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Sample records for crystallization constraints gas

  1. Unitary Gas Constraints on Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomeitsev, Evgeni E; Ohnishi, Akira; Tews, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We show the existence of a lower bound on the volume symmetry energy parameter $S_0$ from unitary gas considerations. We further demonstrate that values of $S_0$ above this minimum imply upper and lower bounds on the symmetry energy parameter $L$ describing its lowest-order density dependence. The bounds are found to be consistent with both recent calculations of the energies of pure neutron matter and constraints from nuclear experiments. These results are significant because many equations of state in active use for simulations of nuclear structure, heavy ion collisions, supernovae, neutron star mergers, and neutron star structure violate these constraints.

  2. Observational constraints on extended Chaplygin gas cosmologies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B C PAUL; P THAKUR; A SAHA

    2017-08-01

    We investigate cosmological models with extended Chaplygin gas (ECG) as a candidate for dark energy and determine the equation of state parameters using observed data namely, observed Hubble data, baryon acousticoscillation data and cosmic microwave background shift data. Cosmological models are investigated considering cosmic fluid which is an extension of Chaplygin gas, however, it reduces to modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) andalso to generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) in special cases. It is found that in the case of MCG and GCG, the best-fit values of all the parameters are positive. The distance modulus agrees quite well with the experimental Union2data. The speed of sound obtained in the model is small, necessary for structure formation. We also determine the observational constraints on the constants of the ECG equation.

  3. Lunar Magma Ocean Crystallization: Constraints from Fractional Crystallization Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The currently accepted paradigm of lunar formation is that of accretion from the ejecta of a giant impact, followed by crystallization of a global scale magma ocean. This model accounts for the formation of the anorthosite highlands crust, which is globally distributed and old, and the formation of the younger mare basalts which are derived from a source region that has experienced plagioclase extraction. Several attempts at modelling the crystallization of such a lunar magma ocean (LMO) have been made, but our ever-increasing knowledge of the lunar samples and surface have raised as many questions as these models have answered. Geodynamic models of lunar accretion suggest that shortly following accretion the bulk of the lunar mass was hot, likely at least above the solidus]. Models of LMO crystallization that assume a deep magma ocean are therefore geodynamically favorable, but they have been difficult to reconcile with a thick plagioclase-rich crust. A refractory element enriched bulk composition, a shallow magma ocean, or a combination of the two have been suggested as a way to produce enough plagioclase to account for the assumed thickness of the crust. Recently however, geophysical data from the GRAIL mission have indicated that the lunar anorthositic crust is not as thick as was initially estimated, which allows for both a deeper magma ocean and a bulk composition more similar to the terrestrial upper mantle. We report on experimental simulations of the fractional crystallization of a deep (approximately 100km) LMO with a terrestrial upper mantle-like (LPUM) bulk composition. Our experimental results will help to define the composition of the lunar crust and mantle cumulates, and allow us to consider important questions such as source regions of the mare basalts and Mg-suite, the role of mantle overturn after magma ocean crystallization and the nature of KREEP

  4. Electrospinning jet behaviors under the constraints of a sheath gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the ejection efficiency and uniformity of nanofibers is the key to applications of electrospinning technology. In this work, a novel electrospinning spinneret with a sheath gas passageway is designed. The frictional resistance that stems from the sheath gas provides additional stretching and restriction forces on the jet. The sheath gas also reduces interference and enhances the stability of the charged jet. A bead-on-strain simulation model is built up to determine the constraint effects of the sheath gas. Simulation results show that the sheath gas decreases the motion area and increases the stretching ratio of the liquid jet. The stretching force from the sheath gas decreases the diameter and increases the uniformity of the nanofiber. As the gas pressure increases from 0 kPa to 50 kPa, the critical voltage of the jet ejection decreases from 8.4 kV to 2.5 kV, the diameter of the nanofiber deposition zone decreases from 40 cm to 10 cm, and the diameter of the nanofibers decreases from 557.97 nm to 277.73 nm. The uniformity of nanofibers can be improved significantly using a sheath gas. The sheath gas contributes to the rapid deposition of a uniform nanofibrous membrane and the industrial applications of electrospinning.

  5. Electrospinning jet behaviors under the constraints of a sheath gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Jiang, Jiaxin; Li, Wenwang; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Ping; Zheng, Gaofeng

    2016-11-01

    Increasing the ejection efficiency and uniformity of nanofibers is the key to applications of electrospinning technology. In this work, a novel electrospinning spinneret with a sheath gas passageway is designed. The frictional resistance that stems from the sheath gas provides additional stretching and restriction forces on the jet. The sheath gas also reduces interference and enhances the stability of the charged jet. A bead-on-strain simulation model is built up to determine the constraint effects of the sheath gas. Simulation results show that the sheath gas decreases the motion area and increases the stretching ratio of the liquid jet. The stretching force from the sheath gas decreases the diameter and increases the uniformity of the nanofiber. As the gas pressure increases from 0 kPa to 50 kPa, the critical voltage of the jet ejection decreases from 8.4 kV to 2.5 kV, the diameter of the nanofiber deposition zone decreases from 40 cm to 10 cm, and the diameter of the nanofibers decreases from 557.97 nm to 277.73 nm. The uniformity of nanofibers can be improved significantly using a sheath gas. The sheath gas contributes to the rapid deposition of a uniform nanofibrous membrane and the industrial applications of electrospinning.

  6. First cosmological constraints on the Superfluid Chaplygin gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Lazkoz, Ruth; Salzano, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    In this work we set observational constraints of the Superfluid Chaplygin gas model, which gives a unified description of the dark sector of the Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) that behaves as dark energy (DE) while it is in the ground state and as dark matter (DM) when it is in the excited state. We first show and perform the various steps leading to a form of the equations suitable for the observational tests to be carried out. Then, by using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) code, we constrain the model with a sample of cosmology-independent long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) calibrated using their Type I Fundamental Plane, as well as the Union2.1 set and observational Hubble parameter data. In this analysis, using our cosmological constraints, we sketch the effective equation of state parameter and deceleration parameter, and we also obtain the redshift of the transition from deceleration to acceleration: $z_t$.

  7. Observational constraints on new generalized Chaplygin gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Kai; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2012-01-01

    We use the latest data to investigate observational constraints on the new generalized Chaplygin gas (NGCG) model. Using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we constrain the NGCG model with the type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from Union2 set (557 data), the usual baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) observation from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 7 (DR7) galaxy sample, the cosmic microwave background (CMB) observation from the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) results, the newly revised $H(z)$ data, as well as a value of $\\theta_{BAO} (z=0.55) = (3.90 \\pm 0.38)^{\\circ}$ for the angular BAO scale. The constraint results for NGCG model are $\\omega_X = -1.0510_{-0.1685}^{+0.1563}(1\\sigma)_{-0.2398}^{+0.2226}(2\\sigma)$, $\\eta = 1.0117_{-0.0502}^{+0.0469}(1\\sigma)_{-0.0716}^{+0.0693}(2\\sigma)$, and $\\Omega_X = 0.7297_{-0.0276}^{+0.0229}(1\\sigma)_{-0.0402}^{+0.0329}(2\\sigma)$, which give a rather stringent constraint. From the results, we can see a phantom model ...

  8. Observational constraints on the new generalized Chaplygin gas model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Liao; Yu Pan; Zong-Hong Zhu

    2013-01-01

    We use the latest data to investigate observational constraints on the new generalized Chaplygin gas (NGCG) model.Using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method,we constrain the NGCG model with type Ⅰa supernovae from the Union2 set (557 data),the usual baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) observation from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7 galaxy sample,the cosmic microwave background observation from the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results,newly revised data on H(z),as well as a value of θBAO (z =0.55) =(3.90° ± 0.38°) for the angular BAO scale.The constraint results for the NGCG model are ωx=-1.0510(-0.1685)(+0.1563)(1σ)(-0.2398)(+0.2226)(2σ),η=1.0117(-0.0502)(+0.0469)(1σ)(-0.0716)(+0.0693)(2σ) and Ωx=0.7297(-0.0276)(+0.0229)(1σ)(-0.0402)(+0.0329)(2σ),which give a rather stringent constraint.From the results,we can see that a phantom model is slightly favored and the proba-bility that energy transfers from dark matter to dark energy is a little larger than the inverse.

  9. Constraints on modified Chaplygin gas from large scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bikash Chandra; Thakur, Prasenjit; Beesham, Aroon

    2016-10-01

    We study cosmological models with modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) to determine observational constraints on its EoS parameters using the background and the growth tests data. The background test data consists of H(z)-z data, Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations peak parameter, CMB shift parameter, SN Ia data and the growth test data consists of the linear growth function for the large scale structures of the universe are considered to study MCG in favor of dark energy. For a given range of redshift, the Wiggle-Z measurements and rms mass fluctuations from Ly-α data, employed for analyzing cosmological models numerically to constrain the MCG parameters. The Wang-Steinhardt ansatz for the growth index (γ ) and growth function (f) are also considered for numerical analysis. The best-fit values of EoS parameters determined here are used to study the variation of f, growth index (γ ), EoS parameter, squared sound speed and deceleration parameter with redshift. The constraints on the MCG parameters found here are compared with that of GCG (generalized Chaplygin gas) model for viable cosmology. Cosmologies with MCG satisfactorily describe late acceleration followed by a matter dominated phase. The range of values of EoS parameters, the associated parameters (f, γ , ω , Ω, c2s, q) are also determined from observational data in order to understand the suitability of the MCG model.

  10. Observational constraints on Modified Chaplygin Gas from Large Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Bikash Chandra; Beesham, Aroonkumar

    2014-01-01

    We study cosmological models with modified Chaplygin gas (in short, MCG) to determine observational constraints on its EoS parameters. The observational data of the background and the growth tests are employed. The background test data namely, H(z)-z data, CMB shift parameter, Baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak parameter, SN Ia data are considered to study the dynamical aspects of the universe. The growth test data we employ here consists of the linear growth function for the large scale structures of the universe, models are explored assuming MCG as a candidate for dark energy. Considering the observational growth data for a given range of redshift from the Wiggle-Z measurements and rms mass fluctuations from Ly-$\\alpha$ measurements, cosmological models are analyzed numerically to determine constraints on the MCG parameters. In this case, the Wang-Steinhardt ansatz for the growth index $\\gamma$ and growth function $f$ (defined as $f=\\Omega_{m}^{\\gamma} (a)$) are also taken into account for the numeri...

  11. Geometric dynamical observables in rare gas crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti, L. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Macchi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), Unita di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 2, 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    We present a detailed description of how a differential geometric approach to Hamiltonian dynamics can be used for determining the existence of a crossover between different dynamical regimes in a realistic system, a model of a rare gas solid. Such a geometric approach allows us to locate the energy threshold between weakly and strongly chaotic regimes, and to estimate the largest Lyapunov exponent. We show how standard methods of classical statistical mechanics, i.e., Monte Carlo simulations, can be used for our computational purposes. Finally we consider a Lennard-Jones crystal modeling solid xenon. The value of the energy threshold turns out to be in excellent agreement with the numerical estimate based on the crossover between slow and fast relaxation to equilibrium obtained in a previous work by molecular dynamics simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Geometric dynamical observables in rare gas crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Casetti, Lapo; Macchi, Alessandro

    1996-01-01

    We present a detailed description of how a differential geometric approach to Hamiltonian dynamics can be used for determining the existence of a crossover between different dynamical regimes in a realistic system, a model of a rare gas solid. Such a geometric approach allows to locate the energy threshold between weakly and strongly chaotic regimes, and to estimate the largest Lyapunov exponent. We show how standard mehods of classical statistical mechanics, i.e. Monte Carlo simulations, can be used for our computational purposes. Finally we consider a Lennard Jones crystal modeling solid Xenon. The value of the energy threshold turns out to be in excellent agreement with the numerical estimate based on the crossover between slow and fast relaxation to equilibrium obtained in a previous work by molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. Employing a cylindrical single crystal in gas-surface dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, C.; Shan, J.; Liu, Y.; Berg, van den O.; Kleijn, A.W.; Juurlink, L.B.F.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the use of a polished, hollow cylindrical nickel single crystal to study effects of step edges on adsorption and desorption of gas phase molecules. The crystal is held in an ultra-high vacuum apparatus by a crystal holder that provides axial rotation about a [100] direction, and a crysta

  14. Observational Constraints on a Pluto Torus of Circumsolar Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Smith, H. T.; Bagenal, F.; Brown, L. E.; Elliott, H. A.; Haggerty, D. K.; Horanyi, M.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kusterer, M. B.; Lisse, C. M.; McComas, D. J.; Piquette, M. R.; Sidrow, E. J.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Zirnstein, E.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the concept of a neutral gas torus surrounding the Sun, aligned with Pluto's orbit, and place observational constraints based primarily on comparison of New Horizons (NH) measurements with a 3-D Monte Carlo model adapted from analogous satellite tori surrounding Saturn and Jupiter. Such a torus, or perhaps partial torus, should result from neutral N2 escaping from Pluto's exosphere. Unlike other more massive planets closer to the Sun, neutrals escape Pluto readily owing, e.g., to the high thermal speed relative to the escape velocity. Importantly, escaped neutrals have a long lifetime due to the great distance from the Sun, ~100 years for photoionization of N2 and ~180 years for photoionization of N, which results from disassociated N2. Despite the lengthy 248-year orbit, these long e-folding lifetimes may allow an enhanced neutral population to form an extended gas cloud that modifies the N2 spatial profile near Pluto. These neutrals are not directly observable by NH but once ionized N2+ or N+ are picked up by the solar wind, reaching ~50 keV, making these pickup ions (PUIs) detectable by NH's Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument. PEPSSI observations analyzed to date may constrain the N2 density; the remaining ~95% of the encounter data, scheduled for downlink in August along with similarly anticipated data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) experiment, should help determine the Pluto outgassing rates. Measurements from SWAP include the solar wind speed, a quantity that greatly enhances PUI studies by enabling us to directly account for the PUI distribution's sensitive dependence on plasma speed. Note that anomalous cosmic ray Si observed at Voyager is overabundant by a factor of ~3000 relative to interstellar composition. This might be related to "outer source" PUIs, but the fact that N2 and Si are indistinguishable in many instruments could mean that N2 is actually driving this apparent Si discrepancy.

  15. Geometric constraints on phase coexistence in vanadium dioxide single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahan, Christina; Gamage, Sampath; Liang, Jiran; Cross, Brendan; Marvel, Robert E.; Haglund, Richard F.; Abate, Yohannes

    2017-02-01

    The appearance of stripe phases is a characteristic signature of strongly correlated quantum materials, and its origin in phase-changing materials has only recently been recognized as the result of the delicate balance between atomic and mesoscopic materials properties. A vanadium dioxide (VO2) single crystal is one such strongly correlated material with stripe phases. Infrared nano-imaging on low-aspect-ratio, single-crystal VO2 microbeams decorated with resonant plasmonic nanoantennas reveals a novel herringbone pattern of coexisting metallic and insulating domains intercepted and altered by ferroelastic domains, unlike previous reports on high-aspect-ratio VO2 crystals where the coexisting metal/insulator domains appear as alternating stripe phases perpendicular to the growth axis. The metallic domains nucleate below the crystal surface and grow towards the surface with increasing temperature as suggested by the near-field plasmonic response of the gold nanorod antennas.

  16. Geometric constraints on phase coexistence in vanadium dioxide single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahan, Christina; Gamage, Sampath; Liang, Jiran; Cross, Brendan; Marvel, Robert E; Haglund, Richard F; Abate, Yohannes

    2017-02-24

    The appearance of stripe phases is a characteristic signature of strongly correlated quantum materials, and its origin in phase-changing materials has only recently been recognized as the result of the delicate balance between atomic and mesoscopic materials properties. A vanadium dioxide (VO2) single crystal is one such strongly correlated material with stripe phases. Infrared nano-imaging on low-aspect-ratio, single-crystal VO2 microbeams decorated with resonant plasmonic nanoantennas reveals a novel herringbone pattern of coexisting metallic and insulating domains intercepted and altered by ferroelastic domains, unlike previous reports on high-aspect-ratio VO2 crystals where the coexisting metal/insulator domains appear as alternating stripe phases perpendicular to the growth axis. The metallic domains nucleate below the crystal surface and grow towards the surface with increasing temperature as suggested by the near-field plasmonic response of the gold nanorod antennas.

  17. Cosmological constraints on generalized Chaplygin gas model: Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Lixin; Lu, Jianbo

    2010-01-01

    We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to investigate a global constraints on the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) model as the unification of dark matter and dark energy from the latest observational data: the Constitution dataset of type supernovae Ia (SNIa), the observational Hubble data (OHD), the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. In a non-flat universe, the constraint results for GCG model are, $\\Ome...

  18. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-08-21

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.

  19. Selective gas sensing for photonic crystal lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk.......We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk....

  20. Real-Time Optimization of a maturing North Sea gas asset with production constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, R.J.P. van der; Busking, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    As gas and oil fields mature their operation becomes increasingly more complex, due to complex process dynamics, like slugging, gas coning, water breakthrough, salt or hydrate deposition. Moreover these phenomena also lead to production constraints in the upstream facilities. This complexity asks fo

  1. Real-Time Optimization of a maturing North Sea gas asset with production constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, R.J.P. van der; Busking, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    As gas and oil fields mature their operation becomes increasingly more complex, due to complex process dynamics, like slugging, gas coning, water breakthrough, salt or hydrate deposition. Moreover these phenomena also lead to production constraints in the upstream facilities. This complexity asks fo

  2. Real-Time Optimization of a maturing North Sea gas asset with production constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, R.J.P. van der; Busking, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    As gas and oil fields mature their operation becomes increasingly more complex, due to complex process dynamics, like slugging, gas coning, water breakthrough, salt or hydrate deposition. Moreover these phenomena also lead to production constraints in the upstream facilities. This complexity asks

  3. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-07-01

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 246922. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30940h

  4. Combined constraints on modified Chaplygin gas model from cosmological observed data: Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin; Wu, Yabo; Liu, Molin

    2011-01-01

    We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to investigate a global constraints on the modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) model as the unification of dark matter and dark energy from the latest observational data: the Union2 dataset of type supernovae Ia (SNIa), the observational Hubble data (OHD), the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. In a flat universe, the constraint results for MCG model are, $\\Omega_{b}h^{2}=0...

  5. Recent observational constraints on generalized Chaplygin gas in UDME scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, P.

    2017-03-01

    Recent observational predictions suggest that our Universe is passing through an accelerating phase in the recent past. This acceleration may be realized with the negatively pressured dark energy. Generalized Chaplygin gas may be suitable to describe the evolution of the Universe as a candidate of unified dark matter energy (UDME) model. Its EoS parameters are constrained using (i) dimensionless age parameter ( H 0 t 0) and (ii) the observed Hubble ( H( z)- z) data (OHD) + baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data + cosmic microwave background (CMB) shift data + supernovae (Union2.1) data. Dimensionless age parameter puts loose bounds on the EoS parameters. Best-fit values of the EoS parameters H 0, A s and α ( A s and α are defined in the energy density for generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) and in EoS) are then determined from OHD + BAO + CMB + Union2.1 data and contours are drawn to obtain their allowed range of values. The present age of the Universe ( t 0) and the present Hubble parameter ( H 0) have been estimated with 1 σ confidence level. Best-fit values of deceleration parameter ( q), squared sound speed (cs2) and EoS parameter ( ω) of this model are then determined. It is seen that GCG satisfactorily accommodates an accelerating phase and structure formation phase.

  6. Recent observational constraints on generalized Chaplygin gas in UDME scenario

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P THAKUR

    2017-03-01

    Recent observational predictions suggest that our Universe is passing through an accelerating phase in the recent past. This acceleration may be realized with the negatively pressured dark energy. Generalized Chaplygin gas may be suitable to describe the evolution of the Universe as a candidate of unified dark matterenergy (UDME) model. Its EoS parameters are constrained using (i) dimensionless age parameter ($H_{0}t_{0}$) and (ii) the observed Hubble (H(z) − z) data (OHD) + baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data + cosmic microwavebackground (CMB) shift data + supernovae (Union2.1) data. Dimensionless age parameter puts loose bounds on the EoS parameters. Best-fit values of the EoS parameters $H_{0}, A_{s}$ and $\\alpha$ ($A_{s}$ and $\\alpha$ are defined in the energy density for generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) and in EoS) are then determined from OHD+BAO+CMB+Union2.1 data and contours are drawn to obtain their allowed range of values. The present age of the Universe ($t_0$) and the present Hubble parameter ($H_0$) have been estimated with 1σ confidence level. Best-fit values of deceleration parameter (q), squared sound speed ($c^{2}_{s}$ ) and EoS parameter ($\\omega$) of this model are then determined. It is seen that GCG satisfactorily accommodates an accelerating phase and structure formation phase.

  7. Measurement of gas viscosity using photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R.-K.; Sheehe, S. L.; Kurtz, J.; O'Byrne, S.

    2016-11-01

    A new measurement technique for gas viscosity coefficient is designed and demonstrated using the technique of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Gas flow is driven by a pressure gradient between two gas cells, through a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) surrounded by a furnace for temperature adjustment. PCF with 20-micron diameter affords physical space for gas-light interaction and provides a basis for gas viscosity measurement by determining the time for flow to exit a capillary tube under the influence of a pressure gradient. Infrared radiation from a diode laser is coupled into the fiber to be guided through the gas, and the light attenuation due to absorption from the molecular absorbing species is measured by a photo detector placed at the exit of the fiber. A numerical model from Sharipov and Graur describing local number density distribution in a unsteady state is applied for the determination of gas viscosity, based on the number density of gas measured by the absorption of the laser light, using the Beer-Lambert law. The measurement system is confirmed by measuring the viscosity of CO2 as a reference gas.

  8. Reconfigurable photonic crystal using self-initiated gas breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregório, José; Parsons, Stephen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    We present a resonant photonic crystal for which transmission is time-modulated by a self-initiated gaseous plasma. A resonant cavity in the photonic crystal is used to amplify an incoming microwave field to intensities where gas breakdown is possible. The presence of the plasma in the resonant cavity alters the transmission spectrum of the device. We investigate both transient and steady-state operation with computational simulations using a time-domain model that couples Maxwell’s equations and plasma fluid equations. The predicted plasma ignition and stability are then experimentally verified.

  9. Time reversal constraint limits unidirectional photon emission in slow-light photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Ben; Oulton, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal waveguides are known to support C-points - point-like polarisation singularities with local chirality. Such points can couple with dipole-like emitters to produce highly directional emission, from which spin-photon entanglers can be built. Much is made of the promise of using slow-light modes to enhance this light-matter coupling. Here we explore the transition from travelling to standing waves for two different photonic crystal waveguide designs. We find that time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocal nature of light places constraints on using C-points in the slow-light regime. We observe two distinctly different mechanisms through which this condition is satisfied in the two waveguides. In the waveguide designs we consider, a modest group-velocity of $v_g \\approx c/10$ is found to be the optimum for slow-light coupling to the C-points.

  10. Constraints on the generalized Chaplygin gas model from Gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, R.C., E-mail: rc_freitas@terra.com.br [Grupo de Gravitacao e Cosmologia, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Goncalves, S.V.B., E-mail: sergio.vitorino@pq.cnpq.br [Grupo de Gravitacao e Cosmologia, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Velten, H.E.S., E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br [Grupo de Gravitacao e Cosmologia, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2011-09-14

    We study the generalized Chaplygin gas model (GCGM) using Gamma-ray bursts as cosmological probes. In order to avoid the so-called circularity problem we use cosmology-independent data set and Bayesian statistics to impose constraints on the model parameters. We observe that a negative value for the parameter {alpha} is favoured in a flat Universe and the estimated value of the parameter H{sub 0} is lower than that found in literature.

  11. Gas expulsion in massive star clusters?. Constraints from observations of young and gas-free objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Martin G. H.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Bastian, Nate; Diehl, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Context. Gas expulsion is a central concept in some of the models for multiple populations and the light-element anti-correlations in globular clusters. If the star formation efficiency was around 30 per cent and the gas expulsion happened on the crossing timescale, this process could preferentially expel stars born with the chemical composition of the proto-cluster gas, while stars with special composition born in the centre would remain bound. Recently, a sample of extragalactic, gas-free, young massive clusters has been identified that has the potential to test the conditions for gas expulsion. Aims: We investigate the conditions required for residual gas expulsion on the crossing timescale. We consider a standard initial mass function and different models for the energy production in the cluster: metallicity-dependent stellar winds, radiation, supernovae and more energetic events, such as hypernovae, which are related to gamma ray bursts. The latter may be more energetic than supernovae by up to two orders of magnitude. Methods: We computed a large number of thin-shell models for the gas dynamics, and calculated whether the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is able to disrupt the shell before it reaches the escape speed. Results: We show that the success of gas expulsion depends on the compactness index of a star cluster C5 ≡ (M∗/ 105 M⊙)/(rh/ pc), with initial stellar mass M∗ and half-mass radius rh. For given C5, a certain critical, local star formation efficiency is required to remove the rest of the gas. Common stellar feedback processes may not lead to gas expulsion with significant loss of stars above C5 ≈ 1. Considering pulsar winds and hypernovae, the limit increases to C5 ≈ 30. If successful, gas expulsion generally takes place on the crossing timescale. Some observed young massive clusters have 1 age. Conclusions: Globular clusters should initially have C5 ≲ 100, if the gas expulsion paradigm was correct. Early gas expulsion, which is

  12. Employing a cylindrical single crystal in gas-surface dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christine; Shan, Junjun; Liu, Ying; Berg, Otto; Kleijn, Aart W; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2012-03-21

    We describe the use of a polished, hollow cylindrical nickel single crystal to study effects of step edges on adsorption and desorption of gas phase molecules. The crystal is held in an ultra-high vacuum apparatus by a crystal holder that provides axial rotation about a [100] direction, and a crystal temperature range of 89 to 1100 K. A microchannel plate-based low energy electron diffraction/retarding field Auger electron spectrometer (AES) apparatus identifies surface structures present on the outer surface of the cylinder, while a separate double pass cylindrical mirror analyzer AES verifies surface cleanliness. A supersonic molecular beam, skimmed by a rectangular slot, impinges molecules on a narrow longitudinal strip of the surface. Here, we use the King and Wells technique to demonstrate how surface structure influences the dissociation probability of deuterium at various kinetic energies. Finally, we introduce spatially-resolved temperature programmed desorption from areas exposed to the supersonic molecular beam to show how surface structures influence desorption features.

  13. Gas expulsion in massive star clusters? Constraints from observations of young and gas-free objects

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Martin G H; Bastian, Nate; Diehl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Gas expulsion is a central concept in some of the models for multiple populations and the light-element anticorrelations in globular clusters. If the star formation efficiency was around 30 per cent and the gas expulsion happened on the crossing timescale, this process could expel preferentially stars born with the chemical composition of the proto-cluster gas, while stars with special composition born in the centre would remain bound. Recently, a sample of extragalactic, gas-free, young massive clusters has been identified that has the potential to test the conditions for gas expulsion. We compute a large number of thin shell models, and calculate if the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is able to disrupt the shell before it reaches the escape speed. We show that the success of gas expulsion depends on the compactness index of a star cluster C5, proportionate to stellar mass over half-mass radius. For given C5, a certain critical, local star formation efficiency is required to remove the rest of the gas. Common s...

  14. Constraints on the Rates of Replenishment, Magma Mixing, and Crystal Recycling at Santorini Volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, V. M.; Davidson, J. P.; Morgan, D. J.; Jerram, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Santorini is a young, active volcano, which preserves abundant evidence for open-system processes such as magma replenishment and crystal recycling, and thus represents an ideal system in which to study magma chamber dynamics. Santorini is the largest volcanic centre in the Aegean arc, with an eruptive history spanning more than 250,000 years over two eruptive cycles. The cycles are dominated by extended periods of effusive shield-building activity with occasional large-magnitude explosive eruptions, the Minoan eruption of ~3600 years ago being the most recent. Current activity consists of a phase of post-caldera reconstruction, focused recently on the intra-caldera Kameni islands. Microsampling to measure 87Sr/86Sr ratios of plagioclase cores indicates the presence of a complex plumbing system beneath Santorini. Large rhyodacitic deposits typically contain a mafic component, interpreted as the eruption trigger. In some cases, the mafic magma groundmass and phenocrysts are isotopically similar to their rhyodacite host; other deposits show the opposite, implying the coexistence of isotopically distinct magma batches. To add further complexity, plagioclase phenocrysts are in some cases in equilibrium with their groundmass while others show the reverse, implying modification due to crystal recycling or shallow mixing processes prior to eruption. Mafic enclaves in the recent Kameni lavas, again interpreted as the probable eruption trigger, provide some constraints on the rates of these recycling, mixing, and triggering processes. Glomerocrysts and xenocrysts of recycled gabbroic cumulate material are present in a number of Kameni enclaves. Isotopic and chemical disequilibrium between the cumulate crystals and the host indicate that these fragments are derived from pre- existing crystal mush piles pervaded by the replenishing melts as they migrated to shallow levels, creating disequilibrium between the cumulate mineral cores and the replenishing melts. 87Sr/86Sr isotope

  15. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase.

  16. Thermally induced atmospheric pressure gas discharges using pyroelectric crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Linczer, John; Go, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Using a heated pyroelectric crystal, an atmospheric pressure gas discharge was generated through the input of heat. When put through a change in temperature, the polarization of a pyroelectric can change significantly, creating a substantial electric potential at its surface. When configured with a grounded sharp counter electrode, a large inhomogeneous electric field forms in the interstitial gas to initiate a corona-like discharge. Under constant heating conditions, gaseous ions drifting to the pyroelectric accumulate and screen the electric field, extinguishing the discharge. By thermally cycling the pyroelectric, negative and positive discharges are generated during heating and cooling, respectively, with peak currents on the order of 80 nA. Time-integrated visualization confirmed the generation of both a corona-like discharge and a surface discharge on the pyroelectric. Parametric studies identified that thermal cycling conditions significantly influence discharge formation for this new atmospheric pressure discharge approach.

  17. Market liberalization in the European Natural Gas Market. The importance of capacity constraints and efficiency differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakman, S. [University of Groningen, Faculty of Economics, Department of International Economics and Business, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Van Marrewijk, C.; Van Witteloostuijn, A. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    In the European Union, energy markets are increasingly being liberalized. A case in point is the European natural gas industry. The general expectation is that more competition will lead to lower prices and higher volumes, and hence higher welfare. This paper indicates that this might not happen for at least two reasons. First, energy markets, including the market for natural gas, are characterized by imperfect competition and increasing costs to develop new energy sources. As a result, new entrants in the market are less efficient than incumbent firms. Second, energy markets, again including the market for natural gas, are associated with capacity constraints. Prices are determined in residual markets where the least efficient firms are active. This is likely to lead to price increases, rather than decreases.

  18. Time-reversal constraint limits unidirectional photon emission in slow-light photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ben; Beggs, Daryl M; Oulton, Ruth

    2016-08-28

    Photonic crystal waveguides are known to support C-points-point-like polarization singularities with local chirality. Such points can couple with dipole-like emitters to produce highly directional emission, from which spin-photon entanglers can be built. Much is made of the promise of using slow-light modes to enhance this light-matter coupling. Here we explore the transition from travelling to standing waves for two different photonic crystal waveguide designs. We find that time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocal nature of light places constraints on using C-points in the slow-light regime. We observe two distinctly different mechanisms through which this condition is satisfied in the two waveguides. In the waveguide designs, we consider a modest group velocity of vg≈c/10 is found to be the optimum for slow-light coupling to the C-points.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'.

  19. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Constraints on gen4eralized Chaplygin gas model including gamma-ray bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-Yin Wang; Zi-Gao Dai; Shi Qi

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Chaplygin gas (whose equation of state is PGCG = -A/PGCGα) was proposed as a candidate for unification of dark energy and dark matter. We inves-tigate constraints on this model with the latest observed data. We test the model with type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy, X-ray gas mass fractions in clusters, and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We calibrate the GRB lu-minosity relations without assuming any cosmological models using SNe Ia. We show that GRBs can extend the Hubble diagram to higher redshifts (z> 6). The GRB Hubble diagram is well behaved and delineates the shape of the Hubble diagram well. We mea-sure As≡A/PGCG,0α+1=0.68-0.08+0.04 (where PGCG,0 is the energy density today) and α=-0.22-0.13+0.15at the 1σconfidence level using all the datasets. Our results rule out the standard Chaplygin gas model (α = 1) at the 3a confidence level. The ACDM is allowed at the 2or confidence level. We find that acceleration could have started at a redshift of z ~ 0.70. The concordance of the generalized Chaplygin gas model with the age estimate of an old high redshift quasar is found. In addition, we show that GRBs can break the degeneracy between the generalized Chaplygin gas model and the XCDM model.

  1. Nucleation and growth constraints and outcome in the natural gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrate formation processes are functions of energy distribution constrained by physical and kinetic parameters. The generation of energy and energy derivative plots of a constrained growth crucible are used to demonstrate nucleation probability zones (phase origin(s)). Nucleation sets the stage for growth by further constraining the pathways through changes in heat capacity, heat flow coefficient, and enthalpy which in turn modify the mass and energy flow into the hydrate formation region. Nucleation events result from the accumulation of materials and energy relative to pressure, temperature, and composition. Nucleation induction is predictive (a frequency parameter) rather than directly dependent on time. Growth, as mass tranfer into a new phase, adds time as a direct parameter. Growth has direct feedback on phase transfer, energy dynamics, and mass export/import rates. Many studies have shown that hydrate growth is largely an equilibrium process controlled by either mass or energy flows. Subtle changes in the overall energy distribution shift the equilibrium in a predictable fashion. We will demonstrate the localization of hydrate nucleation in a reservoir followed by likely evolution of growth in a capped, sand filled environment. The gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) can be characterized as a semi-batch crystallizer in which nucleation and growth of natural gas hydrate (NGH) is a continuous process that may result in very large concentrations of NGH. Gas flux, or the relative concentration of hydrate-forming gas is the critical factor in a GHSZ. In an open groundwater system in which flow rate exceeds diffusion transport rate, dissolved natural gas is transported into and through the GHSZ. In a closed system, such as a geological trap, diffusion of hydrate-forming gas from a free gas zone below the GHSZ is the primary mechanism for movement of gas reactants. Because of the lower molecular weight of methane, where diffusion is the principal transport mechanism

  2. Mechanical interaction between gas bubbles and micro-crystals in magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Florian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Bredemeyer, Stefan; Arellano, Santiago; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of volcanic gas emissions from low viscosity magmas is controlled by many factors. The buoyancy driven ascent of gas bubbles in the volcanic conduit is one of them. During the ascent the bubbles may collide with micro-crystals, slide along the crystal faces, and finally leave the crystal at the crystal tip. We investigate the mechanical consequences of this interaction in a static volume of magma assuming constant pressure, temperature and chemical composition and neglecting thermodynamic processes between bubbles and crystals. Explicitly, we focus on tabular crystals whose extensions are about one order of magnitude larger than the bubbles. The mechanical interaction changes the motion of both the bubbles and the crystals. The buoyancy force of the bubbles results in a torque on the crystal which ultimately orients the long axis of the crystal to the vertical direction. On the other hand, bubbles change their ascent path and velocity if they slide along a crystal face. This change in the bubble motion may have two opposing impacts on the magnitude of volcanic emissions: First, the reduced ascent velocity results in a bubble accumulation and thus enhanced bubble coalescence rate in the proximity of crystals. Second, the crystals align the bubbles in rise channels starting at the crystal tips while no bubbles access the magma volume immediately located above the crystal cross section, which we call "crystal shadow". Now, volatile degassing from supersaturated magma is a diffusive short-distance process which accelerate in the proximity of pre-existing gas bubbles. We thus infer that the orientation of the crystals influences the bulk volatile degassing rate and thus the volcanic gas emission rate due to the crystal shadow. The mechanical model suggests that all crystals get erected by the bubble-induced torque within time periods in the order of weeks to months. This has to be compared to the crystal nucleation rate in order to obtain a steady state

  3. Satellite Carbon Monoxide Measurements as Top-Down Constraints on Fire Trace Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasibhatla, P.; Randerson, J.; van der Werf, G.; Giglio, L.; Collatz, J.; Defries, R.; Morton, D.

    2008-12-01

    There has been considerable progress in recent years in characterizing trace gas emissions from vegetation fires on a global scale. This progress has been driven by the availability of remotely-sensed vegetation and fire products, combined with the development of global-scale, process-based terrestrial biogeochemistry models that explicitly include fire. Nevertheless, significant uncertainties remain in our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of trace gas emissions from fires, and in the underlying climatic and human factors that drive this variability. Here, we examine the extent to which remote sensing measurements of atmospheric trace gas concentrations can provide additional constraints of emissions from fires. Specifically, we focus on using the multi-year record of carbon monoxide measurements from the MOPITT instrument on the Terra platform in an inverse modeling framework to elucidate the reduction in uncertainty in fire emissions at regional scales afforded by these measurements. We further examine the sensitivity of our estimates to various aspects of the inverse modeling set-up in an attempt to characterize the robustness of the derived uncertainty estimates, with a specific emphasis on regions with high deforestation rates in South America and Equatorial Asia.

  4. Terahertz Active Photonic Crystals for Condensed Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Unterrainer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The terahertz (THz spectral region, covering frequencies from 1 to 10 THz, is highly interesting for chemical sensing. The energy of rotational and vibrational transitions of molecules lies within this frequency range. Therefore, chemical fingerprints can be derived, allowing for a simple detection scheme. Here, we present an optical sensor based on active photonic crystals (PhCs, i.e., the pillars are fabricated directly from an active THz quantum-cascade laser medium. The individual pillars are pumped electrically leading to laser emission at cryogenic temperatures. There is no need to couple light into the resonant structure because the PhC itself is used as the light source. An injected gas changes the resonance condition of the PhC and thereby the laser emission frequency. We achieve an experimental frequency shift of 10−3 times the center lasing frequency. The minimum detectable refractive index change is 1.6 × 10−5 RIU.

  5. Influence of external constraint and rolling geometry on deformation banding of copper single crystals with {123} orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanping Zeng; Jianxin Dong; Maicang Zhang; Xishan Xie; Weimin Mao; Zhensheng Li

    2003-01-01

    In order to further understand the similarity and difference between deformation mechanisms of single crystals and poly-crystalline materials, the influence of external constraint and rolling geometry on the deformation behaviour of copper single crystalswith {123} orientation was investigated by embedding them into metal frames of different strengths. The metal frames weremade of aluminum and mild steel, respectively. The results show that the deformation banding degree of the crystal increases withthe strength of metal frame and shear strain. For the crystals rolled under lower γg (γg is the ratio of the geometrical redundant shearstrain to the normal rolling strain), the deformation is homogeneous. For the crystals rolled under higher γg, the deformation is ex-tremely inhomogeneous. The deformation is more homogeneous in the crystals rolled in steel frames than that rolled in aluminumframes. The S-orientation is more stable in the crystals rolled under lower γg than that rolled under higher γg.

  6. Textures and melt-crystal-gas interactions in granites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Vigneresse

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Felsic intrusions present ubiquitous structures. They result from the differential interactions between the magma components (crystal, melt, gas phase while it flows or when the flow is perturbed by a new magma injection. The most obvious structure consists in fabrics caused by the interactions of rotating grains in a flowing viscous melt. New magma inputs through dikes affect the buk massif flow, considered as global within each mineral facies. A review of the deformation and flow types developing in a magma chamber identifis the patterns that could be expected. It determines their controlling parameters and summarizes the tools for their quantification. Similarly, a brief review of the rheology of a complex multi-phase magma identifies and suggests interactions between the different components. The specific responses each component presents lead to instability development. In particular, the change in vorticity orientation, associated with the switch between monoclinic to triclinic flow is a cause of many instabilities. Those are preferentially local. Illustrations include fabric development, shear zones and flow banding. They depend of the underlying rheology of interacting magmas. Dikes, enclaves, schlieren and ladder dikes result from the interactions between the magma components and changing boundary conditions. Orbicules, pegmatites, unidirectional solidification textures and miarolitic cavities result from the interaction of the melt with a gaseous phase. The illustrations examine what is relevant to the bulk flow, local structures or boundary conditions. In each case a field observation illustrates the instability. The discussion reformulates instability observations, suggesting new trails for ther description and interpretation in terms of local departure to a bulk flow. A brief look at larger structures and at their evolution tries to relate these instabilities on a broader scale. The helical structures of the Říčany pluton, Czech

  7. Textures and melt-crystal-gas interactions in granites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Louis Vigneresse

    2015-01-01

    Felsic intrusions present ubiquitous structures. They result from the differential interactions between the magma components (crystal, melt, gas phase) while it flows or when the flow is perturbed by a new magma injection. The most obvious structure consists in fabrics caused by the interactions of rotating grains in a flowing viscous melt. New magma inputs through dikes affect the buk massif flow, considered as global within each mineral facies. A review of the deformation and flow types developing in a magma chamber identifis the patterns that could be expected. It determines their controlling parameters and summarizes the tools for their quantification. Similarly, a brief review of the rheology of a complex multi-phase magma identifies and suggests interactions between the different components. The specific re-sponses each component presents lead to instability development. In particular, the change in vorticity orientation, associated with the switch between monoclinic to triclinic flow is a cause of many in-stabilities. Those are preferentially local. Illustrations include fabric development, shear zones and flow banding. They depend of the underlying rheology of interacting magmas. Dikes, enclaves, schlieren and ladder dikes result from the interactions between the magma components and changing boundary conditions. Orbicules, pegmatites, unidirectional solidification textures and miarolitic cavities result from the interaction of the melt with a gaseous phase. The illustrations examine what is relevant to the bulk flow, local structures or boundary conditions. In each case a field observation illustrates the instability. The discussion reformulates instability observations, suggesting new trails for ther description and interpretation in terms of local departure to a bulk flow. A brief look at larger structures and at their evolution tries to relate these instabilities on a broader scale. The helical structures of the ?Rí?cany pluton, Czech Republic and by

  8. Isothermal currents in InSe, GaSe, and GaS single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micocci, G.; Rizzo, A.; Tepore, A.; Zuanni, F. (Lecce Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1983-11-16

    Isothermal current-time measurements are performed on InSe, GaSe, and GaS single crystals. The results reveal the presence of trapping centres and their activation energies and capture cross-sections are determined. The limitations of this method for the determination of trapping parameters in crystals are also discussed.

