction temperature variations on the crystallographic state of spinel cobalt aluminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Minori; Nakane, Takayuki; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Shimizu, Tadashi; Sakka, Yoshio; Matsushita, Akiyuki; Abe, Hiroya; Funazukuri, Toshitaka; Naka, Takashi

    2013-05-21

    In this study, we report a rapid and simple technique for obtaining cobalt aluminate having a spinel structure. The products were prepared from a hydroxide precursor synthesized by coprecipitation of cobalt (Co(2+)) and aluminum (Al(3+)) nitrates with an alkaline solution. The chosen precursor enabled low temperature fabrication of cobalt aluminate with a spinel structure by sintering it for 2 hours at low temperatures (>400 °C). Crystallographic and thermal analyses suggest that the low-temperature-sintered products contain Co(3+) ions stabilized by chemisorbed water and/or hydroxide groups, which was not observed for products sintered at temperatures higher than 1000 °C. The color of the products turned from clear blue (Thenard's blue) to dark green when sintering temperatures were below 1000 °C. Magnetic quantities, Curie constants, and Weiss temperatures show a strong dependence on the sintering temperature. These findings suggest that there are mixed valent states, i.e. Co(2+) and Co(3+), and unique cation distributions at the different crystallographic sites in the spinel structure, especially in the products sintered at lower temperatures.

  7. Synthesis of crystallographically oriented olivine aggregates using colloidal processing in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Sanae; Suzuki, Tohru S.; Sakka, Yoshio; Yabe, Kosuke; Hiraga, Takehiko

    2016-11-01

    This study develops a fabrication technique to obtain Fe-free and Fe-bearing (Fe:Mg = 1:9) olivine aggregates not only with high density and fine grain size but with crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). A magnetic field (≤12 T) is applied to synthetic, fine-grained ( 120 nm), olivine particles dispersed in solvent. The alignment of certain crystallographic axes of the particles with respect to a magnetic direction is anticipated due to magnetic anisotropy of olivine. The dispersed particles are gradually consolidated on a porous alumina mold covered with a solid-liquid separation filter during drainage of the solvent. The resultant aligned consolidated aggregate is then isostatically pressed and vacuum sintered. We find that (1) preparation of fully reacted olivine particles, with less propensity to coalesce; (2) preparation of a suspension with highly dispersed particles; and (3) application of a certain strength of the magnetic field are essential to obtain well-sintered and well-aligned aggregates. High density (i.e., olivine aggregates were successfully synthesized with uniaxially aligned a- and c-axes, respectively. Attempts to uniaxially align the magnetization hard axis and to triaxially align Fe-bearing olivine by rotating the suspension in the magnetic field succeeded in obtaining weakly developed CPO aggregates.

  8. Crystallographic and electronic properties of AlCrN films that absorb visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatemizo, N.; Imada, S.; Miura, Y.; Nishio, K.; Isshiki, T.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the crystallographic and electronic properties of wurtzite Cr-doped AlN (AlCrN) films (Cr ≤12.0%) that absorb visible light. We confirmed that the films consist of wurtzite columnar single crystals that are densely packed, c-axis oriented, and exhibit a random rotation along the a-axis in plane by using transmission electron microscopy. The oxidation state of Cr was found to be 3+ using Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, which implies that Cr can be a substitute for Al3+ in AlN. The first nearest neighbor distances estimated using Cr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were found to be nearly isotropic for incident light with electric fields that are parallel and perpendicular to the plane. The results of ab initio lattice relaxation calculations for the model of wurtzite Al1-xCrxN supercell where Cr replaces Al support the EXAFS results. The calculations for the model showed that additional energy bands are formed in the band gap of AlN, in which the Fermi energy (EF) is present. As expected from the calculation results, the electrical conductivity increases with increase in the Cr concentration, implying that the density of states at EF increases monotonically. From these results, we can conclude that AlCrN films are an intermediate band material with respect to their crystallographic and electric properties.

  9. Determination of precise crystallographic directions for mask alignment in wet bulk micromachining for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sajal Sagar; Pal, Prem; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Xing, Yan; Sato, Kazuo

    2016-12-01

    In wet bulk micromachining, the etching characteristics are orientation dependent. As a result, prolonged etching of mask openings of any geometric shape on both Si{100} and Si{110} wafers results in a structure defined by the slowest etching planes. In order to fabricate microstructures with high dimensional accuracy, it is vital to align the mask edges along the crystal directions comprising of these slowest etching planes. Thus, precise alignment of mask edges is important in micro/nano fabrication. As a result, the determination of accurate crystal directions is of utmost importance and is in fact the first step to ensure dimensionally accurate microstructures for improved performance. In this review article, we have presented a comprehensive analysis of different techniques to precisely determine the crystallographic directions. We have covered various techniques proposed in the span of more than two decades to determine the crystallographic directions on both Si{100} and Si{110} wafers. Apart from a detailed discussion of each technique along with their design and implementation, we have provided a critical analysis of the associated constraints, benefits and shortcomings. We have also summed up the critical aspects of each technique and presented in a tabular format for easy reference for readers. This review article comprises of an exhaustive discussion and is a handy reference for researchers who are new in the field of wet anisotropic etching or who want to get abreast with the techniques of determination of crystal directions.

  10. Conformation-changing aggregation in hydroxyacetone: a combined low-temperature FTIR, jet, and crystallographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Archna; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui; Hesse, Susanne; Xue, Zhifeng; Suhm, Martin A; Nayak, Susanta K; Sathishkumar, Ranganthan; Pal, Rumpa; Row, Tayur N Guru

    2011-12-21

    Aggregation in hydroxyacetone (HA) is studied using low-temperature FTIR, supersonic jet expansion, and X-ray crystallographic (in situ cryocrystallization) techniques. Along with quantum chemical methods (MP2 and DFT), the experiments unravel the conformational preferences of HA upon aggregation to dimers and oligomers. The O-H···O═C intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the gas-phase monomer partially opens upon aggregation in supersonic expansions, giving rise to intermolecular cooperatively enhanced O-H···O-H hydrogen bonds in competition with isolated O-H···O═C hydrogen bonds. On the other hand, low-temperature IR studies on the neat solid and X-ray crystallographic data reveal that HA undergoes profound conformational changes upon crystallization, with the HOCC dihedral angle changing from ~0° in the gas phase to ~180° in the crystalline phase, hence giving rise to a completely new conformation. These conclusions are supported by theoretical calculations performed on the geometry derived from the crystalline phase. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeudy, Sandra [Information Génomique et Structurale, CNRS UPR 2589, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France); Coutard, Bruno [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, CNRS UMR 6098, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France); Lebrun, Régine [IBSM, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France); Abergel, Chantal, E-mail: chantal.abergel@igs.cnrs-mrs.fr [Information Génomique et Structurale, CNRS UPR 2589, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille CEDEX 20 (France)

    2005-06-01

    A. polyphaga mimivirus, the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, is the first virus to exhibit a nucleoside diphosphate kinase gene. The expression and crystallization of the viral NDK are reported. The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004 ▶), Science, 306, 1344–1350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005 ▶), Acta Cryst. F61, 212–215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameter 99.425 Å. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities.

  12. The fourth crystallographic closest packing unveiled in the gold nanocluster crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zibao; Chen, Jishi; Wang, Juan; Wang, Chengming; Li, Man-Bo; Yao, Chuanhao; Zhuang, Shengli; Xu, An; Li, Lingling; Wu, Zhikun

    2017-03-01

    Metal nanoclusters have recently attracted extensive interest not only for fundamental scientific research, but also for practical applications. For fundamental scientific research, it is of major importance to explore the internal structure and crystallographic arrangement. Herein, we synthesize a gold nanocluster whose composition is determined to be Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36 by using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray crystallography (SCXC). SCXC also reveals that Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36 consists of a fcc-like Au20 kernel protected by a pair of giant Au20S3(SCH2Ph)18 staple motifs, which contain 6 tetrahedral-coordinate μ4-S atoms not previously reported in the Au-S interface. Importantly, the fourth crystallographic closest-packed pattern, termed 6H left-handed helical (6HLH) arrangement, which results in the distinct loss of solid photoluminescence of amorphous Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36, is found in the crystals of Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36. The solvent-polarity-dependent solution photoluminescence is also demonstrated. Overall, this work provides important insights about the structure, Au-S bonding and solid photoluminescence of gold nanoclusters.

  13. Evaluating Free Energies of Binding and Conservation of Crystallographic Waters Using SZMAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Moustakas, Demetri T; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane; Lamb, Michelle L

    2015-08-24

    The SZMAP method computes binding free energies and the corresponding thermodynamic components for water molecules in the binding site of a protein structure [ SZMAP, 1.0.0 ; OpenEye Scientific Software Inc. : Santa Fe, NM, USA , 2011 ]. In this work, the ability of SZMAP to predict water structure and thermodynamic stability is examined for the X-ray crystal structures of a series of protein-ligand complexes. SZMAP results correlate with higher-level replica exchange thermodynamic integration double decoupling calculations of the absolute free energy of bound waters in the test set complexes. In addition, SZMAP calculations show good agreement with experimental data in terms of water conservation (across multiple crystal structures) and B-factors over a subset of the test set. In particular, the SZMAP neutral entropy difference term calculated at crystallographic water positions within each of the complex structures correlates well with whether that crystallographic water is conserved or displaceable. Furthermore, the calculated entropy of the water probe relative to the continuum shows a significant degree of correlation with the B-factors associated with the oxygen atoms of the water molecules. Taken together, these results indicate that SZMAP is capable of quantitatively predicting water positions and their energetics and is potentially a useful tool for determining which waters to attempt to displace, maintain, or build in through water-mediated interactions when evolving a lead series during a drug discovery program.

  14. Development of Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture in a Double-Sided Friction Stir Welded Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, S.; Wynne, B. P.; Baker, T. N.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and crystallographic texture has been investigated in double-sided friction stir welded microalloyed steel, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure analyses show that the center of stirred zone reached a temperature between Ac1 and Ac3 during FSW, resulting in a dual-phase austenitic/ ferritic microstructure. The temperatures in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the overlapped area between the first and second weld pass did not exceed the Ac1. The shear generated by the rotation probe occurs in austenitic/ferritic phase field where the austenite portion of the microstructure is transformed to a bainitic ferrite, on cooling. Analysis of crystallographic textures with regard to shear flow lines generated by the probe tool shows the dominance of simple shear components across the whole weld. The austenite texture at Ac1 - Ac3 is dominated by the B { {1bar{1}2} }stirred zone and the ferrites in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and the overlapped area underwent shear deformation with textures dominated by the D1 { {bar{1}bar{1}2} }weld pass. This is due to continuous dynamic strain-induced recrystallization as a result of simultaneous severe shear deformation and drastic undercooling.

  15. Enhancing nanoscale SEM image segmentation and reconstruction with crystallographic orientation data and machine learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Converse, Matthew I., E-mail: mconverse85@yahoo.com; Fullwood, David T.

    2013-09-15

    Current methods of image segmentation and reconstructions from scanning electron micrographs can be inadequate for resolving nanoscale gaps in composite materials (1–20 nm). Such information is critical to both accurate material characterizations and models of piezoresistive response. The current work proposes the use of crystallographic orientation data and machine learning for enhancing this process. It is first shown how a machine learning algorithm can be used to predict the connectivity of nanoscale grains in a Nickel nanostrand/epoxy composite. This results in 71.9% accuracy for a 2D algorithm and 62.4% accuracy in 3D. Finally, it is demonstrated how these algorithms can be used to predict the location of gaps between distinct nanostrands — gaps which would otherwise not be detected with the sole use of a scanning electron microscope. - Highlights: • A method is proposed for enhancing the segmentation/reconstruction of SEM images. • 3D crystallographic orientation data from a nickel nanocomposite is collected. • A machine learning algorithm is used to detect trends in adjacent grains. • This algorithm is then applied to predict likely regions of nanoscale gaps. • These gaps would otherwise be unresolved with the sole use of an SEM.

  16. CRYSNET manual. Informal report. [Hardware and software of crystallographic computing network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1976-07-01

    This manual describes the hardware and software which together make up the crystallographic computing network (CRYSNET). The manual is intended as a users' guide and also provides general information for persons without any experience with the system. CRYSNET is a network of intelligent remote graphics terminals that are used to communicate with the CDC Cyber 70/76 computing system at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Central Scientific Computing Facility. Terminals are in active use by four research groups in the field of crystallography. A protein data bank has been established at BNL to store in machine-readable form atomic coordinates and other crystallographic data for macromolecules. The bank currently includes data for more than 20 proteins. This structural information can be accessed at BNL directly by the CRYSNET graphics terminals. More than two years of experience has been accumulated with CRYSNET. During this period, it has been demonstrated that the terminals, which provide access to a large, fast third-generation computer, plus stand-alone interactive graphics capability, are useful for computations in crystallography, and in a variety of other applications as well. The terminal hardware, the actual operations of the terminals, and the operations of the BNL Central Facility are described in some detail, and documentation of the terminal and central-site software is given. (RWR)

  17. The Structural Biology Center 19ID undulator beamline: facility specifications and protein crystallographic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Alkire, Randy W; Evans, Gwyndaf; Rotella, Frank J; Lazarski, Krzystof; Zhang, Rong Guang; Ginell, Stephan L; Duke, Norma; Naday, Istvan; Lazarz, Jack; Molitsky, Michael J; Keefe, Lisa; Gonczy, John; Rock, Larry; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Walsh, Martin A; Westbrook, Edwin; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The 19ID undulator beamline of the Structure Biology Center has been designed and built to take full advantage of the high flux, brilliance and quality of X-ray beams delivered by the Advanced Photon Source. The beamline optics are capable of delivering monochromatic X-rays with photon energies from 3.5 to 20 keV (3.5-0.6 A wavelength) with fluxes up to 8-18 x 10(12) photons s(-1) (depending on photon energy) onto cryogenically cooled crystal samples. The size of the beam (full width at half-maximum) at the sample position can be varied from 2.2 mm x 1.0 mm (horizontal x vertical, unfocused) to 0.083 mm x 0.020 mm in its fully focused configuration. Specimen-to-detector distances of between 100 mm and 1500 mm can be used. The high flexibility, inherent in the design of the optics, coupled with a kappa-geometry goniometer and beamline control software allows optimal strategies to be adopted in protein crystallographic experiments, thus maximizing the chances of their success. A large-area mosaic 3 x 3 CCD detector allows high-quality diffraction data to be measured rapidly to the crystal diffraction limits. The beamline layout and the X-ray optical and endstation components are described in detail, and the results of representative crystallographic experiments are presented.

