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Sample records for crystallographic fragment screening

  1. Structures of endothiapepsin-fragment complexes from crystallographic fragment screening using a novel, diverse and affordable 96-compound fragment library.

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    Huschmann, Franziska U; Linnik, Janina; Sparta, Karine; Ühlein, Monika; Wang, Xiaojie; Metz, Alexander; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Weiss, Manfred S; Mueller, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    Crystallographic screening of the binding of small organic compounds (termed fragments) to proteins is increasingly important for medicinal chemistry-oriented drug discovery. To enable such experiments in a widespread manner, an affordable 96-compound library has been assembled for fragment screening in both academia and industry. The library is selected from already existing protein-ligand structures and is characterized by a broad ligand diversity, including buffer ingredients, carbohydrates, nucleotides, amino acids, peptide-like fragments and various drug-like organic compounds. When applied to the model protease endothiapepsin in a crystallographic screening experiment, a hit rate of nearly 10% was obtained. In comparison to other fragment libraries and considering that no pre-screening was performed, this hit rate is remarkably high. This demonstrates the general suitability of the selected compounds for an initial fragment-screening campaign. The library composition, experimental considerations and time requirements for a complete crystallographic fragment-screening campaign are discussed as well as the nine fully refined obtained endothiapepsin-fragment structures. While most of the fragments bind close to the catalytic centre of endothiapepsin in poses that have been observed previously, two fragments address new sites on the protein surface. ITC measurements show that the fragments bind to endothiapepsin with millimolar affinity.

  2. Structures of endothiapepsin–fragment complexes from crystallographic fragment screening using a novel, diverse and affordable 96-compound fragment library

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    Huschmann, Franziska U.; Linnik, Janina; Sparta, Karine; Ühlein, Monika; Wang, Xiaojie; Metz, Alexander; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Weiss, Manfred S.; Mueller, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic screening of the binding of small organic compounds (termed fragments) to proteins is increasingly important for medicinal chemistry-oriented drug discovery. To enable such experiments in a widespread manner, an affordable 96-compound library has been assembled for fragment screening in both academia and industry. The library is selected from already existing protein–ligand structures and is characterized by a broad ligand diversity, including buffer ingredients, carbohydrates, nucleotides, amino acids, peptide-like fragments and various drug-like organic compounds. When applied to the model protease endothiapepsin in a crystallographic screening experiment, a hit rate of nearly 10% was obtained. In comparison to other fragment libraries and considering that no pre-screening was performed, this hit rate is remarkably high. This demonstrates the general suitability of the selected compounds for an initial fragment-screening campaign. The library composition, experimental considerations and time requirements for a complete crystallographic fragment-screening campaign are discussed as well as the nine fully refined obtained endothiapepsin–fragment structures. While most of the fragments bind close to the catalytic centre of endothiapepsin in poses that have been observed previously, two fragments address new sites on the protein surface. ITC measurements show that the fragments bind to endothiapepsin with millimolar affinity. PMID:27139825

  3. Identification of N-ethylmethylamine as a novel scaffold for inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase by crystallographic fragment screening.

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    Amano, Yasushi; Tanabe, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    2015-05-15

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential target for the treatment of inflammation and hypertension. X-ray crystallographic fragment screening was used to identify fragment hits and their binding modes. Eight fragment hits were identified via soaking of sEH crystals with fragment cocktails, and the co-crystal structures of these hits were determined via individual soaking. Based on the binding mode, N-ethylmethylamine was identified as a promising scaffold that forms hydrogen bonds with the catalytic residues of sEH, Asp335, Tyr383, and Tyr466. Compounds containing this scaffold were selected from an in-house chemical library and assayed. Although the starting fragment had a weak inhibitory activity (IC50: 800μM), we identified potent inhibitors including 2-({[2-(adamantan-1-yl)ethyl]amino}methyl)phenol exhibiting the highest inhibitory activity (IC50: 0.51μM). This corresponded to a more than 1500-fold increase in inhibitory activity compared to the starting fragment. Co-crystal structures of the hit compounds demonstrate that the binding of N-ethylmethylamine to catalytic residues is similar to that of the starting fragment. We therefore consider crystallographic fragment screening to be appropriate for the identification of weak but promising fragment hits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Advantages of crystallographic fragment screening: functional and mechanistic insights from a powerful platform for efficient drug discovery.

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    Patel, Disha; Bauman, Joseph D; Arnold, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has been an under-appreciated screening tool for fragment-based drug discovery due to the perception of low throughput and technical difficulty. Investigators in industry and academia have overcome these challenges by taking advantage of key factors that contribute to a successful crystallographic screening campaign. Efficient cocktail design and soaking methodologies have evolved to maximize throughput while minimizing false positives/negatives. In addition, technical improvements at synchrotron beamlines have dramatically increased data collection rates thus enabling screening on a timescale comparable to other techniques. The combination of available resources and efficient experimental design has resulted in many successful crystallographic screening campaigns. The three-dimensional crystal structure of the bound fragment complexed to its target, a direct result of the screening effort, enables structure-based drug design while revealing insights regarding protein dynamics and function not readily obtained through other experimental approaches. Furthermore, this "chemical interrogation" of the target protein crystals can lead to the identification of useful reagents for improving diffraction resolution or compound solubility. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Advantages of Crystallographic Fragment Screening: Functional and Mechanistic Insights from a Powerful Platform for Efficient Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Disha; Bauman, Joseph D.; Arnold, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has been an under-appreciated screening tool for fragment-based drug discovery due to the perception of low throughput and technical difficulty. Investigators in industry and academia have overcome these challenges by taking advantage of key factors that contribute to a successful crystallographic screening campaign. Efficient cocktail design and soaking methodologies have evolved to maximize throughput while minimizing false positives/negatives. In addition, technical improvements at synchrotron beamlines have dramatically increased data collection rates thus enabling screening on a timescale comparable to other techniques. The combination of available resources and efficient experimental design has resulted in many successful crystallographic screening campaigns. The three-dimensional crystal structure of the bound fragment complexed to its target, a direct result of the screening effort, enables structure-based drug design while revealing insights regarding protein dynamics and function not readily obtained through other experimental approaches. Furthermore, this “chemical interrogation” of the target protein crystals can lead to the identification of useful reagents for improving diffraction resolution or compound solubility. PMID:25117499

  6. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

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    Krystal Cole

    Full Text Available High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above, the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above, the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  7. Mass spectrometry for fragment screening.

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    Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2017-11-08

    Fragment-based approaches in chemical biology and drug discovery have been widely adopted worldwide in both academia and industry. Fragment hits tend to interact weakly with their targets, necessitating the use of sensitive biophysical techniques to detect their binding. Common fragment screening techniques include differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and ligand-observed NMR. Validation and characterization of hits is usually performed using a combination of protein-observed NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography. In this context, MS is a relatively underutilized technique in fragment screening for drug discovery. MS-based techniques have the advantage of high sensitivity, low sample consumption and being label-free. This review highlights recent examples of the emerging use of MS-based techniques in fragment screening. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Developments in SPR Fragment Screening.

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    Chavanieu, Alain; Pugnière, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Fragment-based approaches have played an increasing role alongside high-throughput screening in drug discovery for 15 years. The label-free biosensor technology based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is now sensitive and informative enough to serve during primary screens and validation steps. In this review, the authors discuss the role of SPR in fragment screening. After a brief description of the underlying principles of the technique and main device developments, they evaluate the advantages and adaptations of SPR for fragment-based drug discovery. SPR can also be applied to challenging targets such as membrane receptors and enzymes. The high-level of immobilization of the protein target and its stability are key points for a relevant screening that can be optimized using oriented immobilized proteins and regenerable sensors. Furthermore, to decrease the rate of false negatives, a selectivity test may be performed in parallel on the main target bearing the binding site mutated or blocked with a low-off-rate ligand. Fragment-based drug design, integrated in a rational workflow led by SPR, will thus have a predominant role for the next wave of drug discovery which could be greatly enhanced by new improvements in SPR devices.

  9. Fragment-based lead generation: identification of seed fragments by a highly efficient fragment screening technology

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    Neumann, Lars; Ritscher, Allegra; Müller, Gerhard; Hafenbradl, Doris

    2009-08-01

    For the detection of the precise and unambiguous binding of fragments to a specific binding site on the target protein, we have developed a novel reporter displacement binding assay technology. The application of this technology for the fragment screening as well as the fragment evolution process with a specific modelling based design strategy is demonstrated for inhibitors of the protein kinase p38alpha. In a fragment screening approach seed fragments were identified which were then used to build compounds from the deep-pocket towards the hinge binding area of the protein kinase p38alpha based on a modelling approach. BIRB796 was used as a blueprint for the alignment of the fragments. The fragment evolution of these deep-pocket binding fragments towards the fully optimized inhibitor BIRB796 included the modulation of the residence time as well as the affinity. The goal of our study was to evaluate the robustness and efficiency of our novel fragment screening technology at high fragment concentrations, compare the screening data with biochemical activity data and to demonstrate the evolution of the hit fragments with fast kinetics, into slow kinetic inhibitors in an in silico approach.

  10. Discovery of novel inhibitors for DHODH via virtual screening and X-ray crystallographic structures

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    McLean, Larry R.; Zhang, Ying; Degnen, William; Peppard, Jane; Cabel, Dasha; Zou, Chao; Tsay, Joseph T.; Subramaniam, Arun; Vaz, Roy J.; Li, Yi (Sanofi)

    2010-10-28

    Amino-benzoic acid derivatives 1-4 were found to be inhibitors for DHODH by virtual screening, biochemical, and X-ray crystallographic studies. X-ray structures showed that 1 and 2 bind to DHODH as predicted by virtual screening, but 3 and 4 were found to be structurally different from the corresponding compounds initially identified by virtual screening.

  11. Integration of fragment screening and library design.

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    Siegal, Gregg; Ab, Eiso; Schultz, Jan

    2007-12-01

    With more than 10 years of practical experience and theoretical analysis, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has entered the mainstream of the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. An array of biophysical techniques has been used to detect the weak interaction between a fragment and the target. Each technique presents its own requirements regarding the fragment collection and the target; therefore, in order to optimize the potential of FBDD, the nature of the target should be a driving factor for simultaneous development of both the library and the screening technology. A roadmap is now available to guide fragment-to-lead evolution when structural information is available. The next challenge is to apply FBDD to targets for which high-resolution structural information is not available.

  12. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

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    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in 3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  13. Fragment screening by SPR and advanced application to GPCRs.

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    Shepherd, Claire A; Hopkins, Andrew L; Navratilova, Iva

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is one of the primary biophysical methods for the screening of low molecular weight 'fragment' libraries, due to its low protein consumption and 'label-free' methodology. SPR biosensor interaction analysis is employed to both screen and confirm the binding of compounds in fragment screening experiments, as it provides accurate information on the affinity and kinetics of molecular interactions. The most advanced application of the use of SPR for fragment screening is against membrane protein drug targets, such G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Biophysical GPCR assays using SPR have been validated with pharmacological measurements approximate to cell-based methods, yet provide the advantage of biophysical methods in their ability to measure the weak affinities of low molecular weight fragments. A number of SPR fragment screens against GPCRs have now been disclosed in the literature. SPR fragment screening is proving versatile to screen both thermostabilised GPCRs and solubilised wild type receptors. In this chapter, we discuss the state-of-the-art in GPCR fragment screening by SPR and the technical considerations in performing such experiments. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Recombinant Kinase Production and Fragment Screening by NMR Spectroscopy.

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    Han, Byeonggu; Ahn, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has rapidly evolved and several drugs or drug candidates developed by FBDD approach are clinically in use or in clinical trials. For example, vemurafenib, a V600E mutated BRAF inhibitor, was developed by utilizing FBDD approach and approved by FDA in 2011. In FBDD, screening of fragments is the starting step for identification of hits and lead generation. Fragment screening usually relies on biophysical techniques by which the protein-bound small molecules can be detected. NMR spectroscopy has been extensively used to study the molecular interaction between the protein and the ligand, and has many advantages in fragment screening over other biophysical techniques. This chapter describes the practical aspects of fragment screening by saturation transfer difference NMR.

  15. Large scale meta-analysis of fragment-based screening campaigns: privileged fragments and complementary technologies.

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    Kutchukian, Peter S; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Lindvall, Mika K; Wright, S Kirk; Ottl, Johannes; Jacob, Jaison; Scheufler, Clemens; Marzinzik, Andreas; Brooijmans, Natasja; Glick, Meir

    2015-06-01

    A first step in fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) often entails a fragment-based screen (FBS) to identify fragment "hits." However, the integration of conflicting results from orthogonal screens remains a challenge. Here we present a meta-analysis of 35 fragment-based campaigns at Novartis, which employed a generic 1400-fragment library against diverse target families using various biophysical and biochemical techniques. By statistically interrogating the multidimensional FBS data, we sought to investigate three questions: (1) What makes a fragment amenable for FBS? (2) How do hits from different fragment screening technologies and target classes compare with each other? (3) What is the best way to pair FBS assay technologies? In doing so, we identified substructures that were privileged for specific target classes, as well as fragments that were privileged for authentic activity against many targets. We also revealed some of the discrepancies between technologies. Finally, we uncovered a simple rule of thumb in screening strategy: when choosing two technologies for a campaign, pairing a biochemical and biophysical screen tends to yield the greatest coverage of authentic hits. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  16. Fragment-assisted hit investigation involving integrated HTS and fragment screening: Application to the identification of phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors.

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    Varnes, Jeffrey G; Geschwindner, Stefan; Holmquist, Christopher R; Forst, Janet; Wang, Xia; Dekker, Niek; Scott, Clay W; Tian, Gaochao; Wood, Michael W; Albert, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) relies on direct elaboration of fragment hits and typically requires high resolution structural information to guide optimization. In fragment-assisted drug discovery (FADD), fragments provide information to guide selection and design but do not serve as starting points for elaboration. We describe FADD and high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign strategies conducted in parallel against PDE10A where fragment hit co-crystallography was not available. The fragment screen led to prioritized fragment hits (IC50's ∼500μM), which were used to generate a hypothetical core scaffold. Application of this scaffold as a filter to HTS output afforded a 4μM hit, which, after preparation of a small number of analogs, was elaborated into a 16nM lead. This approach highlights the strength of FADD, as fragment methods were applied despite the absence of co-crystallographical information to efficiently identify a lead compound for further optimization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fragment-based screening by protein crystallography: successes and pitfalls.

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    Chilingaryan, Zorik; Yin, Zhou; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-10-08

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) concerns the screening of low-molecular weight compounds against macromolecular targets of clinical relevance. These compounds act as starting points for the development of drugs. FBDD has evolved and grown in popularity over the past 15 years. In this paper, the rationale and technology behind the use of X-ray crystallography in fragment based screening (FBS) will be described, including fragment library design and use of synchrotron radiation and robotics for high-throughput X-ray data collection. Some recent uses of crystallography in FBS will be described in detail, including interrogation of the drug targets β-secretase, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, phosphodiesterase 4A and Hsp90. These examples provide illustrations of projects where crystallography is straightforward or difficult, and where other screening methods can help overcome the limitations of crystallography necessitated by diffraction quality.

  18. Fragment-Based Screening by Protein Crystallography: Successes and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Oakley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD concerns the screening of low-molecular weight compounds against macromolecular targets of clinical relevance. These compounds act as starting points for the development of drugs. FBDD has evolved and grown in popularity over the past 15 years. In this paper, the rationale and technology behind the use of X-ray crystallography in fragment based screening (FBS will be described, including fragment library design and use of synchrotron radiation and robotics for high-throughput X-ray data collection. Some recent uses of crystallography in FBS will be described in detail, including interrogation of the drug targets β-secretase, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, phosphodiesterase 4A and Hsp90. These examples provide illustrations of projects where crystallography is straightforward or difficult, and where other screening methods can help overcome the limitations of crystallography necessitated by diffraction quality.

  19. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

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    Niu Huang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  20. NMR-Fragment Based Virtual Screening: A Brief Overview.

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    Singh, Meenakshi; Tam, Benjamin; Akabayov, Barak

    2018-01-25

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) using NMR has become a central approach over the last twenty years for development of small molecule inhibitors against biological macromolecules, to control a variety of cellular processes. Yet, several considerations should be taken into account for obtaining a therapeutically relevant agent. In this review, we aim to list the considerations that make NMR fragment screening a successful process for yielding potent inhibitors. Factors that may govern the competence of NMR in fragment based drug discovery are discussed, as well as later steps that involve optimization of hits obtained by NMR-FBDD.

  1. NMR-Fragment Based Virtual Screening: A Brief Overview

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    Meenakshi Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD using NMR has become a central approach over the last twenty years for development of small molecule inhibitors against biological macromolecules, to control a variety of cellular processes. Yet, several considerations should be taken into account for obtaining a therapeutically relevant agent. In this review, we aim to list the considerations that make NMR fragment screening a successful process for yielding potent inhibitors. Factors that may govern the competence of NMR in fragment based drug discovery are discussed, as well as later steps that involve optimization of hits obtained by NMR-FBDD.

  2. Fragment-based screening in tandem with phenotypic screening provides novel antiparasitic hits.

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    Blaazer, Antoni R; Orrling, Kristina M; Shanmugham, Anitha; Jansen, Chimed; Maes, Louis; Edink, Ewald; Sterk, Geert Jan; Siderius, Marco; England, Paul; Bailey, David; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Methods to discover biologically active small molecules include target-based and phenotypic screening approaches. One of the main difficulties in drug discovery is elucidating and exploiting the relationship between drug activity at the protein target and disease modification, a phenotypic endpoint. Fragment-based drug discovery is a target-based approach that typically involves the screening of a relatively small number of fragment-like (molecular weight <300) molecules that efficiently cover chemical space. Here, we report a fragment screening on TbrPDEB1, an essential cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) from Trypanosoma brucei, and human PDE4D, an off-target, in a workflow in which fragment hits and a series of close analogs are subsequently screened for antiparasitic activity in a phenotypic panel. The phenotypic panel contained T. brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania infantum, and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agents of human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and malaria, respectively, as well as MRC-5 human lung cells. This hybrid screening workflow has resulted in the discovery of various benzhydryl ethers with antiprotozoal activity and low toxicity, representing interesting starting points for further antiparasitic optimization. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  3. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

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    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  4. Small molecule inhibitors of the LEDGF site of human immunodeficiency virus integrase identified by fragment screening and structure based design.

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    Thomas S Peat

    Full Text Available A fragment-based screen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV integrase led to a number of compounds that bound to the lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF binding site of the integrase catalytic core domain. We determined the crystallographic structures of complexes of the HIV integrase catalytic core domain for 10 of these compounds and quantitated the binding by surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that the compounds inhibit the interaction of LEDGF with HIV integrase in a proximity AlphaScreen assay, an assay for the LEDGF enhancement of HIV integrase strand transfer and in a cell based assay. The compounds identified represent a potential framework for the development of a new series of HIV integrase inhibitors that do not bind to the catalytic site of the enzyme.

  5. Fragment Screening of Human Kynurenine Aminotransferase-II.

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    Jayawickrama, Gayan S; Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Church, W Bret

    2018-03-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase-II (KAT-II) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that acts in the tryptophan metabolic pathway by catalyzing the transamination of kynurenine into kynurenic acid (KYNA). It is one of four isoforms in the KAT family, of which it is the primary homologue responsible for KYNA production in the mammalian brain. KAT-II is targeted for inhibition as KYNA is implicated in diseases such as schizophrenia, where it is found in elevated concentrations. Previously, many different approaches have been taken to develop KAT-II inhibitors, and herein fragment-based drug design (FBDD) approaches have been exploited to provide further lead compounds that can be designed into novel inhibitors. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to screen a fragment library containing 1000 compounds, of which 41 hits were identified. These hits were further evaluated with SPR, and 18 were selected for inhibition studies. From these hits, two fragments, F6037-0164 and F0037-7280, were pursued and determined to have an IC 50 of 524.5 (± 25.6) μM and 115.2 (± 4.5) μM, respectively. This strategy shows the viability of using FBDD in gleaning knowledge about KAT-II inhibition and generating leads for the production of KAT-II inhibitors.

  6. Label free fragment screening using surface plasmon resonance as a tool for fragment finding - analyzing parkin, a difficult CNS target.

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    Karin Regnström

    Full Text Available Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR is rarely used as a primary High-throughput Screening (HTS tool in fragment-based approaches. With SPR instruments becoming increasingly high-throughput it is now possible to use SPR as a primary tool for fragment finding. SPR becomes, therefore, a valuable tool in the screening of difficult targets such as the ubiquitin E3 ligase Parkin. As a prerequisite for the screen, a large number of SPR tests were performed to characterize and validate the active form of Parkin. A set of compounds was designed and used to define optimal SPR assay conditions for this fragment screen. Using these conditions, more than 5000 pre-selected fragments from our in-house library were screened for binding to Parkin. Additionally, all fragments were simultaneously screened for binding to two off target proteins to exclude promiscuous binding compounds. A low hit rate was observed that is in line with hit rates usually obtained by other HTS screening assays. All hits were further tested in dose responses on the target protein by SPR for confirmation before channeling the hits into Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and other hit-confirmation assays.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of transportin 1 in complex with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear localization fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Hidaka, Yuji; Yamada, Michiyuki; Sato, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    Transportin 1 was cocrystallized with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling fragments of JKTBP and hnRNP D and a nuclear localization fragment of TAP. X-ray diffraction data were collected using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins with molar masses of larger than 60 000 is mediated by transport receptors. The transport receptor transportin1 (Trn1) transports various kinds of RNA-binding proteins such as JKTBP, hnRNP D and TAP. Trn1 was successfully cocrystallized with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling fragments of JKTBP and hnRNP D and a nuclear localization fragment of TAP. The crystal of the Trn1–JKTBP fragment complex belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 131.5, b =171.5, c = 68.2 Å. The crystals of Trn1 in complex with hnRNP D and TAP fragments are orthorhombic, space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 69.1, b = 119.1, c = 151.1 Å and a = 69.0, b = 119.1, c = 146.0 Å, respectively. The crystals diffracted to beyond 3.0, 3.2 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8

  8. Critical Evaluation of Native Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Fragment-Based Screening.

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    Göth, Melanie; Badock, Volker; Weiske, Jörg; Pagel, Kevin; Kuropka, Benno

    2017-08-08

    Fragment-based screening presents a promising alternative to high-throughput screening and has gained great attention in recent years. So far, only a few studies have discussed mass spectrometry as a screening technology for fragments. Herein, we report the application of native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) for screening defined sets of fragments against four different target proteins. Fragments were selected from a primary screening conducted with a thermal shift assay (TSA) and represented different binding categories. Our data indicated that, beside specific complex formation, many fragments show extensive multiple binding and also charge-state shifts. Both of these factors complicate automated data analysis and decrease the attractiveness of native MS as a primary screening tool for fragments. A comparison of the hits identified by native MS and TSA showed good agreement for two of the proteins. Furthermore, we discuss general challenges, including the determination of an optimal fragment concentration and the question of how to rank fragment hits according to their affinity. In conclusion, we consider native MS to be a highly valuable tool for the validation and deeper investigation of promising fragment hits rather than a method for primary screening. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Native State Mass Spectrometry, Surface Plasmon Resonance, and X-ray Crystallography Correlate Strongly as a Fragment Screening Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lucy A; Dolezal, Olan; Ren, Bin; Ryan, John H; Peat, Thomas S; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-03-10

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is contingent on the development of analytical methods to identify weak protein-fragment noncovalent interactions. Herein we have combined an underutilized fragment screening method, native state mass spectrometry, together with two proven and popular fragment screening methods, surface plasmon resonance and X-ray crystallography, in a fragment screening campaign against human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II). In an initial fragment screen against a 720-member fragment library (the "CSIRO Fragment Library") seven CA II binding fragments, including a selection of nonclassical CA II binding chemotypes, were identified. A further 70 compounds that comprised the initial hit chemotypes were subsequently sourced from the full CSIRO compound collection and screened. The fragment results were extremely well correlated across the three methods. Our findings demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity to apply native state mass spectrometry as a complementary fragment screening method to accelerate drug discovery.

  10. NMR screening in fragment-based drug design: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hai-Young; Wyss, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) comprises both fragment-based screening (FBS) to find hits and elaboration of these hits to lead compounds. Typical fragment hits have lower molecular weight (FBDD since it identifies and localizes the binding site of weakly interacting hits on the target protein. Here we describe ligand-based NMR methods for hit identification from fragment libraries and for functional cross-validation of primary hits.

  11. Fragment screening of cyclin G-associated kinase by weak affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiby, Elinor; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M; Ohlson, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a new strategy for drug discovery where lead compounds are evolved from small molecules. These fragments form low affinity interactions (dissociation constant (K(D)) = mM - μM) with protein targets, which require fragment screening methods of sufficient sensitivity. Weak affinity chromatography (WAC) is a promising new technology for fragment screening based on selective retention of fragments by a drug target. Kinases are a major pharmaceutical target, and FBDD has been successfully applied to several of these targets. In this work, we have demonstrated the potential to use WAC in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for fragment screening of a kinase target-cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK). One hundred seventy fragments were selected for WAC screening by virtual screening of a commercial fragment library against the ATP-binding site of five different proteins. GAK protein was immobilized on a capillary HPLC column, and compound binding was characterized by frontal affinity chromatography. Compounds were screened in sets of 13 or 14, in combination with MS detection for enhanced throughput. Seventy-eight fragments (46 %) with K(D) < 200 μM were detected, including a few highly efficient GAK binders (K(D) of 2 μM; ligand efficiency = 0.51). Of special interest is that chiral screening by WAC may be possible, as two stereoisomeric fragments, which both contained one chiral center, demonstrated twin peaks. This ability, in combination with the robustness, sensitivity, and simplicity of WAC makes it a new method for fragment screening of considerable potential.

  12. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography protein-recovery screening is predictive of crystallographic structure success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Nakazawa Hewitt, Stephen; Napuli, Alberto; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the methods used for high-throughput cloning and protein-expression screening of SSGCID hexahistidine recombinant proteins is provided. It is demonstrated that screening for recombinant proteins that are highly recoverable from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography improves the likelihood that a protein will produce a structure. The recombinant expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli continues to be a major bottleneck in structural genomics. The establishment of reliable protocols for the performance of small-scale expression and solubility testing is an essential component of structural genomic pipelines. The SSGCID Protein Production Group at the University of Washington (UW-PPG) has developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol for the measurement of protein recovery from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) which predicts successful purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins. The protocol is based on manual transfer of samples using multichannel pipettors and 96-well plates and does not depend on the use of robotic platforms. This protocol has been applied to evaluate the expression and solubility of more than 4000 proteins expressed in E. coli. The UW-PPG also screens large-scale preparations for recovery from IMAC prior to purification. Analysis of these results show that our low-cost non-automated approach is a reliable method for the HTS demands typical of large structural genomic projects. This paper provides a detailed description of these protocols and statistical analysis of the SSGCID screening results. The results demonstrate that screening for proteins that yield high recovery after IMAC, both after small-scale and large-scale expression, improves the selection of proteins that can be successfully purified and will yield a crystal structure

  13. Towards novel therapeutics for HIV through fragment-based screening and drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiefendbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C David

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has been applied with varying levels of success to a number of proteins involved in the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) life cycle. Fragment-based approaches have led to the discovery of novel binding sites within protease, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and gp41. Novel compounds that bind to known pockets within CCR5 have also been identified via fragment screening, and a fragment-based approach to target the TAR-Tat interaction was explored. In the context of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), fragment-based approaches have yielded fragment hits with mid-μM activity in an in vitro activity assay, as well as fragment hits that are active against drug-resistant variants of RT. Fragment-based drug discovery is a powerful method to elucidate novel binding sites within proteins, and the method has had significant success in the context of HIV proteins.

  14. Computational fragment-based screening using RosettaLigand: the SAMPL3 challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Zhang, Kam Y. J.

    2012-05-01

    SAMPL3 fragment based virtual screening challenge provides a valuable opportunity for researchers to test their programs, methods and screening protocols in a blind testing environment. We participated in SAMPL3 challenge and evaluated our virtual fragment screening protocol, which involves RosettaLigand as the core component by screening a 500 fragments Maybridge library against bovine pancreatic trypsin. Our study reaffirmed that the real test for any virtual screening approach would be in a blind testing environment. The analyses presented in this paper also showed that virtual screening performance can be improved, if a set of known active compounds is available and parameters and methods that yield better enrichment are selected. Our study also highlighted that to achieve accurate orientation and conformation of ligands within a binding site, selecting an appropriate method to calculate partial charges is important. Another finding is that using multiple receptor ensembles in docking does not always yield better enrichment than individual receptors. On the basis of our results and retrospective analyses from SAMPL3 fragment screening challenge we anticipate that chances of success in a fragment screening process could be increased significantly with careful selection of receptor structures, protein flexibility, sufficient conformational sampling within binding pocket and accurate assignment of ligand and protein partial charges.

  15. Fragment virtual screening based on Bayesian categorization for discovering novel VEGFR-2 scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmin; Jiao, Yu; Xiong, Xiao; Liu, Haichun; Ran, Ting; Xu, Jinxing; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Pan, Jing; Qiao, Xin; Shi, Zhihao; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of novel scaffolds against a specific target has long been one of the most significant but challengeable goals in discovering lead compounds. A scaffold that binds in important regions of the active pocket is more favorable as a starting point because scaffolds generally possess greater optimization possibilities. However, due to the lack of sufficient chemical space diversity of the databases and the ineffectiveness of the screening methods, it still remains a great challenge to discover novel active scaffolds. Since the strengths and weaknesses of both fragment-based drug design and traditional virtual screening (VS), we proposed a fragment VS concept based on Bayesian categorization for the discovery of novel scaffolds. This work investigated the proposal through an application on VEGFR-2 target. Firstly, scaffold and structural diversity of chemical space for 10 compound databases were explicitly evaluated. Simultaneously, a robust Bayesian classification model was constructed for screening not only compound databases but also their corresponding fragment databases. Although analysis of the scaffold diversity demonstrated a very unevenly distribution of scaffolds over molecules, results showed that our Bayesian model behaved better in screening fragments than molecules. Through a literature retrospective research, several generated fragments with relatively high Bayesian scores indeed exhibit VEGFR-2 biological activity, which strongly proved the effectiveness of fragment VS based on Bayesian categorization models. This investigation of Bayesian-based fragment VS can further emphasize the necessity for enrichment of compound databases employed in lead discovery by amplifying the diversity of databases with novel structures.

  16. Screening of a Novel Fragment Library with Functional Complexity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Federica; Zuccotto, Fabio; Fletcher, Daniel; Convery, Maire A; Fernandez-Menendez, Raquel; Bates, Robert; Encinas, Lourdes; Zeng, Jingkun; Chung, Chun-Wa; De Dios Anton, Paco; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Mackenzie, Claire; Green, Simon R; Huggett, Margaret; Barros, David; Wyatt, Paul G; Ray, Peter C

    2018-04-06

    Our findings reported herein provide support for the benefits of including functional group complexity (FGC) within fragments when screening against protein targets such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA. We show that InhA fragment actives with FGC maintained their binding pose during elaboration. Furthermore, weak fragment hits with functional group handles also allowed for facile fragment elaboration to afford novel and potent InhA inhibitors with good ligand efficiency metrics for optimization. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  17. Comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening and sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation from three males carrying balanced chromosome rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laia; Daina, Gemma; Del Rey, Javier; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Fernández-Encinas, Alba; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Boada, Montserrat; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether preimplantation genetic screening can successfully identify cytogenetically normal embryos in couples carrying balanced chromosome rearrangements in addition to increased sperm DNA fragmentation. Comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening was performed on three couples carrying chromosome rearrangements. Sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed for each patient. Academic center. One couple with the male partner carrying a chromosome 2 pericentric inversion and two couples with the male partners carrying a Robertsonian translocation (13:14 and 14:21, respectively). A single blastomere from each of the 18 cleavage-stage embryos obtained was analysed by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization. Single- and double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation was determined by the alkaline and neutral Comet assays. Single- and double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation values and incidence of chromosome imbalances in the blastomeres were analyzed. The obtained values of single-strand sperm DNA fragmentation were between 47% and 59%, and the double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation values were between 43% and 54%. No euploid embryos were observed in the couple showing the highest single-strand sperm DNA fragmentation. However, euploid embryos were observed in the other two couples: embryo transfer was performed, and pregnancy was achieved by the couple showing the lowest sperm DNA fragmentation values. Preimplantation genetic screening enables the detection of euploid embryos in couples affected by balanced chromosome rearrangements and increased sperm DNA fragmentation. Even though sperm DNA fragmentation may potentially have clinical consequences on fertility, comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening allows for the identification and transfer of euploid embryos. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Super: a web server to rapidly screen superposable oligopeptide fragments from the protein data bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, James H.; Lesk, Arthur M.; Garcia de la Banda, Maria; Konagurthu, Arun S.

    2012-01-01

    Searching for well-fitting 3D oligopeptide fragments within a large collection of protein structures is an important task central to many analyses involving protein structures. This article reports a new web server, Super, dedicated to the task of rapidly screening the protein data bank (PDB) to identify all fragments that superpose with a query under a prespecified threshold of root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Super relies on efficiently computing a mathematical bound on the commonly used structural similarity measure, RMSD of superposition. This allows the server to filter out a large proportion of fragments that are unrelated to the query; >99% of the total number of fragments in some cases. For a typical query, Super scans the current PDB containing over 80 500 structures (with ∼40 million potential oligopeptide fragments to match) in under a minute. Super web server is freely accessible from: http://lcb.infotech.monash.edu.au/super. PMID:22638586

  19. Design of a multi-purpose fragment screening library using molecular complexity and orthogonal diversity metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wan F.; Withka, Jane M.; Hepworth, David; Magee, Thomas V.; Du, Yuhua J.; Bakken, Gregory A.; Miller, Michael D.; Hendsch, Zachary S.; Thanabal, Venkataraman; Kolodziej, Steve A.; Xing, Li; Hu, Qiyue; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S.; Love, Robert; Charlton, Maura E.; Hughes, Samantha; van Hoorn, Willem P.; Mills, James E.

    2011-07-01

    Fragment Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) continues to advance as an efficient and alternative screening paradigm for the identification and optimization of novel chemical matter. To enable FBDD across a wide range of pharmaceutical targets, a fragment screening library is required to be chemically diverse and synthetically expandable to enable critical decision making for chemical follow-up and assessing new target druggability. In this manuscript, the Pfizer fragment library design strategy which utilized multiple and orthogonal metrics to incorporate structure, pharmacophore and pharmacological space diversity is described. Appropriate measures of molecular complexity were also employed to maximize the probability of detection of fragment hits using a variety of biophysical and biochemical screening methods. In addition, structural integrity, purity, solubility, fragment and analog availability as well as cost were important considerations in the selection process. Preliminary analysis of primary screening results for 13 targets using NMR Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) indicates the identification of uM-mM hits and the uniqueness of hits at weak binding affinities for these targets.

  20. Fragment screening for drug leads by weak affinity chromatography (WAC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlson, Sten; Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao

    2018-02-23

    Fragment-based drug discovery is an important tool for design of small molecule hit-to-lead compounds against various biological targets. Several approved drugs have been derived from an initial fragment screen and many such candidates are in various stages of clinical trials. Finding fragment hits, that are suitable for optimisation by medicinal chemists, is still a challenge as the binding between the small fragment and its target is weak in the range of mM to µM of K d and irrelevant non-specific interactions are abundant in this area of transient interactions. Fortunately, there are methods that can study weak interactions quite efficiently of which NMR, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and X-ray crystallography are the most prominent. Now, a new technology based on zonal affinity chromatography, weak affinity chromatography (WAC), has been introduced which has remedied many of the problems with other technologies. By combining WAC with mass spectrometry (WAC-MS), it is a powerful tool to identify binders quantitatively in terms of affinity and kinetics either from fragment libraries or from complex mixtures of biological extracts. As WAC-MS can be multiplexed by analysing mixtures of fragments (20-100 fragments) in one sample, this approach yields high throughput, where a whole library of e.g. >2000 fragments can be analysed quantitatively within a day. WAC-MS is easy to perform, where the robustness and quality of HPLC is fully utilized. This review will highlight the rationale behind the application of WAC-MS for fragment screening in drug discovery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular-Simulation-Driven Fragment Screening for the Discovery of New CXCL12 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rosell, Gerard; Harvey, Matt J; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2018-03-26

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a mainstream approach in drug design because it allows the reduction of the chemical space and screening libraries while identifying fragments with high protein-ligand efficiency interactions that can later be grown into drug-like leads. In this work, we leverage high-throughput molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to screen a library of 129 fragments for a total of 5.85 ms against the CXCL12 monomer, a chemokine involved in inflammation and diseases such as cancer. Our in silico binding assay was able to recover binding poses, affinities, and kinetics for the selected library and was able to predict 8 mM-affinity fragments with ligand efficiencies higher than 0.3. All of the fragment hits present a similar chemical structure, with a hydrophobic core and a positively charged group, and bind to either sY7 or H1S68 pockets, where they share pharmacophoric properties with experimentally resolved natural binders. This work presents a large-scale screening assay using an exclusive combination of thousands of short MD adaptive simulations analyzed with a Markov state model (MSM) framework.

  2. Influence of atomic screening on fragmentation of ultrarelativistic lead ions in LHC collimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan C.; Sørensen, Allan H.

    2009-01-01

    ) electromagnetic dissociation dominates the fragmentation in medium to heavy target materials. Due to the extended range of the interaction at high energies, atomic screening affects the dissociation in the LHC collimators. We determine the magnitude of the reduction in cross section relative to the unscreened...

  3. Leveraging structure determination with fragment screening for infectious disease drug targets: MECP synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begley, Darren W.; Hartley, Robert C.; Davies, Douglas R.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Leonard, Jess T.; Abendroth, Jan; Burris, Courtney A.; Bhandari, Janhavi; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J. (UWASH); (Emerald)

    2011-09-28

    As part of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease, we seek to enhance structural genomics with ligand-bound structure data which can serve as a blueprint for structure-based drug design. We have adapted fragment-based screening methods to our structural genomics pipeline to generate multiple ligand-bound structures of high priority drug targets from pathogenic organisms. In this study, we report fragment screening methods and structure determination results for 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MECP) synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the gram-negative bacterium which causes melioidosis. Screening by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as crystal soaking followed by X-ray diffraction led to the identification of several small molecules which bind this enzyme in a critical metabolic pathway. A series of complex structures obtained with screening hits reveal distinct binding pockets and a range of small molecules which form complexes with the target. Additional soaks with these compounds further demonstrate a subset of fragments to only bind the protein when present in specific combinations. This ensemble of fragment-bound complexes illuminates several characteristics of MECP synthase, including a previously unknown binding surface external to the catalytic active site. These ligand-bound structures now serve to guide medicinal chemists and structural biologists in rational design of novel inhibitors for this enzyme.

  4. Target Immobilization as a Strategy for NMR-Based Fragment Screening: Comparison of TINS, STD, and SPR for Fragment Hit Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; Retra, K.; Figaroa, F.; Hollander, J.G.; Ab, E.; Heetebrij, R.J.; Irth, H.; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely accepted tool that is complementary to high-throughput screening (HTS) in developing small-molecule inhibitors of pharmaceutical targets. Because a fragment campaign can only be as successful as the hit matter found, it is critical that the

  5. NMR characterization of weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and fragment screening hits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiuyang; Gao, Jia; Li, Fudong; Ma, Rongsheng; Wei, Qingtao; Wang, Aidong; Wu, Jihui; Ruan, Ke

    2017-01-01

    The delineation of intrinsically weak interactions between novel targets and fragment screening hits has long limited the pace of hit-to-lead evolution. Rho guanine-nucleotide dissociation inhibitor 2 (RhoGDI2) is a novel target that lacks any chemical probes for the treatment of tumor metastasis. Protein-observed and ligand-observed NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize the weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and fragment screening hits. We identified three hits of RhoGDI2 using streamlined NMR fragment-based screening. The binding site residues were assigned using non-uniformly sampled C α - and H α -based three dimensional NMR spectra. The molecular docking to the proposed geranylgeranyl binding pocket of RhoGDI2 was guided by NMR restraints of chemical shift perturbations and ligand-observed transferred paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. We further validated the weak RhoGDI2-hit interactions using mutagenesis and structure-affinity analysis. Weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and fragment screening hits were delineated using an integrated NMR approach. Binders to RhoGDI2 as a potential anti-cancer target have been first reported, and their weak interactions were depicted using NMR spectroscopy. Our work highlights the powerfulness and the versatility of the integrative NMR techniques to provide valuable structural insight into the intrinsically weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and the fragment screening hits, which could hardly be conceived using other biochemical techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Using In Silico Fragmentation to Improve Routine Residue Screening in Complex Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathryn; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-12-01

    Targeted residue screening requires the use of reference substances in order to identify potential residues. This becomes a difficult issue when using multi-residue methods capable of analyzing several hundreds of analytes. Therefore, the capability of in silico fragmentation based on a structure database ("suspect screening") instead of physical reference substances for routine targeted residue screening was investigated. The detection of fragment ions that can be predicted or explained by in silico software was utilized to reduce the number of false positives. These "proof of principle" experiments were done with a tool that is integrated into a commercial MS vendor instrument operating software (UNIFI) as well as with a platform-independent MS tool (Mass Frontier). A total of 97 analytes belonging to different chemical families were separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography and detected in a data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode using ion mobility hyphenated with quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry. The instrument was operated in the MSE mode with alternating low and high energy traces. The fragments observed from product ion spectra were investigated using a "chopping" bond disconnection algorithm and a rule-based algorithm. The bond disconnection algorithm clearly explained more analyte product ions and a greater percentage of the spectral abundance than the rule-based software (92 out of the 97 compounds produced ≥1 explainable fragment ions). On the other hand, tests with a complex blank matrix (bovine liver extract) indicated that the chopping algorithm reports significantly more false positive fragments than the rule based software. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Identification of Multiple Druggable Secondary Sites by Fragment Screening against DC-SIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretz, Jonas; Baukmann, Hannes; Shanina, Elena; Hanske, Jonas; Wawrzinek, Robert; Zapol'skii, Viktor A; Seeberger, Peter H; Kaufmann, Dieter E; Rademacher, Christoph

    2017-06-12

    DC-SIGN is a cell-surface receptor for several pathogenic threats, such as HIV, Ebola virus, or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Multiple attempts to develop inhibitors of the underlying carbohydrate-protein interactions have been undertaken in the past fifteen years. Still, drug-like DC-SIGN ligands are sparse, which is most likely due to its hydrophilic, solvent-exposed carbohydrate-binding site. Herein, we report on a parallel fragment screening against DC-SIGN applying SPR and a reporter displacement assay, which complements previous screenings using 19 F NMR spectroscopy and chemical fragment microarrays. Hit validation by SPR and 1 H- 15 N HSQC NMR spectroscopy revealed that although no fragment bound in the primary carbohydrate site, five secondary sites are available to harbor drug-like molecules. Building on key interactions of the reported fragment hits, these pockets will be targeted in future approaches to accelerate the development of DC-SIGN inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Protein-observed (19)F-NMR for fragment screening, affinity quantification and druggability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Clifford T; Arntson, Keith E; Urick, Andrew K; Mishra, Neeraj K; Hawk, Laura M L; Wisniewski, Andrea J; Pomerantz, William C K

    2016-08-01

    NMR spectroscopy can be used to quantify the binding affinity between proteins and low-complexity molecules, termed 'fragments'; this versatile screening approach allows researchers to assess the druggability of new protein targets. Protein-observed (19)F-NMR (PrOF NMR) using (19)F-labeled amino acids generates relatively simple spectra that are able to provide dynamic structural information toward understanding protein folding and function. Changes in these spectra upon the addition of fragment molecules can be observed and quantified. This protocol describes the sequence-selective labeling of three proteins (the first bromodomains of Brd4 and BrdT, and the KIX domain of the CREB-binding protein) using commercially available fluorinated aromatic amino acids and fluorinated precursors as example applications of the method developed by our research group. Fragment-screening approaches are discussed, as well as Kd determination, ligand-efficiency calculations and druggability assessment, i.e., the ability to target these proteins using small-molecule ligands. Experiment times on the order of a few minutes and the simplicity of the NMR spectra obtained make this approach well-suited to the investigation of small- to medium-sized proteins, as well as the screening of multiple proteins in the same experiment.

  9. SPR-based fragment screening with neurotensin receptor 1 generates novel small molecule ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sylwia; Casagrande, Fabio; Hug, Melanie N.; Wang, Lisha; Heine, Philipp; Kummer, Lutz; Plückthun, Andreas; Hennig, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 represents an important drug target involved in various diseases of the central nervous system. So far, the full exploitation of potential therapeutic activities has been compromised by the lack of compounds with favorable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties which efficiently penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Recent progress in the generation of stabilized variants of solubilized neurotensin receptor 1 and its subsequent purification and successful structure determination presents a solid starting point to apply the approach of fragment-based screening to extend the chemical space of known neurotensin receptor 1 ligands. In this report, surface plasmon resonance was used as primary method to screen 6369 compounds. Thereby 44 hits were identified and confirmed in competition as well as dose-response experiments. Furthermore, 4 out of 8 selected hits were validated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as orthogonal biophysical method. Computational analysis of the compound structures, taking the known crystal structure of the endogenous peptide agonist into consideration, gave insight into the potential fragment-binding location and interactions and inspires chemistry efforts for further exploration of the fragments. PMID:28510609

  10. Identification of B. anthracis N(5)-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase (PurE) active site binding compounds via fragment library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hao; Jones, Christopher; Zhu, Tian; Patel, Kavankumar; Wolf, Nina M; Fung, Leslie W-M; Lee, Hyun; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-02-15

    The de novo purine biosynthesis pathway is an attractive target for antibacterial drug design, and PurE from this pathway has been identified to be crucial for Bacillus anthracis survival in serum. In this study we adopted a fragment-based hit discovery approach, using three screening methods-saturation transfer difference nucleus magnetic resonance (STD-NMR), water-ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY) NMR, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), against B. anthracis PurE (BaPurE) to identify active site binding fragments by initially testing 352 compounds in a Zenobia fragment library. Competition STD NMR with the BaPurE product effectively eliminated non-active site binding hits from the primary hits, selecting active site binders only. Binding affinities (dissociation constant, KD) of these compounds varied between 234 and 301μM. Based on test results from the Zenobia compounds, we subsequently developed and applied a streamlined fragment screening strategy to screen a much larger library consisting of 3000 computationally pre-selected fragments. Thirteen final fragment hits were confirmed to exhibit binding affinities varying from 14μM to 700μM, which were categorized into five different basic scaffolds. All thirteen fragment hits have ligand efficiencies higher than 0.30. We demonstrated that at least two fragments from two different scaffolds exhibit inhibitory activity against the BaPurE enzyme. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Automated identification of crystallographic ligands using sparse-density representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carolan, C. G.; Lamzin, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel procedure for identifying ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. Density clusters in such maps can be rapidly attributed to one of 82 different ligands in an automated manner. A novel procedure for the automatic identification of ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. It is based on the sparse parameterization of density clusters and the matching of the pseudo-atomic grids thus created to conformationally variant ligands using mathematical descriptors of molecular shape, size and topology. In large-scale tests on experimental data derived from the Protein Data Bank, the procedure could quickly identify the deposited ligand within the top-ranked compounds from a database of candidates. This indicates the suitability of the method for the identification of binding entities in fragment-based drug screening and in model completion in macromolecular structure determination

  12. Probing conformational states of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase by fragment screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begley, Darren W.; Davies, Douglas R.; Hartley, Robert C.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Rychel, Amanda L.; Myler, Peter J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J. (Emerald)

    2014-10-02

    Glutaric acidemia type 1 is an inherited metabolic disorder which can cause macrocephaly, muscular rigidity, spastic paralysis and other progressive movement disorders in humans. The defects in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) associated with this disease are thought to increase holoenzyme instability and reduce cofactor binding. Here, the first structural analysis of a GCDH enzyme in the absence of the cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is reported. The apo structure of GCDH from Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals a loss of secondary structure and increased disorder in the FAD-binding pocket relative to the ternary complex of the highly homologous human GCDH. After conducting a fragment-based screen, four small molecules were identified which bind to GCDH from B. pseudomallei. Complex structures were determined for these fragments, which cause backbone and side-chain perturbations to key active-site residues. Structural insights from this investigation highlight differences from apo GCDH and the utility of small-molecular fragments as chemical probes for capturing alternative conformational states of preformed protein crystals.