  9. An Improved Hybrid Genetic Algorithm for Chemical Plant Layout Optimization with Novel Non-overlapping and Toxic Gas Dispersion Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; WANG Zhenyu; ZHU Qunxiong

    2013-01-01

    New approaches for facility distribution in chemical plants are proposed including an improved non-overlapping constraint based on projection relationships of facilities and a novel toxic gas dispersion constraint.In consideration of the large number of variables in the plant layout model,our new method can significantly reduce the number of variables with their own projection relationships.Also,as toxic gas dispersion is a usual incident in a chemical plant,a simple approach to describe the gas leakage is proposed,which can clearly represent the constraints of potential emission source and sitting facilities.For solving the plant layout model,an improved genetic algorithm (GA) based on infeasible solution fix technique is proposed,which improves the globe search ability of GA.The case study and experiment show that a better layout plan can be obtained with our method,and the safety factors such as gas dispersion and minimum distances can be well handled in the solution.

  10. Rapid X-ray crystal structure analysis in few second measurements using microstrip gas chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, A; Tanimori, T; Ohashi, Y; Toyokawa, H; Nishi, Y; Nishi, Y; Nagayoshi, T; Koishi, S

    2001-01-01

    X-ray crystal structure analysis using microstrip gas chamber was successfully carried out in a measurement time within a few seconds. The continuous rotation photograph method, in which most of the diffraction peaks can be obtained within one continuous rotation of the sample crystal (without stopping or oscillation), was applied for this measurement. As an example, the structure of a single crystal of ammonium bitartrate (r=1 mm, spherical) was measured. Diffraction spots from the sample, which were sufficient to obtain crystal structure, were successfully obtained by taking only 2 s measurements with a commercially available laboratory X-ray source.

  11. Nanoporous dipeptide crystals as selective gas sorbents and polymerization nanovessels

    OpenAIRE

    Distefano,, E.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic dipeptide crystals recently emerged as novel “organic zeolites” featuring tailorable pore size. In fact, seven out of nine pairwise combinations of L-isoleucine, L-valine and L-alanine amino acids crystallize according to the same charge-assisted hydrogen bond pattern, generating a family of microporous materials with right-handed 1D channels, having diameters in the sub-nanometer domain (

  12. EFFECT OF GAS FLOW RATE ON CRYSTAL STRUCTURES OF ELECTROSPUN AND GAS-JET/ELECTROSPUN POLY(VINYLIDENE FLUORIDE) FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Lin; Yong-yi Yao; Xiao-zhan Yang; Li-ming Shen; Rui-xia Li; Da-cheng Wu

    2009-01-01

    The effect of gas flow rate on crystal structures of electrospun and gas-jet/electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers was investigated. PVDF fibers were prepared by electrospinning and gas-jet/electrospinning of its N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions. The morphology of the PVDF fibers was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With an increase of the gas flow rate, the average diameters of PVDF fibers were decreased.The crystal structures and thermal properties of the PVDF fibers were investigated by attenuated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (AT-FTIR), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that electrospinning and gas-jet/electrospinning of PVDF from its DMF solutions promoted the formation of β phase. Moreover, gas-jet/electrospun PVDF fibers exhibited higher crystallinity and β phase content than electrospun fibers did. Similar with electrostatic force, the drawing force of gas jet may induce the conformational change to all-trans (TTTT) planar zigzag conformation, and then promote the formation of the β phase.

  13. Evaluation of crystallization behavior on the surface of nifedipine solid dispersion powder using inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanishi, Hideo; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mizuno, Masayasu; Mimura, Hisashi; Kitamura, Satoshi; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2013-02-01

    To investigate crystallization behavior on the surface of amorphous solid dispersion powder using inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and to predict the physical stability at temperatures below the glass transition temperature (T (g)). Amorphous solid dispersion powder was prepared by melt-quenching of a mixture of crystalline nifedipine and polyvinylpyrrolidon (PVP) K-30. IGC was conducted by injecting undecane (probe gas) and methane (reference gas) repeatedly to the solid dispersion at temperatures below T (g). Surface crystallization was evaluated by the retention volume change of undecane based on the observation that the surface of the solid dispersion with crystallized nifedipine gives an increased retention volume. On applying the retention volume change to the Hancock-Sharp equation, surface crystallization was found to follow a two-dimensional growth of nuclei mechanism. Estimation of the crystallization rates at temperatures far below T (g) using the Avrami-Erofeev equation and Arrhenius equation showed that, to maintain its quality for at least three years, the solid dispersion should be stored at -20°C (T (g) - 65°C). IGC can be used to evaluate crystallization behavior on the surface of a solid dispersion powder, and, unlike traditional techniques, can also predict the stability of the solid dispersion based on the surface crystallization behavior.

  14. Photonic Crystal Fiber-Based High Sensitivity Gas Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research, Inc. proposes to develop a lightweight, compact, rugged, near and mid-infrared gas-sensing spectroscopy instrument to accurately measure the...

  15. Photonic Crystal Fiber-Based High Sensitivity Gas Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research, Inc. proposes to develop a lightweight, compact, rugged, near-infrared gas-sensing spectroscopy instrument to accurately measure the abundance of...

  16. Constraints on the generalized Chaplygin gas model from gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Rodolfo Camargo; Goncalves, Sergio Vitorino de Borba; Velten, H.E.S. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Grupo de Gravitacao e Cosmologia

    2011-07-01

    Full text: One of the most important problems of Modern Cosmology is the determination of the matter content of the Universe. Combining data of the rotation curve of spiral galaxies, the dynamics of galaxy clusters and structure formation indicate that there is about ten times more pressureless matter in the Universe than can be afforded by the baryonic matter. Moreover, the Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data indicates that the Universe is accelerating. Models considering matter content dominated by an exotic fluid whose pressure is negative is one of the proposals to explain this current accelerated phase of the Universe. At the same time, the position of the first acoustic peak in the spectrum of CMB anisotropies, as obtained by WMAP, favours a spatially flat Universe. If we consider the matter content of the Universe dominated by a fluid with negative pressure we have a scenario with a proportion of {Omega}{sub m} {approx} 0.27 and the {Omega}{sub de} {approx} 0.73, with respect to the critical density, for the fractions of the pressureless matter and dark energy, respectively. Much observational data that has been used for comparison with the theoretical cosmological models like the generalized Chaplygin gas model. The spectra of anisotropy of cosmic microwave background radiation, baryonic acoustic oscillations, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, the matter power spectrum, gravitational lenses, X-ray data and ages estimates of high-z objects have been used in this sense. Gamma-ray bursts are jets that release {approx} 10{sup 51} - 10{sup 53} ergs or more for a few seconds and becomes, in this brief period of time, the most bright object in the Universe. The search for a self-consistent method to use the GRBs in cosmological problems is intense and promising. In a recent article Liang et al. employed a method to obtain the distance moduli {approx} of GRBs in the redshift range of SNe Ia and extend this result to very high redshift GRBs (z > 1.4) in a completely

  17. Ultraviolet Light Generation in Gas-Filled Kagome Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sílvia M. G.; Facão, Margarida; Ferreira, Mário F. S.

    2015-03-01

    Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers were found to be ideal for the occurrence of ultrafast non-linear optics. This article reports the optimal conditions for the generation of ultraviolet light using a gas filled kagome hollow-core-photonic crystal fiber. It is shown that by changing the pressure of the gas and the input pulse characteristics, the efficiency of conversion and quality of ultraviolet light can be improved, as well as tuning its central frequency. Results suggest that a highly coherent and tunable ultraviolet light source can be constructed, which can find numerous applications.

  18. Enhanced transduction of photonic crystal dye lasers for gas sensing via swelling polymer film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner;

    2011-01-01

    We present the enhanced transduction of a photonic crystal dye laser for gas sensing via deposition of an additional swelling polymer film. Device operation involves swelling of the polymer film during exposure to specific gases, leading to a change in total effective refractive index. Experimental...... in its application to other intracavity-based detection schemes to enable gas sensing. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  19. Distributions of crystals and gas bubbles in reservoir ice during winter growth period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun LI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the dominant factors of ice physical properties for ice thermodynamics and mechanics, in-situ observations of ice growth and decay processes were carried out. Two samplings were done, in the stages of fast ice growth and steady ice growth. These ice samples were used to observe ice crystals and gas bubbles in ice, and to measure ice density. Vertical profiles of the ice crystal type, ice crystal size, gas bubble shape and size, gas bubble content, as well as ice density were ontained. The results reveal that the upper part of the samples is granular ice and the lower part is columnar ice, the average grain size increases along ice depth and keeps steady within fast and steady ice growth stages; the shape of gas bubbles in ice upper layer is spherical with higher total content, and the shape in the middle and lower layers is cylinder with lower total content; the gas bubble size and content are active along with the ice growth stage; ice density decreases with the gas content increasing.

  20. Crystal-liquid-gas phase transitions and thermodynamic similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Skripov, Vladimir P; Schmelzer, Jurn W P

    2006-01-01

    Professor Skripov obtained worldwide recognition with his monograph ""Metastable liquids"", published in English by Wiley & Sons. Based upon this work and another monograph published only in Russia, this book investigates the behavior of melting line and the properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phase of simple substances across a wide range of pressures, including metastable states of the coexisting phases. The authors derive new relations for the thermodynamic similarity for liquid-vapour phase transition, as well as describing solid-liquid, liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid phase tra

  1. A search for nEDM and new constraints on short-range "pseudo-magnetic" interaction using neutron optics of noncentrosymmetric crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Voronin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    New approach to measure both neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) and short-range pseudomagnetic nucleon-nucleon interaction using neutron optics of a crystal without center of symmetry is presented. This approach allows getting best direct constraint on the parameters of short range pseudomagnetic interaction of a free neutron with matter for the range of interaction distances λ<10-7 m.

  2. Crystallization, sublimation, and gas release in the interior of a porous comet nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prialnik, Dina

    1992-01-01

    A numerical code is developed for evolutionary calculations of the thermal structure and composition of a porous comet nucleus made of water ice, in amorphous or crystalline form, other volatiles, dust, and gases trapped in amorphous ice. Bulk evaporation, crystallization, gas release, and free (Knudsen) flow of gases through the pores are taken into account. The numerical scheme yields exact conservation laws for mass and energy. The code is used to study the effect of bulk evaporation of ice in the interior of a comet nucleus during crystallization. It is found that evaporation controls the temperature distribution; the vapor prevents cooling of the crystallized layer of ice, by recondensation and release of latent heat. Thus high temperatures are maintained below the surface of the nucleus and down to depths of tens or hundreds of meters, even at large heliocentric distances, as long as crystallization goes on. Gas trapped in the ice and released during the phase transition flows both toward the interior and toward the surface and out of the nucleus. The progress of crystallization is largely determined by the contribution of gas fluxes to heat transfer.

  3. Growth of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te single crystals by vapor phase gas transport method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Tabatabai Yazdi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available   Cd0.96Zn0.04Te crystals were grown using vapor phase gas transport method (VPGT. The results show that dendritic crystals with grain size up to 3.5 mm can be grown with this technique. X-ray diffraction and Laue back-reflection patterns show that dendritic crystals are single-phase, whose single crystal grains are randomly oriented with respect to the gas-transport axis. Electrical measurements, carried out using Van der Pauw method, show that the as-grown crystals have resistivity of about 104 Ω cm and n-type conductivity.

  4. Gone with the heat: a fundamental constraint on the imaging of dust and molecular gas in the early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Papadopoulos, Padelis P; Ivison, R J; Galametz, Maud; Smith, M W L; Xilouris, Emmanuel M

    2016-06-01

    Images of dust continuum and carbon monoxide (CO) line emission are powerful tools for deducing structural characteristics of galaxies, such as disc sizes, H2 gas velocity fields and enclosed H2 and dynamical masses. We report on a fundamental constraint set by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the observed structural and dynamical characteristics of galaxies, as deduced from dust continuum and CO-line imaging at high redshifts. As the CMB temperature rises in the distant Universe, the ensuing thermal equilibrium between the CMB and the cold dust and H2 gas progressively erases all spatial and spectral contrasts between their brightness distributions and the CMB. For high-redshift galaxies, this strongly biases the recoverable H2 gas and dust mass distributions, scale lengths, gas velocity fields and dynamical mass estimates. This limitation is unique to millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths and unlike its known effect on the global dust continuum and molecular line emission of galaxies, it cannot be addressed simply. We nevertheless identify a unique signature of CMB-affected continuum brightness distributions, namely an increasing rather than diminishing contrast between such brightness distributions and the CMB when the cold dust in distant galaxies is imaged at frequencies beyond the Raleigh-Jeans limit. For the molecular gas tracers, the same effect makes the atomic carbon lines maintain a larger contrast than the CO lines against the CMB.

  5. Effect of thermal shield and gas flow on thermal elastic stresses in 300 mm silicon crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yu; XIAO Qinghua; ZHOU Qigang; DAI Xiaolin; TU Hailing

    2006-01-01

    The thermal elastic stresses induced in 300 mm Si crystal may be great troubles because it can incur the generation of dislocations and undesirable excessive residual stresses.A special thermal modeling tool, CrysVUn, was used for numerical analysis of thermal elastic stresses and stress distribution of 300 mm Si crystal under the consideration of different thermal shields and gas flow conditions.The adopted governing partial equations for stress calculation are Cauchy's first and second laws of motion.It is demonstrated that the presence and shape of thermal shield, the gas pressure and velocity can strongly affect von Mises stress distribution in Si crystal.With steep-wall shield, however, the maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are relatively low.With slope-wall shield or without shield, both maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are increased in evidence.Whether thermal shields are used or not, the increase of gas flow velocity could raise the stress level.In contrast, the increase of gas pressure cannot result in so significant effect.The influence of thermal shield and gas flow should be attributed to the modification of heat conduction and heat radiation by them.

  6. Cross-border infrastructure constraints, regulatory measures and economic integration of the Dutch - German gas market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, G.H.; Mulder, M.

    2013-01-01

    We estimate to which extent regulatory measures in the Dutch market have reduced the vulnerability of this market to constraints in the cross-border infrastructure with Germany, which is the largest Dutch neighbouring market. We measure this vulnerability by the degree the markets are integrated, i.

  7. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  8. Gone with the heat: A fundamental constraint on the imaging of dust and molecular gas in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ivison, R J; Galametz, Maud; Smith, M W L; Xilouris, Emmanuel M

    2016-01-01

    Images of dust continuum and CO line emission are powerful tools for deducing structural characteristics of galaxies, such as disk sizes, H$_2$ gas velocity fields and enclosed H$_2$ and dynamical masses. We report on a fundamental constraint set by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the observed structural and dynamical characteristics of galaxies, as deduced from dust continuum and CO-line imaging at high redshifts. As the CMB temperature rises in the distant Universe, the ensuing thermal equilibrium between the CMB and the cold dust and H$_2$ gas progressively erases all spatial and spectral contrasts between their brightness distributions and the CMB. For high-redshift galaxies, this strongly biases the recoverable H$_2$ gas and dust mass distributions, scale lengths, gas velocity fields and dynamical mass estimates. This limitation is unique to mm/submm wavelengths and unlike its known effect on the global dust continuum and molecular line emission of galaxies, it cannot be addressed simply. We nev...

  9. Gas phase appearance and disappearance as a problem with complementarity constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Gharbia, Ibtihel Ben

    2011-01-01

    The modeling of migration of hydrogen produced by the corrosion of the nuclear waste packages in an underground storage including the dissolution of hydrogen involves a set of nonlinear partial differential equations with nonlinear complementarity constraints. This article shows how to apply a modern and efficient solution strategy, the Newton-min method, to this geoscience problem and investigates its applicability and efficiency. In particular, numerical experiments show that the Newton-min method is quadratically convergent for this problem.

  10. Top-down Constraints on Emissions: Example for Oil and Gas Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petron, G.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Brewer, A.; Hardesty, R.; Banta, R. M.; Frost, G. J.; Trainer, M.; Miller, B. R.; Conley, S. A.; Kofler, J.; Newberger, T.; Higgs, J. A.; Wolter, S.; Guenther, D.; Andrews, A. E.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Lang, P. M.; Montzka, S. A.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W. P.; Brown, S. S.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; Wolfe, D. E.; Bruhwiler, L.; Tans, P. P.; Schnell, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    In many countries, human-caused emissions of the two major long lived greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, are primarily linked to the use of fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas). Fugitive emissions of natural gas (mainly CH4) from the oil and gas exploration and production sector may also be an important contributor to natural gas life cycle/greenhouse gas footprint. Fuel use statistics have traditionally been used in combination with fuel and process specific emission factors to estimate CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel-based energy systems (power plants, motor vehicles…). Fugitive emissions of CH4, in contrast, are much harder to quantify. Fugitive emission levels may vary substantially from one oil and gas producing basin to another and may not scale with common activity data, such as production numbers. In the USA, recent efforts by the industry, States and the US Environmental Protection Agency have focused on developing new bottom-up inventory methodologies to assess methane and volatile organic compounds emissions from oil and gas producing basins. The underlying assumptions behind these inventories are multiple and result de facto in large uncertainties. Independent atmospheric-based estimates of emissions provide another valuable piece of information that can be used to evaluate inventories. Over the past year, the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory has used its expertise in high quality GHG and wind measurements to evaluate regional emissions of methane from two oil and gas basins in the Rocky Mountain region. Results from these two campaigns will be discussed and compared with available inventories.

  11. Dynamics of blueshifted floating pulses in gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Facao, M

    2013-01-01

    Frequency blueshifting was recently observed in light pulses propagating on gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers where a plasma has been produced due to photoionization of the gas. One of the propagation models that is adequate to describe the actual experimental observations is here investigated. It is a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with an extra term, to which we applied a self-similar change of variables and found its accelerating solitons. As in other NLS related models possessing accelerating solitons, there exist asymmetrical pulses that decay as they propagate in some parameter region that was here well defined.

  12. Stable Isotopic Constraints on Abiogenic Hydrocarbon gas Contributions to Thermogenic Natural gas Resources in the Northern Appalachian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burruss, R. C.; Laughrey, C. D.

    2006-05-01

    The generation of abiogenic methane by serpentinization or by graphite-water reactions in high-grade metamorphic rocks is well documented by isotopic, fluid inclusion, and petrographic studies. However, geochemical evidence is equivocal for abiogenic generation of higher hydrocarbon gases (ethane through pentane) in economic resources. Thermogenic hydrocarbon gases, generated by thermal cracking of sedimentary organic matter of biological origin, are progressively enriched in 13C as a function of increasing number of carbon atoms in the molecule. The isotopic composition is controlled by the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) during carbon-carbon bond breaking with the largest KIE for methane. Published work on gases in Precambrian rocks in Canada and South Africa suggest that some were generated by abiogenic Fischer-Tropsch type reactions that produced gases with carbon isotopic compositions that are reversed from the thermogenic trend. We have documented reversed isotopic compositions in natural gas accumulations in lower Paleozoic reservoirs of the Appalachian basin regionally from West Virginia and eastern Ohio through Pennsylvania to central New York. The regional accumulation in lower Silurian age strata shows progressive enhancement of the isotopic reversal with increasing depth in the basin. Multivariate analysis of the molecular and isotopic data define an end-member in the deep basin with an approximate composition of 98 mol % CH4, 1-2 mol % C2H6, -150‰, C1/C2+ up to 220). New isotopic studies of gas accumulations, gases in fluid inclusions, and of sedimentary organic matter in the Appalachian basin are in progress to constrain the possible contribution of abiogenic hydrocarbon generation to gas accumulations in this basin.

  13. Accelerating Solitons in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Facao, M; Almeida, P

    2013-01-01

    We found the self-similar solitary solutions of a recently proposed model for propagation of pulses in gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers that includes a plasma induced nonlinearity. As anticipated for a simpler model and using a perturbation analysis, there are indeed stationary solitary waves that accelerate and self-shift to higher frequencies. However, if the plasma nonlinearity strength is large or the pulse amplitudes are small, the solutions have distinguished long tails and decay as they propagate.

  14. Quartz Crystal Microbalance: A tool for analyzing loss of volatile compounds, gas sorption, and curing kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajric, Sendin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has recently procured a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Current popular uses are biological sensors, surface chemistry, and vapor detection. LANL has projects related to analyzing curing kinetics, measuring gas sorption on polymers, and analyzing the loss of volatile compounds in polymer materials. The QCM has yet to be employed; however, this review will cover the use of the QCM in these applications and its potential.

  15. Gas flows in galactic nuclei: observational constraints on BH-galaxy coevolution

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Burillo, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy nuclei are a unique laboratory to study gas flows. High-resolution imaging of the gas flows in galactic nuclei are instrumental in the study of the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in nearby galaxies. Several fueling mechanisms can be now confronted in detail with observations done with state-of-the-art interferometers. Furthermore, the study of gas flows in galactic nuclei can probe the feedback of activity on the interstellar medium of galaxies. Feedback action from star formation and AGN activity is invoked to prevent galaxies from becoming overly massive, but also to explain scaling laws like black hole (BH)-bulge mass correlations and the bimodal color distribution of galaxies. This close relationship between galaxies and their central supermassive BH can be described as co-evolution. There is mounting observational evidence for the existence of gas outflows in different populations of starbursts and active galaxies, a manifestation of the feedback of activity. We su...

  16. Market liberalization in the European Natural Gas Market : The importance of capacity constraints and efficiency differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, S.; van Marrewijk, J.G.M.; van Witteloostuijn, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the European Union, energy markets are increasingly being liberalized. A case in point is the European natural gas industry. The general expectation is that more competition will lead to lower prices and higher volumes, and hence higher welfare. This paper indicates that this might not happen for

  17. Geological constraints of giant and medium-sized gas fields in Kuqa Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There is a gas-rich and well-charged petroleum system in the Kuqa Depression where Triassic and Jurassic source rocks play important roles. Distributed in an area of more than 10000 km2 and with a thickness of up to 1000 m, they are composed of dark mudstones, carbonaceous mudstones and coal seams containing 6%, 40% and 90% of TOC, respectively, and are mainly the humic organic matter. As high-quality regional cap rocks, the Neogene and Eogene gypsum rocks and gypseous mudstones matched well with the underlying Neogene and Cretaceous-Eogene sandstones. They have formed the most favorable reservoir-seal assemblages in the Kuqa Depression. Also the Jurassic sandstones and mudstones formed another favorable reservoir-seal assemblage. The traps are shaped late in the fold-thrust belt, mainly fixed in the Tertiary-Quaternary, where ten structure styles have been distinguished. These traps spread as a zone in N-S, are scattered like a segmental line in W-E and show tier-styled vertically. The best traps are gypsum-salt covered fault-bend anticlines related to the passive roof duplex. This petroleum system is characterized by late accumulation. In the early Himalayan Movement, mainly gas condensate and oil accumulated and were distributed in the outer circular region of the kitchen; whereas in the middle and late Himalayan the gas accumulations mainly formed and were distributed in the inner circular region near the kitchen. The overpressure of gas pools is common and is formed by seal capacity of thick gypsum layers, extensive tectonic compression and large uplift. The well-preserved anticline traps underlying the high-quality regional cap rocks of the Tertiary gypsum rocks and gypseous mudstones are the main targets for the discovery of giant and medium-sized gas fields. Above conclusions are important for the petroleum geology theory and the exploration of the fold-thrust belt in foreland basins in central and western China.

  18. Green house gas flux at high latitudes - constraints and susceptibility to a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    High latitude boreal forests and peatlands contribute importantly to the land-atmosphere exchange of both carbon dioxide and methane. High latitude biomes are also identified as most vulnerable to changing climate. High latitudes are characterized by a strong seasonality in incoming solar radiation, weather conditions and biogeochemical processes. The strong seasonality in incoming solar radiation, not to change in response to a changing climate, constitute firm constraints on how changes in air temperature, evapotranspiration and precipitation will affect biogeochemical processes underlying the land atmosphere exchange of green house gases. Timing of the soil frost thaw and plant phenology thus constitutes two master controls on how fluxes of both CO2 and CH4 will be affected by weather conditions. In addition also the wintertime conditions importantly affect GHG fluxes both during winter time as well as during the succeeding summer. Examples will primarily be given for peatlands and coniferous forests.

  19. Kinematic Constraints on Evolutionary Scenarios for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies I. Neutral Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Zee, L; Skillman, E D; Zee, Liese van; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of high spatial resolution HI synthesis observations of six blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. Optically, the selected galaxies have smooth, symmetric isophotes, and thus are the most likely of the BCD class to fade into an object morphologically similar to a dwarf elliptical when the current starburst ends. The neutral gas in all six galaxies appears to be rotationally supported, however, indicating that true morphological transformation from a BCD to a dE will require significant loss of angular momentum. Based on the observed neutral gas dynamics of these and other BCDs, it is unlikely that present-day BCDs will evolve directly into dwarf ellipticals after a starburst phase. We discuss alternative evolutionary scenarios for BCDs and place them within the larger context of galaxy formation and evolution models.

  20. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  1. Constraints on the presence of SiO gas in the debris disk of HD 172555

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T L; Chen, C H; Lisse, C M; Moerchen, M; Käufl, H -U; Banzatti, A

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out two sets of observations to quantify the properties of SiO gas in the unusual HD 172555 debris disk: (1) a search for the J=8-7 rotational transition from the vibrational ground state, carried out with the APEX sub-millimeter telescope and heterodyne receiver at 863 microns, and (2) a search at 8.3 microns for the P(17) ro-vibrational transition of gas phase SiO, carried out with VLT/VISIR with a resolution, $\\lambda/\\Delta\\lambda$, of 30000. The APEX measurement resulted in a 3.3 $\\sigma$ detection of an interstellar feature, but only an upper limit to emission at the radial velocity and linewidth expected from HD 172555. The VLT/VISIR result was also an upper limit. These were used to provide limits for the abundance of gas phase SiO, for a range of temperatures. The upper limit from our APEX detection, assuming an 8000\\,K primary star photospheric excitation, falls more than an order of magnitude below the self-shielding stability threshold derived by Johnson et al. (2012). Our results ...

  2. Rancang Bangun Sistem Pencacah Frekuensi Untuk Sensor Gas Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brilianda Adi Wicaksono

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dalam suatu sistem identifikasi gas menggunakan sensor Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM diperlukan sebuah pencacah frekuensi yang digunakan untuk menghitung perubahan frekuensi dari sensor. Sistem ini digunakan untuk menghasilkan output berupa perubahan frekuensi yang akan diproses untuk identifikasi gas. Metode ini menggunakan selisih antara frekuensi sensor QCM dan frekuensi referensi. Hasil dari selisih tersebut dibagi dan digunakan untuk mengaktifkan pencacah frekuensi. Semakin besar bilangan pembagi, maka sistem pencacah frekuensi ini semakin stabil dan akurat. Penelitian ini menggunakan kristal referensi 20MHz dengan pencacah frekuensi 24 bit. Data hasil pencacahan diakuisisi oleh mikrokontroler dan dikirim ke komputer untuk proses identifikasi menggunakan neural network. Output dari neural network ini merupakan hasil dari proses identifikasi gas. Dengan metode yang digunakan, perubahan frekuensi yang dapat dideteksi mencapai 0,068 Hz. Dalam pengujian keseluruhan sistem digunakan 3 bahan uji, yaitu alkohol, amoniak, dan asam asetat (cuka.Untuk sistem identifikasi gas telah dapat mengenali gas uji dengan keberhasilan 90%. Secara keseluruhan, metode ini diharapkan menjadi metode yang baik untuk sistem identifikasi gas.

  3. Detection of low concentration formaldehyde gas by photonic crystal sensor fabricated by nanoimprint process in polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.; Ee, R.J. van; Stevens, R.S.A.; Saalmink, M.; Charlton, M.D.B.; Pollard, M.E.; Chen, R.; Kontturi, V.; Karioja, P.; Alajoki, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes experimental measurement results for photonic crystal sensor devices which have been functionalized for gas sensing applications. The sensor consists of a two dimensional photonic crystal etched into a slab waveguide having a refractive index of 1.7-1.9. Test devices were fabric

  4. Gas-driven filter pressing in magmas: insights into in-situ melt segregation from crystal mushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, M.; Arzilli, F.; Dobson, K. J.; Cordonnier, B.; Reusser, E.; Ulmer, P.; Marone, F.; Whittington, A. G.; Mancini, L.; Fife, J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Gas-driven filter pressing is the process of melt expulsion from a volatile-saturated crystal mush, induced by the buildup and subsequent release of gas pressure. Filter pressing is inferred to play a major role in magma fractionation at shallow depths (bubbles and crystals (~74 vol%). Above this threshold, the mush tends to fracture and gas escapes via fractures. Therefore, the efficiency of gas-driven filter pressing is promoted close to the percolation threshold and in situations where a mush inflates slowly relative to build-up of pressure and expulsion of melt. Such observations offer a likely explanation for the production of eruptible, crystal-poor magmas within Earth's crust. Figure = Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy 3D renderings of representative haplogranite (A-D) and dacite (E-H) samples, with different crystal (Φ) and bubble fractions (β) at representative temperatures and experimental times (t, in minutes). Black objects are bubbles and fractures; dark gray field is silicic glass/melt; light gray objects are corundum crystals in haplogranite sample, and quartz in dacite sample. White and black arrows indicate representative fractures and directions of melt expulsion during vesiculation, respectively. In H, white contours highlight quartz cluster boundaries and melt channels where melt is driven by gas bubbles. During experiments, gas exsolution mainly consists of (1) bubble nucleation and growth (white circles) and (2) crystal clustering and/or compaction (white rectangles).

  5. Ore genesis constraints on the Idaho Cobalt Belt from fluid inclusion gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratio analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, Albert H.; Landis, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    The Idaho cobalt belt is a 60-km-long alignment of deposits composed of cobaltite, Co pyrite, chalcopyrite, and gold with anomalous Nb, Y, Be, and rare-earth elements (REEs) in a quartz-biotite-tourmaline gangue hosted in Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Lemhi Group. It is the largest cobalt resource in the United States with historic production from the Blackbird Mine. All of the deposits were deformed and metamorphosed to upper greenschist-lower amphibolite grade in the Cretaceous. They occur near a 1377 Ma anorogenic bimodal plutonic complex. The enhanced solubility of Fe, Co, Cu, and Au as chloride complexes together with gangue biotite rich in Fe and Cl and gangue quartz containing hypersaline inclusions allows that hot saline fluids were involved. The isotopes of B in gangue tourmaline are suggestive of a marine source, whereas those of Pb in ore suggest a U ± Th-enriched source. The ore and gangue minerals in this belt may have trapped components in fluid inclusions that are distinct from those in post-ore minerals and metamorphic minerals. Such components can potentially be identified and distinguished by their relative abundances in contrasting samples. Therefore, we obtained samples of Co and Cu sulfides, gangue quartz, biotite, and tourmaline and post-ore quartz veins as well as Cretaceous metamorphic garnet and determined the gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratios of fluid inclusion extracts by mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. The most abundant gases present in extracts from each sample type are biased toward the gas-rich population of inclusions trapped during maximum burial and metamorphism. All have CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios of evolved crustal fluids, and many yield a range of H2-CH4-CO2-H2S equilibration temperatures consistent with the metamorphic grade. Cretaceous garnet and post-ore minerals have high RH and RS values suggestive of reduced sulfidic conditions. Most extracts have anomalous 4He produced by decay of U and Th and

  6. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Constraints on a Modified Chaplygin Gas Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dao-Jun; LI Xin-Zhou

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified Chaplygin gas model of unifying dark energy and dark matter with the exotic equation of state p = Bρ- A/ρα , which can also explain the recent expansion of the universe, is investigated by means of constraining the location of the peak of the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum. We find that the result of CMBR measurements does not exclude the nonzero value of parameter B, but allows it in the range -0.35 (<~) B (<~) 0.025.

  7. Constraints on the gas masses of low-z damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, Parichay; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We report a deep search for redshifted HI 21 cm emission from three damped and sub-damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) at $z \\approx 0.1$ with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). No evidence for a redshifted HI 21 cm emission signal was obtained in the GBT spectra of two absorbers, with the data on the third rendered unusable by terrestrial interference. The non-detections of HI 21 cm emission yield strong constraints on the HI masses of the associated galaxies, M$_{\\rm HI} < 2.3 \\times 10^9 \\times (\\Delta V/100)^{1/2}$ M$_\\odot$ for the sub-DLA at $z = 0.0830$ towards J1553+3548, and M$_{\\rm HI} < 2.7 \\times 10^9 \\times (\\Delta V/100)^{1/2}$ M$_\\odot$ for the DLA at $z = 0.0963$ towards J1619+3342, where $\\Delta V$ is the HI 21 cm line width, in km s$^{-1}$. This continues the trend of low HI masses found in all low-$z$ DLAs and sub-DLAs that have been searched for redshifted HI 21 cm emission. Low-redshift absorbers with relatively low HI column densities, $\\lesssim few \\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$, thus ...

  8. Observational Constraints on the Molecular Gas Content in Nearby Starburst Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Dolphin, Andrew E; Cannon, John M; Holtzman, Jon; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in nineteen nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming a SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high HI surface densities (~10^2-10^3 Msun pc^-2), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H_2 in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in HI surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations app...

  9. Bayesian Statistics and Parameter Constraints on the Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model using SNe Ia Data

    CERN Document Server

    Colistete, R C; Goncalves, S V B

    2004-01-01

    The type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observational data are used to estimate the parameters of a cosmological model with cold dark matter and the generalized Chaplygin gas model (GCGM). The GCGM depends essentially on five parameters: the Hubble constant, the parameter $\\bar{A}$ related to the velocity of the sound, the equation of state parameter $\\alpha$, the curvature of the Universe and the fraction density of the generalized Chaplygin gas (or the cold dark matter). The parameter $\\alpha$ is allowed to take negative values and to be greater than 1. The Bayesian parameter estimation yields $\\alpha = - 0.86^{+6.01}_{-0.15}$, $H_0 = 62.0^{+1.32}_{-1.42} km/Mpc.s$, $\\Omega _{k0}=-1.26_{-1.42}^{+1.32}$, $\\Omega_{m0} = 0.00^{+0.86}_{-0.00}$, $\\Omega_{c0} = 1.39^{+1.21}_{-1.25}$, $\\bar A =1.00^{+0.00}_{-0.39}$, $t_0 = 15.3^{+4.2}_{-3.2}$ and $q_0 = -0.80^{+0.86}_{-0.62}$, where $t_0$ is the age of the Universe and $q_0$ is the value of the deceleration parameter today. Our results indicate that a Universe completely ...

  10. The Intracluster Gas Fraction in X-ray Clusters Constraints on the Clustered Mass Density

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, A E

    1997-01-01

    The mean intracluster gas fraction of X-ray clusters within their hydrostatic regions is derived from recent observational compilations of David, Jones & Forman and White & Fabian. At radii encompassing a mean density 500 times the critical value, the individual sample bi-weight means are moderately ($2.4 by numerical simulations removes the discrepancy and results in a combined sample mean and standard error $\\fbargas(r_{500}) = (0.060 \\pm 0.003) assumption to maximize cluster gas content, this value constrains the universal ratio of total, clustered to baryonic mass $\\Omega_m/\\Omega_b \\le 23.1 physically plausible approach based on low D/H inferences from quasar absorption spectra and accounting for baryons within cluster galaxies yields an estimate $Ømega_m \\h^{2/3} = 0.28 \\pm 0.07$ with sources of systematic error involved in the derivation providing approximately $35%$ uncertainty. Additional effects which could provide consistency with the Einstein-deSitter case $Ømega_m \\se 1$ are presented, ...

  11. New constraints on the gas age-ice age difference along the EPICA ice cores, 0–50 kyr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chappellaz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Gas is trapped in polar ice sheets at ~50–120 m below the surface and is therefore younger than the surrounding ice. Firn densification models are used to evaluate this ice age-gas age difference (Δage in the past. However, such models need to be validated by data, in particular for periods colder than present day on the East Antarctic plateau. Here we bring new constraints to test a firn densification model applied to the EPICA Dome C (EDC site for the last 50 kyr, by linking the EDC ice core to the EPICA Dronning Maud Land (EDML ice core, both in the ice phase (using volcanic horizons and in the gas phase (using rapid methane variations. We also use the structured 10Be peak, occurring 41 kyr before present (BP and due to the low geomagnetic field associated with the Laschamp event, to experimentally estimate the Δage during this event. Our results seem to reveal an overestimate of the Δage by the firn densification model during the last glacial period at EDC. Tests with different accumulation rates and temperature scenarios do not entirely resolve this discrepancy. Although the exact reasons for the Δage overestimate at the two EPICA sites remain unknown at this stage, we conclude that current densification model simulations have deficits under glacial climatic conditions. Whatever the cause of the Δage overestimate, our finding suggests that the phase relationship between CO2 and EDC temperature previously inferred for the start of the last deglaciation (lag of CO2 by 800±600 yr seems to be overestimated.

  12. New constraints on the gas age-ice age difference along the EPICA ice cores, 0–50 kyr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chappellaz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas is trapped in polar ice sheets at ~50–120 m below the surface and is therefore younger than the surrounding ice. Firn densification models are used to evaluate this ice age-gas age difference (Δage in the past. However, such models are not well tested on low accumulation and cold sites of the East Antarctic plateau, especially for periods with different climatic conditions. Here we bring new constraints to test a firn densification model applied to the EPICA Dome C (EDC site for the last 50 kyr, by linking the EDC ice core to the EPICA Dronning Maud Land (EDML ice core, both in the ice phase (using volcanic horizons and in the gas phase (using rapid methane variations. We use the structured 10Be peak, occurring 41 kyr before present (BP and due to the low geomagnetic field associated with the Laschamp event, to experimentally estimate the Δage and Δdepth during this event. It allows us to evaluate the model and to link together climatic archives from EDC and EDML to NorthGRIP (Greenland. Our results reveal an overestimate of the Δage by the firn densification model during the last glacial period at EDC. Tests with different accumulation rates and temperature scenarios do not entirely resolve this discrepancy. Our finding suggests that the phase relationship between CO2 and EDC temperature inferred at the start of the last deglaciation (lag of CO2 by 800±600 yr is overestimated and that the CO2 increase could well have been in phase or slightly leading the temperature increase at EDC.

  13. The overmassive black hole in NGC 1277: new constraints from molecular gas kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharwächter, J.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Sun, M.; Krips, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the detection of CO(1-0) emission from NGC 1277, a lenticular galaxy in the Perseus Cluster. NGC 1277 has previously been proposed to host an overmassive black hole (BH) compared to the galaxy bulge luminosity (mass), based on stellar-kinematic measurements. The CO(1-0) emission, observed with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) using both, a more compact (2.9-arcsec resolution) and a more extended (1-arcsec resolution) configuration, is likely to originate from the dust lane encompassing the galaxy nucleus at a distance of 0.9 arcsec (˜320 pc). The double-horned CO(1-0) profile found at 2.9-arcsec resolution traces 1.5 × 108 M⊙ of molecular gas, likely orbiting in the dust lane at ˜550 km s-1, which suggests a total enclosed mass of ˜2 × 1010 M⊙. At 1-arcsec resolution, the CO(1-0) emission appears spatially resolved along the dust lane in east-west direction, though at a low signal-to-noise ratio. In agreement with the previous stellar-kinematic measurements, the CO(1-0) kinematics is found to be consistent with an ˜1.7 × 1010 M⊙ BH for a stellar mass-to-light ratio of M/LV = 6.3, while a less massive BH of ˜5 × 109 M⊙ is possible when assuming a larger M/LV = 10. While the molecular gas reservoir may be associated with a low level of star formation activity, the extended 2.6-mm continuum emission is likely to originate from a weak AGN, possibly characterized by an inverted radio-to-millimetre spectral energy distribution. Literature radio and X-ray data indicate that the BH in NGC 1277 is also overmassive with respect to the Fundamental Plane of BH activity.