  18. Mode decomposition based on crystallographic symmetry in the band-unfolding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yuji; Carreras, Abel; Seko, Atsuto; Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2017-01-01

    The band-unfolding method is widely used to calculate the effective band structures of a disordered system from its supercell model. The unfolded band structures show the crystallographic symmetry of the underlying structure, where the difference of chemical components and the local atomic relaxation are ignored. However, it has still been difficult to decompose the unfolded band structures into the modes based on the crystallographic symmetry of the underlying structure, and therefore detailed analyses of the unfolded band structures have been restricted. In this study, a procedure to decompose the unfolded band structures according to the small representations (SRs) of the little groups is developed. The decomposition is performed using the projection operators for SRs derived from the group representation theory. The current method is employed to investigate the phonon band structure of disordered face-centered-cubic Cu0.75Au0.25 , which has large variations of atomic masses and force constants among the atomic sites due to the chemical disorder. In the unfolded phonon band structure, several peculiar behaviors such as discontinuous and split branches are found in the decomposed modes corresponding to specific SRs. They are found to occur because different combinations of the chemical elements contribute to different regions of frequency.

  19. Governmental Fragmentation in Metropolitan Detroit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis, Kristal D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available At its population peak in the 1950’s, Detroit, Michigan was inhabited by almost two million residents and served as the car capital of the country. Today, however, the population has dropped by more than fifty percent. With the loss of Detroit residents to surrounding cities and counties, the wedge between Detroit and the suburbs has grown wider. Detroit, once considered the crown jewel of the state of Michigan, is now treated as an immovable stain by its surrounding municipalities. What this means for the metro Detroit area is a high level of governmental fragmentation, preventing economic opportunities for both the city and its suburbs. This is especially unfortunate for the economy of the metro Detroit area because of the current economic crisis in the state of Michigan. With the state’s long tradition of home rule and pride in autonomous, municipal decision-making, municipalities in the metro Detroit area might better realize economic opportunities and the relief they can bring to their own local economies by not only collaborating with the city of Detroit, but with neighboring cities as well.

  20. A role for fragment-based drug design in developing novel lead compounds for central nervous system targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wasko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of millions of U.S. dollars are invested in the research and development of a single drug. Lead compound development is an area ripe for new design strategies. Therapeutic lead candidates have been traditionally found using high-throughput in vitro pharmacologic screening, a costly method for assaying thousands of compounds. This approach has recently been augmented by virtual screening, which employs computer models of the target protein to narrow the search for possible leads. A variant of virtual screening is fragment-based drug design, an emerging in silico lead discovery method that introduces low molecular weight fragments, rather than intact compounds, into the binding pocket of the receptor model. These fragments serve as starting points for growing the lead candidate. Current efforts in virtual fragment-based drug design within central nervous system (CNS targets are reviewed, as is a recent rule-based optimization strategy in which new molecules are generated within a 3D receptor binding pocket using the fragment as a scaffold. This process places special emphasis on creating synthesizable molecules but also exposes computational questions worth addressing. Fragment-based methods provide a viable, relatively low-cost alternative for therapeutic lead discovery and optimization that can be applied to CNS targets to augment current design strategies.

  1. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2006-01-01

    . The fragmentation of dipeptide along the polypeptide chain, as well as the interaction between alanines, has been considered. The energy of the system has been analyzed as a function of the distance between fragments for all possible dipeptide fragmentation channels. Analysis of the energy barriers makes...... it possible to estimate the characteristic fragmentation times and to determine the degree of applicability of classical electrodynamics for describing the system energy....

  2. Generation of polymerase chain reaction-specific probes for library screening using single degenerate primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, N G; Arp, D J; Sayavedra-Soto, L A

    1995-03-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were made to peptide sequences from hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from Nitrosomonas europaea. The primers were used singly in PCR reactions to amplify portions of the gene for HAO from genomic DNA. Southern hybridizations using fragments amplified with each primer showed that they labeled the same genomic DNA fragments. The PCR-amplified fragments were successfully used to screen a gene library for clones containing the HAO gene. The method of isolating genes by PCR with single primers has general utility.

  3. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  4. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  5. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  6. Testicular Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professional Testicular Cancer Treatment Testicular Cancer Screening Testicular Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Testicular Cancer Key Points Testicular cancer is a disease in ...

  7. Modelling distribution functions and fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, J; Mulders, P J

    1995-01-01

    We present examples for the calculation of the distribution and fragmentation functions using the representation in terms of non-local matrix elements of quark field operators. As specific examples, we use a simple spectator model to estimate the leading twist quark distribution functions and the fragmentation functions for a quark into a nucleon or a pion.

  8. The Family Circle: A Study in Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1976-01-01

    Presents data describing the fragmentation of the family, suggests causes for the fragmentation, and offers suggestions for reversing the trend. The suggestions focus on day care, part-time employment practices, enhancing the position of women, and work and responsibility. (IRT)

  9. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  10. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  11. Pollen and gene flow in fragmented habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwak, Manja M.; Velterop, Odilia; van Andel, Jelte

    1998-01-01

    . Habitat fragmentation affects both plants and pollinators. Habitat fragmentation leads to changes in species richness, population number and size, density, and shape, thus to changes in the spatial arrangement of flowers. These changes influence the amount of food for flower-visiting insects and t

  12. Pollen and gene flow in fragmented habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwak, Manja M.; Velterop, Odilia; van Andel, Jelte

    1998-01-01

    . Habitat fragmentation affects both plants and pollinators. Habitat fragmentation leads to changes in species richness, population number and size, density, and shape, thus to changes in the spatial arrangement of flowers. These changes influence the amount of food for flower-visiting insects and t

  13. INTERMITTENCY, A TEST FOR STRING FRAGMENTATION PROCESSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O

    The Artru-Mennessier and the string fragmentation procedure as implemented in the code VENUS have been compared. The two fragmentation prescriptions predict a similar rapidity spectrum including its energy dependence and event multiplicities, but give rise to very different intermittency results.

  14. Fragmentation of eastern United States forest types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation is a continuing threat to the sustainability of forests in the Eastern United States, where land use changes supporting a growing human population are the primary driver of forest fragmentation (Stein and others 2009). While once mostly forested, approximately 40 percent of the original forest area has been converted to other land uses, and most of the...

  15. Long-term effects of fragmentation and fragment properties on bird species richness in Hawaiian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Flaspohler; Christian P. Giardina; Gregory P. Asner; Patrick Hart; Jonathan Price; Cassie Ka’apu Lyons; Xeronimo. Castaneda

    2010-01-01

    Forest fragmentation is a common disturbance affecting biological diversity, yet the impacts of fragmentation on many forest processes remain poorly understood. Forest restoration is likely to be more successful when it proceeds with an understanding of how native and exotic vertebrates utilize forest patches of different size. We used a system of forest fragments...

  16. Diversity of nitrite reductase (nirK and nirS) gene fragments in forested upland and wetland soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priemé, Anders; Braker, Gesche; Tiedje, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of nitrite reductase gene (nirK and nirS) fragments from denitrifying prokaryotes in forested upland and marsh soil was investigated using molecular methods. nirK gene fragments could be amplified from both soils, whereas nirS gene fragments could be amplified only from...... the marsh soil. PCR products were cloned and screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and representative fragments were sequenced. The diversity of nirK clones was lower than the diversity of nirS clones. Among the 54 distinct nirK RFLP patterns identified in the two soils, only one...... marsh clones and all upland clones. Only a few of the nirK clone sequences branched with those of known denitrifying bacteria. The nirS clones formed two major clusters with several subclusters, but all nirS clones showed less than 80% identity to nirS sequences from known denitrifying bacteria. Overall...

  17. CLP-based protein fragment assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Palu', Alessandro Dal; Fogolari, Federico; Pontelli, Enrico; 10.1017/S1471068410000372

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates a novel approach, based on Constraint Logic Programming (CLP), to predict the 3D conformation of a protein via fragments assembly. The fragments are extracted by a preprocessor-also developed for this work- from a database of known protein structures that clusters and classifies the fragments according to similarity and frequency. The problem of assembling fragments into a complete conformation is mapped to a constraint solving problem and solved using CLP. The constraint-based model uses a medium discretization degree Ca-side chain centroid protein model that offers efficiency and a good approximation for space filling. The approach adapts existing energy models to the protein representation used and applies a large neighboring search strategy. The results shows the feasibility and efficiency of the method. The declarative nature of the solution allows to include future extensions, e.g., different size fragments for better accuracy.

  18. The politics of municipal fragmentation in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Kuyini Mohammed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The scholarly debate over the rival merits of local government consolidation and fragmentation is an old but enduring one. However, in this debate very little attention has been focused on the political dimension of council amalgamation and fragmentation – yet political considerations play a central role in both the formulation and outcomes of de-concentration policy. The purpose of this article is to fill a gap in the literature by examining local government fragmentation in Ghana from 1988 to 2014. The article does this by identifying the key players and analysing their interests and gains, as well as the tensions arising from the fragmentation exercise. The implications from the Ghanaian case for more general theories of fragmentation are drawn out.

  19. First principles approach to ionicity of fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-02-01

    We develop a first principles approach towards the ionicity of fragments. In contrast to the bond ionicity, the fragment ionicity refers to an electronic property of the constituents of a larger system, which may vary from a single atom to a functional group or a unit cell to a crystal. The fragment ionicity is quantitatively defined in terms of the coefficients of contributing charge states in a superposition of valence configurations of the system. Utilizing the constrained density functional theory-based computations, a practical method to compute the fragment ionicity from valence electron charge densities, suitably decomposed according to the Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model prescription for those electron densities, is presented for the first time. The adopted approach is illustrated using BeO, MgO and CaO diatomic molecules as simple examples. The results are compared and discussed with respect to the bond ionicity scales of Phillips and Pauling.

  20. Creating novel activated factor XI inhibitors through fragment based lead generation and structure aided drug design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Fjellström

    Full Text Available Activated factor XI (FXIa inhibitors are anticipated to combine anticoagulant and profibrinolytic effects with a low bleeding risk. This motivated a structure aided fragment based lead generation campaign to create novel FXIa inhibitor leads. A virtual screen, based on docking experiments, was performed to generate a FXIa targeted fragment library for an NMR screen that resulted in the identification of fragments binding in the FXIa S1 binding pocket. The neutral 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one and the weakly basic quinolin-2-amine structures are novel FXIa P1 fragments. The expansion of these fragments towards the FXIa prime side binding sites was aided by solving the X-ray structures of reported FXIa inhibitors that we found to bind in the S1-S1'-S2' FXIa binding pockets. Combining the X-ray structure information from the identified S1 binding 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment and the S1-S1'-S2' binding reference compounds enabled structure guided linking and expansion work to achieve one of the most potent and selective FXIa inhibitors reported to date, compound 13, with a FXIa IC50 of 1.0 nM. The hydrophilicity and large polar surface area of the potent S1-S1'-S2' binding FXIa inhibitors compromised permeability. Initial work to expand the 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment towards the prime side to yield molecules with less hydrophilicity shows promise to afford potent, selective and orally bioavailable compounds.