  13. Virtual Screening of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Fragments Targeted to Inhibit Bacterial Dithiol Oxidase DsbA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilko Duprez

    Full Text Available Antibacterial drugs with novel scaffolds and new mechanisms of action are desperately needed to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. The periplasmic oxidative folding system in Gram-negative bacteria represents a possible target for anti-virulence antibacterials. By targeting virulence rather than viability, development of resistance and side effects (through killing host native microbiota might be minimized. Here, we undertook the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting the interaction between the two key enzymes of oxidative folding, DsbA and DsbB, with the ultimate goal of preventing virulence factor assembly. Structures of DsbB--or peptides--complexed with DsbA revealed key interactions with the DsbA active site cysteine, and with a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site. The present work aimed to discover peptidomimetics that target the hydrophobic groove to generate non-covalent DsbA inhibitors. The previously reported structure of a Proteus mirabilis DsbA active site cysteine mutant, in a non-covalent complex with the heptapeptide PWATCDS, was used as an in silico template for virtual screening of a peptidomimetic fragment library. The highest scoring fragment compound and nine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for DsbA binding and inhibition. These experiments discovered peptidomimetic fragments with inhibitory activity at millimolar concentrations. Although only weakly potent relative to larger covalent peptide inhibitors that interact through the active site cysteine, these fragments offer new opportunities as templates to build non-covalent inhibitors. The results suggest that non-covalent peptidomimetics may need to interact with sites beyond the hydrophobic groove in order to produce potent DsbA inhibitors.

  14. Optimizing virtual fragment screening for GPCRs: Identification of novel ligands for the histamine H3 receptor using ligand- and structure-based molecular fingerprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirci, F.; Istyastono, E.P.; Vischer, H.F.; Nijmeijer, S.; Kuijer, M.; Kooistra, A.J.; Wijtmans, M.; Mannhold, R.; Leurs, R.; de Esch, I.J.P.; de Graaf, C.

    2012-01-01

    Virtual fragment screening (VFS) is a promising new method that uses computer models to identify small, fragment-like biologically active molecules as useful starting points for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). Training sets of true active and inactive fragment-like molecules to construct and

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of the yeast prion-remodeling factor Hsp104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukyeong; Tsai, Francis T. F., E-mail: ftsai@bcm.tmc.edu [Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2007-09-01

    An N-terminal fragment of S. cerevisiae Hsp104 has been crystallized. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones. A 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 was crystallized in two different crystal forms. Native 1 diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, b = 75.8, c = 235.7 Å. Native 2 diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 179.1, b = 179.1, c = 69.7 Å. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the single-chain variable fragment of antibody chA21 in complex with an N-terminal fragment of ErbB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huihao; Zhu, Juanjuan; Gao, Yongxiang; Niu, Liwen; Liu, Jing; Teng, Maikun

    2009-01-01

    An antibody–antigen complex consisting of a single-chain variable fragment of the potential therapeutic antibody chA21 and an N-terminal fragment (residues 1–192) of the human ErbB2 extracellular domain was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.45 Å resolution. ErbB2 is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase, the overexpression of which causes abnormality and disorder in cell signalling and leads to cell transformation. Previously, an anti-ErbB2 single-chain chimeric antibody chA21 that specifically inhibits the growth of ErbB2-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo was developed. Here, an antibody–antigen complex consisting of the single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of chA21 and an N-terminal fragment (residues 1–192, named EP I) of the ErbB2 extracellular domain was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.45 Å resolution from a single flash-cooled crystal; the crystal belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1

  17. Fragment-based virtual screening approach and molecular dynamics simulation studies for identification of BACE1 inhibitor leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Prabu; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2018-05-01

    Traditional structure-based virtual screening method to identify drug-like small molecules for BACE1 is so far unsuccessful. Location of BACE1, poor Blood Brain Barrier permeability and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) susceptibility of the inhibitors make it even more difficult. Fragment-based drug design method is suitable for efficient optimization of initial hit molecules for target like BACE1. We have developed a fragment-based virtual screening approach to identify/optimize the fragment molecules as a starting point. This method combines the shape, electrostatic, and pharmacophoric features of known fragment molecules, bound to protein conjugate crystal structure, and aims to identify both chemically and energetically feasible small fragment ligands that bind to BACE1 active site. The two top-ranked fragment hits were subjected for a 53 ns MD simulation. Principle component analysis and free energy landscape analysis reveal that the new ligands show the characteristic features of established BACE1 inhibitors. The potent method employed in this study may serve for the development of potential lead molecules for BACE1-directed Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

  18. Application of Fragment Ion Information as Further Evidence in Probabilistic Compound Screening Using Bayesian Statistics and Machine Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldegebriel, Michael; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G.J.; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we introduce an automated, efficient, and elegant model to combine all pieces of evidence (e.g., expected retention times, peak shapes, isotope distributions, fragment-to-parent ratio) obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS/MS) data for screening

  19. Target immobilization as a strategy for NMR-based fragment screening: comparison of TINS, STD, and SPR for fragment hit identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Retra, Kim; Figaroa, Francis; Hollander, Johan G; Ab, Eiso; Heetebrij, Robert J; Irth, Hubertus; Siegal, Gregg

    2010-09-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely accepted tool that is complementary to high-throughput screening (HTS) in developing small-molecule inhibitors of pharmaceutical targets. Because a fragment campaign can only be as successful as the hit matter found, it is critical that the first stage of the process be optimized. Here the authors compare the 3 most commonly used methods for hit discovery in FBDD: high concentration screening (HCS), solution ligand-observed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). They selected the commonly used saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and the proprietary target immobilized NMR screening (TINS) as representative of the array of possible NMR methods. Using a target typical of FBDD campaigns, the authors find that HCS and TINS are the most sensitive to weak interactions. They also find a good correlation between TINS and STD for tighter binding ligands, but the ability of STD to detect ligands with affinity weaker than 1 mM K(D) is limited. Similarly, they find that SPR detection is most suited to ligands that bind with K(D) better than 1 mM. However, the good correlation between SPR and potency in a bioassay makes this a good method for hit validation and characterization studies.

  20. Automated NMR fragment based screening identified a novel interface blocker to the LARG/RhoA complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Gao

    Full Text Available The small GTPase cycles between the inactive GDP form and the activated GTP form, catalyzed by the upstream guanine exchange factors. The modulation of such process by small molecules has been proven to be a fruitful route for therapeutic intervention to prevent the over-activation of the small GTPase. The fragment based approach emerging in the past decade has demonstrated its paramount potential in the discovery of inhibitors targeting such novel and challenging protein-protein interactions. The details regarding the procedure of NMR fragment screening from scratch have been rarely disclosed comprehensively, thus restricts its wider applications. To achieve a consistent screening applicable to a number of targets, we developed a highly automated protocol to cover every aspect of NMR fragment screening as possible, including the construction of small but diverse libray, determination of the aqueous solubility by NMR, grouping compounds with mutual dispersity to a cocktail, and the automated processing and visualization of the ligand based screening spectra. We exemplified our streamlined screening in RhoA alone and the complex of the small GTPase RhoA and its upstream guanine exchange factor LARG. Two hits were confirmed from the primary screening in cocktail and secondary screening over individual hits for LARG/RhoA complex, while one of them was also identified from the screening for RhoA alone. HSQC titration of the two hits over RhoA and LARG alone, respectively, identified one compound binding to RhoA.GDP at a 0.11 mM affinity, and perturbed the residues at the switch II region of RhoA. This hit blocked the formation of the LARG/RhoA complex, validated by the native gel electrophoresis, and the titration of RhoA to ¹⁵N labeled LARG in the absence and presence the compound, respectively. It therefore provides us a starting point toward a more potent inhibitor to RhoA activation catalyzed by LARG.

  1. Practical application of in silico fragmentation based residue screening with ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathry; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-07-15

    A screening concept for residues in complex matrices based on liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry LC/IMS-HRMS is presented. The comprehensive four-dimensional data (chromatographic retention time, drift time, mass-to-charge and ion abundance) obtained in data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode was used for data mining. An in silico fragmenter utilizing a molecular structure database was used for suspect screening, instead of targeted screening with reference substances. The utilized data-independent acquisition mode relies on the MS E concept; where two constantly alternating HRMS scans (low and high fragmentation energy) are acquired. Peak deconvolution and drift time alignment of ions from the low (precursor ion) and high (product ion) energy scan result in relatively clean product ion spectra. A bond dissociation in silico fragmenter (MassFragment) supplied with mol files of compounds of interest was used to explain the observed product ions of each extracted candidate component (chromatographic peak). Two complex matrices (fish and bovine liver extract) were fortified with 98 veterinary drugs. Out of 98 screened compounds 94 could be detected with the in silico based screening approach. The high correlation among drift time and m/z value of equally charged ions was utilized for an orthogonal filtration (ranking). Such an orthogonal ion mobility based filter removes multiply charged ions (e.g. peptides and proteins from the matrix) as well as noise and artefacts. Most significantly, this filtration dramatically reduces false positive findings but hardly increases false negative findings. The proposed screening approach may offer new possibilities for applications where reference compounds are hardly or not at all commercially available. Such areas may be the analysis of metabolites of drugs, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, marine toxins, derivatives of sildenafil or novel designer drugs (new psychoactive substances

  2. Lead identification for the K-Ras protein: virtual screening and combinatorial fragment-based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan AAK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Akbar Ali Khan Pathan,1,2,* Bhavana Panthi,3,* Zahid Khan,1 Purushotham Reddy Koppula,4–6 Mohammed Saud Alanazi,1 Sachchidanand,3 Narasimha Reddy Parine,1 Mukesh Chourasia3,* 1Genome Research Chair (GRC, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, 2Integrated Gulf Biosystems, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Pharmacoinformatics, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Hajipur, India; 4Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, 5Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Affairs Hospital, 6Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Kirsten rat sarcoma (K-Ras protein is a member of Ras family belonging to the small guanosine triphosphatases superfamily. The members of this family share a conserved structure and biochemical properties, acting as binary molecular switches. The guanosine triphosphate-bound active K-Ras interacts with a range of effectors, resulting in the stimulation of downstream signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Efforts to target K-Ras have been unsuccessful until now, placing it among high-value molecules against which developing a therapy would have an enormous impact. K-Ras transduces signals when it binds to guanosine triphosphate by directly binding to downstream effector proteins, but in case of guanosine diphosphate-bound conformation, these interactions get disrupted. Methods: In the present study, we targeted the nucleotide-binding site in the “on” and “off” state conformations of the K-Ras protein to find out suitable lead compounds. A structure-based virtual screening approach has been used to screen compounds from different databases, followed by a combinatorial fragment-based approach to design the apposite lead for the K-Ras protein. Results: Interestingly, the designed compounds exhibit a binding preference for the

  3. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Repositioning the substrate activity screening (SAS) approach as a fragment-based method for identification of weak binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Cleenewerck, Matthias; Joossens, Jurgen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2014-10-13

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has evolved into an established approach for "hit" identification. Typically, most applications of FBDD depend on specialised cost- and time-intensive biophysical techniques. The substrate activity screening (SAS) approach has been proposed as a relatively cheap and straightforward alternative for identification of fragments for enzyme inhibitors. We have investigated SAS for the discovery of inhibitors of oncology target urokinase (uPA). Although our results support the key hypotheses of SAS, we also encountered a number of unreported limitations. In response, we propose an efficient modified methodology: "MSAS" (modified substrate activity screening). MSAS circumvents the limitations of SAS and broadens its scope by providing additional fragments and more coherent SAR data. As well as presenting and validating MSAS, this study expands existing SAR knowledge for the S1 pocket of uPA and reports new reversible and irreversible uPA inhibitor scaffolds. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A Fragment-Based Ligand Screen Against Part of a Large Protein Machine: The ND1 Domains of the AAA+ ATPase p97/VCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Michael S; Bulfer, Stacie L; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Renslo, Adam R; Jacobson, Matthew P; James, Thomas L; Arkin, Michelle R; Kelly, Mark J S

    2015-07-01

    The ubiquitous AAA+ ATPase p97 functions as a dynamic molecular machine driving several cellular processes. It is essential in regulating protein homeostasis, and it represents a potential drug target for cancer, particularly when there is a greater reliance on the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to degrade an overabundance of secreted proteins. Here, we report a case study for using fragment-based ligand design approaches against this large and dynamic hexamer, which has multiple potential binding sites for small molecules. A screen of a fragment library was conducted by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and followed up by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), two complementary biophysical techniques. Virtual screening was also carried out to examine possible binding sites for the experimental hits and evaluate the potential utility of fragment docking for this target. Out of this effort, 13 fragments were discovered that showed reversible binding with affinities between 140 µM and 1 mM, binding stoichiometries of 1:1 or 2:1, and good ligand efficiencies. Structural data for fragment-protein interactions were obtained with residue-specific [U-(2)H] (13)CH3-methyl-labeling NMR strategies, and these data were compared to poses from docking. The combination of virtual screening, SPR, and NMR enabled us to find and validate a number of interesting fragment hits and allowed us to gain an understanding of the structural nature of fragment binding. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. Fragment length analysis screening for detection of CEBPA mutations in intermediate-risk karyotype acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Oscar; Barragán, Eva; Bolufer, Pascual; Such, Esperanza; Valencia, Ana; Ibáñez, Mariam; Dolz, Sandra; de Juan, Inmaculada; Jiménez, Antonio; Gómez, Maria Teresa; Buño, Ismael; Martínez, Joaquín; Cervera, José; Montesinos, Pau; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Miguel Ángel

    2012-01-01

    During last years, molecular markers have been increased as prognostic factors routinely screened in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, an increasing interest has been reported in introducing to clinical practice screening for mutations in the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPA) gene in AML, as it seems to be a good prognostic factor. However, there is no reliable established method for assessing CEBPA mutations during the diagnostic work-up of AMLs. We describe here a straightforward and reliable fragment analysis method based in PCR capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CE) for screening of CEBPA mutations; moreover, we present the results obtained in 151 intermediate-risk karyotype AML patients (aged 16-80 years). The method gave a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 93% with a lower detection limit of 1-5% for CEBPA mutations. The series found 19 mutations and four polymorphisms in 12 patients, seven of whom (58%) presented two mutations. The overall frequency of CEBPA mutations in AML was 8% (n = 12). CEBPA mutations showed no coincidence with FLT3-ITD or NPM1 mutations. CEBPA mutation predicted better disease-free survival in the group of patients without FLT3-ITD, NPM, or both genes mutated (HR 3.6, IC 95%; 1.0-13.2, p = 0.05) and better overall survival in patients younger than 65 of this group without molecular markers (HR 4.0, IC 95%; 1.0-17.4, p = 0.05). In conclusion, the fragment analysis method based in PCR-CE is a rapid, specific, and sensitive method for CEBPA mutation screening and our results confirm that CEBPA mutations can identify a subgroup of patients with favorable prognosis in AML with intermediate-risk karyotype.

  7. An expanded allosteric network in PTP1B by multitemperature crystallography, fragment screening, and covalent tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Daniel A; Hill, Zachary B; Biel, Justin T; Kang, Emily; Rettenmaier, T Justin; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Pearce, Nicholas M; von Delft, Frank; Wells, James A; Fraser, James S

    2018-06-07

    Allostery is an inherent feature of proteins, but it remains challenging to reveal the mechanisms by which allosteric signals propagate. A clearer understanding of this intrinsic circuitry would afford new opportunities to modulate protein function. Here we have identified allosteric sites in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) by combining multiple-temperature X-ray crystallography experiments and structure determination from hundreds of individual small-molecule fragment soaks. New modeling approaches reveal 'hidden' low-occupancy conformational states for protein and ligands. Our results converge on allosteric sites that are conformationally coupled to the active-site WPD loop and are hotspots for fragment binding. Targeting one of these sites with covalently tethered molecules or mutations allosterically inhibits enzyme activity. Overall, this work demonstrates how the ensemble nature of macromolecular structure, revealed here by multitemperature crystallography, can elucidate allosteric mechanisms and open new doors for long-range control of protein function. © 2018, Keedy et al.

  8. Fragment library screening identifies hits that bind to the non-catalytic surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DsbA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headey, Stephen J.; Vazirani, Mansha; Shouldice, Stephen R.; Coinçon, Mathieu; Tay, Stephanie; Morton, Craig J.; Simpson, Jamie S.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    At a time when the antibiotic drug discovery pipeline has stalled, antibiotic resistance is accelerating with catastrophic implications for our ability to treat bacterial infections. Globally we face the prospect of a future when common infections can once again kill. Anti-virulence approaches that target the capacity of the bacterium to cause disease rather than the growth or survival of the bacterium itself offer a tantalizing prospect of novel antimicrobials. They may also reduce the propensity to induce resistance by removing the strong selection pressure imparted by bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, disulfide bond protein A (PaDsbA1) plays a central role in the oxidative folding of virulence factors and is therefore an attractive target for the development of new anti-virulence antimicrobials. Using a fragment-based approach we have identified small molecules that bind to PaDsbA1. The fragment hits show selective binding to PaDsbA1 over the DsbA protein from Escherichia coli, suggesting that developing species-specific narrow-spectrum inhibitors of DsbA enzymes may be feasible. Structures of a co-complex of PaDsbA1 with the highest affinity fragment identified in the screen reveal that the fragment binds on the non-catalytic surface of the protein at a domain interface. This biophysical and structural data represent a starting point in the development of higher affinity compounds, which will be assessed for their potential as selective PaDsbA1 inhibitors. PMID:28346540

  9. An NMR strategy for fragment-based ligand screening utilizing a paramagnetic lanthanide probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saio, Tomohide; Ogura, Kenji; Shimizu, Kazumi; Yokochi, Masashi; Burke, Terrence R.; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance-based ligand screening strategy utilizing a paramagnetic lanthanide probe is presented. By fixing a paramagnetic lanthanide ion to a target protein, a pseudo-contact shift (PCS) and a paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) can be observed for both the target protein and its bound ligand. Based on PRE and PCS information, the bound ligand is then screened from the compound library and the structure of the ligand–protein complex is determined. PRE is an isotropic paramagnetic effect observed within 30 Å from the lanthanide ion, and is utilized for the ligand screening in the present study. PCS is an anisotropic paramagnetic effect providing long-range (∼40 Å) distance and angular information on the observed nuclei relative to the paramagnetic lanthanide ion, and utilized for the structure determination of the ligand–protein complex. Since a two-point anchored lanthanide-binding peptide tag is utilized for fixing the lanthanide ion to the target protein, this screening method can be generally applied to non-metal-binding proteins. The usefulness of this strategy was demonstrated in the case of the growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and its low- and high-affinity ligands.

  10. Establish an automated flow injection ESI-MS method for the screening of fragment based libraries: Application to Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi Sirtori, Federico; Caronni, Dannica; Colombo, Maristella; Dalvit, Claudio; Paolucci, Mauro; Regazzoni, Luca; Visco, Carlo; Fogliatto, Gianpaolo

    2015-08-30

    ESI-MS is a well established technique for the study of biopolymers (nucleic acids, proteins) and their non covalent adducts, due to its capacity to detect ligand-target complexes in the gas phase and allows inference of ligand-target binding in solution. In this article we used this approach to investigate the interaction of ligands to the Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90). This enzyme is a molecular chaperone involved in the folding and maturation of several proteins which has been subjected in the last years to intensive drug discovery efforts due to its key role in cancer. In particular, reference compounds, with a broad range of dissociation constants from 40pM to 100μM, were tested to assess the reliability of ESI-MS for the study of protein-ligand complexes. A good agreement was found between the values measured with a fluorescence polarization displacement assay and those determined by mass spectrometry. After this validation step we describe the setup of a medium throughput screening method, based on ESI-MS, suitable to explore interactions of therapeutic relevance biopolymers with chemical libraries. Our approach is based on an automated flow injection ESI-MS method (AFI-MS) and has been applied to screen the Nerviano Medical Sciences proprietary fragment library of about 2000 fragments against Hsp90. In order to discard false positive hits and to discriminate those of them interacting with the N-terminal ATP binding site, competition experiments were performed using a reference inhibitor. Gratifyingly, this group of hits matches with the ligands previously identified by NMR FAXS techniques and confirmed by X-ray co-crystallization experiments. These results support the use of AFI-MS for the screening of medium size libraries, including libraries of small molecules with low affinity typically used in fragment based drug discovery. AFI-MS is a valid alternative to other techniques with the additional opportunities to identify compounds interacting with

  11. Yeast two-hybrid screening of proteins interacting with plasmin receptor subunit: C-terminal fragment of annexin A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Laumonnier, Yves; Syrovets, Tatiana; Simmet, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    To identify proteins that interact with the C-terminal fragment of annexin A2 (A2IC), generated by plasmin cleavage of the plasmin receptor, a heterotetramer (AA2t) containing annexin A2. The gene that encodes the A2IC fragment was obtained from PCR-amplified cDNA isolated from human monocytes, and was ligated into the pBTM116 vector using a DNA ligation kit. The resultant plasmid (pBTM116-A2IC) was sequenced with an ABI PRISM 310 Genetic Analyzer. The expression of an A2IC bait protein fused with a LexA-DNA binding domain (BD) was determined using Western blot analysis. The identification of proteins that interact with A2IC and are encoded in a human monocyte cDNA library was performed using yeast two-hybrid screening. The DNA sequences of the relevant cDNAs were determined using an ABI PRISM BigDye terminator cycle sequencing ready reaction kit. Nucleotide sequence databases were searched for homologous sequences using BLAST search analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). Confirmation of the interaction between the protein LexA-A2IC and each of cathepsin S and SNX17 was conducted using a small-scale yeast transformation and X-gal assay. The yeast transformed with plasmids encoding the bait proteins were screened with a human monocyte cDNA library by reconstituting full-length transcription factors containing the GAL4-active domain (GAL4-AD) as the prey in a yeast two-hybrid approach. After screening 1×10(7) clones, 23 independent β-Gal-positive clones were identified. Sequence analysis and a database search revealed that 15 of these positive clones matched eight different proteins (SNX17, ProCathepsin S, RPS2, ZBTB4, OGDH, CCDC32, PAPD4, and actin which was already known to interact with annexin A2). A2IC A2IC interacts with various proteins to form protein complexes, which may contribute to the molecular mechanism of monocyte activation induced by plasmin. The yeast two-hybrid system is an efficient approach for investigating protein interactions.

  12. Distinguishing Binders from False Positives by Free Energy Calculations: Fragment Screening Against the Flap Site of HIV Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool used in drug discovery and structural biology for predicting the structures of ligand–receptor complexes. However, the accuracy of docking calculations can be limited by factors such as the neglect of protein reorganization in the scoring function; as a result, ligand screening can produce a high rate of false positive hits. Although absolute binding free energy methods still have difficulty in accurately rank-ordering binders, we believe that they can be fruitfully employed to distinguish binders from nonbinders and reduce the false positive rate. Here we study a set of ligands that dock favorably to a newly discovered, potentially allosteric site on the flap of HIV-1 protease. Fragment binding to this site stabilizes a closed form of protease, which could be exploited for the design of allosteric inhibitors. Twenty-three top-ranked protein–ligand complexes from AutoDock were subject to the free energy screening using two methods, the recently developed binding energy analysis method (BEDAM) and the standard double decoupling method (DDM). Free energy calculations correctly identified most of the false positives (≥83%) and recovered all the confirmed binders. The results show a gap averaging ≥3.7 kcal/mol, separating the binders and the false positives. We present a formula that decomposes the binding free energy into contributions from the receptor conformational macrostates, which provides insights into the roles of different binding modes. Our binding free energy component analysis further suggests that improving the treatment for the desolvation penalty associated with the unfulfilled polar groups could reduce the rate of false positive hits in docking. The current study demonstrates that the combination of docking with free energy methods can be very useful for more accurate ligand screening against valuable drug targets. PMID:25189630

  13. Identification of potential glutaminyl cyclase inhibitors from lead-like libraries by in silico and in vitro fragment-based screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaszkó, Mária; Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Dobi, Krisztina; Magyar, Csaba; Simon, István; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Kapui, Zoltán; Pázmány, Tamás; Cseh, Sándor; Dormán, György

    2017-02-01

    A glutaminyl cyclase (QC) fragment library was in silico selected by disconnection of the structure of known QC inhibitors and by lead-like 2D virtual screening of the same set. The resulting fragment library (204 compounds) was acquired from commercial suppliers and pre-screened by differential scanning fluorimetry followed by functional in vitro assays. In this way, 10 fragment hits were identified ([Formula: see text]5 % hit rate, best inhibitory activity: 16 [Formula: see text]). The in vitro hits were then docked to the active site of QC, and the best scoring compounds were analyzed for binding interactions. Two fragments bound to different regions in a complementary manner, and thus, linking those fragments offered a rational strategy to generate novel QC inhibitors. Based on the structure of the virtual linked fragment, a 77-membered QC target focused library was selected from vendor databases and docked to the active site of QC. A PubChem search confirmed that the best scoring analogues are novel, potential QC inhibitors.

  14. Application of Fragment Ion Information as Further Evidence in Probabilistic Compound Screening Using Bayesian Statistics and Machine Learning: A Leap Toward Automation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldegebriel, M.; Zomer, P.; Mol, H.G.J.; Vivó-Truyols, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we introduce an automated, efficient, and elegant model to combine all pieces of evidence (e.g., expected retention times, peak shapes, isotope distributions, fragment-to-parent ratio) obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS/MS) data for screening

  15. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  16. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Bauman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  17. Assessment of Dengue virus helicase and methyltransferase as targets for fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Li, Changqing; Sharff, Andrew; Lescar, Julien; Bricogne, Gérard; Barral, Karine

    2014-06-01

    Seasonal and pandemic flaviviruses continue to be leading global health concerns. With the view to help drug discovery against Dengue virus (DENV), a fragment-based experimental approach was applied to identify small molecule ligands targeting two main components of the flavivirus replication complex: the NS3 helicase (Hel) and the NS5 mRNA methyltransferase (MTase) domains. A library of 500 drug-like fragments was first screened by thermal-shift assay (TSA) leading to the identification of 36 and 32 fragment hits binding Hel and MTase from DENV, respectively. In a second stage, we set up a fragment-based X-ray crystallographic screening (FBS-X) in order to provide both validated fragment hits and structural binding information. No fragment hit was confirmed for DENV Hel. In contrast, a total of seven fragments were identified as DENV MTase binders and structures of MTase-fragment hit complexes were solved at resolution at least 2.0Å or better. All fragment hits identified contain either a five- or six-membered aromatic ring or both, and three novel binding sites were located on the MTase. To further characterize the fragment hits identified by TSA and FBS-X, we performed enzymatic assays to assess their inhibition effect on the N7- and 2'-O-MTase enzymatic activities: five of these fragment hits inhibit at least one of the two activities with IC50 ranging from 180μM to 9mM. This work validates the FBS-X strategy for identifying new anti-flaviviral hits targeting MTase, while Hel might not be an amenable target for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). This approach proved to be a fast and efficient screening method for FBDD target validation and discovery of starting hits for the development of higher affinity molecules that bind to novel allosteric sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fragment-Based Screening of a Natural Product Library against 62 Potential Malaria Drug Targets Employing Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Natural products are well known for their biological relevance, high degree of three-dimensionality, and access to areas of largely unexplored chemical space. To shape our understanding of the interaction between natural products and protein targets in the postgenomic era, we have used native mass spectrometry to investigate 62 potential protein targets for malaria using a natural-product-based fragment library. We reveal here 96 low-molecular-weight natural products identified as binding partners of 32 of the putative malarial targets. Seventy-nine (79) fragments have direct growth inhibition on Plasmodium falciparum at concentrations that are promising for the development of fragment hits against these protein targets. This adds a fragment library to the published HTS active libraries in the public domain. PMID:29436819

  19. Post processing of protein-compound docking for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD): in-silico structure-based drug screening and ligand-binding pose prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi

    2010-01-01

    For fragment-based drug development, both hit (active) compound prediction and docking-pose (protein-ligand complex structure) prediction of the hit compound are important, since chemical modification (fragment linking, fragment evolution) subsequent to the hit discovery must be performed based on the protein-ligand complex structure. However, the naïve protein-compound docking calculation shows poor accuracy in terms of docking-pose prediction. Thus, post-processing of the protein-compound docking is necessary. Recently, several methods for the post-processing of protein-compound docking have been proposed. In FBDD, the compounds are smaller than those for conventional drug screening. This makes it difficult to perform the protein-compound docking calculation. A method to avoid this problem has been reported. Protein-ligand binding free energy estimation is useful to reduce the procedures involved in the chemical modification of the hit fragment. Several prediction methods have been proposed for high-accuracy estimation of protein-ligand binding free energy. This paper summarizes the various computational methods proposed for docking-pose prediction and their usefulness in FBDD.

  20. Discovery of novel dengue virus NS5 methyltransferase non-nucleoside inhibitors by fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, Fatiha; Trist, Iuni; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Querat, Gilles; Brancale, Andrea; Barral, Karine

    2017-01-05

    With the aim to help drug discovery against dengue virus (DENV), a fragment-based drug design approach was applied to identify ligands targeting a main component of DENV replication complex: the NS5 AdoMet-dependent mRNA methyltransferase (MTase) domain, playing an essential role in the RNA capping process. Herein, we describe the identification of new inhibitors developed using fragment-based, structure-guided linking and optimization techniques. Thermal-shift assay followed by a fragment-based X-ray crystallographic screening lead to the identification of three fragment hits binding DENV MTase. We considered linking two of them, which bind to proximal sites of the AdoMet binding pocket, in order to improve their potency. X-ray crystallographic structures and computational docking were used to guide the fragment linking, ultimately leading to novel series of non-nucleoside inhibitors of flavivirus MTase, respectively N-phenyl-[(phenylcarbamoyl)amino]benzene-1-sulfonamide and phenyl [(phenylcarbamoyl)amino]benzene-1-sulfonate derivatives, that show a 10-100-fold stronger inhibition of 2'-O-MTase activity compared to the initial fragments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening and identification of male-specific DNA fragments in common carps Cyprinus carpio using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J J; Du, Q Y; Yue, Y Y; Dang, B J; Chang, Z J

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a sex subtractive genomic DNA library was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between male and female Cyprinus carpio. Twenty-two clones with distinguishable hybridization signals were selected and sequenced. The specific primers were designed based on the sequence data. Those primers were then used to amplify the sex-specific fragments from the genomic DNA of male and female carp. The amplified fragments from two clones showed specificity to males but not to females, which were named as Ccmf2 [387 base pairs (bp)] and Ccmf3 (183 bp), respectively. The sex-specific pattern was analysed in a total of 40 individuals from three other different C. carpio. stocks and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella using Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 as dot-blotting probes. The results revealed that the molecular diversity exists on the Y chromosome of C. carpio. No hybridization signals, however, were detected from individuals of C. idella, suggesting that the two sequences are specific to C. carpio. No significant homologous sequences of Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 were found in GenBank. Therefore, it was interpreted that the results as that Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 are two novel male-specific sequences; and both fragments could be used as markers to rapidly and accurately identify the genetic sex of part of C. carpio. This may provide a very efficient selective tool for practically breeding monosex female populations in aquacultural production.

  2. Fragment-Linking Approach Using (19)F NMR Spectroscopy To Obtain Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of β-Secretase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, John B; Whittington, Douglas A; Bartberger, Michael D; Sickmier, E Allen; Chen, Kui; Cheng, Yuan; Judd, Ted

    2016-04-28

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely used tool in small-molecule drug discovery efforts. One of the most commonly used biophysical methods in detecting weak binding of fragments is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, FBDD performed with (19)F NMR-based methods has been shown to provide several advantages over (1)H NMR using traditional magnetization-transfer and/or two-dimensional methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility and power of (19)F-based fragment screening by detailing the identification of a second-site fragment through (19)F NMR screening that binds to a specific pocket of the aspartic acid protease, β-secretase (BACE-1). The identification of this second-site fragment allowed the undertaking of a fragment-linking approach, which ultimately yielded a molecule exhibiting a more than 360-fold increase in potency while maintaining reasonable ligand efficiency and gaining much improved selectivity over cathepsin-D (CatD). X-ray crystallographic studies of the molecules demonstrated that the linked fragments exhibited binding modes consistent with those predicted from the targeted screening approach, through-space NMR data, and molecular modeling.

  3. Screening for single-chain variable fragment antibodies against multiple Cry1 toxins from an immunized mouse phage display antibody library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sa; Bo, Zongyi; Zhang, Cunzheng; Feng, Jianguo; Liu, Xianjin

    2018-04-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is a kind of antibody that possess only one chain of the complete antibody while maintaining the antigen-specific binding abilities and can be expressed in prokaryotic system. In this study, scFvs against Cry1 toxins were screened out from an immunized mouse phage displayed antibody library, which was successfully constructed with capacity of 6.25 × 10 7  CFU/mL. Using the mixed and alternative antigen coating strategy and after four rounds of affinity screening, seven positive phage-scFvs against Cry1 toxins were selected and characterized. Among them, clone scFv-3H9 (MG214869) showing relative stable and high binding abilities to six Cry1 toxins was selected for expression and purification. SDS-PAGE indicated that the scFv-3H9 fragments approximately 27 kDa were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli HB2151 strain. The purified scFv-3H9 was used to establish the double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method (DAS-ELISA) for detecting six Cry1 toxins, of which the lowest detectable limits (LOD) and the lowest quantitative limits (LOQ) were 3.14-11.07 and 8.22-39.44 ng mL -1 , respectively, with the correlation coefficient higher than 0.997. The average recoveries of Cry1 toxins from spiked rice leaf samples were ranged from 84 to 95%, with coefficient of variation (CV) less than 8.2%, showing good accuracy for the multi-residue determination of six Cry1 toxins in agricultural samples. This research suggested that the constructed phage display antibody library based on the animal which was immunized with the mixture of several antigens under the same category can be used for the quick and effective screening of generic antibodies.

  4. The Crystallographic Information File (CIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I D Brown

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The Crystallographic Information File (CIF, owned by the International Union of Crystallography, is a file structure based on tag-value ASCII pairs with tags defined in machine-readable dictionaries. The crystallographic community publishes and archives large quantities of numeric information generated by crystal structure determinations, and CIF's acceptance was assured by its adoption as the submission format for Acta Crystallographica and by the obvious needs of the community. CIF's strength lies in its dictionaries, which define most of the concepts of crystallography; its weakness is the difficulty of writing software that exploits its full potential.

  5. Screens

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This Sixth volume in the series The Key Debates. Mutations and Appropriations in European Film Studies investigates the question of screens in the context both of the dematerialization due to digitalization and the multiplication of media screens. Scholars offer various infomations and theories of topics such as the archeology of screen, film and media theories, contemporary art, pragmatics of new ways of screening (from home video to street screening).

  6. Mycobacterium avium restriction fragment lenght polymorphism-IS IS1245 and the simple double repetitive element polymerase chain reaction typing method to screen genetic diversity in Brazilian strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Carvalho de Sequeira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Simple double repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (MaDRE-PCR and Pvu II-IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing methods were used to type 41 Mycobacterium avium isolates obtained from 14 Aids inpatients and 10 environment and animals specimens identified among 53 mycobacteria isolated from 237 food, chicken, and pig. All environmental and animals strains showed orphan patterns by both methods. By MaDRE-PCR four patients, with multiple isolates, showed different patterns, suggesting polyclonal infection that was confirmed by RFLP in two of them. This first evaluation of MaDRE-PCR on Brazilian M. avium strains demonstrated that the method seems to be useful as simple and less expensive typing method for screening genetic diversity in M. avium strains on selected epidemiological studies, although with limitation on analysis identical patterns except for one band.

  7. Application of Fragment Ion Information as Further Evidence in Probabilistic Compound Screening Using Bayesian Statistics and Machine Learning: A Leap Toward Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldegebriel, Michael; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G J; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel

    2016-08-02

    In this work, we introduce an automated, efficient, and elegant model to combine all pieces of evidence (e.g., expected retention times, peak shapes, isotope distributions, fragment-to-parent ratio) obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS/MS) data for screening purposes. Combining all these pieces of evidence requires a careful assessment of the uncertainties in the analytical system as well as all possible outcomes. To-date, the majority of the existing algorithms are highly dependent on user input parameters. Additionally, the screening process is tackled as a deterministic problem. In this work we present a Bayesian framework to deal with the combination of all these pieces of evidence. Contrary to conventional algorithms, the information is treated in a probabilistic way, and a final probability assessment of the presence/absence of a compound feature is computed. Additionally, all the necessary parameters except the chromatographic band broadening for the method are learned from the data in training and learning phase of the algorithm, avoiding the introduction of a large number of user-defined parameters. The proposed method was validated with a large data set and has shown improved sensitivity and specificity in comparison to a threshold-based commercial software package.

  8. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  9. Fragment-based approaches to anti-HIV drug discovery: state of the art and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-12-01

    The search for additional drugs to treat HIV infection is a continuing effort due to the emergence and spread of HIV strains resistant to nearly all current drugs. The recent literature reveals that fragment-based drug design/discovery (FBDD) has become an effective alternative to conventional high-throughput screening strategies for drug discovery. In this critical review, the authors describe the state of the art in FBDD strategies for the discovery of anti-HIV drug-like compounds. The article focuses on fragment screening techniques, direct fragment-based design and early hit-to-lead progress. Rapid progress in biophysical detection and in silico techniques has greatly aided the application of FBDD to discover candidate agents directed at a variety of anti-HIV targets. Growing evidence suggests that structural insights on key proteins in the HIV life cycle can be applied in the early phase of drug discovery campaigns, providing valuable information on the binding modes and efficiently prompting fragment hit-to-lead progression. The combination of structural insights with improved methodologies for FBDD, including the privileged fragment-based reconstruction approach, fragment hybridization based on crystallographic overlays, fragment growth exploiting dynamic combinatorial chemistry, and high-speed fragment assembly via diversity-oriented synthesis followed by in situ screening, offers the possibility of more efficient and rapid discovery of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. Though the use of FBDD in anti-HIV drug discovery is still in its infancy, it is anticipated that anti-HIV agents developed via fragment-based strategies will be introduced into the clinic in the future.

  10. Fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyfant, Eric; Cross, Jason B; Paris, Kevin; Tsao, Désirée H H

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD), which is comprised of both fragment screening and the use of fragment hits to design leads, began more than 15 years ago and has been steadily gaining in popularity and utility. Its origin lies on the fact that the coverage of chemical space and the binding efficiency of hits are directly related to the size of the compounds screened. Nevertheless, FBDD still faces challenges, among them developing fragment screening libraries that ensure optimal coverage of chemical space, physical properties and chemical tractability. Fragment screening also requires sensitive assays, often biophysical in nature, to detect weak binders. In this chapter we will introduce the technologies used to address these challenges and outline the experimental advantages that make FBDD one of the most popular new hit-to-lead process.

  11. Jet fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxon, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    The paper reviews studies on jet fragmentation. The subject is discussed under the topic headings: fragmentation models, charged particle multiplicity, bose-einstein correlations, identified hadrons in jets, heavy quark fragmentation, baryon production, gluon and quark jets compared, the string effect, and two successful models. (U.K.)

  12. Liquid chromatography, in combination with a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument (LC QTOF), with sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) acquisition: systematic studies on its use for screenings in clinical and forensic toxicology and comparison with information-dependent acquisition (IDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmelt, Andreas T; Steuer, Andrea E; Poetzsch, Michael; Kraemer, Thomas

    2014-12-02

    Forensic and clinical toxicological screening procedures are employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques with information-dependent acquisition (IDA) approaches more and more often. It is known that the complexity of a sample and the IDA settings might prevent important compounds from being triggered. Therefore, data-independent acquisition (DIA) methods should be more suitable for systematic toxicological analysis (STA). The DIA method sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH), which uses Q1 windows of 20-35 Da for data-independent fragmentation, was systematically investigated for its suitability for STA. Quality of SWATH-generated mass spectra were evaluated with regard to mass error, relative abundance of the fragments, and library hits. With the Q1 window set to 20-25 Da, several precursors pass Q1 at the same time and are fragmented, thus impairing the library search algorithms to a different extent: forward fit was less affected than reverse fit and purity fit. Mass error was not affected. The relative abundance of the fragments was concentration dependent for some analytes and was influenced by cofragmentation, especially of deuterated analogues. Also, the detection rate of IDA compared to SWATH was investigated in a forced coelution experiment (up to 20 analytes coeluting). Even using several different IDA settings, it was observed that IDA failed to trigger relevant compounds. Screening results of 382 authentic forensic cases revealed that SWATH's detection rate was superior to IDA, which failed to trigger ∼10% of the analytes.

  13. Nuclear fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction to nuclear fragmentation, with emphasis in percolation ideas, is presented. The main theoretical models are discussed and as an application, the uniform expansion approximation is presented and the statistical multifragmentation model is used to calculate the fragment energy spectra. (L.C.)

  14. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites forin silicoscreening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  15. A generic approach for expanding homolog-targeted residue screening of sulfonamides using a fast matrix separation and class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chunlin; Guo Bin; Wang Xiaoying; Li Jie; Zhu Weitao; Chen Bo; Ouyang Shan; Yao Shouzhuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Generic homolog-targeted screening approach for multi-residual sulfonamide analogs. ► Single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup for direct injection. ► Class-specific fragmentation for expanding coverage of N 4 -acetyl and N-OH metabolites. ► PreS–IDA–EPI in LC–QqLIT for simultaneous screening and confirmation of real samples. - Abstract: A generic and efficient homolog-targeted approach was used to expand screening and detection of target class of sulfonamides and structural analogs, based on a fast single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup (SEP/MAC) for class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a liquid chromatography–hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LC–QqLIT). By combining the two-stage process conducted in a single tube as one-pot protocol, the straightforward SEP/MAC procedure was optimized to offer clean extracts with reasonable recovery (71–109% with RSDs 4 -acetyl and hydroxylamine metabolites plus their possible dimers. Moreover, the PreS-triggered automatically enhanced product ion spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous screening, profiling and confirmation of an unlimited number of analytes belonging to the sulfonamide class within a single analysis. The validation and application results of the generic SEP/MAC-based LC–QqLIT strategy consistently demonstrated favorable performances with acceptable accuracy (67–116%), precision (RSDs −1 ) to meet the acceptance criteria for all the sulfonamide–tissue combinations. Thus, the integration of the matrix-independent SEP/MAC procedure and the multiparameter matching algorithm with the unit-resolution LC–QqLIT instrument can serve as a valuable semi-targeted discovery strategy for rapid screening and reliable quantitative/confirmatory analysis of real samples.

  16. Virtual fragment preparation for computational fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has become an important component of the drug discovery process. The use of fragments can accelerate both the search for a hit molecule and the development of that hit into a lead molecule for clinical testing. In addition to experimental methodologies for FBDD such as NMR and X-ray Crystallography screens, computational techniques are playing an increasingly important role. The success of the computational simulations is due in large part to how the database of virtual fragments is prepared. In order to prepare the fragments appropriately it is necessary to understand how FBDD differs from other approaches and the issues inherent in building up molecules from smaller fragment pieces. The ultimate goal of these calculations is to link two or more simulated fragments into a molecule that has an experimental binding affinity consistent with the additive predicted binding affinities of the virtual fragments. Computationally predicting binding affinities is a complex process, with many opportunities for introducing error. Therefore, care should be taken with the fragment preparation procedure to avoid introducing additional inaccuracies.This chapter is focused on the preparation process used to create a virtual fragment database. Several key issues of fragment preparation which affect the accuracy of binding affinity predictions are discussed. The first issue is the selection of the two-dimensional atomic structure of the virtual fragment. Although the particular usage of the fragment can affect this choice (i.e., whether the fragment will be used for calibration, binding site characterization, hit identification, or lead optimization), general factors such as synthetic accessibility, size, and flexibility are major considerations in selecting the 2D structure. Other aspects of preparing the virtual fragments for simulation are the generation of three-dimensional conformations and the assignment of the associated atomic point charges.

  17. Controlled fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Werner

    2002-01-01

    Contrary to natural fragmentation, controlled fragmentation offers the possibility to adapt fragment parameters like size and mass to the performance requirements in a very flexible way. Known mechanisms like grooves inside the casing, weaken the structure. This is, however, excluded for applications with high accelerations during launch or piercing requirements for example on a semi armor piercing penetrator. Another method to achieve controlled fragmentation with an additional grid layer is presented with which the required grooves are produced 'just in time' inside the casing during detonation of the high explosive. The process of generating the grooves aided by the grid layer was studied using the hydrocode HULL with respect to varying grid designs and material combinations. Subsequent to this, a large range of these theoretically investigated combinations was contemplated in substantial experimental tests. With an optimised grid design and a suitable material selection, the controlled fragment admits a very flexible adaptation to the set requirements. Additional advantages like the increase of perforation performance or incendiary amplification can be realized with the grid layer

  18. Chameleon fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA 2306, F-91191Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Upadhye, Amol, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: aupadhye@anl.gov [Institute for the Early Universe, Ewha University, International Education, Building #601, 11-1, Daehyun-Dong Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signature which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.

  19. Chameleon fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Upadhye, Amol

    2014-01-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signature which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ 4 and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments

  20. Precursor Ion Scan Mode-Based Strategy for Fast Screening of Polyether Ionophores by Copper-Induced Gas-Phase Radical Fragmentation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevelin, Eduardo J; Possato, Bruna; Lopes, João L C; Lopes, Norberto P; Crotti, Antônio E M

    2017-04-04

    The potential of copper(II) to induce gas-phase fragmentation reactions in macrotetrolides, a class of polyether ionophores produced by Streptomyces species, was investigated by accurate-mass electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Copper(II)/copper(I) transition directly induced production of diagnostic acylium ions with m/z 199, 185, 181, and 167 from α-cleavages of [macrotetrolides + Cu] 2+ . A UPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodology based on the precursor ion scan of these acylium ions was developed and successfully used to identify isodinactin (1), trinactin (2), and tetranactin (3) in a crude extract of Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 in the precursor ion scan mode. In addition, copper(II) was also used to induce radical fragmentation reactions in the carboxylic acid polyether ionophore nigericin. The resulting product ions with m/z 755 and 585 helped to identify nigericin in a crude extract of Streptomyces sp. Eucal-26 by means of precursor ion scan experiments, demonstrating that copper-induced fragmentation reactions can potentially identify different classes of polyether ionophores rapidly and selectively.