  14. Indigenous nitrogen in the Moon: Constraints from coupled nitrogen-noble gas analyses of mare basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Barry, Peter H.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Marty, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by step-wise CO2 laser-extraction, static-mass spectrometry analysis, are reported for bulk fragments and mineral separates of ten lunar mare basalts (10020, 10057, 12008, 14053, 15555, 70255, 71557, 71576, 74255, 74275), one highland breccia (14321), and one ferroan anorthosite (15414). The mare basalt sub-samples 10057,183 and 71576,12 contain a large amount of solar noble gases, whereas neon and argon in all other samples are purely cosmogenic, as shown by their 21Ne/22Ne ratios of ≈0.85 and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of ≈0.65. The solar-gas-free basalts contain a two-component mixture of cosmogenic 15N and indigenous nitrogen (Earth's primordial mantle or an enstatite chondrite-like impactor. While the lowest δ15 N values allow for nitrogen trapped in the Moon's interior to be inherited from the proto-Earth and/or the impactor, the more 15N-enriched compositions require that carbonaceous chondrites provided nitrogen to the lunar magma ocean prior to the solidification of the crust. Since nitrogen can efficiently be incorporated into mafic minerals (olivine, pyroxene) under oxygen fugacities close to or below the iron-wustite buffer (Li et al., 2013), the mare basalt source region is likely characterized by a high nitrogen storage capacity. In contrast, anorthosite 15414 shows no traces of indigenous nitrogen, suggesting that nitrogen was not efficiently incorporated into the lunar crust during magma ocean differentiation.

  15. Diffuse gas in retired galaxies: nebular emission templates and constraints on the sources of ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jonas; Woods, Tyrone E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarzi, Marc; Chen, Yan-Mei; Oh, Kyuseok

    2016-10-01

    We present emission-line templates for passively-evolving (`retired') galaxies, useful for investigation of the evolution of the interstellar medium in these galaxies, and characterization of their high-temperature source populations. The templates are based on high signal-to-noise (>800) co-added spectra (3700-6800 Å) of ˜11 500 gas-rich Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies devoid of star formation and active galactic nuclei. Stacked spectra are provided for the entire sample and sub-samples binned by mean stellar age. In our previous paper, Johansson et al., these spectra provided the first measurements of the He II 4686 Å line in passively-evolving galaxies, and the observed He II/Hβ ratio constrained the contribution of accreting white dwarfs (the `single-degenerate' scenario) to the Type Ia supernova rate. In this paper, the full range of unambiguously detected emission lines are presented. Comparison of the observed [O I] 6300 Å/Hα ratio with photoionization models further constrains any high-temperature single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (with 1.5 ≲ T/105 K ≲ 10) to ≲3-6 per cent of the observed rate in the youngest age bin (i.e. highest SN Ia rate). Hence, for the same temperatures, in the presence of an ambient population of post-asymptotic giant branch stars, we exclude additional high-temperature sources with a combined ionizing luminosity of ≈1.35 × 1030 L⊙/M⊙,* for stellar populations with mean ages of 1-4 Gyr. Furthermore, we investigate the extinction affecting both the stellar and nebular continuum. The latter shows about five times higher values. This contradicts isotropically distributed dust and gas that renders similar extinction values for both cases.

  16. Nucleation in a Potts lattice gas model of crystallization from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Nathan; Peters, Baron

    2009-11-01

    Nucleation from solution is important in many pharmaceutical crystallization, biomineralization, material synthesis, and self-assembly processes. Simulation methodology has progressed rapidly for studies of nucleation in pure component and implicit solvent systems; however little progress has been made in the simulation of explicit solvent systems. The impasse stems from the inability of rare events simulation methodology to be combined with simulation techniques which maintain a constant chemical potential driving force (supersaturation) for nucleation. We present a Potts lattice gas (PLG) to aid in the development of new simulation strategies for nucleation from solution. The PLG captures common crystallization phase diagram features such as a eutectic point and solute/solvent melting points. Simulations of the PLG below the bulk solute melting temperature reveal a competition between amorphous and crystalline nuclei. As the temperature is increased toward the bulk melting temperature, the nucleation pathway changes from a one step crystalline nucleation pathway to a two step pathway, where an amorphous nucleus forms and then crystallizes. We explain these results in terms of classical nucleation theory with different size-dependant chemical potentials for the amorphous and crystalline nucleation pathways. The two step pathway may be particularly important when crystallization is favored only at postcritical sizes.

  17. Nucleation in a Potts lattice gas model of crystallization from solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Nathan; Peters, Baron

    2009-11-14

    Nucleation from solution is important in many pharmaceutical crystallization, biomineralization, material synthesis, and self-assembly processes. Simulation methodology has progressed rapidly for studies of nucleation in pure component and implicit solvent systems; however little progress has been made in the simulation of explicit solvent systems. The impasse stems from the inability of rare events simulation methodology to be combined with simulation techniques which maintain a constant chemical potential driving force (supersaturation) for nucleation. We present a Potts lattice gas (PLG) to aid in the development of new simulation strategies for nucleation from solution. The PLG captures common crystallization phase diagram features such as a eutectic point and solute/solvent melting points. Simulations of the PLG below the bulk solute melting temperature reveal a competition between amorphous and crystalline nuclei. As the temperature is increased toward the bulk melting temperature, the nucleation pathway changes from a one step crystalline nucleation pathway to a two step pathway, where an amorphous nucleus forms and then crystallizes. We explain these results in terms of classical nucleation theory with different size-dependant chemical potentials for the amorphous and crystalline nucleation pathways. The two step pathway may be particularly important when crystallization is favored only at postcritical sizes.

  18. Road project opportunity costs subject to a regional constraint on greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Christophe; Point, Patrick

    2012-12-15

    France has constrained the Aquitaine region to set up a climate plan to avoid an emission of 2883 ktCO(2)eq for the period 2007-2013. In parallel, the region has decided to carry out the construction of road infrastructures in order to avoid very high congestion costs. Those road projects will involve an increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during that period. In the present context of strong sustainability, all emissions (direct and indirect) generated by those projects should be offset. At the regional level, the offsetting of GHG emissions is usually carried out by implementing carbon sequestration projects or projects that reduce energy demand. This paper aims at determining the maximum budget for financing GHG emissions offsetting projects, with computation being based on the opportunity costs of projects, the minimum cost of economic activity reduction required to offset emissions from those projects. The maximum budget devoted to GHG emissions offsetting projects should not exceed €(2001) 1920 M to €(2001) 3592 M, according to low/high traffic growth assumptions.

  19. Diffuse Gas in Retired Galaxies: Nebular Emission Templates and Constraints on the Sources of Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Jonas; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarzi, Marc; Chen, Yan-Mei; Oh, Kyuseok

    2016-01-01

    We present emission line templates for passively evolving ("retired") galaxies, useful for investigation of the evolution of the ISM in these galaxies, and characterization of their high-temperature source populations. The templates are based on high signal-to-noise ($>800$) co-added spectra ($3700-6800$\\AA) of $\\sim11500$ gas-rich Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies devoid of star-formation and active galactic nuclei. Stacked spectra are provided for the entire sample and sub-samples binned by mean stellar age. In Johansson~et al (2014), these spectra provided the first measurements of the He II 4686\\AA\\ line in passively-evolving galaxies, and the observed He II/H$\\beta$ ratio constrained the contribution of accreting white dwarfs (the "single-degenerate" scenario) to the type Ia supernova rate. In this paper, the full range of unambiguously detected emission lines are presented. Comparison of the observed [O I] 6300\\AA/H$\\alpha$ ratio with photoionization models further constrains any high-temperature single...

  20. Observational constraints on modified Chaplygin gas in Horava–Lifshitz gravity with dark radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B C Paul; P Thakur; M M Verma

    2013-10-01

    Cosmological models with modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) in the framework of Horava–Lifshitz (HL) theory of gravity, both with and without detailed balance, are obtained. The equation of state (EOS) for a MCG contains three unknown parameters namely, , , . The allowed values of some of these parameters of the EOS are determined using the recent astrophysical and cosmological observational data. Using observational data from $H(z)-z$, baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak parameter and cosmic microwave background (CMB) shift parameter we study cosmologies in detailed-balance and beyond detailed-balance scenario. In this paper we take up the beyond detailed-balance scenario in totality and contribution of dark radiation in detailedbalance scenario on the parameters of the EOS. We explore the effect of dark radiation on the whole range of the effective neutrino parameter ($ N_{}$) to constrain matter contributing parameter in both the detailed-balance and the beyond detailed-balance scenarios. It has been observed that greater the dark radiation less the matter contribution in the MCG in both the scenario considered here. In order to check the validity of beyond detailed-balance scenario we plot supernovae magnitudes () with red-shift of Union2 data and then the variation of state parameter with redshift is studied. It is noted that beyond detailed-balance scenario is suitable for cosmological model in HL gravity with MCG.

  1. The over-massive black hole in NGC 1277: New constraints from molecular gas kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Scharwächter, J; Salomé, P; Sun, M; Krips, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of CO(1-0) emission from NGC 1277, a lenticular galaxy in the Perseus Cluster, which has been proposed to host a $(1.3-1.7) \\times 10^{10}\\ M_\\odot$ black hole (BH) based on stellar kinematic measurements. The CO(1-0) emission, observed with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) using both, a more extended (~1-arcsec resolution) and a more compact (~2.5-arcsec resolution) configuration, is likely to originate from the dust lane encompassing the galaxy nucleus at a distance of 0.9 arcsec (~320 pc). The spatially-unresolved double-horned CO(1-0) profile found at 2.5-arcsec resolution is likely to trace gas orbiting in the dust lane with rotational velocities of ~520 km s$^{-1}$, indicative of an enclosed mass of ~$2 \\times 10^{10}\\ M_\\odot$. Based on models with realistic mass distributions, the CO(1-0) kinematics is found to be consistent with a ~$1.7 \\times 10^{10}\\ M_\\odot$ BH, while a less massive BH is still possible assuming a large stellar mass-to-light ratio. The stronge...

  2. A porous Cu(II) metal-organic framework: Synthesis, crystal structure and gas adsorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu-Wu; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2017-09-01

    Presented here is a new porous Cu(II) metal-organic framework, namely [Cu(tdc)(H2O)]n·n(DMA) (1 H2tdc = thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid, DMA = N,N‧-dimethylacetamide), which was obtained by the self-assembly reaction of CuCl2 and H2tdc under solvothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that compound 1 features a 3D porous framework based on 1D chain structure subunits, and the 1D rhombohedral channels are occupied by the lattice DMA molecules. Gas adsorption studies reveal that this desolvated sample exhibit high uptake capacity for light hydrocarbons.

  3. Design of single mode spiral photonic crystal fiber for gas sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ibadul Islam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a spiral shape photonic crystal fiber (S-PCF has been suggested as a gas sensor for detecting toxic or colorless gases as well as monitoring the air pollution by metering gas condensate elements in production facilities. Our reported S-PCF is micro-structured where two layers porous core is encircled by a spiral shape cladding. The geometrical parameters have altered to optimize the parameters of the proposed structure. The numerical analysis of the proposed S-PCF is performed by utilizing finite element method (FEM. The relative sensitivity and birefringence of the proposed S-PCF are 55.10% and 7.23 × 10−3 respectively at the 1.33 μm wavelength that lies in the absorption line of toxic gases (methane and hydrogen fluoride. Besides, effective area, nonlinear coefficient and V parameters are also described briefly.

  4. Gas phase acetic acid and its qualitative effects on snow crystal morphology and the quasi-liquid layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Knepp

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A chamber was constructed within which snow crystals were grown on a string at various temperatures, relative humidities, and acetic acid gas phase mole fractions. The temperature, relative humidity, and acid mole fraction were measured for the first time at the point of crystal growth. Snow crystal morphological transition temperature shifts were recorded as a function of acid mole fraction, and interpreted according to the calculated acid concentration in the crystal's quasi-liquid layer, which is believed to have increased in thickness as a function of acid mole fraction, thereby affecting the crystal's morphology consistent with the hypothesis of Kuroda and Lacmann. Deficiencies in the understanding of the quasi-liquid layer and its role in determining snow crystal morphology are briefly discussed.

  5. Experimental Investigations of Halogen and Noble Gas Geochemistry as Constraints on Planetary Outgassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Drake, M. J.; Swindle, T. D.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction The ^129Xe/^132Xe ratio in Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (MORBs) is higher than in the atmosphere and Ocean Island Basalts. Enhanced ^129Xe/^132Xe ratios are widely regarded to be the result of ^129I decay (t(sub)1/2 = 16 m.y.) early in solar system history (e.g. Swindle et al., 1986). Allegre et al. (1983, 1988) proposed a catastrophic degassing scheme to explain this excess. Both Musselwhite et al. (1990) and Hiyagon and Ozima (1990) have noted that because mineral/melt partition coefficients (D) for I appear lower than for Xe, the I/Xe ratio may not be enhanced in the mantle by mineral/melt fractionation. Musselwhite et al. (1990) proposed recycling of I back into the mantle following outgassing, and Hiyagon and Ozima (1990) proposed impact degassing of the mantle as a way around this problem. Knowledge of the relative values of D(I) and D(Xe) is important to the discussion of early planetary outgassing models. Although the dataset for D(I) values is not complete, the known values so far are uniformly low. The dataset for Xe on the other hand is quite ambiguous. Experimentally determined values for D(Xe) vary widely--ranging from 0.05 to >> 1 (Hiyagon and Ozima, 1986; Broadhurst et al., 1992), and it is unclear which of the values is the geologically significant one. Particularly important is the question of whether D(Xe) is greater than or less than unity. Partitioning Experiments: We have undertaken to simultaneously determine the D(I) and D(Ar) values directly, then calculate the D(Xe) from D(Ar). This approach is possible because experiments investigating the mineral/melt partitioning of noble gases, while not consistent in an absolute sense between experiments, do display a consistent trend with the lightest noble gases being most incompatible and Xe most compatible. We are adapting our technique to determine D(Kr) and D(Xe) directly. Finely crushed silica glass (~100 micrometer grain size) was placed in a gas pressure vessel. The vessel was

  6. Preparation and Gas Permeability of ZIF-7 Membranes Prepared via Two-step Crystallization Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang; Li, Qiming; Bao, Xinxia; Gui, Jianzhou; Yu, Xiaofei [Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun (China)

    2014-06-15

    Continuous and dense ZIF-7 membranes were successfully synthesized on α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} porous substrate via two-step crystallization technique. ZIF-7 seeding layer was first deposited on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate by in-situ low temperature crystallization, and then ZIF-7 membrane layer can be grown through the secondary high-temperature crystallization. Two synthesis solutions with different concentration were used to prepare ZIF-7 seeding layer and membrane layer on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate, respectively. As a result, a continuous and defect-free ZIF-7 membrane layer can be prepared on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate, as confirmed by scanning electron microscope. XRD characterization shows that the resulting membrane layer is composed of pure ZIF-7 phase without any impurity. A single gas permeation test of H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} or CO{sub 2} was conducted based on our prepared ZIF-7 membrane. The ZIF-7 membrane exhibited excellent H{sub 2} molecular sieving properties due to its suitable pore aperture and defect-free membrane layer.

  7. Hydrogen gas permeation through amorphous and partially crystallized Fe40Ni38Mo4B18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Martins Ribeiro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Samples of amorphous and partially crystallized Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 alloy were submitted to hydrogen gas permeation from 523 to 643 K. The hydrogen permeation curves exhibited a single sigmoidal shape, typical of tests where no hydride formation occurs. It was observed that the hydrogen diffusivity increases for the amorphous samples and partially crystallized alloy with the temperature increase. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature was found to be D = 5.1 ± 0.5 × 10-12 exp (-11.0 ± 3.5/RT (m².s-1 for amorphous condition and D = 3.6 ± 0.5 × 10-11 exp (-19.8 ± 3.3/RT (m².s-1 for the partially crystallized condition. This suggests that the annihilation of defects in the amorphous structure and the crystalline phase precipitate contributes to the increase of the hydrogen diffusion.

  8. A Gas Cell Based on Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF and Its Application for the Detection of Greenhouse Gas (GHG: Nitrous Oxide (N2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas K. Valiunas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the detection of nitrous oxide gas using intracavity fiber laser absorption spectroscopy. A gas cell based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber was constructed and used inside a fiber ring laser cavity as an intracavity gas cell. The fiber laser in the 1.55 μm band was developed using a polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber as the gain medium. The wavelength of the laser was selected by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG, and it matches one of the absorption lines of the gas under investigation. The laser wavelength contained multilongitudinal modes, which increases the sensitivity of the detection system. N2O gas has overtones of the fundamental absorption bands and rovibrational transitions in the 1.55 μm band. The system was operated at room temperature and was capable of detecting nitrous oxide gas at sub-ppmv concentration level.

  9. Terahertz gas sensing based on a simple one-dimensional photonic crystal cavity with high-quality factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, T.; Han, Z. H.; Liu, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    exhibits high-quality factors, facilitating the realization of high sensitivity in the gas refractive index sensing. In our experiment, 6% of the change of hydrogen concentration in air, which corresponds to a refractive index change of 1.4 x 10(-5), can be steadily detected, and different gas samples can......We report in this paper terahertz gas sensing using a simple 1D photonic crystal cavity. The resonant frequencies of the cavity depend linearly on the refractive index of the ambient gas, which can then be measured by monitoring the resonance shift. Although quite easy to manufacture, this cavity...

  10. Gas geochemical survey of long dormant Ciomadul volcano (South Harghita Mts., Romania): constraints on the flux and origin of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Boglárka-Mercedesz; Ionescu, Artur; Harangi, Szabolcs; Palcsu, László; Etiope, Giuseppe; Baciu, Cǎlin

    2016-04-01

    The Ciomadul, located in the South Harghita Mountains (Eastern Carpathians, Romania) is the youngest volcano built by the Neogene volcanism in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region. The volcanic activity was characterized by an initial extrusive lava dome building period from about 200 ka to 100 ka followed by a more explosive eruption stage from 57 to 32 ka. Although the volcano seems to be inactive, several features (e.g. geophysical anomalies in the crust; fast remobilization of near solidus long lasting crystal mush prior to the past eruptions) suggest that melt-bearing magmatic body could still exist beneath the Ciomadul. This is supported by the abundance of dry gas emanations (CO2, CH4, H2S), CO2 rich mineral water springs and bubbling pools. The long-term observation of seemingly inactive, dormant volcanoes has become important in the past years (Ontake volcano-Japan, Colli Albani volcano-Italy). Gas-geochemical survey and monitoring (noble gases, isotopic composition of carbon species, flux measurements) of such volcanoes is an adequate tool in detecting changes in their volcanic plumbing system. Starting from 2015 we commenced a gas-monitoring study to constrain the origin of fluids at Ciomadul by measuring the flux of two gas-species and collecting the gas-phase from several mofettes and mineral water springs. A total of 46 sites have been surveyed, including 29 gas emanations (mofettes and bubbling pools), 3 drilled wells, 11 springs and 3 surface water sites. We provide the first complex CO2 and CH4 flux measurements in the area considering mofettes and bubbling pools. The CO2 flux values range between 10 and 264 kg/day while the CH4 flux has a range between 125 and 4723 g/day. Estimates of total CO2 and CH4 output into the atmosphere are ~229 and ~1.3 t/year, respectively. These values are consistent with other geothermal systems in Europe. The chemical composition of samples indicate CO2 content of up to 96.77%, CH4 content up to 1.42% and He content up to

  11. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolov, Sergei; Yüce, Emre; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    We perform a spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: helium and nitrogen. The use of high-conducting gas in combination with low-conducting semiconductor leads to a resonance control with a spatial resolution better than 4 microns.

  12. Exploiting Solvate Ionic Liquids for Amine Gas Analysis on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hsin-Yi; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2017-05-16

    We demonstrated in this work the usefulness of solvate ionic liquids SIL 3 and SIL 4 for chemoselective detection of amine gases on a quartz crystal microbalance. This detection of gaseous amines was achieved by nucleophilic aromatic addition reactions with super electrophilic SIL 3 or SIL 4 thin-coated on quartz chips. Starting with inexpensive reagents, functional SIL 3 and SIL 4 could be readily synthesized in two short steps with high isolated yield (81 and 77%, respectively). The QCM platform developed in this work is readily applicable and highly sensitive to low molecular weight amine gases: for propylamine gas at 10 Hz decrease in resonance frequency, the sensitivity of detection using SIL 4 was 5.4 ppb. This simple and convenient assembly of neutral ligands (e.g., 1a and 1b) with Li(+) ion to afford room temperature ionic liquids should be of great importance for a myriad of applications. To the best of our knowledge, no example to date of reports based on nucleophilic aromatic addition reactions demonstrating sensitive amine gas detection in solvate ionic liquids on a QCM has been reported. Furthermore, because of the high color intensity of the Meisenheimer complexes formed, our preliminary result showed that SIL 4 loaded on copier paper can be used not only as a portable amine gas sensor but also as a potential invisible ink that is only revealed by amine vapor.

  13. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Sergei, E-mail: s.sokolov@utwente.nl; Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P. [Complex Photonic Systems (COPS), MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo [Thales Research and Technology, Route Départementale 128, 91767 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  14. Accommodative Behavior of Non-porous Molecular crystal at Solid-Gas and Solid-Liquid Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Mande, Hemant M.; Ghalsasi, Prasanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular crystals demonstrate drastically different behavior in solid and liquid state, mainly due to their difference in structural frameworks. Therefore, designing of unique structured molecular compound which can work at both these interfaces has been a challenge. Here, we present remarkable ‘molecular’ property by non-porous molecular solid crystal, dinuclear copper complex (C6H5CH(X)NH2)2CuCl2, to reversibly ‘adsorb’ HCl gas at solid-gas interface as well as ‘accommodate’ azide anion at...

  15. Astrometric Constraints on the Masses of Long-period Gas Giant Planets in the TRAPPIST-1 Planetary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Keiser, Sandra A.; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Thompson, Ian B.

    2017-09-01

    Transit photometry of the M8V dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 (2MASS J23062928-0502285) has revealed the presence of at least seven planets with masses and radii similar to that of Earth, orbiting at distances that might allow liquid water to be present on their surfaces. We have been following TRAPPIST-1 since 2011 with the CAPSCam astrometric camera on the 2.5 m du Pont telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. In 2016, we noted that TRAPPIST-1 lies slightly farther away than previously thought, at 12.49 pc, rather than 12.1 pc. Here, we examine 15 epochs of CAPSCam observations of TRAPPIST-1, spanning the five years from 2011 to 2016, and obtain a revised trigonometric distance of 12.56 ± 0.12 pc. The astrometric data analysis pipeline shows no evidence for a long-period astrometric wobble of TRAPPIST-1. After proper motion and parallax are removed, residuals at the level of ±1.3 mas remain. The amplitude of these residuals constrains the masses of any long-period gas giant planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system: no planet more massive than ∼4.6 M Jup orbits with a 1 year period, and no planet more massive than ∼1.6 M Jup orbits with a 5 year period. Further refinement of the CAPSCam data analysis pipeline, combined with continued CAPSCam observations, should either detect any long-period planets, or put an even tighter constraint on these mass upper limits.

  16. Temporal condensed matter physics in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Tran, Truong X; Marini, Andrea; Belli, Federico; Abdolvand, Amir; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Raman effect in gases can generate an extremely long-living wave of coherence that can lead to the establishment of an almost perfect periodic variation of the medium refractive index. We show theoretically and numerically that the equations, regulate the pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by Raman-active gas, are exactly identical to a classical problem in quantum condensed matter physics -- but with the role of space and time reversed -- namely an electron in a periodic potential subject to a constant electric field. We are therefore able to infer the existence of Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch oscillations, and Zener tunneling, phenomena that are normally associated with condensed matter physics only, now realized with purely optical means in the temporal domain.

  17. Contortionist bubbles in andesitic enclaves: implications for gas migration and phase segregation in crystal-rich magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, J. C.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Dobson, K. J.; Bacon, C. R.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    In order to constrain gas migration behaviors in crystal-rich magmas, we compare results of analogue experiments to frozen structures in andesitic enclaves. In the analogue experiments air was injected into mixtures of syrup and particles sandwiched between glass plates. We observed a significant increase in bubble deformation and coalescence when particle fractions increased beyond a critical value (the random loose packing). At high particle fractions, bubble growth re-organized (compacted) the particles adjacent to the bubble walls. This caused liquid segregation into patches within the particle suspension and into large void spaces near the outer edge of experiments. We compare these experiments to void morphologies in a 58 x 70 x 73 cm andesitic enclave from silicic-andesite lava flows of Mt Mazama, Oregon (Bacon, 1986). This enclave is zoned, with a vesicle-rich center and a glass-rich rim, suggesting gas-driven melt segregation from the center to the rim. We use both 2D (optical microscopy and SEM) and 3D (X-ray tomography) techniques to image crystal textures and bubble shapes. The center of the enclave bears scattered patches of groundmass in the main phenocryst framework. These patches are similar to those observed in experiments, and thus melt segregation in the enclave may have occurred both toward the rim and toward these patches. Bubble morphologies reveal two main types of bubbles. (1) Lobate and finger-like bubbles, similar to the deformed bubbles in experiments, are found exclusively in the groundmass patches. They are also often associated with compacted crystal structures at the bubble walls. (2) Diktytaxitic textures - angular bubbles flattened against phenocrysts - are abundant in the crystal networks. These voids are entirely connected in 3D and formed the gas-rich center of the enclave. They likely represent a gas migration regime where the expanding gas front cannot deform the crystal structure but instead invades the pore-space between

  18. Highly birefringent single mode spiral shape photonic crystal fiber based sensor for gas sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ibadul Islam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article represents a gas sensor based on spiral photonic crystal fiber (S-PCF for detecting harmful or colorless gasses and monitoring air pollution by metering gas condensate elements in production facilities. The proposed micro-structured S-PCF contains two layers porous core encircled by a spiral shape cladding. The geometrical parameters are tuned to fix the optimized S-PCF structure. The numerical analysis of the proposed S-PCF is performed by utilizing finite element method (FEM with circular perfectly match layer (C-PML. The relative sensitivity and birefringence of the recommended structure are 57.61% and 7.53 × 10−3 respectively at 1.33 μm wavelength on the absorption line of toxic gasses (methane and hydrogen fluoride. The exhibited beam divergence is about 4.1° at the same wavelength. Besides, beat length, nonlinear coefficient, effective area and V parameters are also described briefly for optimized S-PCF structure over broader wavelength range from 1 μm to 1.8 μm.

  19. ZnO nanoflowers with single crystal structure towards enhanced gas sensing and photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sha; Chen, Hsueh-Shih; Matras-Postolek, Katarzyna; Yang, Ping

    2015-11-11

    In this paper, ZnO nanoflowers (NFs) were fabricated by thermal decomposition in an organic solvent and their application in gas sensors and photocatalysis was investigated. These single crystal ZnO NFs, which were observed for the first time, with an average size of ∼60 nm and were grown along the {100} facet. It was suggested that oleylamine used in the synthesis inhibited the growth and agglomeration of ZnO through the coordination of the oleylamine N atoms. The NFs exhibited excellent selectivity to acetone with a concentration of 25 ppm at 300 °C because they had a high specific surface area that provided more active sites and the surface adsorbed oxygen species for interaction with acetone. In addition, the ZnO NFs showed enhanced gas sensing response which was also ascribed to abundant oxygen vacancies at the junctions between petals of the NFs. Furthermore, ZnO-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites were fabricated by loading the ZnO NFs on the surface of the stratiform RGO sheet. In the photodegradation of rhodamine B tests, the composite revealed an enhanced photocatalytic performance compared with ZnO NFs under UV light irradiation.

  20. Statistical mechanical model of gas adsorption in porous crystals with dynamic moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Efrem; Carraro, Carlo; Smit, Berend

    2017-01-01

    Some nanoporous, crystalline materials possess dynamic constituents, for example, rotatable moieties. These moieties can undergo a conformation change in response to the adsorption of guest molecules, which qualitatively impacts adsorption behavior. We pose and solve a statistical mechanical model of gas adsorption in a porous crystal whose cages share a common ligand that can adopt two distinct rotational conformations. Guest molecules incentivize the ligands to adopt a different rotational configuration than maintained in the empty host. Our model captures inflections, steps, and hysteresis that can arise in the adsorption isotherm as a signature of the rotating ligands. The insights disclosed by our simple model contribute a more intimate understanding of the response and consequence of rotating ligands integrated into porous materials to harness them for gas storage and separations, chemical sensing, drug delivery, catalysis, and nanoscale devices. Particularly, our model reveals design strategies to exploit these moving constituents and engineer improved adsorbents with intrinsic thermal management for pressure-swing adsorption processes. PMID:28049851

  1. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Coated with Sol-gel-derived Thin Films as Gas Sensor for NO Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. O’Shea

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibilities and properties of Indium tin oxide (ITO-covered quartz crystal as a NOx toxic gas-sensor. The starting sol-gel solution was prepared by mixing indium chloride dissolved in acetylacetone and tin chloride dissolved in ethanol (0-20% by weight. The ITO thin films were deposited on the gold electrodes of quartz crystal by spin-coating technique and subsequently followed a standard photolithography to pattern the derived films to ensure all sensors with the same sensing areas. All heat treatment processes were controlled below 500°C in order to avoid the piezoelectric characteristics degradation of quartz crystal (Quartz will lose its piezoelectricity at ~573°C due to the phase change from α to β. The electrical and structural properties of ITO thin films were characterized with Hall analysis system, TG/DTA, XRD, XPS, SEM and etc. The gas sensor had featured with ITO thin films of ~100nm as the receptor to sense the toxic gas NO and quartz crystal with frequency of 10MHz as the transducer to transfer the surface reactions (mass loading, etc into the frequency shift. A homemade setup had been employed to measure the sensor response under the static mode. The experimental results had indicated that the ITO-coated QCM had a good sensitivity for NO gas, ~12Hz/100ppm within 5mins. These results prove that the ITO-covered quartz crystals are usable as a gas sensor and as an analytical device.

  2. Influence of gas flow on thermal field and stress during growth of sapphire single crystal using Kyropoulos method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jinquan; SU Xiaoping; NA Mujilatu; YANG Hai; LI Jianmin; YU Yunqi; MI Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    The professional modeling software package CrysVUn was employed to study the process of a large sapphire single crystal growth using Kyropoulos method.The influence of gas pressure on thermal field, solid-liquid interface shape, gas velocity field and von Mises stress were studied for the first time.It is found that the root of the seed melt when gas pressure equals to one atmosphere or more than one atmosphere, especially during the seeding period, this result is consistent with the experimental observation, and this paper presents three ways to solve this problem.The temperature gradient and stress decreases significantly as the gas pressure increases.The convexity of the solid-liquid interface slightly increases when the gas pressure increases.Numerical analysis was used to optimize the hot zone design.

  3. Radiation of X-rays using polarized LiNbO3 single crystal in low-pressure ambient gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Shinji; Nakanishi, Yoshikazu; Mizoguchi, Tadahiro; Ito, Yoshiaki; Yoshikado, Shinzo

    2009-09-01

    The dependence of X-ray intensity on the pressure and type of ambient gas was investigated for LiNbO(3) single crystals polarized in the c-axis direction at pressures of approximately 1 to 30 Pa. Ionization of surrounding gas molecules by the electric field generated by the crystal led to the production of both positive ions and free electrons. The electrons were accelerated toward a Cu target, radiating both white X-rays and X-rays specific to the crystal or target material by bremsstrahlung. The integrated X-ray intensity per cycle in the energy range 1 to 20 keV showed a local maximum value at a pressure P(max). The logarithm of P(max) was proportional to the Boltzmann factor using the first ionization energy of each ambient gas molecule. The value of P(max) was found to be independent of the electrical surface area of the crystal. The integrated X-ray intensity was approximated qualitatively by a quadratic function with pressure, which was upwardly convex. It was found that one of the causes of the reduction in X-ray intensity at pressures P > P(max) is the adsorption of positive ions generated by the ionization of gas molecules on the negative electric surface. It was also discovered that the lifetime of the X-ray radiation device could be improved when the X-ray radiation case was covered with another hermetically sealed decompression case. The gas with the smallest first ionization energy, with a partial pressure of P(max), was enclosed inside the X-ray radiation case (inner case) and the gas with the largest first ionization energy was enclosed at a suitable pressure between the inner and outer cases.

  4. Group IVA irons: New constraints on the crystallization and cooling history of an asteroidal core with a complex history

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, T. J.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Yang, J.; McDonough, W. F.; Rumble, D.; Chabot, N. L.; Ash, R. D.; Corrigan, C. M.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.

    2011-11-01

    We report analyses of 14 group IVA iron meteorites, and the ungrouped but possibly related, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83230, for siderophile elements by laser ablation ICP-MS and isotope dilution. EET was also analyzed for oxygen isotopic composition and metallographic structure, and Fuzzy Creek, currently the IVA with the highest Ni concentration, was analyzed for metallographic structure. Highly siderophile elements (HSE) Re, Os and Ir concentrations vary by nearly three orders of magnitude over the entire range of IVA irons, while Ru, Pt and Pd vary by less than factors of five. Chondrite normalized abundances of HSE form nested patterns consistent with progressive crystal-liquid fractionation. Attempts to collectively model the HSE abundances resulting from fractional crystallization achieved best results for 3 wt.% S, compared to 0.5 or 9 wt.% S. Consistent with prior studies, concentrations of HSE and other refractory siderophile elements estimated for the bulk IVA core and its parent body are in generally chondritic proportions. Projected abundances of Pd and Au, relative to more refractory HSE, are slightly elevated and modestly differ from L/LL chondrites, which some have linked with group IVA, based on oxygen isotope similarities. Abundance trends for the moderately volatile and siderophile element Ga cannot be adequately modeled for any S concentration, the cause of which remains enigmatic. Further, concentrations of some moderately volatile and siderophile elements indicate marked, progressive depletions in the IVA system. However, if the IVA core began crystallization with ˜3 wt.% S, depletions of more volatile elements cannot be explained as a result of prior volatilization/condensation processes. The initial IVA core had an approximately chondritic Ni/Co ratio, but a fractionated Fe/Ni ratio of ˜10, indicates an Fe-depleted core. This composition is most easily accounted for by assuming that the surrounding silicate shell was enriched in iron

  5. Controllable preparation of copper phthalocyanine single crystal nano column and its chlorine gas sensing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The unsubstituted copper phthalocyanine (CuPc single crystal nano columns were fabricated for the first time as chlorine (Cl2 gas sensors in this paper. The nano columns of CuPc have been prepared on different substrates via template-free physical vapor deposition (PVD approach. The growth mechanism of CuPc nano column on quartz was explored and the same condition used on other substrates including glass, sapphire (C-plane, M-plane, R-plane, Si and SiO2/Si came to a same conclusion, which confirmed that the aligned growth of CuPc nano column is not substrate-dependent. And then the CuPc nano column with special morphology was integrated as in-situ sensor device which exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity towards Cl2 at room temperature with a minimum detection limit as low as 0.08 ppm. The response of sensor was found to increase linearly (26∼659% with the increase for Cl2 within concentration range (0.08∼4.0ppm. These results clearly demonstrate the great potential of the nano column growth and device integration approach for sensor device.

  6. Design and optimization of photonic crystal fiber based sensor for gas condensate and air pollution monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Ibadul; Ahmed, Kawsar; Sen, Shuvo; Chowdhury, Sawrab; Paul, Bikash Kumar; Islam, Md. Shadidul; Miah, Mohammad Badrul Alam; Asaduzzaman, Sayed

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a hexagonal shape photonic crystal fiber (H-PCF) has been proposed as a gas sensor of which both micro-structured core and cladding are organized by circular air cavities. The reported H-PCF has a single layer circular core which is surrounded by a five-layer hexagonal cladding. The overall pretending process of the H-PCF is completed by using a full vectorial finite element method (FEM) with perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition. All geometrical parameters like diameters and pitches of both core and cladding regions have fluctuated with an optimized structure. After completing the numerical analysis, it is clearly visualized that the proposed H-PCF exhibits high sensitivity with low confinement loss. The investigated results reveal the relative sensitivity of 56.65% and confinement loss of 2.31×10-5 dB/m at the 1.33-μm wavelength. Moreover, effective area, nonlinearity, and V-parameter of the suggested PCF are also briefly described.

  7. Universality of Coherent Raman Gain Suppression in Gas-Filled Broadband-Guiding Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Mridha, M. K.; Novoa, D.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-03-01

    As shown in the early 1960s, the gain in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is drastically suppressed when the rate of creation of phonons (via a pump-to-Stokes conversion) is exactly balanced by the rate of phonon annihilation (via a pump-to-anti-Stokes conversion). This occurs when the phonon coherence waves—synchronized vibrations of a large population of molecules—have identical propagation constants for both processes; i.e., they are phase-velocity matched. As recently demonstrated, hydrogen-filled photonic crystal fiber pumped in the vicinity of its zero-dispersion wavelength provides an ideal system for observing this effect. Here we report that Raman gain suppression is actually a universal feature of SRS in gas-filled hollow-core fibers and that it can strongly impair SRS even when the phase mismatch is high, particularly at high pump powers when it is normally assumed that nonlinear processes become more (not less) efficient. This counterintuitive result means that intermodal stimulated Raman scattering (for example, between LP01 and LP11 core modes) begins to dominate at high power levels. The results reported have important implications for fiber-based Raman shifters, amplifiers, or frequency combs, especially for operation in the ultraviolet, where the Raman gain is much higher.

  8. Low-damage surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon using gas cluster ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokioka, H.; Yamarin, H.; Fujino, T.; Inoue, M.; Seki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2007-04-01

    Surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) technology has been studied. It is found that both SF6-GCIB and O2-GCIB decrease the height of hillocks and reduce the surface roughness of the irradiated films. The mean surface roughness value of poly-Si films was reduced from 10.8 nm to 2.8 nm by SF6-GCIB irradiation at 80°. Ultraviolet reflectance measurement reveals that GCIB irradiation causes damage near-surface of the poly-Si films. Formation of the damage, however, can be suppressed by using GCIB irradiation at high incident angle. Effect of GCIB irradiation in a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor has also been investigated. The capacitance-voltage curves of MIS capacitor with SF6-GCIB irradiation are distorted. On the contrary, the distortion is reduced by O2-GCIB irradiation at 80, which suggests that electrical-activated damage of the films can be decreased by using O2-GCIB irradiation.

  9. A porous cadmium(II) framework. Synthesis, crystal structure, gas adsorption, and fluorescence sensing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Pingping [College of Sciences, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding (China)

    2017-05-18

    The Cd{sup II} compound, namely [Cd(Tppa)(SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1) [Tppa = tris(4-(pyridyl)phenyl) amine], was synthesized by the reaction of CdSO{sub 4}.8H{sub 2}O and Tppa under solvothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that compound 1 features a 3D porous framework based on 1D inorganic -[Cd-SO{sub 4}-Cd]{sub n}- chains. Topological analysis reveals that compound 1 represents a trinodal (3,4,6)-connected topological network with the point symbol of {6.7"2}{sub 2}{6"4.7.10}{6"4.7"5.8"4.10"2}. Gas adsorption properties investigations indicate that compound 1 exhibits moderate adsorption capacities for light hydrocarbons at room temperature. Luminescence property studies revealed that this Cd{sup II} compound exhibits high fluorescence sensitivity for sensing of CS{sub 2} molecule. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Crystallization of metastable beta glycine from gas phase via the sublimation of alpha or gamma form in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Zhong, Lin; Ying, Pinliang; Feng, Zhaochi; Li, Can

    2008-01-01

    It is found that beta glycine, the metastable polymorph of glycine, can be rapidly formed from gas phase via the sublimation of its stable alpha or gamma form in vacuum. The transformation process was monitored by infrared spectroscopy and the crystal structure of the sublimate was identified by X-ray diffraction techniques. It is the first report about the transformation of stable alpha or gamma glycine into metastable beta form in "one-step" (heating then cool down spontaneously). Crystallization of beta glycine from gas phase is very different from other methods that require additives in solution. The hydrogen-bonding interaction and self-assembling of amino acid were discussed based on the observations.

  11. Constraint on the Gas-to-Dust Ratio in Massive Star-Forming Galaxies at z~1.4

    CERN Document Server

    Seko, Akifumi; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Yabe, Kiyoto; Takeuchi, Tomoe; Iono, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    We carried out 12CO(J=2-1) observations toward three star-forming galaxies on the main sequence at z~1.4 with the Nobeyama 45m radio telescope. These galaxies are detected with Spitzer/MIPS in 24 um, Herschel/SPIRE in 250 um and 350 um, and their gas metallicity, derived from optical emission line ratios based on near infrared spectroscopic observations, is close to the solar metallicity. Although weak signal-like features of CO were seen, we could not detect significant CO emission. The dust mass and the upper limits on the molecular gas mass are (3.4-6.7) x 10^{8} Msun and (9.7-14) x 10^{10} Msun, respectively. The upper limits on the gas-to-dust ratios at z~1.4 are 150-410 which are comparable to the gas-to-dust ratios in local galaxies with similar gas metallicity. A line stacking analysis enables us to detect a significant CO emission and to derive an average molecular gas mass of 1.3 x 10^{11} Msun and gas-to-dust ratio of 250. This gas-to-dust ratio is also near that in local galaxies with solar metall...