  1. Effect of crystallographic orientation on hillock formation in thermally cycled large grain tin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, John Patrick

    Tin whiskers and hillocks grow spontaneously from the surfaces of polycrystalline Sn films at room temperature. Whiskers can grow long enough to cause short circuits in electronic devices. We hypothesized that the anisotropies of the crystal structure lead to locally high strain energies that are relieved by the growth of whiskers and hillocks. This research studies hillock formations on large grain Sn-alloy films relative to the crystallographic orientations of the adjacent grains. Large grain films were produced by solidifying 96.5wt% Sn - 3wt% Ag - 0.5wt% Cu solder alloy on a Cu substrate. These surface defects (hillocks) grew predominately at grain boundaries during thermal cycling. The formation of the surface defects between two grains created a pseudo-bi-crystal sample geometry, making it ideal for studying surface defects relative to the local crystallographic orientations and the grains' corresponding anisotropic properties. The crystallographic orientations of the grains were studied with Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) and Laue micro-diffraction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Local orientation studies of the surface defects and the surrounding grains indicated that the surface defects nucleated and grew with low dislocation densities. In addition, the linear surface defect densities along the grain boundaries were measured and observed to change as a function of orientation. The change in linear defect density with respect to orientation was due, in part, to the anisotropy of the coefficient of thermal expansion of β-Sn. In addition, it was important to account for elastic anisotropies. The elastic stresses, strains, and strain energy densities of the microstructures were determined with Object Oriented Finite element analysis. The simulations indicated that during thermal cycling the local stresses exceeded the yield strength. As a result, the highest linear defect densities did not occur at orientations

  2. The peculiarities of the crystallographics modification of a tissues from corpse during putrefactive corpse transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorova Е.А.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The crystallographic method was used to study the extracts of organs and blood in forensic medicine is not developed yet. However, it is fairly easy to use and does not require additional special equipment, so there is quite promising. Objective. The aim of research are became basis of possibility and effectively to use by thezygraphy method for medico-legal definition of prescription of approach of death by tissue of a corpse during its putrefaction. Methods. Thezygraphy method is used a modification of crystallogramms during dynamics postmortem period for medico-legal definition of prescription of approach of death. Sectional material consisted of the corpses of people who died from violent and nonviolent death in the age range from 18 to 92 years. All the bodies after death were preserved in the same temperature conditions. The tissues from various internal organs: brain, heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, spleen and blood from 30 cadavers were the object of sectional study. There for 939 biological objects were investigated. Results. The article deals with generalization the crystallography (thezigraphy observation of crystallogramms from different tissues extract and blood depending on the different cause of violent and nonviolent death. The main purpose is to identify common crystallogramms features of the extracts of internal organs taken during putrefactive corpse transformation of people who died from various kinds of death. It has been proved that: 1.The typical сrystallogramms were formed from various tissue extracts: blood, brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen in first day after of approach of death, depending on the cause of deaths. 2. In the dynamics of postmortem period and putrefactive transformation of the corpses (first week the dynamic changes occur in crystallographic patterns obtained from extracts of the internal organs, and they can be used to establish the approach of death. Conclusion. The thezygraphy

  3. Exact Solutions of Fragmentation Equations with General Fragmentation Rates and Separable Particles Distribution Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Oukouomi Noutchie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We make use of Laplace transform techniques and the method of characteristics to solve fragmentation equations explicitly. Our result is a breakthrough in the analysis of pure fragmentation equations as this is the first instance where an exact solution is provided for the fragmentation evolution equation with general fragmentation rates. This paper is the key for resolving most of the open problems in fragmentation theory including “shattering” and the sudden appearance of infinitely many particles in some systems with initial finite particles number.

  4. Prenatal screening and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderson, P; Aro, A R; Dragonas, T

    2001-01-01

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we...... examine definitions of the relevant concepts in order to illustrate this point. The concepts are i) prenatal, ii) genetic screening, iii) screening, scanning and testing, iv) maternal and foetal tests, v) test techniques and vi) genetic conditions. So far, prenatal screening has little connection...... with precisely defined genetics. There are benefits but also disadvantages in overstating current links between them in the term genetic screening. Policy making and professional and public understandings about screening could be clarified if the distinct meanings of prenatal screening and genetic screening were...

  5. Fragment-Based Approach to the Development of an Orally Bioavailable Lactam Inhibitor of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Alison J-A; Day, Philip J; Bénéton, Véronique; Berdini, Valerio; Coyle, Joseph E; Dudit, Yann; Grondin, Pascal; Huet, Pascal; Lee, Lydia Y W; Manas, Eric S; McMenamin, Rachel L; Murray, Christopher W; Page, Lee W; Patel, Vipulkumar K; Potvain, Florent; Rich, Sharna J; Sang, Yingxia; Somers, Don O; Trottet, Lionel; Wan, Zehong; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2016-12-08

    Lp-PLA2 has been explored as a target for a number of inflammation associated diseases, including cardiovascular disease and dementia. This article describes the discovery of a new fragment derived chemotype that interacts with the active site of Lp-PLA2. The starting fragment hit was discovered through an X-ray fragment screen and showed no activity in the bioassay (IC50 > 1 mM). The fragment hit was optimized using a variety of structure-based drug design techniques, including virtual screening, fragment merging, and improvement of shape complementarity. A novel series of Lp-PLA2 inhibitors was generated with low lipophilicity and a promising pharmacokinetic profile.

  6. Improved chemical shift based fragment selection for CS-Rosetta using Rosetta3 fragment picker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, Robert [Hospital for Sick Children, Program in Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department Chemie, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    A new fragment picker has been developed for CS-Rosetta that combines beneficial features of the original fragment picker, MFR, used with CS-Rosetta, and the fragment picker, NNMake, that was used for purely sequence based fragment selection in the context of ROSETTA de-novo structure prediction. Additionally, the new fragment picker has reduced sensitivity to outliers and other difficult to match data points rendering the protocol more robust and less likely to introduce bias towards wrong conformations in cases where data is bad, missing or inconclusive. The fragment picker protocol gives significant improvements on 6 of 23 CS-Rosetta targets. An independent benchmark on 39 protein targets, whose NMR data sets were published only after protocol optimization had been finished, also show significantly improved performance for the new fragment picker (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR, 2013)

  7. Decomposition and fragmentation principles in computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2015-12-01

    A common approach to the mathematical modeling of various objects and processes is the subdivision of the problem into smaller, (and, as hoped), more easily understandable entities. By modeling these smaller entities, which are often fragments of the whole, and eventually re-combining these smaller fragment models into a model of the whole, one may expect that a reasonably reliable modeling approach for the complete problem may be obtained. One crucial aspect of such an approach is the level of complexity of the interrelations between the fragments. If the interrelations are weak and relatively simple, than the fragmentation approach may succeed and provide satisfactory results. However, as often happens, the interrelations are complex and not well understood, and then the fragmentation approach may face difficulties and even fail. One field where the interrelations between potential fragments is strong, yet the fragment-based approach has proven to be successful, is the modelling of both small and large molecules, providing valuable lessons for some fields not directly linked to chemistry.

  8. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  9. Compilation of Existing Neutron Screen Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chrysanthopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactors is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials, nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials, and tritium breeding materials. Therefore, introduction of these reactors into operation will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Due to limited availability of fast reactors, testing of future reactor materials will mostly take place in water cooled material test reactors (MTRs by tailoring the neutron spectrum via neutron screens. The latter rely on the utilization of materials capable of absorbing neutrons at specific energy. A large but fragmented experience is available on that topic. In this work a comprehensive compilation of the existing neutron screen technology is attempted, focusing on neutron screens developed in order to locally enhance the fast over thermal neutron flux ratio in a reactor core.

  10. Conserving and Restoring the Hereford Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Heath

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this film, the Victoria and Albert Museum's Head of Metalwork Conservation, Diana Heath, describes her involvement in the intricate conservation and restoration of the Hereford Screen over a number of years. From her first encounter with the screen in 1983, as its fragments arrived in the conservation studio packed in cases stuffed with straw, to the return of the screen to its former glory when it was installed as a whole object in the Metalwork Galleries above the main entrance to the Victoria and Albert Museum, Diana Heath guides us step-by-step through the restoration process of one of the most significant pieces of nineteenth-century metalwork.

  11. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of Pru du amandin, an allergenic protein from Prunus dulcis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaur, Vineet; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Salunke, Dinakar M., E-mail: dinakar@nii.res.in [National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2008-01-01

    The purification, identification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an allergy-related protein, Pru du amandin, from P. dulcis nuts are reported. Food allergies appear to be one of the foremost causes of hypersensitivity reactions. Nut allergies account for most food allergies and are often permanent. The 360 kDa hexameric protein Pru du amandin, a known allergen, was purified from almonds (Prunus dulcis) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion-exchange chromatography. The protein was identified by a BLAST homology search against the nonredundant sequence database. Pru du amandin belongs to the 11S legumin family of seed storage proteins characterized by the presence of a cupin motif. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 150.7, c = 164.9 Å.

  12. Paramagnetic and crystallographic effects of low temperature ashing on human bone and tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochon-Danguy, H J; Very, J M; Geoffroy, M; Baud, C A

    1978-02-28

    Low temperature ashing by excited gas (LTA) causes crystallographic and paramagnetic alterations of the human bone and tooth enamel mineral. On the one hand, LTA induces variations of the alpha lattice parameter. These variations depend upon the nature of the gas used, but are little affected by its degree of excitation. Trapping of gas molecules in the crystal structure is demonstrated. On the other hand, LTA produces two preponderant paramagnetic centers in bone and enamel samples at 20 degrees C. Their inorganic origin clearly indicated. One of the two radicals has been identified as O3- (g1 = 2.002, g2 = 2.010, g3 = 2.016) and the other as (CO3-3 (parallel = 1.996, g = perpendicular 2.003). Variations of the alpha lattice parameter and trapping of paramagnetic gas species do not seem to be directly related.

  13. Radiation of high-energy electrons near crystallographic axes and planes of a diamond crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Avakyan, E.O.; Avetisyan, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the experimental study of high-energy electrons interaction with diamond crystals of different thicknesses at small incident angles with respect to crystallographic axes and planes. The effect of the so-called channeling phenomenon on the process of electron radiation in a crystal is studied. Results of the measurements of 4.5. GeV electrons radiation spectra at incident angles approximately O are given. For comparison, we have also presented the spectrum of the radiation on an amorphous target /sup 12/C of similar thickness. Results indicate that the low-energy part of spectra greatly surpass the amorphous spectrum with a pronounced peak structure, with peak widths being noticeably wider in the case of axial channeling than in the planar case. Spectra are measured by a No.I(Tl) total absorption detector. The experiment is performed on the Yerevan electron synchrotron beam with small angular divergence.

  14. Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses,Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2006-10-03

    Monomeric thiosalicylaldiminate complexes of rhodium(I) and iridium(I) were prepared by ligand transfer from the homoleptic zinc(II) species. In the presence of strongly donating ligands, the iridium complexes undergo insertion of the metal into the imine carbon-hydrogen bond. Thiophenoxyketimines were prepared by non-templated reaction of o-mercaptoacetophenone with anilines, and were complexed with rhodium(I), iridium(I), nickel(II) and platinum(II). X-ray crystallographic studies showed that while the thiosalicylaldiminate complexes display planar ligand conformations, those of the thiophenoxyketiminates are strongly distorted. Results of a computational study were consistent with a steric-strain interpretation of the difference in preferred ligand geometries.

  15. Processing and crystallographic structure of non-equilibrium Si-doped HfO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dong; Fancher, Chris M.; Esteves, Giovanni; Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Zhao, Lili [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710127 (China)

    2015-06-28

    Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was confirmed to exist as a non-equilibrium state. The crystallographic structures of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} were studied using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and the Rietveld refinement method. Incorporation of Si into HfO{sub 2} and diffusion of Si out of (Hf,Si)O{sub 2} were determined as a function of calcination temperature. Higher thermal energy input at elevated calcination temperatures resulted in the formation of HfSiO{sub 4}, which is the expected major secondary phase in Si-doped HfO{sub 2}. The effect of SiO{sub 2} particle size (nano- and micron-sized) on the formation of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was also determined. Nano-crystalline SiO{sub 2} was found to incorporate into HfO{sub 2} more readily.

  16. Quantification of thin film crystallographic orientation using X-ray diffraction with an area detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jessy L; Jimison, Leslie H; Mannsfeld, Stefan; Volkman, Steven; Yin, Shong; Subramanian, Vivek; Salleo, Alberto; Alivisatos, A Paul; Toney, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    As thin films become increasingly popular (for solar cells, LEDs, microelectronics, batteries), quantitative morphological and crystallographic information is needed to predict and optimize the film's electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. This quantification can be obtained quickly and easily with X-ray diffraction using an area detector in two sample geometries. In this paper, we describe a methodology for constructing complete pole figures for thin films with fiber texture (isotropic in-plane orientation). We demonstrate this technique on semicrystalline polymer films, self-assembled nanoparticle semiconductor films, and randomly packed metallic nanoparticle films. This method can be immediately implemented to help understand the relationship between film processing and microstructure, enabling the development of better and less expensive electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Maximum a posteriori estimation of crystallographic phases in X-ray diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Bicer, Tekin; Almer, Jonathan D.; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; Stock, Stuart; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-06-13

    A maximum a posteriori approach is proposed for X-ray diffraction tomography for reconstructing three-dimensional spatial distribution of crystallographic phases and orientations of polycrystalline materials. The approach maximizes the a posteriori density which includes a Poisson log-likelihood and an a priori term that reinforces expected solution properties such as smoothness or local continuity. The reconstruction method is validated with experimental data acquired from a section of the spinous process of a porcine vertebra collected at the 1-ID-C beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, at Argonne National Laboratory. The reconstruction results show significant improvement in the reduction of aliasing and streaking artefacts, and improved robustness to noise and undersampling compared to conventional analytical inversion approaches. The approach has the potential to reduce data acquisition times, and significantly improve beamtime efficiency.

  18. Ge/SrTiO{sub 3}(001): Correlation between interface chemistry and crystallographic orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobaut, B.; Penuelas, J.; Grenet, G.; Ferrah, D.; Benamrouche, A.; Chettaoui, A.; Robach, Y.; Botella, C.; Saint-Girons, G. [Universite de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); El Kazzi, M.; Silly, M. G.; Sirotti, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL (TEMPO beamline), l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the desorption of a submonolayer deposit of Ge on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) is studied by reflection high energy electron diffraction. The results are compared to those of a previous experiment done using soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Combining these techniques allows for correlating interface chemistry and crystal orientation, and for bringing clarifying elements concerning the competition between (111) and (001) crystal orientation typical for the semiconductor/perovskite epitaxial systems. Despite poor interface matching, (111)-oriented islands are stabilized at the expense of (001)-oriented islands due to the relatively low energy of their free facets. Such 'surface energy driven' crystallographic orientation of the deposit is enhanced by the low adhesion energy characteristic of the Ge/SrTiO{sub 3} system.