  1. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The PhD project Bespoke Fragments is investigating the space emerging in the exploration of the relationship between digital drawing and fabrication, and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Through a series of different experiments, the project situates itself in a shuttli...

  2. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  3. Architectural fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jacob Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    I have created a large collection of plaster models: a collection of Obstructions, errors and opportunities that may develop into architecture. The models are fragments of different complex shapes as well as more simple circular models with different profiling and diameters. In this contect I have....... I try to invent the ways of drawing the models - that decode and unfold them into architectural fragments- into future buildings or constructions in the landscape. [1] Luigi Moretti: Italian architect, 1907 - 1973 [2] Man Ray: American artist, 1890 - 1976. in 2015, I saw the wonderful exhibition...... "Man Ray - Human Equations" at the Glyptotek in Copenhagen, organized by the Philips Collection in Washington D.C. and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem (in 2013). See also: "Man Ray - Human Equations" catalogue published by Hatje Cantz Verlag, Germany, 2014....

  4. A generic approach for expanding homolog-targeted residue screening of sulfonamides using a fast matrix separation and class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Chunlin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Guo Bin, E-mail: binnguo@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Wang Xiaoying [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Li Jie [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Zhu Weitao; Chen Bo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Ouyang Shan [Food Inspection and Quarantine Center, Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of the People' s Republic of China, Shenzhen 518067 (China); Yao Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2012-08-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generic homolog-targeted screening approach for multi-residual sulfonamide analogs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup for direct injection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Class-specific fragmentation for expanding coverage of N{sup 4}-acetyl and N-OH metabolites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PreS-IDA-EPI in LC-QqLIT for simultaneous screening and confirmation of real samples. - Abstract: A generic and efficient homolog-targeted approach was used to expand screening and detection of target class of sulfonamides and structural analogs, based on a fast single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup (SEP/MAC) for class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a liquid chromatography-hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LC-QqLIT). By combining the two-stage process conducted in a single tube as one-pot protocol, the straightforward SEP/MAC procedure was optimized to offer clean extracts with reasonable recovery (71-109% with RSDs < 20%) and decreased matrix interferences (-9 to 19%) of multiresidual sulfonamide extraction from different tissue samples. The novel use of neutral loss scan of 66 Da (NLS) or precursor ion scanning of m/z 108 (PreS) in positive ion mode was found to achieve more comprehensive coverage of protonated molecular ions of a wide array of sulfonamides including N{sup 4}-acetyl and hydroxylamine metabolites plus their possible dimers. Moreover, the PreS-triggered automatically enhanced product ion spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous screening, profiling and confirmation of an unlimited number of analytes belonging to the sulfonamide class within a single analysis. The validation and application results of the generic SEP/MAC-based LC-QqLIT strategy consistently demonstrated favorable performances with acceptable accuracy (67-116%), precision (RSDs < 25%), and sensitivity (LOQs {<=} 7.5 ng

  5. Intermediate Fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This text and its connected exhibition are aiming to reflect both on the thoughts, the processes and the outcome of the design and production of the artefact ‘Intermediate Fragment’ and making as a contemporary architectural tool in general. Intermediate Fragment was made for the exhibition ‘Enga...... of realising an exhibition object was conceived, but expanded, refined and concretised through this process. The context of the work shown here is an interest in a tighter, deeper connection between experimentally obtained material knowledge and architectural design....

  6. Fragmentation based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Gaining the understanding of mobile agent architecture and the security concerns, in this paper, we proposed a security protocol which addresses security with mitigated computational cost. The protocol is a combination of self decryption, co-operation and obfuscation technique. To circumvent the risk of malicious code execution in attacking environment, we have proposed fragmentation based encryption technique. Our encryption technique suits the general mobile agent size and provides hard and thorny obfuscation increasing attacker’s challenge on the same plane providing better performance with respect to computational cost as compared to existing AES encryption.

  7. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    , investigating levels of control and uncertainty encountering with these. Through tangible experiments, the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrications tools as direct expansions of the architect's digital drawing and workflow. The project sees this expansion as an opportunity to connect...... architectural designs, tectonics and aesthetics. In this Ph.D.-project a series a physical, but conceptual, experiment plays the central role in the knowledge production. The experiments result in materialised architectural fragments and tangible experiences. However, these creations also become the driving...

  8. The crystallographic growth directions of Sn whiskers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, J.; Welzel, U.; Leineweber, A.; Huegel, W.; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The growth directions of 55 Sn whiskers, i.e. the crystallographic orientation parallel to the whisker-growth axes, were determined using (i) a focused ion beam microscope for the determination of the physical growth angles of the whiskers with respect to a specimen (reference) coordinate system and (ii) an electron backscatter detector in a scanning electron microscope for the determination of the crystallographic orientation of the whiskers. The Sn whiskers were found to grow preferentially along low-index directions of the β-Sn crystal structure. The experimental findings of this study (and most of the results presented in the literature as well) were explained by applying, in a modified way, the Hartman–Perdok concept of periodic bond chains, i.e. chains of strong bonds running uninterruptedly through the structure, to the Sn whisker-growth phenomenon

  9. Virtual screening with AutoDock Vina and the common pharmacophore engine of a low diversity library of fragments and hits against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase: participation in the SAMPL4 protein-ligand binding challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, Alexander L; Santiago, Daniel N; Forli, Stefano; Martins, Diogo Santos; Olson, Arthur J

    2014-04-01

    To rigorously assess the tools and protocols that can be used to understand and predict macromolecular recognition, and to gain more structural insight into three newly discovered allosteric binding sites on a critical drug target involved in the treatment of HIV infections, the Olson and Levy labs collaborated on the SAMPL4 challenge. This computational blind challenge involved predicting protein-ligand binding against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase (IN), a viral enzyme for which two drugs (that target the active site) have been approved by the FDA. Positive control cross-docking experiments were utilized to select 13 receptor models out of an initial ensemble of 41 different crystal structures of HIV IN. These 13 models of the targets were selected using our new "Rank Difference Ratio" metric. The first stage of SAMPL4 involved using virtual screens to identify 62 active, allosteric IN inhibitors out of a set of 321 compounds. The second stage involved predicting the binding site(s) and crystallographic binding mode(s) for 57 of these inhibitors. Our team submitted four entries for the first stage that utilized: (1) AutoDock Vina (AD Vina) plus visual inspection; (2) a new common pharmacophore engine; (3) BEDAM replica exchange free energy simulations, and a Consensus approach that combined the predictions of all three strategies. Even with the SAMPL4's very challenging compound library that displayed a significantly lower amount of structural diversity than most libraries that are conventionally employed in prospective virtual screens, these approaches produced hit rates of 24, 25, 34, and 27 %, respectively, on a set with 19 % declared binders. Our only entry for the second stage challenge was based on the results of AD Vina plus visual inspection, and it ranked third place overall according to several different metrics provided by the SAMPL4 organizers. The successful results displayed by these approaches highlight the utility of the computational

  10. Virtual screening with AutoDock Vina and the common pharmacophore engine of a low diversity library of fragments and hits against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase: participation in the SAMPL4 protein-ligand binding challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, Alexander L.; Santiago, Daniel N.; Forli, Stefano; Santos-Martins, Diogo; Olson, Arthur J.

    2014-04-01

    To rigorously assess the tools and protocols that can be used to understand and predict macromolecular recognition, and to gain more structural insight into three newly discovered allosteric binding sites on a critical drug target involved in the treatment of HIV infections, the Olson and Levy labs collaborated on the SAMPL4 challenge. This computational blind challenge involved predicting protein-ligand binding against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase (IN), a viral enzyme for which two drugs (that target the active site) have been approved by the FDA. Positive control cross-docking experiments were utilized to select 13 receptor models out of an initial ensemble of 41 different crystal structures of HIV IN. These 13 models of the targets were selected using our new "Rank Difference Ratio" metric. The first stage of SAMPL4 involved using virtual screens to identify 62 active, allosteric IN inhibitors out of a set of 321 compounds. The second stage involved predicting the binding site(s) and crystallographic binding mode(s) for 57 of these inhibitors. Our team submitted four entries for the first stage that utilized: (1) AutoDock Vina (AD Vina) plus visual inspection; (2) a new common pharmacophore engine; (3) BEDAM replica exchange free energy simulations, and a Consensus approach that combined the predictions of all three strategies. Even with the SAMPL4's very challenging compound library that displayed a significantly lower amount of structural diversity than most libraries that are conventionally employed in prospective virtual screens, these approaches produced hit rates of 24, 25, 34, and 27 %, respectively, on a set with 19 % declared binders. Our only entry for the second stage challenge was based on the results of AD Vina plus visual inspection, and it ranked third place overall according to several different metrics provided by the SAMPL4 organizers. The successful results displayed by these approaches highlight the utility of the computational

  11. Identification of ligand efficient, fragment-like hits from an HTS library: structure-based virtual screening and docking investigations of 2H- and 3H-pyrazolo tautomers for Aurora kinase A selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvagalla, Sailu; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Ke, Yi-Yu; Shiao, Hui-Yi; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Hsu, John T A; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Furanopyrimidine 1 (IC50 = 273 nM, LE = 0.36, LELP = 10.28) was recently identified by high-throughput screening (HTS) of an in-house library (125,000 compounds) as an Aurora kinase inhibitor. Structure-based hit optimization resulted in lead molecules with in vivo efficacy in a mouse tumour xenograft model, but no oral bioavailability. This is attributed to "molecular obesity", a common problem during hit to lead evolution during which degradation of important molecular properties such as molecular weight (MW) and lipophilicity occurs. This could be effectively tackled by the right choice of hit compounds for optimization. In this regard, ligand efficiency (LE) and ligand efficiency dependent lipophilicity (LELP) indices are more often used to choose fragment-like hits for optimization. To identify hits with appropriate LE, we used a MW cut-off library. Next, structure-based virtual screening using software (Libdock and Glide) in the Aurora A crystal structure (PDB ID: 3E5A) was carried out, and the top scoring 18 compounds tested for Aurora A enzyme inhibition. This resulted in the identification of a novel tetrahydro-pyrazolo-isoquinoline hit 7 (IC50 = 852 nM, LE = 0.44, LELP = 8.36) with fragment-like properties suitable for further hit optimization. Moreover, hit 7 was found to be selective for Aurora A (Aurora B IC50 = 35,150 nM) and the possible reasons for selectivity investigated by docking two tautomeric forms (2H- and 3H-pyrazole) of 7 in Auroras A and B (PDB ID: 4AF3) crystal structures. This docking study shows that the major 3H-pyrazole tautomer of 7 binds in Aurora A stronger than in Aurora B.

  12. Crystallographic computing system JANA2006: General features

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petříček, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Palatinus, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 229, č. 5 (2014), s. 345-352 ISSN 0044-2968 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : JANA2006 * aperiodic structures * magnetic structures * crystallographic computing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.310, year: 2014

  13. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Susana C. M. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Leal, Ricardo M. F. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Mitchell, Edward P. [EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Forsyth, V. Trevor, E-mail: tforsyth@ill.fr [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  14. Crystallographic theory of the martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The martensitic transformation is one of the most researched topics in the materials science during the 20th century. The second half of this century was mainly remembered by the development of several theories related with the kinetics of phase transformation, the mechanisms involved in the nucleation phenomenon, and the way as the crystallographic change is produced. In this paper are described the fundamental concepts that are defined in the crystallographic framework of the martensitic transformation. The study is focused on the application of the most outstanding crystallographic models: the Bain; the Wechsler, Lieberman & Read; and the Bowles & Mackenzie. The topic is presented based upon the particular features of the martensitic transformation, such as its non-diffusional character, type of interface between parent (austenite and product (martensite phases, the formation of substructural defects, and the shape change; all of these features are mathematically described by equations aimed to predict how the transformation will take place rather than to explain the actual movement of the atoms within the structure. This mathematical development is known as the Phenomenological Theory of Martensite Crystallography (PTMC.

  15. [Crystallographic evaluation of structural changes in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farashchuk, N F; Rakhmanin, Yu A; Savostikova, O N; Telenkova, O G

    2014-01-01

    The study of the structural state of tap water that has been stored for two days in the packaging materials of various type and in different conditions, was performed with the use of crystallographic method for the investigation of liquids based on a special approach for dehydration of the drop, which is a fixed thin "slice" of the examines liquid. Most organized crystallographic pattern was shown to observe in a drop of water after treatment Bioptron lamp (content of liquid-crystal associates (LCA)--6.90 ± 0.23), and stored in a silver vessel (content LCA--6.28 ± 0.17), and the least organized, almost amorphous precipitate is formed in a drop of water stored in plastic containers (content LCA--2.92 ± 0.15%). Basing on the obtained results, it can be concluded that the crystallographic method can be used for the identification of qualitative changes occurring in liquid water under the influence of various physical factors, for the identification of the rationality of the use of hereafter sophisticated quantitative techniques.

  16. Asymptotic value of screening parameter as determined from the one-electron fragment of the kinetic energy or electrostatic potential at the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruya, Hirohide; Anno, Tosinobu

    1985-01-01

    Numerical value of lim sub(Z → infinity) delta(i, j)/delta Zsub(i), where (i, j) stands for average interaction energy of a pair of electrons embedded in hydrogenic orbitals (HAO's) is presented for a wide range of HAO's. Data to be presented should be useful to calculate the asymptotic limit of screening effect seen by an electron embedded in a given kind of orbital for an isoelectronic series of atoms as determined from the ''one-electron component'' of the total kinetic energy of or of the electrostatic potential at the nucleus within an atom. (author)

  17. Asymptotic value of screening parameter as determined from the one-electron fragment of the kinetic energy or electrostatic potential at the nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teruya, Hirohide; Anno, Tosinobu

    1985-09-01

    Numerical value of lim sub(Z ..-->.. infinity) delta(i, j)/delta Zsub(i), where (i, j) stands for average interaction energy of a pair of electrons embedded in hydrogenic orbitals (HAO's) is presented for a wide range of HAO's. Data to be presented should be useful to calculate the asymptotic limit of screening effect seen by an electron embedded in a given kind of orbital for an isoelectronic series of atoms as determined from the ''one-electron component'' of the total kinetic energy of or of the electrostatic potential at the nucleus within an atom.

  18. Framing Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary industrialized architecture based on advanced information technology and highly technological production processes, implies a radically different approach to architecture than what we have experienced in the past. Works of architecture composed of prefabricated building components......, contain distinctive architectural traits, not only based on rational repetition, but also supporting composition and montage as dynamic concepts. Prefab architecture is an architecture of fragmentation, individualization and changeability, and this sets up new challenges for the architect. This paper...... tries to develop a strategy for the architect dealing with industrially based architecture; a strategy which exploits architectural potentials in industrial building, which recognizes the rules of mass production and which redefines the architect’s position among the agents of building. If recent...

  19. World directory of crystallographers and of other scientists employing crystallographic methods

    CERN Document Server

    Filippini, G; Hashizume, H; Torriani, I; Duax, W

    1995-01-01

    The 9th edition of the World Directory of Crystallographers and of Other Scientists Employing Crystallographic Methods, which contains 7907 entries embracing 72 countries, differs considerably from the 8th edition, published in 1990. The content has been updated, and the methods used to acquire the information presented and to produce this new edition of the Directory have involved the latest advances in technology. The Directory is now also available as a regularly updated electronic database, accessible via e-mail, Telnet, Gopher, World-Wide Web, and Mosaic. Full details are given in an Appendix to the printed edition.

  20. Missing Fragments: Detecting Cooperative Binding in Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is to identify molecular fragments that bind to alternate subsites within a given binding pocket leading to cooperative binding when linked. In this study, the binding of fragments to human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase is used to illustrate how (a) current protocols may fail to detect fragments that bind cooperatively, (b) theoretical approaches can be used to validate potential hits, and (c) apparent false positives obtained when screening against cocktails of fragments may in fact indicate promising leads. PMID:24900472

  1. Fragment library design: using cheminformatics and expert chemists to fill gaps in existing fragment libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchukian, Peter S; So, Sung-Sau; Fischer, Christian; Waller, Chris L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment based screening (FBS) has emerged as a mainstream lead discovery strategy in academia, biotechnology start-ups, and large pharma. As a prerequisite of FBS, a structurally diverse library of fragments is desirable in order to identify chemical matter that will interact with the range of diverse target classes that are prosecuted in contemporary screening campaigns. In addition, it is also desirable to offer synthetically amenable starting points to increase the probability of a successful fragment evolution through medicinal chemistry. Herein we describe a method to identify biologically relevant chemical substructures that are missing from an existing fragment library (chemical gaps), and organize these chemical gaps hierarchically so that medicinal chemists can efficiently navigate the prioritized chemical space and subsequently select purchasable fragments for inclusion in an enhanced fragment library.

  2. XTAL system of crystallographic programs: programmer's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.R.; Stewart, J.M.; Norden, A.P.; Munn, R.J.; Freer, S.T.

    1980-02-01

    This document establishes the basis for collaborative writing of transportable computer programs for x-ray crystallography. The concepts and general-purpose utility subroutines described here can be readily adapted to other scientific calculations. The complete system of crystallographic programs and subroutines is called XTAL and replaces the XRAY (6,7,8) system of programs. The coding language for the XTAL system is RATMAC (5). The XTAL system of programs contains routines for controlling execution of application programs. In this sense it forms a suboperating system that presents the same computational environment to the user and programmer irrespective of the operating system in use at a particular installation. These control routines replace all FORTRAN I/O code, supply character reading and writing, supply binary file reading and writing, serve as a support library for applications programs, and provide for interprogram communication

  3. Knowledge-based Fragment Binding Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Grace W.; Altman, Russ B.

    2014-01-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening. PMID:24762971

  4. Global crystallographic textures obtained by neutron and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brokmeier, Heinz-Guenter

    2006-01-01

    Global crystallographic textures belong to the main characteristic parameters of engineering materials. The global crystallographic texture is always the average texture of a well-defined sample volume which is representative to solve practical engineering problems. Thus a beam having a high penetration power is needed available as neutron or high energetic X-ray radiation. Texture type and texture sharpness are of great importance for materials properties such as the deep drawing behaviour, one of the basic techniques in many industries. Advantages and disadvantages of both radiations make them complementary for measuring crystallographic textures in a wide range of materials

  5. Crystallographic orientations in one-directional gray cast solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roviglione, A.; Hermida, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the crystallographic orientations of austenite and the A laminar graphite and the compact, in one-directionally grown samples to decide upon the validity of the mentioned theory. (Author) [es

  6. A Journey into Reciprocal Space; A crystallographer's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    This book introduces undergraduate and graduate students to a crystallographer's view of real and reciprocal space, a concept that has been of particular use by crystallographers to understand the patterns of spots when x-rays are diffracted by crystals. It then proceeds to develop the concept in a form suitable for physics applications; such as how solid-state physicists use reciprocal space to explain various solid-state properties such as thermal and electrical phenomena.

  7. Crystallographic cut that maximizes of the birefringence in photorefractive crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Rueda-Parada, Jorge Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The electro-optical birefringence effect depends on the crystal type, cut crystal, applied electric field and the incidence direction of light on the principal crystal faces. It is presented a study of maximizing the birefringence in photorefractive crystals of cubic crystallographic symmetry, in terms of these three parameters. General analytical expressions for the birefringence were obtained, from which birefringence can be established for any type of cut. A new crystallographic cut was en...

  8. Fragment growing exploiting dynamic combinatorial chemistry of inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mondal, Milon; Groothuis, Daphne E.; Hirsch, Anna K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has emerged as an efficient hit-identification and/or-optimization strategy with a higher hit rate than high-throughput screening (HTS). Whereas fragment linking is more challenging, fragment growing has become the preferred fragment-optimization strategy, requiring

  9. Universal elements of fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovsky, V. V.; Tur, A. V.; Kuklina, O. V.

    2010-01-01

    A fragmentation theory is proposed that explains the universal asymptotic behavior of the fragment-size distribution in the large-size range, based on simple physical principles. The basic principles of the theory are the total mass conservation in a fragmentation process and a balance condition for the energy expended in increasing the surface of fragments during their breakup. A flux-based approach is used that makes it possible to supplement the basic principles and develop a minimal theory of fragmentation. Such a supplementary principle is that of decreasing fragment-volume flux with increasing energy expended in fragmentation. It is shown that the behavior of the decreasing flux is directly related to the form of a power-law fragment-size distribution. The minimal theory is used to find universal asymptotic fragment-size distributions and to develop a natural physical classification of fragmentation models. A more general, nonlinear theory of strong fragmentation is also developed. It is demonstrated that solutions to a nonlinear kinetic equation consistent with both basic principles approach a universal asymptotic size distribution. Agreement between the predicted asymptotic fragment-size distributions and experimental observations is discussed.

  10. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data analysis of filamin A repeats 14–16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguda, Adeleke Halilu; Sakwe, Amos Malle; Rask, Lars; Robinson, Robert Charles

    2007-01-01

    The crystallization and crystallographic data analysis of filamin repeats 14–16 are reported. Human filamin A is a 280 kDa protein involved in actin-filament cross-linking. It is structurally divided into an actin-binding headpiece (ABD) and a rod domain containing 24 immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats. A fragment of human filamin A (Ig repeats 14–16) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein was crystallized in 1.6 M ammonium sulfate, 2% PEG 1000 and 100 mM HEPES pH 7.5. The crystals diffracted to 1.95 Å and belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 50.63, b = 52.10, c = 98.46 Å, α = β = γ = 90°

  11. Universality of fragment shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-16

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  12. Anomalous nuclear fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmanov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data are given, the status of anomalon problem is discussed, theoretical approaches to this problem are outlined. Anomalons are exotic objects formed following fragmentation of nuclei-targets under the effect of nuclei - a beam at the energy of several GeV/nucleon. These nuclear fragments have an anomalously large cross section of interaction and respectively, small free path, considerably shorter than primary nuclei have. The experimental daa are obtained in accelerators following irradiation of nuclear emulsions by 16 O, 56 Fe, 40 Ar beams, as well as propane by 12 C beams. The experimental data testify to dependence of fragment free path on the distance L from the point of the fragment formation. A decrease in the fragment free path is established more reliably than its dependence on L. The problem of the anomalon existence cannot be yet considered resolved. Theoretical models suggested for explanation of anomalously large cross sections of nuclear fragment interaction are variable and rather speculative

  13. Crystallographic Topology 2: Overview and Work in Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    This overview describes an application of contemporary geometric topology and stochastic process concepts to structural crystallography. In this application, crystallographic groups become orbifolds, crystal structures become Morse functions on orbifolds, and vibrating atoms in a crystal become vector valued Gaussian measures with the Radon-Nikodym property. Intended crystallographic benefits include new methods for visualization of space groups and crystal structures, analysis of the thermal motion patterns seen in ORTEP drawings, and a classification scheme for crystal structures based on their Heegaard splitting properties.

  14. Fission fragment angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenne, D. De

    1991-01-01

    Most of the energy released in fission is converted into translational kinetic energy of the fragments. The remaining excitation energy will be distributed among neutrons and gammas. An important parameter characterizing the scission configuration is the primary angular momentum of the nascent fragments. Neutron emission is not expected to decrease the spin of the fragments by more than one unit of angular momentum and is as such of less importance in the determination of the initial fragment spins. Gamma emission is a suitable tool in studying initial fragment spins because the emission time, number, energy, and multipolarity of the gammas strongly depend on the value of the primary angular momentum. The main conclusions of experiments on gamma emission were that the initial angular momentum of the fragments is large compared to the ground state spin and oriented perpendicular to the fission axis. Most of the recent information concerning initial fragment spin distributions comes from the measurement of isomeric ratios for isomeric pairs produced in fission. Although in nearly every mass chain isomers are known, only a small number are suitable for initial fission fragment spin studies. Yield and half-life considerations strongly limit the number of candidates. This has the advantage that the behavior of a specific isomeric pair can be investigated for a number of fissioning systems at different excitation energies of the fragments and fissioning nuclei. Because most of the recent information on primary angular momenta comes from measurements of isomeric ratios, the global deexcitation process of the fragments and the calculation of the initial fragment spin distribution from measured isomeric ratios are discussed here. The most important results on primary angular momentum determinations are reviewed and some theoretical approaches are given. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  15. X-Ray powder diffractometry, crystallographic phase analysis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computerized X-Ray diffraction system has been used to determine the composition and lattice parameters of raw and activated kaolinite. The universal diffractometry URD 63 was interfaced with computer via an APX 63 software package for rapid capturing of data on reflected intensity and other crystallographic ...

  16. Crystallographic Mapping of Guided Nanowires by Second Harmonic Generation Polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeman, Lior; Ben-Zvi, Regev; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Oron, Dan; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-02-08

    The growth of horizontal nanowires (NWs) guided by epitaxial and graphoepitaxial relations with the substrate is becoming increasingly attractive owing to the possibility of controlling their position, direction, and crystallographic orientation. In guided NWs, as opposed to the extensively characterized vertically grown NWs, there is an increasing need for understanding the relation between structure and properties, specifically the role of the epitaxial relation with the substrate. Furthermore, the uniformity of crystallographic orientation along guided NWs and over the substrate has yet to be checked. Here we perform highly sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) polarimetry of polar and nonpolar guided ZnO NWs grown on R-plane and M-plane sapphire. We optically map large areas on the substrate in a nondestructive way and find that the crystallographic orientations of the guided NWs are highly selective and specific for each growth direction with respect to the substrate lattice. In addition, we perform SHG polarimetry along individual NWs and find that the crystallographic orientation is preserved along the NW in both polar and nonpolar NWs. While polar NWs show highly uniform SHG along their axis, nonpolar NWs show a significant change in the local nonlinear susceptibility along a few micrometers, reflected in a reduction of 40% in the ratio of the SHG along different crystal axes. We suggest that these differences may be related to strain accumulation along the nonpolar wires. We find SHG polarimetry to be a powerful tool to study both selectivity and uniformity of crystallographic orientations of guided NWs with different epitaxial relations.

  17. Recovery of crystallographic texture in remineralized dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Samera; Anderson, Paul; Al-Jawad, Maisoon

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) and position of the (002) Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected enamel to regain

  18. Recovery of crystallographic texture in remineralized dental enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samera Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture and position of the (002 Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected

  19. String fragmentation; La fragmentation des cordes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees - SUBATECH, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-10-01

    The classical string model is used in VENUS as a fragmentation model. For the soft domain simple 2-parton strings were sufficient, whereas for higher energies up to LHC, the perturbative regime of the QCD gives additional soft gluons, which are mapped on the string as so called kinks, energy singularities between the leading partons. The kinky string model is chosen to handle fragmentation of these strings by application of the Lorentz invariant area law. The `kinky strings` model, corresponding to the perturbative gluons coming from pQCD, takes into consideration this effect by treating the partons and gluons on the same footing. The decay law is always the Artru-Menessier area law which is the most realistic since it is invariant to the Lorentz and gauge transformations. For low mass strings a manipulation of the rupture point is necessary if the string corresponds already to an elementary particle determined by the mass and the flavor content. By means of the fragmentation model it will be possible to simulate the data from future experiments at LHC and RHIC 3 refs.

  20. ACFIS: a web server for fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Jiang, Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Wu, Feng-Xu; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Feng-Biao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-07-08

    In order to foster innovation and improve the effectiveness of drug discovery, there is a considerable interest in exploring unknown 'chemical space' to identify new bioactive compounds with novel and diverse scaffolds. Hence, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) was developed rapidly due to its advanced expansive search for 'chemical space', which can lead to a higher hit rate and ligand efficiency (LE). However, computational screening of fragments is always hampered by the promiscuous binding model. In this study, we developed a new web server Auto Core Fragment in silico Screening (ACFIS). It includes three computational modules, PARA_GEN, CORE_GEN and CAND_GEN. ACFIS can generate core fragment structure from the active molecule using fragment deconstruction analysis and perform in silico screening by growing fragments to the junction of core fragment structure. An integrated energy calculation rapidly identifies which fragments fit the binding site of a protein. We constructed a simple interface to enable users to view top-ranking molecules in 2D and the binding mode in 3D for further experimental exploration. This makes the ACFIS a highly valuable tool for drug discovery. The ACFIS web server is free and open to all users at http://chemyang.ccnu.edu.cn/ccb/server/ACFIS/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. ACFIS: a web server for fragment-based drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Jiang, Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Wu, Feng-Xu; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Feng-Biao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    In order to foster innovation and improve the effectiveness of drug discovery, there is a considerable interest in exploring unknown ‘chemical space’ to identify new bioactive compounds with novel and diverse scaffolds. Hence, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) was developed rapidly due to its advanced expansive search for ‘chemical space’, which can lead to a higher hit rate and ligand efficiency (LE). However, computational screening of fragments is always hampered by the promiscuous binding model. In this study, we developed a new web server Auto Core Fragment in silico Screening (ACFIS). It includes three computational modules, PARA_GEN, CORE_GEN and CAND_GEN. ACFIS can generate core fragment structure from the active molecule using fragment deconstruction analysis and perform in silico screening by growing fragments to the junction of core fragment structure. An integrated energy calculation rapidly identifies which fragments fit the binding site of a protein. We constructed a simple interface to enable users to view top-ranking molecules in 2D and the binding mode in 3D for further experimental exploration. This makes the ACFIS a highly valuable tool for drug discovery. The ACFIS web server is free and open to all users at http://chemyang.ccnu.edu.cn/ccb/server/ACFIS/. PMID:27150808

  2. Fragment-Based Discovery of a Potent, Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor That Modulates the Phosphorylation and Catalytic Activity of ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heightman, Tom D; Berdini, Valerio; Braithwaite, Hannah; Buck, Ildiko M; Cassidy, Megan; Castro, Juan; Courtin, Aurélie; Day, James E H; East, Charlotte; Fazal, Lynsey; Graham, Brent; Griffiths-Jones, Charlotte M; Lyons, John F; Martins, Vanessa; Muench, Sandra; Munck, Joanne M; Norton, David; O'Reilly, Marc; Palmer, Nick; Pathuri, Puja; Reader, Michael; Rees, David C; Rich, Sharna J; Richardson, Caroline; Saini, Harpreet; Thompson, Neil T; Wallis, Nicola G; Walton, Hugh; Wilsher, Nicola E; Woolford, Alison J-A; Cooke, Michael; Cousin, David; Onions, Stuart; Shannon, Jonathan; Watts, John; Murray, Christopher W

    2018-05-31

    Aberrant activation of the MAPK pathway drives cell proliferation in multiple cancers. Inhibitors of BRAF and MEK kinases are approved for the treatment of BRAF mutant melanoma, but resistance frequently emerges, often mediated by increased signaling through ERK1/2. Here, we describe the fragment-based generation of ERK1/2 inhibitors that block catalytic phosphorylation of downstream substrates such as RSK but also modulate phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by MEK without directly inhibiting MEK. X-ray crystallographic and biophysical fragment screening followed by structure-guided optimization and growth from the hinge into a pocket proximal to the C-α helix afforded highly potent ERK1/2 inhibitors with excellent kinome selectivity. In BRAF mutant cells, the lead compound suppresses pRSK and pERK levels and inhibits proliferation at low nanomolar concentrations. The lead exhibits tumor regression upon oral dosing in BRAF mutant xenograft models, providing a promising basis for further optimization toward clinical pERK1/2 modulating ERK1/2 inhibitors.

  3. Dimensional crossover in fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez, Arezky H.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2000-11-01

    Experiments in which thick clay plates and glass rods are fractured have revealed different behavior of fragment mass distribution function in the small and large fragment regions. In this paper we explain this behavior using non-extensive Tsallis statistics and show how the crossover between the two regions is caused by the change in the fragments’ dimensionality during the fracture process. We obtain a physical criterion for the position of this crossover and an expression for the change in the power-law exponent between the small and large fragment regions. These predictions are in good agreement with the experiments on thick clay plates.

  4. Embedded Fragments Registry (EFR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — In 2009, the Department of Defense estimated that approximately 40,000 service members who served in OEF/OIF may have embedded fragment wounds as the result of small...

  5. Physics of projectile fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamisono, Tadanori

    1982-01-01

    This is a study report on the polarization phenomena of the projectile fragments produced by heavy ion reactions, and the beta decay of fragments. The experimental project by using heavy ions with the energy from 50 MeV/amu to 250 MeV/amu was designed. Construction of an angle-dispersion spectrograph for projectile fragments was proposed. This is a two-stage spectrograph. The first stage is a QQDQQ type separator, and the second stage is QDQD type. Estimation shows that Co-66 may be separated from the nuclei with mass of 65 and 67. The orientation of fragments can be measured by detecting beta-ray. The apparatus consists of a uniform field magnet, an energy absorber, a stopper, a RF coil and a beta-ray hodoscope. This system can be used for not only this purpose but also for the measurement of hyperfine structure. (Kato, T.)

  6. Fragmentation Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The fragmentation model combines patch size and patch continuity with diversity of vegetation types per patch and rarity of vegetation types per patch. A patch was...

  7. Stone fragmentation by ultrasound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In the present work, enhancement of the kidney stone fragmentation by using ultrasound is studied. The cavi- ... ment system like radiation pressure balance, the power is given by ... Thus the bubble size has direct relationship with its life and.

  8. Fragment capture device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  9. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  10. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Key, Brian P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garcia, Daniel B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-05

    The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

  11. Dynamic effects in fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G. F.; Esbensen, H.

    2002-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions offer a useful tool to study the spectroscopy of halo nuclei, but the large extent of the halo wave function makes the reaction theory more difficult. The simple reaction models based on the eikonal approximation for the nuclear interaction or first-order perturbation theory for the Coulomb interaction have systematic errors that they investigate here, comparing to the predictions of complete dynamical calculations. They find that stripping probabilities are underpredicted by the eikonal model, leading to extracted spectroscopy strengths that are two large. In contrast, the Coulomb excitation is overpredicted by the simple theory. They attribute this to a screening effect, as is well known in the Barkas effect on stopping powers. The errors decrease with beam energy as E(sub beam)(sup -1), and are not significant at beam energies above 50 MeV/u. At lower beam energies, the effects should be taken into account when extracting quantitative spectroscopic strengths

  12. Experiences in fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher W; Verdonk, Marcel L; Rees, David C

    2012-05-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become established in both industry and academia as an alternative approach to high-throughput screening for the generation of chemical leads for drug targets. In FBDD, specialised detection methods are used to identify small chemical compounds (fragments) that bind to the drug target, and structural biology is usually employed to establish their binding mode and to facilitate their optimisation. In this article, we present three recent and successful case histories in FBDD. We then re-examine the key concepts and challenges of FBDD with particular emphasis on recent literature and our own experience from a substantial number of FBDD applications. Our opinion is that careful application of FBDD is living up to its promise of delivering high quality leads with good physical properties and that in future many drug molecules will be derived from fragment-based approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fragment informatics and computational fragment-based drug design: an overview and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chunquan; Zhang, Wannian

    2013-05-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a promising approach for the discovery and optimization of lead compounds. Despite its successes, FBDD also faces some internal limitations and challenges. FBDD requires a high quality of target protein and good solubility of fragments. Biophysical techniques for fragment screening necessitate expensive detection equipment and the strategies for evolving fragment hits to leads remain to be improved. Regardless, FBDD is necessary for investigating larger chemical space and can be applied to challenging biological targets. In this scenario, cheminformatics and computational chemistry can be used as alternative approaches that can significantly improve the efficiency and success rate of lead discovery and optimization. Cheminformatics and computational tools assist FBDD in a very flexible manner. Computational FBDD can be used independently or in parallel with experimental FBDD for efficiently generating and optimizing leads. Computational FBDD can also be integrated into each step of experimental FBDD and help to play a synergistic role by maximizing its performance. This review will provide critical analysis of the complementarity between computational and experimental FBDD and highlight recent advances in new algorithms and successful examples of their applications. In particular, fragment-based cheminformatics tools, high-throughput fragment docking, and fragment-based de novo drug design will provide the focus of this review. We will also discuss the advantages and limitations of different methods and the trends in new developments that should inspire future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Crystallographically-based analysis of the NMR spectra of maghemite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiers, K.M.; Cashion, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    All possible iron environments with respect to nearest neighbour vacancies in vacancy-ordered and vacancy-disordered maghemite have been evaluated and used as the foundation for a crystallographically-based analysis of the published NMR spectra of maghemite. The spectral components have been assigned to particular configurations and excellent agreement obtained in comparing predicted spectra with published spectra taken in applied magnetic fields. The broadness of the published NMR lines has been explained by calculations of the magnetic dipole fields at the various iron sites and consideration of the supertransferred hyperfine fields. - Highlights: ► Analysis of 57 Fe NMR of maghemite based on vacancy ordering and nearest neighbour vacancies. ► Assignment of NMR spectral components based on crystallographic analysis of unique iron sites. ► Strong agreement between predicted spectra and published spectra taken in applied magnetic fields. ► Maghemite NMR spectral broadening due to various iron sites and supertransferred hyperfine field.

  15. A crystallographic perspective on sharing data and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Ian J.; Groom, Colin R.

    2014-10-01

    The crystallographic community is in many ways an exemplar of the benefits and practices of sharing data. Since the inception of the technique, virtually every published crystal structure has been made available to others. This has been achieved through the establishment of several specialist data centres, including the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, which produces the Cambridge Structural Database. Containing curated structures of small organic molecules, some containing a metal, the database has been produced for almost 50 years. This has required the development of complex informatics tools and an environment allowing expert human curation. As importantly, a financial model has evolved which has, to date, ensured the sustainability of the resource. However, the opportunities afforded by technological changes and changing attitudes to sharing data make it an opportune moment to review current practices.

  16. An alternative to the crystallographic reconstruction of austenite in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction programme written in Matlab is developed by combining the best features of the existing models: the orientation relationship refinement, the local pixel-by-pixel analysis and the nuclei identification and spreading strategy. This programme can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. Its applicability is demonstrated on both quenching and partitioning and as-quenched lath-martensite steels. - Highlights: • An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction program is developed. • The method combines a local analysis and a nuclei identification/spreading strategy. • The validity of the calculated orientation relationship is verified on a Q and P steel. • The accuracy of the reconstructed microtexture is investigated on a martensite steel

  17. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Henriques

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  18. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam

  19. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  20. Searching Fragment Spaces with feature trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessel, Uta; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Lilienthal, Markus; Claussen, Holger

    2009-02-01

    Virtual combinatorial chemistry easily produces billions of compounds, for which conventional virtual screening cannot be performed even with the fastest methods available. An efficient solution for such a scenario is the generation of Fragment Spaces, which encode huge numbers of virtual compounds by their fragments/reagents and rules of how to combine them. Similarity-based searches can be performed in such spaces without ever fully enumerating all virtual products. Here we describe the generation of a huge Fragment Space encoding about 5 * 10(11) compounds based on established in-house synthesis protocols for combinatorial libraries, i.e., we encode practically evaluated combinatorial chemistry protocols in a machine readable form, rendering them accessible to in silico search methods. We show how such searches in this Fragment Space can be integrated as a first step in an overall workflow. It reduces the extremely huge number of virtual products by several orders of magnitude so that the resulting list of molecules becomes more manageable for further more elaborated and time-consuming analysis steps. Results of a case study are presented and discussed, which lead to some general conclusions for an efficient expansion of the chemical space to be screened in pharmaceutical companies.

  1. Some non-linear physics in crystallographic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubry, S.

    1977-10-01

    A summary of studies on simple but strongly nonlinear crystallographic models that make use of some methods in stochasticity is presented. Two one-dimensional models are described; one has been studied to understand some aspects of the nonlinear dynamics in crystals when close to the transition temperature, the other is for commensurability and incommensurability problems. Periodic orbits and the dynamics of a one-dimensional coupled double-well chain are considered, along with lattice locking and stochasticity

  2. The crystallographic space groups and Heterotic string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    While the 17 planar crystallographic groups were shown to correspond to 17 two and three Stein spaces with a total dimension equal to DimE12=5α-bar o ≅685, the present work reveals that the corresponding 219 three dimensional groups leads to a total dimensionality equal to N o ≅8872 which happens to be the exact total number of massless states of the transfinite version of Heterotic super string spectrum.

  3. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    OpenAIRE

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Zwart, Peter H.; Adams, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An i...

  4. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E. [ETSIT-ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M. [Dept. Química Inorgánica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  5. Crystallographic features of lath martensite in low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Hiromoto; Ueji, Rintaro; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Minamino, Yoritoshi

    2006-01-01

    Electron backscattering diffraction with field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze crystallographically the lath martensite structure in a 0.20% carbon steel. The crystallographic features of the lath martensite structure, of the order of the prior austenite grain size or larger, were clarified. Although the orientations of the martensite crystals were scattered around the ideal variant orientations, the martensite in this steel maintained the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship. The procedures of the crystallographic analysis of the martensite (ferrite) phase with the K-S orientation relationship were explained in detail. Variant analysis showed that all 24 possible variants did not necessarily appear within a single prior austenite grain and that all six variants did not necessarily appear within each packet. Specific combinations of two variants appeared within local regions (sub-blocks), indicating a strict rule for variant selection. Prior austenite grain boundaries and most of the packet boundaries were clearly recognized. However, it was difficult to determine the block boundaries within the sub-blocks

  6. Crystallographic deterioration of MOVPE InN during the growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, K.; Nagai, Y.; Houchin, Y.; Hashimoto, A.; Yamamoto, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the crystallographic degradation of MOVPE InN during the growth. Using FWHMs of X-ray rocking curve, tilt ((0002)) and twist ((10-10)) angle distributions are evaluated and effects of the major growth parameters, such as growth temperature, growth time and with/without GaN buffer in the degradation, are revealed. With increasing either thickness of grown InN or growth temperature up to 600 C, the tilt angle distribution is markedly increased, indicating the crystallographic degradation of grown films. The use of a GaN buffer reduces such degradation. Since the twist angle distribution is scarcely changed by such growth parameters, the destruction of InN crystals during growth and annealing is concluded to be anisotropic. The trends of the crystallographic degradation revealed here are in good agreement with those for the electrical and optical degradation previously reported. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Advances in fragment-based drug discovery platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Masaya; Warizaya, Masaichi; Amano, Yasushi; Ohno, Kazuki; Niimi, Tatsuya

    2009-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has been established as a powerful alternative and complement to traditional high-throughput screening techniques for identifying drug leads. At present, this technique is widely used among academic groups as well as small biotech and large pharmaceutical companies. In recent years, > 10 new compounds developed with FBDD have entered clinical development, and more and more attention in the drug discovery field is being focused on this technique. Under the FBDD approach, a fragment library of relatively small compounds (molecular mass = 100 - 300 Da) is screened by various methods and the identified fragment hits which normally weakly bind to the target are used as starting points to generate more potent drug leads. Because FBDD is still a relatively new drug discovery technology, further developments and optimizations in screening platforms and fragment exploitation can be expected. This review summarizes recent advances in FBDD platforms and discusses the factors important for the successful application of this technique. Under the FBDD approach, both identifying the starting fragment hit to be developed and generating the drug lead from that starting fragment hit are important. Integration of various techniques, such as computational technology, X-ray crystallography, NMR, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, mass spectrometry and high-concentration screening, must be applied in a situation-appropriate manner.

  8. Fragmentation of relativistic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cork, B.

    1975-06-01

    Nuclei with energies of several GeV/n interact with hadrons and produce fragments that encompass the fields of nuclear physics, meson physics, and particle physics. Experimental results are now available to explore problems in nuclear physics such as the validity of the shell model to explain the momentum distribution of fragments, the contribution of giant dipole resonances to fragment production cross sections, the effective Coulomb barrier, and nuclear temperatures. A new approach to meson physics is possible by exploring the nucleon charge-exchange process. Particle physics problems are explored by measuring the energy and target dependence of isotope production cross sections, thus determining if limiting fragmentation and target factorization are valid, and measuring total cross sections to determine if the factorization relation, sigma/sub AB/ 2 = sigma/sub AA/ . sigma/sub BB/, is violated. Also, new experiments have been done to measure the angular distribution of fragments that could be explained as nuclear shock waves, and to explore for ultradense matter produced by very heavy ions incident on heavy atoms. (12 figures, 2 tables)

  9. The ways and means of fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, Bradley C; Norton, Raymond S; Scanlon, Martin J

    2016-11-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has emerged as a mainstream approach for the rapid and efficient identification of building blocks that can be used to develop high-affinity ligands against protein targets. One of the strengths of FBDD is the relative ease and low cost of the primary screen to identify fragments that bind. However, the fragments that emerge from primary screens often have low affinities, with K D values in the high μM to mM range, and a significant challenge for FBDD is to develop the initial fragments into more potent ligands. Successful fragment elaboration often requires co-structures of the fragments bound to their target proteins, as well as a range of biophysical and biochemical assays to track potency and efficacy. These challenges have led to the development of specific chemical strategies for the elaboration of weakly-binding fragments into more potent "hits" and lead compounds. In this article we review different approaches that have been employed to meet these challenges and describe some of the strategies that have resulted in several fragment-derived compounds entering clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Fragment-based drug discovery: concept and aim].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daisuke

    2010-03-01

    Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) has been recognized as a newly emerging lead discovery methodology that involves biophysical fragment screening and chemistry-driven fragment-to-lead stages. Although fragments, defined as structurally simple and small compounds (typically FBDD primarily turns our attention to weakly but specifically binding fragments (hit fragments) as the starting point of medicinal chemistry. Hit fragments are then promoted to more potent lead compounds through linking or merging with another hit fragment and/or attaching functional groups. Another positive aspect of FBDD is ligand efficiency. Ligand efficiency is a useful guide in screening hit selection and hit-to-lead phases to achieve lead-likeness. Owing to these features, a number of successful applications of FBDD to "undruggable targets" (where HTS and other lead identification methods failed to identify useful lead compounds) have been reported. As a result, FBDD is now expected to complement more conventional methodologies. This review, as an introduction of the following articles, will summarize the fundamental concepts of FBDD and will discuss its advantages over other conventional drug discovery approaches.

  11. Land fragmentation and production diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciaian, Pavel; Guri, Fatmir; Rajcaniova, Miroslava; Drabik, Dusan; Paloma, Sergio Gomez Y.