  12. Enhanced Gas-Sensing Properties of the Hierarchical TiO₂ Hollow Microspheres with Exposed High-Energy {001} Crystal Facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Liang, Yan; Wang, Guozhong; Liu, Liangliang; Yuan, Cailei; Yu, Ting; Li, Qinliang; Zeng, Fanyan; Gu, Gang

    2015-11-11

    Anatase hierarchical TiO2 with innovative designs (hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets, hollow microspheres without {001} crystal facets, and solid microspheres without {001} crystal facets) were synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal method and characterized. Based on these materials, gas sensors were fabricated and used for gas-sensing tests. It was found that the sensor based on hierarchical TiO2 hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets exhibited enhanced acetone sensing properties compared to the sensors based on the other two materials due to the exposing of high-energy {001} crystal facets and special hierarchical hollow structure. First-principle calculations were performed to illustrate the sensing mechanism, which suggested that the adsorption process of acetone molecule on TiO2 surface was spontaneous, and the adsorption on high-energy {001} crystal facets would be more stable than that on the normally exposed {101} crystal facets. Further characterization indicated that the {001} surface was highly reactive for the adsorption of active oxygen species, which was also responsible for the enhanced sensing performance. The present studies revealed the crystal-facets-dependent gas-sensing properties of TiO2 and provided a new insight into improving the gas sensing performance by designing hierarchical hollow structure with special-crystal-facets exposure.

  13. Ca(Ti,Si)O3 Diamond Inclusions Crystallized From Carbonate Melts in the Transition Zone: Experimental Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, L. S.; Walter, M. J.; Keshav, S.; Bulanova, G.; Pickles, J.; Lord, O. T.; Lennie, A.

    2007-12-01

    Composite diamond inclusions consisting of coexisting endmember CaSiO3 and CaTiO3 are rare but occur in diamond populations from Juina, Brazil1-2. Phase relations show that above ~9 GPa (at 1500 K) a perovskite-structured solid solution exists between these endmembers, while at lower pressures intermediate compositions produce coexisting CaTiO3-perovskite and CaSiO3 in the walstromite structure3. Inclusions with `perovskite' stoichiometry are commonly interpreted as fragments of solid mantle from the transition zone or lower mantle4-6. Here we report on two composite diamond inclusions from Juina kimberlite, and can effectively eliminate a subsolidus origin on the basis of experimental mineral phase relations. Instead, based on new melting experiments we find that the inclusions most likely crystallized directly from Ca-rich carbonate melts. Like other workers1-2 we interpret the composite inclusions as exsolution products of a high-pressure Ca(Ti,Si)O3 perovskite stable in the transition zone. Our bulk inclusion compositions are estimated to contain 50- 65 mol% CaTiO3, and are remarkably low in MgSiO3 component at less than 0.2 mol%. Experiments have shown that in peridotite or eclogite lithologies, Ca-rich perovskite in equilibrium with an MgSiO3-phase (majorite or Mg-perovskite) have about 3 to 7 mol% MgSiO37-8. Here we report on new subsolidus laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments at 20-50 GPa in the ternary system CaSiO3-CaTiO3-MgSiO3 that bracket the CaTi-rich limb of the solvus between Ca- and Mg-rich perovskites. All experiments were made at 2000 (±200) K for 45-75 min, and were analysed using synchrotron micro-focus X-ray diffraction. We find that the solubility of MgSiO3 in CaTi-perovskite solid solutions increases significantly with increasing CaTiO3 component. Thus, Ti-rich calcium perovskite in peridotite or eclogite lithologies should have very high, not exceptionally low, MgSiO3 component. Accordingly, a subsolidus paragenesis is unlikely for

  14. Geochemical constraints on the origin and volume of gas in the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian), eastern Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hasenmueller, N.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study involved analyses of kerogen petrography, gas desorption, geochemistry, microporosity, and mesoporosity of the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the eastern part of the Illinois Basin. Specifically, detailed core analysis from two locations, one in Owen County, Indiana, and one in Pike County, Indiana, has been conducted. The gas content in the locations studied was primarily dependent on total organic carbon content and the micropore volume of the shales. Gas origin was assessed using stable isotope geochemistry. Measured and modeled vitrinite reflectance values were compared. Depth of burial and formation water salinity dictated different dominant origins of the gas in place in the two locations studied in detail. The shallower Owen County location (415-433 m [1362-1421 ft] deep) contained significant additions of microbial methane, whereas the Pike County location (832-860 m [2730-2822 ft] deep) was characterized exclusively by thermogenic gas. Despite differences in the gas origin, the total gas in both locations was similar, reaching up to 2.1 cm3/g (66 scf/ton). Lower thermogenic gas content in the shallower location (lower maturity and higher loss of gas related to uplift and leakage via relaxed fractures) was compensated for by the additional generation of microbial methane, which was stimulated by an influx of glacial melt water, inducing brine dilution and microbial inoculation. The characteristics of the shale of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician) in the Pike County location are briefly discussed to provide a comparison to the New Albany Shale. Copyright ??2010. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  15. The polytropic approximation and X-ray scaling relations: constraints on gas and dark matter profiles for galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Capelo, Pedro R; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2011-01-01

    We constrain gas and dark matter (DM) parameters of galaxy groups and clusters, by comparing X-ray scaling relations to theoretical expectations, obtained assuming that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium with the DM and follows a polytropic relation. We vary four parameters: the gas polytropic index Gamma, its temperature at large radii T_xi, the DM logarithmic slope at large radii zeta and its concentration c_vir. When comparing the model to the observed mass-temperature (M-T) relation of local clusters, our results are independent of both T_xi and c_vir. We thus obtain constraints on Gamma, by fixing the DM profile, and on zeta, by fixing the gas profile. For an NFW DM profile, we find that 6/5

  16. Fluid pressure arrival time tomography: Estimation and assessment in the presence of inequality constraints, with an application to a producing gas field at Krechba, Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucci, A.; Vasco, D.W.; Novali, F.

    2010-04-01

    Deformation in the overburden proves useful in deducing spatial and temporal changes in the volume of a producing reservoir. Based upon these changes we estimate diffusive travel times associated with the transient flow due to production, and then, as the solution of a linear inverse problem, the effective permeability of the reservoir. An advantage an approach based upon travel times, as opposed to one based upon the amplitude of surface deformation, is that it is much less sensitive to the exact geomechanical properties of the reservoir and overburden. Inequalities constrain the inversion, under the assumption that the fluid production only results in pore volume decreases within the reservoir. We apply the formulation to satellite-based estimates of deformation in the material overlying a thin gas production zone at the Krechba field in Algeria. The peak displacement after three years of gas production is approximately 0.5 cm, overlying the eastern margin of the anticlinal structure defining the gas field. Using data from 15 irregularly-spaced images of range change, we calculate the diffusive travel times associated with the startup of a gas production well. The inequality constraints are incorporated into the estimates of model parameter resolution and covariance, improving the resolution by roughly 30 to 40%.

  17. The formation of the global natural gas industry: definition, constraints and challenges; A formacao da industria global de gas natural: definicao, condicionantes e desafios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathias, Melissa Cristina Pinto Pires

    2008-03-15

    This study aims to investigate the real possibilities for the natural gas industry to become a global energy industry. So, it is necessary to define what global energy industry really means. In order to do a comparative analysis between the oil and natural gas industries, it is necessary to define three distinct stages of the evolution of an energy industry, namely internationalization, mundialization and globalization. This study analyzes the evolution of the oil industry trying to identify the main aspects that promoted changes and transformed the oil business into a global industry. Then, the evolution of the natural gas industry is analyzed, looking for similarities between the structural changes in both industries, and trying to determine what is the current stage of the natural gas industry. Despite the increase in the natural gas international trade and the prospects of growth of natural gas demand, there are still some challenges for this industry to effectively become global. Some of the challenges are the need of investments in production infrastructure, transportation and distribution sectors, the access to the main reserves, the uncertainty related to the demand evolution and the possible creation of a natural gas producers cartel, like the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). (author)

  18. High harmonic generation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckl, O. H.; Baer, C. R. E.; Kränkel, C.; Marchese, S. V.; Schapper, F.; Holler, M.; Südmeyer, T.; Robinson, J. S.; Tisch, J. W. G.; Couny, F.; Light, P.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2009-10-01

    :270, 2007). The interaction between the laser pulses and the gas occurs in a Kagome-type Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber (HC-PCF) (Benabid et al., Science 298:399, 2002), which reduces the detection threshold for HHG to only 200 nJ. This novel type of fiber guides nearly all of the light in the hollow core (Couny et al., Science 318:1118, 2007), preventing damage even at intensities required for HHG. Our fiber guided 30-fs pulses with a pulse energy of more than 10 μJ, which is more than five times higher than for any other photonic crystal fiber (Hensley et al., Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO), IEEE Press, New York, 2008).

  19. Hydrogen stable isotopic constraints on methane emissions from oil and gas extraction in the Colorado Front Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Botner, E. C.; Jimenez, K.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Meinardi, S.; Barletta, B.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Bon, D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The climatic implications of a shift from oil and coal to natural gas depend on the magnitude of fugitive emissions of methane from the natural gas supply chain. Attempts to constrain methane emissions from natural gas production regions can be confounded by other sources of methane. Here we demonstrate the utility of stable isotopes, particularly hydrogen isotopes, for source apportionment of methane emissions. The Denver, Colorado area is home to a large oil and gas field with both conventional oil and gas wells and newer hydraulic fracturing wells. The region also has a large metropolitan area with several landfills and a sizable cattle population. As part of the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPE field campaigns in summer 2014, we collected three types of canister samples for analysis of stable isotopic composition of methane: 1), samples from methane sources; 2), samples from two stationary ground sites, one in the Denver foothills, and one in an oil and gas field; and 3), from the NCAR C-130 aircraft in samples upwind and downwind of the region. Our results indicate that hydrogen isotope ratios are excellent tracers of sources of methane in the region, as we have shown previously in California and Texas. Use of carbon isotope ratios is complicated by the similarity of natural gas isotope ratios to that of background methane. Our results indicate that, despite the large amount of natural gas production in the region, biological sources such as cattle feedlots and landfills account for at least 50% of total methane emissions in the Front Range. Future work includes comparison of isotopes and alkane ratios as tracers of methane sources, and calculation of total methane fluxes in the region using continuous measurements of methane concentrations during aircraft flights.

  20. Crystal structure and composition of BAlN thin films: Effect of boron concentration in the gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Xiaohang; Fischer, Alec M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the microstructure of BxAl1-xN films grown by flow-modulated epitaxy at 1010 °C, with B/(B + Al) gas-flow ratios ranging from 0.06 to 0.18. The boron content obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns ranges from x = 0.02 to 0.09. On the other hand, boron content deduced from the aluminum signal in the Rutherford backscattering spectra (RBS) ranges from x = 0.06 to 0.16, closely following the gas-flow ratios. Transmission electron microscopy indicates the sole presence of a wurtzite crystal structure in the BAlN films, and a tendency towards columnar growth for B/(B + Al) gas-flow ratios below 0.12. For higher ratios, the BAlN films exhibit a tendency towards twin formation and finer microstructure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy has been used to profile spatial variations in the composition of the films. The RBS data suggest that the incorporation of B is highly efficient for our growth method, while the XRD data indicate that the epitaxial growth may be limited by a solubility limit in the crystal phase at about 9%, for the range of B/(B + Al) gas-flow ratios that we have studied, which is significantly higher than previously thought.

  1. Crystal structure and composition of BAlN thin films: Effect of boron concentration in the gas flow

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Shuo

    2017-07-20

    We have investigated the microstructure of BxAl1-xN films grown by flow-modulated epitaxy at 1010 oC, with B/(B+Al) gas-flow ratios ranging from 0.06 to 0.18. The boron content obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns ranges from x = 0.02 to 0.09. On the other hand, boron content deduced from the aluminum signal in the Rutherford backscattering spectra (RBS) ranges x = 0.06 to 0.16, closely following gas-flow ratios. Transmission electron microscopy indicates the sole presence of wurtzite crystal structure in the BAlN films, and a tendency towards columnar growth for B/(B+Al) gas-flow ratios below 0.12. For higher ratios, the BAlN films exhibit a tendency towards twin formation and finer microstructure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy has been used to profile spatial variations in the composition of the films.The RBS data suggest that the incorporation of B is highly efficient for our growth method, while the XRD data indicate that the epitaxial growth may be limited by a solubility limit in the crystal phase at about 9%, for the range of B/(B+Al) gas-flow ratios that we used, which is significantly higher than previously thought.

  2. Structural and magnetic ordering of CrNb3S6 single crystals grown by gas transport method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenko, E. B.; Berezin, V. A.; Kolesnikov, N. N.; Gartman, V. K.; Matveev, D. V.; Shakhlevich, O. F.

    2017-07-01

    Paramagnetic layered semiconductor NbS2 doped with some transition metals can transform into ferromagnetic material. That is why such materials are promising candidates for spintronic devices. It is found that only at certain concentrations of a doping metal T crystallographic ordering is possible, which is essential for magnetic ordering of ternary compounds TNbS2. In particular, CrNb3S6 crystals are studied, which form almost completely ordered superstructure with intercalated Cr between NbS2 layers. The main difficulty in crystal growth is reaching stoichiometry of the compound. This problem is solved in the developed method of two-staged gas transport chemical reaction. This new approach provides growth of CrNb3S6 single crystals of several millimeters in diameter and 0.3-0.5 mm thickness. X-ray phase analysis (XRD) of powders is performed to identify all phases involved in synthesis and growth of the crystals. High frequency absorption in external periodic magnetic field as a function of temperature and intensity of magnetic field is used to estimate the temperature of ferromagnetic transition in CrNb3S6 single crystals. The Curie temperature is estimated as 115 K. Growth of CrNb3S6 crystals from vapor phase is studied in detail and full analysis of phase transitions during growth is given. It has been shown that using of high frequency absorption in the crystal provides reliable estimation of the point of ferromagnetic transition in this semiconductor. The authors are grateful to the Physical Science Department of Russian Academy of Sciences for financial support of the studies in the frameworks of the program "Physics of new materials and structures" (project no. 00-12-10).

  3. Laboratory Constraints on the Stability of Petroleum at Elevated Temperatures: Implications for the Origin of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seewald, Jeffrey, S.

    2011-03-14

    Results of prior DOE supported research conducted at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have demonstrated the participation of sedimentary minerals and water as reactants and catalysts in chemical transformations associated with the degradation of oil and the formation of low molecular weight organic compounds. The occurrence of such processes in natural environments can be difficult to recognize because the composition of organic alteration products may not be substantially different than those produced by thermal cracking. The goals of this study were the development of diagnostic tools based on hydrogen and carbon isotopes that can be used to identify geochemical processes responsible for the formation of thermogenic natural gas. In addition, our activities were expanded to include experimental investigation of CO2 reduction in aqueous systems at elevated temperature and pressures and an assessment of microbial activity in relatively low temperature (<70°C) natural gas reservoirs in southeastern Oklahoma. Specific objectives included: A laboratory investigation of geochemical processes that regulate the hydrogen isotope composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbons in natural gas at elevated temperatures and pressures. A laboratory investigation of factors that regulate the carbon isotope composition of organic acids in basinal brines. A laboratory assessment of the role of methanol during reduction of CO2 to CH4 under hydrothermal conditions. Characterization of microbial ecosystems in coproduced fluids from the Potato Hills gas field to assess the role of microbes in the generation of natural gas.

  4. Photonic crystal waveguides integrated with microcantilevers as a novel platform for gas sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, S.V.; Kauppinen, L.J.; Dijkstra, M.; Wolferen, van H.A.G.M.; Ridder, de R.M.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present results related to the simulation and fabrication of a novel and highly sensitive mechano-optical sensor for gas detection (i.e., hydrogen gas) based on microcantilevers, supplied with a selective gas absorption layer, suspended above a Si3N4 grated waveguide (GWG). The presence of a diel

  5. The potential of renewables versus natural gas with CO2 capture and storage for power generation under CO2 constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, Machteld|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092946895; Berghout, Niels|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328201057; Rubin, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    The costs of intermittent renewable energy systems (IRES) and power storage technologies are compared on a level playing field to those of natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO2 capture and storage (NGCC-CCS). To account for technological progress over time, an "experience curve

  6. The potential of renewables versus natural gas with CO2 capture and storage for power generation under CO2 constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, Machteld; Berghout, Niels; Rubin, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    The costs of intermittent renewable energy systems (IRES) and power storage technologies are compared on a level playing field to those of natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO2 capture and storage (NGCC-CCS). To account for technological progress over time, an "experience curve

  7. The potential of renewables versus natural gas with CO2 capture and storage for power generation under CO2 constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, Machteld; Berghout, Niels; Rubin, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    The costs of intermittent renewable energy systems (IRES) and power storage technologies are compared on a level playing field to those of natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO2 capture and storage (NGCC-CCS). To account for technological progress over time, an "experience

  8. One-dimensional photonic crystals for eliminating cross-talk in mid-IR photonics-based respiratory gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, L.; Gibson, D.; Song, S.; Hutson, D.; Reid, S.; MacGregor, C.; Clark, C.

    2017-02-01

    Mid-IR carbon dioxide (CO2) gas sensing is critical for monitoring in respiratory care, and is finding increasing importance in surgical anaesthetics where nitrous oxide (N2O) induced cross-talk is a major obstacle to accurate CO2 monitoring. In this work, a novel, solid state mid-IR photonics based CO2 gas sensor is described, and the role that 1- dimensional photonic crystals, often referred to as multilayer thin film optical coatings [1], play in boosting the sensor's capability of gas discrimination is discussed. Filter performance in isolating CO2 IR absorption is tested on an optical filter test bed and a theoretical gas sensor model is developed, with the inclusion of a modelled multilayer optical filter to analyse the efficacy of optical filtering on eliminating N2O induced cross-talk for this particular gas sensor architecture. Future possible in-house optical filter fabrication techniques are discussed. As the actual gas sensor configuration is small, it would be challenging to manufacture a filter of the correct size; dismantling the sensor and mounting a new filter for different optical coating designs each time would prove to be laborious. For this reason, an optical filter testbed set-up is described and, using a commercial optical filter, it is demonstrated that cross-talk can be considerably reduced; cross-talk is minimal even for very high concentrations of N2O, which are unlikely to be encountered in exhaled surgical anaesthetic patient breath profiles. A completely new and versatile system for breath emulation is described and the capability it has for producing realistic human exhaled CO2 vs. time waveforms is shown. The cross-talk inducing effect that N2O has on realistic emulated CO2 vs. time waveforms as measured using the NDIR gas sensing technique is demonstrated and the effect that optical filtering will have on said cross-talk is discussed.

  9. MUSE searches for galaxies near very metal-poor gas clouds at z~3: new constraints for cold accretion models

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Michele; Dekel, Avishai; Morris, Simon L; O'Meara, John M; Prochaska, J Xavier; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We report on the search for galaxies in the proximity of two very metal-poor gas clouds at z~3 towards the quasar Q0956+122. With a 5-hour MUSE integration in a ~500x500 kpc^2 region centred at the quasar position, we achieve a >80% complete spectroscopic survey of continuum-detected galaxies with m3e41 erg/s. We do not identify galaxies at the redshift of a z~3.2 Lyman limit system (LLS) with log Z/Zsun = -3.35 +/- 0.05, placing this gas cloud in the intergalactic medium or circumgalactic medium of a galaxy below our sensitivity limits. Conversely, we detect five Ly{\\alpha} emitters at the redshift of a pristine z~3.1 LLS with log Z/Zsun < -3.8, while ~0.4 sources were expected given the z~3 Ly{\\alpha} luminosity function. Both this high detection rate and the fact that at least three emitters appear aligned in projection with the LLS suggest that this pristine cloud is tracing a gas filament that is feeding one or multiple galaxies. Our observations uncover two different environments for metal-poor LLSs,...

  10. Noble gas constraints on hydrocarbon accumulation and groundwater flow in the central area of Western Sichuan Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊然学

    2001-01-01

    The noble gas concentrations and isotope ratios of seven natural gas samples from the central area of the Western Sichuan Basin were measured. The samples all have 40Ar/36Ar ratios greater than the atmospheric values, and the 3He/4He ratios (R/Ra) are entirely consistent with the crustal radiogenic He values. The vertical variation of the calculated CH4/36Ar ratios with depth clearly indicates that the CH4and 36Ar are intimately associated, indicating a common reservoir intermediate to the sampled reservoirs, where they are well mixed and stored together prior to entrapment into gas reservoirs. Meanwhile, the calculated CH4/36Ar ratios range between 8×106 and 64×106 very much greater than the CH4/36Ar values for pure water and 5 mol/L NaCI brine at low temperature and hydrostatic conditions, reflecting the presence of "excess" thermogenic CH4 over that supplied by a CH4-saturated groundwater at low temperature, and the excess CH4 saturation and dissolution to be at depth greater than the sampled reserv

  11. Soliton self-frequency blue-shift in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We show theoretically that the photoionization process in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with a Raman-inactive noble gas leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous shift to higher frequencies, limited only by ionization loss. This phenomenon is opposite to the well-known Raman self-frequency red-shift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers. We also predict the existence of unconventional long-range non-local soliton interactions leading to s...

  12. Electron gas polarization effect induced by heavy H-like ions of moderate velocities channeled in a silicon crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Dauvergne, D; Bosch, F; Bräuning, H; Chevallier, M; Cohen, C; Gumberidze, A; Hagmann, S; L'Hoir, A; Kirsch, R; Kozhuharov, C; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Poizat, J C; Ray, C; Rozet, J P; Stöhlker, T; Toleikis, S; Toulemonde, M; Verma, P; St\\"{o}hlker, Th.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the observation of a strong perturbation of the electron gas induced by 20 MeV/u U$^{91+}$ ions and 13 MeV/u Pb$^{81+}$ ions channeled in silicon crystals. This collective response (wake effect) in-duces a shift of the continuum energy level by more than 100 eV, which is observed by means of Radiative Electron Capture into the K and L-shells of the projectiles. We also observe an increase of the REC probability by 20-50% relative to the probability in a non-perturbed electron gas. The energy shift is in agreement with calculations using the linear response theory, whereas the local electron density enhancement is much smaller than predicted by the same model. This shows that, for the small values of the adiabaticity parameter achieved in our experiments, the density fluctuations are not strongly localized at the vicinity of the heavy ions.

  13. Theory of photoionization-induced blueshift of ultrashort solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Chang, Wonkeun; Hölzer, Philipp; Nazarkin, Alexander; Travers, John C; Joly, Nicolas Y; Russell, Philip St J; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-11-11

    We show theoretically that the photoionization process in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with a Raman-inactive noble gas leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous shift to higher frequencies, limited only by ionization loss. This phenomenon is opposite to the well-known Raman self-frequency redshift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers. We also predict the existence of unconventional long-range nonlocal soliton interactions leading to spectral and temporal soliton clustering. Furthermore, if the core is filled with a Raman-active molecular gas, spectral transformations between redshifted, blueshifted, and stabilized solitons can take place in the same fiber.

  14. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusch, Andreas; de Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S.; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C.; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H.; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-12-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff’s law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO2 absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO2 gas sensor.

  15. Theory of Photoionization-Induced Blueshift of Ultrashort Solitons in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Chang, Wonkeun; Hölzer, Philipp; Nazarkin, Alexander; Travers, John C.; Joly, Nicolas Y.; Russell, Philip St. J.; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-11-01

    We show theoretically that the photoionization process in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with a Raman-inactive noble gas leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous shift to higher frequencies, limited only by ionization loss. This phenomenon is opposite to the well-known Raman self-frequency redshift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers. We also predict the existence of unconventional long-range nonlocal soliton interactions leading to spectral and temporal soliton clustering. Furthermore, if the core is filled with a Raman-active molecular gas, spectral transformations between redshifted, blueshifted, and stabilized solitons can take place in the same fiber.

  16. Soliton self-frequency blue-shift in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Hoelzer, Philipp; Nazarkin, Alexander; Travers, John C; Joly, Nicolas Y; Russell, Philip St J; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    We show theoretically that the photoionization process in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with a Raman-inactive noble gas leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous shift to higher frequencies, limited only by ionization loss. This phenomenon is opposite to the well-known Raman self-frequency red-shift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers. We also predict the existence of unconventional long-range non-local soliton interactions leading to spectral and temporal soliton clustering. Furthermore, if the core is filled with a Raman-active molecular gas, spectral transformations between red-shifted, blue-shifted and stabilized solitons can take place in the same fiber.

  17. Electron gas polarization effect induced by heavy H-like ions of moderate velocities channeled in a silicon crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)]. E-mail: d.dauvergne@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Justus Liebig Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Chevallier, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Cohen, C. [Institut des Nano-Sciences de Paris, CNRS-UMR75-88, Universites Paris VI et Paris VII, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Gumberidze, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); L' Hoir, A. [Institut des Nano-Sciences de Paris, CNRS-UMR75-88, Universites Paris VI et Paris VII, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Kirsch, R. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mokler, P.H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Poizat, J.-C.; Ray, C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Rozet, J.-P. [Institut des Nano-Sciences de Paris, CNRS-UMR75-88, Universites Paris VI et Paris VII, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Stoehlker, Th.; Toleikis, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche Ions-Lasers, UMR 11, CEA-CNRS, 14040 Caen cedex (France); Verma, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    We report on the observation of a strong perturbation of the electron gas induced by 20 MeV/u U{sup 91+} ions and 13 MeV/u Pb{sup 81+} ions channeled in silicon crystals. This collective response (wake effect) induces a shift of the continuum energy level by more than 100 eV, which is observed by means of radiative electron capture into the K- and L-shells of the projectiles. We also observe an increase of the REC probability by 20-50% relative to the probability in a non-perturbed electron gas. The energy shift is in agreement with calculations using the linear response theory, whereas the local electron density enhancement is much smaller than predicted by the same model. This shows that, for the small values of the adiabaticity parameter achieved in our experiments, the density fluctuations are not strongly localized in the vicinity of the heavy ions.

  18. Isotopic, chemical and dissolved gas constraints on spring water from Popocatepetl volcano (Mexico): evidence of gas water interaction between magmatic component and shallow fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguaggiato, S.; Martin-Del Pozzo, A. L.; Aguayo, A.; Capasso, G.; Favara, R.

    2005-03-01

    Geochemical research was carried out on cold and hot springs at Popocatepetl (Popo) volcano (Mexico) in 1999 to identify a possible relationship with magmatic activity. The chemical and isotopic composition of the fluids is compatible with strong gas-water interaction between deep and shallow fluids. In fact, the isotopic composition of He and dissolved carbon species is consistent with a magmatic origin. The presence of a geothermal system having a temperature of 80-100° C was estimated on the basis of liquid geothermometers. A large amount of dissolved CO 2 in the springs was also detected and associated with high CO 2 degassing.

  19. Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer of a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dursch, Thomas J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ciontea, Monica A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Radke, Clayton J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Nucleation and growth of ice in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are studied using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isothermal crystallization rates and pseudo-steady-state nucleation rates are obtained as a function of subcooling from heat-flow and induction-time measurements. Kinetics of ice nucleation and growth are studied at two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loadings (0 and 10 wt %) in a commercial GDL for temperatures between 240 and 273 K. A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Induction times follow a Poisson distribution and increase upon addition of PTFE, indicating that nucleation occurs more slowly on a hydrophobic fiber than on a hydrophilic fiber. The determined nucleation rates and induction times follow expected trends from classical nucleation theory. Finally, a validated rate expression is now available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs.

  20. Helium Scattering Studies of the Surface Structure and Dynamics of Rare Gas Crystals,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    direct resonance between the adatom vibrations and this substrate mode. EXPERIENTAL The substrate for these experiments was a single crystal of Ag...published. [20] Glannl G. Cardinl, Seamus F. O’Shea, Maurizio Marchese, and M. L. Klein, to be published. (21] L. W. Bruch, private communication . [221 V

  1. Trace gas constraints on vertical transport in models: a case study of Indonesian biomass burning emissions in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, R. D.; Luo, M.; Worden, J.; Kim, D.; Del Genio, A. D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the use of joint Aura TES and MLS CO retrievals in constraining vertical transport in the NASA GISS ModelE2 composition-climate model. We examine September to November 2006 over the tropics. El Nino-induced dry conditions over western Indonesia led to extensive biomass burning and persistent CO greater than 200 ppb in the upper troposphere. This was one of the highest CO episodes over the MLS period since 2004. We show how improvements in the vertical resolution of trace gas retrievals can help to distinguish between errors in parameterized vertical transport and biases in bottom-up emissions estimates. We simulate the episode using the NASA GISS ModelE2 coupled composition-climate model with different subgrid physics for small ensembles of experiments with perturbed initial conditions. The starting point is the CMIP5 version of the model, in which there was a pronounced vertical CO dipole over the Maritime Continent, but with a CO peak 100 ppb higher than Aura CO in the upper troposphere. With modified cumulus and boundary layer parameterizations, but the same prescribed biomass burning emissions estimates, the upper tropospheric CO bias is significantly reduced. Concurrently, precipitation over the emissions source region is reduced relative to observational estimates, leading to better consistency with the dry conditions under which the burning occurred. We discuss the effects of the physics changes on the roles of convective frequency and depth in reducing the bias.

  2. Tectonic Framework and Deep Structure of South China and Their Constraint to Oil-Gas Field Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingchen; LIU Jinsong; DU Zhili; CAI Liguo

    2009-01-01

    South China could be divided into one stable craton,the Yangtze Craton(YzC),and several orogenic belts in the surrounding region,that is the Triassic Qinling-Dabie Orogenic Belt(QDOB)in river Orogenic Belt(TOB)in the west,the Youjiang Orogenic Belt(YOB)in the southwest,the Middle Paleozoic Huanan Orogenic Belt (HOB) in the southeast, and the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Maritime Orogenic Belt(MOB)along the coast.Seismic tomographic images reveal that the Moho depth is deeper than 40 km and the lithosphere iS about 210 km thick beneath the YzC.The SGOB is characterized by thick crust (>40 km)and thin lithosphere(<150 km).The Hob.Yob and Mob have a thin crnst (<40 km)and thin lithosphere(<150 km).Terrestrial heat flow survey revealed a distribution pattern with a low heat flow region in the eastern YzC and western HOB and two high heat flow regions in the TOB and MOB respectively.Such a"high-low-high"heat flow distribution pattern could have resulted from Cenozoic asthenosphere upwelling.All oil-gas fields are concentrated in the central part of the YzC.Remnant oil pools have been discovered along the southern margin of the YzC and its adjacent orogenic belts.From a viewpoint of geological and geophysical structure, regions in South China with thick lithosphere and low heat flOW value.as well as weak deformation.might be the ideal region for further petroleum exploration.

  3. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    , under the assumption that the original constraint-based approach has these properties. Practically, as a concrete case study, we have integrated this technique into OFMC, a state-of-the-art model-checker for security protocol analysis, and demonstrated its effectiveness by extensive experimentation. Our......We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...

  4. Computer Aided Design of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy for Industrial Gas Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xianping; Gong, Xiufang; Yang, Gongxian; Wang, Haiwei; Li, Haisong; Chen, Xueda; Gao, Zhenhuan; Xu, Yongfeng; Yang, Ming

    The influence of molybdenum, tungsten and cobalt on stress-rupture properties of single crystal superalloy PWA1483 has been investigated using the simulated calculation of JMatPro software which ha s been widely used to develop single crystal superalloy, and the effect of alloying element on the stability of strengthening phase has been revealed by using the Thermo-Calc software. Those properties calculation results showed that the increasing of alloy content could facilitate the precipitation of TCP phases and increase the lattice misfit between γ and γ' phase, and the effect of molybdenum, tantalum was the strongest and that of cobalt was the weakest. Then the chemical composition was optimized, and the selected compositions showed excellent microstructure stability and stress-rupture properties by the confirmation of d-electrons concept and software calculation.

  5. Ultrafast Mid-IR Nonlinear Optics in Gas-filled Hollow-core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Selim

    action of self-focusing self-phase modulation (SPM) and anomalous GVD allows strong soliton self-compression down to sub-single cycle duration inside HC-AR fiber. The peak intensity at the maximum temporal compression can reach over 1014 W/cm2 which is sufficient to ionize the gas and form a plasma. We...

  6. Reaction-based azide gas sensing with tailored ionic liquids measured by quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Chung; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2014-02-18

    On the basis of the strain-promoted [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction performed at ambient temperature, a label-free, online, and chemospecific gas-phase measurement of organic azides in real time was efficiently achieved on QCM chips thin-coated with tailored ionic liquid TIL 1.

  7. Energy distribution of metal and noble gas ions traversing single-crystal copper films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakhanov, Z. A.

    2012-09-01

    A comparative investigation of the energy distribution of ions that traversed single-crystal cooper films reveals that the energy loss of channeled and nonchanneled particles depends not only on the mass but also on the radius of bombarding ions. It is established that the energy spectra of transmitted ions are highly sensitive to a change in the composition and structure of the films. From the change in these spectra, one can estimate the degree of disordering in thin films under various applied forces.

  8. Spatial distribution of particles sputtered from single crystals by gas cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, A. V.; Chernysh, V. S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Zhao, J.

    2017-09-01

    The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the bombardment of the Cu (100) and Mo (100) single-crystals by 10 keV Ar cluster ions of different sizes are presented in this paper. Spatial distributions of sputtered material were calculated. The anisotropy of the angular distributions of sputtered atoms was revealed. It was found that the character of the anisotropy is different for Cu and Mo targets. The reasons leading to this anisotropy are discussed according to the dependences of the angular distributions on the cluster size and on the target material.

  9. Strong Raman-induced non-instantaneous soliton interactions in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an analytical model based on the perturbation theory in order to study the optical propagation of two successive intense solitons in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with Raman-active gases. Based on the time delay between the two solitons, we have found that the trailing soliton dynamics can experience unusual nonlinear phenomena such as spectral and temporal soliton oscillations and transport towards the leading soliton. The overall dynamics can lead to a spatiotemporal modulation of the refractive index with a uniform temporal period and a uniform or chirped spatial period.

  10. FIBER LASER CONSTRUCTION AND THEORY INCLUDING FIBER BRAGG GRATINGS Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and applications of gas filled PCFs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Jacob O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The principles used in fiber lasers have been around for a while but it is only within the past few years that fiber lasers have become commercially available and used in high power laser applications. This paper will focus on the basic design principles of fiber lasers, including fiber Bragg gratings, principles of operation, and forms of non-linear effects. It will describe the type and associated doping of the fiber used and difficult designs used to guide energy from the pump to the active medium. Topics covered include fiber laser design, fiber Bragg gratings, materials used, differences in quantum energy loss, thermo-optical effects, stimulated Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering, photonic crystal fibers and applications of gas filled Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs). Thanks to fiber lasers, the energy required to produce high power lasers has greatly dropped and as such we can now produce kW power using a standard 120V 15A circuit. High power laser applications are always requiring more power. The fiber laser can now deliver the greater power that these applications demand. Future applications requiring more power than can be combined using standard materials or configurations will need to be developed to overcome the high energy density and high non-linear optical scattering effects present during high power operations.

  11. Exploring silver ionic liquids for reaction-based gas sensing on a quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Tzu-Hsuan; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Tseng, Ming-Chung; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2015-09-21

    Reaction-based, sensitive sensing of aldehyde and ketone gases in real time was effectively achieved on QCM chips thin-coated with silver ionic liquids and , respectively. The method platform developed in this work involves straightforward synthesis of functional silver ionic liquids in water, and is label-free and highly chemoselective with superior gas reactivity for and and, most significantly, totally insensitive to moisture.

  12. Non-equilibrium dynamics of 2D liquid crystals driven by transmembrane gas flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Kazuyoshi; Ueda, Ken; Okumura, Yu-ichi; Tabe, Yuka

    2011-07-20

    Free-standing films composed of several layers of chiral smectic liquid crystals (SmC*) exhibited unidirectional director precession under various vapor transfers across the films. When the transferred vapors were general organic solvents, the precession speed linearly depended on the momentum of the transmembrane vapors, where the proportional constant was independent of the kind of vapor. In contrast, the same SmC* films under water transfer exhibited precession in the opposite direction. As a possible reason for the rotational inversion, we suggest the competition of two origins for the torques, one of which is microscopic and the other macroscopic. Next, we tried to move an external object by making use of the liquid crystal (LC) motion. When a solid or a liquid particle was set on a film under vapor transfer, the particle was rotated in the same direction as the LC molecules. Using home-made laser tweezers, we measured the force transmitted from the film to the particle, which we found to be several pN.

  13. AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE MECHANICS OF SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES WITH A VIEW TOWARDS ENHANCING GAS TURBINE EFFICIENCY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.R. Rajagopal; I.J. Rao

    2006-05-05

    The demand for increased efficiency of gas turbines used in power generation and aircraft applications has fueled research into advanced materials for gas turbine blades that can withstand higher temperatures in that they have excellent resistance to creep. The term ''Superalloys'' describes a group of alloys developed for applications that require high performance at elevated temperatures. Superalloys have a load bearing capacity up to 0.9 times their melting temperature. The objective of the investigation was to develop a thermodynamic model that can be used to describe the response of single crystal superalloys that takes into account the microstructure of the alloy within the context of a continuum model. Having developed the model, its efficacy was to be tested by corroborating the predictions of the model with available experimental data. Such a model was developed and it is implemented in the finite element software ABAQUS/STANDARD through a user subroutine (UMAT) so that the model can be used in realistic geometries that correspond to turbine blades.

  14. Long-period grating and its cascaded counterpart in photonic crystal fiber for gas phase measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Kanka, Jiri; Du, Henry

    2012-09-10

    Regular and cascaded long period gratings (LPG, C-LPG) of periods ranging from 460 to 590 μm were inscribed in an endlessly single mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using CO(2) laser for sensing measurements of helium, argon and acetylene. High index sensitivities in excess of 1700 nm/RIU were achieved in both grating schemes with a period of 460 μm. The sharp interference fringes in the transmission spectrum of C-PCF-LPG afforded not only greatly enhanced sensing resolution, but also accuracy when the phase-shift of the fringe pattern is determined through spectral processing. Comparative numerical and experimental studies indicated LP(01) to LP(03) mode coupling as the principal coupling step for both PCF-LPG and C-PCF-LPG with emergence of multi-mode coupling at shorter grating periods or longer resonance wavelengths.

  15. Zero-order crystallization in the Bethe-Fermi homework and electron gas problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaggio, M. C.; De Llano, M.; Plastino, A.; Szybisz, L.; Ramírez, S.

    1980-04-01

    Single-determinantal states consisting of localized, non-overlapping single-particle orbitals are used in comparison with those made up of plane wave ones to show that neutron matter prefers a "crystalline" configuration beyond a density of around 0.07 fm -3 for the ν0 homework potential. The total energy is not too high above the best Jastrow-correlated calculations. No such effect is found for the ν1 homework potential. The analogous question for the electron gas is also studied.

  16. Preparation and crystallization of hollow α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} microspheres following the gas-bubble template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladares, L. de los Santos, E-mail: ld301@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J.J Thomson Av., Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); León Félix, L. [Laboratorio de Cerámicos y Nanomateriales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Ap. Postal 14-0149, Lima (Peru); Laboratory of Magnetic Characterization, Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, DF 70910-900, Brasilia (Brazil); Espinoza Suarez, S.M.; Bustamante Dominguez, A.G. [Laboratorio de Cerámicos y Nanomateriales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Ap. Postal 14-0149, Lima (Peru); Mitrelias, T.; Holmes, S. [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J.J Thomson Av., Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Moreno, N.O. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000, Sao Cristóvao, Sergipe (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J. [Laboratório de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avançados, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901, Recife (Brazil); Barnes, C.H.W. [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J.J Thomson Av., Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-01

    In this work we report the formation of hollow α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) microspheres by the gas-bubble template method. This technique is simple and it does not require hard templates, surfactants, special conditions of atmosphere or complex steps. After reacting Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.9H{sub 2}O and citric acid in water by sol–gel, the precursor was annealed in air at different temperatures between 180 and 600 °C. Annealing at 550 and 600 °C generates bubbles on the melt which crystallize and oxidizes to form hematite hollow spheres after quenching. The morphology and crystal evolution are studied by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. We found that after annealing at 250–400 °C, the sample consist of a mixture of magnetite, maghemite and hematite. Single hematite phase in the form of hollow microspheres is obtained after annealing at 550 and 600 °C. The crystallization and crystal size of the hematite shells increase with annealing temperature. A possible mechanism for hollow sphere formation is presented. - Highlights: • Formation of hollow hematite microspheres by the gas-bubble template method. • This technique does not require hard templates or special conditions of atmosphere. • Annealing promotes the transition magnetite to maghemite to hematite. • Crystallization of the hematite shells increase with annealing temperature.

  17. Adsorption Device Based on a Langatate Crystal Microbalance for High Temperature High Pressure Gas Adsorption in Zeolite H-ZSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenjin; Baracchini, Giulia; Klumpp, Michael; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Dittmeyer, Roland

    2016-08-25

    We present a high-temperature and high-pressure gas adsorption measurement device based on a high-frequency oscillating microbalance (5 MHz langatate crystal microbalance, LCM) and its use for gas adsorption measurements in zeolite H-ZSM-5. Prior to the adsorption measurements, zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals were synthesized on the gold electrode in the center of the LCM, without covering the connection points of the gold electrodes to the oscillator, by the steam-assisted crystallization (SAC) method, so that the zeolite crystals remain attached to the oscillating microbalance while keeping good electroconductivity of the LCM during the adsorption measurements. Compared to a conventional quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which is limited to temperatures below 80 °C, the LCM can realize the adsorption measurements in principle at temperatures as high as 200-300 °C (i.e., at or close to the reaction temperature of the target application of one-stage DME synthesis from the synthesis gas), owing to the absence of crystalline-phase transitions up to its melting point (1,470 °C). The system was applied to investigate the adsorption of CO2, H2O, methanol and dimethyl ether (DME), each in the gas phase, on zeolite H-ZSM-5 in the temperature and pressure range of 50-150 °C and 0-18 bar, respectively. The results showed that the adsorption isotherms of these gases in H-ZSM-5 can be well fitted by Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, the determined adsorption parameters, i.e., adsorption capacities, adsorption enthalpies, and adsorption entropies, compare well to literature data. In this work, the results for CO2 are shown as an example.