  19. Dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes: Synthesis, crystallographic structures and applications in organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Gaole

    2015-01-01

    Two soluble and stable dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes with two (DAP1) and six (DAP2) phenyl substituents were synthesized. Both compounds possess a small energy band gap and show amphoteric redox behaviour due to intramolecular donor-accepter interactions. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that DAP2 has a closely packed structure with multi-dimensional [C-H⋯π] interactions although there are no π-π interactions between the dianthraceno[a,e]pentalene cores. As a result, solution-processed field effect transistors based on DAP2 exhibited an average hole mobility of 0.65 cm2 V-1 s-1. Under similar conditions, DAP1 showed an average field effect hole mobility of 0.001 cm2 V-1 s-1. This journal is

  20. Preliminary crystallographic data for the thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase from brewers' yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyda, F; Furey, W; Swaminathan, S; Sax, M; Farrenkopf, B; Jordan, F

    1990-10-15

    Single crystals of the thiamin diphosphate (the vitamin B1 coenzyme)-dependent enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) from brewers' yeast have been grown using polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. Crystals of the homotetrameric version alpha 4 of the holoenzyme are triclinic, space group P1, with cell constants a = 81.0, b = 82.4, c = 116.6 A, alpha = 69.5 beta = 72.6, gamma = 62.4 degrees. The crystals are reasonably stable in a rotating anode x-ray beam and diffract to at least 2.5 A resolution. The Vm value of 2.55 A/dalton is consistent with a unit cell containing four subunits with mass of approximately 60 kDa each. Rotation function results with native data indicate strong non-crystallographic 222 symmetry relating the four identical subunits, thus density averaging methods are likely to play a role in the structure determination.

  1. Crystallographic analysis of CVD films using x-ray polychromatic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, B. [CNRS, Toulouse (France). Centre d`Elaboration de Materiaux et d`Etudes Structurales; Brissonneau, L.; Baggot, E.; Vahlas, C. [INPT-CNRS, Toulouse (France). Lab. Materiaux et Interfaces

    1998-12-31

    The Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffractometry (EDXD) technique was tested for in-situ crystallographic characterization of nickel films processed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The diffracted beam at low Bragg angle was analyzed in energy by a solid state detector. A nickel reference sample was used to face the problems of EDXD background signal and uncertainty of sample location. The relative accuracy on lattice parameters measurements is 1.5.10{sup {minus}3}, to be compared to 0.5.10{sup {minus}3} for classical (monochromatic) X-ray diffraction. Texture measurements yields results in agreement with those obtained form recent texture goniometer. Finally, an estimation of the thickness was obtained from the intensity of nickel fluorescence peak. In view of the obtained results, EDXD appears to be a promising technique for in-situ studies. Although less powerful compared to the synchrotron facility, it is more flexible and can be applied at lower cost.

  2. Crystallographic and magnetic structures of Pr6Fe13Ge studied by powder neutron diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fang-Wei; Zhang Pan-Lin; Shen Bao-Gen; Yan Qi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Crystallographic and magnetic structures of Pr6Fel3Ge have been investigated by high-resolution powder neutron diffraction in the temperature range of 10-300 K. The magnetic structure consists of ferromagnetic Pr6Fe13 slabs that alternate antiferromagnetically, along c, with the next Pr6Fe13 slab separated by a non-magnetic Ge layer. The magnetic moments lie within the ab-planes. The propagation vector of this structure is k=(001) with respect to the conventional reciprocal lattice of the Ⅰ-centred structure. However, the temperature-dependence of neutron-scattering intensity of the (110) Bragg peak, very similar to the temperature-dependent magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer,indicates that a small c-axis ferromagnetic component should be added to the above antiferromagnetic model.

  3. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases: a crystallographer's view on a new class of biomass-degrading enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian E. H. Frandsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs are a new class of microbial copper enzymes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides. They have only been discovered and characterized in the last 5–10 years and have stimulated strong interest both in biotechnology and in bioinorganic chemistry. In biotechnology, the hope is that these enzymes will finally help to make enzymatic biomass conversion, especially of lignocellulosic plant waste, economically attractive. Here, the role of LPMOs is likely to be in attacking bonds that are not accessible to other enzymes. LPMOs have attracted enormous interest since their discovery. The emphasis in this review is on the past and present contribution of crystallographic studies as a guide to functional understanding, with a final look towards the future.

  4. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tokuoka, Keiji [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uchiyama, Nahoko [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Urade, Yoshihiro [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: inouet@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    Old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F{sub 2α}, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model.

  5. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M

    2014-01-01

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow to extract new information on this fragmentation process. In particular, these data favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO).

  6. HETC-3STEP included fragmentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Iga, Kiminori; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    High Energy Transport Code (HETC) based on the cascade-evaporation model is modified to calculate the fragmentation cross section. For the cascade process, nucleon-nucleon cross sections are used for collision computation; effective in-medium-corrected cross sections are adopted instead of the original free-nucleon collision. The exciton model is adopted for improvement of backward nucleon-emission cross section for low-energy nucleon-incident events. The fragmentation reaction is incorporated into the original HETC as a subroutine set by the use of the systematics of the reaction. The modified HETC (HETC-3STEP/FRG) reproduces experimental fragment yields to a reasonable degree. (author)

  7. Composite Overwrap Fragmentation Observations, Concerns, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangham, Mike; Hovater, Mary

    2017-01-01

    A series of test activities has raised some concerns about the generation of orbital debris caused by failures of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). These tests have indicated that a large number of composite fragments can be produced by either pressure burst failures or by high-speed impacts. A review of prior high-speed tests with COPV indicates that other tests have produced large numbers of composite fragments. As was the case with the test referenced here, the tests tended to produce a large number of small composite fragments with relatively low velocities induced by the impact and or gas expansion.

  8. Transfer of olivine crystallographic orientation through a cycle of serpentinisation and dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-08-01

    Our ability to decipher the mechanisms behind metamorphic transformation processes depends in a major way on the extent to which crystallographic and microstructural information is transferred from one stage to another. Within the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides, prograde olivine veins that formed by dehydration of serpentinite veins in dunites exhibit a characteristic distribution of microstructures: The outer part of the veins comprises coarse-grained olivine that forms an unusual, brick-like microstructure. The inner part of the veins, surrounding a central fault, is composed of fine-grained olivine. Where the fault movement included a dilational component, optically clear, equant olivine occurs in the centre. Electron backscatter diffraction mapping reveals that the vein olivine has inherited its crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) from the olivine in the porphyroclastic host rock; however, misorientation is weaker and associated to different rotation axes. We propose that prograde olivine grew epitaxially on relics of mantle olivine and thereby acquired its CPO. Growth towards pre-existing microfractures along which serpentinisation had occurred led to straight grain boundaries and a brick-like microstructure in the veins. When dehydration embrittlement induced slip, a strong strain localisation on discrete fault planes prevented distortion of the CPO due to cataclastic deformation; grain size reduction did not significantly modify the olivine CPO. This illustrates how a CPO can be preserved though an entire metamorphic cycle, including hydration, dehydration, and deformation processes, and that the CPO and the microstructures (e.g. grain shape) of one phase do not necessarily record the same event.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Linnea E. K. [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland); Krasotkina, Julya; Kuchumova, Anastasia; Sokolov, Nikolay N. [Institute for Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 559-B, 10 Pogodinskay St, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Papageorgiou, Anastassios C., E-mail: tassos.papageorgiou@btk.fi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland)

    2005-04-01

    Er. carotovoral-asparaginase, a potential antileukaemic agent, has been crystallized. Crystals diffract to 2.6 Å using a rotating-anode source and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Bacterial l-asparaginases have been used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia for over 30 y. However, their use is limited owing to the glutaminase activity of the administered enzymes, which results in serious side effects. In contrast, l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora exhibits low glutaminase activity at physiological concentrations of l-asparagine and l-glutamine in the blood. Recombinant Er. carotovoral-asparaginase was crystallized in the presence of l-glutamate by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 10 mg ml{sup −1} purified enzyme, 16–18%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M NaF. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å at 293 K using an in-house rotating-anode generator. The crystals belong to the monoclinic P2{sub 1} space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found and refinement is currently in progress. The crystal structure may provide leads towards protein-engineering efforts aimed at safer asparaginase administration in leukaemia treatment.

  10. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastric Cancer Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... from the . There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach cancer. Several types of screening tests have been ...

  11. Prenatal screening and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderson, P.; Aro, A.R.; Dragonas, T.; Ettorre, E.; Hemminki, E.; Jalinoja, P.; Santalahti, P.; Tijmstra, T.

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we

  12. Prenatal screening and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderson, P.; Aro, A.R.; Dragonas, T.; Ettorre, E.; Hemminki, E.; Jalinoja, P.; Santalahti, P.; Tijmstra, T.

    2001-01-01

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we exami

  13. Prenatal screening and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderson, P; Aro, A R; Dragonas, T

    2001-01-01

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we ex...

  14. The effect of crystallographic texture on stress-induced martensitic transformation in NiTi: A computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, F M; Guo, Y; Bruzzi, M S

    2016-01-01

    NiTi׳s superelasticity is exploited in a number of biomedical devices, in particular self-expanding endovascular stents. These stents are often laser-cut from textured micro-tubing; texture is the distribution of crystallographic grain orientations in a polycrystalline material which has been experimentally shown to have a marked influence on mechanical properties. This study offers a computational examination into the effect of texture on the stress-induced martensite transformation (SIMT) in a micro-dogbone NiTi specimen subject to tensile loading. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is employed to simulate the transformational behaviour of the specimen on a micro-scale level. To represent a realistic grain structure in the FEA model, grains present in a 200µm×290µm test site located at the centre edge of the specimen were identified using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Grains are assumed to have homogenous behaviour with properties varying according to their crystallographic orientation to the loading direction. Required material properties were extracted from uniaxial stress-strain curves of single crystals for each crystallographic orientation for input into the in-built UMAT/Nitinol. The orientation of each grain in the test site was identified using Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) techniques. In this way, a quantitative explanation is offered to the effect of crystallographic texture on SIMT. Finally, the evolution of grains in the specimen, during the transformation process, was experimentally investigated by means of an in-situ SEM tensile test.

  15. Characterization of Tumor-Avid Antibody Fragments Genetically Engineered for Mono-Specific Radionuclide Chelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, T.P.

    2003-12-31

    The successful clinical application of targeted-radiopharmaceuticals depends on the development of molecules that optimize tumor specific radionuclide deposition and minimize non-specific organ irradiation. To this end, this proposal outlines a research effort to identify and evaluate novel antibodies and antibody fragments that bind breast tumors. The tumor-avid antibodies will be investigated for as imaging and therapeutic agents and to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of radiolabeled tumor-avid antibody fragments through the use of site-specifically labeled molecules. Antibodies or antibody fragments, that bind breast carcinoma carbohydrate antigens, will be obtained from hybridoma or bacteriophage library screening. More specifically, antibody fragments that bind the carcinoma-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen will be radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}Re at a natural amino acid chelation site and will be investigated in vivo for their abilities to target human breast tumors. In addition, site-specific radiolabeled antibody fragments will be biosynthesized using misacylated suppressor tRNAs. Homogeneously radiolabeled populations of antibody fragments will be used to investigate the effects of radionuclide location and chelation chemistries on their biodistribution and metabolism. It is hypothesized that site-specifically radiolabeled antibody fragments will possess enhanced tumor imaging and therapeutic properties due to optimal label location and conjugation chemistries. New insights into the factors that govern antibody metabolism in vivo are also expected from this work. Results from these studies should enhance our ability to design and synthesize radiolabeled antibody fragments that have improved pharmacokinetic properties. The studies in this proposal involve basic research into the development of antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals, with the ultimate goal of application in humans. This type of basic

  16. Screening for abdominalt aortaaneurisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J S; Juul, Svend; Henneberg, E W;

    1997-01-01

    rupture. Ultrasonographic screening for AAA takes 10 minutes per scan, and the sensitivity and specificity are high. Ultrasonographic screening for AAA is a reliable, safe and inexpensive method for screening, and screening for AAA is discussed worldwide. One point four percent of deaths among men from 65...... on uncertain assumptions concerning prevalence, incidence and risk of rupture. Therefore a randomized trial screening of 65-73 year old males is taking place in the County of Viborg in Denmark. Udgivelsesdato: 1997-Mar-24...

  17. Screening for abdominalt aortaaneurisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Henneberg, E W;

    1997-01-01

    rupture. Ultrasonographic screening for AAA takes 10 minutes per scan, and the sensitivity and specificity are high. Ultrasonographic screening for AAA is a reliable, safe and inexpensive method for screening, and screening for AAA is discussed worldwide. One point four percent of deaths among men from 65...... on uncertain assumptions concerning prevalence, incidence and risk of rupture. Therefore a randomized trial screening of 65-73 year old males is taking place in the County of Viborg in Denmark....