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the impact of land fragmentation on production diversification in rural Albania. Albania represents a particularly interesting case for studying land fragmentation as the fragmentation is a direct outcome of land reforms. The results indicate that land fragmentation is an important driver

  12. Heavy fragment radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silisteanu, I.

    1991-06-01

    The effect of collective mode excitation in heavy fragment radioactivity (HFR) is explored and discussed in the light of current experimental data. It is found that the coupling and resonance effects in fragment interaction and also the proper angular momentum effects may lead to an important enhancing of the emission process. New useful procedures are proposed for the study of nuclear decay properties. The relations between different decay processes are investigated in detail. We are also trying to understand and explain in a unified way the reaction mechanisms in decay phenomena. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression Screening Substance Abuse Screening Alcohol Use Screening Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  14. PELE fragmentation dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreault, J.; Hinsberg, N.P. van; Abadjieva, E.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical model that describes the PELE fragmentation dynamics is presented and compared with experimental results from literature. The model accounts for strong shock effects and detailed interactions taking place between the filling – the inner core of the ammunition – and the target

  15. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (Pzooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (Pzooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (P0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (Pzooxanthellae are the most sensitive element in the coral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fragments of the Past

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Szende; Annie Holcombe

    2016-01-01

    With travel being made more accessible throughout the decades, the hospitality industry constantly evolved their practices as society and technology progressed. Hotels looked for news ways up service their customers, which led to the invention of the Servidor in 1918. Once revolutionary innovations have gone extinct, merely becoming fragments of the past.

  17. Synthesis of arabinoxylan fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underlin, Emilie Nørmølle; Böhm, Maximilian F.; Madsen, Robert

    , or production of commercial chemicals which are mainly obtained from fossil fuels today.The arbinoxylan fragments have a backbone of β-1,4-linked xylans with α-L-arabinose units attached at specific positions. The synthesis ultilises an efficient synthetic route, where all the xylan units can be derived from D...

  18. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    stories. We argue that meaning by story making is not always created by coherence and causality; meaning is created by different types of fragmentation: discontinuities, tensions and editing. The objective of this article is to develop and advance antenarrative practice analysis of work stories...

  19. Fragments of the Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Szende

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With travel being made more accessible throughout the decades, the hospitality industry constantly evolved their practices as society and technology progressed. Hotels looked for news ways up service their customers, which led to the invention of the Servidor in 1918. Once revolutionary innovations have gone extinct, merely becoming fragments of the past.

  20. Crystallographic study of one turn of G/C-rich B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, U; Alings, C

    1989-11-20

    The DNA decamer d(CCAGGCCTGG) has been studied by X-ray crystallography. At a nominal resolution of 1.6 A, the structure was refined to R = 16.9% using stereochemical restraints. The oligodeoxyribonucleotide forms a straight B-DNA double helix with crystallographic dyad symmetry and ten base-pairs per turn. In the crystal lattice, DNA fragments stack end-to-end along the c-axis to form continuous double helices. The overall helical structure and, notably, the groove dimensions of the decamer are more similar to standard, fiber diffraction-determined B-DNA than A-tract DNA. A unique stacking geometry is observed at the CA/TG base-pair step, where an increased rotation about the helix axis and a sliding motion of the base-pairs along their long axes leads to a superposition of the base rings with neighboring carbonyl and amino functions. Three-center (bifurcated) hydrogen bonds are possible at the CC/GG base-pair steps of the decamer. In their common sequence elements, d(CCAGGCCTGG) and the related G.A mismatch decamer d(CCAAGATTGG) show very similar three-dimensional structures, except that d(CCAGGCCTGG) appears to have a less regularly hydrated minor groove. The paucity of minor groove hydration in the center of the decamer may be a general feature of G/C-rich DNA and explain its relative instability in the B-form of DNA.

  1. The use of Fourier reverse transforms in crystallographic phase refinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringrose, Sharon [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Often a crystallographer obtains an electron density map which shows only part of the structure. In such cases, the phasing of the trial model is poor enough that the electron density map may show peaks in some of the atomic positions, but other atomic positions are not visible. There may also be extraneous peaks present which are not due to atomic positions. A method for determination of crystal structures that have resisted solution through normal crystallographic methods has been developed. PHASER is a series of FORTRAN programs which aids in the structure solution of poorly phased electron density maps by refining the crystallographic phases. It facilitates the refinement of such poorly phased electron density maps for difficult structures which might otherwise not be solvable. The trial model, which serves as the starting point for the phase refinement, may be acquired by several routes such as direct methods or Patterson methods. Modifications are made to the reverse transform process based on several assumptions. First, the starting electron density map is modified based on the fact that physically the electron density map must be non-negative at all points. In practice a small positive cutoff is used. A reverse Fourier transform is computed based on the modified electron density map. Secondly, the authors assume that a better electron density map will result by using the observed magnitudes of the structure factors combined with the phases calculated in the reverse transform. After convergence has been reached, more atomic positions and less extraneous peaks are observed in the refined electron density map. The starting model need not be very large to achieve success with PHASER; successful phase refinement has been achieved with a starting model that consists of only 5% of the total scattering power of the full molecule. The second part of the thesis discusses three crystal structure determinations.

  2. A probabilistic fragment-based protein structure prediction algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Simoncini

    Full Text Available Conformational sampling is one of the bottlenecks in fragment-based protein structure prediction approaches. They generally start with a coarse-grained optimization where mainchain atoms and centroids of side chains are considered, followed by a fine-grained optimization with an all-atom representation of proteins. It is during this coarse-grained phase that fragment-based methods sample intensely the conformational space. If the native-like region is sampled more, the accuracy of the final all-atom predictions may be improved accordingly. In this work we present EdaFold, a new method for fragment-based protein structure prediction based on an Estimation of Distribution Algorithm. Fragment-based approaches build protein models by assembling short fragments from known protein structures. Whereas the probability mass functions over the fragment libraries are uniform in the usual case, we propose an algorithm that learns from previously generated decoys and steers the search toward native-like regions. A comparison with Rosetta AbInitio protocol shows that EdaFold is able to generate models with lower energies and to enhance the percentage of near-native coarse-grained decoys on a benchmark of [Formula: see text] proteins. The best coarse-grained models produced by both methods were refined into all-atom models and used in molecular replacement. All atom decoys produced out of EdaFold's decoy set reach high enough accuracy to solve the crystallographic phase problem by molecular replacement for some test proteins. EdaFold showed a higher success rate in molecular replacement when compared to Rosetta. Our study suggests that improving low resolution coarse-grained decoys allows computational methods to avoid subsequent sampling issues during all-atom refinement and to produce better all-atom models. EdaFold can be downloaded from http://www.riken.jp/zhangiru/software.html [corrected].

  3. The Almost Periodic Rigidity of Crystallographic Bar-Joint Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Badri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A crystallographic bar-joint framework, C in Rd, is shown to be almost periodically infinitesimally rigid if and only if it is strictly periodically infinitesimally rigid and the rigid unit mode (RUM spectrum, Ω (C, is a singleton. Moreover, the almost periodic infinitesimal flexes of C are characterised in terms of a matrix-valued function, ΦC(z, on the d-torus, Td, determined by a full rank translation symmetry group and an associated motif of joints and bars.

  4. Hydrophilic Pt nanoflowers: synthesis, crystallographic analysis and catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Altantzis, Thomas; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Bals, Sara; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge

    2016-05-21

    Water-soluble Pt nanoflowers (NFs) were prepared by diethylene glycol-mediated reduction of Pt acetylacetonate (Pt(acac) 2 ) in the presence of polyethylenimine. Advanced electron microscopy analysis showed that the NFs consist of multiple branches with a truncated cubic morphology and different crystallographic orientations. We demonstrate that the nature of the solvent strongly influences the resulting morphology. The catalytic performance of the Pt NFs in 4-nitrophenol reduction was found to be superior to that of other nanoparticle-based catalysts. Additionally, the Pt NFs display good catalytic reusability with no loss of activity after five consecutive cycles.

  5. Fragment-based approaches to the discovery of kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortenson, Paul N; Berdini, Valerio; O'Reilly, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases are one of the most important families of drug targets, and aberrant kinase activity has been linked to a large number of disease areas. Although eminently targetable using small molecules, kinases present a number of challenges as drug targets, not least obtaining selectivity across such a large and relatively closely related target family. Fragment-based drug discovery involves screening simple, low-molecular weight compounds to generate initial hits against a target. These hits are then optimized to more potent compounds via medicinal chemistry, usually facilitated by structural biology. Here, we will present a number of recent examples of fragment-based approaches to the discovery of kinase inhibitors, detailing the construction of fragment-screening libraries, the identification and validation of fragment hits, and their optimization into potent and selective lead compounds. The advantages of fragment-based methodologies will be discussed, along with some of the challenges associated with using this route. Finally, we will present a number of key lessons derived both from our own experience running fragment screens against kinases and from a large number of published studies.

  6. Fragment-based drug discovery using rational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhoti, H

    2007-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is established as an alternative approach to high-throughput screening for generating novel small molecule drug candidates. In FBDD, relatively small libraries of low molecular weight compounds (or fragments) are screened using sensitive biophysical techniques to detect their binding to the target protein. A lower absolute affinity of binding is expected from fragments, compared to much higher molecular weight hits detected by high-throughput screening, due to their reduced size and complexity. Through the use of iterative cycles of medicinal chemistry, ideally guided by three-dimensional structural data, it is often then relatively straightforward to optimize these weak binding fragment hits into potent and selective lead compounds. As with most other lead discovery methods there are two key components of FBDD; the detection technology and the compound library. In this review I outline the two main approaches used for detecting the binding of low affinity fragments and also some of the key principles that are used to generate a fragment library. In addition, I describe an example of how FBDD has led to the generation of a drug candidate that is now being tested in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer.

  7. Fragment-based discovery of a potent NAMPT inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanova, Alla; Longenecker, Kenton L; Pratt, Steve D; Panchal, Sanjay C; Clark, Richard F; Lake, Marc; Gopalakrishnan, Sujatha M; Raich, Diana; Sun, Chaohong; Petros, Andrew M

    2017-12-12

    NAMPT expression is elevated in many cancers, making this protein a potential target for anticancer therapy. We have carried out both NMR based and TR-FRET based fragment screens against human NAMPT and identified six novel binders with a range of potencies. Co-crystal structures were obtained for two of the fragments bound to NAMPT while for the other four fragments force-field driven docking was employed to generate a bound pose. Based on structural insights arising from comparison of the bound fragment poses to that of bound FK866 we were able to synthetically elaborate one of the fragments into a potent NAMPT inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fragments of Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    Time travel films necessarily fragment linear narratives, as scenes are revisited with differences from the first time we saw it. Popular films such as Back to the Future mine comedy from these visitations, but there are many different approaches. One extreme is Chris Marker's La Jetée - a film...... made almost completely of still images, recounting the end of the world. These stills can be viewed as fragments that have survived the end of the world and now provide the only access to the events that occured. Shane Carruth's Primer has a different approach to time travel, the narrative diegesis...... that is presented; how do we understand such films and to what extent is it even possible to make sense of a film that has no real beginning, middle or end?...

  9. Fragmentation of atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, J.L.; Fano, U.

    1996-01-01

    We report recent progress toward a nonperturbative formulation of many-body quantum dynamics that treats all constituent particles on an equal footing. This formulation is capable of detailing the evolution of a system toward the diverse fragments into which it can break up. We illustrate the general concept with the simple example of the simultaneous excitation of both electrons in a helium atom. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Modelling the fragmentation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougault, R.; Durand, D.; Gulminelli, F.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of high amplitude collective motion in the nuclear fragmentation by using semi-classical macroscopic, as well as, microscopic simulations (BUU). These studies are motivated by the search of instabilities responsible for nuclear fragmentation. Two cases were examined: the bubble formation following the collective expansion of the compressed nucleus in case of very central reactions and, in the case of the semi-central collisions, the fast fission of the two partners issued from a binary reaction, in their corresponding Coulomb field. In the two cases the fragmentation channel is dominated by the inter-relation between the Coulomb and nuclear fields, and it is possible to obtain semi-quantitative predictions as functions of interaction parameters. The transport equations of BUU type predicts for central reactions formation of a high density transient state. Of much interest is the mechanism subsequent to de-excitation. It seems reasonable to conceive that the pressure stocked in the compressional mode manifests itself as a collective expansion of the system. As the pressure is a increasing function of the available energy one can conceive a variety of energy depending exit channels, starting from the fragmentation due the amplification of fluctuations interior to the spinodal zone up to the complete vaporization of the highly excited system. If the reached pressure is sufficiently high the reaction final state may preserve the memory of the entrance channel as a collective radial energy superimposed to the thermal disordered motion. Distributions of particles in the configuration space for both central and semi-central reactions for the Pb+Au system are presented. The rupture time is estimated to the order of 300 fm/c, and is strongly dependent on the initial temperature. The study of dependence of the rupture time on the interaction parameters is under way

  11. Hot nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1993-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of nuclei above 5 MeV temperature. Considerable progress has been made recently on the understanding of the formation and the fate of such hot nuclei. It appears that the nucleus seems more stable against temperature than predicted by static calculations. However, the occurrence of multifragment production at high excitation energies is now well established. The various experimental features of the fragmentation process are discussed. (author) 59 refs., 12 figs

  12. Excited nuclei fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental indications leading to the thought of a very excited nucleus fragmentation are resumed. Theoretical approaches are briefly described; they are used to explain the phenomenon in showing off they are based on a minimum information principle. This model is based on time dependent Thomas-Fermi calculation which allows the mean field effect description, and with a site-bound percolation model which allows the fluctuation description [fr

  13. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonine, Pavel V., E-mail: pafonine@lbl.gov; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [CNRS–INSERM–UdS, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods.

  14. Crystallographic investigation of grain selection during initial solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, H; Shinozuka, K; Kataoka, Y

    2016-01-01

    Normally, macroscopic solidified structure consists of chill, columnar and equiaxed zones. In a chill zone, many fine grains nucleate on the mold surface and grow their own preferred growth direction. Only a few of them continue to grow because of grain selection. In order to understand the grain selection process, crystallographic investigation has been carried out in the zone of initial solidification in this study. 10 g of Al-6 wt%Si alloy was melted at 850 °C and poured on the thick copper plate. Longitudinal cross section of the solidified shell was observed by a SEM and analyzed by EBSD. The result of EBSD mapping reveals that crystallographic orientation was random in the range of initial solidification. Further, some grains are elongated along their <100> direction. Columnar grains, whose growth directions are almost parallel to the heat flow direction, develop via grain selection. Here, a dendrite whose growth direction is close to the heat flow direction overgrows the other dendrite whose growth direction is far from the heat flow direction. However, sometimes we observed that dendrite, whose zenith angle is large, overgrew the other dendrite. It can be deduced that the time of nucleation on the mold surface is not constant. (paper)

  15. Azimuthal Anisotropies in Nuclear Fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowska, A.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.

    2002-01-01

    The directed and elliptic flow of fragments emitted from the excited projectile nuclei has been observed for 158 AGeV Pb collisions with the lead and plastic targets. For comparison the flow analysis has been performed for 10.6 AGeV Au collisions with the emulsion target. The strong directed flow of heaviest fragments is found. Light fragments exhibit directed flow opposite to that of heavy fragments. The elliptic flow for all multiply charged fragments is positive and increases with the charge of the fragment. The observed flow patterns in the fragmentation of the projectile nucleus are practically independent of the mass of the target nucleus and the collision energy. Emission of fragments in nuclear multifragmentation shows similar, although weaker, flow effects. (author)

  16. Universality of projectile fragmentation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, G.; Mallik, S.; Das Gupta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Presently projectile fragmentation reaction is an important area of research as it is used for the production of radioactive ion beams. In this work, the recently developed projectile fragmentation model with an universal temperature profile is used for studying the charge distributions of different projectile fragmentation reactions with different projectile target combinations at different incident energies. The model for projectile fragmentation consists of three stages: (i) abrasion, (ii) multifragmentation and (iii) evaporation

  17. An Archeology of Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald L. Bruns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a short (fragmentary history of fragmentary writing from the German Romantics (F. W. Schlegel, Friedrich Hölderlin to modern and contemporary concrete or visual poetry. Such writing is (often deliberately a critique of the logic of subsumption that tries to assimilate whatever is singular and irreducible into totalities of various categorical or systematic sorts. Arguably, the fragment (parataxis is the distinctive feature of literary Modernism, which is a rejection, not of what precedes it, but of what Max Weber called “the rationalization of the world” (or Modernity whose aim is to keep everything, including all that is written, under surveillance and control.

  18. Fragmentation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrain, R.

    1984-08-01

    Projectile and nuclear fragmentation are defined and processes referred to are recalled. The two different aspects of fragmentation are considered but the emphasis is also put on heavy ion induced reactions. The preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL to study peripheral heavy ions induced reactions at intermediate energy are presented. The results of this experiment will illustrate the characteristics of projectile fragmentation and this will also give the opportunity to study projectile fragmentation in the transition region. Then nuclear fragmentation is considered which is associated with more central collisions in the case of heavy ion induced reactions. This aspect of fragmentation is also ilustrated with two heavy ion experiments in which fragments emitted at large angle have been observed

  19. Cloning, expression and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) gp45 ectodomain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Pei-Long; Lv, Shu-Xia; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xin-Qi

    2011-01-01

    The equine infectious anaemia virus gp45 ectodomain was cloned, expressed and crystallized. Preliminary crystallographic analysis showed that the protein belonged to space group P6 3 and contained one molecule per asymmetric unit. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) belongs to the lentivirus genus. The first successful lentiviral vaccine was developed for EIAV. Thus, EIAV may serve as a valuable model for HIV vaccine research. EIAV glycoprotein 45 (gp45) plays a similar role to gp41 in HIV by mediating virus–host membrane fusion. The gp45 ectodomain was constructed according to the structure of HIV gp41, with removal of the disulfide-bond loop region. The protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized following purification. However, most of the crystals grew as aggregates and could not be used for data collection. By extensively screening hundreds of crystals, a 2.7 Å resolution data set was collected from a single crystal. The crystal belonged to space group P6 3 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 46.84, c = 101.61 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Molecular replacement was performed using the coordinates of various lengths of HIV gp41 as search models. A long bent helix was identified and a well defined electron-density map around the long helix was obtained. This primary model provided the starting point for further refinement

  20. Identification of genes affecting vacuole membrane fragmentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydie Michaillat

    Full Text Available The equilibrium of membrane fusion and fission influences the volume and copy number of organelles. Fusion of yeast vacuoles has been well characterized but their fission and the mechanisms determining vacuole size and abundance remain poorly understood. We therefore attempted to systematically characterize factors necessary for vacuole fission. Here, we present results of an in vivo screening for deficiencies in vacuolar fragmentation activity of an ordered collection deletion mutants, representing 4881 non-essential genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen identified 133 mutants with strong defects in vacuole fragmentation. These comprise numerous known fragmentation factors, such as the Fab1p complex, Tor1p, Sit4p and the V-ATPase, thus validating the approach. The screen identified many novel factors promoting vacuole fragmentation. Among those are 22 open reading frames of unknown function and three conspicuous clusters of proteins with known function. The clusters concern the ESCRT machinery, adaptins, and lipases, which influence the production of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. A common feature of these factors of known function is their capacity to change membrane curvature, suggesting that they might promote vacuole fragmentation via this property.

  1. Crystallographic disorder and magnetism in UPd2-xSn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suellow, S.; Mattheus, C.C.; Becker, B.; Snel, C.E.; Nieuwenhuys, G.J.; Mydosh, J.A.; Schenck, A.

    1997-01-01

    The intermetallic compound UPd 2 Sn has been shown in previous investigations to crystallize in an orthorhombic structure (space group Pnma). No indications for magnetic or superconducting transitions were found. However, if the Pd content is reduced, then, similar to UNi 2 Sn, a structural transition occurs. We prepared UPd 1.85 Sn and found it to crystallize as a Heusler compound in the MnCu 2 Al-structure (space group Fm anti 3m). Now the system undergoes a transition into a disordered magnetic state at T mag ≅ 28 K. Here, we present our measurements of the specific heat, susceptibility and muon relaxation of UPd 1.85 Sn, and discuss the nature of the magnetic state in relation to the crystallographic structure. (orig.)

  2. Fragmentation of random trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalay, Z; Ben-Naim, E

    2015-01-01

    We study fragmentation of a random recursive tree into a forest by repeated removal of nodes. The initial tree consists of N nodes and it is generated by sequential addition of nodes with each new node attaching to a randomly-selected existing node. As nodes are removed from the tree, one at a time, the tree dissolves into an ensemble of separate trees, namely, a forest. We study statistical properties of trees and nodes in this heterogeneous forest, and find that the fraction of remaining nodes m characterizes the system in the limit N→∞. We obtain analytically the size density ϕ s of trees of size s. The size density has power-law tail ϕ s ∼s −α with exponent α=1+(1/m). Therefore, the tail becomes steeper as further nodes are removed, and the fragmentation process is unusual in that exponent α increases continuously with time. We also extend our analysis to the case where nodes are added as well as removed, and obtain the asymptotic size density for growing trees. (paper)

  3. Ocean acidification reduces the crystallographic control in juvenile mussel shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzer, Susan C; Cusack, Maggie; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    Global climate change threatens the oceans as anthropogenic carbon dioxide causes ocean acidification and reduced carbonate saturation. Future projections indicate under saturation of aragonite, and potentially calcite, in the oceans by 2100. Calcifying organisms are those most at risk from such ocean acidification, as carbonate is vital in the biomineralisation of their calcium carbonate protective shells. This study highlights the importance of multi-generational studies to investigate how marine organisms can potentially adapt to future projected global climate change. Mytilus edulis is an economically important marine calcifier vulnerable to decreasing carbonate saturation as their shells comprise two calcium carbonate polymorphs: aragonite and calcite. M. edulis specimens were cultured under current and projected pCO2 (380, 550, 750 and 1000μatm), following 6months of experimental culture, adults produced second generation juvenile mussels. Juvenile mussel shells were examined for structural and crystallographic orientation of aragonite and calcite. At 1000μatm pCO2, juvenile mussels spawned and grown under this high pCO2 do not produce aragonite which is more vulnerable to carbonate under-saturation than calcite. Calcite and aragonite were produced at 380, 550 and 750μatm pCO2. Electron back scatter diffraction analyses reveal less constraint in crystallographic orientation with increased pCO2. Shell formation is maintained, although the nacre crystals appear corroded and crystals are not so closely layered together. The differences in ultrastructure and crystallography in shells formed by juveniles spawned from adults in high pCO2 conditions may prove instrumental in their ability to survive ocean acidification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transuranic Hybrid Materials: Crystallographic and Computational Metrics of Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surbella, Robert G. [Department; Ducati, Lucas C. [Department; Pellegrini, Kristi L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Autschbach, Jochen [Department; Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Cahill, Christopher L. [Department

    2017-07-26

    A family of twelve supramolecular [AnO2Cl4]2- (An = U, Np, Pu) containing compounds assembled via hydrogen and halogen bonds donated by substituted 4-X-pyridinium cations (X = H, Cl, Br, I) is reported. These materials were prepared from a room-temperature synthesis wherein crystallization of unhydrolyzed and valence pure [An(VI)O2Cl4]2- (An = U, Np, Pu) tectons are the norm. We present a hierarchy of assembly criteria based on crystallographic observations, and subsequently quantify the strengths of the non-covalent interactions using Kohn-Sham density functional calculations. We provide, for the first time, a detailed description of the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) of the actinyl tetrahalide dianions and reconcile crystallographically observed structural motifs and non-covalent interaction (NCI) acceptor-donor pairings. Our findings indicate that the average electrostatic potential across the halogen ligands (the acceptors) changes by only ~2 kJ mol-1 across the AnO22+ series, indicating the magnitude of the potential is independent of the metal center. The role of the cation is therefore critical in directing structural motifs and dictating the resulting hydrogen and halogen bond strengths, the former being stronger due to the positive charge centralized on the pyridyl nitrogen N-H+. Subsequent analyses using the Quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches support this conclusion and highlight the structure directing role of the cations. Whereas one can infer that the 2 Columbic attraction is the driver for assembly, the contribution of the non-covalent interaction is to direct the molecular-level arrangement (or disposition) of the tectons.

  5. Effective progression of nuclear magnetic resonance-detected fragment hits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Hugh L; Wyss, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become increasingly popular over the last decade as an alternate lead generation tool to HTS approaches. Several compounds have now progressed into the clinic which originated from a fragment-based approach, demonstrating the utility of this emerging field. While fragment hit identification has become much more routine and may involve different screening approaches, the efficient progression of fragment hits into quality lead series may still present a major bottleneck for the broadly successful application of FBDD. In our laboratory, we have extensive experience in fragment-based NMR screening (SbN) and the subsequent iterative progression of fragment hits using structure-assisted chemistry. To maximize impact, we have applied this approach strategically to early- and high-priority targets, and those struggling for leads. Its application has yielded a clinical candidate for BACE1 and lead series in about one third of the SbN/FBDD projects. In this chapter, we will give an overview of our strategy and focus our discussion on NMR-based FBDD approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Process of Fragment-Based Lead Discovery—A Perspective from NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongsheng Ma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD has proven fruitful during the past two decades for a variety of targets, even challenging protein–protein interaction (PPI systems. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy plays a vital role, from initial fragment-based screening to lead generation, because of its power to probe the intrinsically weak interactions between targets and low-molecular-weight fragments. Here, we review the NMR FBLD process from initial library construction to lead generation. We describe technical aspects regarding fragment library design, ligand- and protein-observed screening, and protein–ligand structure model generation. For weak binders, the initial hit-to-lead evolution can be guided by structural information retrieved from NMR spectroscopy, including chemical shift perturbation, transferred pseudocontact shifts, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. This perspective examines structure-guided optimization from weak fragment screening hits to potent leads for challenging PPI targets.

  7. Fragmented medial coronoid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, Cs.; Juhasz, T.

    1997-01-01

    Fragmented medial coronoid process: (FCP) is often considered to be part of the osteochondrosis dissecans complex, but trauma and growth discrepancies between the radius and ulna are proposed as causes. There is little to clinically differentiate FCP, from osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD) of the elbow. Pain on, flexion-extension of the elbow and lateral rotation of the paw is a little more consistent in FCP. Radiographic examination of the elbow is important despite the, fact that radiographic signs of the FCP are often nonspecific. Excessive osteoarthrosis and superimposition of the radial head and coronoid process make identification of the FCP difficult. Craniocaudal, flexed mediolateral and 25 degree craniocaudal-lateromedial views are necessary for diagnosis. Osteophyte production is more dramatic with FCP than with OCD and suggests therefore the occurrence of OCP in many cases. Although the detached process may be seen on any view, the oblique projection offers the least obstructed view. Exposure of the joint is identical to that for OCD, that means a medial approach with osteotomy of the epicondyle. In most cases the process is loose enough to be readily apparent, but in some it is necessary to exert force on the process in order to find the cleavage plane. It is necessary to remove the osteophytes as well and to inspect and irrigate the joint carefully to remove cartilage fragments before closure. Confinement is advisable for 4 weeks before returning the dog to normal activity. The outlook for function is good if the FCP is removed before secondary degenerative joint disease is well established

  8. In silico fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konteatis, Zenon D

    2010-11-01

    In silico fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a relatively new approach inspired by the success of the biophysical fragment-based drug discovery field. Here, we review the progress made by this approach in the last decade and showcase how it complements and expands the capabilities of biophysical FBDD and structure-based drug design to generate diverse, efficient drug candidates. Advancements in several areas of research that have enabled the development of in silico FBDD and some applications in drug discovery projects are reviewed. The reader is introduced to various computational methods that are used for in silico FBDD, the fragment library composition for this technique, special applications used to identify binding sites on the surface of proteins and how to assess the druggability of these sites. In addition, the reader will gain insight into the proper application of this approach from examples of successful programs. In silico FBDD captures a much larger chemical space than high-throughput screening and biophysical FBDD increasing the probability of developing more diverse, patentable and efficient molecules that can become oral drugs. The application of in silico FBDD holds great promise for historically challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. Future advances in force fields, scoring functions and automated methods for determining synthetic accessibility will all aid in delivering more successes with in silico FBDD.

  9. Fractal statistics of brittle fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Davydova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of fragmentation statistics of brittle materials that includes four types of experiments is presented. Data processing of the fragmentation of glass plates under quasi-static loading and the fragmentation of quartz cylindrical rods under dynamic loading shows that the size distribution of fragments (spatial quantity is fractal and can be described by a power law. The original experimental technique allows us to measure, apart from the spatial quantity, the temporal quantity - the size of time interval between the impulses of the light reflected from the newly created surfaces. The analysis of distributions of spatial (fragment size and temporal (time interval quantities provides evidence of obeying scaling laws, which suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmentation.

  10. Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) Simulations for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    OpenAIRE

    Faller, Christina E.; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) involves screening low molecular weight molecules (“fragments”) that correspond to functional groups found in larger drug-like molecules to determine their binding to target proteins or nucleic acids. Based on the principle of thermodynamic additivity, two fragments that bind non-overlapping nearby sites on the target can be combined to yield a new molecule whose binding free energy is the sum of those of the fragments. Experimental FBDD approaches, like NMR ...

  11. Fluctuations in the fragmentation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botet, R.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1993-01-01

    Some general framework of sequential fragmentation is presented, as provided by the newly proposed Fragmentation - Inactivation - Binary model, and to study briefly its basic and universal features. This model includes as particular cases most of the previous kinetic fragmentation models. In particular it is discussed how one arrives in this framework to the critical behaviour, called the shattering transition. This model is then compared to recent data on gold multifragmentation at 600 MeV/nucl. (authors) 20 refs., 5 figs

  12. MRI of displaced meniscal fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunoski, Brian; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Laor, Tal

    2012-01-01

    A torn meniscus frequently requires surgical fixation or debridement as definitive treatment. Meniscal tears with associated fragment displacement, such as bucket handle and flap tears, can be difficult to recognize and accurately describe on MRI, and displaced fragments can be challenging to identify at surgery. A displaced meniscal fragment can be obscured by synovium or be in a location not usually evaluated at arthroscopy. We present a pictorial essay of meniscal tears with displaced fragments in patients referred to a pediatric hospital in order to increase recognition and accurate interpretation by the radiologist, who in turn can help assist the surgeon in planning appropriate therapy. (orig.)

  13. MRI of displaced meniscal fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunoski, Brian [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Laor, Tal [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    A torn meniscus frequently requires surgical fixation or debridement as definitive treatment. Meniscal tears with associated fragment displacement, such as bucket handle and flap tears, can be difficult to recognize and accurately describe on MRI, and displaced fragments can be challenging to identify at surgery. A displaced meniscal fragment can be obscured by synovium or be in a location not usually evaluated at arthroscopy. We present a pictorial essay of meniscal tears with displaced fragments in patients referred to a pediatric hospital in order to increase recognition and accurate interpretation by the radiologist, who in turn can help assist the surgeon in planning appropriate therapy. (orig.)

  14. The importance of hydration thermodynamics in fragment-to-lead optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Osamu; Shimada, Yuzo; Yoshidome, Daisuke

    2014-12-01

    Using a computational approach to assess changes in solvation thermodynamics upon ligand binding, we investigated the effects of water molecules on the binding energetics of over 20 fragment hits and their corresponding optimized lead compounds. Binding activity and X-ray crystallographic data of published fragment-to-lead optimization studies from various therapeutically relevant targets were studied. The analysis reveals a distinct difference between the thermodynamic profile of water molecules displaced by fragment hits and those displaced by the corresponding optimized lead compounds. Specifically, fragment hits tend to displace water molecules with notably unfavorable excess entropies-configurationally constrained water molecules-relative to those displaced by the newly added moieties of the lead compound during the course of fragment-to-lead optimization. Herein we describe the details of this analysis with the goal of providing practical guidelines for exploiting thermodynamic signatures of binding site water molecules in the context of fragment-to-lead optimization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. When fragments link: a bibliometric perspective on the development of fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romasanta, Angelo K S; van der Sijde, Peter; Hellsten, Iina; Hubbard, Roderick E; Keseru, Gyorgy M; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2018-05-05

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is a highly interdisciplinary field, rich in ideas integrated from pharmaceutical sciences, chemistry, biology, and physics, among others. To enrich our understanding of the development of the field, we used bibliometric techniques to analyze 3642 publications in FBDD, complementing accounts by key practitioners. Mapping its core papers, we found the transfer of knowledge from academia to industry. Co-authorship analysis showed that university-industry collaboration has grown over time. Moreover, we show how ideas from other scientific disciplines have been integrated into the FBDD paradigm. Keyword analysis showed that the field is organized into four interconnected practices: library design, fragment screening, computational methods, and optimization. This study highlights the importance of interactions among various individuals and institutions from diverse disciplines in newly emerging scientific fields. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nadine [Theoretical Particle Physics, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University,Sölvegatan 14A, Lund, SE-223 62 (Sweden); School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University,Wellington Road, Clayton, VIC-3800 (Australia); Sjöstrand, Torbjörn [Theoretical Particle Physics, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University,Sölvegatan 14A, Lund, SE-223 62 (Sweden)

    2017-01-31

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  17. Polymer fragmentation in extensional flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroja, Armando M.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Ciesla, Michal; Longa, Lech

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of fragmentation of dilute polymer solutions in extensional flow. The transition rate is investigated both from theoretical and computational approaches, where the existence of a Gaussian distribution for the breaking bonds has been controversial. We give as well an explanation for the low fragmentation frequency found in DNA experiments.

  18. An Algebra for Program Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    1985-01-01

    Program fragments are described either by strings in the concrete syntax or by constructor applications in the abstract syntax. By defining conversions between these forms, both may be intermixed. Program fragments are constructed by terminal and nonterminal symbols from the grammar and by variab...

  19. Fracture mechanics model of fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, L.A.; Gommerstadt, B.Y.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    A model of the fragmentation process is developed, based on the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics, which predicts the average fragment size as a function of strain rate and material properties. This approach permits a unification of previous results, yielding Griffith's solution in the low-strain-rate limit and Grady's solution at high strain rates

  20. Synthesis, crystallographic and magnetic properties of protactinium pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hery, Yves.

    1979-03-01

    From a theoretical point of view, protactinium lies in a very important place in the periodic system for it seems to be the first element of the actinide series where the 5f state is occupied. We have studied protactinium pnictides, particularly arsenides and antimonides. PaAs 2 , Pa 3 As 4 , PaSb 2 and Pa 3 Sb 4 were synthetized and their crystallographic properties were determined and discussed. We have measured the magnetic susceptibilities of PaC, PaAs 2 and PaSb 2 . Protactinium exhibits a dual character. In its monocarbide, which is a weakly diamagnet, it behaves as a transition element while in the temperature independent paramagnets PaAs 2 and PaSb 2 , it behaves like a 'f' element. This 'f' element character increases with increasing metal-metal distances. Furthermore the radial expansion of the protactinium 5f orbital seems to be more important than the Uranium one, and consequently the corresponding protactinium 5f electrons are less localized. In addition, some protactinium chalcogenides (βPaS 2 , γPaSe 2 and PaOSe) have been identified [fr

  1. Preliminary crystallographic characterization of an RNA helicase from Kunjin virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangelo, Eloise; Bollati, Michela; Milani, Mario; Brisbarre, Nadège; Lamballerie, Xavier de; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Khromykh, Alexander; Bolognesi, Martino

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal 440 amino acids of the NS3 protein from Kunjin virus (Flaviviridae) code for a helicase. The protein has been overexpressed and crystallized. Characterization of the isolated monoclinic crystal form and diffraction data (at 3.0 Å resolution) are presented, together with a preliminary molecular-replacement solution. Kunjin virus is a member of the Flavivirus genus and is an Australian variant of West Nile virus. The C-terminal domain of the Kunjin virus NS3 protein displays helicase activity. The protein is thought to separate daughter and template RNA strands, assisting the initiation of replication by unwinding RNA secondary structure in the 3′ nontranslated region. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the NS3 helicase domain are reported. It is shown that Kunjin virus helicase may adopt a dimeric assembly in absence of nucleic acids, oligomerization being a means to provide the helicases with multiple nucleic acid-binding capability, facilitating translocation along the RNA strands. Kunjin virus NS3 helicase domain is an attractive model for studying the molecular mechanisms of flavivirus replication, while simultaneously providing a new basis for the rational development of anti-flaviviral compounds

  2. Phormidium phycoerythrin forms hexamers in crystals: a crystallographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Sharma, Mahima; Gupta, Gagan Deep; Kumar, Vinay; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The crystallographic analysis of a marine cyanobacterium (Phormidium sp. A09DM) phycoerythrin (PE) that shows distinct sequence features compared with known PE structures from cyanobacteria and red algae is reported. Phormidium PE was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Diffraction data were collected on the protein crystallography beamline at the Indus-2 synchrotron. The crystals diffracted to about 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals, with an apparent hexagonal morphology, belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 108.3, b = 108.4 Å, c = 116.6 Å, α = 78.94, β = 82.50, γ = 60.34°. The molecular-replacement solution confirmed the presence of 12 αβ monomers in the P1 cell. The Phormidium PE elutes as an (αβ)3 trimer of αβ monomers from a molecular-sieve column and exists as [(αβ)3]2 hexamers in the crystal lattice. Unlike red algal PE proteins, the hexamers of Phormidium PE do not form higher-order structures in the crystals. The existence of only one characteristic visual absorption band at 564 nm suggests the presence of phycoerythrobilin chromophores, and the absence of any other types of bilins, in the Phormidium PE assembly. PMID:26249689

  3. Neutron crystallographic studies of amino acids and nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Tatsuki

    2014-01-01

    Neutron crystallographic studies of two representative umami materials were executed utilizing iBLX at MLF/J-PARC. The results of them will be summarized in this report. At first, structure analysis of the alpha form crystal of L-glutamic acid was performed in order to assess the usefulness of neutron crystallography at iBIX to our company's R and D. Neutron crystal structure of it was successfully determined at 0.6 A resolution. All hydrogen atoms were clearly observed. Next, the mixed crystal of disodium Inosine-5'-phosphate (IMP · 2Na) and disodium Guanosine-5'-phosphate (GMP · 2Na) was analyzed by neutron crystallography. Neutron crystal structure of the mixed crystal of IMP and GMP (IM/GMP rate = 1.7) was successfully determined at 0.8 A resolution. In the neutron crystal structure of the mixed crystal, the hydrogen atom bonded to the C2 atom of purine base in IMP and the nitrogen atom bonded to the C2 atom of purine base in GMP were clearly observed in the nuclear density map, structurally demonstrating that this crystal is the mixed crystal. (author)

  4. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-04-01

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  5. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Ringe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR, the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask `how are nanoshapes created?', `how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', `how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  6. CRYSTMET—The NRCC Metals Crystallographic Data File

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Gordon H.; Rodgers, John R.; Gough, S. Roger; Villars, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    CRYSTMET is a computer-readable database of critically evaluated crystallographic data for metals (including alloys, intermetallics and minerals) accompanied by pertinent chemical, physical and bibliographic information. It currently contains about 60 000 entries and covers the literature exhaustively from 1913. Scientific editing of the abstracted entries, consisting of numerous automated and manual checks, is done to ensure consistency with related, previously published studies, to assign structure types where necessary and to help guarantee the accuracy of the data and related information. Analyses of the entries and their distribution across key journals as a function of time show interesting trends in the complexity of the compounds studied as well as in the elements they contain. Two applications of CRYSTMET are the identification of unknowns and the prediction of properties of materials. CRYSTMET is available either online or via license of a private copy from the Canadian Scientific Numeric Database Service (CAN/SND). The indexed online search and analysis system is easy and economical to use yet fast and powerful. Development of a new system is under way combining the capabilities of ORACLE with the flexibility of a modern interface based on the Netscape browsing tool. PMID:27805157

  7. Brillouin-zone database on the Bilbao Crystallographic Server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroyo, Mois I; Orobengoa, Danel; de la Flor, Gemma; Tasci, Emre S; Perez-Mato, J Manuel; Wondratschek, Hans

    2014-03-01

    The Brillouin-zone database of the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (http://www.cryst.ehu.es) offers k-vector tables and figures which form the background of a classification of the irreducible representations of all 230 space groups. The symmetry properties of the wavevectors are described by the so-called reciprocal-space groups and this classification scheme is compared with the classification of Cracknell et al. [Kronecker Product Tables, Vol. 1, General Introduction and Tables of Irreducible Representations of Space Groups (1979). New York: IFI/Plenum]. The compilation provides a solution to the problems of uniqueness and completeness of space-group representations by specifying the independent parameter ranges of general and special k vectors. Guides to the k-vector tables and figures explain the content and arrangement of the data. Recent improvements and modifications of the Brillouin-zone database, including new tables and figures for the trigonal, hexagonal and monoclinic space groups, are discussed in detail and illustrated by several examples.

  8. Fission fragment spins and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durell, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Prompt γ-ray coincidence experiments have been carried out on γ-rays emitted from post-neutron emission fission fragments produced by the aup 19F + 197 Au and 18 O + 232 Th reactions. Decay schemes have been established for even-even nuclei ranging from 78 Se to 148 Nd. Many new states with spin up to ∼ 12h have been observed. Apart from providing a wealth of new information on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei, the data have been analyzed to determine the average spin of primary fission fragments as a function of fragment mass. The results suggest that the fragment spins are determined by the temperature and shape of the primary fragments at or near to scission

  9. Effect of pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientation on the rheology of Carrara marble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raadt, W.S.; Burlini, L.; Kunze, K.; Spiers, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Localized deformation during high temperature plastic flow is frequently attributed to mechanical weakening caused by grain size reduction and, in some cases, by the development of a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). This study aims to investigate experimentally the contribution

  10. Dependence of Crystallographic Orientation on Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloy 028

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, LiNa; Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Dong, JianXin; Ojo, Olanrewaju A.; Wang, Xu

    2018-03-01

    The influence of crystallographic orientation on the pitting corrosion behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr alloy 028 was studied using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), potentiodynamic polarization technique, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that there is anisotropy of pitting corrosion that strongly depends on crystallographic orientation of the surface plane. The distribution of pit density in a standard stereographic triangle indicates that the crystallographic planes close to {100} are more prone to pitting corrosion compared to planes {110} and {111}. The surface energy calculation of (001) and (111) shows that the plane with a high atomic packing density has a low surface energy with concomitant strong resistance to pitting corrosion. A correlation function between crystallographic orientation and pitting corrosion susceptibility suggests a method that not only predicts the pitting resistance of known textured materials, but also could help to improve corrosion resistance by controlling material texture.

  11. Fragmentation cross sections outside the limiting-fragmentation regime

    CERN Document Server

    Sümmerer, K

    2003-01-01

    The empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections, EPAX, has been successfully applied to estimate fragment production cross sections in reactions of heavy ions at high incident energies. It is checked whether a similar parametrization can be found for proton-induced spallation around 1 GeV, the range of interest for ISOL-type RIB facilities. The validity of EPAX for medium-energy heavy-ion induced reactions is also checked. Only a few datasets are available, but in general EPAX predicts the cross sections rather well, except for fragments close to the projectile, where the experimental cross sections are found to be larger.

  12. The effect of crystallographic orientation on the active corrosion of pure magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Qiu Dong; Zhao Mingchun; Song, Guangling; Atrens, Andrej

    2008-01-01

    An improved method was used to investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the corrosion of pure magnesium in 0.1 N HCl. The corrosion depth and orientation of surface features were mapped against crystallographic orientation (obtained by electron backscatter diffraction) for many off-principal magnesium crystals. The grains near (0 0 0 1) orientation are the most corrosion resistant. Most grains exhibited a striated structure of long and narrow hillocks with a unique direction

  13. The multiple roles of computational chemistry in fragment-based drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Richard; Barker, Oliver; Barker, John J.; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Godemann, Robert; Andersen, Ole; Fryatt, Tara; Courtney, Steve; Hallett, Dave; Whittaker, Mark

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a change in strategy from the screening of molecules with higher molecular weights and physical properties more akin to fully drug-like compounds, to the screening of smaller, less complex molecules. This is because it has been recognised that fragment hit molecules can be efficiently grown and optimised into leads, particularly after the binding mode to the target protein has been first determined by 3D structural elucidation, e.g. by NMR or X-ray crystallography. Several studies have shown that medicinal chemistry optimisation of an already drug-like hit or lead compound can result in a final compound with too high molecular weight and lipophilicity. The evolution of a lower molecular weight fragment hit therefore represents an attractive alternative approach to optimisation as it allows better control of compound properties. Computational chemistry can play an important role both prior to a fragment screen, in producing a target focussed fragment library, and post-screening in the evolution of a drug-like molecule from a fragment hit, both with and without the available fragment-target co-complex structure. We will review many of the current developments in the area and illustrate with some recent examples from successful FBDD discovery projects that we have conducted.

  14. Fragmentation functions approach in pQCD fragmentation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolli, S.

    1996-07-01

    Next-to-leading order parton fragmentation functions into light mesons are presented. They have been extracted from real and simulated e + e - data and used to predict inclusive single particle distributions at different machines

  15. A model for projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, G; Mallik, S; Gupta, S Das

    2013-01-01

    A model for projectile fragmentation is developed whose origin can be traced back to the Bevalac era. The model positions itself between the phenomenological EPAX parametrization and transport models like 'Heavy Ion Phase Space Exploration' (HIPSE) model and antisymmetrised molecular dynamics (AMD) model. A very simple impact parameter dependence of input temperature is incorporated in the model which helps to analyze the more peripheral collisions. The model is applied to calculate the charge, isotopic distributions, average number of intermediate mass fragments and the average size of largest cluster at different Z bound of different projectile fragmentation reactions at different energies.

  16. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-01

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of 235 U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10 -10 sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass

  17. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-15

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10{sup -10} sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass.

  18. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  20. Shape and crystallographic orientation of nanodiamonds for quantum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, S Y; Chipaux, M; Nagl, A; Schirhagl, R

    2017-05-03

    Nanodiamonds with dimensions down to a few tens of nanometers containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers have revealed their potential as powerful and versatile quantum sensors with a unique combination of spatial resolution and sensitivity. The NV centers allow transducing physical properties, such as strain, temperature, and electric or magnetic field, to an optical transition that can be detected in the single photon range. For example, this makes it possible to sense a single electron spin or a few nuclear spins by detecting their magnetic resonance. The location and orientation of these defects with respect to the diamond surface play a crucial role in interpreting the data and predicting their sensitivities. Despite its relevance, the geometry of these nanodiamonds has never been thoroughly investigated. Without accurate data, spherical models have been applied to interpret or predict results in the past. With the use of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), we investigated nanodiamonds with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 25 nm (the most common type for quantum sensing) and found a flake-like geometry, with 23.2 nm and 4.5 nm being the average lateral and vertical dimensions. We have also found evidence for a preferred crystallographic orientation of the main facet in the (110) direction. Furthermore, we discuss the consequences of this difference in geometry on diamond-based applications. Shape not only influences the creation efficiency of nitrogen-vacancy centers and their quantum coherence properties (and thus sensing performance), but also the optical properties of the nanodiamonds, their interaction with living cells, and their surface chemistry.

  1. The dynamics of fragment formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1994-09-01

    We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac's BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4 He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy

  2. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J. K.; Moseley, F.