  18. The vibrational spectra of N-phenylpyrrole in the gas phase, in argon matrices and in single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweke, D. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Farkas Center for Light-Induced Processes, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Brauer, B. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Fritz Haber Research Center, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Gerber, R.B. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Fritz Haber Research Center, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Haas, Y. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Farkas Center for Light-Induced Processes, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: yehuda@chem.ch.huji.ac.il

    2007-03-30

    The infrared spectrum of N-phenylpyrrole (PP) was measured in the gas phase and in an argon matrix, and the Raman spectrum was obtained in a single crystal. The measured matrix shifts are found to be small: many bands are not split, and the shifts from the gas phase values are less than 1%. Splitting to two sub-bands is observed for some bands, indicating the presence of two major trapping sites, in agreement with previous predictions. The spectra are analyzed with the help of harmonic calculations on the free molecule and on its adduct with one or two argon atoms, and anharmonic frequency calculations on the free molecule. Harmonic frequencies were obtained at the MP2/cc-pVDZ and DFT-B3LYP/cc-pVDZ levels. Anharmonic frequencies were obtained by the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method with a variant of the PM3 semiempirical electronic structure method, calibrated for much improved spectroscopic accuracy. The potential surfaces used in the CC-VSCF calculation obtained by adjusting standard PM3 surfaces so that they provide harmonic frequencies that are comparable to those obtained at the DFT-B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level. Agreement between the experimental and theoretical results is in general very good, allowing the assignments of most bands. The harmonic frequency calculations of PP-Ar clusters, at the MP2/cc-pVDZ level show that the environment can greatly affect the intensities of some of the transitions, which is in accord with experiment.

  19. Understanding the dynamics of photoionization-induced solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F

    2011-01-01

    We present in detail our developed model [Saleh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107] that governs pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by an ionizing gas. By using perturbative methods, we find that the photoionization process induces the opposite phenomenon of the well-known Raman self-frequency red-shift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers, as was recently experimentally demonstrated [Hoelzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107]. This process is only limited by ionization losses, and leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous blue-shift in the frequency domain. By applying the Gagnon-B\\'{e}langer gauge transformation, multi-peak `inverted gravity-like' solitary waves are predicted. We also demonstrate that the pulse dynamics shows the ejection of solitons during propagation in such fibers, analogous to what happens in conventional solid-core fibers. Moreover, unconventional long-range non-local interactions between temporally distant solitons, unique of...

  20. Effect of phonon focusing on Knudsen flow of phonon gas in single-crystal nanowires made of spintronics materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleev, I. I.; Bakharev, S. M.; Kuleev, I. G.; Ustinov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Effect of anisotropy of elastic energy on the phonon propagation in single-crystal nanowires made of Fe, Cu, MgO, InSb, and GaAs materials that are used to fabricate spintronics devices in the regime of the Knudsen flow of phonon gas has been studied. A new method of analyzing the focusing of quasi-transverse modes has been suggested, which made it possible to determine the average values of the densities of phonon states in the regions of focusing and defocusing slow and fast quasi-transverse modes. The effect of phonon focusing on the anisotropy of heat conductivity and lengths of the phonon free paths has been analyzed for all acoustic modes that exist in spintronics nanostructures. It has been shown that for all the nanowires investigated the angular dependences of the free paths of fast and slow transverse modes in the {100} and {110} planes correlate with the angular dependences of the densities of phonon states for these modes. Directions of the heat flux that ensure the maximum and minimum phonon heat conductivity in the nanowires have been determined.

  1. Influence of gas hydrates crystals or ice crystals on the permeability of a porous medium; Influence de cristaux d'hydrates de gaz ou de glace sur la permeabilite d'un milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnefoy, O.

    2005-03-15

    The first part is a bibliographic study. We study the conditions for thermodynamic equilibrium of the hydrates as a bulk medium and the composition of the liquid and solid phases. We then describe the basics of fluid dynamics in a porous medium. Eventually, we merge the two approaches and study the influence of the porous medium on the hydrate stability. An off-shore hydrate field (Blake Ridge) and an on-shore field (Mallik) are precisely described. The latter will be used as a reference case for subsequent numerical simulations. The second part is devoted to the experiments. Their goal is to measure the permeability of a sediment containing crystals. To get closer to natural geologic conditions, crystals are synthesized in absence of free gas. It turns out that hydrates form in a very heterogeneous way in the porous medium, which makes the measurements non representative. We believe that this result has a general character and that, at the laboratory time-scale, it is difficult, to say the least to achieve a uniform distribution of gas hydrates grown from dissolved gas. To circumvent this difficulty, we show, with a theoretical approach, that ice crystals behave much the same way as the hydrate crystals, concerning the Van der Waals forces that govern the agglomeration. This allows us to calculate the Hamaker constant of the hydrates. The second series of experiments focuses on the permeability of a non consolidated porous medium under mechanical stress, where the pores are filled with ice crystals. Two silica beads populations are used to form a porous medium: 3 mm and 0.2 mm. With the large grains, results show two thresholds: for saturations below the lower threshold, the presence of crystals does not modify the permeability. For saturations above the upper threshold, the permeability vanishes almost completely (percolation phenomenon). Between these two limits, the permeability decreases exponentially with the saturation. With the fine grains, the permeability

  2. Mass Spectrometric Investigation of Silicon Extremely Enriched in (28)Si: From (28)SiF4 (Gas Phase IRMS) to (28)Si Crystals (MC-ICP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramann, Axel; Rienitz, Olaf

    2016-06-01

    A new generation of silicon crystals even further enriched in (28)Si (x((28)Si) > 0.999 98 mol/mol), recently produced by companies and institutes in Russia within the framework of a project initiated by PTB, were investigated with respect to their isotopic composition and molar mass M(Si). A modified isotope dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) method treating the silicon as the matrix containing a so-called virtual element (VE) existing of the isotopes (29)Si and (30)Si solely and high resolution multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) were applied in combination. This method succeeds also when examining the new materials holding merely trace amounts of (29)Si (x((29)Si) ≈ 5 × 10(-6) mol/mol) and (30)Si (x((30)Si) ≈ 7 × 10(-7) mol/mol) extremely difficult to detect with lowest uncertainty. However, there is a need for validating the enrichment in (28)Si already in the precursor material of the final crystals, silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4) gas prior to crystal production. For that purpose, the isotopic composition of selected SiF4 samples was determined using a multicollector magnetic sector field gas-phase isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Contaminations of SiF4 by natural silicon due to storing and during the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurements were observed and quantified. The respective MC-ICP-MS measurements of the corresponding crystal samples show-in contrast-several advantages compared to gas phase IRMS. M(Si) of the new crystals were determined to some extent with uncertainties urel(M) Si)) on the degree of enrichment in (28)Si. This leads to a reduction of urel(M(Si)) during the past decade by almost 3 orders of magnitude and thus further reduces the uncertainty of the Avogadro constant NA which is one of the preconditions for the redefinition of the SI unit kilogram.

  3. Growth of Large-Size SnS Thin Crystals Driven by Oriented Attachment and Applications to Gas Sensors and Photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Lian, Gang; Xu, Zhenghao; Fu, Chen; Lin, Zhaojun; Li, Liyi; Wang, Qilong; Cui, Deliang; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-04-20

    Freestanding large-size SnS thin crystals are synthesized via two-dimensional oriented attachment (OA) growth of colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) in a novel high-pressure solvothermal reaction. The SnS thin crystals present a uniform rectangular shape with a lateral size of 20-30 um and thickness of time and organic ligands results in polycrystal-to-monocrystal formation and defect annihilation. Furthermore, gas sensor and photodetector devices, based on SnS thin single crystals, are also prepared. The sensing devices present high sensitivity, superior selectivity, low detection limit (≪100 ppb) and reversibility to NO2 at room temperature. The fabricated photodetector devices exhibit a high responsivity of 2.04 × 10(3) A W(1-) and high external quantum efficiency of ∼4.75 × 10(5) % at 532 nm, which are much higher than most of the photodetector devices.

  4. Ionization-induced asymmetric self-phase modulation and universal modulational instability in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J; Biancalana, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of relatively long pulses with ionizing intensities in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with a Raman-inactive gas. Due to photoionization, previously unknown types of asymmetric self-phase modulation and `universal' modulational instabilities existing in both normal and anomalous dispersion regions appear. We also show that it is possible to spontaneously generate a plasma-induced continuum of blueshifting solitons, opening up new possibilities for pushing supercontinuum generation towards shorter and shorter wavelengths.

  5. Slow photon amplification of gas-phase ethanol photo-oxidation in titania inverse opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovic, Vedran; Idriss, Hicham; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I. N.

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe the successful fabrication of six titania inverse opal (TiO2 IO) photocatalysts with fcc[1 1 1] pseudo photonic band gaps (PBGs) tuned to span the UV-vis region. Photocatalysts were fabricated by a colloidal crystal templating and sol-gel approach - a robust and highly applicable bottom-up scheme which allowed for precise control over the geometric and optical properties of the TiO2 IO photocatalysts. Optical properties of the TiO2 IO thin films were investigated in detail by UV-vis transmittance and reflectance measurements. The PBG along the fcc[1 1 1] direction in the TiO2 IOs was dependent on the inter-planar spacing in the [1 1 1] direction, the incident angle of light and the refractive index of the medium filling the macropores in the IOs, in agreement with a modified Bragg's law expression. Calculated photonic band structures for the photocatalysts revealed a PBG along the Γ → L direction at a/λ ∼ 0.74, in agreement with the experimental optical data. By coupling the low frequency edge of the PBG along the [1 1 1] direction with the electronic absorption edge of anatase TiO2, a two-fold enhancement in the rate of gas phase ethanol photo-oxidation in air was achieved. This enhancement appears to be associated with a 'slow photon' effect that acts to both enhance TiO2 absorption and inhibit spontaneous emission (i.e. suppress electron-hole pair recombination).

  6. (non) Emergent Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. S.; Hattab, M. W.; Huerta, G.

    2014-12-01

    Emergent constraints are observable quantities that provide some physical basis for testing or predicting how a climate model will respond to greenhouse gas forcing. Very few such constraints have been identified for the multi-model CMIP archive. Here we explore the question of whether constraints that apply to a single model, a perturbed parameter ensemble (PPE) of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.1), can be applied to predicting the climate sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. In particular we construct our predictive patterns from multivariate EOFs of the CAM3.1 ensemble control climate. Multiple regressive statistical models were created that do an excellent job of predicting CAM3.1 sensitivity to greenhouse gas forcing. However, these same patterns fail spectacularly to predict sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. We attribute this failure to several factors. First, and perhaps the most important, is that the structures affecting climate sensitivity in CAM3.1 have a unique signature in the space of our multivariate EOF patterns that are unlike any other climate model. That is to say, we should not expect CAM3.1 to represent the way another models within CMIP archive respond to greenhouse gas forcing. The second, perhaps related, reason is that the CAM3.1 PPE does a poor job of spanning the range of climates and responses found within the CMIP archive. We shall discuss the implications of these results for the prospect of finding emergent constraints within the CMIP archive. We will also discuss what this may mean for establishing uncertainties in climate projections.

  7. Ultra-high sensitivity Fabry-Perot interferometer gas refractive index fiber sensor based on photonic crystal fiber and Vernier effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Mingran; Tian, Jiajun; Yao, Yong

    2015-11-01

    An ultra-high sensitivity open-cavity Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) gas refractive index (RI) sensor based on the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and Vernier effect is proposed and demonstrated. The sensor is prepared by splicing a section of PCF to a section of fiber tube fused with a section of single mode fiber. The air holes running along the cladding of the PCF enable the gas to enter or leave the cavity freely. The reflection beam from the last end face of the PCF is used to generate the Vernier effect, which significantly improves the sensitivity of the sensor. Experimental results show that the proposed sensor can provide an ultra-high RI sensitivity of 30899 nm/RIU. This sensor has potential applications in fields such as gas concentration analyzing and humidity monitoring.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberger, H; Belli, F; Liu, H; Calegari, F; Chavez-Cervantes, M; Li, M T; Lin, C T; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J; Cavalleri, A; Travers, J C; Gierz, I

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  10. Topaz magmatic crystallization in rhyolites of the Central Andes (Chivinar volcanic complex, NW Argentina): Constraints from texture, mineralogy and rock chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioncada, Anna; Orlandi, Paolo; Vezzoli, Luigina; Omarini, Ricardo H.; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Lopez-Azarevich, Vanina; Sureda, Ricardo; Azarevich, Miguel; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Topaz-bearing rhyolite lavas were erupted as domes and cryptodomes during the early history of the Late Miocene Chivinar volcano, in Central Andes. These are the only topaz rhyolite lavas recognized in Central Andes. Textural, mineralogical and geochemical data on the Chivinar rhyolites suggest that topaz crystallized from strongly residual, fluorine-rich, peraluminous silicate melts of topazite composition before the complete solidification of the lava domes. Crystallization of the rhyolitic magma began with sodic plagioclase and alkali feldspar phenocrysts in the magma chamber, followed by groundmass quartz + alkali feldspar + minor sodic plagioclase during dome emplacement, and terminated with quartz + topaz + vapour bubbles forming small scattered miaroles. Fluorine partitioning into the fluid phase occurred only in the final stage of groundmass crystallization. The magmatic origin of topaz indicates the presence of a fluorine-rich highly differentiated magma in the early history of the Chivinar volcano and suggests the possibility of rare metals mineralizations related to the cooling and solidification of a silicic magma chamber. A late fluid circulation phase, pre-dating the andesitic phase of the Chivinar volcano, affected part of the topaz rhyolite lavas. The presence of Nb, Ta and Mn minerals as primary accessories in the rhyolites and as secondary minerals in veins suggests a connection of the fluid circulation phase with the silicic magmatic system. Although at the edge of the active volcanic arc, the Chivinar topaz rhyolites are in correspondence of the transtensive Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system, suggesting preferred extensional conditions for the formation of magmatic topaz in convergent settings, consistently with evidence from other known cases worldwide.

  11. Constraints of gas venting activity for the interstitial water geochemistry at the shallow gas hydrate site, eastern margin of the Japan Sea; results from high resolution time-series fluid sampling by OsmoSampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owari, S.; Tomaru, H.; Matsumoto, R.

    2016-12-01

    We have conducted ROV researches in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea where active gas venting and outcropping of gas hydrates were observed near the seafloor and have found the strength and location of venting had changed within a few days. These observations indicate the seafloor environments with the shallow gas hydrate system could have changed for short period compared to a geological time scale. We have applied a long-term osmotic fluid sampling system "OsmoSampler" on the active gas hydrate system for one year in order to document how the gas venting and gas hydrate activity have changed the geochemical environments near the seafloor. All the major ion concentrations in the interstitial water show synchronous increase and decrease repeatedly in three to five days, reflecting the incorporation and release of fresh water in gas hydrates in response to the gas concentration change near the sampling site. Dissolved methane concentration increases rapidly and excessively (over several mM) in the first 40 days corresponding to the active gas venting. The increases of methane concentration are often associated with high ion concentration during high water pressure period, indicating excess gas release from shallow gas pockets. Contrarily, enhanced gas hydrate growth may plug the fluid-gas paths in shallow sediment, reducing gas hydrate formation due to the decrease of methane flux. This study was conducted under the commission from AIST as a part of the methane hydrate research project funded by METI (the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan).

  12. How useful is ion mobility mass spectrometry for structural biology? The relationship between protein crystal structures and their collision cross sections in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Barran, Perdita E

    2011-01-07

    The technique of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has become of increasing interest for rapid analysis of the conformations adopted by biological macromolecules. It is currently used routinely for analysis of explosives and illegal substances in airport and military security. In biophysical research, it can be used to determine the temperature dependent rotationally averaged collision cross section of gas-phase ions of proteins and nucleic acids along with their mass to charge ratios. Nanoelectrospray ionisation allows the gentle transfer of intact biomolecules from solutions in which the native form(s) are present, into the solvent free environment of a mass spectrometer. It is believed by many researchers that the experimental collision cross sections of these molecules should have some relationship to crystal structure coordinates. In this review we outline the different experimental methods that can be used to measure ion mobility; we also describe methods used to calculate collision cross sections from input coordinates. Following this survey of the methodological approaches to IM-MS, we then summarise IM-MS data published to date for some monomeric peptides and small soluble proteins, along with collision cross sections calculated from their crystal structure coordinates. Finally we consider the relationship between experimental gas-phase conformations and those adopted in crystals and give an outlook on the application of IM-MS as a tool for structural biology.

  13. Novel Flow Field with Superhydrophobic Gas Channels Prepared by One-step Solvent-induced Crystallization for Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junsheng Liang; Kuanyao Liu; Shouzuo Li; Dazhi Wang; Tongqun Ren; Xiaoying Xu; Ying Luo

    2015-01-01

    The CO2-induced capillary blocking in anode flow field is one of the key adverse factors to reduce the performance of a micro-direct methanol fuel cell (lDMFC). In order to solve this problem, new polycarbonate (PC) flow field plates with nested arrangement of hydrophilic fuel channels and superhydrophobic gas channels were designed, fabricated, and tested in this work. The gas channels were treated with solvent-induced crystallization using acetone solution. The superhydrophobicity with 160? water contact angle and 2? tilting angle was obtained on the PC substrates. A dummy cell using hydrogen peroxide decomposition reaction and a test loop were separately set up to evaluate the flow fields’ performance. It was found that a 37% pressure drop decrease can be obtained in the new serpentine flow field compared with that of the conventional one. The benefit of the new flow field to remove gas bubbles was also confirmed by an in situ visualization study on the dummy cell. Results show that the auxiliary superhydrophobic gas channels can speed up the discharge of the gas bubbles from the flow field, which will in turn improve the lDMFC performance.

  14. Effects of Magnesium and Ferric Ions on Crystallization of Calcium Sulfate Dihydrate Under the Simulated Conditions of Wet Flue-gas Desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiang; HUO Wang; ZHONG Yi; LUO Zhong-yang; CEN Ke-fa; NI Ming-jiang; CHEN Le-ming

    2008-01-01

    The influences of magnesium and ferric ions in their different ratios on the rate of gypsum crystallization were studied under the conditions similar to those of wet flue-gas desulfurization(WFGD).The results show thataddition of both Mg2+ and Fe3+ increased induction time and decreased the growth efficiency up to 50% compared with the baseline(without impurities) depending on the concentration and the type of impurity.The effects of Mg2+ and Fe3+ on the surface energy and the rate of nucleation were estimated by employing the classical nucleation theory.The surface energy decreased by 8% and 14% with the addition of 0.02 mol/L magnesium or ferric ions,respectively,compared to the baseline.Mg2+ and Fe3+ made the growth rate of the (020),(021) and (040) faces of gypsum crystal a much greater reduction,which leads to the formation of needle crystals compared to the baseline which favors the formation of plate or flakes.Furthermore,an edge detection program was developed to quantify the effects of impurities on the filtration rate of gypsum product.The results show that the inhibition efficiency of the presence of 0.02 mol/L Mg2+ and Fe3+ on the filtration rate of gypsum crystal ranges from 22% to 39%.

  15. Constraint on the Inflow/outflow Rates in Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 1.4 from Molecular Gas Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Akifumi; Ohta, Kouji; Yabe, Kiyoto; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Akiyama, Masayuki; Tamura, Naoyuki; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Dalton, Gavin

    2016-12-01

    We constrain the rate of gas inflow into and outflow from a main-sequence star-forming galaxy at z∼ 1.4 by fitting a simple analytic model for the chemical evolution in a galaxy to the observational data of the stellar mass, metallicity, and molecular gas mass fraction. The molecular gas mass is derived from CO observations with a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor, and the gas metallicity is derived from the Hα and [N ii]λ 6584 emission line ratio. Using a stacking analysis of CO integrated intensity maps and the emission lines of Hα and [N ii], the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and gas mass fraction is derived. We constrain the inflow and outflow rates with least-chi-square fitting of a simple analytic chemical evolution model to the observational data. The best-fit inflow and outflow rates are ∼1.7 and ∼0.4 in units of star formation rate (SFR), respectively. The inflow rate is roughly comparable to the sum of the SFR and outflow rate, which supports the equilibrium model for galaxy evolution; i.e., all inflow gas is consumed by star formation and outflow.

  16. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  17. Photoionization-induced emission of tunable few-cycle mid-IR dispersive waves in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Novoa, David; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the emission of few-cycle dispersive waves in the mid-infrared using hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with noble gas. The underlying mechanism is the formation of a plasma cloud by a self-compressed, sub-cycle pump pulse. The resulting free-electron population modifies the fiber dispersion, allowing phase-matched access to dispersive waves at otherwise inaccessible frequencies, well into the mid-IR. Remarkably, the pulses generated turn out to have durations of the order of two optical cycles. In addition, this ultrafast emission, which occurs even in the absence of a zero dispersion point between pump and mid-IR wavelengths, is tunable over a wide frequency range simply by adjusting the gas pressure. These theoretical results pave the way to a new generation of compact, fiber-based sources of few-cycle mid-IR radiation.

  18. A frequency-stabilized laser based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber CO2 gas cell and its application scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ze-Heng; Yang, Fei; Chen, Di-Jun; Cai, Hai-Wen

    2017-04-01

    A frequency-stabilized laser system based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) CO2 gas cell for the space-borne CO2 light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is proposed. This system will help realize precise measurement of the global atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The relation between the frequency stability and the temperature of the HC-PCF cell was studied in detail. It is proved that accurate control of the temperature of the HC-PCF cell is very important to realize high stability of the proposed system. The laser is locked to CO2 gas R18 absorption line at 1572.0179 nm, and its peak-to-peak frequency stability is approximately 485 kHz, satisfying the requirements for the integrated path differential absorption system for CO2 measurement with an accuracy of  <1 ppm over 5 h.

  19. Photoionization-Induced Emission of Tunable Few-Cycle Midinfrared Dispersive Waves in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, D; Cassataro, M; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-07-17

    We propose a scheme for the emission of few-cycle dispersive waves in the midinfrared using hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with noble gas. The underlying mechanism is the formation of a plasma cloud by a self-compressed, subcycle pump pulse. The resulting free-electron population modifies the fiber dispersion, allowing phase-matched access to dispersive waves at otherwise inaccessible frequencies, well into the midinfrared. Remarkably, the pulses generated turn out to have durations of the order of two optical cycles. In addition, this ultrafast emission, which occurs even in the absence of a zero dispersion point between pump and midinfrared wavelengths, is tunable over a wide frequency range simply by adjusting the gas pressure. These theoretical results pave the way to a new generation of compact, fiber-based sources of few-cycle midinfrared radiation.

  20. Dramatic Raman Gain Suppression in the Vicinity of the Zero Dispersion Point in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bauerschmidt, Sebastian T; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    In 1964 Bloembergen and Shen predicted that Raman gain could be suppressed if the rates of phonon creation and annihilation (by inelastic scattering) exactly balance. This is only possible if the momentum required for each process is identical, i.e., phonon coherence waves created by pump-to-Stokes scattering are identical to those annihilated in pump-to-anti-Stokes scattering. In bulk gas cells, this can only be achieved over limited interaction lengths at an oblique angle to the pump axis. Here we report a simple system that provides dramatic Raman gain suppression over long collinear path-lengths in hydrogen. It consists of a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber whose zero dispersion point is pressure-adjusted to lie close to the pump laser wavelength. At a certain precise pressure, generation of Stokes light in the fundamental mode is completely suppressed, allowing other much weaker nonlinear processes to be explored.

  1. Single crystal to single crystal (SC-to-SC) transformation from a nonporous to porous metal-organic framework and its application potential in gas adsorption and Suzuki coupling reaction through postmodification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Rupam; Saha, Debraj; Koner, Subratanath; Brandão, Paula; Lin, Zhi

    2015-04-07

    A new amino-functionalized strontium-carboxylate-based metal-organic framework (MOF) has been synthesized that undergoes single crystal to single crystal (SC-to-SC) transformation upon desolvation. Both structures have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The desolvated structure shows an interesting 3D porous structure with pendent -NH2 groups inside the pore wall, whereas the solvated compound possesses a nonporous structure with DMF molecules on the metal centers. The amino group was postmodified through Schiff base condensation by pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde and palladium was anchored on that site. The modified framework has been utilized for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction. The compound shows high activity towards the C-C cross-coupling reaction with good yields and turnover frequencies. Gas adsorption studies showed that the desolvated compound had permanent porosity and was microporous in nature with a BET surface area of 2052 m(2)  g(-1). The material also possesses good CO2 (8 wt %) and H2 (1.87 wt %) adsorption capabilities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Constraint on the inflow/outflow rates in star-forming galaxies at z~1.4 from molecular gas observations

    CERN Document Server

    Seko, Akifumi; Yabe, Kiyoto; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Akiyama, Masayuki; Tamura, Naoyuki; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Dalton, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the rate of gas inflow into and outflow from a main-sequence star-forming galaxy at z~1.4 by fitting a simple analytic model for the chemical evolution in a galaxy to the observational data of the stellar mass, metallicity, and molecular gas mass fraction. The molecular gas mass is derived from CO observations with a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor, and the gas metallicity is derived from the H{\\alpha} and [NII]{\\lambda} 6584 emission line ratio. Using a stacking analysis of CO integrated intensity maps and the emission lines of H{\\alpha} and [NII], the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and gas mass fraction is derived. We constrain the inflow and outflow rates with least-chi-square fitting of a simple analytic chemical evolution model to the observational data. The best-fit inflow and outflow rates are ~1.7 and ~0.4 in units of star-formation rate, respectively. The inflow rate is roughly comparable to the sum of the star-formation rate and outflow rate, which supports...

  3. Planck early results. XIX. All-sky temperature and dust optical depth from Planck and IRAS. Constraints on the "dark gas" in our Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    mass fraction is relatively constant down to a few degrees from the Galactic plane. A possible explanation for the dark gas lies in a dark molecular phase, where H2 survives photodissociation but CO does not. The observed transition for the onsetof this phase in the solar neighbourhood (AV = 0.4mag...... density of observed gas is linear in the lowest column density regions at high Galactic latitudes. At high NH, the correlation is consistent with that of the lowest NH, for a given choice of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor. In the intermediate NH range, a departure from linearity is observed, with the dust......) appears consistent with recent theoretical predictions. It is also possible that up to half of the dark gas could be in atomic form, due to optical depth effects in the Hi measurements. © ESO, 2011....

  4. Planck early results. XIX. All-sky temperature and dust optical depth from Planck and IRAS. Constraints on the "dark gas" in our Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    An all sky map of the apparent temperature and optical depth of thermal dust emission is constructed using the Planck-HFI (350μm to 2 mm) andIRAS(100μm) data. The optical depth maps are correlated with tracers of the atomic (Hi) and molecular gas traced by CO. The correlation with the column...... density of observed gas is linear in the lowest column density regions at high Galactic latitudes. At high NH, the correlation is consistent with that of the lowest NH, for a given choice of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor. In the intermediate NH range, a departure from linearity is observed, with the dust...... optical depth in excess of the correlation. This excess emission is attributed to thermal emission by dust associated with a dark gas phase, undetected in the available Hi and CO surveys. The 2D spatial distribution of the dark gas in the solar neighbourhood (|bII| > 10°) is shown to extend around known...

  5. Geochemical and VOC-constraints on landfill gas age and attenuation characteristics: A case study from a waste disposal facility in Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Benjamin; Kerfoot, Henry B; Verwiel, Mark; Matlock, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a multi-tracer approach was applied to a complex, methane-impacted site in Southern California to (1) distinguish between natural gas and landfill gas (LFG)-derived methane impacts at site perimeter gas probes, (2) estimate the relative age of the LFG at these probes, and (3) document natural attenuation trends during a 3-year monitoring period. Relationships between methane and ethane values suggest that at the majority of probes, methane is from LFG and not from natural gas and that the relative contribution of LFG methane at these probes has increased over the monitoring period. To evaluate whether LFG is attenuating in the subsurface, the relative age of LFG was estimated by comparing readily degraded VOCs that are major constituents in LFG (toluene in this case) with those resistant to degradation (Freons). Time-series data trends are consistent with several probes being impacted by fresh LFG from recent releases that occurred after the update of the local LFG collection and control system (LFGCCS). Data further indicate some probes to be only affected by legacy LFG from a past release that occurred prior to the LFGCCS update and that, because of a lack of oxygen in the subsurface, had not been fully degraded. The outlined attenuation evaluation methodology is potentially applicable to other sites or even groundwater contaminants; however, the assessment is limited by the degree of homogeneity of the LFG source composition and non-LFG-derived toluene inputs to the analyzed samples.

  6. Fluid expulsion at a 3-km long fracture system in the Northern North Sea - geochemical constraints on the origin of gas and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, M.; Wallmann, K.; Schmidt, M.; Liebetrau, V.; Sommer, S.; Schroller, D.; Schoenfeld, J.; Karstens, J.; Berndt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Investigating the integrity of the overburden is a key element for assessing the risks involved in geologic CO2 storage. In the course of the ECO2 project, in 2011 colleagues from the University of Bergen have discovered a 3-km long fracture, named Hugin, in the North Sea, about 25 km north of the Utsira CO2 plume. The Hugin fracture is easily identified by extended stretches of bacterial mats at the seafloor, indicating the expulsion of reduced fluids. Geochemical analyses of porewater constituents from push cores and vibrocores, taken during cruises in 2012 and 2013, confirmed the upward advection of anoxic porewater containing dissolved methane of C2+ ratio decreases with decreasing methane concentration. In addition, total alkalinity and sulfate correlate linearly with the d13C of the total dissolved inorganic carbon. However, low amounts of higher alkanes, such as propane, n-/iso-butane, pentane and even hexane, were also found indicating small admixtures of thermogenic gas as well. The likely source of the biogenic methane is a gas-rich horizon of Pliocene age, whereas the thermogenic gas component must have migrated upwards from the known deeper reservoirs, e.g. the underlying Sleipner fields. While biogeochemical indications for upward gas migration, dissolution and oxidation are observed along the entire fracture, at two sites, also active seepage of porewater at comparably high advection velocities of ~50 cm/a was detected. This porewater shows a distinctly lower salinity than today's seawater and is clearly of meteoric origin according to its linear d18O/dD correlation. The porewater is slightly more radiogenic than seawater indicative of weathering of sediments. In addition, this porewater has also seen stronger biogeochemical reactions from anaerobic oxidation of methane and associated authigenic carbonate precipitation as indicated by its higher total alkalinity and stronger depletion in Ca. Overall, we can postulate that the fracture is an active

  7. Constraints on temporal velocity variations associated with an underground gas storage in the Gulf of Valencia using earthquake and seismic ambient noise data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Arantza; Gaite, Beatriz; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    During September 2013, the injection of the base gas in a depleted oil reservoir used as an underground natural gas storage (CASTOR) caused a sudden seismic activity increase in the eastern coast of Spain. As a result, a compact cluster of more than 550 earthquakes with magnitudes mbLg > 0.7 were located in the shallow offshore area of the Gulf of Valencia during two months. The strongest event, having a magnitude of Mw=4.2, was followed by two Mw=4.1 events the day after and took place once the gas injection activities had finished. Using the seismic data recorded by permanent stations at more than 25 km from the injection well, we applied coda wave interferometry to monitor changes in seismic velocity structure between similar earthquakes. Then we solved for a continuous function of velocity changes with time by combining observations from all the closely located earthquake sources. The rate of repeating events allowed measurements of relative velocity variations for about 30 days on a daily scale. To extend the analysis in time, we also processed the continuous data using the autocorrelation of band-pass filtered ambient seismic noise. A 10-day average was required to achieve a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the 0.2-0.5 Hz and 0.5-1 Hz frequency bands. We quantified the time lags between two traces in the frequency and time domains by means of the Moving Window Cross Spectral Analysis and a Dynamic Time Warping technique, respectively. Injection of fluids in geologic formations causes variations in seismic velocities associated to changes in fluid saturation, increase in pore pressure or opening or enlargement of cracks due to the injection process. Time delays associated with stress changes caused by moderate to large earthquakes have also been established. In this work, we found no velocity changes during the gas injection period nor on the occasion of the Mw 4.2 earthquake. The sensitivity of the method is dependent on the seismic network geometry and

  8. Gas monitoring system based on photonic crystal fiber sensor%基于光子晶体光纤传感器的瓦斯监测系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦民红; 童敏明; 童夏敏

    2012-01-01

    With special structure and light propagation mechanism, hollow-core bandgap photonic crystal fiber is superior to other common fibers in many aspects, for example, it is more sensitive to detect gas. The sensor is adopted as testing components, and gas monitoring system based on Zig Bee wireless sensor networks is designed. The test results is compared with sample value and the experimental results show that relative error is within 10% and the purpose of on-line gas monitoring is achieved fundamentally.%空芯带隙型光子晶体光纤以其独特的结构和导光机制,具有其它普通光纤无法比拟的优势,这种光纤传感器在气体检测方面灵敏度更高.设计了以这种传感器为检测元件,基于Zig Bee的无线传感器网络的瓦斯监测系统,实验测试结果与样本值比较表明:相对误差在10%以内,基本达到了实时在线监测瓦斯的目的.

  9. Growth of dopamine crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Vidya, E-mail: vidya.patil@ruparel.edu; Patki, Mugdha, E-mail: mugdha.patki@ruparel.edu [D. G. Ruparel College, Senapati Bapat Marg, Mahim, Mumbai – 400 016 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  10. Growth of dopamine crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  11. Significant Gas Adsorption and Catalytic Performance by a Robust Cu(II) -MOF Derived through Single-Crystal to Single-Crystal Transmetalation of a Thermally Less-Stable Zn(II) -MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tapan K; De, Dinesh; Neogi, Subhadip; Pachfule, Pradip; Senthilkumar, S; Xu, Qiang; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2015-12-21

    By using a bent tetracarboxylic acid ligand that incorporates a pendent-NH2 functional group, a 3D Zn(II)-framework (1) based on Zn2 (CO2)4 secondary building units and Zn12 (CO2)24 supramolecular building blocks has been synthesized. Framework 1 is thermally less stable, which precludes its application as a porous framework for gas adsorption or catalytic studies. This framework undergoes single-crystal to single-crystal transmetalation to give isostructural 1Cu. Unlike 1, the Cu(II) analogue is very stable and can be activated by removing metal-bound lattice solvent molecules by heating to afford 1Cu'. The activated 1Cu' exhibits excellent H2 storage (2.29 wt%) at 77 K and a high 32.1 wt% CO2 uptake at 273 K. Additionally, it displays significant selectivity for CO2 adsorption over N2 and H2 and can catalyse size-selective Knoevenagel condensation reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A.; Flores-Camacho, J. Manuel; Campbell, Charles T.; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical/thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption/reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2 s-1 and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 nJ (or 120 nJ cm

  13. Causes of unrest at silicic calderas in the East African Rift: New constraints from InSAR and soil-gas chemistry at Aluto volcano, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, William; Biggs, Juliet; Mather, Tamsin A.; Pyle, David M.; Lewi, Elias; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Clor, Laura E.; Fischer, Tobias P.

    2016-08-01

    Restless silicic calderas present major geological hazards, and yet many also host significant untapped geothermal resources. In East Africa, this poses a major challenge, although the calderas are largely unmonitored their geothermal resources could provide substantial economic benefits to the region. Understanding what causes unrest at these volcanoes is vital for weighing up the opportunities against the potential risks. Here we bring together new field and remote sensing observations to evaluate causes of ground deformation at Aluto, a restless silicic volcano located in the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER). Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data reveal the temporal and spatial characteristics of a ground deformation episode that took place between 2008 and 2010. Deformation time series reveal pulses of accelerating uplift that transition to gradual long-term subsidence, and analytical models support inflation source depths of ˜5 km. Gases escaping along the major fault zone of Aluto show high CO2 flux, and a clear magmatic carbon signature (CO2-δ13C of -4.2‰ to -4.5‰). This provides compelling evidence that the magmatic and hydrothermal reservoirs of the complex are physically connected. We suggest that a coupled magmatic-hydrothermal system can explain the uplift-subsidence signals. We hypothesize that magmatic fluid injection and/or intrusion in the cap of the magmatic reservoir drives edifice-wide inflation while subsequent deflation is related to magmatic degassing and depressurization of the hydrothermal system. These new constraints on the plumbing of Aluto yield important insights into the behavior of rift volcanic systems and will be crucial for interpreting future patterns of unrest.

  14. Photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Kurt; Wehrspohn, Ralf B; Föll, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    The majority of the contributions in this topically edited book stems from the priority program SPP 1113 ""Photonische Kristalle"" run by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), resulting in a survey of the current state of photonic crystal research in Germany. The first part of the book describes methods for the theoretical analysis of their optical properties as well as the results. The main part is dedicated to the fabrication, characterization and modeling of two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals, while the final section presents a wide spectrum of applications: gas sensors, micr

  15. Metal-rich multi-phase gas in M87: AGN-driven metal transport, magnetic-field supported multi-temperature gas, and constraints on non-thermal emission observed with XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Simionescu, A; Finoguenov, A; Böhringer, H; Brüggen, M

    2007-01-01

    We use deep (~120 ks) XMM-Newton data of the M87 halo to analyze its spatially resolved temperature structure and chemical composition. We focus particularly on the regions of enhanced X-ray brightness associated with the inner radio lobes. Compared to a simple two-temperature fit, we obtain a better and more physical description of the spectra using a model which involves a continuous range of temperatures in each spatial bin. The range of temperatures of the multiphase gas spans between ~0.6-3.2 keV. Such a multiphase structure is only possible if thermal conduction is suppressed by magnetic fields. In the multi-temperature regions, we find a correlation between the amount of cool gas (with a temperature below that of the surrounding X-ray plasma) and the metallicity, and conclude that the cool gas is more metal-rich than the ambient halo. We estimate the Fe abundance of the cool gas to ~2.2 solar. Our results thus point toward the key role of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in transporting heavy elements...

  16. Volatile constraints on the magma supply, dynamics and plumbing system of a top-ranking basaltic gas emitter: Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    P. Allard1,2, A. Aiuppa3,4, P. Bani5, N. Métrich1,6, A. Bertagnini6, M. Burton7, P-J. Gauthier5, F. Parello3, H. Shinohara8, G. Sawyer9, E. Bagnato3, E. Garaebiti10 1IPGP, UMR7154 CNRS, Paris France; 2INGV, Sezione di Catania, Italy; 3DiSTEM, Palermo University, Italy; 4INGV, Sezione di Palermo, Italy; 5LMV-OPGC, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 6INGV, Sezione di Pisa, Italy; 7SEAES, University of Manchester, UK; 8Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Japan; 9Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK; 10GEOHAZARD, Port Vila, Vanuatu. Ambrym basaltic volcano (central Vanuatu arc) is one of the most active volcanic systems of the Southwest Pacific region, where recurrent lava lake activity sustains voluminous gas release from two main cones, Benbow and Marum, in a 12 km-wide summit caldera. In 2007-2008 we could perform the first detailed investigations of gas emissions from this very active but remote and hardly accessible intra-oceanic arc volcano, combining ground-based and airborne measurements and using both in situ and remote sensing tools. The degassing budget of major, minor, trace and radioactive volatile species reveals that Ambrym ranks amongst the three most powerful persistent emitters of magmatic volatiles at global scale [1]. Coupled with the analysis of dissolved volatiles in the feeding basalt (olivine-hosted melt inclusions), the gas emission rates imply a very high average magma supply/degassing rate of 25 m3/s - 6 times the rate at Mount Etna - from a reservoir emplaced at about 4 km depth beneath the caldera floor. The chemical composition of emitted volcanic gases is compatible with dominant closed-system ascent and degassing of the basalt, followed by open degassing at shallow depth as water exsolution becomes extensive. The modest time-averaged extrusion rate, estimated from caldera infilling over the past 2 ka, requires convective downward recycling of the denser degassed magma in conduits with diameter of order 10 m. High resolution OP

  17. Noble gas isotopic ratios from historical lavas and fumaroles at Mount Vesuvius (southern Italy): constraints for current and future volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Dario; Nagao, Keisuke; Scarsi, Paolo

    1998-12-01

    Helium, neon and argon isotope ratios have been analysed from phenocrysts of eleven lava samples belonging to the last eruptive cycle of Mount Vesuvius (1631 until 1944). The phenocrysts separates include pyroxene ( N=10) and olivine ( N=1). All phenocryst samples show similarly low gas contents (He, Ne and Ar ˜10 -10 cm 3/g). 3He/ 4He ratios, 5.3-2.11 Ra, are generally low if compared to those typical of the MORB and those of the European Subcontinental Mantle (ESCM), respectively R/ Ra 8.5±1 and 6.0-6.5. A decreasing trend is found from 1631 to 1796, while a more homogeneous set of data is obtained for more recent eruptions, as evidenced by an average R/ Ra value of 2.85. Neon ratios ( 21Ne/ 22Ne and 20Ne/ 22Ne) strongly differ from those typically found on volcanoes and suggest that a crustal component has been added in the source region to Mt. Vesuvius magmas. Argon ratios ( 40Ar/ 36Ar and 38Ar/ 36Ar) have values similar to the atmosphere and are well correlated. The low 40Ar/ 36Ar ratio (max. 302) is, however, in the range of the 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained from several lava samples at other Italian volcanoes and might be considered to have a deep origin. Two hypothesis have been discussed: (1) a deep argon-like-air source, due to subduction of air-rich sediments and/or (2) a preferential loss of Ar, in comparison to lighter noble gases, from silicic melts. Helium isotopic analysis of gas samples recently collected from crater and submarine fumaroles are similar to those of lavas belonging to the final part of this eruptive cycle. This result supports the idea that no new juvenile fluids from the source region have been injected into the magmatic reservoir during the 1631-1944 eruptive cycle and, more importantly, until 1993. Both sets of data help to understand the genesis of these fluids and to constrain the current activity of the volcano.