  18. Crystallographic Behavior of Iron Oxide Minerals in the Deformed Iron Formation of Quadrilátero Ferrífero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Lisboa, Filipe Augusto; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Martins Graça, Leonardo; Ávila, Carlos Fernando; Ferreira Barbosa, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) which is located in Brazil represents a mineral province of great importance for hosting Banded Iron Formation deposits (BIFs). The Alegria mine which belongs to Vale Company is located in the east part of Quadrilátero Ferrífero and it explores iron ore from a region of great structural complexity. A deformed BIF sample that presents a micro-fold on quartz and hematite bands was analyzed through Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD) in order to relate the crystallographic orientations with the microstructures along the micro-fold envelop. For the sample orientation the Z-axis is taken parallel to the fold limb, Y-axis is perpendicular to the fold hinge and X-axis perpendicular to the YZ plane. In the limbs hematite grains are mostly stretched whereas at the hinge grains tend to be somewhat equant. On the other hand, quartz grain shapes are invariable along the fold, with a few exceptions in the hinge where grains are slightly elongated. Grains of hematite present a strong c-axis ({0001}) preferred orientation forming a subtle girdle somewhat parallel to the XY plane of the strain ellipsoid determined macroscopically (XY being the foliation plane), and a strong () crystallographic fabric approximately parallel to the Z-axis. Similarly, the poles to the prismatic planes ({m} or {10bar10}) also have a stronger crystallographic fabric parallel to the Z axis. It seems that there are two crossing planes for the orientation of and {m} with the two maxima at the intersection of the two planes. Typical hematite crystallographic fabrics are somewhat distinct, since {c} axis commonly forms a very strong fiber texture parallel to the pole of the foliation. Most studies regard such crystallographic texture as evidence for high activity of {c} slip. The {c} girdles observed here are common for mica grains under rigid body rotation in constriction strain, which mechanism is commonly observed in the hematite grains of the sample. The

  19. Fragment-based discovery of potent inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic MCL-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Andrew M; Swann, Steven L; Song, Danying; Swinger, Kerren; Park, Chang; Zhang, Haichao; Wendt, Michael D; Kunzer, Aaron R; Souers, Andrew J; Sun, Chaohong

    2014-03-15

    Apoptosis is regulated by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which is comprised of both pro-death and pro-survival members. Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant cells. One way in which cancer cells achieve this evasion is thru overexpression of the pro-survival members of the BCL-2 family. Overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival protein, has been shown to be a resistance factor for Navitoclax, a potent inhibitor of BCL-2 and BCL-XL. Here we describe the use of fragment screening methods and structural biology to drive the discovery of novel MCL-1 inhibitors from two distinct structural classes. Specifically, cores derived from a biphenyl sulfonamide and salicylic acid were uncovered in an NMR-based fragment screen and elaborated using high throughput analog synthesis. This culminated in the discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of MCL-1 that may serve as promising leads for medicinal chemistry optimization efforts.

  20. Oscillating Filaments: I - Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid based AMR-code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, e.g. with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process `geometrical fragmentation'. In our realization the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristical scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. ...

  1. Gravitational fragmentation of the Carina Flare supershell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell (GSH287+04-17) in the 13CO(2-1) line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  2. Habitat fragmentation causes rapid genetic differentiation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... differentiation and homogenization in natural plant populations – A ... The effects of habitat fragmentations on the forage grass Leymus thinness (Trin.) Tzvel, which ... selection etc, combined together with ecological factors.

  3. FOREST FRAGMENTATION AS AN ECONOMIC INDICATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite concern over the ecological consequences of conversion of land from natural cover to anthropogenic uses, there are few studies that show a quantitative relationship between fragmentation and economic factors. For the southside economic region of Virginia, we generated a ...

  4. Energy efficiency of consecutive fragmentation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Fontbona, Joaquin; Martinez, Servet

    2010-01-01

    We present a ?rst study on the energy required to reduce a unit mass fragment by consecutively using several devices, as it happens in the mining industry. Two devices are considered, which we represent as different stochastic fragmentation processes. Following the self-similar energy model introduced by Bertoin and Martinez, we compute the average energy required to attain a size x with this two-device procedure. We then asymptotically compare, as x goes to 0 or 1, its energy requirement with that of individual fragmentation processes. In particular, we show that for certain range of parameters of the fragmentation processes and of their energy cost-functions, the consecutive use of two devices can be asymptotically more efficient than using each of them separately, or conversely.

  5. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  6. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  7. An improved algorithm for MFR fragment assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxis, Georg, E-mail: georg.kontaxis@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Centre for Molecular Biology (Austria)

    2012-06-15

    A method for generating protein backbone models from backbone only NMR data is presented, which is based on molecular fragment replacement (MFR). In a first step, the PDB database is mined for homologous peptide fragments using experimental backbone-only data i.e. backbone chemical shifts (CS) and residual dipolar couplings (RDC). Second, this fragment library is refined against the experimental restraints. Finally, the fragments are assembled into a protein backbone fold using a rigid body docking algorithm using the RDCs as restraints. For improved performance, backbone nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) may be included at that stage. Compared to previous implementations of MFR-derived structure determination protocols this model-building algorithm offers improved stability and reliability. Furthermore, relative to CS-ROSETTA based methods, it provides faster performance and straightforward implementation with the option to easily include further types of restraints and additional energy terms.

  8. Successfully introduce maize DNA fragments into rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGKaizhi

    1994-01-01

    The maize DNA fragments was successfully incorporated into rice by Associate Prof WAN Wenju's research team at Hunan Agricultural College, Changsha, China. The new gene transferring rice is named Genetic Engineered Rice (GER) line.

  9. The Fragmentation of the College Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper examines to what extent and asking reason the fragmentation of college mathematics have attained the present development in the course of looking at the history of mathematics education. (Contains 1 table.)

  10. Anthropogenic Fragmentation in the western United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — We evaluated the fragmentation of the western United States by anthropogenic features. The addition of roads, railroads, and power lines to wildlands, and the...

  11. Emission of intermediate mass fragments during fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. L.; de Souza, R. T.; Cornell, E.; Davin, B.; Hamilton, T. M.; Hulbert, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lou, Y.; Viola, V. E.; Korteling, R. G.; Wile, J. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ternary fission in the reaction 4He + 232Th at Elab=200 MeV has been observed. Intermediate mass fragments (IMF: 3fission. The widths of the energy spectra are relatively constant for neck fragments with Z>=4, suggesting little variability in the scission configurations. A linear dependence of on Z is observed for the neck IMFs. The observed trend is compared with a Coulomb trajectory model.

  12. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter R Underhill

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively. Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively. Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  13. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  14. Fragmentation of Care in Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulberg, Debra B; Dahlquist, Irma; Jarosch, Christina; Lindau, Stacy T

    2016-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Women who experience fragmented care may undergo unnecessary delays to diagnosis and treatment. Based on ectopic pregnancy cases observed in clinical practice that raised our concern about fragmentation of care, we designed an exploratory study to describe the number, characteristics, and outcomes of fragmented care among patients with ectopic pregnancy at one urban academic hospital. Chart review with descriptive statistics. Fragmented care was defined as a patient being evaluated at an outside facility for possible ectopic pregnancy and transferred, referred, or discharged before receiving care at the study institution. Of 191 women seen for possible or definite ectopic pregnancy during the study period, 42 (22 %) met the study definition of fragmented care. The study was under-powered to observe statistically significant differences across groups, but we found concerning, non-significant trends: patients with fragmented care were more likely to be Medicaid recipients (65.9 vs. 58.8 %) and to experience a complication (23.8 vs. 18.1 %) compared to those with non-fragmented care. Most patients (n = 37) received no identifiable treatment prior to transfer and arrived to the study hospital with no communication to the receiving hospital from the outside provider (n = 34). Nine patients (21 %) presented with ruptured ectopic pregnancies. The fragmentation we observed in our study may contribute to previously identified socio-economic disparities in ectopic pregnancy outcomes. If future research confirms these findings, health information exchanges and regional coordination of care may be important strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

  15. Modified Empirical Parametrization of Fragmentation Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Sümmerer, K

    2000-01-01

    New experimental data obtained mainly at the GSI/FRS facility allow to modify the empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections, EPAX. It will be shown that minor modifications of the parameters lead to a much better reproduction of measured cross sections. The most significant changes refer to the description of fragmentation yields close to the projectile and of the memory effect of neutron-deficient projectiles.

  16. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  17. Structure solution with ARCIMBOLDO using fragments derived from distant homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammito, Massimo; Meindl, Kathrin; de Ilarduya, Iñaki M; Millán, Claudia; Artola-Recolons, Cecilia; Hermoso, Juan A; Usón, Isabel

    2014-09-01

    Molecular replacement, one of the general methods used to solve the crystallographic phase problem, relies on the availability of suitable models for placement in the unit cell of the unknown structure in order to provide initial phases. ARCIMBOLDO, originally conceived for ab initio phasing, operates at the limit of this approach, using small, very accurate fragments such as polyalanine α-helices. A distant homolog may contain accurate building blocks, but it may not be evident which sub-structure is the most suitable purely from the degree of conservation. Trying out all alternative possibilities in a systematic way is computationally expensive, even if effective. In the present study, the solution of the previously unknown structure of MltE, an outer membrane-anchored endolytic peptidoglycan lytic transglycosylase from Escherichia coli, is described. The asymmetric unit contains a dimer of this 194 amino acid protein. The closest available homolog was the catalytic domain of Slt70 (PDB code 1QTE). Originally, this template was used omitting contiguous spans of aminoacids and setting as many ARCIMBOLDO runs as models, each aiming to locate two copies sequentially with PHASER. Fragment trimming against the correlation coefficient prior to expansion through density modification and autotracing in SHELXE was essential. Analysis of the figures of merit led to the strategy to optimize the search model against the experimental data now implemented within ARCIMBOLDO-SHREDDER (http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/SHREDDER). In this strategy, the initial template is systematically shredded, and fragments are scored against each unique solution of the rotation function. Results are combined into a score per residue and the template is trimmed accordingly.

  18. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Prevention Esophageal Cancer Screening Research Esophageal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go to ... the esophagus and the stomach). Being overweight . Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for ...

  19. First principles approach to ionicity of fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam, E-mail: gpilania@lanl.gov; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • A novel first principles approach towards the fragment ionicity. • Constrained DFT and valance charge density decomposition were employed. • Correct dissociation limit achieved for diatomics. • Ionicity is an input parameter for a new class of atomistic potentials. - Abstract: We develop a first principles approach towards the ionicity of fragments. In contrast to the bond ionicity, the fragment ionicity refers to an electronic property of the constituents of a larger system, which may vary from a single atom to a functional group or a unit cell to a crystal. The fragment ionicity is quantitatively defined in terms of the coefficients of contributing charge states in a superposition of valence configurations of the system. Utilizing the constrained density functional theory-based computations, a practical method to compute the fragment ionicity from valence electron charge densities, suitably decomposed according to the Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model prescription for those electron densities, is presented for the first time. The adopted approach is illustrated using BeO, MgO and CaO diatomic molecules as simple examples. The results are compared and discussed with respect to the bond ionicity scales of Phillips and Pauling.

  20. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Belgya, T.; Billnert, R.; Borcea, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Karlsson, J.; Kis, Z.; Martinez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Takác, K.

    2010-10-01

    For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments' heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E) spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  1. DNA fragmentation status in patients with necrozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem, Sonia; Jellad, Sonia; Ibala, Samira; Saad, Ali; Mehdi, Meriem

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between the levels of sperm DNA fragmentation and necrospermia in infertile men. Semen samples obtained from 70 men consulting for infertility evaluation were analyzed according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Patients were subdivided into three groups according to the percentage of necrotic spermatozoa: normozoospermia (80%; n = 20). DNA fragmentation was detected by the terminal desoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) was 9.28 ± 2.98% in patients with a normal level of necrotic spermatozoa, 20.25 ± 3.21% in patients with moderate necrozoospermia, and 35.31 ± 5.25% in patients with severe necrozoospermia. There was a statistically significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the necrozoospermic group (P DNA fragmentation. We concluded that patients with necrozoospermia showed a high level of DNA fragmentation compared to normozoospermic men. Severe necrozoospermia (>80%) is a predictive factor for increased sperm DNA damage.

  2. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynie, Lucille; Schnell, Robert; McMahon, Stephen A.; Sandalova, Tatyana; Boulkerou, Wassila Abdelli; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Alphey, Magnus; Cukier, Cyprian; Duthie, Fraser; Kopec, Jolanta; Liu, Huanting; Jacewicz, Agata; Hunter, William N.; Naismith, James H.; Schneider, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns. PMID:23295481

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the sclerostin-neutralizing Fab AbD09097.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschert, Verena; Muth, Eva Maria; Knappik, Achim; Frisch, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D

    2015-04-01

    The secreted cystine-knot protein sclerostin was first identified from genetic screening of patients suffering from the rare bone-overgrowth diseases sclerosteosis and van Buchem disease. Sclerostin acts a negative regulator of bone growth through inhibiting the canonical Wnt signalling cascade by binding to and blocking the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6. Its function in blocking osteoblastogenesis makes it an important target for osteoanabolic therapy approaches to treat osteoporosis, which is characterized by a progressive decrease in bone mass and density. In this work, the production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis of a sclerostin-neutralizing human Fab antibody fragment, AbD09097, obtained from a naive antibody library are reported. Crystals of the Fab AbD09097 belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 45.19, b = 78.49, c = 59.20 Å, β = 95.71° and diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 1.8 Å.

  4. Protein crystallization with microseed matrix screening: application to human germline antibody Fabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obmolova, Galina, E-mail: gobmolov@its.jnj.com; Malia, Thomas J.; Teplyakov, Alexey; Sweet, Raymond W.; Gilliland, Gary L., E-mail: gobmolov@its.jnj.com [Janssen Research and Development LLC, 1400 McKean Road, Spring House, PA 19477 (United States)

    2014-07-23

    The power of microseed matrix screening is demonstrated in the crystallization of a panel of antibody Fab fragments. The crystallization of 16 human antibody Fab fragments constructed from all pairs of four different heavy chains and four different light chains was enabled by employing microseed matrix screening (MMS). In initial screening, diffraction-quality crystals were obtained for only three Fabs, while many Fabs produced hits that required optimization. Application of MMS, using the initial screens and/or refinement screens, resulted in diffraction-quality crystals of these Fabs. Five Fabs that failed to give hits in the initial screen were crystallized by cross-seeding MMS followed by MMS optimization. The crystallization protocols and strategies that resulted in structure determination of all 16 Fabs are presented. These results illustrate the power of MMS and provide a basis for developing future strategies for macromolecular crystallization.