    1960-01-01

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author) [fr

  3. Route to three-dimensional fragments using diversity-oriented synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Alvin W; Ramek, Alex; Wang, Yikai; Kaya, Taner; Wilson, J Anthony; Clemons, Paul A; Young, Damian W

    2011-04-26

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has proven to be an effective means of producing high-quality chemical ligands as starting points for drug-discovery pursuits. The increasing number of clinical candidate drugs developed using FBDD approaches is a testament of the efficacy of this approach. The success of fragment-based methods is highly dependent on the identity of the fragment library used for screening. The vast majority of FBDD has centered on the use of sp(2)-rich aromatic compounds. An expanded set of fragments that possess more 3D character would provide access to a larger chemical space of fragments than those currently used. Diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) aims to efficiently generate a set of molecules diverse in skeletal and stereochemical properties. Molecules derived from DOS have also displayed significant success in the modulation of function of various "difficult" targets. Herein, we describe the application of DOS toward the construction of a unique set of fragments containing highly sp(3)-rich skeletons for fragment-based screening. Using cheminformatic analysis, we quantified the shapes and physical properties of the new 3D fragments and compared them with a database containing known fragment-like molecules.

  4. QGP and Modified Jet Fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-01-01

    Recent progresses in the study of jet modification in hotmedium and their consequences in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. In particular, I will discuss energy loss for propagating heavy quarks and the resulting modified fragmentation function. Medium modification of the parton fragmentation function due to quark recombination are formulated within finite temperature field theory and their implication on the search for deconfined quark-gluon plasma is also discussed

  5. Robust Object Tracking Using Valid Fragments Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin; Li, Bo; Tian, Peng; Luo, Gang

    Local features are widely used in visual tracking to improve robustness in cases of partial occlusion, deformation and rotation. This paper proposes a local fragment-based object tracking algorithm. Unlike many existing fragment-based algorithms that allocate the weights to each fragment, this method firstly defines discrimination and uniqueness for local fragment, and builds an automatic pre-selection of useful fragments for tracking. Then, a Harris-SIFT filter is used to choose the current valid fragments, excluding occluded or highly deformed fragments. Based on those valid fragments, fragment-based color histogram provides a structured and effective description for the object. Finally, the object is tracked using a valid fragment template combining the displacement constraint and similarity of each valid fragment. The object template is updated by fusing feature similarity and valid fragments, which is scale-adaptive and robust to partial occlusion. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is accurate and robust in challenging scenarios.

  6. Twenty years on: the impact of fragments on drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlanson, Daniel A; Fesik, Stephen W; Hubbard, Roderick E; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Jhoti, Harren

    2016-09-01

    After 20 years of sometimes quiet growth, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become mainstream. More than 30 drug candidates derived from fragments have entered the clinic, with two approved and several more in advanced trials. FBDD has been widely applied in both academia and industry, as evidenced by the large number of papers from universities, non-profit research institutions, biotechnology companies and pharmaceutical companies. Moreover, FBDD draws on a diverse range of disciplines, from biochemistry and biophysics to computational and medicinal chemistry. As the promise of FBDD strategies becomes increasingly realized, now is an opportune time to draw lessons and point the way to the future. This Review briefly discusses how to design fragment libraries, how to select screening techniques and how to make the most of information gleaned from them. It also shows how concepts from FBDD have permeated and enhanced drug discovery efforts.

  7. Transforming fragments into candidates: small becomes big in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloe, Gerdien E; Bailey, David; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2009-07-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a logical and efficient approach to lead discovery and optimisation. It can draw on structural, biophysical and biochemical data, incorporating a wide range of inputs, from precise mode-of-binding information on specific fragments to wider ranging pharmacophoric screening surveys using traditional HTS approaches. It is truly an enabling technology for the imaginative medicinal chemist. In this review, we analyse a representative set of 23 published FBDD studies that describe how low molecular weight fragments are being identified and efficiently transformed into higher molecular weight drug candidates. FBDD is now becoming warmly endorsed by industry as well as academia and the focus on small interacting molecules is making a big scientific impact.

  8. The breakage behaviour of Aspirin under quasi-static indentation and single particle impact loading: effect of crystallographic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusanmi, D; Roberts, K J; Ghadiri, M; Ding, Y

    2011-06-15

    The influence of crystallographic structural anisotropy on the breakage behaviour of Aspirin under impact loading is highlighted. Under both quasi-static testing conditions, using nano-indentation, and dynamic impact tests, Aspirin demonstrates clear anisotropy in its slip and fracture behaviour. During nano-indentation on the (100) and (001) faces, cracks were propagated along the [010] direction. While the hardness was found to be comparatively similar for both these faces, it was observed that slip due to plastic deformation occurred more readily on the (100) than the (001) crystal planes suggesting the former as the preferred slip plane. Furthermore, the fracture toughness on the (001) planes was found to be distinctly lower than that of the (100) planes, indicating the former as the preferred cleavage plane. Observations of the crystal morphology of damaged particles after dynamic impact testing showed that both the chipping and fragmentation of Aspirin mostly occurred via cleavage in a manner consistent with the observed fracture behaviour following nano-indentation. This work highlights the importance of cleavage as a dominant factor underpinning the fracture mechanism of Aspirin under both quasi-static and impact loading conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Recent progress on perturbative QCD fragmentation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, K.

    1995-05-01

    The recent development of perturbative QCD (PQCD) fragmentation functions has strong impact on quarkonium production. I shall summarize B c meson production based on these PQCD fragmentation functions, as well as, the highlights of some recent activities on applying these PQCD fragmentation functions to explain anomalous J/ψ and ψ' production at the Tevatron. Finally, I discuss a fragmentation model based on the PQCD fragmentation functions for heavy quarks fragmenting into heavy-light mesons

  10. Toxicology screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003578.htm Toxicology screen To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A toxicology screen refers to various tests that determine the ...

  11. Detection of ligand binding hot spots on protein surfaces via fragment-based methods: application to DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, Melissa R.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Ju, Shulin; Caaveiro, Jose M.M.; Orwig, Susan D.; Kozakov, Dima; Brenke, Ryan; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Beglov, Dmitry; Vajda, Sandor; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; (BU-M); (Brandeis); (GIT)

    2010-08-04

    The identification of hot spots, i.e., binding regions that contribute substantially to the free energy of ligand binding, is a critical step for structure-based drug design. Here we present the application of two fragment-based methods to the detection of hot spots for DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase (GCase), targets for the development of therapeutics for Parkinson's and Gaucher's diseases, respectively. While the structures of these two proteins are known, binding information is lacking. In this study we employ the experimental multiple solvent crystal structures (MSCS) method and computational fragment mapping (FTMap) to identify regions suitable for the development of pharmacological chaperones for DJ-1 and GCase. Comparison of data derived via MSCS and FTMap also shows that FTMap, a computational method for the identification of fragment binding hot spots, is an accurate and robust alternative to the performance of expensive and difficult crystallographic experiments.

  12. Identification of Histamine H3 Receptor Ligands Using a New Crystal Structure Fragment-based Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Ida Osborn; Boesgaard, Michael W; Fidom, Kimberley

    2017-01-01

    Virtual screening offers an efficient alternative to high-throughput screening in the identification of pharmacological tools and lead compounds. Virtual screening is typically based on the matching of target structures or ligand pharmacophores to commercial or in-house compound catalogues....... The complete pharmacophore fragment library is freely available through the GPCR database, GPCRdb, allowing the successful application herein to be repeated for most of the 285 class A GPCR targets. The method could also easily be adapted to other protein families....

  13. Discovery of covalent inhibitors for MIF tautomerase via cocrystal structures with phantom hits from virtual screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, Larry R.; Zhang, Ying; Li, Hua; Li, Ziyu; Lukasczyk, Ulrike; Choi, Yong-Mi; Han, Zuoning; Prisco, Joy; Fordham, Jeremy; Tsay, Joseph T.; Reiling, Stephan; Vaz, Roy J.; Li, Yi; (Sanofi)

    2010-10-28

    Biochemical and X-ray crystallographic studies confirmed that hydroxyquinoline derivatives identified by virtual screening were actually covalent inhibitors of the MIF tautomerase. Adducts were formed by N-alkylation of the Pro-1 at the catalytic site with a loss of an amino group of the inhibitor.

  14. The rise of fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher W; Rees, David C

    2009-06-01

    The search for new drugs is plagued by high attrition rates at all stages in research and development. Chemists have an opportunity to tackle this problem because attrition can be traced back, in part, to the quality of the chemical leads. Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is a new approach, increasingly used in the pharmaceutical industry, for reducing attrition and providing leads for previously intractable biological targets. FBDD identifies low-molecular-weight ligands (∼150 Da) that bind to biologically important macromolecules. The three-dimensional experimental binding mode of these fragments is determined using X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, and is used to facilitate their optimization into potent molecules with drug-like properties. Compared with high-throughput-screening, the fragment approach requires fewer compounds to be screened, and, despite the lower initial potency of the screening hits, offers more efficient and fruitful optimization campaigns. Here, we review the rise of FBDD, including its application to discovering clinical candidates against targets for which other chemistry approaches have struggled.

  15. Fragmentation of rotating protostellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohline, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    We examine, with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, the behavior of rotating, isothermal gas clouds as they collapse from Jeans unstable configurations, in order to determine whether they are susceptible to fragmentation during the initial dynamic collapse phase of their evolution. We find that a gas cloud will not fragment unless (a) it begins collapsing from a radius much smaller than the Jeans radius (i.e., the cloud initially encloses many Jeans masses) and (b) irregularities in the cloud's initial structure (specifically, density inhomogeneities) enclose more than one Jeans mass of material. Gas pressure smooths out features that are not initially Jeans unstable while rotation plays no direct role in damping inhomogeneities. Instead of fragmenting, most of our models collapse to a ring configuration (as has been observed by other investigators in two-dimensional, axisymmetric models). The rings appear to be less susceptible to gragmentation from arbitrary perturbations in their structure than has previously been indicated in other work. Because our models, which include the effects of gas pressure, do not readily fragment during a phase of dynamic collapse, we suggest that gas clouds in the galactic disk undergo fragmentation only during quasi-equilibrium phases of their evolution

  16. Tooth fragment reattachment techniques-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Fernanda Cristina P; Poubel, Déborah L N; Almeida, Júlio César F; Toledo, Isabela P; Poi, Wilson R; Guerra, Eliete N S; Rezende, Liliana V M L

    2018-03-07

    Several strategies have been developed for tooth fragment reattachment following fracture. Although many techniques have been reported, there is no consensus on which one has the best results in terms of the bond strength between the fragment and the dentin over time. The aim of this study was to assess the currently reported tooth fragment reattachment techniques for fractured crowns of anterior teeth. The PubMed, LILACS, Web of Science, Cochrane, and Scopus databases were searched in October 2016, and the search was updated in February 2017. A search of the gray literature was performed in Google Scholar and OpenGrey. Reference lists of eligible studies were cross-checked to identify additional studies; gray literature and ongoing trials were investigated. Two authors assessed studies to determine inclusion and undertook data extraction. Case reports/series of three or more cases, cross-sectional studies, cohort studies, and in vivo clinical trials in all languages were included. Five articles remained after screening. These studies predominantly reported on fragment reattachment with composite resin and resin cement. There was little consistency among the studies in regard to the technique used for tooth fragment reattachment and length of the follow-up period. According to the evidence found in the studies included in this review, simple tooth fragment reattachment was the preferred reattachment technique. An increase in the bond strength between tooth fragment and dentin was observed when an intermediate material was used. Further investigation is needed, using standard follow-up periods and larger samples. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  18. Memory effects in nuclear fragmentation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1994-01-01

    A general procedure to identify instability regions which lead to multifragmentation events is presented. The dominant mode at the instability point is determined from the knowledge of the mean properties (density and temperature) of the system at that point. For spinodal instabilities the dependence of fragment structures on the dynamical conditions is studied changing the beam energy and the considered equation of state. An important competition between two dynamical effects, expansion of the system and growth of fluctuations, is revealed. It is shown that in heavy-ion central collisions at medium energies memory effects of the configuration formed at the instability time could be observed in the final fragmentation pattern. Some hints towards a fully dynamical picture of fragmentation processes are finally suggested. ((orig.))

  19. Fragmentation properties of 6Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, R.G.; Kruppa, A.T.; Beck, R.; Dickmann, F.

    1987-01-01

    The α+d and t+τ cluster structure of 6 Li is described in a microscopic α+d cluster model through quantities that enter into the description of cluster fragmentation processes. The states of the separate clusters α, d, t and τ are described as superpositions of Os Slater determinants belonging to different potential size parameters. To describe both the 6 Li and fragment state realistically, nucleon-nucleon forces optimized for the used model state spaces were constructed. The fragmentation properties predicted by them slightly differ from those calculated with some forces of common use provided the latter are modified so as to reproduce the α, d and 6 Li energies. (author) 61 refs.; 9 figs

  20. Hands as markers of fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barnard

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Atwood is an internationally read, translated, and critiqued writer whose novels have established her as one of the most esteemed authors in English (McCombs & Palmer, 1991:1. Critical studies of her work deal mainly with notions of identity from psychoanalytical perspectives. This study has identified a gap in current critical studies on Atwood’s works, namely the challenging of textual unity which is paralleled in the challenging of the traditional (single narrative voice. The challenging of textual unity and the single narrative voice brings about the fragmentation of both. This article will focus on the role that hands play as markers of fragmentation in “The Blind Assassin” (2000. In the novel, the writing hand destabilises the narrative voice, since it is not connected to the voice of a single author. If the author of the text – the final signified – is eliminated, the text becomes fragmentary and open, inviting the reader to contribute to the creation of meaning. Hands play a signficant role in foregrounding the narrator’s fragmented identity, and consequently, the fragmentation of the text. We will investigate this concept in the light of Roland Barthes’ notion of the scriptor, whose hand is metaphorically severed from his or her “voice”. Instead of the text being a unified entity, it becomes unstable and it displays the absence of hierarchical textual levels. Based mainly on Barthes’ writings, this article concludes that hands foreground the narrator’s fragmented identity, which is paralleled in the fragmented text.

  1. Crystallographic contribution to the formation of the columnar grain structure in cobalt films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, K.; Itoh, K.; Okamoto, K.; Hashimoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    In order to clarify the crystallographic contribution to the formation of the columnar grain structure, the geometric and crystallographic alignments of columnar grains in cobalt films were investigated on the basis of magnetic and optical measurements. The films were deposited by sputtering at an incidence angle of 45 on glass substrates heated at 332 K. The film thickness ranged from 20 to 850 nm. Above 50 nm the columnar grains align in the direction parallel to the incidence plane and form a two-degree crystallographic orientation. The packing density of columnar grains decreases with increasing thickness when the thickness exceeds 50 nm. From these results we conclude that the crystal habit appearing on column tops induces the two-degree orientation through geometric selection and aligns the selected columnar grains in the parallel direction. (orig.)

  2. Algebraic K-theory of crystallographic groups the three-dimensional splitting case

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Daniel Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Farrell-Jones isomorphism conjecture in algebraic K-theory offers a description of the algebraic K-theory of a group using a generalized homology theory. In cases where the conjecture is known to be a theorem, it gives a powerful method for computing the lower algebraic K-theory of a group. This book contains a computation of the lower algebraic K-theory of the split three-dimensional crystallographic groups, a geometrically important class of three-dimensional crystallographic group, representing a third of the total number. The book leads the reader through all aspects of the calculation. The first chapters describe the split crystallographic groups and their classifying spaces. Later chapters assemble the techniques that are needed to apply the isomorphism theorem. The result is a useful starting point for researchers who are interested in the computational side of the Farrell-Jones isomorphism conjecture, and a contribution to the growing literature in the field.

  3. Three sets of crystallographic sub-planar structures in quartz formed by tectonic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derez, Tine; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    In quartz, multiple sets of fine planar deformation microstructures that have specific crystallographic orientations parallel to planes with low Miller-Bravais indices are commonly considered as shock-induced planar deformation features (PDFs) diagnostic of shock metamorphism. Using polarized light microscopy, we demonstrate that up to three sets of tectonically induced sub-planar fine extinction bands (FEBs), sub-parallel to the basal, γ, ω, and π crystallographic planes, are common in vein quartz in low-grade tectonometamorphic settings. We conclude that the observation of multiple (2-3) sets of fine scale, closely spaced, crystallographically controlled, sub-planar microstructures is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish PDFs from tectonic FEBs.

  4. Fragmentation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, G.; Roesel, F.; Trautmann, D.; Shyam, R.

    1983-10-01

    Fragmentation processes in nuclear collisions are reviewed. The main emphasis is put on light ion breakup at nonrelativistic energies. The post- and prior-form DWBA theories are discussed. The post-form DWBA, appropriate for the ''spectator breakup'' describes elastic as well as inelastic breakup modes. This theory can also account for the stripping to unbound states. The theoretical models are compared to typical experimental results to illustrate the various possible mechanisms. It is discussed, how breakup reactions can be used to study high-lying single particle strength in the continuum; how it can yield information about momentum distributions of fragments in the nucleus. (orig.)

  5. Refolding Technologies for Antibody Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Arakawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Refolding is one of the production technologies for pharmaceutical grade antibody fragments. Detergents and denaturants are primarily used to solubilize the insoluble proteins. The solubilized and denatured proteins are refolded by reducing the concentration of the denaturants or detergents. Several refolding technologies have been used for antibody fragments, comprising dilution, dialysis, solid phase solvent exchange and size exclusion chromatography, as reviewed here. Aggregation suppressor or folding-assisting agents, including arginine hydrochloride, ionic liquids and detergents or denaturants at low concentrations, are included in the refolding solvent to enhance refolding yield.

  6. Fragmentation of atomic clusters: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M.J.; Jellinek, J.

    1994-01-01

    Collisionless fragmentation of nonrotating model n-atom metal clusters (n=12, 13, and 14) is studied using isoergic molecular-dynamics simulations. Minimum-energy paths for fragmentation are mapped out as functions of the distance between the centers of mass of the fragments. These paths provide information on the fragmentation energies for the different fragmentation channels. Fragmentation patterns (distributions of the fragmentation channel probabilities) and global and channel-specific fragmentation rate constants are computed and analyzed as functions of the internal energy and of the size of the clusters. The trends derived from the dynamics are compared with those obtained using the RRK and TST statistical approaches. The dynamics of the fragmentation process is analyzed in terms of characteristic quantities such as the distance between the centers of mass of the fragments, their relative translational energy, and their interaction energy, all considered as functions of time

  7. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations....... It is found that indentations are preferential nucleation sites. The crystallographic orientations of the deformed grains affect the hardness and the nucleation potentials at the indentations. Higher hardness gives increased nucleation probabilities. Orientation relationships between nuclei developed...... they form. Finally, possible nucleation mechanisms are briefly discussed....

  8. Homological functor of a torsion free crystallographic group of dimension five with a nonabelian point group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Tan Yee; Idrus, Nor'ashiqin Mohd.; Masri, Rohaidah; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Hassim, Hazzirah Izzati Mat

    2014-06-01

    Torsion free crystallographic groups, called Bieberbach groups, appear as fundamental groups of compact, connected, flat Riemannian manifolds and have many interesting properties. New properties of the group can be obtained by, not limited to, exploring the groups and by computing their homological functors such as nonabelian tensor squares, the central subgroup of nonabelian tensor squares, the kernel of the mapping of nonabelian tensor squares of a group to the group and many more. In this paper, the homological functor, J(G) of a centerless torsion free crystallographic group of dimension five with a nonabelian point group which is a dihedral point group is computed using commutator calculus.

  9. Identification of some crystallographic features of martensite in steels by microdiffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, M.; Rao, B.V.N.; Thomas, G.

    1980-03-01

    Considerable attention should be paid to the interpretation of electron diffraction, such as the understanding of the extra reflections and other effects in an SAD pattern obtained from lath martensite by making allowances for spatial resolution limitations in the SAD patterns. These difficulties can be overcome by utilizing the convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) method which permits the use of different probe sizes to obtain crystallographic information from very small regions. Some crystallographic features of lath martensite in low and medium C steels have been identified and some others verified by using CBED

  10. High resolution neutron diffraction crystallographic investigation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened steels of interest for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, R.; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.; Wang, M.; Zhang, G.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution neutron diffraction measurements have been carried out to characterize the crystallographic phases present in different Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels of interest for fusion technology. The different lattice structures, Im3m for the ferritic ODS and Fm3m for the austenitic ODS, are resolved showing line anisotropy effects possibly correlated with differences in dislocation densities and texture. Many contributions from minority phases are detected well above the background noise; none of the expected crystallographic phases, such as M 23 C 6 and including Y 2 O 3 , fits them, but the TiN phase is identified in accordance with results of other microstructural techniques

  11. Correlation between Crystallographic and Magnetic Domains at Co/NiO(001) Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohldag, H.; van der Laan, G.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-12-18

    Using soft x-ray spectromicroscopy we show that NiO(001) exhibits a crystallographic and magnetic domain structure near the surface identical to that of the bulk. Upon Co deposition a perpendicular coupling between the Ni and Co moments is observed that persists even after formation of uncompensated Ni spins at the interface through annealing. The chemical composition at the interface alters its crystallographic structure and leads to a reorientation of the Ni moments from the <112> to the <110> direction. We show that this reorientation is driven by changes in the magnetocrystalline anisotropy rather than exchange coupling mediated by residual uncompensated spins.

  12. The effect of silicon crystallographic orientation on the formation of silicon nanoclusters during anodic electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timokhov, D. F.; Timokhov, F. P.

    2009-01-01

    Possible ways for increasing the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon layers have been investigated. The effect of the anodization parameters on the photoluminescence properties for porous silicon layers formed on silicon substrates with different crystallographic orientations was studied. The average diameters for silicon nanoclusters are calculated from the photoluminescence spectra of porous silicon. The influence of the substrate crystallographic orientation on the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon is revealed. A model explaining the effect of the substrate orientation on the photoluminescence properties for the porous silicon layers formed by anode electrochemical etching is proposed.

  13. Determination of crystallographic and macroscopic orientation of planar structures in TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, X.; Liu, Q.

    1998-01-01

    With the aid of a double-tilt holder in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), simple methods are described for determination of the crystallographic orientation of a planar structure and for calculation of the macroscopic orientation of the planar structure. The correlation between a planar...... structure and a crystallographic plane can be found by comparing the differences in their trace directions on the projection plane and inclination angles with respect to that plane. The angles between the traces of planar structures and the sample axis measured from the TEM micrographs, which have been...

  14. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Souza, S.R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsang, M.B. [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U are around 0.7–0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  15. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  16. Nuclear fragmentation by nucleation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation model is used to simulate nuclear fragmentation processes. The critical value of the effective interaction radius is shown to vary linearly with the expansion factor α. The calculated mass and charge distributions are compared with some experimental data. (author)

  17. Neutron multiplicity of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelrahman, Y S [Physics department, mu` rah university Al-Karak, (Jordan)

    1995-10-01

    The total average neutron multiplicity of the fission fragments produced by the spontaneous fission of {sup 248} Cm has been measured. This measurement has been done by using a new experimental technique. This technique mainly depends on {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence using a very high resolution high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. 2 figs.

  18. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  19. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  20. Research of nuclear fragmentation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richert, J.

    1989-01-01

    Motivations for the study of nuclear fragmentation are presented. Different models and methods which were developed in the past are reviewed, critically discussed and confronted in connection with the experimental information gathered over the past years. Specific aspects related to the onset of the process, its characteristics and the mechanism which governs it are discussed [fr

  1. FRAGMENTED IDENTITIES: THE CULTURAL COLLISION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Born in the former French and German colony of. Togo, Komla-Ebri ... of how cultural barriers not only lead to isolation and fragmented identities, but also ..... and, in recreating bits of Italy, in the form of music, cinema and food, absorbs parts of ...

  2. Phthalocyanides sensitized fragmentation of proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klementová, S.; Tothová, D.; Revaková, R.; Kasková, M.; Wagnerová, Dana Marie

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2001), s. 13-18 ISSN 0972-0626 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/96/1322 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : phthalocyanides * photosensitied fragmentation of proteins Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  3. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  4. Fragment-Based Drug Discovery of Potent Protein Kinase C Iota Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Liu, Boping; Tee, Doris Hui Ying; Chen, Guoying; Ahmad, Nur Huda Binte; Wong, Yun Xuan; Poh, Zhi Ying; Ang, Shi Hua; Tan, Eldwin Sum Wai; Ong, Esther Hq; Nurul Dinie; Poulsen, Anders; Pendharkar, Vishal; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Lee, May Ann; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Ho, Soo Yei; Cherian, Joseph; Hill, Jeffrey; Keller, Thomas H; Hung, Alvin W

    2018-05-24

    Protein kinase C iota (PKC-ι) is an atypical kinase implicated in the promotion of different cancer types. A biochemical screen of a fragment library has identified several hits from which an azaindole-based scaffold was chosen for optimization. Driven by a structure-activity relationship and supported by molecular modeling, a weakly bound fragment was systematically grown into a potent and selective inhibitor against PKC-ι.

  5. Automated building of organometallic complexes from 3D fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foscato, Marco; Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Alsberg, Bjørn K; Jensen, Vidar R

    2014-07-28

    A method for the automated construction of three-dimensional (3D) molecular models of organometallic species in design studies is described. Molecular structure fragments derived from crystallographic structures and accurate molecular-level calculations are used as 3D building blocks in the construction of multiple molecular models of analogous compounds. The method allows for precise control of stereochemistry and geometrical features that may otherwise be very challenging, or even impossible, to achieve with commonly available generators of 3D chemical structures. The new method was tested in the construction of three sets of active or metastable organometallic species of catalytic reactions in the homogeneous phase. The performance of the method was compared with those of commonly available methods for automated generation of 3D models, demonstrating higher accuracy of the prepared 3D models in general, and, in particular, a much wider range with respect to the kind of chemical structures that can be built automatically, with capabilities far beyond standard organic and main-group chemistry.

  6. Percutaneous transhepatic fragmentation of gall stones and extraction of fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.; Klose, K.; Schmidt, H.D.; Staritz, M.; Mainz Univ.; Mainz Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Attempts at percutaneous removal have been made in 13 patients with solitary and multiple intra- and extra-hepatic biliary duct stones measuring 5 to 30 mm. The stones were fragmented with a Dormia basket and the fragments removed transhepatically. In ten patients the procedure was successful, including one patient with multiple intra-hepatic stones. The procedure can be recommended for cases of calculous obstruction of biliary anastomoses or of stones which could not be removed by endoscopy, or where there is already biliary drainage being carried out, or in patients with a high opertive risk. In two patients, dilatation of the papilla was also carried out, in four patients a stenosis was dilated and in a further two patients, electro-incision of a stenosis was performed. (orig.) [de

  7. Analytical and experimental evaluation of a proposed self-forging fragment munition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuft, D.B.; Folsom, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical and experimental tools have been used to study the formation of a proposed self-forging fragment projectile. The primary objective of this study is the determination of the interior and exterior shape of the fully formed fragment, and to determine if the fragment tumbles in flight. In addition, it is of interest to compare computer predictions to experimental results. An experiment was performed using high speed photography and high-energy flash x-ray radiography to study liner and case motion and projectile formation. Fabrication and assembly tolerances were closely controlled in an effort to eliminate tolerances as a possible source of fragment instability. X-ray film-density contours were analyzed to determine the fully formed fragment interior and exterior shape. Down-range yaw screens showed fragment tumbling in flight. The computed fragment shape was compared to experimental results and it was found that a retaining ring in the computational model near the liner periphery had a significant effect on the final computed fragment shape. With the retaining ring in the computational model and full two-way sliding between all material interfaces, the final computed fragment showed very good agreement with the experiment on both exterior and interior shapes

  8. Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  9. Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  10. Fragment-Based Protein-Protein Interaction Antagonists of a Viral Dimeric Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Jonathan E; Lee, Gregory M; Acker, Timothy M; Hulce, Kaitlin R; Gonzalez, Eric R; Schweigler, Patrick; Melkko, Samu; Farady, Christopher J; Craik, Charles S

    2016-04-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery has shown promise as an approach for challenging targets such as protein-protein interfaces. We developed and applied an activity-based fragment screen against dimeric Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) using an optimized fluorogenic substrate. Dose-response determination was performed as a confirmation screen, and NMR spectroscopy was used to map fragment inhibitor binding to KSHV Pr. Kinetic assays demonstrated that several initial hits also inhibit human cytomegalovirus protease (HCMV Pr). Binding of these hits to HCMV Pr was also confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Despite the use of a target-agnostic fragment library, more than 80 % of confirmed hits disrupted dimerization and bound to a previously reported pocket at the dimer interface of KSHV Pr, not to the active site. One class of fragments, an aminothiazole scaffold, was further explored using commercially available analogues. These compounds demonstrated greater than 100-fold improvement of inhibition. This study illustrates the power of fragment-based screening for these challenging enzymatic targets and provides an example of the potential druggability of pockets at protein-protein interfaces. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A Ligand-observed Mass Spectrometry Approach Integrated into the Fragment Based Lead Discovery Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Qin, Shanshan; Chen, Shuai; Li, Jinlong; Li, Lixin; Wang, Zhongling; Wang, Quan; Lin, Jianping; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    In fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD), a cascade combining multiple orthogonal technologies is required for reliable detection and characterization of fragment binding to the target. Given the limitations of the mainstream screening techniques, we presented a ligand-observed mass spectrometry approach to expand the toolkits and increase the flexibility of building a FBLD pipeline especially for tough targets. In this study, this approach was integrated into a FBLD program targeting the HCV RNA polymerase NS5B. Our ligand-observed mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the discovery of 10 hits from a 384-member fragment library through two independent screens of complex cocktails and a follow-up validation assay. Moreover, this MS-based approach enabled quantitative measurement of weak binding affinities of fragments which was in general consistent with SPR analysis. Five out of the ten hits were then successfully translated to X-ray structures of fragment-bound complexes to lay a foundation for structure-based inhibitor design. With distinctive strengths in terms of high capacity and speed, minimal method development, easy sample preparation, low material consumption and quantitative capability, this MS-based assay is anticipated to be a valuable addition to the repertoire of current fragment screening techniques. PMID:25666181

  12. Fragment-based drug discovery and its application to challenging drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amanda J; Howard, Steven; Cons, Benjamin D

    2017-11-08

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is a technique for identifying low molecular weight chemical starting points for drug discovery. Since its inception 20 years ago, FBDD has grown in popularity to the point where it is now an established technique in industry and academia. The approach involves the biophysical screening of proteins against collections of low molecular weight compounds (fragments). Although fragments bind to proteins with relatively low affinity, they form efficient, high quality binding interactions with the protein architecture as they have to overcome a significant entropy barrier to bind. Of the biophysical methods available for fragment screening, X-ray protein crystallography is one of the most sensitive and least prone to false positives. It also provides detailed structural information of the protein-fragment complex at the atomic level. Fragment-based screening using X-ray crystallography is therefore an efficient method for identifying binding hotspots on proteins, which can then be exploited by chemists and biologists for the discovery of new drugs. The use of FBDD is illustrated here with a recently published case study of a drug discovery programme targeting the challenging protein-protein interaction Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1:nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    and receptor residue pairs, from crystal structure complexes. We describe the procedure to collect a library with more than 250 fragments covering 29 residue positions within the generic transmembrane binding pocket. We describe how the library fragments are recombined and inferred to build pharmacophores...... for new targets. A validating retrospective virtual screening of histamine H1 and H3 receptor pharmacophores yielded area-under-the-curves of 0.88 and 0.82, respectively. The fragment-based method has the unique advantage that it can be applied to targets for which no (homologous) crystal structures...... or ligands are known. 47% of the class A G protein-coupled receptors can be targeted with at least four-element pharmacophores. The fragment libraries can also be used to grow known ligands or for rotamer refinement of homology models. Researchers can download the complete fragment library or a subset...

  14. Crystallographic Investigation of Ag (4 mol%) Doped ZnO (SZO) Thin Films by XRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lwin Lwin Nwe; Sandar Dwe; Khant Khant Lin; Khin Thuzar; Than Than Win; Ko Ko Kyaw Soe

    2008-03-01

    Silver doped ZnO(SZO) thin films are prepared by sol-based method. The silver dopant concentration is 4 mol % in this case. XRD analysis carried out to determine, crystallographic properties such as lattice parameters and crystallite size of SZO thin films.

  15. Calibration of reconstruction parameters in atom probe tomography using a single crystallographic orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suram, Santosh K.; Rajan, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology to estimate the APT reconstruction parameters when limited crystallographic information is available. Reliable spatial scaling of APT data currently requires identification of multiple crystallographic poles from the field desorption image for estimating the reconstruction parameters. This requirement limits the capacity of accurately reconstructing APT data for certain complex systems, such as highly alloyed systems and nanostructured materials wherein more than one pole is usually not observed within one grain. To overcome this limitation, we develop a quantitative methodology for calibrating the reconstruction parameters in an APT dataset by ensuring accurate inter-planar spacing and optimizing the curvature correction for the atomic planes corresponding to a single crystallographic orientation. We validate our approach on an aluminum dataset and further illustrate its capabilities by computing geometric reconstruction parameters for W and Al–Mg–Sc datasets. - Highlights: ► Quantitative approach is developed to accurately reconstruct APT data. ► Curvature of atomic planes in APT data is used to calibrate the reconstruction. ► APT reconstruction parameters are determined from a single crystallographic axis. ► Quantitative approach is demonstrated on W, Al and Al–Mg–Sc systems. ► Accurate APT reconstruction of complex materials is now possible

  16. Experimental studies on the crystallographic and plastic anisotropies of zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Viana, C.S. da

    1982-01-01

    The crystallographic and plastic anisotropies of a zircaloy-4 tubing using direct pole figures and experimental yield loci are analyzed. Tensile and plane-strain compression tests were used to assess the mecahnical behaviour. The results are discussed with respect to the dimensional stability and mechanical behaviour expected for the tube in its use in the core of pressurized water cooled reactors. (Author) [pt

  17. Axial‐type olivine crystallographic preferred orientations: the effect of strain geometry on mantle texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzaras, V.; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Cohen, Shaina M.; Medaris Jr., L. Gordon; Withers, Anthony C.; Bagley, Brian

    The effect of finite strain geometry on crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is poorly constrained in the upper mantle. Specifically, the relationship between shape preferred orientation (SPO) and CPO in the mantle rocks remains unclear. We analyzed a suite of 40 spinel peridotite xenoliths

  18. Fragment Discovery for the Design of Nitrogen Heterocycles as Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, Rupesh U; Degani, Mariam S; Raju, Archana; Ray, Mukti Kanta; Rajan, Mysore G R

    2016-08-01

    Fragment-based drug design was used to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors. Screening of ligands against the Mtb DHFR enzyme resulted in the identification of multiple fragment hits with IC50 values in the range of 38-90 μM versus Mtb DHFR and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in the range of 31.5-125 μg/mL. These fragment scaffolds would be useful for anti-tubercular drug design. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. High-density metals and metallic composites for improved fragmentation submunitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, B.G.; Honnell, R.E.; Lederman, G.F. Jr.; Sandstrom, D.J.

    1975-08-01

    The fragmentation of cases (50.8-mm-id) made of tungsten, a tungsten alloy, and depleted uranium (D-38) can be controlled, and velocities greater than 1 mm/μs can be achieved for lethal size fragment weights. Fragmentation was controlled by internal grooves, by internal screens, and by a spheroid-in-weak-matrix scheme. A thin polymer liner was used inside of a grooved tungsten case in one experiment; this system performed exceptionally well. The ease of fabricating cases with D-38 or with the tungsten-alloy spheroid-in-matrix scheme offers an attractive advantage over tungsten and tungsten alloy

  20. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate. The x-ray ablated materials must cool and recondense to allow driver beam propagation. The increased surface area caused by fragmentation will enhance the cooling and condensation rates. Relaxation from the suddenly heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The lithium equation of state was used to demonstrate that neutron-induced vaporization uses only a minor fraction of the added heat, much less than would be required to drive the expansion. A 77% expansion of the lithium is required before the rapid vaporization process of spinodal decomposition could begin, and nucleation and growth are too slow to contribute to the expansion

  2. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Laura, E-mail: bandura@anl.gov [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Erdelyi, Bela [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Hausmann, Marc [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Kubo, Toshiyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Nolen, Jerry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Portillo, Mauricio [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Sherrill, Bradley M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  3. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandura, Laura; Erdelyi, Bela; Hausmann, Marc; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Nolen, Jerry; Portillo, Mauricio; Sherrill, Bradley M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  4. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manpreet [Sri Guru Granth Sahib World University, Fatehgarh Sahib-140406, Punjab (India); Kaur, Varinderjit, E-mail: drvarinderjit@gmail.com [Mata Gujri College, Fatehgarh Sahib-140406, Punjab (India)

    2016-05-06

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping At{sub otal} fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of {sup 197}Au+{sup 27}Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  5. Fragmentation of percolation cluster perimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debierre, Jean-Marc; Bradley, R. Mark

    1996-05-01

    We introduce a model for the fragmentation of porous random solids under the action of an external agent. In our model, the solid is represented by a bond percolation cluster on the square lattice and bonds are removed only at the external perimeter (or `hull') of the cluster. This model is shown to be related to the self-avoiding walk on the Manhattan lattice and to the disconnection events at a diffusion front. These correspondences are used to predict the leading and the first correction-to-scaling exponents for several quantities defined for hull fragmentation. Our numerical results support these predictions. In addition, the algorithm used to construct the perimeters reveals itself to be a very efficient tool for detecting subtle correlations in the pseudo-random number generator used. We present a quantitative test of two generators which supports recent results reported in more systematic studies.

  6. Is magnetic resonance imaging safe for patients with retained metal fragments from combat and terrorist attacks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshed, Iris; Kushnir, Tamar; Shabshin, Noga; Konen, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Background: Increasing numbers of military confrontations and terrorist attacks have led to increasing reports of retained metal fragments among patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The potential hazard of retained metal fragments for patients undergoing MRI has been studied among patients with retained metal fragments from domestic violence but not from combat and terrorist attacks. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety of MRI in patients with subcutaneous warfare-metal fragments. Material and Methods: 10,322 consecutive metal screening forms of patients scheduled for 1.5 Tesla (T) MR examination were retrospectively reviewed. All patients reported to have retained metal fragments were contacted by telephone and asked to describe the event in which they were exposed to the fragments and for any adverse sequelae or sensations during and after MRI. Their radiographs were evaluated for the number and size of the fragments. The data were analyzed for correlations between these factors. Results: Seven of the 24 patients who reported retained metal fragments were excluded, since there was no validating evidence of their presence. Fragments in the remaining 17 patients (18 MRI examinations) were inflicted by military or terrorist attacks that occurred 2-39 years prior to the MRI. The fragment size ranged between 1 and 10 mm. One patient reported a superficial migration of a 10-mm fragment after MRI. No other adverse reactions were reported. Conclusion: Conducting 1.5T MRI examinations is safe in patients with retained metal fragments from combat and terrorist attacks not in the vicinity of vital organs. However, caution is advised.

  7. Is magnetic resonance imaging safe for patients with retained metal fragments from combat and terrorist attacks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris; Kushnir, Tamar; Shabshin, Noga; Konen, Eli (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical center, Tel Hashomer, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel)), e-mail: iris.eshed@sheba.health.gov.il

    2010-03-15

    Background: Increasing numbers of military confrontations and terrorist attacks have led to increasing reports of retained metal fragments among patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The potential hazard of retained metal fragments for patients undergoing MRI has been studied among patients with retained metal fragments from domestic violence but not from combat and terrorist attacks. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety of MRI in patients with subcutaneous warfare-metal fragments. Material and Methods: 10,322 consecutive metal screening forms of patients scheduled for 1.5 Tesla (T) MR examination were retrospectively reviewed. All patients reported to have retained metal fragments were contacted by telephone and asked to describe the event in which they were exposed to the fragments and for any adverse sequelae or sensations during and after MRI. Their radiographs were evaluated for the number and size of the fragments. The data were analyzed for correlations between these factors. Results: Seven of the 24 patients who reported retained metal fragments were excluded, since there was no validating evidence of their presence. Fragments in the remaining 17 patients (18 MRI examinations) were inflicted by military or terrorist attacks that occurred 2-39 years prior to the MRI. The fragment size ranged between 1 and 10 mm. One patient reported a superficial migration of a 10-mm fragment after MRI. No other adverse reactions were reported. Conclusion: Conducting 1.5T MRI examinations is safe in patients with retained metal fragments from combat and terrorist attacks not in the vicinity of vital organs. However, caution is advised.

  8. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species with different size and mobility can be regulated by different processes at the same spatial scale, a principle that may contribute to diversity. Differences in species richness between local commu...

  9. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al. , 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al. , 1990; Ouellette et al. , 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  10. Screen dealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The screen dealing system provides a facility whereby buyers and sellers of spot thermal coal can make bids and offers via the medium of the Reuters screen. A sale results when a market participant notifies his acceptance of a price to a central dealing desk. Use of the system is available to all genuine participants in the coal trade. This paper reports that it provides a focus for information and for the visible making of coal prices. For years screen trading has been used successfully to trade other commodities. At last coal is being traded electronically. It makes sense. It works. Users like it

  11. Intermittency in 197Au fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Olszewski, A.; Szarska, M.; Wilczynska, B.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Cherry, M.L.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jones, W.V.; Sengupta, K.; Wefel, B.

    1995-07-01

    The concept of factorial moments was applied to an analysis of the dynamical fluctuations in the charge distributions of the fragments emitted from gold nuclei with energies 10.6 and < 1.0 GeV/n interacting with emulsion nuclei. Clear evidence for intermittent fluctuations has been found in an analysis using all the particles released from the gold projectile, with a stronger effect observed below 1 GeV/n than at 10.6 GeV/n. For the full data sets, however, the intermittency effect was found to be very sensitive to the singly charged particles, and neglecting these particles strongly reduces the intermittency signal. When the analysis is restricted to the multiply charged fragments, an intermittency effect is revealed only for multifragmentation events, although one that is enhanced as compared to the analysis of all, singly and multiply charged, particles. The properties of the anomalous fractal dimensions suggest a sequential decay mechanism, rather than the existence of possible critical behaviour in the process of nuclear fragmentation. The likely influence of the charge conservation effects and the finite size of decaying systems on the observed intermittency signals was pointed out. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  12. Residual Fragments after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Özdedeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs are described as asymptomatic, noninfectious and nonobstructive stone fragments (≤4 mm remaining in the urinary system after the last session of any intervention (ESWL, URS or PCNL for urinary stones. Their insignificance is questionable since CIRFs could eventually become significant, as their presence may result in recurrent stone growth and they may cause pain and infection due to urinary obstruction. They may become the source of persistent infections and a significant portion of the patients will have a stone-related event, requiring auxilliary interventions. CT seems to be the ultimate choice of assessment. Although there is no concensus about the timing, recent data suggests that it may be performed one month after the procedure. However, imaging can be done in the immediate postoperative period, if there are no tubes blurring the assessment. There is some evidence indicating that selective medical therapy may have an impact on decreasing stone formation rates. Retrograde intrarenal surgery, with its minimally invasive nature, seems to be the best way to deal with residual fragments.

  13. Fragmentation measurement using image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Sereshki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, first of all, the existing problems in fragmentation measurement are reviewed for the sake of its fast and reliable evaluation. Then, the available methods used for evaluation of blast results are mentioned. The produced errors especially in recognizing the rock fragments in computer-aided methods, and also, the importance of determination of their sizes in the image analysis methods are described. After reviewing the previous work done, an algorithm is proposed for the automated determination of rock particles’ boundary in the Matlab software. This method can determinate automatically the particles boundary in the minimum time. The results of proposed method are compared with those of Split Desktop and GoldSize software in two automated and manual states. Comparing the curves extracted from different methods reveals that the proposed approach is accurately applicable in measuring the size distribution of laboratory samples, while the manual determination of boundaries in the conventional software is very time-consuming, and the results of automated netting of fragments are very different with the real value due to the error in separation of the objects.

  14. The Discovery of Aurora Kinase Inhibitor by Multi-Docking-Based Virtual Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Tae Kim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the discovery of aurora kinase inhibitor using the fragment-based virtual screening by multi-docking strategy. Among a number of fragments collected from eMololecules, we found four fragment molecules showing potent activity (>50% at 100 μM against aurora kinase. Based on the explored fragment scaffold, we selected two compounds in our synthesized library and validated the biological activity against Aurora kinase.

  15. Geometrical scaling of jet fragmentation photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Koichi, E-mail: koichi.hattori@riken.jp [RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 (United States); Theoretical Research Division, Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); McLerran, Larry, E-mail: mclerran@bnl.gov [RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 (United States); Physics Dept., Bdg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY-11973 (United States); Physics Dept., China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Schenke, Björn, E-mail: bschenke@bnl.gov [Physics Dept., Bdg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY-11973 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We discuss jet fragmentation photons in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We argue that, if the jet distribution satisfies geometrical scaling and an anisotropic spectrum, these properties are transferred to photons during the jet fragmentation.

  16. Airport Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Airport Screening Fact Sheet Adopted: May 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan ... a safe level. An American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society industry standard states that the maxi- mum ...

  17. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  18. Carrier Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How accurate is carrier screening? No test is perfect. In a small number of cases, test results ... in which an egg is removed from a woman’s ovary, fertilized in a laboratory with the man’s ...

  19. (S-2-(4-Chlorobenzoyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[e]pyrazino[1,2-a][1,4]diazepine-6,12(11H,12aH-dione—Synthesis and Crystallographic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Mieczkowski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available (S-2-(4-Chlorobenzoyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[e]pyrazino[1,2-a][1,4]diazepine-6,12(11H,12aH-dione was obtained in a three-step, one-pot synthesis, starting from optically pure (S-2-piperazine carboxylic acid dihydrochloride. Selective acylation of the β-nitrogen atom followed by condensation with isatoic anhydride and cyclization with HATU/DIPEA to a seven-member benzodiazepine ring, led to the tricyclic benzodiazepine derivative. Crystallographic studies and initial biological screening were performed for the title compound.

  20. Evolution equations for extended dihadron fragmentation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccopieri, F.A.; Bacchetta, A.

    2007-03-01

    We consider dihadron fragmentation functions, describing the fragmentation of a parton in two unpolarized hadrons, and in particular extended dihadron fragmentation functions, explicitly dependent on the invariant mass, M h , of the hadron pair. We first rederive the known results on M h -integrated functions using Jet Calculus techniques, and then we present the evolution equations for extended dihadron fragmentation functions. Our results are relevant for the analysis of experimental measurements of two-particle-inclusive processes at different energies. (orig.)

  1. Polarization and alignment of nucleus fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Correlation of fragment orientation with orientation axis of fissile nucleus and with n-vector f vector of fragment divergence is considered. Estimations of polarization and alignment of fission fragments of preliminarily oriented nuclei in correlation (with n-vector f recording) and integral (with n-vector f averaging) experiments were conducted. It is shown that high sensitivity of polarization and fragment alignment to the character of nucleus movement at the stage of descent from barrier to rupture point exists

  2. Photon-hadron fragmentation: theoretical situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschanski, R.

    1983-07-01

    Using a selection of new experimental results models of hadronic fragmentation and their phenomenological comparison are presented. Indeed a convenient theory of hadronic fragmentation -for instance based on Q.C.D.- does not exist: low transverse momentum fragmentation involves the badly known hadronic long-range forces. Models should clarify the situation in the prospect of an eventual future theory

  3. Scaling and critical behaviour in nuclear fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, X.

    1990-09-01

    These notes review recent results on nuclear fragmentation. An analysis of experimental data from exclusive experiments is made in the framework of modern theories of fragmentation of finite size objects. We discuss the existence of a critical regime of fragmentation and the relevance of scaling and finite size scaling

  4. Remarks about the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.T.; Yang, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    Remarks are made about the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. In particular, the concept of favored and disfavored fragment distribution is introduced. Also, a sum rule is proved leading to a useful quantity called energy-fragmentation fraction. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  5. Quark fragmentation in e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, P.