  18. The role of transport sector within the German energy system under greenhouse gas reduction constraints and effects on other exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walbeck, M.; Martinsen, D. [Research Center Juelich (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    The German Federal Government pledged itself to make a 25% reduction in national CO{sub 2} emissions by 2005 on the basis of 1990 CO{sub 2} emissions. This reduction target is valid for the entire Federal Republic. Within that context the Federal Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Technology initiated the IKARUS project (Instruments for Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies) in 1990. The aim of the project is to provide tools for developing strategies to reduce energy-related emissions of greenhouse gases in Germany. A range of instruments has been developed consisting of models, a data base and various tools with the aid of which different action sequences can be simulated and evaluated until the year 2020. By using the database and mainly one of the models of the project a scenario in terms of energy and carbon dioxide emissions will be sown as it could be expected for the year 2005. For this scenario as base two different strategies that hit the 25% reduction target will be discussed. Special attention is given to the transport sector. (au)

  19. Understanding the dynamics of photoionization-induced nonlinear effects and solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    We present the details of our previously formulated model [Saleh , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.203902 107, 203902 (2011)] that governs pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by an ionizable gas. By using perturbative methods, we find that the photoionization process induces the opposite phenomenon of the well-known Raman self-frequency redshift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers, as was recently experimentally demonstrated [Hölzer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.203901 107, 203901 (2011)]. This process is only limited by ionization losses, and leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous blueshift in the frequency domain. By applying the Gagnon-Bélanger gauge transformation, multipeak “inverted gravitylike” solitary waves are predicted. We also demonstrate that the pulse dynamics shows the ejection of solitons during propagation in such fibers, analogous to what happens in conventional solid-core fibers. Moreover, unconventional long-range nonlocal interactions between temporally distant solitons, unique of gas plasma systems, are predicted and studied. Finally, the effects of higher-order dispersion coefficients and the shock operator on the pulse dynamics are investigated, showing that the conversion efficiency of resonant radiation into the deep UV can be improved via plasma formation.

  20. Sugar nanowires based on cyclodextrin on quartz crystal microbalance for gas sensing with ultra-high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Atsushi; Maeyoshi, Yuta; Watanabe, Shogo; Saeki, Akinori; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Nanto, Hidehito; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shun-Ichiro; Seki, Shu

    2013-03-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs), hosting selectively a wide range of guest molecules in their hydrophobic cavity, were directly fabricated into 1-dimensional nanostructures with extremely wide surface area by single particle nanofabrication technique in the present paper. The copolymers of acrylamide and mono(6-allyl)-β-CD were synthesized, and the crosslinking reaction of the polymer alloys with poly(4-bromostyrene) (PBrS) in SPNT gave nanowires on the quarts substrate with high number density of 5×109 cm-2. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurement suggested 320 fold high sensitivity for formic acid vapor adsorption in the nanowire fabricated surfaces compared with that in the thin solid film of PBrS, due to the incorporation of CD units and extremely wide surface area of the nanowires.

  1. Stochastic Constraint Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Toby

    2009-01-01

    To model combinatorial decision problems involving uncertainty and probability, we introduce stochastic constraint programming. Stochastic constraint programs contain both decision variables (which we can set) and stochastic variables (which follow a probability distribution). They combine together the best features of traditional constraint satisfaction, stochastic integer programming, and stochastic satisfiability. We give a semantics for stochastic constraint programs, and propose a number...

  2. Top-down constraints to aerosol emissions from open biomass burning: the role of gas-particle partitioning and secondary organic aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Beekmann, Matthias; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Petetin, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Open biomass burning (BB), including wildfires and controlled burns in agriculture and foresty, is known to provide an important contribution to organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) emissions on the global scale. However, quantitative estimates of BB aerosol emissions and their effects on climate and environment remain rather uncertain. A useful way to constrain the OA&BC emissions involves using atmospheric measurements in the framework of the inverse modeling approach. In such an approach, the relationship between the emissions and the measurements is simulated by a chemistry transport model; this means that top-down estimates may be sensitive to possible model uncertainties. As a result of assimilation of satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, several recent studies (e.g. [1,2]) indicated that aerosol emissions provided by bottom-up emission inventories may be strongly underestimated relative to emissions of gaseous species (such as CO). Meanwhile, it was earlier shown (e.g. [3]) that the relationship between primary organic aerosol emissions and aerosol concentration in the atmosphere can be significantly affected by gas-particle partitioning and oxidation of lower-volatility organic emissions; these processes are usually not taken into account in typical chemistry transport models. The main goal of this study was to examine to what degree the discrepancy between the OA&BC/CO emission ratios predicted by the bottom-up inventories and derived from satellite observations can be associated with the mentioned processes and explained in the framework of the volatility basis set approach (VBS) [3] to OA modelling. To achieve this goal, a VBS scheme, which was recently implemented in the CHIMERE chemistry transport model (CTM), was first modified to account for OA emissions from biomass burning. An ensemble of simulations with the CHIMERE CTM was then performed for the case of the 2010 mega-fire event in European Russia [4]; each of the simulations

  3. Nanoassembled thin film gas sensors. III. Sensitive detection of amine odors using TiO2/poly(acrylic acid) ultrathin film quartz crystal microbalance sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Takahara, Naoki; Korposh, Sergiy; Yang, Do-Hyeon; Toko, Kiyoshi; Kunitake, Toyoki

    2010-03-15

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gas sensors based on the alternate adsorption of TiO(2) and polyacrilic acid (PAA) were developed for the sensitive detection of amine odors. Individual TiO(2) gel layers could be regularly assembled with a thickness of approximately 0.3 nm by the gas-phase surface sol-gel process (GSSG). The thickness of the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) layer is dependent on its molecular weight, showing different thicknesses of approximately 0.4 nm for PAA(25) (Mw 250,000) and 0.6-0.8 nm for PAA(400) (Mw 4,000,000). The QCM sensors showed a linear response to ammonia in the concentration range 0.3-15 ppm, depending on the deposition cycle of the alternate TiO(2)/PAA layer. The ammonia binding is based on the acid-base interaction to the free carboxylic acid groups of PAA and the limit of detection (LOD) of the 20-cycle TiO(2)/PAA(400) film was estimated to be 0.1 ppm when exposed to ammonia. The sensor response was very fast and stable in a wide relative humidity (rH) range of 30-70%, showing almost the same frequency changes at a given concentration of ammonia. Sensitivity to n-butylamine and ammonia was higher than to pyridine, which is owing to the difference of molecular weight and basicity of the amine analytes. The alternate TiO(2)/PAA(400) films have a highly effective ability to capture amine odors, and the ambient ammonia concentration of 15 ppm could be condensed up to approximately 20,000 ppm inside the films.

  4. A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand: Solvothermal synthesis, crystal structure, gas adsorption and magnetic property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingfu, E-mail: zhangqingfu@lcu.edu.cn; Zhang, Haina; Geng, Aijing; Wang, Suna; Zhang, Chong

    2014-04-01

    A new cobalt(II)–organic framework, [Co{sub 2}(L)(py){sub 2}(DMSO)]{sub n}• 0.5nDMF• 2nDMSO (1) [H{sub 4}L=5,5'-((naphthalene-2,6-dicarbonyl)bis(azanediyl))diisophthalic acid, py=pyridine, DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide, DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide], has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, PXRD and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The structural analysis reveals that complex 1 is a 3D framework built from nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligands (L{sup 4−}) and dinuclear [Co{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 4}] secondary building units (SBUs), exhibiting a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology with the Schläfli symbol of (4• 6{sup 5}). The desolvated complex (1a) displays higher adsorption capability for CO{sub 2} than N{sub 2}, which may be due to the relatively strong binding affinity between the CO{sub 2} molecules and acylamide groups in the framework. The magnetic investigation shows that the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction is observed in complex 1. - Graphical abstract: A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand was solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized, its thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied. - Highlights: • A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized. • Complex 1 exhibits a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology. • The thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied.

  5. The Soft Cumulative Constraint

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    This research report presents an extension of Cumulative of Choco constraint solver, which is useful to encode over-constrained cumulative problems. This new global constraint uses sweep and task interval violation-based algorithms.

  6. Morphology of Diamond Layers Grown on Different Facets of Single Crystal Diamond Substrates by a Microwave Plasma CVD in CH4-H2-N2 Gas Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny E. Ashkinazi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial growth of diamond films on different facets of synthetic IIa-type single crystal (SC high-pressure high temperature (HPHT diamond substrate by a microwave plasma CVD in CH4-H2-N2 gas mixture with the high concentration (4% of nitrogen is studied. A beveled SC diamond embraced with low-index {100}, {110}, {111}, {211}, and {311} faces was used as the substrate. Only the {100} face is found to sustain homoepitaxial growth at the present experimental parameters, while nanocrystalline diamond (NCD films are produced on other planes. This observation is important for the choice of appropriate growth parameters, in particular, for the production of bi-layer or multilayer NCD-on-microcrystalline diamond (MCD superhard coatings on tools when the deposition of continuous conformal NCD film on all facet is required. The development of the film morphology with growth time is examined with SEM. The structure of hillocks, with or without polycrystalline aggregates, that appear on {100} face is analyzed, and the stress field (up to 0.4 GPa within the hillocks is evaluated based on high-resolution mapping of photoluminescence spectra of nitrogen-vacancy NV optical centers in the film.

  7. Composing constraint solvers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoeteweij, P.

    2005-01-01

    Composing constraint solvers based on tree search and constraint propagation through generic iteration leads to efficient and flexible constraint solvers. This was demonstrated using OpenSolver, an abstract branch-and-propagate tree search engine that supports a wide range of relevant solver configu

  8. Numerical simulation on vacuum solution heat treatment and gas quenching process of a low rhenium-containing Ni-based single crystal turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe-xin Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerical heat-transfer and turbulent flow model for an industrial high-pressure gas quenching vacuum furnace was established to simulate the heating, holding and gas fan quenching of a low rhenium-bearing Ni-based single crystal turbine blade. The mesh of simplified furnace model was built using finite volume method and the boundary conditions were set up according to the practical process. Simulation results show that the turbine blade geometry and the mutual shielding among blades have significant influence on the uniformity of the temperature distribution. The temperature distribution at sharp corner, thin wall and corner part is higher than that at thick wall part of blade during heating, and the isotherms show a toroidal line to the center of thick wall. The temperature of sheltered units is lower than that of the remaining part of blade. When there is no shelteration among multiple blades, the temperature distribution for all blades is almost identical. The fluid velocity field, temperature field and cooling curves of the single and multiple turbine blades during gas fan quenching were also simulated. Modeling results indicate that the loading tray, free outlet and the location of turbine blades have important influences on the flow field. The high-speed gas flows out from the nozzle is divided by loading tray, and the free outlet enhanced the two vortex flow at the end of the furnace door. The closer the blade is to the exhaust outlet and the nozzle, the greater the flow velocity is and the more adequate the flow is. The blade geometry has an effect on the cooling for single blade and multiple blades during gas fan quenching, and the effects in double layers differs from that in single layer. For single blade, the cooing rate at thin-walled part is lower than that at thick-walled part, the cooling rate at sharp corner is greater than that at tenon and blade platform, and the temperature at regions close to the internal position is

  9. Crystal growth, differential gas adsorption, high thermal stability, and reversible coordination of two new barium-organic frameworks, Ba(SBA)(DMF){sub 4} and Ba{sub 2}(BTEC)(H{sub 2}O)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halake, Shobha; Ok, Kang Min, E-mail: kmok@cau.ac.kr

    2015-11-15

    Single crystals of two barium-organic framework materials, Ba(SBA)(DMF){sub 4} (CAUMOF-15) and Ba{sub 2}(BTEC)(H{sub 2}O) (CAUMOF-16), have been grown through solvothermal reactions (H{sub 2}SBA=4,4′-sulfonyldibenzoic acid and H{sub 4}BTEC=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid). The crystal structures of the reported frameworks have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The materials have been fully characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), elemental analyses, Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). CAUMOF-15 reveals a three-dimensional open-framework that comprises of an inorganic motif with one-dimensional chains and the SBA linkers. CAUMOF-16 shows another three-dimensional backbone consisting of layers of edge-shared BaO{sub 9} and BaO{sub 10} polyhedra, and BTEC pillars. Both of the 3D frameworks exhibit relatively high thermal stabilities. The PXRD and IR spectral data confirm that CAUMOF-15 and CAUMOF-16 reveal reversible coordinations of the respective solvent molecules, DMF and H{sub 2}O. Gas adsorption properties towards nitrogen, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide have been also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Crystals of two new barium-organic frameworks, Ba(SBA)(DMF){sub 4} and Ba{sub 2}(BTEC)(H{sub 2}O), exhibiting a differential gas adsorption, a high thermal stability, and a reversible coordination of solvent molecules have been grown. - Highlights: • Crystals of two new 3D Ba-MOFs are grown. • The two Ba-MOFs reveal very high thermal stabilities up to ca. 400 °C. • Ba(SBA)(DMF){sub 4} exhibits differential gas adsorption properties. • The two Ba-MOFs show reversible coordination of the solvent molecules.

  10. On Testing Constraint Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Lazaar, Nadjib; Yahia, Lebbah

    2010-01-01

    The success of several constraint-based modeling languages such as OPL, ZINC, or COMET, appeals for better software engineering practices, particularly in the testing phase. This paper introduces a testing framework enabling automated test case generation for constraint programming. We propose a general framework of constraint program development which supposes that a first declarative and simple constraint model is available from the problem specifications analysis. Then, this model is refined using classical techniques such as constraint reformulation, surrogate and global constraint addition, or symmetry-breaking to form an improved constraint model that must be thoroughly tested before being used to address real-sized problems. We think that most of the faults are introduced in this refinement step and propose a process which takes the first declarative model as an oracle for detecting non-conformities. We derive practical test purposes from this process to generate automatically test data that exhibit no...

  11. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  12. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  13. Constraints meet concurrency

    CERN Document Server

    Mauro, Jacopo

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the benefits that emerge when the fields of constraint programming and concurrency meet. On the one hand, constraints can be used in concurrency theory to increase the conciseness and the expressive power of concurrent languages from a pragmatic point of view. On the other hand, problems modeled by using constraints can be solved faster and more efficiently using a concurrent system. Both directions are explored providing two separate lines of development. Firstly the expressive power of a concurrent language is studied, namely Constraint Handling Rules, that supports constraints as a primitive construct. The features of this language which make it Turing powerful are shown. Then a framework is proposed to solve constraint problems that is intended to be deployed on a concurrent system. For the development of this framework the concurrent language Jolie following the Service Oriented paradigm is used. Based on this experience, an extension to Service Oriented Languages is also proposed in ...

  14. On Minimal Constraint Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gottlob, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In a minimal binary constraint network, every tuple of a constraint relation can be extended to a solution. It was conjectured that computing a solution to such a network is NP complete. We prove this conjecture true and show that the problem remains NP hard even in case the total domain of all values that may appear in the constraint relations is bounded by a constant.

  15. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Valencia Posso, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...... reflect the reactive interactions between concurrent constraint processes and their environment, as well as internal interactions between individual processes. Relationships between the suggested notions are studied, and they are all proved to be decidable for a substantial fragment of the calculus...

  16. Theory of Constraints (TOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Aage U.

    2004-01-01

    Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process.......Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process....

  17. Credit Constraints in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints have recently become important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, as their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  18. Theory of Constraints (TOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Aage U.

    2004-01-01

    Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process.......Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process....

  19. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...

  20. Evaluating Distributed Timing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.H.; Drejer, N.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems.......In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems....

  1. Decentralized Constraint Satisfaction

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, K R; Leith, D J

    2011-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) lie at the heart of many modern industrial and commercial tasks. An important new collection of CSPs has recently been emerging that differ from classical problems in that they impose constraints on the class of algorithms that can be used to solve them. In computer network applications, these constraints arise as the variables within the CSP are located at physically distinct devices that cannot communicate. At each instant, every variable only knows if all its constraints are met or at least one is not. Consequently, the CSP's solution must be found using a decentralized approach. Existing algorithms for solving CSPs are either centralized or distributed, both of which violate these algorithmic constraints. In this article we present the first algorithm for solving CSPs that fulfills these new requirements. It is fully decentralized, making no use of a centralized controller or message-passing between variables. We prove that this algorithm converges with probability ...

  2. Constraints in Quantum Geometrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gentle, A P; Kheyfets, A I; Miller, W A; Gentle, Adrian P.; George, Nathan D.; Kheyfets, Arkady; Miller, Warner A.

    2003-01-01

    We compare different treatments of the constraints in canonical quantum gravity. The standard approach on the superspace of 3-geometries treats the constraints as the sole carriers of the dynamic content of the theory, thus rendering the traditional dynamic equations obsolete. Quantization of the constraints in both the Dirac and ADM square root Hamiltonian approach lead to the well known problems of the description of time evolution. These problems of time are both of interpretational and technical nature. In contrast, the so-called geometrodynamic quantization procedure on the superspace of the true dynamic variables separates the issue of quantization from enforcing the constraints. The resulting theory takes into account the states that are off shell with respect to the constraints, and thus avoids the problems of time. Here, we develop, for the first time, the geometrodynamic quantization formalism in a general setting and show that it retains all essential features previously illustrated in the context ...

  3. A generalized crystal-cutting method for modeling arbitrarily oriented crystals in 3D periodic simulation cells with applications to crystal-crystal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Mathew, Nithin; Jiang, Shan; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2016-10-01

    A Generalized Crystal-Cutting Method (GCCM) is developed that automates construction of three-dimensionally periodic simulation cells containing arbitrarily oriented single crystals and thin films, two-dimensionally (2D) infinite crystal-crystal homophase and heterophase interfaces, and nanostructures with intrinsic N-fold interfaces. The GCCM is based on a simple mathematical formalism that facilitates easy definition of constraints on cut crystal geometries. The method preserves the translational symmetry of all Bravais lattices and thus can be applied to any crystal described by such a lattice including complicated, low-symmetry molecular crystals. Implementations are presented with carefully articulated combinations of loop searches and constraints that drastically reduce computational complexity compared to simple loop searches. Orthorhombic representations of monoclinic and triclinic crystals found using the GCCM overcome some limitations in standard distributions of popular molecular dynamics software packages. Stability of grain boundaries in β-HMX was investigated using molecular dynamics and molecular statics simulations with 2D infinite crystal-crystal homophase interfaces created using the GCCM. The order of stabilities for the four grain boundaries studied is predicted to correlate with the relative prominence of particular crystal faces in lab-grown β-HMX crystals. We demonstrate how nanostructures can be constructed through simple constraints applied in the GCCM framework. Example GCCM constructions are shown that are relevant to some current problems in materials science, including shock sensitivity of explosives, layered electronic devices, and pharmaceuticals.

  4. Constraint-based reachability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gotlieb

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Iterative imperative programs can be considered as infinite-state systems computing over possibly unbounded domains. Studying reachability in these systems is challenging as it requires to deal with an infinite number of states with standard backward or forward exploration strategies. An approach that we call Constraint-based reachability, is proposed to address reachability problems by exploring program states using a constraint model of the whole program. The keypoint of the approach is to interpret imperative constructions such as conditionals, loops, array and memory manipulations with the fundamental notion of constraint over a computational domain. By combining constraint filtering and abstraction techniques, Constraint-based reachability is able to solve reachability problems which are usually outside the scope of backward or forward exploration strategies. This paper proposes an interpretation of classical filtering consistencies used in Constraint Programming as abstract domain computations, and shows how this approach can be used to produce a constraint solver that efficiently generates solutions for reachability problems that are unsolvable by other approaches.

  5. Communication with Disturbance Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Bandemer, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The problem of communication with disturbance constraints is introduced. The rate-disturbance region is established for the single constraint case. The optimal encoding scheme turns out to be the same as the Han-Kobayashi scheme for the two user-pair interference channel. For communication with two disturbance constraints, a coding scheme and a corresponding inner bound for the deterministic case are presented. The results suggest a natural way to obtain a new inner bound on the capacity region of the interference channel with more than two user pairs.

  6. The influence of sedimentation rate variation on the occurrence of methane hydrate crystallized from dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is commonly delivered to the gas hydrate stability zone by advection of methane-bearing fluids, diffusion of dissolved methane, and in-situ biogenic methane production (Davie and Buffett, 2003), except at cold vent sites. Burial of pore water and sediment compaction can induce the fluid flux change (Bhatnagar et al., 2007). Sedimentation supply the organic material for methane production. In addition, Gas hydrate can move to below gas hydrate stability zone and decompose via sedimentation. Therefore, sedimentation significantly affect the gas hydrate accumulation. ODP site 997 located at the Blake Ridge. The sedimentation rate is estimated to 48 m/Ma, 245m/Ma, 17.2 m/Ma and 281m/Ma for 0-2.5Ma, 2.5-3.75Ma, 3.75-4.4Ma, and 4.4-5.9Ma, respectively, according to the age-depth profile of biostratigraphic marker of nonnofossils(Paull et al., 1996). We constructed a gas hydrate formation model and apply to ODP sites 997 to evaluate the influence of variation of sedimentation rate on gas hydrate accumulation. Our results show that the gas hydrate format rate varied from 0.013mol/m2-a to 0.017mol/m2-a and the gas hydrate burial to below gas hydrate stability zone varied from 0.001mol/m2-a to 0.018mol/m2-a during recently 5Ma. The gas hydrate formation rate by pore water advection and dissolved methane diffusion would be lower, and the top occurrence of gas hydrate would be shallower, when the sedimentation rate is higher. With higher sedimentation rate, the amount of gas hydrate burial to below stability zone would be larger. The relative high sedimentation rate before 2.5 Ma at ODP site 997 produced the gas hydrate saturation much lower than present value, and over 60% of present gas hydrates are formed during recent 2.5Ma. Reference: Bhatnagar,G., Chapman, W. G.,Dickens, G. R., et al. Generalization of gas hydrate distribution and saturation in marine sediments by scaling of thermodynamic and transport processes. American Journal of Science, 2007, 307, 861

  7. Rheology of Volatile-rich Crystal Mush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, M.; Caricchi, L.; Ulmer, P.; Reusser, E.; Mancktelow, N.; Burlini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Magma batholiths are commonly highly crystalline (> 50 vol%; crystal mush, Bachmann and Bergantz, 2008a) and possible modes of mobilization and emplacement have been intensively discussed in the last decades. Recently, it has been proposed that a stiff mushy batholith must be reheated to mobilize; this produces a reduction in crystallinity that leads to an increase of the magma buoyancy (Burgisser and Bergantz, 2011). Another way of batholith mobilization in the crust can be caused by addition of volatiles (mainly H2O and CO2) released by ascending hydrous mafic magmas coming from the mantle (Bachmann and Bergantz, 2008b). The enrichment in volatiles induces a drastic decrease in the bulk viscosity of the granitic body and, thus, an evident change in the rheological properties of the batholith. The rheology of such very crystal-rich highly viscous systems is still a matter of debate. To provide some additional experimental constraints relevant to this discussion, we deformed hydrous (2.52 wt% H2O) haplogranitic magmas containing variable amounts of quartz crystals (from 55 to 65 vol%), and fixed volume of gas-pressurized CO2-bubbles (9-10 vol%), in simple shear using a HT-HP Paterson-type rock deformation apparatus. Strain rates ranging between 1•10-5 s-1 and 4•10-3 s-1 were applied at temperatures between 823 and 1023 K and constant confining pressure of 200-250 MPa (8-9 km depth). The results suggest that three-phase suspensions are characterized by strain rate-dependent rheology (non-Newtonian behavior). Two non-Newtonian regimes were observed: shear thinning (decrease of viscosity with increasing strain rate) and shear thickening (increase of viscosity with increasing strain rate). The first effect dominantly occurs because of crystal size reduction and shear localization, enhanced by the presence of gas bubbles in the weak shear bands. However, when the solid crystal framework induces an internal flow blockage due to crystal interlock, the second effect

  8. Optimization under Nonlinear Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    In this paper a timesaving method is proposed for maximizing likelihood functions when the parameter space is subject to nonlinear constraints, expressible as second order polynomials. The suggested approach is especially attractive when dealing with systems with many parameters.

  9. Crystals in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Schmidt, I.; Carlsson, A.;

    2005-01-01

    A major factor governing the performance of catalytically active particles supported on a zeolite carrier is the degree of dispersion. It is shown that the introduction of noncrystallographic mesopores into zeolite single crystals (silicalite-1, ZSM-5) may increase the degree of particle dispersion...... of the zeolite particles, particularly after thermal treatment. When using mesoporous zeolites, the particles were evenly distributed throughout the mesopore system of the zeolitic support, even after calcination, leading to nanocrystals within mesoporous zeolite single crystals....

  10. Crystal science fundamentals

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, V.; Halfpenny, PJ; Roberts, KJ

    2017-01-01

    The fundamentals of crystal science notably crystallography, crystal chemistry, crystal defects, crystal morphology and the surface chemistry of crystals are introduced with particular emphasis on organic crystals.

  11. The photogrammetric inner constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermanis, Athanasios

    A derivation of the complete inner constraints, which are required for obtaining "free network" solutions in close-range photogrammetry, is presented. The inner constraints are derived analytically for the bundle method, by exploiting the fact that the rows of their coefficient matrix from a basis for the null subspace of the design matrix used in the linearized observation equations. The derivation is independent of any particular choice of rotational parameters and examples are given for three types of rotation angles used in photogrammetry, as well as for the Rodriguez elements. A convenient algorithm based on the use of the S-transformation is presented, for the computation of free solutions with either inner or partial inner constraints. This approach is finally compared with alternative approaches to free network solutions.

  12. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloviev, V. O., E-mail: Vladimir.Soloviev@ihep.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  13. Psychological constraints on egalitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Debates over egalitarianism for the most part are not concerned with constraints on achieving an egalitarian society, beyond discussions of the deficiencies of egalitarian theory itself. This paper looks beyond objections to egalitarianism as such and investigates the relevant psychological...... processes motivating people to resist various aspects of egalitarianism. I argue for two theses, one normative and one descriptive. The normative thesis holds that egalitarians must take psychological constraints into account when constructing egalitarian ideals. I draw from non-ideal theories in political...... philosophy, which aim to construct moral goals with current social and political constraints in mind, to argue that human psychology must be part of a non-ideal theory of egalitarianism. The descriptive thesis holds that the most fundamental psychological challenge to egalitarian ideals comes from what...

  14. Constraints as evolutionary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rácz, István

    2016-01-01

    The constraint equations for smooth $[n+1]$-dimensional (with $n\\geq 3$) Riemannian or Lorentzian spaces satisfying the Einstein field equations are considered. It is shown, regardless of the signature of the primary space, that the constraints can be put into the form of an evolutionary system comprised either by a first order symmetric hyperbolic system and a parabolic equation or, alternatively, by a strongly hyperbolic system and a subsidiary algebraic relation. In both cases the (local) existence and uniqueness of solutions are also discussed.

  15. Constraint-based scheduling applying constraint programming to scheduling problems

    CERN Document Server

    Baptiste, Philippe; Nuijten, Wim

    2001-01-01

    Constraint Programming is a problem-solving paradigm that establishes a clear distinction between two pivotal aspects of a problem: (1) a precise definition of the constraints that define the problem to be solved and (2) the algorithms and heuristics enabling the selection of decisions to solve the problem. It is because of these capabilities that Constraint Programming is increasingly being employed as a problem-solving tool to solve scheduling problems. Hence the development of Constraint-Based Scheduling as a field of study. The aim of this book is to provide an overview of the most widely used Constraint-Based Scheduling techniques. Following the principles of Constraint Programming, the book consists of three distinct parts: The first chapter introduces the basic principles of Constraint Programming and provides a model of the constraints that are the most often encountered in scheduling problems. Chapters 2, 3, 4, and 5 are focused on the propagation of resource constraints, which usually are responsibl...

  16. Constraint Optimization Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    COPs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS high-performance computing, mobile ad hoc network, optimization, constraint, satisfaction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...France): INRA Editions; 1996. p. 111–150. Black PE. Branch-and-bound. US national institute of standards and technology dictionary of algorithms

  17. A constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangians subjected to nonholonomic constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, M. [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); de Diego, D.M. [Departamento de Economia Aplicada Cuantitativa, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas y Empresariales, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-06-01

    We construct a constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangian systems subjected to nonholonomic constraints which generalizes that of Dirac for constrained Hamiltonian systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Cosmographic Constraints and Cosmic Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Capozziello

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reproducing dark energy effects is reviewed here with particular interest devoted to cosmography. We summarize some of the most relevant cosmological models, based on the assumption that the corresponding barotropic equations of state evolve as the universe expands, giving rise to the accelerated expansion. We describe in detail the ΛCDM (Λ-Cold Dark Matter and ωCDM models, considering also some specific examples, e.g., Chevallier–Polarsky–Linder, the Chaplygin gas and the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati cosmological model. Finally, we consider the cosmological consequences of f(R and f(T gravities and their impact on the framework of cosmography. Keeping these considerations in mind, we point out the model-independent procedure related to cosmography, showing how to match the series of cosmological observables to the free parameters of each model. We critically discuss the role played by cosmography, as a selection criterion to check whether a particular model passes or does not present cosmological constraints. In so doing, we find out cosmological bounds by fitting the luminosity distance expansion of the redshift, z, adopting the recent Union 2.1 dataset of supernovae, combined with the baryonic acoustic oscillation and the cosmic microwave background measurements. We perform cosmographic analyses, imposing different priors on the Hubble rate present value. In addition, we compare our results with recent PLANCK limits, showing that the ΛCDM and ωCDM models seem to be the favorite with respect to other dark energy models. However, we show that cosmographic constraints on f(R and f(T cannot discriminate between extensions of General Relativity and dark energy models, leading to a disadvantageous degeneracy problem.

  19. Design of photonic crystal fiber SF6 gas sensors and leakage monitoring network%光子晶体光纤SF6气体传感器设计与泄漏监控网络

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    束梅玲; 陆兵; 黄晓慧

    2013-01-01

    应用在大量电力设备中的SF6气体泄漏不可避免.针对现有电化学和负电晕放电等气体泄漏检测技术存在的测量精度低、实时性差等问题,设计了一种新型光子晶体光纤SF6气体传感器,并采用谐波检测方法和计算机无线传输网络构建了远程实时监控系统.实验表明:气体检测相对误差在2%以内,SF6体积分数大于10-3时能实时报警,同时开启风机,系统具有极好的应用前景.%Leakage of SF6 gas in a lot of electrical equipments is inevitable.Aiming at problems of negative corona discharge and electrochemical gas leakage detection technologies such as bad real-time and low precision of measurement,a new type of photonic crystal fiber SF6 gas sensor is designed and use harmonic detection method and computer wireless transmission network to construct remote real-time monitoring system.Experiments show that relative error of gas detecting is within 2%,when volume fraction of SF6 is greater than 10-3,real-time alarm can realize and turn on fans,and system has a very good application prospect.

  20. Spectrometry of the Rutherford backscattering of ions and the Raman scattering of light in GaS single crystals irradiated with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibov, A. A.; Madatov, R. S., E-mail: msrahim@mail.ru [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radiation Problems (Azerbaijan); Komarov, F. F.; Pilko, V. V. [Belarus State University, RTCCU of “Nanotechnology and Physical Electronics” (Belarus); Mustafayev, Yu. M.; Akhmedov, F. I.; Jakhangirov, M. M. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radiation Problems (Azerbaijan)

    2015-05-15

    The methods of the Raman scattering of light and Rutherford backscattering are used to study the degree of structural disorder in layered GaS crystals before and after irradiation with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. It is shown that the distribution of the crystal’s components over depth is homogeneous; for doses as high as 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, the stoichiometric composition of the compound’s components is retained. The experimental value of the critical dose for the beginning of amorphization amounts to about 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and is in accordance with the calculated value. The results obtained by the method of the Raman scattering of light confirm conservation of crystalline structure and the start of the amorphization process.

  1. Raman-Free, Noble-Gas-Filled Photonic-Crystal Fiber Source for Ultrafast, Very Bright Twin-Beam Squeezed Vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Martin A; Iskhakov, Timur Sh; Joly, Nicolas Y; Chekhova, Maria V; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-10-02

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic-crystal fiber. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ∼2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (∼50  THz) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes. The presented source outperforms all previously reported squeezed-vacuum twin-beam sources in terms of brightness and low mode content.

  2. Raman-Free, Noble-Gas-Filled Photonic-Crystal Fiber Source for Ultrafast, Very Bright Twin-Beam Squeezed Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Martin A.; Iskhakov, Timur Sh.; Joly, Nicolas Y.; Chekhova, Maria V.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic-crystal fiber. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ˜2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (˜50 THz ) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes. The presented source outperforms all previously reported squeezed-vacuum twin-beam sources in terms of brightness and low mode content.

  3. Dynamical Constraints on Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, Jonti; Tinney, Chris; Hinse, Tobias C; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical studies of new exoplanet systems are a critical component of the discovery and characterisation process. Such studies can provide firmer constraints on the parameters of the newly discovered planets, and may even reveal that the proposed planets do not stand up to dynamical scrutiny. Here, we demonstrate how dynamical studies can assist the characterisation of such systems through two examples: QS Virginis and HD 73526.

  4. The NCL natural constraint language

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jianyang

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the Natural Constraint Language (NCL) language, a description language in conventional mathematical logic for modeling and solving constraint satisfaction problems. It uses illustrations and tutorials to detail NCL and its applications.

  5. Constraints on Relaxion Windows

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Kiwoon

    2016-01-01

    We examine low energy phenomenology of the relaxion solution to the weak scale hierarchy problem. Assuming that the Hubble friction is responsible for the dissipation of relaxion energy, we identify the cosmological relaxion window which corresponds to the parameter region compatible with a given value of the acceptable number of inflationary $e$-foldings. We then discuss a variety of observational constraints on the relaxion window, while focusing on the case that the barrier potential to stabilize the relaxion is induced by new physics, rather than by low energy QCD dynamics. We find that majority of the parameter space with a relaxion mass $m_\\phi\\gtrsim 100$ eV or a relaxion decay constant $f\\lesssim 10^7$ GeV is excluded by existing constraints. There is an interesting small parameter region with $m_\\phi\\sim \\,0.2-1$ GeV and $f\\sim\\, {\\rm few}-10$ TeV, which is allowed by existing constraints, but can be probed soon by future beam dump experiment such as the SHiP experiment, or by improved EDM experiment...

  6. Parallel Handling of Integrity Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Flokstra, Jan; Apers, Peter M.G.

    1990-01-01

    Integrity constraints form an important part of a data model. Therefore, a complete integrity constraint handling subsystem is considered an important part of any modern DBMS. In implementing an integrity constraint handling subsystem, there are two major problem areas: providing enough functionalit

  7. Precise control of photoluminescence of silicon-vacancy color centers in homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond: evaluation of efficiency of Si doping from gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralchenko, Victor; Sedov, Vadim; Saraykin, Vladimir; Bolshakov, Andrey; Zavedeev, Evgeny; Ashkinazi, Evgeny; Khomich, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Ability to precisely control the Si-related color center abundance in diamond is important for the use of silicon-vacancy (SiV) defects with bright photoluminescence (PL) in quantum information technologies and optical biomarkers. Here, we evaluated the efficiency of Si incorporation in (100) plane of homoepitaxial diamond layers upon in situ doping by adding silane SiH4 in the course of diamond chemical vapor deposition in microwave plasma using CH4-H2 mixtures. Both the Si concentration in the doped samples, as determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and PL intensity of SiV centers at 738 nm wavelength, measured at excitation wavelength of 473 nm, demonstrate a linear increase with silane content in feed gas in the range. The incorporation efficiency f, defined as the ratio of Si concentration in diamond to that in gas, f = [Si/C]dia/[Si/C]gas is found to be (1.1 ± 0.5) × 10-3 for the silane concentrations explored, [SiH4/CH4] < 0.7 %; thus, the Si atoms are accommodated in (100) diamond face easier than nitrogen and phosphorus, but more difficult than boron. This finding allows a tailoring of the Si content and photoluminescence intensity of SiV centers in in situ doped CVD diamond.

  8. Supercontinuum generation and tunable ultrafast emission in the vacuum ultraviolet using noble-gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolov, Alexey; Frosz, Michael H; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the generation of a three-octave supercontinuum extending from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near-infrared, spanning at least 113 to 1000 nm (i.e., 11 to 1.2 eV), in He-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic crystal fiber. The same system also permits generation of narrower-band VUV radiation tunable from 113 to 200 nm with efficiencies exceeding 1% and VUV pulse energies in excess of 50 nJ. Modeling confirms that the mechanism involves soliton self-compression to sub-femtosecond pulse durations, dispersive-wave emission and the plasma-induced soliton self-frequency blue-shift. The bandwidth of the generated VUV light, which modeling shows to be coherent, is sufficient to support 500 as single-cycle pulses.

  9. Supercontinuum generation in the vacuum ultraviolet through dispersive-wave and soliton-plasma interaction in a noble-gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolov, A.; Mak, K. F.; Frosz, M. H.; Travers, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the generation of a three-octave-wide supercontinuum extending from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared, spanning at least 113-1000 nm (i.e., 11 -1.2 eV ), in He-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic crystal fiber. Numerical simulations confirm that the main mechanism is an interaction between dispersive-wave emission and plasma-induced blue-shifted soliton recompression around the fiber zero dispersion frequency. The VUV part of the supercontinuum, the modeling of which proves to be coherent and possesses a simple phase structure, has sufficient bandwidth to support single-cycle pulses of 500 asec duration. We also demonstrate, in the same system, the generation of narrower-band VUV pulses through dispersive-wave emission, tunable from 120 to 200 nm with efficiencies exceeding 1 % and VUV pulse energies in excess of 50 nJ.

  10. Axion Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ozaki, Sho

    2016-01-01

    The low-energy effective theories for gapped insulators are classified by three parameters: permittivity $\\epsilon$, permeability $\\mu$, and theta angle $\\theta$. Crystals with periodic $\\epsilon$ are known as photonic crystals. We here study the band structure of photons in a new type of crystals with periodic $\\theta$ (modulo $2\\pi$) in space, which we call the axion crystals. We find that the axion crystals have a number of new properties that the usual photonic crystals do not possess, such as the helicity-dependent photonic band gaps and the nonrelativistic gapless dispersion relation at small momentum. We briefly discuss possible realizations of axion crystals in condensed matter systems as well as high-energy physics.

  11. Chandra ACIS-S Observations of Three Quasars with Low-Redshift Damped Ly-alpha Absorption Constraints on the Cosmic Neutral-Gas-Phase Metallicity at Redshift z \\approx 0.4

    CERN Document Server

    Turnshek, D A; Ptak, A F; Griffiths, R E; Monier, E M; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.; Ptak, Andrew F.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Monier, Eric M.

    2003-01-01

    Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) ACIS-S spectra of three quasars which lie behind three foreground damped Lyman alpha (DLA) absorbers are analyzed in order to attempt to determine the amount of photoelectric absorption due to metals present in their x-ray spectra. These absorbers are the three largest neutral hydrogen column density absorption-line systems known at low redshift (0.313 \\le z_abs \\le 0.524). They have HI column densities which lie between 3E21 and 5E21 atoms/cm^2. At these redshifts the amount of photoelectric absorption at x-ray energies is primarily an indicator of the oxygen abundance. Since the column densities of these systems are so high, one would expect accurate metallicity measurements of them to yield a robust estimate of the column-density-weighted cosmic neutral-gas-phase metallicity at z \\approx 0.4. We consider cases where the DLA gas has solar element abundance ratios and ones with the alpha-group element abundance ratios enhanced. For the adopted assumptions, the column-density-w...

  12. Asteroseismic constraints for Gaia

    CERN Document Server

    Creevey, O L

    2012-01-01

    Distances from the Gaia mission will no doubt improve our understanding of stellar physics by providing an excellent constraint on the luminosity of the star. However, it is also clear that high precision stellar properties from, for example, asteroseismology, will also provide a needed input constraint in order to calibrate the methods that Gaia will use, e.g. stellar models or GSP_phot. For solar-like stars (F, G, K IV/V), asteroseismic data delivers at the least two very important quantities: (1) the average large frequency separation and (2) the frequency corresponding to the maximum of the modulated-amplitude spectrum nu_max. Both of these quantities are related directly to stellar parameters (radius and mass) and in particular their combination (gravity and density). We show how the precision in , nu_max, and atmospheric parameters T_eff and [Fe/H] affect the determination of gravity (log g) for a sample of well-known stars. We find that log g can be determined within less than 0.02 dex accuracy for ou...