  5. Okazaki fragment maturation: nucleases take centre stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Binghui Shen

    2011-01-01

    Completion of lagging strand DNA synthesis requires processing of up to 50 million Okazaki fragments per cell cycle in mammalian cells. Even in yeast, the Okazaki fragment maturation happens approximately a million times during a singte round of DNA replication. Therefore, efficient processing of Okazaki fragments is vital for DNA replication and cell proliferation. During this process,primase-synthesized RNA/DNA primers are removed, and Okazaki fragments are joined into an intact lagging strand DNA. The processing of RNA/DNA primers requires a group of structure-specific nucleases typified by flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1). Here, we summarize the distinct roles of these nucleases in different pathways for removal of RNA/DNA primers. Recent findings reveal that Okazaki fragment maturation is highly coordinated. The dynamic interactions of polymerase δ, FEN1 and DNA ligase I with proliferating cell nuclear antigen allow these enzymes to act sequentially during Okazaki fragment maturation. Such protein-protein interactions may be regulated by post-translational modifications. We also discuss studies using mutant mouse models that suggest two distinct cancer etiological mechanisms arising from defects in different steps of Okazaki fragment maturation.Mutations that affect the efficiency of RNA primer removal may result in accumulation of unligated nicks and DNA double-strand breaks. These DNA strand breaks can cause varying forms of chromosome aberrations, contributing to development of cancer that associates with aneuploidy and gross chromosomal rearrangement. On the other hand, mutations that impair editing out of polymerase o incorporation errors result in cancer displaying a strong mutator phenotype.

  6. Invariant Object Recognition Based on Extended Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy eBart

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual appearance of natural objects is profoundly affected by viewing conditions such as viewpoint and illumination. Human subjects can nevertheless compensate well for variations in these viewing conditions. The strategies that the visual system uses to accomplish this are largely unclear. Previous computational studies have suggested that in principle, certain types of object fragments (rather than whole objects can be used for invariant recognition. However, whether the human visual system is actually capable of using this strategy remains unknown. Here, we show that human observers can achieve illumination invariance by using object fragments that carry the relevant information. To determine this, we have used novel, but naturalistic, 3-D visual objects called ‘digital embryos’. Using novel instances of whole embryos, not fragments, we trained subjects to recognize individual embryos across illuminations. We then tested the illumination-invariant object recognition performance of subjects using fragments. We found that the performance was strongly correlated with the mutual information (MI of the fragments, provided that MI value took variations in illumination into consideration. This correlation was not attributable to any systematic differences in task difficulty between different fragments. These results reveal two important principles of invariant object recognition. First, the subjects can achieve invariance at least in part by compensating for the changes in the appearance of small local features, rather than of whole objects. Second, the subjects do not always rely on generic or pre-existing invariance of features (i.e., features whose appearance remains largely unchanged by variations in illumination, and are capable of using learning to compensate for appearance changes when necessary. These psychophysical results closely fit the predictions of earlier computational studies of fragment-based invariant object recognition.

  7. Invariant object recognition based on extended fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Evgeniy; Hegdé, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Visual appearance of natural objects is profoundly affected by viewing conditions such as viewpoint and illumination. Human subjects can nevertheless compensate well for variations in these viewing conditions. The strategies that the visual system uses to accomplish this are largely unclear. Previous computational studies have suggested that in principle, certain types of object fragments (rather than whole objects) can be used for invariant recognition. However, whether the human visual system is actually capable of using this strategy remains unknown. Here, we show that human observers can achieve illumination invariance by using object fragments that carry the relevant information. To determine this, we have used novel, but naturalistic, 3-D visual objects called "digital embryos." Using novel instances of whole embryos, not fragments, we trained subjects to recognize individual embryos across illuminations. We then tested the illumination-invariant object recognition performance of subjects using fragments. We found that the performance was strongly correlated with the mutual information (MI) of the fragments, provided that MI value took variations in illumination into consideration. This correlation was not attributable to any systematic differences in task difficulty between different fragments. These results reveal two important principles of invariant object recognition. First, the subjects can achieve invariance at least in part by compensating for the changes in the appearance of small local features, rather than of whole objects. Second, the subjects do not always rely on generic or pre-existing invariance of features (i.e., features whose appearance remains largely unchanged by variations in illumination), and are capable of using learning to compensate for appearance changes when necessary. These psychophysical results closely fit the predictions of earlier computational studies of fragment-based invariant object recognition.

  8. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J; Fedder, J

    2017-07-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated. In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage. The present decade continues within this research area. Some of the more novel methods recently submerging are sorting of cells with increased DNA fragmentation and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding techniques. The clinical value of these tests remains to be elucidated. In spite of half a century of research within the area, this analysis is not routinely implemented into the fertility clinics. The underlying causes are multiple. The abundance of methods has impeded the need for a clinical significant threshold. One of the most promising methods was commercialized in 2005 and has been reserved for larger licensed laboratories. Myriads of reviews and meta-analyses on studies using different assays for analysis of DNA fragmentation, different clinical Artificial Reproductive Treatments (ART), different definitions of successful ART outcome and small patient cohorts have been published. Although the area of DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa is highly relevant in the fertility clinics, the need for further studies focusing on standardization of the methods and clinical

  9. Effect of crystallographic texture and dislocation hardening on limit strain in sheet metal forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiyu

    2000-10-01

    In the metal industry, sheet metals are widely used to produce packaging materials for consumer goods, for structures such as automobilse, and for building construction and transportation. The desired shape of the products is imparted by plastic deformation in either the cold or hot state. Traditionally, the prediction of the forming limit of sheet metals is based on tensile tests, simulation tests and continuum mathematical models. Continuum models used in the prediction of the plastic behavior of sheet metals are based on average values of mechanical properties such as elongation, yield strength, work hardening and work-hardening rate, which are usually derived from tensile tests. Although attempts have been made to abandon the phenomenological description of the yield function by applying the theory of crystal plasticity to calculate the yield surface of texture polycrystals and hence the limit strains, only the average properties of the microstructure (e.g., the crystallographic texture of the bulk sheet) have been taken into account. So far, there has been no model for the prediction of the strain path and the limit strain of sheet metals that takes into account the effect of individual grain orientation and the dislocation property. In this thesis, different approaches in the study of plastic deformation are reviewed from the view-point of both macroplasticity and microplasticity. Instead of relying on a unique flow rule to describe the stress and strain relationship, the role of work hardening in the instability process of sheet metal and hence the flow localization phenomenon is explored from a study of the changes in the orientation of the constituent crystallites and from the changes in the dislocation density associated with different grain orientations during the course of large biaxial deformation. The changes in the crystallographic textures of an aluminium sheet sample deformed under various stress states from plane-strain tension to equi

  10. Crystal growth and first crystallographic characterization of mixed uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) oxalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamain, Christelle; Arab Chapelet, Bénédicte; Rivenet, Murielle; Abraham, Francis; Caraballo, Richard; Grandjean, Stéphane

    2013-05-06

    The mixed-actinide uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) oxalate single crystals (NH4)0.5[Pu(III)0.5U(IV)0.5(C2O4)2·H2O]·nH2O (1) and (NH4)2.7Pu(III)0.7U(IV)1.3(C2O4)5·nH2O (2) have been prepared by the diffusion of different ions through membranes separating compartments of a triple cell. UV-vis, Raman, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry analyses demonstrate the presence of both uranium and plutonium metal cations with conservation of the initial oxidation state, U(IV) and Pu(III), and the formation of mixed-valence, mixed-actinide oxalate compounds. The structure of 1 and an average structure of 2 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and were solved by direct methods and Fourier difference techniques. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first mixed uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) compounds to be structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure of 1, space group P4/n, a = 8.8558(3) Å, b = 7.8963(2) Å, Z = 2, consists of layers formed by four-membered rings of the two actinide metals occupying the same crystallographic site connected through oxalate ions. The actinide atoms are nine-coordinated by oxygen atoms from four bidentate oxalate ligands and one water molecule, which alternates up and down the layer. The single-charged cations and nonbonded water molecules are disordered in the same crystallographic site. For compound 2, an average structure has been determined in space group P6/mmm with a = 11.158(2) Å and c = 6.400(1) Å. The honeycomb-like framework [Pu(III)0.7U(IV)1.3(C2O4)5](2.7-) results from a three-dimensional arrangement of mixed (U0.65Pu0.35)O10 polyhedra connected by five bis-bidentate μ(2)-oxalate ions in a trigonal-bipyramidal configuration.

  11. Rock fragmentation control in opencast blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The blasting operation plays a pivotal role in the overall economics of opencast mines. The blasting sub-system affects all the other associated sub-systems, i.e. loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Fragmentation control through effective blast design and its effect on productivity are the challenging tasks for practicing blasting engineer due to inadequate knowledge of actual explosive energy released in the borehole, varying initiation practice in blast design and its effect on explosive energy release characteristic. This paper describes the result of a systematic study on the impact of blast design parameters on rock fragmentation at three mines in India. The mines use draglines and shovel–dumper combination for removal of overburden. Despite its pivotal role in controlling the overall economics of a mining operation, the expected blasting performance is often judged almost exclusively on the basis of poorly defined parameters such as powder factor and is often qualitative which results in very subjective assessment of blasting performance. Such an approach is very poor substitutes for accurate assessment of explosive and blasting performance. Ninety one blasts were conducted with varying blast designs and charging patterns, and their impacts on the rock fragmentation were documented. A high-speed camera was deployed to record the detonation sequences of the blasts. The efficiency of the loading machines was also correlated with the mean fragment size obtained from the fragmentation analyses.

  12. Short read DNA fragment anchoring algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Peiheng; Liu, Xinchun

    2009-01-30

    The emerging next-generation sequencing method based on PCR technology boosts genome sequencing speed considerably, the expense is also get decreased. It has been utilized to address a broad range of bioinformatics problems. Limited by reliable output sequence length of next-generation sequencing technologies, we are confined to study gene fragments with 30 - 50 bps in general and it is relatively shorter than traditional gene fragment length. Anchoring gene fragments in long reference sequence is an essential and prerequisite step for further assembly and analysis works. Due to the sheer number of fragments produced by next-generation sequencing technologies and the huge size of reference sequences, anchoring would rapidly becoming a computational bottleneck. We compared algorithm efficiency on BLAT, SOAP and EMBF. The efficiency is defined as the count of total output results divided by time consumed to retrieve them. The data show that our algorithm EMBF have 3 - 4 times efficiency advantage over SOAP, and at least 150 times over BLAT. Moreover, when the reference sequence size is increased, the efficiency of SOAP will get degraded as far as 30%, while EMBF have preferable increasing tendency. In conclusion, we deem that EMBF is more suitable for short fragment anchoring problem where result completeness and accuracy is predominant and the reference sequences are relatively large.

  13. Formation of wide binaries by turbulent fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho; Dunham, Michael M.; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Choi, Minho; Bergin, Edwin A.; Evans, Neal J.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the formation of wide-binary systems of very low-mass stars (M ≤ 0.1 solar masses, M⊙) is challenging 1,2,3 . The most obvious route is through widely separated low-mass collapsing fragments produced by turbulent fragmentation of a molecular core4,5. However, close binaries or multiples from disk fragmentation can also evolve to wide binaries over a few initial crossing times of the stellar cluster through tidal evolution6. Finding an isolated low-mass wide-binary system in the earliest stage of formation, before tidal evolution could occur, would prove that turbulent fragmentation is a viable mechanism for (very) low-mass wide binaries. Here we report high-resolution ALMA observations of a known wide-separation protostellar binary, showing that each component has a circumstellar disk. The system is too young7 to have evolved from a close binary, and the disk axes are misaligned, providing strong support for the turbulent fragmentation model. Masses of both stars are derived from the Keplerian rotation of the disks; both are very low-mass stars.

  14. Supramolecular gel electrophoresis of large DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Oyoshi, Takanori; Yamanaka, Masamichi

    2017-07-06

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a frequent technique used to separate exceptionally large DNA fragments. In a typical continuous field electrophoresis, it is challenging to separate DNA fragments larger than 20 kbp because they migrate at a comparable rate. To overcome this challenge, it is necessary to develop a novel matrix for the electrophoresis. Here, we describe the electrophoresis of large DNA fragments up to 166 kbp using a supramolecular gel matrix and a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. C3 -symmetric tris-urea self-assembled into a supramolecular hydrogel in tris-boric acid-EDTA buffer, a typical buffer for DNA electrophoresis, and the supramolecular hydrogel was used as a matrix for electrophoresis to separate large DNA fragments. Three types of DNA marker, the λ-Hind III digest (2 to 23 kbp), Lambda DNA-Mono Cut Mix (10 to 49 kbp), and Marker 7 GT (10 to 165 kbp), were analyzed in this study. Large DNA fragments of greater than 100 kbp showed distinct mobility using a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Global-Scale Patterns of Forest Fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Riitters

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 x 9 pixels, "small" scale to 59,049 km 2 (243 x 243 pixels, "large" scale were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (interior, perforated, edge, transitional, patch, and undetermined from the amount of forest and its occurrence as adjacent forest pixels. Interior forest exists only at relatively small scales; at larger scales, forests are dominated by edge and patch conditions. At the smallest scale, there were significant differences in fragmentation among continents; within continents, there were significant differences among individual forest types. Tropical rain forest fragmentation was most severe in North America and least severe in Europe-Asia. Forest types with a high percentage of perforated conditions were mainly in North America (five types and Europe-Asia (four types, in both temperate and subtropical regions. Transitional and patch conditions were most common in 11 forest types, of which only a few would be considered as "naturally patchy" (e.g., dry woodland. The five forest types with the highest percentage of interior conditions were in North America; in decreasing order, they were cool rain forest, coniferous, conifer boreal, cool mixed, and cool broadleaf.