    1984-12-01

    This brief review of new results in quark and gluon fragmentation observed in e + e - collisions concentrates mostly on PEP results and, within PEP, mostly on TPC results. The new PETRA results have been reported at this conference by M. Davier. It is restricted to results on light quark fragmentation since the results on heavy quark fragmentation have been reported by J. Chapman

  6. Self-organized criticality in fragmenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, L.; Dimon, P.; Bohr, J.

    1993-01-01

    The measured mass distributions of fragments from 26 fractured objects of gypsum, soap, stearic paraffin, and potato show evidence of obeying scaling laws; this suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmenting. The probability of finding a fragment scales inversely to a power...

  7. Neighbouring charge fragmentations in low energy fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.

    1986-10-01

    Shell and odd-even effects in fission have been largely studied until now. The structure in fragment mass, charge and kinetic energy distributions of fragments were interpreted as shell and even-odd effects. In this paper, we want to show that the discret change of fragment charge symmetry should produce also structures in those distribution. 19 refs

  8. e-Drug3D: 3D structure collections dedicated to drug repurposing and fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan, Emilie; Colliandre, Lionel; Guichou, Jean-François; Douguet, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    In the drug discovery field, new uses for old drugs, selective optimization of side activities and fragment-based drug design (FBDD) have proved to be successful alternatives to high-throughput screening. e-Drug3D is a database of 3D chemical structures of drugs that provides several collections of ready-to-screen SD files of drugs and commercial drug fragments. They are natural inputs in studies dedicated to drug repurposing and FBDD. e-Drug3D collections are freely available at http://chemoinfo.ipmc.cnrs.fr/e-drug3d.html either for download or for direct in silico web-based screenings.

  9. Influence of different kinds of rolling on the crystallographic texture and magnetic induction of a NOG 3 wt% Si steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. M.; Baêta Júnior, E. S.; Moraes, N. R. D. C.; Botelho, R. A.; Felix, R. A. C.; Brandao, L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the influence of different kinds of rolling on the magnetic properties of NOG steel, an electric steel widely used in electrical motors. These properties are highly correlated with the crystallographic texture of the material, which can be changed by rolling. Three kinds of rolling were examined: conventional rolling, cross-rolling and asymmetrical rolling. The crystallographic texture was determined by X-ray diffraction and the magnetic properties were calculated from a theoretical model that related the magnetic induction to crystallographic texture through the anisotropy energy. The results show that cross-rolling yields higher values of magnetic induction than the other processes.

  10. Fission fragment excited laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  11. Fragment emission from modestly excited nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Y. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Souza, R.T. de [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Chen, S.L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Cornell, E.W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Davin, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Fox, D. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Hamilton, T.M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Mcdonald, K. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Tsang, M.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Glasmacher, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Dinius, J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Gelbke, C.K. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Handzy, D.O. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Hsi, W.C.

    1996-07-08

    Fragment emission patterns occurring in nuclear systems of modest excitation are studied. Exclusive measurement of fragment emission in {sup 14}N+{sup 197}Au reactions at E/A=100, 130 and 156 MeV allows selection of central collisions where a single source dominates the decay. Low threshold measurement of IMF emission for these events allows investigation of the influence of detector threshold effects. The time scale of fragment emission is deduced using fragment-fragment velocity correlations. Comparisons are made to the predictions of a statistical decay model. (orig.).

  12. Velocity distribution of fragments of catastrophic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasuhiko; Kato, Manabu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional velocities of fragments produced by laboratory impact experiments were measured for basalts and pyrophyllites. The velocity distribution of fragments obtained shows that the velocity range of the major fragments is rather narrow, at most within a factor of 3 and that no clear dependence of velocity on the fragment mass is observed. The NonDimensional Impact Stress (NDIS) defined by Mizutani et al. (1990) is found to be an appropriate scaling parameter to describe the overall fragment velocity as well as the antipodal velocity.

  13. Models of fragmentation with composite power laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Z.; Rodgers, G. J.

    1999-06-01

    Some models for binary fragmentation are introduced in which a time dependent transition size produces two regions of fragment sizes above and below the transition size. In the first model we assume a fixed rate of fragmentation for the largest fragment and two different rates of fragmentation in the two regions of sizes above and below the transition size. The model is solved exactly in the long time limit to reveal stable time-invariant solutions for the fragment size and mass distributions. These solutions exhibit composite power law behaviours; power laws with two different exponents for fragments in smaller and larger regions. A special case of the model with no fragmentation in the smaller size region is also examined. Another model is also introduced which have three regions of fragment sizes with different rates of fragmentation. The similarities between the stable distributions in our models and composite power law distributions from experimental work on shock fragmentation of long thin glass rods and thick clay plates are discussed.

  14. Extraction of 16th Century Calender Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jakob Povl; Etheridge, Christian

    at the Cultural Heritage & Archaeometric Research Team, SDU. Upon finding medieval manuscript fragments in the university library’s special collections, scholars at the Centre for Medieval Literature are consulted. In most cases, digital pictures of the finds will circulate in the international community...... fragments may require extensive use of Big Data and other forms of analysis in order to be identified. Usually, the university library prefers not to remove the fragments from their “fragment carriers”. In order to read fragments that are only partially visible or invisible, x-ray technology may be deployed...... of medieval scholars. Thousands of 16th and 17th Century books are stored in the University Library of Southern Denmark. One out of five of these books is expected to contain medieval manuscript fragments or fragments of rare prints, e.g. incunabula....

  15. The formation of planets by disc fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatellos Dimitris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the role that disc fragmentation plays in the formation of gas giant and terrestrial planets, and how this relates to the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars, and ultimately to the process of star formation. Protostellar discs may fragment, if they are massive enough and can cool fast enough, but most of the objects that form by fragmentation are brown dwarfs. It may be possible that planets also form, if the mass growth of a proto-fragment is stopped (e.g. if this fragment is ejected from the disc, or suppressed and even reversed (e.g by tidal stripping. I will discuss if it is possible to distinguish whether a planet has formed by disc fragmentation or core accretion, and mention of a few examples of observed exoplanets that are suggestive of formation by disc fragmentation.

  16. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystallographic texture control helps improve pipeline steel resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F; Hallen, J M; Herrera, O; Venegas, V [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Baudin, T [Universite de Paris Sud, Orsay, (France)

    2010-07-01

    The resistance to HIC of sour service pipeline steels has been improved through several strategies but none have proven to be totally efficient in the preservation of HIC in difficult operating conditions. The crystallographic texture plays a significant role in determining the behavior of HIC in pipeline steels. The present study tried to prove that crystallographic texture control, through warm rolling schedules, helps improve pipeline steel resistance to HIC. Several samples of an API 5L X52 grade pipeline steel were produced using different thermomechanical processes (austenization, controlled rolling and recrystallization). These samples were subjected to cathodic charging. Scanning electron microscopy and automated FEG/EBSD were used to perform metallographic inspections and to collect microstructure data. The results showed that the strong y fiber texture significantly reduces or even prevents the HIC damage. It is possible to improve the HIC resistance of pipeline steels using crystallography texture control and grain boundary engineering.

  18. Microstructure and crystallographic texture of pure titanium parts generated by laser additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-González, Felipe; del Val, Jesús; Comesaña, Rafael; Penide, Joaquín; Lusquiños, Fernando; Quintero, Félix; Riveiro, Antonio; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Gil, Francisco Javier; Pou, Juan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and crystallographic texture of pure Ti thin walls generated by Additive Manufacturing based on Laser Cladding (AMLC) are analyzed in depth. From the results obtained, it is possible to better understand the AMLC process of pure titanium. The microstructure observed in the samples consists of large elongated columnar prior β grains which have grown epitaxially from the substrate to the top, in parallel to the building direction. Within the prior β grains, α-Ti lamellae and lamellar colonies are the result of cooling from above the β-transus temperature. This transformation follows the Burgers relationship and the result is a basket-weave microstructure with a strong crystallographic texture. Finally, a thermal treatment is proposed to transform the microstructure of the as-deposited samples into an equiaxed microstructure of α-Ti grains.

  19. Auxeticity of Yukawa Systems with Nanolayers in the (111 Crystallographic Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł M. Pigłowski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Elastic properties of model crystalline systems, in which the particles interact via the hard potential (infinite when any particles overlap and zero otherwise and the hard-core repulsive Yukawa interaction, were determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of structural modifications, in the form of periodic nanolayers being perpendicular to the crystallographic axis [111], on auxetic properties of the crystal was investigated. It has been shown that the hard sphere nanolayers introduced into Yukawa crystals allow one to control the elastic properties of the system. It has been also found that the introduction of the Yukawa monolayers to the hard sphere crystal induces auxeticity in the [ 11 1 ¯ ] [ 112 ] -direction, while maintaining the negative Poisson’s ratio in the [ 110 ] [ 1 1 ¯ 0 ] -direction, thus expanding the partial auxeticity of the system to an additional important crystallographic direction.

  20. The distribution of intervariant crystallographic planes in a lath martensite using five macroscopic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beladi, Hossein; Rohrer, Gregory S.; Rollett, Anthony D.; Tari, Vahid; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction analysis was employed to compute the closest orientation relationship and the distribution of intervariant boundary character in a lath martensitic microstructure. The misorientations were close to the Kurdjumov–Sachs orientation relationship. The intervariant crystallographic plane distribution exhibited a relatively high anisotropy with a tendency for the lath interfaces to terminate on (1 1 0) planes. This results from the crystallographic constraints associated with the shear transformation rather than a low energy interface configuration. The lath martensite habit plane was determined to be mostly (1 1 0) or near (1 1 0). The relative populations of boundaries with [1 1 1] and [1 1 0] misorientations were greater than other high index misorientations, mostly characterized as (1 1 0) symmetric tilt and (1 1 0) twist boundary types, respectively. Analysis with homology metrics of the connectivity in the lath martensitic microstructure revealed the connectivity dominated by population of misorientation angle and boundary plane type

  1. Asymmetric Rolling Process Simulations by Dynamic Explicit Crystallographic Homogenized Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Terao, Toshihiro; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the asymmetric rolling (ASR) has been applied to the material processing of aluminum alloy sheet to control micro-crystal structure and texture in order to improve the mechanical properties. Previously, several studies aimed at high formability sheet generation have been carried out experimentally, but finite element simulations to predict the deformation induced texture evolution of the asymmetrically rolled sheet metals have not been investigated rigorously. In this study, crystallographic homogenized finite element (FE) codes are developed and applied to analyze the asymmetrical rolling processes. The textures of sheet metals were measured by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and compared with FE simulations. The results from the dynamic explicit type Crystallographic homogenization FEM code shows that this type of simulation is a comprehensive tool to predict the plastic induced texture evolution

  2. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Cherney, Maia M.; Solomonson, Matthew; Liu, Jianshe; James, Michael N. G.; Weiner, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    The sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. Crystallization and preliminarily X-ray crystallographic analysis were performed for the recombinant enzyme. The gene product of open reading frame AFE-1293 from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 is annotated as encoding a sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, an enzyme that catalyses electron transfer from sulfide to quinone. Following overexpression in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The native crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4 2 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.7, c = 208.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, with an extreme value of the Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 4.53 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 72.9%

  3. Comparison of the free volume sizes and shapes determined from crystallographic and PALS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tydda Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two different classes of molecular crystals were investigated. The first group was benzenediols, which are characterized by the same chemical composition but a different organization of their crystallographic structures; all of the compounds from this group have only one kind of free volumes. The second class was represented by olanzapine, which has more complex chemical composition and two kinds of free volumes in the structure. The o-Ps lifetime values determined from positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS measurements agree quite well with those calculated for sizes found from crystallographic data for benzenediols (agreement within 10% of the lifetime values. For olanzapine, a good agreement is observed in the case of cuboidal free volumes, while for the other kind of void, the agreement is less satisfactory. Positronium diffusion coefficient determined from o-Ps redistribution in olanzapine agrees with these found for polymers.

  4. Surface crystallographic structures of cellulose nanofiber films and overlayers of pentacene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yasuo; Mori, Toshiaki; Tsuruta, Ryohei; Yamanaka, Soichiro; Yoshida, Koki; Imai, Kento; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Hosokai, Takuya

    2018-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers or nanocellulose is a promising recently developed biomass and biodegradable material used for various applications. In order to utilize this material as a substrate in organic electronic devices, thorough understanding of the crystallographic structures of the surfaces of the nanocellulose composites and of their interfaces with organic semiconductor molecules is essential. In this work, surface crystallographic structures of nanocellulose films (NCFs) and overlayers of pentacene were investigated by two-dimensional grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. The NCFs are found to crystallize on solid surfaces with the crystal lattice preserving the same structure of the known bulk phase, whereas distortion of interchain packing toward the surface normal direction is suggested. The pentacene overlayers on the NCFs are found to form the thin-film phase with an in-plane mean crystallite size of over 10 nm.

  5. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of proteinase K at pD 6.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardberg, Anna S [ORNL; Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Myles, Dean A A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    AbstractA preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the proteolytic enzyme proteinase K is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the vapour-diffusion method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2.3 on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in 2.5 days. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, particularly at the active site. This information will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying proteinase K's catalytic activity and to an enriched understanding of the subtilisin clan of serine proteases.

  6. Revisiting the Lund Fragmentation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Nilsson, A.

    1992-10-01

    We present a new method to implement the Lund Model fragmentation distributions for multi-gluon situations. The method of Sjoestrand, implemented in the well-known Monte Carlo simulation program JETSET, is robust and direct and according to his findings there are no observable differences between different ways to implement his scheme. His method can be described as a space-time method because the breakup proper time plays a major role. The method described in this paper is built on energy-momentum space methods. We make use of the χ-curve, which is defined directly from the energy momentum vectors of the partons. We have shown that the χ-curve describes the breakup properties and the final state energy momentum distributions in the mean. We present a method to find the variations around the χ-curve, which also implements the basic Lund Model fragmentation distributions (the area-law and the corresponding iterative cascade). We find differences when comparing the corresponding Monte Carlo implementation REVJET to the JETSET distributions inside the gluon jets. (au)

  7. Luminescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-I.

    1982-01-01

    Luminescent screens which are useful for such purposes as intensifying screens for radiographs are comprised of a support bearing a layer of finely divided particles of a phosphor dispersed in a cross-linked polymeric matrix formed by heat-curing of a coating composition comprising an unsaturated cross-linkable polymer, a polymerizable acrylic monomer, a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, and a heat-activatable polymerization initiator. The phosphor layer includes voids formed by evaporation of an evaporable component which is present in the coating composition from which such layer is formed. (author)

  8. Shape effect related to crystallographic orientation of deformation behavior in copper crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Chang, C.H.; Koo, Y.M.; MacDowell, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The deformation behavior of pure copper single crystals has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation using the in situ reflection Laue method. Two types of samples with the same orientation of tensile axes, but with different crystallographic orientations in the directions of the width and thickness of the samples, have been studied. They showed different characteristics of deformation behavior, such as the activated slip systems, the movement of the tensile axis, and the mode of fracture

  9. Reintroducing Electrostatics into Macromolecular Crystallographic Refinement: Application to Neutron Crystallography and DNA Hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Fenn, Timothy D.; Schnieders, Michael J.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Wu, Chuanjie; Langan, Paul; Pande, Vijay S.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2011-01-01

    Most current crystallographic structure refinements augment the diffraction data with a priori information consisting of bond, angle, dihedral, planarity restraints and atomic repulsion based on the Pauli exclusion principle. Yet, electrostatics and van der Waals attraction are physical forces that provide additional a priori information. Here we assess the inclusion of electrostatics for the force field used for all-atom (including hydrogen) joint neutron/X-ray refinement. Two DNA and a prot...

  10. Determination of lower bound crystallographic yield loci of zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Viana, C.S. da

    1980-01-01

    The use of zircaloy-4 tubing in fuel elements of water cooled reactors is discussed with respect to its mechanisms of deformation and also its resulting anisotropic plastic behaviour. A method for obtaining lower bound crystallographic yield loci of α-Zr is presented and applied to individual crystal orientations and to a real texture described by the main components observed on a direct pole figure. (Author) [pt

  11. Microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA2017A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.M.Z., E-mail: mohamed_ahmed4@s-petrol.suez.edu.eg [Institute for Microstructural and Mechanical Processing Engineering, University of Sheffield (IMMPETUS), Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Suez Canal University, Suez 43721 (Egypt); Wynne, B.P.; Rainforth, W.M. [Institute for Microstructural and Mechanical Processing Engineering, University of Sheffield (IMMPETUS), Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Threadgill, P.L. [TWI LTD, Granta Park, Great Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    In this study a thick section (20 mm) friction stir welded AA2017A-T451 has been characterized in terms of microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties. For microstructural analysis both optical and scanning electron microscopes have been used. A detailed crystallographic texture analysis has been carried out using the electron back scattering diffraction technique. Crystallographic texture has been examined in both shoulder and probe affected regions of the weld NG. An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region which is mainly explained by the effect of the sequential multi pass deformation experienced by both tool probe and tool shoulder. The texture in the probe dominated region at the AS side of the weld is relatively weak but still assembles the simple shear texture of FCC metals with B/B{sup Macron} and C components existing across the whole map. However, the texture is stronger at the RS than at the AS of the weld, mainly dominated byB/B{sup Macron} components and with C component almost absent across the map. An alternating bands between (B) components and (B{sup Macron }) component are observed only at the AS side of the weld. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed investigation of microstructure and crystallographic texture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grain size is varied from the top to the bottom of the NG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The texture in the probe affected region is dominated by simple shear texture.

  12. Tungsten heavy metal alloys relations between the crystallographic texture and the internal stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, G.; Voltz, M.

    2001-01-01

    Quite often the W-Ni-Fe-Co heavy alloys are subjected to a thermomechanical processing of swaging and aging in order to obtain the highest possible level of resistance. Within the framework of this plastic deformation on cylindrical parts, the swaging leads to the distribution of morphological and crystallographic texture as well as specific internal stresses. The resulting mechanical characteristics are correlated to structural and sub-structural variations. (author)

  13. Medicinal chemistry inspired fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanter, James; Zhang, Xuqing; Sui, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Lead generation can be a very challenging phase of the drug discovery process. The two principal methods for this stage of research are blind screening and rational design. Among the rational or semirational design approaches, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has emerged as a useful tool for the generation of lead structures. It is particularly powerful as a complement to high-throughput screening approaches when the latter failed to yield viable hits for further development. Engagement of medicinal chemists early in the process can accelerate the progression of FBDD efforts by incorporating drug-friendly properties in the earliest stages of the design process. Medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 2b and ketohexokinase are chosen as examples to illustrate the importance of close collaboration of medicinal chemists, crystallography, and modeling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RAY TRACING RENDER MENGGUNAKAN FRAGMENT ANTI ALIASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Rendering is generating surface and three-dimensional effects on an object displayed on a monitor screen. Ray tracing as a rendering method that traces ray for each image pixel has a drawback, that is, aliasing (jaggies effect. There are some methods for executing anti aliasing. One of those methods is OGSS (Ordered Grid Super Sampling. OGSS is able to perform aliasing well. However, this method requires more computation time since sampling of all pixels in the image will be increased. Fragment Anti Aliasing (FAA is a new alternative method that can cope with the drawback. FAA will check the image when performing rendering to a scene. Jaggies effect is only happened at curve and gradient object. Therefore, only this part of object that will experience sampling magnification. After this sampling magnification and the pixel values are computed, then downsample is performed to retrieve the original pixel values. Experimental results show that the software can implement ray tracing well in order to form images, and it can implement FAA and OGSS technique to perform anti aliasing. In general, rendering using FAA is faster than using OGSS

  15. Alcohol Use Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression Screening Substance Abuse Screening Alcohol Use Screening Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Instructions The following questions ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Manual Instructions The following ...

  16. Origin of intragranular crystallographic misorientations in hot-dip Al-Zn-Si coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederberger, Ch.; Michler, J.; Jacot, A.

    2008-01-01

    The origin of intragranular variations of the crystallographic orientation in hot-dip Al-Zn-Si coatings is discussed based on new experimental results and modelling. The solidification microstructure in as-received 55Al-43.4Zn-1.6Si (in wt.%) coatings deposited on steel plates in an industrial production line was analyzed by electron backscattered diffraction, glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results were compared with those obtained in coatings re-solidified under different cooling and mechanical loading conditions. Continuous variations of the crystallographic orientation as large as 35 deg. were observed within individual grains of Al-Zn-Si, consistent with previous studies. However, the mechanisms previously proposed for the origin of intragranular crystallographic misorientations had to be revisited. The new experimental data acquired during this study indicate that the solidification shrinkage accumulating in the area of the grain envelope is the driving force for the formation of intragranular misorientations. The solidification shrinkage leads to the development of tensile stresses in the oxide film covering the coating while it solidifies. Estimations based on AFM profiles and phase field simulations of the dendritic structure indicate that the stresses applied on the dendrite network are sufficient to deform plastically the dendrite arms during solidification

  17. Resolution of a protein sequence ambiguity by X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, L.J.; Lattman, E.E.; Wolkow, C.; Woods, A.; Chevrier, M.; Cotter, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ambiguities in amino acid sequences are a potential problem in X-ray crystallographic studies of proteins. Amino acid side chains often cannot be reliably identified from the electron density. Many protein crystal structures that are now being solved are simple variants of a known wild-type structure. Thus, cloning artifacts or other untoward events can readily lead to cases in which the proposed sequence is not correct. An example is presented showing that mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool for analyzing suspected errors. The X-ray crystal structure of an insertion mutant of Staphylococcal nuclease has been solved to 1.67 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R value of 0.170. A single residue has been inserted in the C-terminal α helix. The inserted amino acid was believed to be an alanine residue, but the final electron density maps strongly indicated that a glycine had been inserted instead. To confirm the observations from the X-ray data, matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry was employed to verify the glycine insertion. This mass spectrometric technique has sufficient mass accuracy to detect the methyl group that distinguishes glycine from alanine and can be extended to the more common situation in which crystallographic measurements suggest a problem with the sequence, but cannot pinpoint its location or nature. (orig.)

  18. Resolution of a protein sequence ambiguity by X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, L.J.; Lattman, E.E. (Dept. of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Wolkow, C.; Woods, A.; Chevrier, M.; Cotter, R.J. (Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Lab., Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Ambiguities in amino acid sequences are a potential problem in X-ray crystallographic studies of proteins. Amino acid side chains often cannot be reliably identified from the electron density. Many protein crystal structures that are now being solved are simple variants of a known wild-type structure. Thus, cloning artifacts or other untoward events can readily lead to cases in which the proposed sequence is not correct. An example is presented showing that mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool for analyzing suspected errors. The X-ray crystal structure of an insertion mutant of Staphylococcal nuclease has been solved to 1.67 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R value of 0.170. A single residue has been inserted in the C-terminal {alpha} helix. The inserted amino acid was believed to be an alanine residue, but the final electron density maps strongly indicated that a glycine had been inserted instead. To confirm the observations from the X-ray data, matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry was employed to verify the glycine insertion. This mass spectrometric technique has sufficient mass accuracy to detect the methyl group that distinguishes glycine from alanine and can be extended to the more common situation in which crystallographic measurements suggest a problem with the sequence, but cannot pinpoint its location or nature. (orig.).

  19. Deriving Quantitative Crystallographic Information from the Wavelength-Resolved Neutron Transmission Analysis Performed in Imaging Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Current status of Bragg-edge/dip neutron transmission analysis/imaging methods is presented. The method can visualize real-space distributions of bulk crystallographic information in a crystalline material over a large area (~10 cm with high spatial resolution (~100 μm. Furthermore, by using suitable spectrum analysis methods for wavelength-dependent neutron transmission data, quantitative visualization of the crystallographic information can be achieved. For example, crystallographic texture imaging, crystallite size imaging and crystalline phase imaging with texture/extinction corrections are carried out by the Rietveld-type (wide wavelength bandwidth profile fitting analysis code, RITS (Rietveld Imaging of Transmission Spectra. By using the single Bragg-edge analysis mode of RITS, evaluations of crystal lattice plane spacing (d-spacing relating to macro-strain and d-spacing distribution’s FWHM (full width at half maximum relating to micro-strain can be achieved. Macro-strain tomography is performed by a new conceptual CT (computed tomography image reconstruction algorithm, the tensor CT method. Crystalline grains and their orientations are visualized by a fast determination method of grain orientation for Bragg-dip neutron transmission spectrum. In this paper, these imaging examples with the spectrum analysis methods and the reliabilities evaluated by optical/electron microscope and X-ray/neutron diffraction, are presented. In addition, the status at compact accelerator driven pulsed neutron sources is also presented.

  20. Influence of crystallographic orientation on the fracture toughness of strongly textured Ti--6Al--4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    Fracture toughness values for six test piece orientations in a strongly textured 57-mm thick rolled and annealed Ti--6Al--4V bar have been related to their crystallographic orientations. The K/sub Ic/ values, ranging from 46.3 to 93.3 MPa/m, could be divided into two groups. High values (74.7 to 93.3 MPa/m) were obtained when a crystallographic deformation mode ([1010] or [1122] slip) was parallel to the planes of maximum shear stress for plane strain conditions, and the significant fractographic feature for this group was a clearly defined stretch zone. In the second group, where crystallographic deformation modes were not aligned with the planes of maximum shear stress, much lower K/sub Ic/ values were recorded (46.3 to 50.7 MPa/m). In this case there was no stretch zone and, in addition, some test pieces appeared, in effect, to have delaminated in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip. Similar trends were also indicated by the results of Charpy impact tests. The influence of in-plane elastic anisotropy on fracture toughness is discussed, and the importance of test piece geometry highlighted. From the results it could be inferred that high toughness in anisotropic materials is possible only in certain orientations; stretch zone formation and fatigue striation formation are by the same mechanical process; and there will be significantly different critical crack sizes in textured titanium alloy components

  1. Electron diffraction study of {alpha}-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-06-01

    The structure of crystalline {alpha}-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes, allowing the space group symmetry to be studied. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pm3-bar were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for very thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. The structural basis of the Pm3-bar to Im3-bar transformation may be understood in terms of an analysis of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns is described. An electron diffraction pattern of the 5-fold axis of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi is also included; this is compared with the experimental results and calculations for the [0{tau}1] axis of Pm3-bar and Im3-bar crystalline phases. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  2. Effect of crystallographic texture on the bulk magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pampa, E-mail: pampaghosh@gmail.com [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 0C5 (Canada); Chromik, Richard R., E-mail: richard.chromik@mcgill.ca [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 0C5 (Canada); Vashegi, Babak; Knight, Andrew M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative physical models for non-oriented electrical steels require precise knowledge of chemical and microstructural parameters for the material, with crystallographic texture being one of the most important. Describing the structure–property relationships in these materials is made difficult in that all of the parameters have an effect on magnetic properties. In the present study, a set of non-oriented electrical steel specimens are examined, where chemistry and grain size are kept similar from sample to sample, but texture is varied. A new texture parameter called Magnetic Texture Factor is introduced which is defined as the ratio of the volume fractions of 〈100〉 direction to 〈111〉 direction along magnetization vector. It was found that this Magnetic Texture Factor was a better parameter for identifying trends of magnetic properties with crystallographic texture than the often used Texture Factor, which is described as the ratio of the volume fractions of {100} planes to {111} planes. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of a set of electrical steels were measured. • The effect of crystallographic texture was isolated from other material parameters. • A new texture factor is introduced called the Magnetic Texture Factor.

  3. Phage-display libraries of murine and human antibody Fab fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Andersen, P S; Nielsen, L K

    1996-01-01

    We provide efficient and detailed procedures for construction, expression, and screening of comprehensive libraries of murine or human antibody Fab fragments displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. In addition, protocols for producing and using ultra-electrocompetent cells, for producing Fab...

  4. Magnetic anisotropy induced by crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment in directionally-solidified eutectic Mn-Sb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Chang-Sheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang Ligong University, Shenyang 110159 (China); Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Tie, E-mail: liutie@epm.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Dong, Meng; Wu, Chun; Shao, Jian-Guo; Wang, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2017-02-15

    The influences of the crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of polycrystalline materials were investigated. Microstructures obtained in eutectic Mn-Sb alloys via directional solidification simultaneously displayed crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment. Both the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment were able to induce magnetic anisotropy in the alloys, wherein the influence of the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of the alloys strongly depended upon their directions and exhibited either mutual promotion or competition. These findings may provide useful guidance for the fabrication design of functional magnetic materials. - Highlights: • We study effects of orientation in crystal and morphology on magnetic anisotropy. • Both orientation in crystal and morphology can induce magnetic anisotropy. • Their effects depend on direction and exhibit either mutual promotion or competition.

  5. A comparative crystallographic analysis of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation in the yttria-zirconia system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, N.

    2008-06-01

    The various requirements for effective transformation toughening cannot be predicted without a detailed understanding of the crystallography of the martensitic transformation. In this connection, a comparative crystallographic analysis for four pairs of lattice-correspondence variants in the yttria-zirconia system has been performed on the basis of infinitesimal-deformation (ID) approach and Wechsler-Lieberman-Read (WLR) crystallographic theory. A comparison of the crystallographic features obtained from these two theories was made. In order to verify the applicability of the two theories to this transformation, the calculated results were also compared with the experimental data available. The present study shows that the predictions of both the ID approach and the WLR crystallographic theory can provide data necessary for the model of transformation toughening and act as a guideline for the experimental work in the yttria-zirconia system.

  6. Fragment-based drug discovery and protein–protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turnbull AP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrew P Turnbull,1 Susan M Boyd,2 Björn Walse31CRT Discovery Laboratories, Department of Biological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, London, UK; 2IOTA Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Cambridge, UK; 3SARomics Biostructures AB, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Protein–protein interactions (PPIs are involved in many biological processes, with an estimated 400,000 PPIs within the human proteome. There is significant interest in exploiting the relatively unexplored potential of these interactions in drug discovery, driven by the need to find new therapeutic targets. Compared with classical drug discovery against targets with well-defined binding sites, developing small-molecule inhibitors against PPIs where the contact surfaces are frequently more extensive and comparatively flat, with most of the binding energy localized in “hot spots”, has proven far more challenging. However, despite the difficulties associated with targeting PPIs, important progress has been made in recent years with fragment-based drug discovery playing a pivotal role in improving their tractability. Computational and empirical approaches can be used to identify hot-spot regions and assess the druggability and ligandability of new targets, whilst fragment screening campaigns can detect low-affinity fragments that either directly or indirectly perturb the PPI. Once fragment hits have been identified and confirmed using biochemical and biophysical approaches, three-dimensional structural data derived from nuclear magnetic resonance or X-ray crystallography can be used to drive medicinal chemistry efforts towards the development of more potent inhibitors. A small-scale comparison presented in this review of “standard” fragments with those targeting PPIs has revealed that the latter tend to be larger, be more lipophilic, and contain more polar (acid/base functionality, whereas three-dimensional descriptor data indicate that there is little difference in their three

  7. Dissecting fragment-based lead discovery at the von Hippel-Lindau protein:hypoxia inducible factor 1α protein-protein interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Molle, Inge; Thomann, Andreas; Buckley, Dennis L; So, Ernest C; Lang, Steffen; Crews, Craig M; Ciulli, Alessio

    2012-10-26

    Fragment screening is widely used to identify attractive starting points for drug design. However, its potential and limitations to assess the tractability of often challenging protein:protein interfaces have been underexplored. Here, we address this question by means of a systematic deconstruction of lead-like inhibitors of the pVHL:HIF-1α interaction into their component fragments. Using biophysical techniques commonly employed for screening, we could only detect binding of fragments that violate the Rule of Three, are more complex than those typically screened against classical druggable targets, and occupy two adjacent binding subsites at the interface rather than just one. Analyses based on ligand and group lipophilicity efficiency of anchored fragments were applied to dissect the individual subsites and probe for binding hot spots. The implications of our findings for targeting protein interfaces by fragment-based approaches are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fragmentation of Ceramics in Rapid Expansion Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Spandan; Geubelle, Philippe H.; Rangaswamy, Krishnan

    The study of the fragmentation process goes back to more than a century, motivated primarily by problems related to mining and ore handling (Grady and Kipp, 1985). Various theories have been proposed to predict the fragmentation stress and the fragment size and distribution. But the investigations are generally case specific and relate to only a narrow set of fragmentation processes. A number of theoretical studies of dynamic fragmentation in a rapidly expanding body can be found in the literature. For example, the study summarized in (Grady, 1982) presents a model based on a simple energy balance concept between the surface energy released due to fracture and the kinetic energy of the fragments. Subsequent refinements of the energy balance model have been proposed by (Glenn and Chudnovsky, 1986), which take into account the strain energy of the fragments and specify a threshold stress below which no fragmentation occurs. These models assume that the fracture events are instantaneous and occur simultaneously. Evidently, these assumptions are quite restrictive and these models can not take into account the transient nature of the fragmentation process after the onset of fracture in the material. A more recent model proposed by (Miller et al., 1999) however takes into account this time-dependent nature of the fragmentation event and the distribution of flaws of various strengths in the original material.

  9. Hearing Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  10. Vision Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an efficient and cost-effective method to identify children with visual impairment or eye conditions that are likely to lead ... main goal of vision screening is to identify children who have or are at ... visual impairment unless treated in early childhood. Other problems that ...

  11. Evolutions in fragment-based drug design: the deconstruction–reconstruction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Zhou, Xiaobin; Wang, Ailan; Zheng, Yunquan; Gao, Yu; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of molecular recognition and protein–ligand interactions have facilitated rapid development of potent and selective ligands for therapeutically relevant targets. Over the past two decades, a variety of useful approaches and emerging techniques have been developed to promote the identification and optimization of leads that have high potential for generating new therapeutic agents. Intriguingly, the innovation of a fragment-based drug design (FBDD) approach has enabled rapid and efficient progress in drug discovery. In this critical review, we focus on the construction of fragment libraries and the advantages and disadvantages of various fragment-based screening (FBS) for constructing such libraries. We also highlight the deconstruction–reconstruction strategy by utilizing privileged fragments of reported ligands. PMID:25263697

  12. Straightforward hit identification approach in fragment-based discovery of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysko, Petro; Moroz, Yurii S; Vasylchenko, Oleksandr V; Hurmach, Vasyl V; Starodubtseva, Anastasia; Stefanishena, Natalia; Nesteruk, Kateryna; Zozulya, Sergey; Kondratov, Ivan S; Grygorenko, Oleksandr O

    2018-05-09

    A combination approach of a fragment screening and "SAR by catalog" was used for the discovery of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) inhibitors. Initial screening of 3695-fragment library against bromodomain 1 of BRD4 using thermal shift assay (TSA), followed by initial hit validation, resulted in 73 fragment hits, which were used to construct a follow-up library selected from available screening collection. Additionally, analogs of inactive fragments, as well as a set of randomly selected compounds were also prepared (3 × 3200 compounds in total). Screening of the resulting sets using TSA, followed by re-testing at several concentrations, counter-screen, and TR-FRET assay resulted in 18 confirmed hits. Compounds derived from the initial fragment set showed better hit rate as compared to the other two sets. Finally, building dose-response curves revealed three compounds with IC 50  = 1.9-7.4 μM. For these compounds, binding sites and conformations in the BRD4 (4UYD) have been determined by docking. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunogenic properties of Streptococcus agalactiae FbsA fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Papasergi

    Full Text Available Several species of Gram-positive bacteria can avidly bind soluble and surface-associated fibrinogen (Fng, a property that is considered important in the pathogenesis of human infections. To gain insights into the mechanism by which group B Streptococcus (GBS, a frequent neonatal pathogen, interacts with Fng, we have screened two phage displayed genomic GBS libraries. All of the Fng-binding phage clones contained inserts encoding fragments of FbsA, a protein displaying multiple repeats. Since the functional role of this protein is only partially understood, representative fragments were recombinantly expressed and analyzed for Fng binding affinity and ability to induce immune protection against GBS infection. Maternal immunization with 6pGST, a fragment containing five repeats, significantly protected mouse pups against lethal GBS challenge and these protective effects could be recapitulated by administration of anti-6pGST serum from adult animals. Notably, a monoclonal antibody that was capable of neutralizing Fng binding by 6pGST, but not a non-neutralizing antibody, could significantly protect pups against lethal GBS challenge. These data suggest that FbsA-Fng interaction promotes GBS pathogenesis and that blocking such interaction is a viable strategy to prevent or treat GBS infections.

  14. Impact failure and fragmentation properties of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E. [Applied Research Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kipp, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-03-01

    In the present study we describe the development of an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. Spherical test samples of the metals of interest are subjected to controlled impulsive stress loads by acceleration to high velocities with a light-gas launcher facility and subsequent normal impact on thin plates. Motion, deformation and fragmentation of the test samples are diagnosed with multiple flash radiography methods. The impact plate materials are selected to be transparent to the x-ray method so that only test metal material is imaged. Through a systematic series of such tests both strain-to-failure and fragmentation resistance properties are determined through this experimental method. Fragmentation property data for several steels, copper, aluminum, tantalum and titanium have been obtained to date. Aspects of the dynamic data have been analyzed with computational methods to achieve a better understanding of the processes leading to failure and fragmentation, and to test an existing computational fragmentation model.

  15. Fragmentation and flow in central collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacak, B.V.; Doss, K.G.R.; Gustafsson, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Investigation of the fragmentation mechanism requires the measurement of complicated observables. To identify what part of the reacting system gives rise to the fragments, it would be useful to tag them as participants or spectators. A large acceptance for all the reaction products and an event-by-event measurement of the fragment multiplicity is required to distinguish fragment formation via sequential emission from a large equilibrated system and multifragmentation. In order to address whether fragments are formed early or late in the collision, information about the dynamical evolution of the reaction is necessary. This can be provided by study of the global properties of the events. This paper discusses experimental techniques applicable to studying fragmentation processes. 25 refs., 8 figs

  16. Gallstone fragmentation by control electrohydraulic lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, G.A.; Mueller, P.R.; Brink, J.A.; Saini, S.; Picus, D.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have performed in vitro contact electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) of 100 gallstones > 10 mm in diameter to identify physical and technical factors that affect fragmentation success. Ninety-one of 100 stones were fragmented with a 3-F electrode (average, seven shocks; range, 1--42); only 12 stones were fragmented with a single shock. Of the nine stones refractory to 50 shocks, four were > 30 mm in diameter and five stones were densely calcified. The most important variable determining power requirements for fragmentation was gallstone size (R = .58), but radiographic calcification of gallstones was also important (R = .47). Stones < 15 mm tended to produce fragments of left-angle 2 mm; stones right-angle 20 mm tended to produce two to five large discrete fragments (P , .05). In addition, lithotripsy could be conducted equally well in 1:1 dilute diatrizoate contrast agent as in 1:6 normal saline, suggesting that contact EHL could be performed under fluoroscopy

  17. Expression, limited proteolysis and preliminary crystallographic analysis of IpaD, a component of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Steven [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Roversi, Pietro [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Espina, Marianela [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Deane, Janet E. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Birket, Susan; Picking, William D. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Blocker, Ariel [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Picking, Wendy L. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Lea, Susan M., E-mail: susan.lea@path.ox.ac.uk [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the S. flexneri type III secretion system, has been crystallized in a variety of crystal forms using in-drop proteolysis. Native and selenomethionine-labelled data collection and preliminary analyses are reported. IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system, has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of the native protein in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.9, b = 100.7, c = 112.0 Å, and data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak at 50% of the origin on the Harker section v = 0.5, suggesting twofold non-crystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. As attempts to derivatize or grow selenomethionine-labelled protein crystals failed, in-drop proteolysis was used to produce new crystal forms. A trace amount of subtilisin Carlsberg was added to IpaD before sparse-matrix screening, resulting in the production of several new crystal forms. This approach produced SeMet-labelled crystals and diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The SeMet crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 139.4, b = 45.0, c = 99.5 Å, β = 107.9°. An anomalous difference Patterson map revealed peaks on the Harker section v = 0, while the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold noncrystallographic symmetry axis, which is consistent with two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  18. Expression, limited proteolysis and preliminary crystallographic analysis of IpaD, a component of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Espina, Marianela; Deane, Janet E.; Birket, Susan; Picking, William D.; Blocker, Ariel; Picking, Wendy L.; Lea, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the S. flexneri type III secretion system, has been crystallized in a variety of crystal forms using in-drop proteolysis. Native and selenomethionine-labelled data collection and preliminary analyses are reported. IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system, has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of the native protein in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 55.9, b = 100.7, c = 112.0 Å, and data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak at 50% of the origin on the Harker section v = 0.5, suggesting twofold non-crystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. As attempts to derivatize or grow selenomethionine-labelled protein crystals failed, in-drop proteolysis was used to produce new crystal forms. A trace amount of subtilisin Carlsberg was added to IpaD before sparse-matrix screening, resulting in the production of several new crystal forms. This approach produced SeMet-labelled crystals and diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The SeMet crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 139.4, b = 45.0, c = 99.5 Å, β = 107.9°. An anomalous difference Patterson map revealed peaks on the Harker section v = 0, while the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold noncrystallographic symmetry axis, which is consistent with two molecules per asymmetric unit

  19. Plasma wake and nuclear forces on fragmented H+ transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Deutsch, Claude

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the target electronic and nuclear interactions produced when a H + ion traverses classical plasma matter. Electronic interactions are treated by means of the dielectric formalism while nuclear interactions are dealt within the classical dispersion theory through a Monte Carlo computer code. The interactions through plasma electronic medium among close ions are called wake forces. We checked that these forces screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H + ion decreasing their relative distance in the analysed cases. These forces align the interproton vector along the motion direction. They also tend the two-proton energy loss to the value of two isolated protons when at early times it is rather larger. Nevertheless most parts of these wake effects cannot be corroborated experimentally as they are masked by the projectile collisions with target nuclei in our numerical experiment. These collisions cancel the screening produced by the wake forces, increasing the interproton distance even faster than for bare Coulomb explosion. Also they misalign the interproton vector along the motion direction and contribute moderately to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H + ion. These nuclear collisions effects are more significant in reducing projectile velocity

  20. Complex fragment emission from hot compound nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental evidence for compound nucleus emission of complex fragments at low energies is used to interpret the emission of the same fragments at higher energies. The resulting experimental picture is that of highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion processes which decay statistically. In particular, complex fragments appear to be produced mostly through compound nucleus decay. In the appendix a geometric-kinematic theory for incomplete fusion and the associated momentum transfer is outlined. 10 refs., 19 figs

  1. Fragment Size Distribution of Blasted Rock Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jug, Jasmin; Strelec, Stjepan; Gazdek, Mario; Kavur, Boris

    2017-12-01

    Rock mass is a heterogeneous material, and the heterogeneity of rock causes sizes distribution of fragmented rocks in blasting. Prediction of blasted rock mass fragmentation has a significant role in the overall economics of opencast mines. Blasting as primary fragmentation can significantly decrease the cost of loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Blast fragmentation chiefly depends on the specific blast design (geometry of blast holes drilling, the quantity and class of explosive, the blasting form, the timing and partition, etc.) and on the properties of the rock mass (including the uniaxial compressive strength, the rock mass elastic Young modulus, the rock discontinuity characteristics and the rock density). Prediction and processing of blasting results researchers can accomplish by a variety of existing software’s and models, one of them is the Kuz-Ram model, which is possibly the most widely used approach to estimating fragmentation from blasting. This paper shows the estimation of fragmentation using the "SB" program, which was created by the authors. Mentioned program includes the Kuz-Ram model. Models of fragmentation are confirmed and calibrated by comparing the estimated fragmentation with actual post-blast fragmentation from image processing techniques. In this study, the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model has been used for an open-pit limestone quarry in Dalmatia, southern Croatia. The resulting calibrated value of the rock factor enables the quality prognosis of fragmentation in further blasting works, with changed drilling geometry and blast design parameters. It also facilitates simulation in the program to optimize blasting works and get the desired fragmentations of the blasted rock mass.

  2. Fragmentation of neck-like structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Peaslee, G.F.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for intermediate mass fragment emission from neck-like structures joining projectile- and target-like residues has been observed for peripheral 129 Xe+ nat Cu collisions at E/A=50 MeV. These framents are emitted primarily at velocities intermediate between those of the projectile and the target. Relative to the charge distribution for fragments evaporated from the projectile-like residue, the distribution for ''neck'' emission shows an enhanced emission for fragments with 4 f < 8. (orig.)

  3. Fragment-based approaches to TB drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Chiara; Chan, Daniel S H; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2018-02-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The rise of antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) urgently demands the development of new drug leads to tackle resistant strains. Fragment-based methods have recently emerged at the forefront of pharmaceutical development as a means to generate more effective lead structures, via the identification of fragment molecules that form weak but high quality interactions with the target biomolecule and subsequent fragment optimization. This review highlights a number of novel inhibitors of Mtb targets that have been developed through fragment-based approaches in recent years.

  4. Gluon fragmentation in T(1S) decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienlein, J.K.

    1983-05-01

    In T(1S) decays most observables (sphericity, charged multiplicity, photonic energy fraction, inclusive spectra) can be understood assuming that gluons fragment like quarks. New results from LENA use the (axis-independent) Fox-Wolfram moments for the photonic energy deposition. Continuum reactions show 'standard' Field-Feynman fragmentation. T(1S) decays show a significant difference in the photonic energy topology. It is more isotropic than with the Field-Feynman fragmentation scheme. Gluon fragmentation into isoscalar mesons (a la Peterson and Walsh) is excluded. But if one forces the leading particle to be isoscalar, one gets good agreement with the data. (orig.)

  5. Measuring the temperature of hot nuclear fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuenschel, S.; Bonasera, A.; May, L.W.; Souliotis, G.A.; Tripathi, R.; Galanopoulos, S.; Kohley, Z.; Hagel, K.; Shetty, D.V.; Huseman, K.; Soisson, S.N.; Stein, B.C.; Yennello, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    A new thermometer based on fragment momentum fluctuations is presented. This thermometer exhibited residual contamination from the collective motion of the fragments along the beam axis. For this reason, the transverse direction has been explored. Additionally, a mass dependence was observed for this thermometer. This mass dependence may be the result of the Fermi momentum of nucleons or the different properties of the fragments (binding energy, spin, etc.) which might be more sensitive to different densities and temperatures of the exploding fragments. We expect some of these aspects to be smaller for protons (and/or neutrons); consequently, the proton transverse momentum fluctuations were used to investigate the temperature dependence of the source.