  13. Design with Nonlinear Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2015-12-10

    Most modern industrial and architectural designs need to satisfy the requirements of their targeted performance and respect the limitations of available fabrication technologies. At the same time, they should reflect the artistic considerations and personal taste of the designers, which cannot be simply formulated as optimization goals with single best solutions. This thesis aims at a general, flexible yet e cient computational framework for interactive creation, exploration and discovery of serviceable, constructible, and stylish designs. By formulating nonlinear engineering considerations as linear or quadratic expressions by introducing auxiliary variables, the constrained space could be e ciently accessed by the proposed algorithm Guided Projection, with the guidance of aesthetic formulations. The approach is introduced through applications in different scenarios, its effectiveness is demonstrated by examples that were difficult or even impossible to be computationally designed before. The first application is the design of meshes under both geometric and static constraints, including self-supporting polyhedral meshes that are not height fields. Then, with a formulation bridging mesh based and spline based representations, the application is extended to developable surfaces including origami with curved creases. Finally, general approaches to extend hard constraints and soft energies are discussed, followed by a concluding remark outlooking possible future studies.

  14. Natural gas; Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos A.; Moraes, Claudia C.D. [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo S.A. (ELETROPAULO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Carlos H.F. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Clecio Fabricio da; Alves, Ricardo P. [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sposito, Edivaldo Soares; Hulle, Lutero [Espirito Santo Centrais Eletricas S.A. (ESCELSA), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); S. Martins, Icaro da [Centrais Eletricas do Norte do Brasil S.A. (ELETRONORTE), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vilhena, Joao Luiz S. de [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fagundes, Zaluar Aquino [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    An increase in the consumption of natural gas in Brazil is an expected fact in what concerns energetic planning. This work presents the existing situation in what concerns natural gas utilization in the main world economies, as well as an analysis of the participation of this fuel among the energy final consumption per sources. The Brazilian consumption of natural gas is also analysed as well as the international agreement between Brazil and Bolivia for natural gas commercialization. Some legal, institutional and political aspects related to natural gas commercialization are also discussed. Finally, several benefits to be brought by the utilization of natural gas are presented 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Gas Sensor Based on Photonic Crystal Fibres in the 2ν3 and ν2 + 2ν3 Vibrational Bands of Methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Lopez-Higuera

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, methane detection is performed on the 2ν3 and ν2 + 2ν3 absorption bands in the Near-Infrared (NIR wavelength region using an all-fibre optical sensor. Hollowcore photonic bandgap fibres (HC-PBFs are employed as gas cells due to their compactness, good integrability in optical systems and feasibility of long interaction lengths with gases. Sensing in the 2ν3 band of methane is demonstrated to achieve a detection limit one order of magnitude better than that of the ν2 + 2ν3 band. Finally, the filling time of a HC-PBF is demonstrated to be dependent on the fibre length and geometry.

  16. Rewriting Constraint Models with Metamodels

    CERN Document Server

    Chenouard, Raphael; Soto, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    An important challenge in constraint programming is to rewrite constraint models into executable programs calculat- ing the solutions. This phase of constraint processing may require translations between constraint programming lan- guages, transformations of constraint representations, model optimizations, and tuning of solving strategies. In this paper, we introduce a pivot metamodel describing the common fea- tures of constraint models including different kinds of con- straints, statements like conditionals and loops, and other first-class elements like object classes and predicates. This metamodel is general enough to cope with the constructions of many languages, from object-oriented modeling languages to logic languages, but it is independent from them. The rewriting operations manipulate metamodel instances apart from languages. As a consequence, the rewriting operations apply whatever languages are selected and they are able to manage model semantic information. A bridge is created between the metamode...

  17. Constraint Propagation as Information Maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, A Nait

    2012-01-01

    Dana Scott used the partial order among partial functions for his mathematical model of recursively defined functions. He interpreted the partial order as one of information content. In this paper we elaborate on Scott's suggestion of regarding computation as a process of information maximization by applying it to the solution of constraint satisfaction problems. Here the method of constraint propagation can be interpreted as decreasing uncertainty about the solution -- that is, as gain in information about the solution. As illustrative example we choose numerical constraint satisfaction problems to be solved by interval constraints. To facilitate this approach to constraint solving we formulate constraint satisfaction problems as formulas in predicate logic. This necessitates extending the usual semantics for predicate logic so that meaning is assigned not only to sentences but also to formulas with free variables.

  18. Efficient Searching with Linear Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan; Erickson, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    We show how to preprocess a set S of points in d into an external memory data structure that efficiently supports linear-constraint queries. Each query is in the form of a linear constraint xd a0+∑d−1i=1 aixi; the data structure must report all the points of S that satisfy the constraint. This pr......We show how to preprocess a set S of points in d into an external memory data structure that efficiently supports linear-constraint queries. Each query is in the form of a linear constraint xd a0+∑d−1i=1 aixi; the data structure must report all the points of S that satisfy the constraint...

  19. Constraints On Cosmic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mbonye, M R

    2003-01-01

    Observationally, the universe appears virtually critical. Yet, there is no simple explanation for this state. In this article we advance and explore the premise that the dynamics of the universe always seeks equilibrium conditions. Vacuum-induced cosmic accelerations lead to creation of matter-energy modes at the expense of vacuum energy. Because they gravitate, such modes constitute inertia against cosmic acceleration. On the other extreme, the would-be ultimate phase of local gravitational collapse is checked by a phase transition in the collapsing matter fields leading to a de Sitter-like fluid deep inside the black hole horizon, and at the expense of the collapsing matter fields. As a result, the universe succumbs to neither vacuum-induced run-away accelerations nor to gravitationally induced spacetime curvature singularities. Cosmic dynamics is self-regulating. We discuss the physical basis for these constraints and the implications, pointing out how the framework relates and helps resolve standing puzzl...

  20. Constraints on Spontaneous Entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Past research has revealed that a person's rhythmic limb movements become spontaneously entrained to an environmental rhythm if a. visual information about the environmental rhythm is available and b. its frequency of the environmental rhythm is near that of the person's movements. Further, this research has demonstrated that if the eyes track the environmental stimulus, the spontaneous entrainment to the environmental rhythm is strengthened. Experiments were performed to investigate two hypotheses that could explain this eye-tracking enhancement of spontaneous entrainment. One hypothesis is that eye tracking allows for the pick up of important coordinative information at the turn-around points of a movement trajectory. Another hypothesis is that the limb movements entrain to the moving eyes through a neuromotor synergy linking the eyes and limb. Results of these experiments will help delineate the informational and dynamical constraints that can impact the acquisition of skilled actions.

  1. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  2. Constraint-Based Categorial Grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Bouma, G; Bouma, Gosse; Noord, Gertjan van

    1994-01-01

    We propose a generalization of Categorial Grammar in which lexical categories are defined by means of recursive constraints. In particular, the introduction of relational constraints allows one to capture the effects of (recursive) lexical rules in a computationally attractive manner. We illustrate the linguistic merits of the new approach by showing how it accounts for the syntax of Dutch cross-serial dependencies and the position and scope of adjuncts in such constructions. Delayed evaluation is used to process grammars containing recursive constraints.

  3. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  4. Computational crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  5. Radiation generation with pyroelectric crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuther, Jeffrey A.

    2007-12-01

    Pyroelectric crystals heated or cooled in vacuum have been used to produce low-energy x-ray devices since 1992. In the course of this thesis, experiments with lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) and lithium niobate (LiNbO 3) were performed to extend the usefulness of pyroelectric radiation sources. Paired-crystal x-ray generators were shown to double the x-ray energy and yield, and allow the k-shell fluorescence of any metal up to thorium (Z = 90). It was demonstrated that the electron emission from a single pyroelectric crystal could be transmitted through a beryllium window to allow the electron beam to be extracted from the vacuum chamber. The electron emission current and energy were measured, and a mathematical model was developed to predict emission current and energy. Magnetic deflection experiments were used to verify that the electric field produced by the pyroelectric effect in lithium tantalate was sufficient to ionize gas. Finally, a paired-crystal system was used to ionize a deuterium fill gas near a metallic tip mounted to a pyroelectric crystal, and accelerate these ions into a deuterated target mounted to the opposing crystal. This technique was used to produce a compact, low-power fusion neutron source driven by pyroelectric crystals.

  6. Constraints on the optical depth of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Flender, Samuel; McDonald, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth ($\\tau$) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on $\\tau$ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intra-cluster medium, which takes into account star-formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. By calibrating the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters and $M_{\\mathrm{gas}}-M$ relations of groups ...

  7. MOF Crystal Chemistry Paving the Way to Gas Storage Needs: Aluminum Based soc-MOF for CH4, O2 and CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2015-09-28

    The molecular building block approach was employed effectively to construct a series of novel isoreticular, highly porous and stable, aluminum based Metal-Organic Frameworks with soc topology. From this platform, three compounds were experimentally isolated and fully characterized, namely, the parent Al-soc-MOF-1 and its naphthalene and anthracene analogues. Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits outstanding gravimetric methane uptake (total and working capacity). It is shown experimentally, for the first time, that the Al-soc-MOF platform can address the challenging Department of Energy dual target of 0.5 g/g (gravimetric) and 264 cm3 (STP)/cm3 (volumetric) methane storage. Furthermore, Al-soc-MOF exhibited the highest total gravimetric and volumetric uptake for carbon dioxide and the utmost total and deliverable uptake for oxygen at relatively high pressures among all microporous MOFs. In order to correlate the MOF pore structure and functionality to the gas storage properties, to better understand the structure-properties relationship, we performed a molecular simulation study and evaluated the methane storage performance of Al-soc-MOF platform using diverse organic linkers. It was found that shortening the parent Al-soc-MOF-1 linker resulted in a noticeable enhancement in the working volumetric capacity at specific temperatures and pressures with amply conserved gravimetric uptake/working capacity. In contrast, further expansion of the organic linker (branches and/or core) led to isostructural Al-soc-MOFs with enhanced gravimetric uptake but noticeably lower volumetric capacity. The collective experimental and simulation studies indicated that the parent Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits the best compromise between the volumetric and gravimetric total and working uptakes in a wide range of pressure and temperature conditions.

  8. MOF Crystal Chemistry Paving the Way to Gas Storage Needs: Aluminum-Based soc-MOF for CH4, O2, and CO2 Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alezi, Dalal; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Suyetin, Mikhail; Bhatt, Prashant M; Weseliński, Łukasz J; Solovyeva, Vera; Adil, Karim; Spanopoulos, Ioannis; Trikalitis, Pantelis N; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-10-21

    The molecular building block approach was employed effectively to construct a series of novel isoreticular, highly porous and stable, aluminum-based metal-organic frameworks with soc topology. From this platform, three compounds were experimentally isolated and fully characterized: namely, the parent Al-soc-MOF-1 and its naphthalene and anthracene analogues. Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits outstanding gravimetric methane uptake (total and working capacity). It is shown experimentally, for the first time, that the Al-soc-MOF platform can address the challenging Department of Energy dual target of 0.5 g/g (gravimetric) and 264 cm(3) (STP)/cm(3) (volumetric) methane storage. Furthermore, Al-soc-MOF exhibited the highest total gravimetric and volumetric uptake for carbon dioxide and the utmost total and deliverable uptake for oxygen at relatively high pressures among all microporous MOFs. In order to correlate the MOF pore structure and functionality to the gas storage properties, to better understand the structure-property relationship, we performed a molecular simulation study and evaluated the methane storage performance of the Al-soc-MOF platform using diverse organic linkers. It was found that shortening the parent Al-soc-MOF-1 linker resulted in a noticeable enhancement in the working volumetric capacity at specific temperatures and pressures with amply conserved gravimetric uptake/working capacity. In contrast, further expansion of the organic linker (branches and/or core) led to isostructural Al-soc-MOFs with enhanced gravimetric uptake but noticeably lower volumetric capacity. The collective experimental and simulation studies indicated that the parent Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits the best compromise between the volumetric and gravimetric total and working uptakes under a wide range of pressure and temperature conditions.

  9. A theoretical study of the XP and NEXAFS spectra of alanine: gas phase molecule, crystal, and adsorbate at the ZnO(10 ̅10) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, You Kun; Traeger, Franziska; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Staemmler, Volker

    2011-06-14

    The adsorption of alanine on the mixed-terminated ZnO(10 ̅10) surface is studied by means of quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Using a finite cluster model and the adsorption geometry as obtained both by periodic CPMD and embedded cluster calculations, the C1s, N1s and O1s X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra are calculated for single alanine molecules on ZnO(10 ̅10). These spectra are compared with the spectra calculated for alanine in the gas phase and in its crystalline form and with experimental XPS and NEXAFS data for the isolated alanine molecule and for alanine adsorbed on ZnO(10 ̅10) at multilayer and monolayer coverage. The excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated XP and NEXAFS spectra confirms the calculated adsorption geometry: A single alanine molecule is bound to ZnO(10 ̅10) in a dissociated bidentate form with the two O atoms of the acid group bound to two Zn atoms of the surface and the proton transferred to one O atom of the surface. Other possible structures, such as adsorption of alanine in one of its neutral or zwitterionic forms in which the proton of the -COOH group remains at this group or is transferred to the amino group, can be excluded since they would give rise to quite different XP spectra. In the multilayer coverage regime, on the other hand, alanine is in its crystalline form as is also shown by the analysis of the XP spectra.

  10. Seismological Constraints on Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2004-12-01

    Earth is an open thermodynamic system radiating heat energy into space. A transition from geostatic earth models such as PREM to geodynamical models is needed. We discuss possible thermodynamic constraints on the variables that govern the distribution of forces and flows in the deep Earth. In this paper we assume that the temperature distribution is time-invariant, so that all flows vanish at steady state except for the heat flow Jq per unit area (Kuiken, 1994). Superscript 0 will refer to the steady state while x denotes the excited state of the system. We may write σ 0=(J{q}0ṡX{q}0)/T where Xq is the conjugate force corresponding to Jq, and σ is the rate of entropy production per unit volume. Consider now what happens after the occurrence of an earthquake at time t=0 and location (0,0,0). The earthquake introduces a stress drop Δ P(x,y,z) at all points of the system. Response flows are directed along the gradients toward the epicentral area, and the entropy production will increase with time as (Prigogine, 1947) σ x(t)=σ 0+α {1}/(t+β )+α {2}/(t+β )2+etc A seismological constraint on the parameters may be obtained from Omori's empirical relation N(t)=p/(t+q) where N(t) is the number of aftershocks at time t following the main shock. It may be assumed that p/q\\sim\\alpha_{1}/\\beta times a constant. Another useful constraint is the Mexican-hat geometry of the seismic transient as obtained e.g. from InSAR radar interferometry. For strike-slip events such as Landers the distribution of \\DeltaP is quadrantal, and an oval-shaped seismicity gap develops about the epicenter. A weak outer triggering maxiμm is found at a distance of about 17 fault lengths. Such patterns may be extracted from earthquake catalogs by statistical analysis (Lomnitz, 1996). Finally, the energy of the perturbation must be at least equal to the recovery energy. The total energy expended in an aftershock sequence can be found approximately by integrating the local contribution over

  11. Crystal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  12. Minimal Flavor Constraints for Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakuma, Hidenori; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the constraints on the the vacuum polarization of the standard model gauge bosons from a minimal set of flavor observables valid for a general class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will show that the constraints have a strong impact on the self-coupling and mas...

  13. Nonholonomic constraints with fractional derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Vasily E [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Zaslavsky, George M [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2006-08-04

    We consider the fractional generalization of nonholonomic constraints defined by equations with fractional derivatives and provide some examples. The corresponding equations of motion are derived using variational principle. We prove that fractional constraints can be used to describe the evolution of dynamical systems in which some coordinates and velocities are related to velocities through a power-law memory function.

  14. An Introduction to 'Creativity Constraints'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder; Biskjær, Michael Mose

    2013-01-01

    Constraints play a vital role as both restrainers and enablers in innovation processes by governing what the creative agent/s can and cannot do, and what the output can and cannot be. Notions of constraints are common in creativity research, but current contributions are highly dispersed due to n...

  15. Market segmentation using perceived constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinhee Jun; Gerard Kyle; Andrew Mowen

    2008-01-01

    We examined the practical utility of segmenting potential visitors to Cleveland Metroparks using their constraint profiles. Our analysis identified three segments based on their scores on the dimensions of constraints: Other priorities--visitors who scored the highest on 'other priorities' dimension; Highly Constrained--visitors who scored relatively high on...

  16. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  17. Constraint Programming for Context Comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    of knowledge. The language of Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, is suggested for defining constraint solvers that reflect “world knowledge” for the given domain, and driver algorithms may be ex- pressed in Prolog or additional rules of CHR. It is argued that this way of doing context comprehension is an instance...

  18. Stable isotope and noble gas constraints on the source and residence time of spring water from the Table Mountain Group Aquifer, Paarl, South Africa and implications for large scale abstraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. A.; Dunford, A. J.; Swana, K. A.; Palcsu, L.; Butler, M.; Clarke, C. E.

    2017-08-01

    Large scale groundwater abstraction is increasingly being used to support large urban centres especially in areas of low rainfall but presents particular challenges in the management and sustainability of the groundwater system. The Table Mountain Group (TMG) Aquifer is one of the largest and most important aquifer systems in South Africa and is currently being considered as an alternative source of potable water for the City of Cape Town, a metropolis of over four million people. The TMG aquifer is a fractured rock aquifer hosted primarily in super mature sandstones, quartzites and quartz arenites. The groundwater naturally emanates from numerous springs throughout the cape region. One set of springs were examined to assess the source and residence time of the spring water. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes indicate that the spring water has not been subject to evaporation and in combination with Na/Cl ratios implies that recharge to the spring systems is via coastal precipitation. Although rainfall in the Cape is usually modelled on orographic rainfall, δ18O and δ2H values of some rainfall samples are strongly positive indicating a stratiform component as well. Comparing the spring water δ18O and δ2H values with that of local rainfall, indicates that the springs are likely derived from continuous bulk recharge over the immediate hinterland to the springs and not through large and/or heavy downpours. Noble gas concentrations, combined with tritium and radiocarbon activities indicate that the residence time of the TMG groundwater in this area is decadal in age with a probable maximum upper limit of ∼40 years. This residence time is probably a reflection of the slow flow rate through the fractured rock aquifer and hence indicates that the interconnectedness of the fractures is the most important factor controlling groundwater flow. The short residence time of the groundwater suggest that recharge to the springs and the Table Mountain Group Aquifer as a whole is

  19. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  20. Crystal fields and conduction electrons in praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, K.N.; Aagaard Sørensen, S.; McEwen, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    The interactions between the crystal-field excitations, the phonons and the conduction electrons in Pr have been studied further. The low-energy satellites to the crystal-field excitations, which are believed to be associated with propagating paramagnon modes in the conduction-electron gas, appear...

  1. Macromolecular crystallization and crystal perfection

    CERN Document Server

    Chayen, Naomi E; Snell, Edward H

    2010-01-01

    Structural biology is key to our understanding of the mechanisms of biological processes. This text describes current methods and future frontiers in crystal growth and use of X-ray and neutron crystallography, in the context of automation of crystallization and generation of synchrotron X-ray and neutron beams.

  2. Cosmological constraints on the generalized holographic dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jianbo; Wu, Yabo; Wang, Tianqiang

    2012-01-01

    We use the Markov ChainMonte Carlo method to investigate global constraints on the generalized holographic (GH) dark energy with flat and non-flat universe from the current observed data: the Union2 dataset of type supernovae Ia (SNIa), high-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), the observational Hubble data (OHD), the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. The most stringent constraints on the GH model parameter are obtained. In addition, it is found that the equation of state for this generalized holographic dark energy can cross over the phantom boundary wde =-1.

  3. Liquid crystal tunable photonic crystal dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buss, Thomas; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Smith, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    We present a dye-doped liquid crystal laser using a photonic crystal cavity. An applied electric field to the liquid crystal provides wavelength tunability. The photonic crystal enhances resonant interaction with the gain medium....

  4. Evolutionary constraints or opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection is traditionally viewed as a leading factor of evolution, whereas variation is assumed to be random and non-directional. Any order in variation is attributed to epigenetic or developmental constraints that can hinder the action of natural selection. In contrast I consider the positive role of epigenetic mechanisms in evolution because they provide organisms with opportunities for rapid adaptive change. Because the term “constraint” has negative connotations, I use the term “regulated variation” to emphasize the adaptive nature of phenotypic variation, which helps populations and species to survive and evolve in changing environments. The capacity to produce regulated variation is a phenotypic property, which is not described in the genome. Instead, the genome acts as a switchboard, where mostly random mutations switch “on” or “off” preexisting functional capacities of organism components. Thus, there are two channels of heredity: informational (genomic) and structure-functional (phenotypic). Functional capacities of organisms most likely emerged in a chain of modifications and combinations of more simple ancestral functions. The role of DNA has been to keep records of these changes (without describing the result) so that they can be reproduced in the following generations. Evolutionary opportunities include adjustments of individual functions, multitasking, connection between various components of an organism, and interaction between organisms. The adaptive nature of regulated variation can be explained by the differential success of lineages in macro-evolution. Lineages with more advantageous patterns of regulated variation are likely to produce more species and secure more resources (i.e., long-term lineage selection). PMID:24769155

  5. Crystal Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W. Armstrong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystal dislocations were invisible until the mid-20th century although their presence had been inferred; the atomic and molecular scale dimensions had prevented earlier discovery. Now they are normally known to be just about everywhere, for example, in the softest molecularly-bonded crystals as well as within the hardest covalently-bonded diamonds. The advent of advanced techniques of atomic-scale probing has facilitated modern observations of dislocations in every crystal structure-type, particularly by X-ray diffraction topography and transmission electron microscopy. The present Special Issue provides a flavor of their ubiquitous presences, their characterizations and, especially, their influence on mechanical and electrical properties.

  6. CONSTRAINT PROGRAMMING AND UNIVERSITY TIMETABLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Groves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The technology of Constraint Programming is rapidly becoming a popular alternative for solving large-scale industry problems. This paper provides an introduction to Constraint Programming and to Constraint Logic Programming (CLP, an enabler of constraint programming. The use of Constraint Logic Programming is demonstrated by describing a system developed for scheduling university timetables. Timetabling problems have a high degree of algorithmic complexity (they are usually NP-Complete, and share features with scheduling problems encountered in industry. The system allows the declaration of both hard requirements, which must always be satisfied, and soft constraints which need not be satisfied, though this would be an advantage.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Hierdie artikel beskryf ’n familie van probleem-oplossingstegnieke bekend as “Constraint Programming”, wat al hoe meer gebruik word om groot-skaalse industriële probleme op te los. Die nut van hierdie tegnieke word gedemonstreer deur die beskrywing van ’n skeduleringsisteem om die roosters vir ’n universiteit te genereer. Roosterskeduleringsprobleme is in praktiese gevalle NP-volledig en deel baie eienskappe met industriële skeduleringsprobleme. Die sisteem wat hier beskryf word maak gebruik van beide harde beperkings (wat altyd bevredig moet word en sagte beperkings (bevrediging hiervan is wel voordelig maar dit is opsioneel.

  7. Effective Constraints for Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin; Skirzewski, Aureliano; Tsobanjan, Artur

    2008-01-01

    An effective formalism for quantum constrained systems is presented which allows manageable derivations of solutions and observables, including a treatment of physical reality conditions without requiring full knowledge of the physical inner product. Instead of a state equation from a constraint operator, an infinite system of constraint functions on the quantum phase space of expectation values and moments of states is used. The examples of linear constraints as well as the free non-relativistic particle in parameterized form illustrate how standard problems of constrained systems can be dealt with in this framework.

  8. Gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ok Ryong

    2004-01-15

    This book introduces gas turbine cycle explaining general thing of gas turbine, full gas turbine cycle, Ericson cycle and Brayton cycle, practical gas turbine cycle without pressure loss, multiaxial type gas turbine cycle and special gas turbine cycle, application of basic theory on a study on suction-cooling gas turbine cycle with turbo-refrigerating machine using the bleed air, and general performance characteristics of the suction-cooling gas turbine cycle combined with absorption-type refrigerating machine.

  9. Weighted constraints in generative linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, Joe

    2009-08-01

    Harmonic Grammar (HG) and Optimality Theory (OT) are closely related formal frameworks for the study of language. In both, the structure of a given language is determined by the relative strengths of a set of constraints. They differ in how these strengths are represented: as numerical weights (HG) or as ranks (OT). Weighted constraints have advantages for the construction of accounts of language learning and other cognitive processes, partly because they allow for the adaptation of connectionist and statistical models. HG has been little studied in generative linguistics, however, largely due to influential claims that weighted constraints make incorrect predictions about the typology of natural languages, predictions that are not shared by the more popular OT. This paper makes the case that HG is in fact a promising framework for typological research, and reviews and extends the existing arguments for weighted over ranked constraints.

  10. Topology Optimization with Stress Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbart, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis contains contributions to the development of topology optimization techniques capable of handling stress constraints. The research that led to these contributions was motivated by the need for topology optimization techniques more suitable for industrial applications. Currently, topolo

  11. Model-Driven Constraint Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Chenouard, Raphael; Soto, Ricardo; 10.1145/1389449.1389479

    2010-01-01

    Constraint programming can definitely be seen as a model-driven paradigm. The users write programs for modeling problems. These programs are mapped to executable models to calculate the solutions. This paper focuses on efficient model management (definition and transformation). From this point of view, we propose to revisit the design of constraint-programming systems. A model-driven architecture is introduced to map solving-independent constraint models to solving-dependent decision models. Several important questions are examined, such as the need for a visual highlevel modeling language, and the quality of metamodeling techniques to implement the transformations. A main result is the s-COMMA platform that efficiently implements the chain from modeling to solving constraint problems

  12. An Introduction to 'Creativity Constraints'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder; Biskjaer, Michael Mose

    Constraints play a vital role as both restrainers and enablers in innovation processes by governing what the creative agent/s can and cannot do, and what the output can and cannot be. Notions of constraints are common in creativity research, but current contributions are highly dispersed due...... to no overall conceptual framing or shared terminology. This lack of unity hinders overt opportunities for cross-disciplinary interchange. We argue that an improved understanding of constraints in creativity holds a promising potential for advancements in creativity research across domains and disciplines. Here......, we give an overview of the growing, but incohesive body of research into creativity and constraints, which leads us to introduce ‘creativity constraints’ as a unifying concept to help bridge these disjoint contributions to facilitate cross- disciplinary interchange. Finally, we suggest key topics...

  13. Decentralized systems with design constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmoud, Magdi S

    2014-01-01

    This volume provides a rigorous examination of the analysis, stability and control of large-scale systems, and addresses the difficulties that arise because of dimensionality, information structure constraints, parametric uncertainty and time-delays.

  14. Constraint Programming for Context Comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    A close similarity is demonstrated between context comprehension, such as discourse analysis, and constraint programming. The constraint store takes the role of a growing knowledge base learned throughout the discourse, and a suitable con- straint solver does the job of incorporating new pieces o...... of abductive reasoning. The approach fits with possible worlds semantics that allows both standard first-order and non-monotonic semantics....

  15. Formal Verification under Unknown Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-hui; LI Xiao-wei

    2005-01-01

    We present a formal method of verifying designs with unknown constraints (e. g. , black boxes) using Boolean satisfiability (SAT). This method is based on a new encoding scheme of unknown constraints, and solves the corresponding conjunctive normal form (CNF) formulas. Furthermore, this method can avoid the potential memory explosion, which the binary decision diagram (BDD) based techniques maybe suffer from, thus it has the capacity of verifying large designs. Experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and feasibility of the proposed method.

  16. Observation Constraints on the Simplified GCG Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Su-Mei; WU Pu-Xun

    2007-01-01

    A simplified version of generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) as a dark energy model is studied. By using the latest 162 ESSENCE type la supernovae (Sne la) data, 30 high redshift Sne la data, the baryonk acoustic oscillation peak from SDSS and the CMB data from WMAP3, a strong constraint on this simplified GCG model is obtained. At the 95.4% confidence level we obtain 0.21 ≤ Ωm ≤ 0.31 and 0.994 ≤ a ≤ 1.0 with the best fit fim = 0.25 and a = 1. This best fit scenario corresponds to an accelerating universe with qo ~_0.65 and z ~- 0.81 (a redshift of cosmic phase transition from deceleration to acceleration).

  17. Phase equilibrium constraints on angrite petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, John

    1999-02-01

    crystallize had much lower Al content than that of ADOR. In the late stages of crystallization the 86010 residual liquid (and that of LEW87051) encountered the low Mg' set of equilibria involving kirschsteinite. These relationships require either a higher degree of melting for the 86010 parent magma or source region different than ADOR's. These relationships are also consistent with compositionally dependent REE partition coefficients between fassaite and the ADOR liquid being as much as 1.5-2 times higher than those for the 86010 liquid at the onset of pyroxene crystallization. The combination of a trapped liquid component, higher partition coefficients, and smaller degrees of melting help to explain the observation that ADOR, an apparent cumulate, has REE concentrations twice as high as those in 86010 (Mittlefehdlt and Lindstrom, 1990), an apparent chilled liquid. The absence of a strong negative Eu-anomaly in the ADOR parent liquid, however, requires relatively high degrees of partial melting to eliminate plagioclase in the source region (resorption of plagioclase at the peritectic eliminates the Eu-anomaly that develops during crystallization), so ultimately different source regions are required. Progressive iron loss from devolatilized primitive chondrites (Allende, Murchison) produces source regions capable of producing a wide range of melt compositions with angritic to eucritic crystallization behavior. The compositions of carbonaceous and ordinary chondrite provide a similar range of potential source region compositions. However, primitive chondrite(±Fe) source regions that produce angrite-like melts have Mg' that is too low, whereas chondrite(±Fe) sources that have Mg' sufficiently high to yield the Mg' in angrite minerals have too much silica (or orthopyroxene) component to yield angrite-like liquids. No single group of meteorites ± Fe simultaneously satisfies the constraints of Mg' and silica component. However, mixtures of Fe-depleted chondrite plus a low

  18. Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  19. Constraint-based animation: temporal constraints in the Animus systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duisberg, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Algorithm animation has a growing role in computer-aided algorithm design documentation and debugging, since interactive graphics is a richer channel than text for communication. Most animation is currently done laboriously by hand, and it often has the character of canned demonstrations with restricted user interaction. Animus is a system that allows easy construction of an animation with minimal concern for lower-level graphics programming. Constraints are used to describe the appearance and structure of a picture as well as how those pictures evolve in time. The implementation and support of temporal constraints is a substantive extension to previous constraint languages which had only allowed specification of static state. Use of the Animus system is demonstrated in the creation of animations of dynamic mechanical and electrical-circuit simulations, sorting algorithms, problems in operating systems, and geometric curve-drawing algorithms.

  20. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holekamp, Kay E; Swanson, Eli M; Van Meter, Page E

    2013-05-19

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility.

  1. Constraint programming and decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    2014-01-01

    In many application areas, it is necessary to make effective decisions under constraints. Several area-specific techniques are known for such decision problems; however, because these techniques are area-specific, it is not easy to apply each technique to other applications areas. Cross-fertilization between different application areas is one of the main objectives of the annual International Workshops on Constraint Programming and Decision Making. Those workshops, held in the US (El Paso, Texas), in Europe (Lyon, France), and in Asia (Novosibirsk, Russia), from 2008 to 2012, have attracted researchers and practitioners from all over the world. This volume presents extended versions of selected papers from those workshops. These papers deal with all stages of decision making under constraints: (1) formulating the problem of multi-criteria decision making in precise terms, (2) determining when the corresponding decision problem is algorithmically solvable; (3) finding the corresponding algorithms, and making...

  2. Ribbon Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Markvorsen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    A repetitive crystal-like pattern is spontaneously formed upon the twisting of straight ribbons. The pattern is akin to a tessellation with isosceles triangles, and it can easily be demonstrated with ribbons cut from an overhead transparency. We give a general description of developable ribbons...

  3. Therapeutic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  4. Photonic crystals principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary Properties of Photonic CrystalsFabrication of Photonic CrystalsPhotonic Crystal All-Optical SwitchingTunable Photonic Crystal FilterPhotonic Crystal LaserPhotonic Crystal Logic DevicesPhotonic Crystal Sensors

  5. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems with gas if you: Are lactose or gluten intolerant Eat a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes Drink carbonated beverages Have a chronic intestinal condition, such as irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease Neither age nor sex ...

  6. Space group constraints on weak indices in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjas, Dániel; de Juan, Fernando; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    2017-07-01

    Lattice translation symmetry gives rise to a large class of "weak" topological insulators (TIs), characterized by translation-protected gapless surface states and dislocation bound states. In this work we show that space group symmetries lead to constraints on the weak topological indices that define these phases. In particular, we show that screw rotation symmetry enforces the Hall conductivity in planes perpendicular to the screw axis to be quantized in multiples of the screw rank, which generally applies to interacting systems. We further show that certain 3D weak indices associated with quantum spin Hall effects (class AII) are forbidden by the Bravais lattice and by glide or even-fold screw symmetries. These results put strong constraints on weak TI candidates in the experimental and numerical search for topological materials, based on the crystal structure alone.

  7. Intertemporal consumption and credit constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Petersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    There is continuing controversy over the importance of credit constraints. This paper investigates whether total household expenditure and debt is affected by an exogenous increase in access to credit provided by a credit market reform that enabled Danish house owners to use housing equity as col...

  8. Perceptual Constraints in Phonotactic Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endress, Ansgar D.; Mehler, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Structural regularities in language have often been attributed to symbolic or statistical general purpose computations, whereas perceptual factors influencing such generalizations have received less interest. Here, we use phonotactic-like constraints as a case study to ask whether the structural properties of specific perceptual and memory…

  9. Sterile neutrino constraints from cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of light particles beyond the standard model's three neutrino species can profoundly impact the physics of decoupling and primordial nucleosynthesis. I review the observational signatures of extra light species, present constraints from recent data, and discuss the implications...... of possible sterile neutrinos with O(eV)-masses for cosmology....

  10. Sterile neutrino constraints from cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg G.;

    2012-01-01

    The presence of light particles beyond the standard model's three neutrino species can profoundly impact the physics of decoupling and primordial nucleosynthesis. I review the observational signatures of extra light species, present constraints from recent data, and discuss the implications of po...

  11. Constraint-based facial animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.M. Ruttkay

    1999-01-01

    textabstractConstraints have been traditionally used for computer animation applications to define side conditions for generating synthesized motion according to a standard, usually physically realistic, set of motion equations. The case of facial animation is very different, as no set of motion equ

  12. Constraint-induced movement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Gianola, Silvia; Banzi, Rita;

    2014-01-01

    on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included in a Cochrane systematic review on the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for stroke patients. METHODS: We extracted data on the functional independence measure (FIM) and the action research arm test (ARAT) from RCTs that compared CIMT...

  13. Constraint Programming versus Mathematical Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) is a relatively new technique from the 80's with origins in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. Lately, much research have been focused on ways of using CLP within the paradigm of Operations Research (OR) and vice versa. The purpose of this paper...

  14. Observational constraints on cluster evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, S.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833347

    2008-01-01

    Current observational constraints on the dynamical evolution of star clusters are reviewed. Theory and observations now agree nicely on the mass dependency and time scales for disruption of young star clusters in galactic disks, but many problems still await resolution. The origin of the mass

  15. Constraint-based facial animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.M. Ruttkay

    1999-01-01

    textabstractConstraints have been traditionally used for computer animation applications to define side conditions for generating synthesized motion according to a standard, usually physically realistic, set of motion equations. The case of facial animation is very different, as no set of motion

  16. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  17. Creativity from Constraints in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of constraints in limiting and enhancing creativity in engineering design. Based on a review of literature relating constraints to creativity, the paper presents a longitudinal participatory study from Coloplast A/S, a major international producer of disposable......, removal, introducing and revising. Constraints introduced late in a project contributed to the generation of new solutions to old problems, and existing solutions were creatively adopted to satisfy new constraints. This paper recommends creative constraint-handling strategies, as well as identifying...... potential directions for future research on the relationship between creativity and constraints...

  18. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  19. INTERNAL FINANCIAL CONSTRAINTS, EXTERNAL FINANCIAL CONSTRAINTS AND INVESTMENT CHOICE: EVIDENCE FROM PAKISTANI FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Muhammad AZAM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of internal and external financial constraints on investmentchoice. The data have been taken from 9 major sectors (52 listed firms in the Karachi Stock Exchange namely; Pharmaceutical & Bio Technology, Textile, Sugar, Tobacco, Chemicals, Oil and Gas, Fixed line Telecommunication, Industrial metal and Mining, and Cement sectors for the time period 2004 to 2010 on annual basis. Multiple regression analysis has been done to examine the relationship among firm’s size, dividend payout ratio, firm’s age, and investment. The empirical findings show that there is positive relationship between the firms’ size and investment while a negative relationship exists between firms’ age and investment. It also reports that there is negative relationship between dividend payout ratio and the investment. This shows that if a firm grows old or high dividend payout ratio then it will tend to spend less for expansion as compared to the young firms.

  20. Self-Imposed Creativity Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biskjaer, Michael Mose

    2013-01-01

    . As the majority of work in creativity research originates from psychology, the dissertation shows how the humanities – given their salient critical-analytical reflection and high concept awareness – can contribute new types of studies to creativity research, which, despite its blossoming as a field, is becoming...... increasingly fragmented and in need of new ‘big’ unifying questions. Hence the designation of the dissertation’s research approach. The four papers serve a dual purpose. They are contributions in their own right, and they provide partial answers to the overall research question. In this respect, the concept...... of the current dispersed studies on constraints in creativity, spanning psychology, engineering, philosophy, design, and aesthetics. (2) Definitions, concepts, and models of self-imposed creativity constraints for analytical application within and across creative domains, including the 6i model for demonstrating...

  1. Observational Constraints on Exponential Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Louis; Luo, Ling-Wei; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    We study the observational constraints on the exponential gravity model of f(R)=-beta*Rs(1-e^(-R/Rs)). We use the latest observational data including Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) Union2 compilation, Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) and Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) in our analysis. From these observations, we obtain a lower bound on the model parameter beta at 1.27 (95% CL) but no appreciable upper bound. The constraint on the present matter density parameter is 0.245< Omega_m^0<0.311 (95% CL). We also find out the best-fit value of model parameters on several cases.

  2. A Compendium of Chameleon Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Burrage, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The chameleon model is a scalar field theory with a screening mechanism that explains how a cosmologically relevant light scalar can avoid the constraints of intra-solar-system searches for fifth-forces. The chameleon is a popular dark energy candidate and also arises in $f(R)$ theories of gravity. Whilst the chameleon is designed to avoid historical searches for fifth-forces it is not unobservable and much effort has gone into identifying the best observables and experiments to detect it. These results are not always presented for the same models or in the same language, a particular problem when comparing astrophysical and laboratory searches making it difficult to understand what regions of parameter space remain. Here we present combined constraints on the chameleon model from astrophysical and laboratory searches for the first time and identify the remaining windows of parameter space. We discuss the implications for cosmological chameleon searches and future small-scale probes.

  3. Integral Constraints and MHD Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T. H.

    2003-10-01

    Determining stability of a plasma in MHD equilibrium, energetically isolated by a conducting wall, requires an assumption on what governs the dynamics of the plasma. One example is the assumption that the plasma obeys ideal MHD, leading to the well known ``δ W" criteria [I. Bernstein, et al., Proc. Roy. Soc. London A244, 17 (1958)]. A radically different approach was used by Taylor [J.B. Taylor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 58, 741 (1986)] in assuming that the dynamics of the plasma is restricted only by the requirement that helicity, an integral constant associated with the plasma, is conserved. The relevancy of Taylor's assumption is supported by the agreement between resulting theoretical results and experimental observations. Another integral constraint involves the canonical angular momentum of the plasma particles. One consequence of using this constraint is that tokamak plasmas have no poloidal current in agreement with some current hole tokamak observations [T.H. Jensen, Phys. Lett. A 305, 183 (2002)].

  4. A compendium of chameleon constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, Clare; Sakstein, Jeremy

    2016-11-01

    The chameleon model is a scalar field theory with a screening mechanism that explains how a cosmologically relevant light scalar can avoid the constraints of intra-solar-system searches for fifth-forces. The chameleon is a popular dark energy candidate and also arises in f(R) theories of gravity. Whilst the chameleon is designed to avoid historical searches for fifth-forces it is not unobservable and much effort has gone into identifying the best observables and experiments to detect it. These results are not always presented for the same models or in the same language, a particular problem when comparing astrophysical and laboratory searches making it difficult to understand what regions of parameter space remain. Here we present combined constraints on the chameleon model from astrophysical and laboratory searches for the first time and identify the remaining windows of parameter space. We discuss the implications for cosmological chameleon searches and future small-scale probes.