  17. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  18. Stream hydrological fragmentation drives bacterioplankton community composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Fazi

    Full Text Available In Mediterranean intermittent streams, the hydrological fragmentation in summer and the successive water flow re-convergence in autumn allow exploring how local processes shape the microbial community within the same habitat. The objectives of this study were to determine how bacterial community composition responded to hydrological fragmentation in summer, and to evaluate whether the seasonal shifts in community composition predominate over the effects of episodic habitat fragmentation. The bacterial community was assessed along the intermittent stream Fuirosos (Spain, at different levels of phylogenetic resolution by in situ hybridization, fingerprinting, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The hydrological fragmentation of the stream network strongly altered the biogeochemical conditions with the depletion of oxidized solutes and caused changes in dissolved organic carbon characteristics. In the isolated ponds, beta-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria increased their abundance with a gradual reduction of the alpha-diversity as pond isolation time increased. Moreover, fingerprinting analysis clearly showed a shift in community composition between summer and autumn. In the context of a seasonal shift, the temporary stream fragmentation simultaneously reduced the microbial dispersion and affected local environmental conditions (shift in redox regime and quality of the dissolved organic matter tightly shaping the bacterioplankton community composition.

  19. Human antibody fragments specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor selected from large non-immunised phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriau, Christelle; Rothacker, Julie; Hoogenboom, Hennie R; Nice, Edouard

    2004-09-01

    Antibodies to EGFR have been shown to display anti-tumour effects mediated in part by inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, and by enhancement of apoptosis. Humanised antibodies are preferred for clinical use to reduce complications with HAMA and HAHA responses frequently seen with murine and chimaeric antibodies. We have used depletion and subtractive selection strategies on cells expressing the EGFR to sample two large antibody fragment phage display libraries for the presence of human antibodies which are specific for the EGFR. Four Fab fragments and six scFv fragments were identified, with affinities of up to 2.2nM as determined by BIAcore analysis using global fitting of the binding curves to obtain the individual rate constants (ka and kd). This overall approach offers a generic screening method for the identification of growth factor specific antibodies and antibody fragments from large expression libraries and has potential for the rapid development of new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  20. Hearing Loss: Screening Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss Screening Newborns Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... of newborns in the U.S. are screened for hearing loss before they leave the hospital. Research improves the ...

  1. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  2. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Cervical Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued final recommendations on Screening for Cervical Cancer . These recommendations are for women ...

  3. Screening for Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Ovarian Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Ovarian Cancer . This recommendation is for ...

  4. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  5. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any ... as an ultrasound, MRI, or a biopsy. Prostate cancer screening has risks: Finding prostate cancer may not improve ...

  6. Alcohol Use Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Instructions The following questions ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Manual Instructions The following ...

  7. Endometrial Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transvaginal ultrasound Endometrial sampling Tests are used to screen for different types of cancer. Some screening tests ... endometrium by inserting a brush, curette , or thin, flexible tube through the cervix and into the uterus. ...

  8. Screening for Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Glaucoma The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Glaucoma . This final recommendation statement ...

  9. Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) Simulations for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E.; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) involves screening low molecular weight molecules (“fragments”) that correspond to functional groups found in larger drug-like molecules to determine their binding to target proteins or nucleic acids. Based on the principle of thermodynamic additivity, two fragments that bind non-overlapping nearby sites on the target can be combined to yield a new molecule whose binding free energy is the sum of those of the fragments. Experimental FBDD approaches, like NMR and X-ray crystallography, have proven very useful but can be expensive in terms of time, materials, and labor. Accordingly, a variety of computational FBDD approaches have been developed that provide different levels of detail and accuracy. The Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) method of computational FBDD uses all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify fragment binding. The target is “soaked” in an aqueous solution with multiple fragments having different identities. The resulting computational competition assay reveals what small molecule types are most likely to bind which regions of the target. From SILCS simulations, 3D probability maps of fragment binding called “FragMaps” can be produced. Based on the probabilities relative to bulk, SILCS FragMaps can be used to determine “Grid Free Energies (GFEs),” which provide per-atom contributions to fragment binding affinities. For essentially no additional computational overhead relative to the production of the FragMaps, GFEs can be used to compute Ligand Grid Free Energies (LGFEs) for arbitrarily complex molecules, and these LGFEs can be used to rank-order the molecules in accordance with binding affinities. PMID:25709034

  10. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Randall W; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Jasperson, Kory; Klapman, Jason B; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Provenzale, Dawn; Rao, M Sambasiva; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    Mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by early diagnosis and by cancer prevention through polypectomy. These NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities and recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In addition, the guidelines provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome. Screening approaches for Lynch syndrome are also described.

  11. Screening for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Peter J.; Naidich, David P.; Bach, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is by far the major cause of cancer deaths largely because in the majority of patients it is at an advanced stage at the time it is discovered, when curative treatment is no longer feasible. This article examines the data regarding the ability of screening to decrease the number of lung cancer deaths. Methods: A systematic review was conducted of controlled studies that address the effectiveness of methods of screening for lung cancer. Results: Several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including a recent one, have demonstrated that screening for lung cancer using a chest radiograph does not reduce the number of deaths from lung cancer. One large RCT involving low-dose CT (LDCT) screening demonstrated a significant reduction in lung cancer deaths, with few harms to individuals at elevated risk when done in the context of a structured program of selection, screening, evaluation, and management of the relatively high number of benign abnormalities. Whether other RCTs involving LDCT screening are consistent is unclear because data are limited or not yet mature. Conclusions: Screening is a complex interplay of selection (a population with sufficient risk and few serious comorbidities), the value of the screening test, the interval between screening tests, the availability of effective treatment, the risk of complications or harms as a result of screening, and the degree with which the screened individuals comply with screening and treatment recommendations. Screening with LDCT of appropriate individuals in the context of a structured process is associated with a significant reduction in the number of lung cancer deaths in the screened population. Given the complex interplay of factors inherent in screening, many questions remain on how to effectively implement screening on a broader scale. PMID:23649455

  12. Ternary fission fragmentation of 252Cf for all possible third fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, K.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2010-09-01

    The ternary fragmentation of 252Cf for all possible third fragments has been investigated using the recently proposed three-cluster model within a spherical approximation and satisfying the condition A 1 ≥ A 2 ≥ A 3 . The most probable ternary configurations in the fission of 252Cf accompanied with all possible third fragment mass numbers from A 3 = 1 to 84 are predicted and their independent and overall relative yields are calculated. The calculations of the properly charge minimized potential energy surface (PES) and yield reveal that even-mass third fragments are more favored than odd ones. In the most probable configuration having the minimum in the potential energy and the maximum in yield, among the three fragments, at least one (or two) of the fragment(s) associates itself with the neutron (or proton) closed shell and in some cases even with the doubly closed shell. The calculated relative yields imply that next to 14C (the heaviest third fragment observed in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf , 34, 36, 38Si , 46, 48Ar , and 48, 50Ca are presenting themselves as the most favoured cases to be observed as the third particle in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf.

  13. Fragmentation of methane molecules by antiproton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Extending previous work for proton impact, we have investigated the fragmentation of methane molecules due to collisions with antiprotons in the 25 keV to 5 MeV impact energy range. The multi-center nature of the problem is addressed by using a spectral representation of the molecular Hartree-Fock-level Hamiltonian and a single-center expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals. The two-center basis generator method (TC-BGM) is used for orbital propagation. Electron-removal cross sections obtained from the TC-BGM solutions are complemented with a dynamical decay-route fragmentation model to calculate cross sections for the production of fragment ions. Good agreement with the available experimental data is observed for CH4+,CH3+,CH2+and CH+. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  14. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; König, Florian

    2014-08-01

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this paper, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow to extract new information on this fragmentation process. While existing data do not yet convincingly favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO), the data sets recorded by PHENIX and STAR at BNL RHIC in 2013 with tenfold higher statistics should allow for such an analysis.

  15. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael; Koenig, Florian [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this paper, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow one to extract new information on this fragmentation process. While existing data do not yet convincingly favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO), the data sets recorded by PHENIX and STAR at BNL RHIC in 2013 with tenfold higher statistics should allow for such an analysis. (orig.)

  16. Fragmentation of colliding planetesimals with water content

    CERN Document Server

    Maindl, Thomas I; Schäfer, Christoph; Speith, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the outcome of collisions of Ceres-sized planetesimals composed of a rocky core and a shell of water ice. These collisions are not only relevant for explaining the formation of planetary embryos in early planetary systems, but also provide insight into the formation of asteroid families and possible water transport via colliding small bodies. Earlier studies show characteristic collision velocities exceeding the bodies' mutual escape velocity which - along with the distribution of the impact angles - cover the collision outcome regimes 'partial accretion', 'erosion', and 'hit-and-run' leading to different expected fragmentation scenarios. Existing collision simulations use bodies composed of strengthless material; we study the distribution of fragments and their water contents considering the full elasto-plastic continuum mechanics equations also including brittle failure and fragmentation.

  17. Flow angle from intermediate mass fragment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, F.; Crochet, P.; Dona, R.; De Schauenburg, B.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J.P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Merlitz, H.; Mohren, S.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Plettner, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stockmeir, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    1999-02-15

    Directed sideward flow of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments was measured in different symmetric reactions at bombarding energies from 90 to 800 A MeV. The flow parameter is found to increase with the charge of the detected fragment up to Z = 3-4 and then turns into saturation for heavier fragments. Guided by simple simulations of an anisotropic expanding thermal source, we show that the value at saturation can provide a good estimate of the flow angle, {theta}{sub flow}, in the participant region. It is found that {theta}{sub flow} depends strongly on the impact parameter. The excitation function of {theta}{sub flow} reveals striking deviations from the ideal hydrodynamical scaling. The data exhibit a steep rise of {theta}{sub flow} to a maximum at around 250 - 400 A MeV, followed by a moderate decrease as the bombarding energy increases further.

  18. Fragmentation of Kozai–Lidov Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the gravitational instability (GI) of a locally isothermal inclined disk around one component of a binary system. Such a disk can undergo global Kozai–Lidov (KL) cycles if the initial disk tilt is above the critical KL angle (of about 40◦). During these cycles, an initially circular disk exchanges its inclination for eccentricity, and vice versa. Self-gravity may suppress the cycles under some circumstances. However, with hydrodynamic simulations that include self-gravity, we show that for a sufficiently high initial disk tilts and for certain disk masses, disks can undergo KL oscillations and fragment due to GI, even when the Toomre Q value for an equivalent undisturbed disk is well within the stable regime (Q> 2). We suggest that KL triggered disk fragmentation provides a mechanism for the efficient formation of giant planets in binary systems and may enhance the fragmentation of disks in massive black hole binaries.

  19. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  20. Between Stage and Screen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tornqvist, Egil

    1996-01-01

    Ingmar Bergman is worldwide known as a film and stage director. Yet no-one has attempted to compare his stage and screen activities. In Between stage and screen Egil Tornqvist examines formal and thematical correspondences and differences between a number of Bergman's stage, screen, and radio produc

  1. Screen time and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obesity ) Screen time increases your child's risk of obesity because: Sitting and watching a screen is time that is not spent being physically active. TV commercials and other screen ads can lead to unhealthy food choices . Most of the time, the foods in ads ...

  2. Screen Practice in Curating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    During the past one and a half decade, a curatorial orientation towards "screen practice" has expanded the moving image and digital art into the public domain, exploring alternative artistic uses of the screen. The emergence of urban LED screens in the late 1990s provided a new venue that allowed...

  3. Principles of Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-10-01

    Cancer screening has long been an important component of the struggle to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality from cancer. Notwithstanding this history, many aspects of cancer screening remain poorly understood. This article presents a summary of basic principles of cancer screening that are relevant for researchers, clinicians, and public health officials alike. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Breast awareness and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Victoria

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the UK. Breast awareness and screening, along with better treatment, can significantly improve outcomes, and more women than ever are now surviving the disease. This article discusses breast awareness and screening, symptoms and risk factors for breast cancer, and how nurses can raise breast awareness and screening uptake.

  5. Crystallographic orientation and electrode nature are key factors for electric current generation by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Beatriz; Ortiz, Juan M; Schrott, Germán; Busalmen, Juan P; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the influence of electrode material and crystallographic structure on electron transfer and biofilm formation of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Single-crystal gold-Au(110), Au(111), Au(210)-and platinum-Pt(100), Pt(110), Pt(111), Pt(210)-electrodes were tested and compared to graphite rods. G. sulfurreducens electrochemically interacts with all these materials with different attachment kinetics and final current production, although redox species involved in the electron transfer to the anode are virtually the same in all cases. Initial bacterial colonization was fastest on graphite up to the monolayer level, whereas gold electrodes led to higher final current densities. Crystal geometry was shown to have an important influence, with Au(210) sustaining a current density of up to 1442±101μAcm(-2) at the steady state, over Au(111) with 961±94μAcm(-2) and Au(110) with 944±89μAcm(-2). On the other hand, the platinum electrodes displayed the lowest performances, including Pt(210). Our results indicate that both crystal geometry and electrode material are key parameters for the efficient interaction of bacteria with the substrate and should be considered for the design of novel materials and microbial devices to optimize energy production.