  6. Kinetics of fragmentation-annihilation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe, JAN; Rodgers, GJ

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the kinetics of systems in which particles of one species undergo binary fragmentation and pair annihilation. In the latter, nonlinear process, fragments react at collision to produce an inert species, causing loss of mass. We analyze these systems in the reaction-limited regime by solving a continuous model within the mean-field approximation. The rate of fragmentation for a particle of mass x to break into fragments of masses y and x-y has the form x(lambda-1) (lambda > 0), a...

  7. Vision Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  8. Cloning, expression, purification and initial crystallographic studies of UbiG: a methyltransferase involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.A.F.; Magalhaes, R.D.; Nagem, R.A.P.; Ferreira-Junior, J.R.; Barros, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Ubiquinone is a molecule that functions as an electron carrier in the respiratory chain in living organisms. Some clinical phenotypes, including, encephalomyopathy, has been associated with ubiquinone deficiency, raising the interest in the biosynthetic pathway of this molecule. This pathway was proposed mainly from the results of the genetic analysis of mutants of E. coli. UbiG is a methyltransferase involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis in E. coli. In this work we have cloned, expressed, purified and made initial crystallographic assessments of UbiG for later determination of its three-dimensional structure. The gene encoding UbiG was amplified from E. coli genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction. The 753 bases pairs amplicon was inserted into the expression plasmid pMCSG7 by ligation independent cloning system and transformed into BL21(DE3) E. coli strain. The expression of UbiG, verified by SDS polyacrylamide gel, showed a protein of approximately 29kDa after IPTG induction. The recombinant UbiG, in the soluble fraction of the cellular lysate, was purified by affinity chromatography and the molecular weight of recombinant UbiG of approximately 29 kDa was confirmed by mass spectrometry. After removal of His-tag by TEV protease, another affinity chromatography was performed and UbiG, without His-tag, was observed in flow-through fraction. In Size-Exclusion Chromatography (SEC), the recombinant UbiG showed a unique peak with correct molecular weight of a monomer. Analysis of CD indicated that recombinant UbiG has 31,80% of alpha helix at 20 deg C and DLS showed that 70.9% of the sample is still monomeric in solution even five days after purification. Initial crystallization studies were performed with Crystal Screen 1 and Crystal Screen 2 from Hampton Research. Needle-shaped microcrystals of UbiG were obtained using a precipitant solution consisting of 0,1M lithium sulfate, 0,1M Tris pH 7,5 and 30% w/v polyethylene glycol 4,000. (author)

  9. Cloning, expression, purification and initial crystallographic studies of UbiG: a methyltransferase involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, M.A.F.; Magalhaes, R.D.; Nagem, R.A.P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ferreira-Junior, J.R.; Barros, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Ubiquinone is a molecule that functions as an electron carrier in the respiratory chain in living organisms. Some clinical phenotypes, including, encephalomyopathy, has been associated with ubiquinone deficiency, raising the interest in the biosynthetic pathway of this molecule. This pathway was proposed mainly from the results of the genetic analysis of mutants of E. coli. UbiG is a methyltransferase involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis in E. coli. In this work we have cloned, expressed, purified and made initial crystallographic assessments of UbiG for later determination of its three-dimensional structure. The gene encoding UbiG was amplified from E. coli genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction. The 753 bases pairs amplicon was inserted into the expression plasmid pMCSG7 by ligation independent cloning system and transformed into BL21(DE3) E. coli strain. The expression of UbiG, verified by SDS polyacrylamide gel, showed a protein of approximately 29kDa after IPTG induction. The recombinant UbiG, in the soluble fraction of the cellular lysate, was purified by affinity chromatography and the molecular weight of recombinant UbiG of approximately 29 kDa was confirmed by mass spectrometry. After removal of His-tag by TEV protease, another affinity chromatography was performed and UbiG, without His-tag, was observed in flow-through fraction. In Size-Exclusion Chromatography (SEC), the recombinant UbiG showed a unique peak with correct molecular weight of a monomer. Analysis of CD indicated that recombinant UbiG has 31,80% of alpha helix at 20 deg C and DLS showed that 70.9% of the sample is still monomeric in solution even five days after purification. Initial crystallization studies were performed with Crystal Screen 1 and Crystal Screen 2 from Hampton Research. Needle-shaped microcrystals of UbiG were obtained using a precipitant solution consisting of 0,1M lithium sulfate, 0,1M Tris pH 7,5 and 30% w/v polyethylene glycol 4,000. (author)

  10. Mechanisms Affecting Population Density in Fragmented Habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Tischendorf

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a factorial simulation experiment to analyze the relative importance of movement pattern, boundary-crossing probability, and mortality in habitat and matrix on population density, and its dependency on habitat fragmentation, as well as inter-patch distance. We also examined how the initial response of a species to a fragmentation event may affect our observations of population density in post-fragmentation experiments. We found that the boundary-crossing probability from habitat to matrix, which partly determines the emigration rate, is the most important determinant for population density within habitat patches. The probability of crossing a boundary from matrix to habitat had a weaker, but positive, effect on population density. Movement behavior in habitat had a stronger effect on population density than movement behavior in matrix. Habitat fragmentation and inter-patch distance may have a positive or negative effect on population density. The direction of both effects depends on two factors. First, when the boundary-crossing probability from habitat to matrix is high, population density may decline with increasing habitat fragmentation. Conversely, for species with a high matrix-to-habitat boundary-crossing probability, population density may increase with increasing habitat fragmentation. Second, the initial distribution of individuals across the landscape: we found that habitat fragmentation and inter-patch distance were positively correlated with population density when individuals were distributed across matrix and habitat at the beginning of our simulation experiments. The direction of these relationships changed to negative when individuals were initially distributed across habitat only. Our findings imply that the speed of the initial response of organisms to habitat fragmentation events may determine the direction of observed relationships between habitat fragmentation and population density. The time scale of post-fragmentation

  11. Design Principles for Fragment Libraries: Maximizing the Value of Learnings from Pharma Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) Programs for Use in Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keserű, György M; Erlanson, Daniel A; Ferenczy, György G; Hann, Michael M; Murray, Christopher W; Pickett, Stephen D

    2016-09-22

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is well suited for discovering both drug leads and chemical probes of protein function; it can cover broad swaths of chemical space and allows the use of creative chemistry. FBDD is widely implemented for lead discovery in industry but is sometimes used less systematically in academia. Design principles and implementation approaches for fragment libraries are continually evolving, and the lack of up-to-date guidance may prevent more effective application of FBDD in academia. This Perspective explores many of the theoretical, practical, and strategic considerations that occur within FBDD programs, including the optimal size, complexity, physicochemical profile, and shape profile of fragments in FBDD libraries, as well as compound storage, evaluation, and screening technologies. This compilation of industry experience in FBDD will hopefully be useful for those pursuing FBDD in academia.

  12. Parton fragmentation and string dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Gustafson, G.; Ingelman, G.; Sjoestrand, T.

    1983-01-01

    While much has been learned recently about quark and gluon interactions in the framework of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics, the relation between calculated parton properties and observed hadron densities involves models where dynamics and jet empirical rules have to be combined. The purpose of this article is to describe a presently successful approach which is based on a cascade jet model using String dynamics. It can readily lead to Monte Carlo jet programmes of great use when analyzing data. Production processes in an iterative cascade approach, with tunneling in a constant force field, are reviewed. Expected differences between quark and gluon jets are discussed. Low transverse momentum phenomena are also reviewed with emphasis on hyperon polarization. In so far as this approach uses a fragmentation scheme based on String dynamics, it was deemed appropriate to also include under the same cover a special report on the Classical theory of relativistic Strings, seen as the classical limit of the Dual Resonance model. The Equations of motion and interaction among strings are presented. (orig.)

  13. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  14. Fragmentation of eastern United States forest types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation is a continuing threat to the sustainability of forests in the Eastern United States, where land use changes supporting a growing human population are the primary driver of forest fragmentation (Stein and others 2009). While once mostly forested, approximately 40 percent of the original forest area has been converted to other land uses, and most of the...

  15. Thermodynamics of the fuel fragmentation gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R.B.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In the context of nuclear reactor safety studies, a program is in progress at ORNL whereby fuel-fragmentation situations are mocked up by the application of high-current capacitor discharges through solid UO 2 samples. The goal of the present work is to predict such quantities as the number of gas and liquid fragments and their energy distributions. The point of view adopted is that upon fragmentation, a cloud of UO 2 vapor is formed containing ''primeval'' liquid fragments which act as condensation centers. In the evolution of time, fragment growth is controlled by nucleation, coagulation and evaporation processes. Eventually, the vapor-droplet system will reach a situation in which clusters (fragments) of various sizes and UO 2 vapor will coexist in an ''association-disassociation'' equilibrium. Thus, the physical model considered here consists of the identification of the fragmentation gas with an ''imperfect'' vapor, made up of interacting UO 2 vapor and liquid fragments. The results of the study are presented

  16. Momentum sum rules for fragmentation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, S.; Metz, A.; Pitonyak, D.

    2010-01-01

    Momentum sum rules for fragmentation functions are considered. In particular, we give a general proof of the Schaefer-Teryaev sum rule for the transverse momentum dependent Collins function. We also argue that corresponding sum rules for related fragmentation functions do not exist. Our model-independent analysis is supplemented by calculations in a simple field-theoretical model.

  17. A note on convex renorming and fragmentability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Using the game approach to fragmentability, we give new and simpler proofs of the following known results: (a) If the Banach space admits an equivalent. Kadec norm, then its weak topology is fragmented by a metric which is stronger than the norm topology. (b) If the Banach space admits an equivalent rotund ...

  18. Temperatures of fragment kinetic energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.

    1995-01-01

    Multifragmentation reactions without large compression in the initial state (proton-induced reactions, reverse kinematics, projectile fragmentation) are examined, and it is verified quantitatively that the high temperatures obtained from fragment kinetic energy spectra and lower temperatures obtained from observables such as level population or isotope ratios can be understood in a common framework

  19. Pollen and gene flow in fragmented habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwak, Manja M.; Velterop, Odilia; van Andel, Jelte

    . Habitat fragmentation affects both plants and pollinators. Habitat fragmentation leads to changes in species richness, population number and size, density, and shape, thus to changes in the spatial arrangement of flowers. These changes influence the amount of food for flower-visiting insects and

  20. Long-term effects of fragmentation and fragment properties on bird species richness in Hawaiian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Flaspohler; Christian P. Giardina; Gregory P. Asner; Patrick Hart; Jonathan Price; Cassie Ka’apu Lyons; Xeronimo. Castaneda

    2010-01-01

    Forest fragmentation is a common disturbance affecting biological diversity, yet the impacts of fragmentation on many forest processes remain poorly understood. Forest restoration is likely to be more successful when it proceeds with an understanding of how native and exotic vertebrates utilize forest patches of different size. We used a system of forest fragments...

  1. Fragment based drug discovery: practical implementation based on ¹⁹F NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, John B; Poppe, Leszek; Xia, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Alan C; Sun, Yax; Michelsen, Klaus; Eastwood, Heather; Schnier, Paul D; Nixey, Thomas; Zhong, Wenge

    2012-01-26

    Fragment based drug discovery (FBDD) is a widely used tool for discovering novel therapeutics. NMR is a powerful means for implementing FBDD, and several approaches have been proposed utilizing (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) as well as one-dimensional (1)H and (19)F NMR to screen compound mixtures against a target of interest. While proton-based NMR methods of fragment screening (FBS) have been well documented and are widely used, the use of (19)F detection in FBS has been only recently introduced (Vulpetti et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131 (36), 12949-12959) with the aim of targeting "fluorophilic" sites in proteins. Here, we demonstrate a more general use of (19)F NMR-based fragment screening in several areas: as a key tool for rapid and sensitive detection of fragment hits, as a method for the rapid development of structure-activity relationship (SAR) on the hit-to-lead path using in-house libraries and/or commercially available compounds, and as a quick and efficient means of assessing target druggability.

  2. Crystallographic Analysis of a Japanese Sword by using Bragg Edge Transmission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Yoshinori; Hasemi, Hiroyuki; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    Neutron imaging using a pulsed neutron source can give crystallographic information over wide area of a sample by analysing position dependent transmission spectra. With the use of a Bragg edge imaging method we non-destructively obtained crystallographic information of a Japanese sword, signed by Bishu Osafune Norimitsu, in order to know position dependent crystallographic characteristics and to check usefulness of the method for the Japanese sword investigation. Strong texture appeared on the back side. On the other hand in the middle area almost isotropic feature appeared and edge side showed feature between them. Rather isotropic area in the centre area gradually reduced from the grip side to the tip side. The crystallite size was smaller near the edge and became larger towards the back side. The smaller crystallite size will be due to quenching around the edge and this trend disappeared in the grip (nakago) area. The larger crystallite size will be due to strong hammering. Coarse grains were also observed directly as transmission images with the use of a high spatial resolution detector. The spatial distribution of the grains was not uniform but the reason have not been understood. Furthermore, a white area around a tip area was proved to be a void by looking at the Brag edge transmission spectra. This void may be formed during forging process of two kinds of steel. It is suggested that consideration on differences in the texture and the crystallite size depending on position will give information to clarify the manufacturing process, and Bragg edge analysis will be a profitable tool for research of Japanese sword.

  3. Development of dynamic explicit crystallographic homogenization finite element analysis code to assess sheet metal formability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yasunori; Tam, Nguyen Ngoc; Ohata, Tomiso; Morita, Kiminori; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2004-01-01

    The crystallographic texture evolution induced by plastic deformation in the sheet metal forming process has a great influence on its formability. In the present study, a dynamic explicit finite element (FE) analysis code is newly developed by introducing a crystallographic homogenization method to estimate the polycrystalline sheet metal formability, such as the extreme thinning and 'earing'. This code can predict the plastic deformation induced texture evolution at the micro scale and the plastic anisotropy at the macro scale, simultaneously. This multi-scale analysis can couple the microscopic crystal plasticity inhomogeneous deformation with the macroscopic continuum deformation. In this homogenization process, the stress at the macro scale is defined by the volume average of those of the corresponding microscopic crystal aggregations in satisfying the equation of motion and compatibility condition in the micro scale 'unit cell', where the periodicity of deformation is satisfied. This homogenization algorithm is implemented in the conventional dynamic explicit finite element code by employing the updated Lagrangian formulation and the rate type elastic/viscoplastic constitutive equation.At first, it has been confirmed through a texture evolution analyses in cases of typical deformation modes that Taylor's 'constant strain homogenization algorithm' yields extreme concentration toward the preferred crystal orientations compared with our homogenization one. Second, we study the plastic anisotropy effects on 'earing' in the hemispherical cup deep drawing process of pure ferrite phase sheet metal. By the comparison of analytical results with those of Taylor's assumption, conclusions are drawn that the present newly developed dynamic explicit crystallographic homogenization FEM shows more reasonable prediction of plastic deformation induced texture evolution and plastic anisotropy at the macro scale

  4. HRTEM study of α-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic projection axes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of α-AlMnSi is examined by atomic resolution high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and computer-based image matching techniques. Six distinct zone axes are examined; including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes of the structural motifs, which have m3-bar 5 icosahedral symmetry. The results provide a sound basis for understanding HRTEM images of the quasicrystalline alloy i-AlMnSi; thus it was examined to what extent the requirements for obtaining so-called structure images of complex alloy structures may be met experimentally and define when the images may be reliably interpreted on the basis of computer simulation and image-matching at about 0.17nm resolution. Most difficulty was experienced in obtaining the experimental images, especially for the non-crystallographic zones, which are very sensitive to slight changes in orientation off the desired zone axis or projection, the rate at which the crystal thickness is increasing (wedge-angle) and the orientation of the surfaces of the specimen. Surface amorphous layers due to oxidation and/or electron-induced irradiation damage also limit the efficiency of the HRTEM analysis. For the thin specimens used for HRTEM, both the electron diffraction patterns and the HRTEM images are characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. It is suggested that this Im3-bar symmetry may be an example of a statistical symmetry, where the local symmetry is close to Pm3-bar but the average symmetry is Im3-bar. The transition from Pm3-bar to Im3-bar may be understood in terms of an analysis of small changes in the outer shells of the large icosahedral structural elements which are located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. 21 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs

  5. HRTEM study of {alpha}-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic projection axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-06-01

    The structure of {alpha}-AlMnSi is examined by atomic resolution high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and computer-based image matching techniques. Six distinct zone axes are examined; including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes of the structural motifs, which have m3-bar 5 icosahedral symmetry. The results provide a sound basis for understanding HRTEM images of the quasicrystalline alloy i-AlMnSi; thus it was examined to what extent the requirements for obtaining so-called structure images of complex alloy structures may be met experimentally and define when the images may be reliably interpreted on the basis of computer simulation and image-matching at about 0.17nm resolution. Most difficulty was experienced in obtaining the experimental images, especially for the non-crystallographic zones, which are very sensitive to slight changes in orientation off the desired zone axis or projection, the rate at which the crystal thickness is increasing (wedge-angle) and the orientation of the surfaces of the specimen. Surface amorphous layers due to oxidation and/or electron-induced irradiation damage also limit the efficiency of the HRTEM analysis. For the thin specimens used for HRTEM, both the electron diffraction patterns and the HRTEM images are characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. It is suggested that this Im3-bar symmetry may be an example of a statistical symmetry, where the local symmetry is close to Pm3-bar but the average symmetry is Im3-bar. The transition from Pm3-bar to Im3-bar may be understood in terms of an analysis of small changes in the outer shells of the large icosahedral structural elements which are located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. 21 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.

  6. Current fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamer, C.J.

    1975-04-01

    It is argued that the current fragmentation products in deep inelastic electron scattering will not be distributed in a 'one-dimensional' rapidity plateau as in the parton model picture of Feynman and Bjorken. A reaction mechanism with a multiperipheral topology, but which the above configuration might have been achieved, does not in fact populate the current fragmentation plateau; and unless partons are actually observed in the final state, it cannot lead to Bjorken scaling. The basic reason for this failure is shown to be the fact that when a particle is produced in the current fragmentation plateau, the adjacent momentum transfer in the multiperipheral chain becomes large and negative: such processes are inevitably suppressed. Instead, the current fragmentation products are likely to be generated by a fragmentation, or sequential decay process. (author)

  7. The politics of municipal fragmentation in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Kuyini Mohammed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The scholarly debate over the rival merits of local government consolidation and fragmentation is an old but enduring one. However, in this debate very little attention has been focused on the political dimension of council amalgamation and fragmentation – yet political considerations play a central role in both the formulation and outcomes of de-concentration policy. The purpose of this article is to fill a gap in the literature by examining local government fragmentation in Ghana from 1988 to 2014. The article does this by identifying the key players and analysing their interests and gains, as well as the tensions arising from the fragmentation exercise. The implications from the Ghanaian case for more general theories of fragmentation are drawn out.

  8. Graph Theory. 1. Fragmentation of Structural Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz JÄNTSCHI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of structural graphs has many fields of applications in engineering, especially in applied sciences like as applied chemistry and physics, computer sciences and automation, electronics and telecommunication. The main subject of the paper is to express fragmentation criteria in graph using a new method of investigation: terminal paths. Using terminal paths are defined most of the fragmentation criteria that are in use in molecular topology, but the fields of applications are more generally than that, as I mentioned before. Graphical examples of fragmentation are given for every fragmentation criteria. Note that all fragmentation is made with a computer program that implements a routine for every criterion.[1] A web routine for tracing all terminal paths in graph can be found at the address: http://vl.academicdirect.ro/molecular_topology/tpaths/ [1] M. V. Diudea, I. Gutman, L. Jäntschi, Molecular Topology, Nova Science, Commack, New York, 2001, 2002.

  9. Water screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutepov, A.I.; Fedotov, I.N.; Prokopov, O.I.

    1981-01-01

    The invention refers to ventilation and can be used for repair-fitting operations in a blasting-dangerous gas condition, for example, during elimination of gas-oil gushers, repair of gas-oil pipelines, equipment etc. In order to improve safety of labor, the nozzle adapters of the water collector are oriented towards each other. The collector is installed on a support with the possibility of rotating and vertical movement. The proposed screen excludes the possibility of blasting-dangerous concentrations of gases and guarantees extinguishing of the impact spark during operation of the tool.

  10. Relationship between strain stored by compressive deformation and crystallographic orientation in a pure aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Y; Watanabe, H; Yoshimura, T

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate relationship between stored strain and crystallographic orientation, 99.99% purity aluminum cubes were compressed with uniaxial or with plane strain state up to a nominal strain of 30%. The aluminum cubes were examined on the same surface before and after compression by SEM/EBSD technique. Stored strain was estimated by Kernel Average Misorientation (KAM) derived from the EBSD analysis, and Taylor factor (TF) was measured before the compressive deformation. The analysis revealed that KAM value or the stored strain decreases until a certain value of TF and then increases with increment of TF. (paper)

  11. Monte-Carlo simulation of crystallographical pore growth in III-V-semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisner, Malte; Carstensen, Juergen; Foell, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    The growth of crystallographical pores in III-V-semiconductors can be understood in the framework of a simple model, which is based on the assumption that the branching of pores is proportional to the current density at the pore tips. The stochastic nature of this model allows its implementation into a three-dimensional Monte-Carlo-simulation of pore growth. The simulation is able to reproduce the experimentally observed crysto pore structures in III-V-semiconductors in full quantitative detail. The different branching probabilities for different semiconductors, as well as doping levels, can be deduced from the specific passivation behavior of the semiconductor-electrolyte-interface at the pore tips.

  12. Response of Seven Crystallographic Orientations of Sapphire Crystals to Shock Stresses of 16 to 86 GPa

    OpenAIRE

    Kanel, G. I.; Nellis, W. J.; Savinykh, A. S.; Razorenov, S. V.; Rajendran, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Shock-wave profiles of sapphire (single-crystal Al2O3) with seven crystallographic orientations were measured with time-resolved VISAR interferometry at shock stresses in the range 16 to 86 GPa. Shock propagation was normal to the surface of each cut. The angle between the c-axis of the hexagonal crystal structure and the direction of shock propagation varied from 0 for c-cut up to 90 degrees for m-cut in the basal plane. Based on published shock-induced transparencies, shock-induced optical ...

  13. A role for fragment-based drug design in developing novel lead compounds for central nervous system targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wasko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of millions of U.S. dollars are invested in the research and development of a single drug. Lead compound development is an area ripe for new design strategies. Therapeutic lead candidates have been traditionally found using high-throughput in vitro pharmacologic screening, a costly method for assaying thousands of compounds. This approach has recently been augmented by virtual screening, which employs computer models of the target protein to narrow the search for possible leads. A variant of virtual screening is fragment-based drug design, an emerging in silico lead discovery method that introduces low molecular weight fragments, rather than intact compounds, into the binding pocket of the receptor model. These fragments serve as starting points for growing the lead candidate. Current efforts in virtual fragment-based drug design within central nervous system (CNS targets are reviewed, as is a recent rule-based optimization strategy in which new molecules are generated within a 3D receptor binding pocket using the fragment as a scaffold. This process places special emphasis on creating synthesizable molecules but also exposes computational questions worth addressing. Fragment-based methods provide a viable, relatively low-cost alternative for therapeutic lead discovery and optimization that can be applied to CNS targets to augment current design strategies.

  14. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Gene Mutations Testing Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Tests D-dimer Dengue Fever Testing Des-gamma- ... Index of Screening Recommendations Not Listed? Not Listed? Newborn Screening Screening Tests for Infants Screening Tests for ...

  15. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  16. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  17. Exact Solutions of Fragmentation Equations with General Fragmentation Rates and Separable Particles Distribution Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Oukouomi Noutchie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We make use of Laplace transform techniques and the method of characteristics to solve fragmentation equations explicitly. Our result is a breakthrough in the analysis of pure fragmentation equations as this is the first instance where an exact solution is provided for the fragmentation evolution equation with general fragmentation rates. This paper is the key for resolving most of the open problems in fragmentation theory including “shattering” and the sudden appearance of infinitely many particles in some systems with initial finite particles number.

  18. Dual Fragment Impact of PBX Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Peter; Briggs, Richard; Leeming, David; White, Nathan; Cheese, Philip; DE&S MoD UK Team; Ordnance Test Solutions Ltd Team

    2017-06-01

    Fragment impact can pose a significant hazard to many systems containing explosives or propellants. Testing for this threat is most commonly carried out using a single fragment. However, it can be argued that an initial fragment strike (or strikes) could sensitise the energetic material to subsequent impacts, which may then lead to a more violent reaction than would have been predicted based upon single fragment studies. To explore this potential hazard we have developed the capability to launch 2 fragments from the same gun at a range of velocities, and achieve impacts on an acceptor charge with good control over the spatial and temporal separation of the strikes. In this paper we will describe in detail the experimental techniques we have used, both to achieve the dual fragment launch and observe the acceptor charge response. In addition, we will describe the results obtained against PBX filled explosive targets; discuss the mechanisms controlling the target response and their significance for vulnerability assessment. Results of these tests have clearly indicated the potential for detonation upon the second strike, at velocities well below those needed for shock initiation by a single fragment.

  19. Introduction to fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlanson, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has emerged in the past decade as a powerful tool for discovering drug leads. The approach first identifies starting points: very small molecules (fragments) that are about half the size of typical drugs. These fragments are then expanded or linked together to generate drug leads. Although the origins of the technique date back some 30 years, it was only in the mid-1990s that experimental techniques became sufficiently sensitive and rapid for the concept to be become practical. Since that time, the field has exploded: FBDD has played a role in discovery of at least 18 drugs that have entered the clinic, and practitioners of FBDD can be found throughout the world in both academia and industry. Literally dozens of reviews have been published on various aspects of FBDD or on the field as a whole, as have three books (Jahnke and Erlanson, Fragment-based approaches in drug discovery, 2006; Zartler and Shapiro, Fragment-based drug discovery: a practical approach, 2008; Kuo, Fragment based drug design: tools, practical approaches, and examples, 2011). However, this chapter will assume that the reader is approaching the field with little prior knowledge. It will introduce some of the key concepts, set the stage for the chapters to follow, and demonstrate how X-ray crystallography plays a central role in fragment identification and advancement.

  20. Fragmentation in DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhiyong; Suzhou Univ., Suzhou; Zhang Lihui; Li Ming; Fan Wo; Xu Yujie

    2005-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are important lesions induced by irradiations. Random breakage model or quantification supported by this concept is suitable to analyze DNA double strand break data induced by low LET radiation, but deviation from random breakage model is more evident in high LET radiation data analysis. In this work we develop a new method, statistical fragmentation model, to analyze the fragmentation process of DNA double strand breaks. After charged particles enter the biological cell, they produce ionizations along their tracks, and transfer their energies to the cells and break the cellular DNA strands into fragments. The probable distribution of the fragments is obtained under the condition in which the entropy is maximum. Under the approximation E≅E 0 + E 1 l + E 2 l 2 , the distribution functions are obtained as exp(αl + βl 2 ). There are two components, the one proportional to exp(βl 2 ), mainly contributes to the low mass fragment yields, the other component, proportional to exp(αl), decreases slowly as the mass of the fragments increases. Numerical solution of the constraint equations provides parameters α and β. Experimental data, especially when the energy deposition is higher, support the statistical fragmentation model. (authors)

  1. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R.; Jehle, Stefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Jones, Elizabeth V.; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N.; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots—regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy—the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  2. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R; Jehle, Stefan; Jehle, Sefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O; Jones, Elizabeth V; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots--regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy--the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand.

  3. Fragmentation in the branching coral Acropora palmata (Lamarck): growth, survivorship, and reproduction of colonies and fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirman

    2000-08-23

    Acropora palmata, a branching coral abundant on shallow reef environments throughout the Caribbean, is susceptible to physical disturbance caused by storms. Accordingly, the survivorship and propagation of this species are tied to its capability to recover after fragmentation. Fragments of A. palmata comprised 40% of ramets within populations that had experienced recent storms. While the survivorship of A. palmata fragments was not directly related to the size of fragments, removal of fragments from areas where they settled was influenced by size. Survivorship of fragments was also affected by type of substratum; the greatest mortality (58% loss within the first month) was observed on sand, whereas fragments placed on top of live colonies of A. palmata fused to the underlying tissue and did not experience any losses. Fragments created by Hurricane Andrew on a Florida reef in August 1992 began developing new growth (proto-branches) 7 months after the storm. The number of proto-branches on fragments was dependent on size, but growth was not affected by the size of fragments. Growth-rates of proto-branches increased exponentially with time (1.7 cm year(-1) for 1993-1994, 2.7 cm year(-1) for 1994-1995, 4.2 cm year(-1) for 1995-1996, and 6.5 cm year(-1) for 1996-1997), taking over 4 years for proto-branches to achieve rates comparable to those of adult colonies on the same reef (6.9 cm year(-1)). In addition to the initial mortality and reduced growth-rates, fragmentation resulted in a loss of reproductive potential. Neither colonies that experienced severe fragmentation nor fragments contained gametes until 4 years after the initial damage. Although A. palmata may survive periodic fragmentation, the long-term effects of this process will depend ultimately on the balance between the benefits and costs of this process.

  4. Integration of first-principles methods and crystallographic database searches for new ferroelectrics: Strategies and explorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Joseph W.; Rabe, Karin M.

    2012-01-01

    In this concept paper, the development of strategies for the integration of first-principles methods with crystallographic database mining for the discovery and design of novel ferroelectric materials is discussed, drawing on the results and experience derived from exploratory investigations on three different systems: (1) the double perovskite Sr(Sb 1/2 Mn 1/2 )O 3 as a candidate semiconducting ferroelectric; (2) polar derivatives of schafarzikite MSb 2 O 4 ; and (3) ferroelectric semiconductors with formula M 2 P 2 (S,Se) 6 . A variety of avenues for further research and investigation are suggested, including automated structure type classification, low-symmetry improper ferroelectrics, and high-throughput first-principles searches for additional representatives of structural families with desirable functional properties. - Graphical abstract: Integration of first-principles methods with crystallographic database mining, for the discovery and design of novel ferroelectric materials, could potentially lead to new classes of multifunctional materials. Highlights: ► Integration of first-principles methods and database mining. ► Minor structural families with desirable functional properties. ► Survey of polar entries in the Inorganic Crystal Structural Database.

  5. Modeling the characteristic etch morphologies along specific crystallographic orientations by anisotropic chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun-Dar; Miao, Jin-Ru

    2018-02-01

    To improve the advanced manufacturing technology for functional materials, a sophisticated control of chemical etching process is highly demanded, especially in the fields of environment and energy related applications. In this study, a phase-field-based model is utilized to investigate the etch morphologies influenced by the crystallographic characters during anisotropic chemical etching. Three types of etching modes are inspected theoretically, including the isotropic, and preferred oriented etchings. Owing to the specific etching behavior along the crystallographic directions, different characteristic surface structures are presented in the simulations, such as the pimple-like, pyramidal hillock and ridge-like morphologies. In addition, the processing parameters affecting the surface morphological formation and evolution are also examined systematically. According to the numerical results, the growth mechanism of surface morphology in a chemical etching is revealed distinctly. While the etching dynamics plays a dominant role on the surface formation, the characteristic surface morphologies corresponding to the preferred etching direction become more apparent. As the atomic diffusion turned into a determinative factor, a smoothened surface would appear, even under the anisotropic etching conditions. These simulation results provide fundamental information to enhance the development and application of anisotropic chemical etching techniques.

  6. Automatic rebuilding and optimization of crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Robbie P; Joosten, Krista; Cohen, Serge X; Vriend, Gert; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2011-12-15

    Macromolecular crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are a key source of structural insight into biological processes. These structures, some >30 years old, were constructed with methods of their era. With PDB_REDO, we aim to automatically optimize these structures to better fit their corresponding experimental data, passing the benefits of new methods in crystallography on to a wide base of non-crystallographer structure users. We developed new algorithms to allow automatic rebuilding and remodeling of main chain peptide bonds and side chains in crystallographic electron density maps, and incorporated these and further enhancements in the PDB_REDO procedure. Applying the updated PDB_REDO to the oldest, but also to some of the newest models in the PDB, corrects existing modeling errors and brings these models to a higher quality, as judged by standard validation methods. The PDB_REDO database and links to all software are available at http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/pdb_redo. r.joosten@nki.nl; a.perrakis@nki.nl Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of crystallographically aligned CuCr_2Se_4 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esters, Marco; Liebig, Andreas; Ditto, Jeffrey J.; Falmbigl, Matthias; Albrecht, Manfred; Johnson, David C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the low temperature synthesis of highly textured CuCr_2Se_4 thin films using the modulated elemental reactant (MER) method. The structure of CuCr_2Se_4 is determined for the first time in its thin film form and exhibits cell parameters that are smaller than found in bulk CuCr_2Se_4. X-ray diffraction and precession electron diffraction show a strong degree of crystallographic alignment of the crystallites, where the axis is oriented perpendicular to the substrate surface, while being rotationally disordered within the plane. Temperature and field dependent in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization measurements show that the film is ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature of 406 K CuCr_2Se_4 synthesized utilizing the MER method shows stronger magnetic anisotropy (effective anisotropy: 1.82 × 10"6 erg cm"−"3; shape anisotropy: 1.07 × 10"6 erg cm"−"3), with the easy axis lying out of plane, and a larger magnetic moment (6 μ_B/f.u.) than bulk CuCr_2Se_4. - Highlights: • Crystallographically aligned, phase pure CuCr_2Se_4 were synthesized. • The degree of alignment decreases with annealing time. • The films are ferromagnetic with the easy axis along the direction. • The magnetization is larger than bulk CuCr_2Se_4 or other CuCr_2Se_4 films made to date.

  8. CRYSNET manual. Informal report. [Hardware and software of crystallographic computing network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1976-07-01

    This manual describes the hardware and software which together make up the crystallographic computing network (CRYSNET). The manual is intended as a users' guide and also provides general information for persons without any experience with the system. CRYSNET is a network of intelligent remote graphics terminals that are used to communicate with the CDC Cyber 70/76 computing system at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Central Scientific Computing Facility. Terminals are in active use by four research groups in the field of crystallography. A protein data bank has been established at BNL to store in machine-readable form atomic coordinates and other crystallographic data for macromolecules. The bank currently includes data for more than 20 proteins. This structural information can be accessed at BNL directly by the CRYSNET graphics terminals. More than two years of experience has been accumulated with CRYSNET. During this period, it has been demonstrated that the terminals, which provide access to a large, fast third-generation computer, plus stand-alone interactive graphics capability, are useful for computations in crystallography, and in a variety of other applications as well. The terminal hardware, the actual operations of the terminals, and the operations of the BNL Central Facility are described in some detail, and documentation of the terminal and central-site software is given. (RWR)

  9. Modeling the characteristic etch morphologies along specific crystallographic orientations by anisotropic chemical etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Dar Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To improve the advanced manufacturing technology for functional materials, a sophisticated control of chemical etching process is highly demanded, especially in the fields of environment and energy related applications. In this study, a phase-field-based model is utilized to investigate the etch morphologies influenced by the crystallographic characters during anisotropic chemical etching. Three types of etching modes are inspected theoretically, including the isotropic, and preferred oriented etchings. Owing to the specific etching behavior along the crystallographic directions, different characteristic surface structures are presented in the simulations, such as the pimple-like, pyramidal hillock and ridge-like morphologies. In addition, the processing parameters affecting the surface morphological formation and evolution are also examined systematically. According to the numerical results, the growth mechanism of surface morphology in a chemical etching is revealed distinctly. While the etching dynamics plays a dominant role on the surface formation, the characteristic surface morphologies corresponding to the preferred etching direction become more apparent. As the atomic diffusion turned into a determinative factor, a smoothened surface would appear, even under the anisotropic etching conditions. These simulation results provide fundamental information to enhance the development and application of anisotropic chemical etching techniques.

  10. Development of Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture in a Double-Sided Friction Stir Welded Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, S.; Wynne, B. P.; Baker, T. N.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and crystallographic texture has been investigated in double-sided friction stir welded microalloyed steel, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure analyses show that the center of stirred zone reached a temperature between Ac1 and Ac3 during FSW, resulting in a dual-phase austenitic/ ferritic microstructure. The temperatures in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the overlapped area between the first and second weld pass did not exceed the Ac1. The shear generated by the rotation probe occurs in austenitic/ferritic phase field where the austenite portion of the microstructure is transformed to a bainitic ferrite, on cooling. Analysis of crystallographic textures with regard to shear flow lines generated by the probe tool shows the dominance of simple shear components across the whole weld. The austenite texture at Ac1 - Ac3 is dominated by the B { {1bar{1}2} }D2 { {11bar{2}} }< 111rangle simple shear texture components. The formation of ultrafine equiaxed ferrite with submicron grain size has been observed in the overlapped area between the first and second weld pass. This is due to continuous dynamic strain-induced recrystallization as a result of simultaneous severe shear deformation and drastic undercooling.

  11. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of GluB from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qingbo; Li, Defeng; Hu, Yonglin; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    GluB, a substrate-binding protein from C. glutamicum, was expressed, purified and crystallized, followed by X-ray diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis. GluB is a substrate-binding protein (SBP) which participates in the uptake of glutamic acid in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive bacterium. It is part of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system. Together with the transmembrane proteins GluC and GluD and the cytoplasmic protein GluA, which couples the hydrolysis of ATP to the translocation of glutamate, they form a highly active glutamate-uptake system. As part of efforts to study the amino-acid metabolism, especially the metabolism of glutamic acid by C. glutamicum, a bacterium that is widely used in the industrial production of glutamic acid, the GluB protein was expressed, purified and crystallized, an X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å and preliminary crystallographic analysis was performed. The crystal belonged to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 82.50, c = 72.69 Å

  12. On the preferential crystallographic orientation of Au nanoparticles: Effect of electrodeposition time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Deab, Mohamed S.

    2009-01-01

    The crystallographic orientation of Au nanoparticles electrodeposited at glassy carbon (nano-Au/GC) electrodes (prepared by potential step electrolysis) is markedly influenced by the width of the potential step. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the reductive desorption of cysteine have been studied on nano-Au/GC electrodes. Furthermore, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique has been used to probe the crystallographic orientation of the electrodeposited Au nanoparticles. That is, Au nanoparticles prepared in short time (5-60 s) have been found rich in the Au(1 1 1) facet orientation and are characterized by a relatively small particle size (ca. 10-50 nm) as well as high particle density (number of particles per unit area) as revealed by SEM images. Whereas Au nanoparticles prepared by longer electrolysis time (>60 s) are found to be much enriched in the Au(1 0 0) and Au(1 1 0) facets and are characterized by a relatively large particle size (>100 nm). EBSD patterns provided definitive information about the crystal orientations mapping of Au nanoparticles prepared at various deposition times.

  13. Enhancing nanoscale SEM image segmentation and reconstruction with crystallographic orientation data and machine learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converse, Matthew I.; Fullwood, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Current methods of image segmentation and reconstructions from scanning electron micrographs can be inadequate for resolving nanoscale gaps in composite materials (1–20 nm). Such information is critical to both accurate material characterizations and models of piezoresistive response. The current work proposes the use of crystallographic orientation data and machine learning for enhancing this process. It is first shown how a machine learning algorithm can be used to predict the connectivity of nanoscale grains in a Nickel nanostrand/epoxy composite. This results in 71.9% accuracy for a 2D algorithm and 62.4% accuracy in 3D. Finally, it is demonstrated how these algorithms can be used to predict the location of gaps between distinct nanostrands — gaps which would otherwise not be detected with the sole use of a scanning electron microscope. - Highlights: • A method is proposed for enhancing the segmentation/reconstruction of SEM images. • 3D crystallographic orientation data from a nickel nanocomposite is collected. • A machine learning algorithm is used to detect trends in adjacent grains. • This algorithm is then applied to predict likely regions of nanoscale gaps. • These gaps would otherwise be unresolved with the sole use of an SEM

  14. The crystallographic information file (CIF): A new standard archive file for crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.R.; Allen, F.H.; Brown, I.D.

    1991-01-01

    The specification of a new standard Crystallographic Information File (CIF) is described. Its development is based on the Self-Defining Text Archieve and Retrieval (STAR) procedure. The CIF is a general, flexible and easily extensible free-format archive file; it is human and machine readable and can be edited by a simple editor. The CIF is designed for the electronic transmission of crystallographic data between individual laboratories, journals and databases: It has been adopted by the International Union of Crystallography as the recommended medium for this purpose. The file consists of data names and data items, together with a loop facility for repeated items. The data names, constructed hierarchically so as to form data categories, are self-descriptive within a 32-character limit. The sorted list of data names, together with their precise definitions, constitutes the CIF dictionary (core version 1991). The CIF core dictionary is presented in full and covers the fundamental and most commonly used data items relevant to crystal structure analysis. The dictionary is also available as an electronic file suitable for CIF computer applications. Future extensions to the dictionary will include data items used in more specialized areas of crystallography. (orig.)

  15. Characterization of Crystallographic Structures Using Bragg-Edge Neutron Imaging at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, wavelength-dependent neutron radiography, also known as Bragg-edge imaging, has been employed as a non-destructive bulk characterization method due to its sensitivity to coherent elastic neutron scattering that is associated with crystalline structures. Several analysis approaches have been developed to quantitatively determine crystalline orientation, lattice strain, and phase distribution. In this study, we report a systematic investigation of the crystal structures of metallic materials (such as selected textureless powder samples and additively manufactured (AM Inconel 718 samples, using Bragg-edge imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS. Firstly, we have implemented a phenomenological Gaussian-based fitting in a Python-based computer called iBeatles. Secondly, we have developed a model-based approach to analyze Bragg-edge transmission spectra, which allows quantitative determination of the crystallographic attributes. Moreover, neutron diffraction measurements were carried out to validate the Bragg-edge analytical methods. These results demonstrate that the microstructural complexity (in this case, texture plays a key role in determining the crystallographic parameters (lattice constant or interplanar spacing, which implies that the Bragg-edge image analysis methods must be carefully selected based on the material structures.

  16. Multi Scale Finite Element Analyses By Using SEM-EBSD Crystallographic Modeling and Parallel Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamachi, Eiji

    2005-01-01

    A crystallographic homogenization procedure is introduced to the conventional static-explicit and dynamic-explicit finite element formulation to develop a multi scale - double scale - analysis code to predict the plastic strain induced texture evolution, yield loci and formability of sheet metal. The double-scale structure consists of a crystal aggregation - micro-structure - and a macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. At first, we measure crystal morphologies by using SEM-EBSD apparatus, and define a unit cell of micro structure, which satisfy the periodicity condition in the real scale of polycrystal. Next, this crystallographic homogenization FE code is applied to 3N pure-iron and 'Benchmark' aluminum A6022 polycrystal sheets. It reveals that the initial crystal orientation distribution - the texture - affects very much to a plastic strain induced texture and anisotropic hardening evolutions and sheet deformation. Since, the multi-scale finite element analysis requires a large computation time, a parallel computing technique by using PC cluster is developed for a quick calculation. In this parallelization scheme, a dynamic workload balancing technique is introduced for quick and efficient calculations

  17. Crystallographic study of grain refinement in aluminum alloys using the edge-to-edge matching model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, M.-X.; Kelly, P.M.; Easton, M.A.; Taylor, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The edge-to-edge matching model for describing the interfacial crystallographic characteristics between two phases that are related by reproducible orientation relationships has been applied to the typical grain refiners in aluminum alloys. Excellent atomic matching between Al 3 Ti nucleating substrates, known to be effective nucleation sites for primary Al, and the Al matrix in both close packed directions and close packed planes containing these directions have been identified. The crystallographic features of the grain refiner and the Al matrix are very consistent with the edge-to-edge matching model. For three other typical grain refiners for Al alloys, TiC (when a = 0.4328 nm), TiB 2 and AlB 2 , the matching only occurs between the close packed directions in both phases and between the second close packed plane of the Al matrix and the second close packed plane of the refiners. According to the model, it is predicted that Al 3 Ti is a more powerful nucleating substrate for Al alloy than TiC, TiB 2 and AlB 2 . This agrees with the previous experimental results. The present work shows that the edge-to-edge matching model has the potential to be a powerful tool in discovering new and more powerful grain refiners for Al alloys

  18. Strong morphological and crystallographic texture and resulting yield strength anisotropy in selective laser melted tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijs, Lore; Montero Sistiaga, Maria Luz; Wauthle, Ruben; Xie, Qingge; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Van Humbeeck, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) makes use of a high energy density laser beam to melt successive layers of metallic powders in order to create functional parts. The energy density of the laser is high enough to melt refractory metals like Ta and produce mechanically sound parts. Furthermore, the localized heat input causes a strong directional cooling and solidification. Epitaxial growth due to partial remelting of the previous layer, competitive growth mechanism and a specific global direction of heat flow during SLM of Ta result in the formation of long columnar grains with a 〈1 1 1〉 preferential crystal orientation along the building direction. The microstructure was visualized using both optical and scanning electron microscopy equipped with electron backscattered diffraction and the global crystallographic texture was measured using X-ray diffraction. The thermal profile around the melt pool was modeled using a pragmatic model for SLM. Furthermore, rotation of the scanning direction between different layers was seen to promote the competitive growth. As a result, the texture strength increased to as large as 4.7 for rotating the scanning direction 90° every layer. By comparison of the yield strength measured by compression tests in different orientations and the averaged Taylor factor calculated using the viscoplastic self-consistent model, it was found that both the morphological and crystallographic texture observed in SLM Ta contribute to yield strength anisotropy

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of DnaJ from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Shasha; Jin, Li; Niu, Siqiang; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Shaocheng; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng; Huang, Ailong; Yin, Yibing; Wang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    DnaJ from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpDnaJ) is involved in the infectious disease process and is being developed as a potential vaccine to prevent bacterial infection. Here the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SpDnaJ are reported. DnaJ, cooperating with DnaK and GrpE, promotes the folding of unfolded hydrophobic polypeptides, dissociates protein complexes and translocates protein across membranes. Additionally, DnaJ from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpDnaJ) is involved in the infectious disease process and is being developed as a potential vaccine to prevent bacterial infection. Here the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SpDnaJ are reported. The crystals belong to space groups I222 or I2 1 2 1 2 1 and the diffraction resolution is 3.0 Å with unit-cell parameters a = 47.68, b = 104.45, c = 234.57 Å. The crystal most likely contains one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a V M value of 3.24 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 62.1%

  20. HETC-3STEP included fragmentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Iga, Kiminori; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    High Energy Transport Code (HETC) based on the cascade-evaporation model is modified to calculate the fragmentation cross section. For the cascade process, nucleon-nucleon cross sections are used for collision computation; effective in-medium-corrected cross sections are adopted instead of the original free-nucleon collision. The exciton model is adopted for improvement of backward nucleon-emission cross section for low-energy nucleon-incident events. The fragmentation reaction is incorporated into the original HETC as a subroutine set by the use of the systematics of the reaction. The modified HETC (HETC-3STEP/FRG) reproduces experimental fragment yields to a reasonable degree. (author)

  1. Heart Rate Fragmentation: A Symbolic Dynamical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena D. Costa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We recently introduced the concept of heart rate fragmentation along with a set of metrics for its quantification. The term was coined to refer to an increase in the percentage of changes in heart rate acceleration sign, a dynamical marker of a type of anomalous variability. The effort was motivated by the observation that fragmentation, which is consistent with the breakdown of the neuroautonomic-electrophysiologic control system of the sino-atrial node, could confound traditional short-term analysis of heart rate variability.Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1 introduce a symbolic dynamical approach to the problem of quantifying heart rate fragmentation; (2 evaluate how the distribution of the different dynamical patterns (“words” varied with the participants' age in a group of healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD; and (3 quantify the differences in the fragmentation patterns between the two sample populations.Methods: The symbolic dynamical method employed here was based on a ternary map of the increment NN interval time series and on the analysis of the relative frequency of symbolic sequences (words with a pre-defined set of features. We analyzed annotated, open-access Holter databases of healthy subjects and patients with CAD, provided by the University of Rochester Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW.Results: The degree of fragmentation was significantly higher in older individuals than in their younger counterparts. However, the fragmentation patterns were different in the two sample populations. In healthy subjects, older age was significantly associated with a higher percentage of transitions from acceleration/deceleration to zero acceleration and vice versa (termed “soft” inflection points. In patients with CAD, older age was also significantly associated with higher percentages of frank reversals in heart rate acceleration (transitions from acceleration to

  2. Gluon fragmentation into 3 PJ quarkonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The functions of the gluon fragmentation into 3 P j quarkonium are calculated to order α 2 s . With the recent progress in analysing quarkonium systems in QCD it is possible show how the so called divergence in the limit of the zero-binding energy, which is related to P-wave quarkonia, is treated correctly in the case of fragmentation functions. The obtained fragmentation functions satisfy explicitly at the order of α 2 s the Altarelli-Parisi equation and when z → 0 they behave as z -1 as expected. 19 refs., 7 figs

  3. Origin of fragments in multifragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbiri, K.; Aichelin, J.

    2003-01-01

    Using the quantum molecular dynamics approach we have started analyzing the results of the recent INDRA experiments at GSI facilities. For the first time we could identify a midrapidity source in which fragments are formed from an almost identical fraction of projectile and target nucleons. In smaller systems we have found this source. Nevertheless the fragment spectra at small and large angles is completely determined by the dynamics. We discuss how fragments are formed in the different regions of phase space and what they tell us about the reaction mechanism. (authors)

  4. Bone fragments a body can make

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, S.D.; Ross, L.M. Jr. (Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Data obtained from various analytical techniques applied to a number of small bone fragments recovered from a crime scene were used to provide evidence for the occurrence of a fatality. Microscopic and histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the fragments were from a human skull. X-ray microanalysis of darkened areas on the bone fragments revealed a chemical signature that matched the chemical signature of a shotgun pellet recovered at the scene of the crime. The above findings supported the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fingerprint evidence which, along with other evidence, was used to convict a man for the murder of his wife, even though her body was never recovered.