  6. Synthetic, crystallographic, and computational study of copper(II) complexes of ethylenediaminetetracarboxylate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matović, Zoran D; Miletić, Vesna D; Ćendić, Marina; Meetsma, Auke; van Koningsbruggen, Petra J; Deeth, Robert J

    2013-02-04

    Copper(II) complexes of hexadentate ethylenediaminetetracarboxylic acid type ligands H(4)eda3p and H(4)eddadp (H(4)eda3p = ethylenediamine-N-acetic-N,N',N'-tri-3-propionic acid; H(4)eddadp = ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic-N,N'-di-3-propionic acid) have been prepared. An octahedral trans(O(6)) geometry (two propionate ligands coordinated in axial positions) has been established crystallographically for the Ba[Cu(eda3p)]·8H(2)O compound, while Ba[Cu(eddadp)]·8H(2)O is proposed to adopt a trans(O(5)) geometry (two axial acetates) on the basis of density functional theory calculations and comparisons of IR and UV-vis spectral data. Experimental and computed structural data correlating similar copper(II) chelate complexes have been used to better understand the isomerism and departure from regular octahedral geometry within the series. The in-plane O-Cu-N chelate angles show the smallest deviation from the ideal octahedral value of 90°, and hence the lowest strain, for the eddadp complex with two equatorial β-propionate rings. A linear dependence between tetragonality and the number of five-membered rings has been established. A natural bonding orbital analysis of the series of complexes is also presented.

  7. On elliptic Calogero-Moser systems for complex crystallographic reflection groups

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, Pavel; Ma, Xiaoguang; Veselov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    To every irreducible finite crystallographic reflection group (i.e., an irreducible finite reflection group G acting faithfully on an abelian variety X), we attach a family of classical and quantum integrable systems on X (with meromorphic coefficients). These families are parametrized by G-invariant functions of pairs (T,s), where T is a hypertorus in X (of codimension 1), and s in G is a reflection acting trivially on T. If G is a real reflection group, these families reduce to the known generalizations of elliptic Calogero-Moser systems, but in the non-real case they appear to be new. We give two constructions of the integrals of these systems - an explicit construction as limits of classical Calogero-Moser Hamiltonians of elliptic Dunkl operators as the dynamical parameter goes to 0 (implementing an idea of arXiv:hep-th/9403178), and a geometric construction as global sections of sheaves of elliptic Cherednik algebras for the critical value of the twisting parameter. We also prove algebraic integrability ...

  8. Surface energy-mediated construction of anisotropic semiconductor wires with selective crystallographic polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jung Inn; Hong, Woong-Ki; Lee, Sunghoon; Lee, Sanghyo; Ku, Jiyeon; Park, Young Jun; Hong, Jinpyo; Hwang, Sungwoo; Park, Kyung Ho; Warner, Jamie H.; Cha, Seungnam; Kim, Jong Min

    2014-07-01

    ZnO is a wide band-gap semiconductor with piezoelectric properties suitable for opto-electronics, sensors, and as an electrode material. Controlling the shape and crystallography of any semiconducting nanomaterial is a key step towards extending their use in applications. Whilst anisotropic ZnO wires have been routinely fabricated, precise control over the specific surface facets and tailoring of polar and non-polar growth directions still requires significant refinement. Manipulating the surface energy of crystal facets is a generic approach for the rational design and growth of one-dimensional (1D) building blocks. Although the surface energy is one basic factor for governing crystal nucleation and growth of anisotropic 1D structures, structural control based on surface energy minimization has not been yet demonstrated. Here, we report an electronic configuration scheme to rationally modulate surface electrostatic energies for crystallographic-selective growth of ZnO wires. The facets and orientations of ZnO wires are transformed between hexagonal and rectangular/diamond cross-sections with polar and non-polar growth directions, exhibiting different optical and piezoelectrical properties. Our novel synthetic route for ZnO wire fabrication provides new opportunities for future opto-electronics, piezoelectronics, and electronics, with new topological properties.

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF 328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  10. Crystallographic and Computational Analyses of AUUCU Repeating RNA That Causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10 (SCA10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, HaJeung; González, Àlex L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Tran, Tuan; Lohman, Jeremy R; Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-06-23

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of r(AUUCU) within intron 9 of the ATXN10 pre-mRNA. The RNA causes disease by a gain-of-function mechanism in which it inactivates proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. Spectroscopic studies showed that r(AUUCU) repeats form a hairpin structure; however, there were no high-resolution structural models prior to this work. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of model r(AUUCU) repeats refined to 2.8 Å and analysis of the structure via molecular dynamics simulations. The r(AUUCU) tracts adopt an overall A-form geometry in which 3 × 3 nucleotide (5')UCU(3')/(3')UCU(5') internal loops are closed by AU pairs. Helical parameters of the refined structure as well as the corresponding electron density map on the crystallographic model reflect dynamic features of the internal loop. The computational analyses captured dynamic motion of the loop closing pairs, which can form single-stranded conformations with relatively low energies. Overall, the results presented here suggest the possibility for r(AUUCU) repeats to form metastable A-from structures, which can rearrange into single-stranded conformations and attract proteins such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). The information presented here may aid in the rational design of therapeutics targeting this RNA.

  11. Scattering of slow ions by various crystallographic planes of tungsten single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolov, S N; Kortenraad, R; Must, B; Shtinov, E D; Brongersma, K K

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of low-energy ion scattering signal intensity on single crystal surface orientation is investigated, and it is shown that this dependence is not necessarily in direct proportion to atomic density in the uppermost atomic layer. On the basis of comparison of signals from various crystallographic planes of a high purity W single crystal a conclusion is made that the ions scattered from more deep atomic layers contribute considerably to the signal measured for the surface with an open structure. It is shown that reference specimens with a known surface density are needed for quantitative analysis of surface composition by the method of low-energy ion scattering. The best reference specimens are well-oriented single crystals with close-packed planes at the surface, since in this case the low-energy ion scattering signal is proportional to atomic density of the uppermost atomic layer. It single crystals with open surface structure are used as reference specimens the contribution of deeper atomic laye...

  12. CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC RELATIONS OF CEMENTITE–AUSTENITE–FERRITE IN THE DIFFUSIVE DECOMPOSITION OF AUSTENITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary. It was made a search for new and more accurate orientation relations between the crystal lattice in the pearlite and bainite austenite decomposition products. Methods. It were used the methods: transmission electron microscopy, the micro-, mathematical matrix and stereographic analysis. The purpose of the research is with theoretical, numerical and experimental methods to set up to a 0.2 degree angular orientation relations between the lattices of ferrite and cementite in the austenite decomposition products in the temperature range 400 ... 700С. Results. It was established a new, refined value for grids in the diffusion decay of γ → α + (α + θ. Practical significance. It was proposed a new oriented dependence and the corresponding double gnomonic projection with poles to planes α and θ phases, which can be used in patterns of crystallographic lattices relations studies at phase transitions, as well as the subsequent modeling of complex physical processes of structure formation in metals and binary systems.

  13. Changes of structure and crystallographic texture of cladding tubes from austenitic steel under thermal creep testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu; Isaenkova, M.; Fesenko, V.; Dobrokhotov, P.; Tselishchev, A.

    2016-04-01

    The process of changes in structure and crystallographic texture of cladding tubes from austenitic steel ChS68 under thermal creep testing were studied. Testing of tubes was conducted at the temperature 700 oC in the air by their stretching in axial direction under the stress 160 MPa until rupture. By data of phase and texture analysis a number of processes, accompanying plastic deformation of tubes during thermal creep tests at elevated temperature, were identified. The main texture components of original tube, as well as texture components of different parts of the tested tube are {110} and {112}. In the rupture zone the component of the texture of tension with axis along the tube axis becomes stronger. This effect is connected with activation of dislocation slip in the deformed area of tested tube near the new-formed neck. At the same time the character of texture changes in the zone of tube rupture indicates to development of the dynamic recrystallization, conditioned by the total influence of all factors, which control the passage in the tube of thermal creep. In addition, it was revealed the activation of martensitic transformations in the zone of maximal deformation of tube as a result of its creep tests.

  14. Reintroducing electrostatics into macromolecular crystallographic refinement: application to neutron crystallography and DNA hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Timothy D; Schnieders, Michael J; Mustyakimov, Marat; Wu, Chuanjie; Langan, Paul; Pande, Vijay S; Brunger, Axel T

    2011-04-13

    Most current crystallographic structure refinements augment the diffraction data with a priori information consisting of bond, angle, dihedral, planarity restraints, and atomic repulsion based on the Pauli exclusion principle. Yet, electrostatics and van der Waals attraction are physical forces that provide additional a priori information. Here, we assess the inclusion of electrostatics for the force field used for all-atom (including hydrogen) joint neutron/X-ray refinement. Two DNA and a protein crystal structure were refined against joint neutron/X-ray diffraction data sets using force fields without electrostatics or with electrostatics. Hydrogen-bond orientation/geometry favors the inclusion of electrostatics. Refinement of Z-DNA with electrostatics leads to a hypothesis for the entropic stabilization of Z-DNA that may partly explain the thermodynamics of converting the B form of DNA to its Z form. Thus, inclusion of electrostatics assists joint neutron/X-ray refinements, especially for placing and orienting hydrogen atoms.

  15. Protein crystallography for aspiring crystallographers or how to avoid pitfalls and traps in macromolecular structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2013-11-01

    The number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank now approaches 100,000, with the vast majority of them determined by crystallographic methods. Thousands of papers describing such structures have been published in the scientific literature, and 20 Nobel Prizes in chemistry or medicine have been awarded for discoveries based on macromolecular crystallography. New hardware and software tools have made crystallography appear to be an almost routine (but still far from being analytical) technique and many structures are now being determined by scientists with very limited experience in the practical aspects of the field. However, this apparent ease is sometimes illusory and proper procedures need to be followed to maintain high standards of structure quality. In addition, many noncrystallographers may have problems with the critical evaluation and interpretation of structural results published in the scientific literature. The present review provides an outline of the technical aspects of crystallography for less experienced practitioners, as well as information that might be useful for users of macromolecular structures, aiming to show them how to interpret (but not overinterpret) the information present in the coordinate files and in their description. A discussion of the extent of information that can be gleaned from the atomic coordinates of structures solved at different resolution is provided, as well as problems and pitfalls encountered in structure determination and interpretation.

  16. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araullo-Peters, Vicente J., E-mail: vicente.araullopeters@gmail.com [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia); Breen, Andrew; Ceguerra, Anna V. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ringer, Simon P.; Cairney, Julie M. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed. - Highlights: • A new analysis method was designed that determines if reconstructed planes are present in atom probe data. • The location, orientation, and planar spacing of these planes are obtained. • This method was applied to simulated, aluminium alloy and silicon data where the extent of planes was shown to vary considerably. • This method can be used to examine atom probe reconstruction quality.

  17. Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation of anorthosites from Oman ophiolite and the dynamics of melt lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luiz F. G.; Boudier, FrançOise; Nicolas, Adolphe

    2011-04-01

    Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of anorthosite samples interlayered in the upper and lower gabbro sections in the Oman ophiolite were analyzed in this paper. In the anorthosites registering the dynamics of the melt lenses, foliation is flat lying and starts to develop a few meters below the root zone of the sheeted dike complex (RZSDC). Microstructures and CPO of these rocks were developed in response to four different mechanisms: (1) density-controlled settling of plagioclase on the lens floor, (2) deposition of anorthosites related to convection currents, (3) melt compaction, and (4) uncompacted melt accumulation. In these anorthosites, the poles to (010) of plagioclase are parallel to the flow plane of convection, whereas the [100] axes and poles to (001) express the convection flow direction and the axis of convection rolls, respectively. The effect of subsidence of melt lens floor is recorded immediately below the RZSDC and is characterized by the rapid (but progressive) development of dipping foliation and lineation, reflecting the increase of deformation downsection. The degree of foliation and CPO development in the anorthosites is directly related to the distance of the center of the melt lenses before the subsidence starts. Despite the uncertain origin of the anorthosites from the lower gabbro section, all the samples lost the magmatic microstructural characteristics and presently are reequilibrated aggregates. However, they still preserve plagioclase CPO, where some of these patterns present similarities with the anorthosites from the upper gabbro section, but no evidence of intracrystalline deformation under high temperatures.

  18. Purification and crystallographic analysis of a FAD-dependent halogenase from Streptomyces sp. JCM9888.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqun; Yan, Baohua; Yang, Ting; Jiang, Jian; Wei, Heng; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    A new FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide)-dependent halogenase HalY from Streptomyces sp. JCM9888 was reported to be involved in the regioselective halogenation of adenine. HalY is a variant B FAD-dependent halogenase that is most similar to the halogenase PltA involved in pyoluteorin biosynthesis. This study reports the overexpression and purification of HalY with an N-terminal hexahistidine tag, followed by crystallization experiments and X-ray crystallographic analysis. HalY was purified as a monomer in solution and crystallized to give X-ray diffraction to a resolution of 1.7 Å. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.4, b = 113.4, c = 47.6 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 107.4°, and contained one monomer of HalY in the asymmetric unit, with a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.3 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 46%. The structure of the halogenase CndH was used as a search model in molecular replacement to obtain the initial model of HalY. Manual model building and structure refinement of HalY are in progress.

  19. Improved Empirical Parametrization of Fragmentation Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Sümmerer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    A new version is proposed for the universal empirical formula, EPAX, which describes fragmentation cross sections in high-energy heavy-ion reactions. The new version, EPAX 3, can be shown to yield cross sections that are in better agreement with experimental data for the most neutron-rich fragments than the previous version. At the same time, the very good agreement of EPAX 2 with data on the neutron-deficient side has been largely maintained. Comparison with measured cross sections show that the bulk of the data is reproduced within a factor of about 2, for cross sections down to the pico-barn range.

  20. Parton-to-Pion Fragmentation Reloaded

    CERN Document Server

    de Florian, D; Epele, M; Hernandez-Pinto, R J; Stratmann, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a new, comprehensive global analysis of parton-to-pion fragmentation functions at next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD. The obtained results are based on the latest experimental information on single-inclusive pion production in electron-positron annihilation, lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering, and proton-proton collisions. An excellent description of all data sets is achieved, and the remaining uncertainties in parton-to-pion fragmentation functions are estimated based on the Hessian method. Extensive comparisons to the results from our previous global analysis are performed.