  5. Aspect Ratio Dependence of Impact Fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaoka, H.; Toyosawa, E.; Takayasu, H.; Inaoka, H.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical model of three-dimensional impact fragmentation produces a power-law cumulative fragment mass distribution followed by a flat tail. The result is consistent with an experimental result in a recent paper by Meibom and Balslev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2492 (1996)]. Our numerical simulation also implies that the fragment mass distribution changes from a power law with a flat tail to a power law with a sudden cutoff, depending on the aspect ratio of the fractured object. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Origin of fragments in multifragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbiri, K.; Aichelin, J.

    2005-01-01

    Using the quantum molecular dynamics approach we have started to analyze the results of the recent INDRA experiments at GSI experiments. For the first time we could identify a midrapidity source in which fragments are formed from a almost identical fraction of projectile and target nucleons. In smaller systems we have not found this source. Nevertheless the fragment spectra at small and large angles are completely determined by the dynamics. We discuss how fragments are formed in the different regions of phase space and what they tell us about the reaction mechanism. (author)

  7. Characterization of Tumor-Avid Antibody Fragments Genetically Engineered for Mono-Specific Radionuclide Chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, T.P.

    2003-01-01

    The successful clinical application of targeted-radiopharmaceuticals depends on the development of molecules that optimize tumor specific radionuclide deposition and minimize non-specific organ irradiation. To this end, this proposal outlines a research effort to identify and evaluate novel antibodies and antibody fragments that bind breast tumors. The tumor-avid antibodies will be investigated for as imaging and therapeutic agents and to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of radiolabeled tumor-avid antibody fragments through the use of site-specifically labeled molecules. Antibodies or antibody fragments, that bind breast carcinoma carbohydrate antigens, will be obtained from hybridoma or bacteriophage library screening. More specifically, antibody fragments that bind the carcinoma-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen will be radiolabeled with 99m Tc and 188 Re at a natural amino acid chelation site and will be investigated in vivo for their abilities to target human breast tumors. In addition, site-specific radiolabeled antibody fragments will be biosynthesized using misacylated suppressor tRNAs. Homogeneously radiolabeled populations of antibody fragments will be used to investigate the effects of radionuclide location and chelation chemistries on their biodistribution and metabolism. It is hypothesized that site-specifically radiolabeled antibody fragments will possess enhanced tumor imaging and therapeutic properties due to optimal label location and conjugation chemistries. New insights into the factors that govern antibody metabolism in vivo are also expected from this work. Results from these studies should enhance our ability to design and synthesize radiolabeled antibody fragments that have improved pharmacokinetic properties. The studies in this proposal involve basic research into the development of antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals, with the ultimate goal of application in humans. This type of basic nuclear

  8. Novel approach of fragment-based lead discovery applied to renin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawada, Michiko; Suzuki, Shinkichi; Imaeda, Yasuhiro; Oki, Hideyuki; Snell, Gyorgy; Behnke, Craig A; Kondo, Mitsuyo; Tarui, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshimasa; Kuroita, Takanobu; Tomimoto, Masaki

    2016-11-15

    A novel approach was conducted for fragment-based lead discovery and applied to renin inhibitors. The biochemical screening of a fragment library against renin provided the hit fragment which showed a characteristic interaction pattern with the target protein. The hit fragment bound only to the S1, S3, and S3 SP (S3 subpocket) sites without any interactions with the catalytic aspartate residues (Asp32 and Asp215 (pepsin numbering)). Prior to making chemical modifications to the hit fragment, we first identified its essential binding sites by utilizing the hit fragment's substructures. Second, we created a new and smaller scaffold, which better occupied the identified essential S3 and S3 SP sites, by utilizing library synthesis with high-throughput chemistry. We then revisited the S1 site and efficiently explored a good building block attaching to the scaffold with library synthesis. In the library syntheses, the binding modes of each pivotal compound were determined and confirmed by X-ray crystallography and the library was strategically designed by structure-based computational approach not only to obtain a more active compound but also to obtain informative Structure Activity Relationship (SAR). As a result, we obtained a lead compound offering synthetic accessibility as well as the improved in vitro ADMET profiles. The fragments and compounds possessing a characteristic interaction pattern provided new structural insights into renin's active site and the potential to create a new generation of renin inhibitors. In addition, we demonstrated our FBDD strategy integrating highly sensitive biochemical assay, X-ray crystallography, and high-throughput synthesis and in silico library design aimed at fragment morphing at the initial stage was effective to elucidate a pocket profile and a promising lead compound. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) simulations for fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E; Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) involves screening low molecular weight molecules ("fragments") that correspond to functional groups found in larger drug-like molecules to determine their binding to target proteins or nucleic acids. Based on the principle of thermodynamic additivity, two fragments that bind nonoverlapping nearby sites on the target can be combined to yield a new molecule whose binding free energy is the sum of those of the fragments. Experimental FBDD approaches, like NMR and X-ray crystallography, have proven very useful but can be expensive in terms of time, materials, and labor. Accordingly, a variety of computational FBDD approaches have been developed that provide different levels of detail and accuracy.The Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) method of computational FBDD uses all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify fragment binding. The target is "soaked" in an aqueous solution with multiple fragments having different identities. The resulting computational competition assay reveals what small molecule types are most likely to bind which regions of the target. From SILCS simulations, 3D probability maps of fragment binding called "FragMaps" can be produced. Based on the probabilities relative to bulk, SILCS FragMaps can be used to determine "Grid Free Energies (GFEs)," which provide per-atom contributions to fragment binding affinities. For essentially no additional computational overhead relative to the production of the FragMaps, GFEs can be used to compute Ligand Grid Free Energies (LGFEs) for arbitrarily complex molecules, and these LGFEs can be used to rank-order the molecules in accordance with binding affinities.

  10. Dihadron fragmentation function and its evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumder, A.; Wang Xinnian

    2004-01-01

    Dihadron fragmentation functions and their evolution are studied in the process of e + e - annihilation. Under the collinear factorization approximation and facilitated by the cut-vertex technique, the two hadron inclusive cross section at leading order is shown to factorize into a short distance parton cross section and a long distance dihadron fragmentation function. We provide the definition of such a dihadron fragmentation function in terms of parton matrix elements and derive its Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation at leading log. The evolution equation for the nonsinglet quark fragmentation function is solved numerically with a simple ansatz for the initial condition and results are presented for cases of physical interest

  11. A Current Logical Framework: The Propositional Fragment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watkins, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    We present the propositional fragment CLF of the Concurrent Logical Framework (CLF). CLF extends the Linear Logical Framework to allow the natural representation of concurrent computations in an object language...

  12. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP-cDNA) analysis of differential gene expression from the xerophyte Ammopiptanthus mongolicus in response to cold, drought and cold together with drought.

  13. An improved algorithm for MFR fragment assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontaxis, Georg

    2012-01-01

    A method for generating protein backbone models from backbone only NMR data is presented, which is based on molecular fragment replacement (MFR). In a first step, the PDB database is mined for homologous peptide fragments using experimental backbone-only data i.e. backbone chemical shifts (CS) and residual dipolar couplings (RDC). Second, this fragment library is refined against the experimental restraints. Finally, the fragments are assembled into a protein backbone fold using a rigid body docking algorithm using the RDCs as restraints. For improved performance, backbone nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) may be included at that stage. Compared to previous implementations of MFR-derived structure determination protocols this model-building algorithm offers improved stability and reliability. Furthermore, relative to CS-ROSETTA based methods, it provides faster performance and straightforward implementation with the option to easily include further types of restraints and additional energy terms.

  14. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  15. Quark fragmentation into 3PJ quarkonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The functions of parton fragmentation into 3 P J quarkonium at order α 2 s are calculated, where the parton can be a heavy or a light quark. The obtained functions explicitly satisfy the Altarelli-Parisi equation and they are divergent, behaving as z -1 near z = O. However, if one choses the renormalization scale as twice of the heavy quark mass, the fragmentation functions are regular over the whole range of z. 15 refs., 2 figs

  16. The lund Monte Carlo for jet fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, T.

    1982-03-01

    We present a Monte Carlo program based on the Lund model for jet fragmentation. Quark, gluon, diquark and hadron jets are considered. Special emphasis is put on the fragmentation of colour singlet jet systems, for which energy, momentum and flavour are conserved explicitly. The model for decays of unstable particles, in particular the weak decay of heavy hadrons, is described. The central part of the paper is a detailed description on how to use the FORTRAN 77 program. (Author)

  17. Fragmentation of Continental United States Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; Robert V. O' Neill; K. Bruce Jones; Elizabeth R. Smith; John W. Coulston; Timothy G. Wade; Jonathan H. Smith

    2002-01-01

    We report a multiple-scale analysis of forest fragmentation based on 30-m (0.09 ha pixel-1) land- cover maps for the conterminous United States. Each 0.09-ha unit of forest was classified according to fragmentation indexes measured within the surrounding landscape, for five landscape sizes including 2.25, 7.29, 65.61, 590.49, and 5314.41 ha....

  18. A focused fragment library targeting the antibiotic resistance enzyme - Oxacillinase-48: Synthesis, structural evaluation and inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Sundus; Lund, Bjarte Aarmo; Ismael, Aya; Langer, Manuel; Isaksson, Johan; Christopeit, Tony; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Bayer, Annette

    2018-02-10

    β-Lactam antibiotics are of utmost importance when treating bacterial infections in the medical community. However, currently their utility is threatened by the emergence and spread of β-lactam resistance. The most prevalent resistance mechanism to β-lactam antibiotics is expression of β-lactamase enzymes. One way to overcome resistance caused by β-lactamases, is the development of β-lactamase inhibitors and today several β-lactamase inhibitors e.g. avibactam, are approved in the clinic. Our focus is the oxacillinase-48 (OXA-48), an enzyme reported to spread rapidly across the world and commonly identified in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. To guide inhibitor design, we used diversely substituted 3-aryl and 3-heteroaryl benzoic acids to probe the active site of OXA-48 for useful enzyme-inhibitor interactions. In the presented study, a focused fragment library containing 49 3-substituted benzoic acid derivatives were synthesised and biochemically characterized. Based on crystallographic data from 33 fragment-enzyme complexes, the fragments could be classified into R 1 or R 2 binders by their overall binding conformation in relation to the binding of the R 1 and R 2 side groups of imipenem. Moreover, binding interactions attractive for future inhibitor design were found and their usefulness explored by the rational design and evaluation of merged inhibitors from orthogonally binding fragments. The best inhibitors among the resulting 3,5-disubstituted benzoic acids showed inhibitory potential in the low micromolar range (IC 50  = 2.9 μM). For these inhibitors, the complex X-ray structures revealed non-covalent binding to Arg250, Arg214 and Tyr211 in the active site and the interactions observed with the mono-substituted fragments were also identified in the merged structures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Fragman: an R package for fragment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Schlautman, Brandon; Salazar, Walter; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-04-21

    Determination of microsatellite lengths or other DNA fragment types is an important initial component of many genetic studies such as mutation detection, linkage and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping, genetic diversity, pedigree analysis, and detection of heterozygosity. A handful of commercial and freely available software programs exist for fragment analysis; however, most of them are platform dependent and lack high-throughput applicability. We present the R package Fragman to serve as a freely available and platform independent resource for automatic scoring of DNA fragment lengths diversity panels and biparental populations. The program analyzes DNA fragment lengths generated in Applied Biosystems® (ABI) either manually or automatically by providing panels or bins. The package contains additional tools for converting the allele calls to GenAlEx, JoinMap® and OneMap software formats mainly used for genetic diversity and generating linkage maps in plant and animal populations. Easy plotting functions and multiplexing friendly capabilities are some of the strengths of this R package. Fragment analysis using a unique set of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) genotypes based on microsatellite markers is used to highlight the capabilities of Fragman. Fragman is a valuable new tool for genetic analysis. The package produces equivalent results to other popular software for fragment analysis while possessing unique advantages and the possibility of automation for high-throughput experiments by exploiting the power of R.

  20. Microstructural characterization of pipe bomb fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Otto; Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James; Platek, Michael; Ghonem, Hamouda; Bernier, Evan; Downey, Markus; Cumminskey, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Recovered pipe bomb fragments, exploded under controlled conditions, have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and microhardness. Specifically, this paper examines the microstructural changes in plain carbon-steel fragments collected after the controlled explosion of galvanized, schedule 40, continuously welded, steel pipes filled with various smokeless powders. A number of microstructural changes were observed in the recovered pipe fragments: deformation of the soft alpha-ferrite grains, deformation of pearlite colonies, twin formation, bands of distorted pearlite colonies, slip bands, and cross-slip bands. These microstructural changes were correlated with the relative energy of the smokeless powder fillers. The energy of the smokeless powder was reflected in a reduction in thickness of the pipe fragments (due to plastic strain prior to fracture) and an increase in microhardness. Moreover, within fragments from a single pipe, there was a radial variation in microhardness, with the microhardness at the outer wall being greater than that at the inner wall. These findings were consistent with the premise that, with the high energy fillers, extensive plastic deformation and wall thinning occurred prior to pipe fracture. Ultimately, the information collected from this investigation will be used to develop a database, where the fragment microstructure and microhardness will be correlated with type of explosive filler and bomb design. Some analyses, specifically wall thinning and microhardness, may aid in field characterization of explosive devices.

  1. Fragmentation of molten core material by sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.

    1982-01-01

    A series of scoping experiments was performed to study the fragmentation of prototypic high temperature melts in sodium. The quantity of melt involved was at least one order of magnitude larger than previous experiments. Two modes of contact were used: melt streaming into sodium and sodium into melt. The average bulk fragment size distribution was found to be in the range of previous data and the average size distribution was found to be insensitive to mode of contact. SEM studies showed that the metal component typically fragmented in the molten phase while the oxide component fragmented in the solid phase. For UO 2 -ZrO 2 /stainless steel melts no sigificant spatial separation of the metal and oxide was observed. The fragment size distribution was stratified vertically in the debris bed in all cases. While the bulk fragment size showed generally consistent trends, the individual experiments were sufficiently different to cause different degrees of stratification in the debris bed. For the highly stratified beds the permeability can decrease by as much as a factor of 20 from the bottom to the top of the bed

  2. Assessing the lipophilicity of fragments and early hits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortenson, Paul N.; Murray, Christopher W.

    2011-07-01

    A key challenge in many drug discovery programs is to accurately assess the potential value of screening hits. This is particularly true in fragment-based drug design (FBDD), where the hits often bind relatively weakly, but are correspondingly small. Ligand efficiency (LE) considers both the potency and the size of the molecule, and enables us to estimate whether or not an initial hit is likely to be optimisable to a potent, druglike lead. While size is a key property that needs to be controlled in a small molecule drug, there are a number of additional properties that should also be considered. Lipophilicity is amongst the most important of these additional properties, and here we present a new efficiency index (LLEAT) that combines lipophilicity, size and potency. The index is intuitively defined, and has been designed to have the same target value and dynamic range as LE, making it easily interpretable by medicinal chemists. Monitoring both LE and LLEAT should help both in the selection of more promising fragment hits, and controlling molecular weight and lipophilicity during optimisation.

  3. Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragment Modeling: Modifications to the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouge, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests on test satellites are performed by members of the orbital debris scientific community in order to understand and typify the on-orbit collision breakup process. By analysis of these test satellite fragments, the fragment size and mass distributions are derived and incorporated into various orbital debris models. These same fragments are currently being put to new use using emerging technologies. Digital models of these fragments are created using a laser scanner. A group of computer programs referred to as the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve code uses these digital representations in a multitude of ways that describe, measure, and model on-orbit fragments and fragment behavior. The Dynamic Rotation subroutine generates all of the possible reflected intensities from a scanned fragment as if it were observed to rotate dynamically while in orbit about the Earth. This calls an additional subroutine that graphically displays the intensities and the resulting frequency of those intensities as a range of solar phase angles in a Probability Density Function plot. This document reports the additions and modifications to the subset of the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve concerned with the Dynamic Rotation and Probability Density Function plotting subroutines.

  4. From small to powerful: the fragments universe and its "chem-appeal".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancineto, Luca; Massari, Serena; Iraci, Nunzio; Tabarrini, Oriana

    2013-01-01

    While increasing expertise in molecular biology and proteomics is markedly speeding up the target elucidation process, various strategies have been proposed that improve the chances of identifying active molecules. Among them, the Fragment Based Drug Design (FBDD) is surely worth noting. The FBDD entails the screening of a small number of low molecular weight compounds in the hopes of finding even low affine but high ligand efficient fragments that have high probability to became drug candidates. Since 1996, when the first paper on FBDD was reported, the potentialities of this strategy became progressively more apparent as testified by the growing number of publications. Many drug discovery projects started with the identification of fragments which after the optimization gave many molecules close to the approval and one marketed drug Vemurafenib, approved in 2011. A preamble that highlights the advantages of dealing with simple and "very small" molecules over conventional drug-like compounds will be herein given prior to discussing the canonical FBDD stages, from fragment library design, to the different screening methods concluding with the various optimization strategies, in an attempt to illustrate the whole FBDD workflow while discussing the most recent and successful applications. While this review is a tribute to the success achieved by the researchers in this field, it is particularly addressed to scientists who want to become aware of the versatility and potentiality of FBDD.

  5. Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses,Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2006-10-03

    Monomeric thiosalicylaldiminate complexes of rhodium(I) and iridium(I) were prepared by ligand transfer from the homoleptic zinc(II) species. In the presence of strongly donating ligands, the iridium complexes undergo insertion of the metal into the imine carbon-hydrogen bond. Thiophenoxyketimines were prepared by non-templated reaction of o-mercaptoacetophenone with anilines, and were complexed with rhodium(I), iridium(I), nickel(II) and platinum(II). X-ray crystallographic studies showed that while the thiosalicylaldiminate complexes display planar ligand conformations, those of the thiophenoxyketiminates are strongly distorted. Results of a computational study were consistent with a steric-strain interpretation of the difference in preferred ligand geometries.

  6. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of Pru du amandin, an allergenic protein from Prunus dulcis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaur, Vineet; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Salunke, Dinakar M., E-mail: dinakar@nii.res.in [National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2008-01-01

    The purification, identification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an allergy-related protein, Pru du amandin, from P. dulcis nuts are reported. Food allergies appear to be one of the foremost causes of hypersensitivity reactions. Nut allergies account for most food allergies and are often permanent. The 360 kDa hexameric protein Pru du amandin, a known allergen, was purified from almonds (Prunus dulcis) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion-exchange chromatography. The protein was identified by a BLAST homology search against the nonredundant sequence database. Pru du amandin belongs to the 11S legumin family of seed storage proteins characterized by the presence of a cupin motif. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 150.7, c = 164.9 Å.

  7. Recombinant ACHT1 from Arabidopsis thaliana: crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weimin; Wang, Junchao; Yang, Ye; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Min

    2017-07-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) play important roles in chloroplasts by linking photosynthetic light reactions to a series of plastid functions. They execute their function by regulating the oxidation and reduction of disulfide bonds. ACHT1 (atypical cysteine/histidine-rich Trx1) is a thylakoid-associated thioredoxin-type protein found in the Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast. Recombinant ACHT1 protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. The crystal diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and a complete X-ray data set was collected. Preliminary crystallographic analysis suggested that the crystals belonged to space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 102.7, b = 100.6, c = 92.8 Å.

  8. Hydrogen-induced crack interaction and coalescence: the role of local crystallographic texture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M.; Venegas, V. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Baudin, T. [Universite de Paris Sud, Orsay, (France)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) is a big concern in pipeline industry specialized in sour service. The strategies to improve HIC resistance of pipeline steel have not been completely efficient. This study investigated the role of grain orientation in the interaction and coalescence of non-coplanar HIC cracks through experimental analysis. HIC samples of pipeline steels (API 5L X46 and ASME-A106) were studied using automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The results showed that the microtexture can play a significant role in the coalescence of closely spaced non-coplanar HIC cracks. It was also found that the presence of cleavage planes and slip systems correctly oriented to the mixed-mode stresses can activate low-resistance transgranular paths along in which cracks can merge. It is demonstrated that crystallographic texture must be considered in developing predictive models for the study of the stepwise propagation of HIC cracking in pipeline steels.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the PAS domains of EAG and ELK potassium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaixo, Ricardo; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The N-terminal PAS domains from the eukaryotic EAG potassium channels are thought to have a regulatory function. Here the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of two of these domains are described. Per–Arnt–Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous in nature; they are ∼130-amino-acid protein domains that adopt a fairly conserved three-dimensional structure despite their low degree of sequence homology. These domains constitute the N-terminus or, less frequently, the C-terminus of a number of proteins, where they exert regulatory functions. PAS-containing proteins generally display two or more copies of this motif. In this work, the crystallization and preliminary analysis of the PAS domains of two eukaryotic potassium channels from the ether-à-go-go (EAG) family are reported

  10. Research on the phenomenon of graphitization. Crystallographic study - Study of bromine sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, Jacques

    1967-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the mechanism of graphitization of carbon by using X-ray diffraction analysis and the physical and chemical study of lamellar reactions between carbon and bromine. The author first presents generalities and results of preliminary studies (meaning of graphitization, presentation of the various carbon groups and classes), and then reports the study of the graphitization of compact carbons (soft carbons). More precisely, he reports the crystallographic study of partially graphitized carbons: methods and principles, experimental results and their analysis, discussion of the graphitization mechanism. In the next part, the author reports the study of bromine sorption on carbons: experimental method, isotherms of a natural graphite and of a graphitized carbon, structure of carbon-bromine complexes, isotherms of graphitizable carbons and of all other carbons, distribution of bromine layers in partially graphitized carbons, bromine sorption and Fermi level

  11. The distribution function of crystalline orientation's usefulness in crystallographic texture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermida, J.D.; Pochettino, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical fundaments of the Distribution Function of Crystalline Orientations (DFCO) are described and this method is compared with the usual description of the crystallographic texture by direct pole figures. Such function is applied to the study of a Zry-4 sample obtained from a tube belonging to a CANDU type fuel element. The DFCO is obtained from the pole figures (0002), (101-bar0) and (101-bar1). The results show the existence of six fundamental components of texture, which are enunciated below, in decreasing order of importance: (2-bar115) ; (3-bar128) ; (1-bar013) ; (2-bar114) ; (0001) ; (0001) . A much more complete view of the crystals' orientation state of such sample can be obtained by analyzing the weight and the distribution of the different components. (M.E.L.) [es

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4 1 2 1 2 or P4 3 2 1 2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å

  13. Influence of chemical composition in crystallographic texture Fe-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, L.B.; Guimaraes, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    The use of steels with higher contents of Mo in the oil industry has been an alternative to reduce the effect of naphthenic corrosion in refining units. The addition of Mo in Fe-Cr alloys in the same manner that increases resistance to corrosion naphthenic causes some difficulties such as difficulty of forming, welding and embrittlement. In this work, experimental ingots of Fe-Cr-Mo alloys (Cr - 9, 15 and 17%, Mo - 5, 7 and 9%) were melted in vacuum induction furnace and hot and cold rolled in a laboratory rolling mill. The influence of chemical composition on crystallographic texture of samples subjected to the same thermo-mechanical treatment was analyzed by x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that fiber (111) becomes more intense with increasing Mo and/or Cr contents. (author)

  14. Dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes: Synthesis, crystallographic structures and applications in organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Gaole

    2015-01-01

    Two soluble and stable dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes with two (DAP1) and six (DAP2) phenyl substituents were synthesized. Both compounds possess a small energy band gap and show amphoteric redox behaviour due to intramolecular donor-accepter interactions. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that DAP2 has a closely packed structure with multi-dimensional [C-H⋯π] interactions although there are no π-π interactions between the dianthraceno[a,e]pentalene cores. As a result, solution-processed field effect transistors based on DAP2 exhibited an average hole mobility of 0.65 cm2 V-1 s-1. Under similar conditions, DAP1 showed an average field effect hole mobility of 0.001 cm2 V-1 s-1. This journal is

  15. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) from Halothermothrix orenii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, Frederick; Tan, Tien-Chye; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Patel, Bharat K. C.

    2004-01-01

    The first crystallographic study of a sucrose phosphate synthase from H. orenii, an organism that is both thermophilic and halophilic, is reported. The protein crystal diffracts X-rays to 3.01 Å. This is the first report of the crystallization of a sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14). It also constitutes the first study of a sucrose phosphate synthase from a non-photosynthetic thermohalophilic anaerobic bacterium, Halothermothrix orenii. The purified recombinant spsA protein has been crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 154.2, b = 47.9, c = 72.3 Å, β = 103.16°, using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal diffracts X-rays to a resolution limit of 3.01 Å. Heavy-metal and halide-soaking trials are currently in progress to solve the structure

  16. Automating crystallographic structure solution and refinement of protein–ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echols, Nathaniel; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Klei, Herbert E.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Headd, Jeffrey J.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Oeffner, Robert D.; Read, Randy J.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    A software system for automated protein–ligand crystallography has been implemented in the Phenix suite. This significantly reduces the manual effort required in high-throughput crystallographic studies. High-throughput drug-discovery and mechanistic studies often require the determination of multiple related crystal structures that only differ in the bound ligands, point mutations in the protein sequence and minor conformational changes. If performed manually, solution and refinement requires extensive repetition of the same tasks for each structure. To accelerate this process and minimize manual effort, a pipeline encompassing all stages of ligand building and refinement, starting from integrated and scaled diffraction intensities, has been implemented in Phenix. The resulting system is able to successfully solve and refine large collections of structures in parallel without extensive user intervention prior to the final stages of model completion and validation

  17. Influence of crystallographic orientation on the response of copper crystallites to nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korchuganov, Aleksandr V., E-mail: avkor@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kryzhevich, Dmitrij S., E-mail: kryzhev@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: kost@ispms.tsc.ru; Zolnikov, Konstantin P., E-mail: kryzhev@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: kost@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G., E-mail: sp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the features of nucleation and development of plastic deformation in copper crystallites in nanoindentation with different crystallographic orientations of their loaded surface: (011), (001), and (111). Atomic interaction was described by a potential constructed in terms of the embedded atom method. It is shown that behavior of the crystallite reaction force correlates well with a change in the fraction of atoms involved in local structural rearrangements. The generation of local structural changes decreases the slope of the crystallite reaction force curve or results in an extremum due to internal stress relaxation. Analysis of structural changes in the material being indented demonstrates that the orientation of its loaded surface greatly affects the features of nucleation and development of plastic deformation.

  18. Effects of crystallographic texture on stress-migration resistance in copper thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, J.; Wada, M.; Sanada, M.; Maruyama, K.

    2002-01-01

    The crystallographic texture of heat-treated Cu thin films and its effects on stress-migration resistance were studied as a function of film thickness within a range of 50-900 nm. All as-deposited films had (111) texture. After heat treatment at 723 K, texture transition from (111) to (100) was observed in films of thickness greater than 300 nm. The (111) texture films after heat treatment showed severe stress migration; in contrast, the (100) texture films showed no noticeable stress migration. The observed stress-migration resistance in the (100) texture films can be attributed to the absence of twins and to lower thermal stress as compared with the (111) texture films

  19. Spectroscopic and crystallographic studies of YAG:Pr4+ single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlak, D.; Frukacz, Z.; Mierczyk, Z.; Suchocki, A.; Zachara, J.

    1998-01-01

    Y 3 Al 5 O 12 single crystals doped with praseodymium and magnesium ions have been prepared. The reversible color change of this crystal is observed when annealing in oxidizing or reducing atmospheres. The change is ascribed to the formation of Pr 4+ in the as-grown crystal, caused by the second dopant, Mg 2+ . The absorption spectra of YAG:Pr,Mg in the range 200-1100 nm, as grown and annealed in air and H 2 /N 2 atmosphere, are presented and discussed. Additional broad absorption bands are observed for the as-grown crystals and those annealed in oxidizing atmosphere. Crystallographic investigations of the original crystal and after annealing in a reducing atmosphere as described above, show no distinct structural differences. A redox mechanism is proposed to explain the color change during annealing. (orig.)

  20. Crystallographic and oxidation kinetic study of uranium dioxide by high temperature X-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    The structural behavior of UO 2 sintered plates was studied as a function of temperature by X-ray diffractometry. All the experiments were carried out under an inert atmosphere with low oxygen content (approximated 140 ppm). The thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 05 was found to be 10,5 x 10 - 6 0 C - 1 for temperatures above 165 0 C. Structural transformations during oxidation were observed at 170,235 and 275 0 C. The isothermal oxidation of UO 2 to U 3 O 7 follows a parabolic form and the diffusion of oxygen through the product layer U 4 O 9 is the mechanism controlling the oxidation rate. The phases observed were UO 2 (cubic) - U 4 O 9 (cubic) - U 3 O 7 (tetragonal). Activation energies of oxidation were found for different crystallographic planes (hkl). From this one can conclude that there is a preferential occupation of interstitial oxygen within the UO 2 structure. (Author) [pt

  1. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the glycosyltransferase from a marine Streptomyces species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Liping; Xiao, Yi; Liu, Qiang; Li, Sumei; Zhang, Changsheng; Liu, Jinsong

    2010-01-01

    The recombinant glycosyltransferase ElaGT from the elaiophylin-producing marine Streptomyces sp. SCSIO 01934 has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. ElaGT is a glycosyltransferase from a marine Streptomyces species that is involved in the biosynthesis of elaiophylin. Here, the molecular cloning, protein expression and purification, preliminary crystallization and crystallographic characterization of ElaGT are reported. The rod-shaped crystals belonged to space group P2 1 22, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.7, b = 131.7, c = 224.6 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 90°. Data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. A preliminary molecular-replacement solution implied the presence of two ElaGT molecules in the asymmetric unit

  2. Initial crystallographic studies of a small heat-shock protein from Xylella fastidiosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Susely F. S.; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Lorite, Gabriela S.; Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K.; Pelloso, Alexandre César; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Trivella, Daniela B. B.; Cotta, Mônica A.; Souza, Anete Pereira de; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Initial crystallographic studies of the X. fastidiosa small heat-shock protein HSP17.9 are reported. The ORF XF2234 in the Xylella fastidiosa genome was identified as encoding a small heat-shock protein of 17.9 kDa (HSP17.9). HSP17.9 was found as one of the proteins that are induced during X. fastidiosa proliferation and infection in citrus culture. Recombinant HSP17.9 was crystallized and surface atomic force microscopy experiments were conducted with the aim of better characterizing the HSP17.9 crystals. X-ray diffraction data were collected at 2.7 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P4 3 22, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.90, b = 68.90, c = 72.51 Å, and is the first small heat-shock protein to crystallize in this space group

  3. Crystallographic considerations of the δ in equilibrium α displacive transformation in plutonium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, P.H.; Olson, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    Determination of invariant-plane strain crystallographic solutions for martensitic transformation between the FCC δ and monoclinic α phases in plutonium alloys, using three possible lattice correspondences and 53 possible lattice-invariant shear systems, identifies the most probable δ-α lattice correspondence. The operative lattice-invariant shear systems are predicted by comparison of both shape strain magnitudes and computed interfacial energies. For δ → α transformation twinning on (001) [100]/sub α/ is favored, giving a (.817, .538, .208)/sub δ/ habit and a [.947, .269, .174]/sub δ/ shape strain of magnitude m 1 = .324. The α → δ transformation favors slip on (111) [101]/sub δ/, giving a (.255, .844, .471)/sub α/ habit and [.822, .466, .355]/sub α/ shape strain of magnitude m 1 = .417

  4. Vibrational algorithms for quantitative crystallographic analyses of hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials: I, theoretical foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Adachi, Tetsuya; Ichioka, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-05-01

    The Raman spectroscopic method has quantitatively been applied to the analysis of local crystallographic orientation in both single-crystal hydroxyapatite and human teeth. Raman selection rules for all the vibrational modes of the hexagonal structure were expanded into explicit functions of Euler angles in space and six Raman tensor elements (RTE). A theoretical treatment has also been put forward according to the orientation distribution function (ODF) formalism, which allows one to resolve the statistical orientation patterns of the nm-sized hydroxyapatite crystallite comprised in the Raman microprobe. Close-form solutions could be obtained for the Euler angles and their statistical distributions resolved with respect to the direction of the average texture axis. Polarized Raman spectra from single-crystalline hydroxyapatite and textured polycrystalline (teeth enamel) samples were compared, and a validation of the proposed Raman method could be obtained through confirming the agreement between RTE values obtained from different samples.

  5. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 2S albumin seed protein from Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gaur, Vineet; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-01-01

    A 2S albumin from L. culinaris was purified and crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were carried out. Lens culinaris (lentil) is a widely consumed high-protein-content leguminous crop. A 2S albumin protein (26.5 kDa) has been identified using NH 2 -terminal sequencing from a 90% ammonium sulfate saturation fraction of total L. culinaris seed protein extract. The NH 2 -terminal sequence shows very high homology to PA2, an allergy-related protein from Pisum sativum. The 2S albumin protein was purified using a combination of size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the 2S seed albumin obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P4 1 (or P4 3 ), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.6, c = 135.2 Å

  6. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of Pru du amandin, an allergenic protein from Prunus dulcis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Vineet; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2007-01-01

    The purification, identification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an allergy-related protein, Pru du amandin, from P. dulcis nuts are reported. Food allergies appear to be one of the foremost causes of hypersensitivity reactions. Nut allergies account for most food allergies and are often permanent. The 360 kDa hexameric protein Pru du amandin, a known allergen, was purified from almonds (Prunus dulcis) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion-exchange chromatography. The protein was identified by a BLAST homology search against the nonredundant sequence database. Pru du amandin belongs to the 11S legumin family of seed storage proteins characterized by the presence of a cupin motif. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P4 1 (or P4 3 ), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 150.7, c = 164.9 Å

  7. Transfer of olivine crystallographic orientation through a cycle of serpentinisation and dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-08-01

    Our ability to decipher the mechanisms behind metamorphic transformation processes depends in a major way on the extent to which crystallographic and microstructural information is transferred from one stage to another. Within the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides, prograde olivine veins that formed by dehydration of serpentinite veins in dunites exhibit a characteristic distribution of microstructures: The outer part of the veins comprises coarse-grained olivine that forms an unusual, brick-like microstructure. The inner part of the veins, surrounding a central fault, is composed of fine-grained olivine. Where the fault movement included a dilational component, optically clear, equant olivine occurs in the centre. Electron backscatter diffraction mapping reveals that the vein olivine has inherited its crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) from the olivine in the porphyroclastic host rock; however, misorientation is weaker and associated to different rotation axes. We propose that prograde olivine grew epitaxially on relics of mantle olivine and thereby acquired its CPO. Growth towards pre-existing microfractures along which serpentinisation had occurred led to straight grain boundaries and a brick-like microstructure in the veins. When dehydration embrittlement induced slip, a strong strain localisation on discrete fault planes prevented distortion of the CPO due to cataclastic deformation; grain size reduction did not significantly modify the olivine CPO. This illustrates how a CPO can be preserved though an entire metamorphic cycle, including hydration, dehydration, and deformation processes, and that the CPO and the microstructures (e.g. grain shape) of one phase do not necessarily record the same event.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikman, Linnea E. K.; Krasotkina, Julya; Kuchumova, Anastasia; Sokolov, Nikolay N.; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.

    2005-01-01

    Er. carotovoral-asparaginase, a potential antileukaemic agent, has been crystallized. Crystals diffract to 2.6 Å using a rotating-anode source and belong to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Bacterial l-asparaginases have been used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia for over 30 y. However, their use is limited owing to the glutaminase activity of the administered enzymes, which results in serious side effects. In contrast, l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora exhibits low glutaminase activity at physiological concentrations of l-asparagine and l-glutamine in the blood. Recombinant Er. carotovoral-asparaginase was crystallized in the presence of l-glutamate by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 10 mg ml −1 purified enzyme, 16–18%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M NaF. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å at 293 K using an in-house rotating-anode generator. The crystals belong to the monoclinic P2 1 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found and refinement is currently in progress. The crystal structure may provide leads towards protein-engineering efforts aimed at safer asparaginase administration in leukaemia treatment

  9. Macromolecular crystallographic results obtained using a 2048x2048 CCD detector at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, D.J.; Ealick, S.E.; Tate, M.W.; Gruner, S.M.; Eikenberry, E.F.

    1996-01-01

    We present results of macromolecular crystallographic experiments performed at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) with a new CCD-based detector. This detector, installed in January 1995, complements a 1024x1024 CCD detector that has been in continuous operation at CHESS since December 1993. The new detector is based on a 4-port, 2048x2048 pixel CCD that is directly coupled to a Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb phosphor by a 3:1 tapered fiber optic. The active area of the phosphor is a square 82 mm on an edge. The readout time is 7 seconds. In the standard mode of operation, the pixel size at the active area is 41 μm on the edge leading to the capability of resolving approximately 200 orders of diffraction across the detector face. The detector also operates in a 1024x1024 mode in which the pixel size is electronically increased by a factor of 4 in area resulting in smaller data files and faster detector readout but at the expense of spatial resolution. Most of the data that has been collected by this detector has been collected in this mode. Dozens of data sets have been collected by many experimenters using this detector at CHESS during the four month period from its installation until the start of the six-month down period of the storage ring. The capabilities of the detector will be illustrated with results from various crystallographic measurements including experiments in which the recorded diffraction patterns extend in resolution as far as 1 A. The results demonstrate that this detector is capable of collecting data of quality at least equal to that of imaging plates but, in many circumstances, with much greater beamline efficiency. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Linnea E. K. [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland); Krasotkina, Julya; Kuchumova, Anastasia; Sokolov, Nikolay N. [Institute for Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 559-B, 10 Pogodinskay St, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Papageorgiou, Anastassios C., E-mail: tassos.papageorgiou@btk.fi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland)

    2005-04-01

    Er. carotovoral-asparaginase, a potential antileukaemic agent, has been crystallized. Crystals diffract to 2.6 Å using a rotating-anode source and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Bacterial l-asparaginases have been used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia for over 30 y. However, their use is limited owing to the glutaminase activity of the administered enzymes, which results in serious side effects. In contrast, l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora exhibits low glutaminase activity at physiological concentrations of l-asparagine and l-glutamine in the blood. Recombinant Er. carotovoral-asparaginase was crystallized in the presence of l-glutamate by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 10 mg ml{sup −1} purified enzyme, 16–18%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M NaF. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å at 293 K using an in-house rotating-anode generator. The crystals belong to the monoclinic P2{sub 1} space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found and refinement is currently in progress. The crystal structure may provide leads towards protein-engineering efforts aimed at safer asparaginase administration in leukaemia treatment.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human cystathionine β-synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyenarte, Iker; Majtan, Tomas; Ereño, June; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Kraus, Jan P.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a protein construct (hCBS 516–525 ) that contains the full-length cystathionine β-synthase from Homo sapiens (hCBS) and just lacks amino-acid residues 516–525. Human cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent hemeprotein, whose catalytic activity is regulated by S-adenosylmethionine. CBS catalyzes the β-replacement reaction of homocysteine (Hcy) with serine to yield cystathionine. CBS is a key regulator of plasma levels of the thrombogenic Hcy and deficiency in CBS is the single most common cause of homocystinuria, an inherited metabolic disorder of sulfur amino acids. The properties of CBS enzymes, such as domain organization, oligomerization degree or regulatory mechanisms, are not conserved across the eukaryotes. The current body of knowledge is insufficient to understand these differences and their impact on CBS function and physiology. To overcome this deficiency, we have addressed the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a protein construct (hCBS 516–525 ) that contains the full-length CBS from Homo sapiens (hCBS) and just lacks amino-acid residues 516–525, which are located in a disordered loop. The human enzyme yielded crystals belonging to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.98, b = 136.33, c = 169.83 Å and diffracting X-rays to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystal structure appears to contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit which presumably correspond to a dimeric form of the enzyme

  12. Dependence of Fracture Toughness on Crystallographic Orientation in Single-Crystalline Cubic (β) Silicon Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pharr, M.; Katoh, Y.; Bei, H.

    2006-01-01

    Along with other desirable properties, the ability of silicon carbide (SiC) to retain high strength after elevated temperature exposures to neutron irradiation renders it potentially applicable in fusion and advanced fission reactors. However, properties of the material such as room temperature fracture toughness must be thoroughly characterized prior to such practical applications. The objective of this work is to investigate the dependence of fracture toughness on crystallographic orientation for single-crystalline β-SiC. X-ray diffraction was first performed on the samples to determine the orientation of the crystal. Nanoindentation was used to determine a hardness of 39.1 and 35.2 GPa and elastic modulus of 474 and 446 GPa for the single-crystalline and polycrystalline samples, respectively. Additionally, crack lengths and indentation diagonals were measured via a Vickers micro-hardness indenter under a load of 100 gf for different crystallographic orientations with indentation diagonals aligned along fundamental cleavage planes. Upon examination of propagation direction of cracks, the cracks usually did not initiate and propagate from the corners of the indentation where the stresses are concentrated but instead from the indentation sides. Such cracks clearly moved along the {1 1 0} family of planes (previously determined to be preferred cleavage plane), demonstrating that the fracture toughness of SiC is comparatively so much lower along this set of planes that the lower energy required to cleave along this plane overpowers the stress-concentration at indentation corners. Additionally, fracture toughness in the <1 1 0> direction was 1.84 MPa·m1/2, lower than the 3.46 MPa·m1/2 measured for polycrystalline SiC (which can serve as an average of a spectrum of orientations), further demonstrating that single-crystalline β-SiC has a strong fracture toughness anisotropy.

  13. Modeling the effects of ion dose and crystallographic symmetry on the morphological evolution of embedded precipitates under thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kun-Dar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We model the faceted precipitates formation by post-implantation annealing. •The anisotropic interfacial energy and diffusion kinetics play crucial roles. •The evolutions of faceted precipitates, including Ostwald ripening, are revealed. •The mechanism of the nucleation and growth is based on the atomic diffusion. •The effects of ion dose and crystallographic symmetry are also investigated. -- Abstract: Thermal annealing is one of the most common techniques to synthesize embedded precipitates by ion implantation process. In this study, an anisotropic phase field model is presented to investigate the effects of ion dose and crystallographic symmetry on the morphological formation and evolution of embedded precipitates during post-implantation thermal annealing process. This theoretical model provides an efficient numerical approach to understand the phenomenon of faceted precipitates formation by ion implantation. As a theoretical analysis, the interfacial energy and diffusion kinetics play prominent roles in the mechanism of atomic diffusion for the precipitates formation. With a low ion dose, faceted precipitates are developed by virtue of the anisotropic interfacial energy. As an increase of ion dose, connected precipitates with crystallographic characters on the edge are appeared. For a high ion dose, labyrinth-like nanostructures of precipitates are produced and the characteristic morphology of crystallographic symmetry becomes faint. These simulation results for the morphological evolutions of embedded precipitates by ion implantation are corresponded with many experimental observations in the literatures. The quantitative analyses of the simulations are also well described the consequence of precipitates formation under different conditions

  14. On the retrieval of crystallographic information from atom probe microscopy data via signal mapping from the detector coordinate space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nathan D; Ceguerra, Anna V; Breen, Andrew J; Ringer, Simon P

    2018-06-01

    Atom probe tomography is a powerful microscopy technique capable of reconstructing the 3D position and chemical identity of millions of atoms within engineering materials, at the atomic level. Crystallographic information contained within the data is particularly valuable for the purposes of reconstruction calibration and grain boundary analysis. Typically, analysing this data is a manual, time-consuming and error prone process. In many cases, the crystallographic signal is so weak that it is difficult to detect at all. In this study, a new automated signal processing methodology is demonstrated. We use the affine properties of the detector coordinate space, or the 'detector stack', as the basis for our calculations. The methodological framework and the visualisation tools are shown to be superior to the standard method of crystallographic pole visualisation directly from field evaporation images and there is no requirement for iterations between a full real-space initial tomographic reconstruction and the detector stack. The mapping approaches are demonstrated for aluminium, tungsten, magnesium and molybdenum. Implications for reconstruction calibration, accuracy of crystallographic measurements, reliability and repeatability are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were...

  16. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  17. Screening for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer screening is checking for cancer in people who don't have symptoms. Screening tests can help doctors find and treat several types of cancer early, but cancer screening can have harms as well as benefits.

  18. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  19. Screen time and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000355.htm Screen time and children To use the sharing features on ... videos is considered unhealthy screen time. Current Screen Time Guidelines Children under age 2 should have no ...

  20. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a disease in ...