  5. Self-Imposed Creativity Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biskjaer, Michael Mose

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This dissertation epitomizes three years of research guided by the research question: how can we conceptualize creative self-binding as a resource in art and design processes? Concretely, the dissertation seeks to offer insight into the puzzling observation that highly skilled creative...... practitioners sometimes freely and intentionally impose rigid rules, peculiar principles, and other kinds of creative obstructions on themselves as a means to spur momentum in the process and reach a distinctly original outcome. To investigate this the dissertation is composed of four papers (Part II) framed...... of analysis. Informed by the insight that constraints both enable and restrain creative agency, the dissertation’s main contention is that creative self- binding may profitably be conceptualized as the exercise of self-imposed creativity constraints. Thus, the dissertation marks an analytical move from vague...

  6. Deepening Contractions and Collateral Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Ravn, Søren Hove; Santoro, Emiliano

    on the differential impact that occasionally non-binding constraints exert on the shape of expansions and contractions, we are also able to reconcile a more negatively skewed business cycle with a moderation in its volatility. Finally, our model can account for an intrinsic feature of economic downturns preceded...... by private credit build-ups: Financially driven expansions lead to deeper contractions, as compared to equally-sized non-financial expansions....

  7. Managing Restaurant Tables using Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotto, Alfio; Brown, Kenneth N.; Beck, J. Christopher

    Restaurant table management can have significant impact on both profitability and the customer experience. The core of the issue is a complex dynamic combinatorial problem. We show how to model the problem as constraint satisfaction, with extensions which generate flexible seating plans and which maintain stability when changes occur. We describe an implemented system which provides advice to users in real time. The system is currently being evaluated in a restaurant environment.

  8. Causality constraints on TMD PDF

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, A V

    2013-01-01

    In this short note, we discuss constraints on the transverse momentum dependent factorization formulae coming from the causality properties for the hadronic tensor. We show that the range of definition of the TMD PDFs in the transverse coordinate plane is wider that it is allowed by the causality. It indicates the presents of the large compensating corrections for the TMD PDF factorization theorem and/or overestimation of the transverse component dependence of TMD PDF.

  9. Expressing Preferences using Preference Set Constraint Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Brik, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces an extension of Answer Set Programming called Preference Set Constraint Programming which is a convenient and general formalism to reason with preferences. PSC programming extends Set Constraint Programming introduced by Marek and Remmel (Marek and Remmel 2004) by introducing two types of preference set constraint atoms, measure preference set constraint atoms and pre-ordered preference set constraint atoms, which are extensions of set constraint atoms. We show that the question of whether a PSC program has a preferred stable model is CoNP-complete. We give examples of the uses of the preference set constraint atoms and show that Answer Set Optimization (Brewka, Niemel\\"a, and Truszczynski 2003) and General Preference (Son and Pontelli 2006) can be expressed using preference set constraint atoms.

  10. Relaxations of semiring constraint satisfaction problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leenen, L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Semiring Constraint Satisfaction Problem (SCSP) framework is a popular approach for the representation of partial constraint satisfaction problems. In this framework preferences can be associated with tuples of values of the variable domains...

  11. Infrared Constraint on Ultraviolet Theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yuhsin [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM–SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  12. Closure constraints for hyperbolic tetrahedra

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the generalization of loop gravity's twisted geometries to a q-deformed gauge group. In the standard undeformed case, loop gravity is a formulation of general relativity as a diffeomorphism-invariant SU(2) gauge theory. Its classical states are graphs provided with algebraic data. In particular closure constraints at every node of the graph ensure their interpretation as twisted geometries. Dual to each node, one has a polyhedron embedded in flat space R^3. One then glues them allowing for both curvature and torsion. It was recently conjectured that q-deforming the gauge group SU(2) would allow to account for a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda, and in particular that deforming the loop gravity phase space with real parameter q>0 would lead to a generalization of twisted geometries to a hyperbolic curvature. Following this insight, we look for generalization of the closure constraints to the hyperbolic case. In particular, we introduce two new closure constraints for hyperbolic tetrahe...

  13. Updating neutrino magnetic moment constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Cañas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide an updated analysis of the neutrino magnetic moments (NMMs, discussing both the constraints on the magnitudes of the three transition moments Λi and the role of the CP violating phases present both in the mixing matrix and in the NMM matrix. The scattering of solar neutrinos off electrons in Borexino provides the most stringent restrictions, due to its robust statistics and the low energies observed, below 1 MeV. Our new limit on the effective neutrino magnetic moment which follows from the most recent Borexino data is 3.1×10−11μB at 90% C.L. This corresponds to the individual transition magnetic moment constraints: |Λ1|≤5.6×10−11μB, |Λ2|≤4.0×10−11μB, and |Λ3|≤3.1×10−11μB (90% C.L., irrespective of any complex phase. Indeed, the incoherent admixture of neutrino mass eigenstates present in the solar flux makes Borexino insensitive to the Majorana phases present in the NMM matrix. For this reason we also provide a global analysis including the case of reactor and accelerator neutrino sources, presenting the resulting constraints for different values of the relevant CP phases. Improved reactor and accelerator neutrino experiments will be needed in order to underpin the full profile of the neutrino electromagnetic properties.

  14. Geometric constraint solving with geometric transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes two algorithms for solving geometric constraint systems. The first algorithm is for constrained systems without loops and has linear complexity. The second algorithm can solve constraint systems with loops. The latter algorithm is of quadratic complexity and is complete for constraint problems about simple polygons. The key to it is to combine the idea of graph based methods for geometric constraint solving and geometric transformations coming from rule-based methods.

  15. Ant colony optimization and constraint programming

    CERN Document Server

    Solnon, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Ant colony optimization is a metaheuristic which has been successfully applied to a wide range of combinatorial optimization problems. The author describes this metaheuristic and studies its efficiency for solving some hard combinatorial problems, with a specific focus on constraint programming. The text is organized into three parts. The first part introduces constraint programming, which provides high level features to declaratively model problems by means of constraints. It describes the main existing approaches for solving constraint satisfaction problems, including complete tree search

  16. Set Constraints and Logic Programming (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    Assoc Comput Sci Logic Springer September A Aiken D Kozen and E Wimmers Decidability of systems of set constraints with negative...Extensions of Logic Programming ELP volume of Lect Notes Articial Intell pages Springer February J Englefriet Tree... Springer September D Kozen Set constraints and logic programming abstract In JP Jouannaud editor Proc First Conf Constraints in

  17. A general treatment of dynamic integrity constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Brock, EO

    This paper introduces a general, set-theoretic model for expressing dynamic integrity constraints, i.e., integrity constraints on the state changes that are allowed in a given state space. In a managerial context, such dynamic integrity constraints can be seen as representations of "real world"

  18. The Ambiguous Role of Constraints in Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biskjær, Michael Mose; Onarheim, Balder; Wiltschnig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and constraints is often described in the literature either in rather imprecise, general concepts or in relation to very specific domains. Cross-domain and cross-disciplinary takes on how the handling of constraints influences creative activities are rare. In t......-disciplinary research into the ambiguous role of constraints in creativity....

  19. A general treatment of dynamic integrity constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Brock, EO

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces a general, set-theoretic model for expressing dynamic integrity constraints, i.e., integrity constraints on the state changes that are allowed in a given state space. In a managerial context, such dynamic integrity constraints can be seen as representations of "real world" cons

  20. Improved Constraints to the Local Supermassive Black Hole Occupation Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Gallo, Elena; Miller, Brendan P.

    2017-01-01

    The occupation fraction of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in local dwarf galaxies is thought to be related to the formation mechanism of the first black holes in the early Universe. Light black hole seeds, such as Pop III star remnants, are likely to result in a significantly higher occupation fraction compared to heavy seeds (~104 solar mass) arising from the global collapse of massive gas clouds. Chandra observations of nearby dwarf galaxies can push the detection threshold for SMBH activity down to the lowest observable Eddington ratios. This, folded with analytical prescriptions for the intrinsic occupation fraction across the mass spectrum, yields an observational constraints to the SMBH occupation fraction in the dwarf galaxy regime. Building on previous work by Miller et al. (2015), here we analyze a sample of ~240 early-type galaxies (D < 30 Mpc) with archival Chandra coverage, and report on our improved constraints to the local SMBH occupation fraction.

  1. Global optimization over linear constraint non-convex programming problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gui-Jun; WU Ti-Huan; YE Rong; YANG Hai-qing

    2005-01-01

    A improving Steady State Genetic Algorithm for global optimization over linear constraint non-convex programmin g problem is presented. By convex analyzing, the primal optimal problem can be converted to an equivalent problem, in which only the information of convex extremes of feasible space is included, and is more easy for GAs to solve. For avoiding invalid genetic operators, a redesigned convex crossover operator is also performed in evolving. As a integrality, the quality of two problem is proven, and a method is also given to get all extremes in linear constraint space. Simulation result show that new algorithm not only converges faster, but also can maintain an diversity population, and can get the global optimum of test problem.

  2. Constraints on Contact Angles for Multiple Phases in Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Martin J.

    2001-07-01

    For three or more fluid phases in thermodynamic equilibrium and in contact with a solid surface, the Young equation can be used to find relations between the contact angles for different pairs of fluids. For an n-fluid-phase system, n(n-1)/2 contact angles can be defined, but there are (n-1)(n-2)/2 constraints between them, leaving only n-1 independent values of the contact angle. These constraints are very powerful in limiting and determining possible types of wetting behavior. The consequences are discussed for three- and four-phase flow. They have important applications for the understanding of gas injection processes in petroleum reservoirs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Enhanced transduction of polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers via additional layer deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present the concept of enhanced transduction for polymer photonic crystal lasers by deposition of an additional polymer layer with selective gas response. We report a significant increase in sensitivity to changes in gas concentration....

  4. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  5. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  6. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - II. Cosmological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.; Rapetti, D. A.; Applegate, D. E.; Kelly, P. L.; von der Linden, A.; Schmidt, R. W.

    2014-05-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. The data set employed here consists of Chandra observations of 40 such clusters, identified in a comprehensive search of the Chandra archive for hot (kT ≳ 5 keV), massive, morphologically relaxed systems, as well as high-quality weak gravitational lensing data for a subset of these clusters. Here we present cosmological constraints from measurements of the gas mass fraction, fgas, for this cluster sample. By incorporating a robust gravitational lensing calibration of the X-ray mass estimates, and restricting our measurements to the most self-similar and accurately measured regions of clusters, we significantly reduce systematic uncertainties compared to previous work. Our data for the first time constrain the intrinsic scatter in fgas, 7.4 ± 2.3 per cent in a spherical shell at radii 0.8-1.2 r2500 (˜1/4 of the virial radius), consistent with the expected level of variation in gas depletion and non-thermal pressure for relaxed clusters. From the lowest redshift data in our sample, five clusters at z 1, we obtain consistent results for Ωm and interesting constraints on dark energy: Ω _{{Λ }}=0.65^{+0.17}_{-0.22}> for non-flat ΛCDM (cosmological constant) models, and w = -0.98 ± 0.26 for flat models with a constant dark energy equation of state. Our results are both competitive and consistent with those from recent cosmic microwave background, Type Ia supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation data. We present constraints on more complex models of evolving dark energy from the combination of fgas data with these external data sets, and comment on the possibilities for improved fgas constraints using current and next-generation X-ray observatories and lensing data.

  7. Ideal gas behavior of a strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxtoby, Neil P; Griffith, Elias J; Durniak, Céline; Ralph, Jason F; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2013-07-05

    In a laboratory, a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma consists of a low-density ionized gas containing a confined suspension of Yukawa-coupled plastic microspheres. For an initial crystal-like form, we report ideal gas behavior in this strongly coupled system during shock-wave experiments. This evidence supports the use of the ideal gas law as the equation of state for soft crystals such as those formed by dusty plasmas.

  8. Constraint Specialisation in Horn Clause Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kafle, Bishoksan; Gallagher, John Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for specialising the constraints in constrained Horn clauses with respect to a goal. We use abstract interpretation to compute a model of a query-answer transformation of a given set of clauses and a goal. The effect is to propagate the constraints from the goal top......-down and propagate answer constraints bottom-up. Our approach does not unfold the clauses at all; we use the constraints from the model to compute a specialised version of each clause in the program. The approach is independent of the abstract domain and the constraints theory underlying the clauses. Experimental...

  9. Minimal Model Semantics for Sorted Constraint Representation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖乐健; 史忠植

    1995-01-01

    Sorted constraint representation is a very useful representation in AI which combines class hierarchies and constraint networks.For such sorted constraint representation,a problem is how to generalize the idea of default inheritance to constraint network,where the attributes in a class or between different classes interact with each other via the network.To give a formal account for the defeasible reasoning in such representation,a general sorted constraint logic is proposed,and a minimal-model semantics for the logic is presented.

  10. Ribbon crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Bohr

    Full Text Available A repetitive crystal-like pattern is spontaneously formed upon the twisting of straight ribbons. The pattern is akin to a tessellation with isosceles triangles, and it can easily be demonstrated with ribbons cut from an overhead transparency. We give a general description of developable ribbons using a ruled procedure where ribbons are uniquely described by two generating functions. This construction defines a differentiable frame, the ribbon frame, which does not have singular points, whereby we avoid the shortcomings of the Frenet-Serret frame. The observed spontaneous pattern is modeled using planar triangles and cylindrical arcs, and the ribbon structure is shown to arise from a maximization of the end-to-end length of the ribbon, i.e. from an optimal use of ribbon length. The phenomenon is discussed in the perspectives of incompatible intrinsic geometries and of the emergence of long-range order.

  11. Crystallization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert J.; Brown, William R.; Auyang, Lun; Liu, Yin-Chang; Cook, W. Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    An improved crystallization process is disclosed for separating a crystallizable material and an excluded material which is at least partially excluded from the solid phase of the crystallizable material obtained upon freezing a liquid phase of the materials. The solid phase is more dense than the liquid phase, and it is separated therefrom by relative movement with the formation of a packed bed of solid phase. The packed bed is continuously formed adjacent its lower end and passed from the liquid phase into a countercurrent flow of backwash liquid. The packed bed extends through the level of the backwash liquid to provide a drained bed of solid phase adjacent its upper end which is melted by a condensing vapor.

  12. A Maximal Tractable Class of Soft Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D; Jeavons, P; Krokhin, A; 10.1613/jair.1400

    2011-01-01

    Many researchers in artificial intelligence are beginning to explore the use of soft constraints to express a set of (possibly conflicting) problem requirements. A soft constraint is a function defined on a collection of variables which associates some measure of desirability with each possible combination of values for those variables. However, the crucial question of the computational complexity of finding the optimal solution to a collection of soft constraints has so far received very little attention. In this paper we identify a class of soft binary constraints for which the problem of finding the optimal solution is tractable. In other words, we show that for any given set of such constraints, there exists a polynomial time algorithm to determine the assignment having the best overall combined measure of desirability. This tractable class includes many commonly-occurring soft constraints, such as 'as near as possible' or 'as soon as possible after', as well as crisp constraints such as 'greater than'. F...

  13. Constraints on the Optical Depth of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flender, Samuel; Nagai, Daisuke; McDonald, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth (τ) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on τ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intracluster medium, which takes into account star formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. We calibrate the free parameters in the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters, and gas masses of groups and clusters. Our observationally calibrated model predicts the average {τ }500 (i.e., the integrated τ within a disk of size R 500) to better than 6% modeling uncertainty (at 95% confidence level). If the remaining uncertainties associated with other astrophysical uncertainties and X-ray selection effects can be better understood, our model for the optical depth should break the degeneracy between optical depth and cluster velocity in the analysis of future pairwise kSZ measurements and improve cosmological constraints with the combination of upcoming galaxy and CMB surveys, including the nature of dark energy, modified gravity, and neutrino mass.

  14. Constraints on the timeon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takeshi; Geng, C. Q.

    2009-04-01

    The timeon model recently proposed by Friedberg and Lee has a potential problem of flavor changing neutral currents (FCNCs) if the mass of the timeon is small. In order to avoid, we introduce a small dimensionless parameter to suppress FCNCs. Even in this case, we find that the timeon mass must be larger than 151 GeV to satisfy all the constraints from processes involving FCNCs in the quark sectors. We also extend the timeon model to the lepton sector and examine the leptonic processes.

  15. "Demand Constraints and Economic Growth"

    OpenAIRE

    Marc-Andre Pigeon; L. Randall Wray

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, the U.S. has seemed to achieve the best of all possible worlds: robust economic growth, very low unemployment, and low inflation. Many would attribute this performance to fewer supply side constraints, as the U.S. has moved away from stifling regulations and other impediments to trade. Indeed, our lower unemployment rates—especially when compared with the very high unemployment rates suffered in European countries—would appear to be due to freer labor markets and to a less ge...

  16. Closure constraints for hyperbolic tetrahedra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christoph; Livine, Etera R.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the generalization of loop gravity's twisted geometries to a q-deformed gauge group. In the standard undeformed case, loop gravity is a formulation of general relativity as a diffeomorphism-invariant SU(2) gauge theory. Its classical states are graphs provided with algebraic data. In particular, closure constraints at every node of the graph ensure their interpretation as twisted geometries. Dual to each node, one has a polyhedron embedded in flat space {{{R}}3}. One then glues them, allowing for both curvature and torsion. It was recently conjectured that q-deforming the gauge group SU(2) would allow us to account for a non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ \

  17. Quantum Gravity Constraints on Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Conlon, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    We study quantum gravity constraints on inflationary model building. Our approach is based on requiring the entropy associated to a given inflationary model to be less than that of the de Sitter entropy. We give two prescriptions for determining the inflationary entropy, based on either `bits per unit area' or entanglement entropy. The existence of transPlanckian flat directions, necessary for large tensor modes in the CMB, correlates with an inflationary entropy greater than that allowed by de Sitter space. Independently these techniques also constrain or exclude de Sitter models with large-rank gauge groups and high UV cutoffs, such as racetrack inflation or the KKLT construction.

  18. Transition constraints for temporal attributes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ongoma, EAN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available over time as the object migrates from one class to the next. Research on transition constraints has covered only object migration [3] and relation migration [14]. However, to efficiently represent and reason over data, we need to also look at attribute... transition, which is the migration of attributes along an object’s life cycle. Temporal attributes have been used and studied less in comparison to classes and relations. Yet in databases, we have a direct contact with attributes, and if those (temporal...

  19. Intergalactic Filaments as Isothermal Gas Cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Harford, A Gayler

    2010-01-01

    Using a cosmological simulation at redshift 5, we find that the baryon-rich cores of intergalactic filaments radiating from galaxies commonly form isothermal gas cylinders. The central gas density is typically about 500 times the cosmic mean total density, and the temperature is typically 1-2 times 10^4 K, just above the Lyman alpha cooling floor. These findings argue that the hydrodynamic properties of the gas are more important than the dark matter in determining the structure. Filaments form a major pipeline for the transport of gas into the centers of galaxies. Since the temperature and ionization state of the gas completely determine the mass per unit length of an isothermal gas cylinder, our findings suggest a constraint upon gas transport into galaxies by this mechanism.

  20. Observational Constraints on New Exact Inflationary Scalar-field Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2016-01-01

    An algorithm is used to generate new solutions of the scalar field equations in homogeneous and isotropic universes. Solutions can be found for pure scalar fields with various potentials in the absence and presence of spatial curvature and other perfect fluids. A series of generalisations of the Chaplygin gas and bulk viscous cosmological solutions for inflationary universes are found. We also show how the Hubble slow-roll parameters can be calculated using the solution algorithm and we compare these inflationary solutions with the observational data provided by the Planck 2015 collaboration in order to constraint and rule out some of these models.

  1. Grain Constraint and Size Effects in Shape Memory Alloy Microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    Shape memory alloys exhibit interesting and useful properties, such as the shape memory effect and superelasticity. Among the many alloy families that have been shown to exhibit shape memory properties the ones based on copper are interesting because they are relatively inexpensive and show excellent properties when made as single crystals. However, the performance ofthese alloys is severely compromised by the introduction of grain boundaries, to the point where they are too poor for commercial applications. This thesis studies the mechanical properties of fine Cobased wires with a bamboo microstructure, i.e., where triple junctions are absent and grain boundaries run perpendicular to the wire axis. These microwires are not single crystals, but their microstructure is not as complex as that of polycrystals either: we call this new class of shape memory alloys oligocrystals. This thesis seeks to better understand the relationship between microstructure and properties in these alloys through a combination of mechanical testing, in situ experiments and modeling. First, in situ scanning electron microscopy, together with finite element modeling, is used to understand the role of grain constraint on the martensitic transformation. Grain constraints are observed to be much less severe in oligocrystalline wires as compared to polycrystals. Oligocrystalline microwires are then thermomechanically tested and shown to exhibit excellent properties that approach those of single crystals. Next, property evolution during cycling is investigated, revealing training effects as well as fatigue life and fracture. Finally, size effects in damping and transformation morphology are studied and it is shown that a transition from a many-domain to a single domain martensite morphology takes place when the wire diameter is decreased. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  2. Spatial constraints of stereopsis in video displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Clifton

    1989-01-01

    Recent development in video technology, such as the liquid crystal displays and shutters, have made it feasible to incorporate stereoscopic depth into the 3-D representations on 2-D displays. However, depth has already been vividly portrayed in video displays without stereopsis using the classical artists' depth cues described by Helmholtz (1866) and the dynamic depth cues described in detail by Ittleson (1952). Successful static depth cues include overlap, size, linear perspective, texture gradients, and shading. Effective dynamic cues include looming (Regan and Beverly, 1979) and motion parallax (Rogers and Graham, 1982). Stereoscopic depth is superior to the monocular distance cues under certain circumstances. It is most useful at portraying depth intervals as small as 5 to 10 arc secs. For this reason it is extremely useful in user-video interactions such as telepresence. Objects can be manipulated in 3-D space, for example, while a person who controls the operations views a virtual image of the manipulated object on a remote 2-D video display. Stereopsis also provides structure and form information in camouflaged surfaces such as tree foliage. Motion parallax also reveals form; however, without other monocular cues such as overlap, motion parallax can yield an ambiguous perception. For example, a turning sphere, portrayed as solid by parallax can appear to rotate either leftward or rightward. However, only one direction of rotation is perceived when stereo-depth is included. If the scene is static, then stereopsis is the principal cue for revealing the camouflaged surface structure. Finally, dynamic stereopsis provides information about the direction of motion in depth (Regan and Beverly, 1979). Clearly there are many spatial constraints, including spatial frequency content, retinal eccentricity, exposure duration, target spacing, and disparity gradient, which - when properly adjusted - can greatly enhance stereodepth in video displays.

  3. Transport through a Finite One-Dimensional Crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Hekking, F.W.J.; Wees, B.J. van; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Timmering, C.E.; Foxon, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the magnetotransport properties of an artificial one-dimensional crystal. The crystal consists of a sequence of fifteen quantum dots, defined in the two-dimensional electron gas of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure by means of a split-gate technique. At a fixed magnetic field of 2 T, two

  4. Updating neutrino magnetic moment constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Canas, B C; Parada, A; Tortola, M; Valle, J W F

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we provide an updated analysis of the neutrino magnetic moments (NMMs), discussing both the constraints on the magnitudes of the three transition moments Lambda_i as well as the role of the CP violating phases present both in the mixing matrix and in the NMM matrix. The scattering of solar neutrinos off electrons in Borexino provides the most stringent restrictions, due to its robust statistics and the low energies observed, below 1 MeV. Our new limit on the effective neutrino magnetic moment which follows from the most recent Borexino data is 3.1 x 10^-11 mu_B at 90% C.L. This corresponds to the individual transition magnetic moment constraints: |Lambda_1| < 5.6 x10^-11 mu_B, |Lambda_2| < 4.0 x 10^-11 mu_B, and |Lambda_3| < 3.1 x 10^-11 mu_B (90% C.L.), irrespective of any complex phase. Indeed, the incoherent admixture of neutrino mass eigenstates present in the solar flux makes Borexino insensitive to the Majorana phases present in the NMM matrix. For this reason we also provide a gl...

  5. Dilaton constraints and LHC prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Logan, Heather E

    2011-01-01

    The Standard Model Higgs searches using the first 1-2 fb-1 of LHC data can be used to put interesting constraints on new scalar particles other than the Higgs. We investigate one such scenario in which electroweak symmetry is broken via strongly coupled conformal dynamics. This scenario contains a neutral scalar dilaton---the Goldstone boson associated with spontaneously broken scale invariance---with a mass below the conformal symmetry breaking scale and couplings to Standard Model particles similar (but not identical) to those of the Standard Model Higgs boson. We translate the LEP and LHC Higgs limits to constrain the dilaton mass and conformal breaking scale. The conformal breaking scale f is constrained to be above 1 TeV for dilaton masses between 145 and 600 GeV, though it can be as low as 400 GeV for dilaton masses below 110 GeV. We also show that (i) a dilaton chi with mass below 110 GeV and consistent with the LEP constraints can appear in gg --> chi --> gamma gamma with a rate up to ~10 times the co...

  6. Developmental constraint of insect audition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strauß Johannes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect ears contain very different numbers of sensory cells, from only one sensory cell in some moths to thousands of sensory cells, e.g. in cicadas. These differences still await functional explanation and especially the large numbers in cicadas remain puzzling. Insects of the different orders have distinct developmental sequences for the generation of auditory organs. These sensory cells might have different functions depending on the developmental stages. Here we propose that constraints arising during development are also important for the design of insect ears and might influence cell numbers of the adults. Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that the functional requirements of the subadult stages determine the adult complement of sensory units in the auditory system of cicadas. The hypothetical larval sensory organ should function as a vibration receiver, representing a functional caenogenesis. Testing the hypothesis Experiments at different levels have to be designed to test the hypothesis. Firstly, the neuroanatomy of the larval sense organ should be analyzed to detail. Secondly, the function should be unraveled neurophysiologically and behaviorally. Thirdly, the persistence of the sensory cells and the rebuilding of the sensory organ to the adult should be investigated. Implications of the hypothesis Usually, the evolution of insect ears is viewed with respect to physiological and neuronal mechanisms of sound perception. This view should be extended to the development of sense organs. Functional requirements during postembryonic development may act as constraints for the evolution of adult organs, as exemplified with the auditory system of cicadas.

  7. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Implications for the origin of natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel; Herriman, Eleanor

    2009-06-16

    It is broadly accepted that so-called 'thermal' gas is the product of thermal cracking, 'primary' thermal gas from kerogen cracking, and 'secondary' thermal gas from oil cracking. Since thermal cracking of hydrocarbons does not generate products at equilibrium and thermal stress should not bring them to equilibrium over geologic time, we would not expect methane, ethane, and propane to be at equilibrium in subsurface deposits. Here we report compelling evidence of natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Molecular compositions are constrained to equilibrium, [Formula in text] and isotopic compositions are also under equilibrium constraints: [Formula in text].The functions [(CH4)*(C3H8)] and [(C2H6)2] exhibit a strong nonlinear correlation (R2 = 0.84) in which the quotient Q progresses to K as wet gas progresses to dry gas. There are striking similarities between natural gas and catalytic gas generated from marine shales. A Devonian/Mississippian New Albany shale generates gas with Q converging on K over time as wet gas progresses to dry gas at 200 degrees C. The position that thermal cracking is the primary source of natural gas is no longer tenable. It is challenged by its inability to explain the composition of natural gas, natural gases at thermodynamic equilibrium, and by the existence of a catalytic path to gas that better explains gas compositions.

  8. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium Implications for the origin of natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvie Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is broadly accepted that so-called 'thermal' gas is the product of thermal cracking, 'primary' thermal gas from kerogen cracking, and 'secondary' thermal gas from oil cracking. Since thermal cracking of hydrocarbons does not generate products at equilibrium and thermal stress should not bring them to equilibrium over geologic time, we would not expect methane, ethane, and propane to be at equilibrium in subsurface deposits. Here we report compelling evidence of natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Molecular compositions are constrained to equilibrium, and isotopic compositions are also under equilibrium constraints: The functions [(CH4*(C3H8] and [(C2H62] exhibit a strong nonlinear correlation (R2 = 0.84 in which the quotient Q progresses to K as wet gas progresses to dry gas. There are striking similarities between natural gas and catalytic gas generated from marine shales. A Devonian/Mississippian New Albany shale generates gas with Q converging on K over time as wet gas progresses to dry gas at 200°C. The position that thermal cracking is the primary source of natural gas is no longer tenable. It is challenged by its inability to explain the composition of natural gas, natural gases at thermodynamic equilibrium, and by the existence of a catalytic path to gas that better explains gas compositions.

  9. Data Driven Constraints for the SVM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2012-01-01

    We propose a generalized data driven constraint for support vector machines exemplified by classification of paired observations in general and specifically on the human ear canal. This is particularly interesting in dynamic cases such as tissue movement or pathologies developing over time....... Assuming that two observations of the same subject in different states span a vector, we hypothesise that such structure of the data contains implicit information which can aid the classification, thus the name data driven constraints. We derive a constraint based on the data which allow for the use...... of the ℓ1-norm on the constraint while still allowing for the application of kernels. We specialize the proposed constraint to orthogonality of the vectors between paired observations and the estimated hyperplane. We show that imposing the constraint of orthogonality on the paired data yields a more robust...

  10. Causality Constraints in Conformal Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Causality places nontrivial constraints on QFT in Lorentzian signature, for example fixing the signs of certain terms in the low energy Lagrangian. In d-dimensional conformal field theory, we show how such constraints are encoded in crossing symmetry of Euclidean correlators, and derive analogous constraints directly from the conformal bootstrap (analytically). The bootstrap setup is a Lorentzian four-point function corresponding to propagation through a shockwave. Crossing symmetry fixes the signs of certain log terms that appear in the conformal block expansion, which constrains the interactions of low-lying operators. As an application, we use the bootstrap to rederive the well known sign constraint on the (∂φ)4 coupling in effective field theory, from a dual CFT. We also find constraints on theories with higher spin conserved currents. Our analysis is restricted to scalar correlators, but we argue that similar methods should also impose nontrivial constraints on the interactions of spinni...

  11. Causality Constraints in Conformal Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Thomas; Kundu, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Causality places nontrivial constraints on QFT in Lorentzian signature, for example fixing the signs of certain terms in the low energy Lagrangian. In d-dimensional conformal field theory, we show how such constraints are encoded in crossing symmetry of Euclidean correlators, and derive analogous constraints directly from the conformal bootstrap (analytically). The bootstrap setup is a Lorentzian four-point function corresponding to propagation through a shockwave. Crossing symmetry fixes the signs of certain log terms that appear in the conformal block expansion, which constrains the interactions of low-lying operators. As an application, we use the bootstrap to rederive the well known sign constraint on the $(\\partial\\phi)^4$ coupling in effective field theory, from a dual CFT. We also find constraints on theories with higher spin conserved currents. Our analysis is restricted to scalar correlators, but we argue that similar methods should also impose nontrivial constraints on the interactions of spinning o...

  12. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  13. Meditations on Quantified Constraint Satisfaction

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hubie

    2012-01-01

    The quantified constraint satisfaction problem (QCSP) is the problem of deciding, given a structure and a first-order prenex sentence whose quantifier-free part is the conjunction of atoms, whether or not the sentence holds on the structure. One obtains a family of problems by defining, for each structure B, the problem QCSP(B) to be the QCSP where the structure is fixed to be B. In this article, we offer a viewpoint on the research program of understanding the complexity of the problems QCSP(B) on finite structures. In particular, we propose and discuss a group of conjectures; throughout, we attempt to place the conjectures in relation to existing results and to emphasize open issues and potential research directions.

  14. The Kauffman Constraint Coefficients Kw

    CERN Document Server

    Griggs, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    The Kauffman Constraint Coefficients Kw and their corresponding Elementals Ew are presented as solutions to the construction of the (beta)-derivative of Kauffman's Theta-function. Additionally, a new recursion relation is provided to construct the (beta)-derivative of Theta that requires only operational substitutions and summations; this algorithmically simplifies Kauffman's original technique. To demonstrate Kw, we generate the 30 Kw Coefficients from the corresponding Elementals Ew for the (9)-derivative of Theta and find that our results are in complete agreement with Kauffman's Mathematica\\texttrademark solutions. We further present a calculation of two coefficients for the (12)-derivative of Theta and invite readers to use Mathematica\\texttrademark or any other means to calculate and verify our results. Finally, we present a challenging calculation for a coefficient of the (40)-derivative of Theta; owing to the vast numbers of permutations involved, a Mathematica\\texttrademark approach may require subst...

  15. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  16. Integrating Gricean and Attentional Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Passonneau, R J

    1995-01-01

    This paper concerns how to generate and understand discourse anaphoric noun phrases. I present the results of an analysis of all discourse anaphoric noun phrases (N=1,233) in a corpus of ten narrative monologues, where the choice between a definite pronoun or phrasal NP conforms largely to Gricean constraints on informativeness. I discuss Dale and Reiter's [To appear] recent model and show how it can be augmented for understanding as well as generating the range of data presented here. I argue that integrating centering [Grosz et al., 1983] [Kameyama, 1985] with this model can be applied uniformly to discourse anaphoric pronouns and phrasal NPs. I conclude with a hypothesis for addressing the interaction between local and global discourse processing.

  17. Atom mapping with constraint programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Martin; Nahar, Feras; Schnorr, Norah; Backofen, Rolf; Stadler, Peter F; Flamm, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactions are rearrangements of chemical bonds. Each atom in an educt molecule thus appears again in a specific position of one of the reaction products. This bijection between educt and product atoms is not reported by chemical reaction databases, however, so that the "Atom Mapping Problem" of finding this bijection is left as an important computational task for many practical applications in computational chemistry and systems biology. Elementary chemical reactions feature a cyclic imaginary transition state (ITS) that imposes additional restrictions on the bijection between educt and product atoms that are not taken into account by previous approaches. We demonstrate that Constraint Programming is well-suited to solving the Atom Mapping Problem in this setting. The performance of our approach is evaluated for a manually curated subset of chemical reactions from the KEGG database featuring various ITS cycle layouts and reaction mechanisms.

  18. Geographic versus industry diversification: constraints matter

    OpenAIRE

    Ehling, Paul; Ramos, Sofia Brito

    2005-01-01

    This research addresses whether geographic diversification provides benefits over industry diversification. In the absence of constraints, no empirical evidence is found to support the argument that country diversification is superior. With short-selling constraints, however, the geographic tangency portfolio is not attainable by industry portfolios. Results with upper and lower constraints on portfolio weights as well as an out-of-sample analysis show that geographic diversification almost c...

  19. A simpler way of imposing simplicity constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Banburski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a way of imposing simplicity constraints in a holomorphic Spin Foam model that we recently introduced. Rather than imposing the constraints on the boundary spin network, as is usually done, one can impose the constraints directly on the Spin Foam propagator. We find that the two approaches have the same leading asymptotic behaviour, with differences appearing at higher order. This allows us to obtain a model that greatly simplifies calculations, but still has Regge Calculus as its semi-classical limit.

  20. Stability Constraints for Robust Model Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda G. S. Ottoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach for the robust stabilization of systems controlled by MPC strategies. Uncertain SISO linear systems with box-bounded parametric uncertainties are considered. The proposed approach delivers some constraints on the control inputs which impose sufficient conditions for the convergence of the system output. These stability constraints can be included in the set of constraints dealt with by existing MPC design strategies, in this way leading to the “robustification” of the MPC.

  1. Requirements for gas quality and gas appliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsky, Howard; Gersen, Sander; Kiewiet, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The gas transmission network in the Netherlands transports two different qualities of gas, low-calorific gas known as G-gas or L-gas and, high calorific gas (H-gas). These two gas qualities are transported in separate networks, and are connected by means of five blending and conversion

  2. Binary colloidal crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christova-Zdravkova, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Binary crystals are crystals composed of two types of particles having different properties like size, mass density, charge etc. In this thesis several new approaches to make binary crystals of colloidal particles that differ in size, material and charge are reported We found a variety of crystal st

  3. Review of Minimal Flavor Constraints for Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. Fukano, Hidenori; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the constraints on the the vacuum polarization of the standard model gauge bosons from a minimal set of flavor observables valid for a general class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will show that the constraints have a strong impact on the self-coupling and mas......We analyze the constraints on the the vacuum polarization of the standard model gauge bosons from a minimal set of flavor observables valid for a general class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will show that the constraints have a strong impact on the self...

  4. Constraint Processing in Lifted Probabilistic Inference

    CERN Document Server

    Kisynski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    First-order probabilistic models combine representational power of first-order logic with graphical models. There is an ongoing effort to design lifted inference algorithms for first-order probabilistic models. We analyze lifted inference from the perspective of constraint processing and, through this viewpoint, we analyze and compare existing approaches and expose their advantages and limitations. Our theoretical results show that the wrong choice of constraint processing method can lead to exponential increase in computational complexity. Our empirical tests confirm the importance of constraint processing in lifted inference. This is the first theoretical and empirical study of constraint processing in lifted inference.

  5. Notes on Timed Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Valencia, Frank D.

    2004-01-01

    and program reactive systems. This note provides a comprehensive introduction to the background for and central notions from the theory of tccp. Furthermore, it surveys recent results on a particular tccp calculus, ntcc, and it provides a classification of the expressive power of various tccp languages.......A constraint is a piece of (partial) information on the values of the variables of a system. Concurrent constraint programming (ccp) is a model of concurrency in which agents (also called processes) interact by telling and asking information (constraints) to and from a shared store (a constraint...

  6. Optimality criteria design and stress constraint processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for pre-screening stress constraints into either primary or side-constraint categories are reviewed; a projection method, which is developed from prior cycle stress resultant history, is introduced as an additional screening parameter. Stress resultant projections are also employed to modify the traditional stress-ratio, side-constraint boundary. A special application of structural modification reanalysis is applied to the critical stress constraints to provide feasible designs that are preferable to those obtained by conventional scaling. Sample problem executions show relatively short run times and fewer design cycle iterations to achieve low structural weights; those attained are comparable to the minimum values developed elsewhere.

  7. Rigidity Constraints for Large Mesh Deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhao; Xin-Guo Liu; Qun-Sheng Peng; Hu-Jun Bao

    2009-01-01

    It is a challenging problem of surface-based deformation to avoid apparent volumetric distortions around largely deformed areas. In this paper, we propose a new rigidity constraint for gradient domain mesh deformation to address this problem. Intuitively the proposed constraint can be regarded as several small cubes defined by the mesh vertices through mean value coordinates. The user interactively specifies the cubes in the regions which are prone to volumetric distortions, and the rigidity constraints could make the mesh behave like a solid object during deformation. The experimental results demonstrate that our constraint is intuitive, easy to use and very effective.

  8. Toward an automaton Constraint for Local Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the idea of using finite automata to implement new constraints for local search (this is already a successful technique in constraint-based global search. We show how it is possible to maintain incrementally the violations of a constraint and its decision variables from an automaton that describes a ground checker for that constraint. We establish the practicality of our approach idea on real-life personnel rostering problems, and show that it is competitive with the approach of [Pralong, 2007].

  9. Gas magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of a precessional rate of a gas, such as an alkali gas, in a magnetic field is made by promoting a non-uniform precession of the gas in which substantially no net magnetic field affects the gas during a majority of the precession cycle. This allows sensitive gases that would be subject to spin-exchange collision de-phasing to be effectively used for extremely sensitive measurements in the presence of an environmental magnetic field such as the Earth's magnetic field.

  10. Gas magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of a precessional rate of a gas, such as an alkali gas, in a magnetic field is made by promoting a non-uniform precession of the gas in which substantially no net magnetic field affects the gas during a majority of the precession cycle. This allows sensitive gases that would be subject to spin-exchange collision de-phasing to be effectively used for extremely sensitive measurements in the presence of an environmental magnetic field such as the Earth's magnetic field.

  11. Gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiochon, Georges; Guillemin, Claude L.

    1990-11-01

    Gas chromatography is a powerful separation technique for gas and vapor mixtures. Combining separation and on-line detection permits accurate quantitative analysis of complex mixtures, including traces of compounds down to parts per trillions in some particular cases. The importance of gas chromatography in quality control and process control in the chemical and drug industry, in environmental pollution investigations and in clinical analysis is critical. The principles of the technique are discussed, the main components of a gas chromatograph are described and some idea of the importance of the applications is given.

  12. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  13. Cosmological constraints from Chandra observations of galaxy clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven W

    2002-09-15

    Chandra observations of rich, relaxed galaxy clusters allow the properties of the X-ray gas and the total gravitating mass to be determined precisely. Here, we present results for a sample of the most X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed clusters known. We show that the Chandra data and independent gravitational lensing studies provide consistent answers on the mass distributions in the clusters. The mass profiles exhibit a form in good agreement with the predictions from numerical simulations. Combining Chandra results on the X-ray gas mass fractions in the clusters with independent measurements of the Hubble constant and the mean baryonic matter density in the Universe, we obtain a tight constraint on the mean total matter density of the Universe, Omega(m), and an interesting constraint on the cosmological constant, Omega(Lambda). We also describe the 'virial relations' linking the masses, X-ray temperatures and luminosities of galaxy clusters. These relations provide a key step in linking the observed number density and spatial distribution of clusters to the predictions from cosmological models. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a systematic offset of ca. 40% between the normalization of the observed mass-temperature relation and the predictions from standard simulations. This finding leads to a significant revision of the best-fit value of sigma(8) inferred from the observed temperature and luminosity functions of clusters.

  14. Radio jets and outflows of cold gas

    CERN Document Server

    Morganti, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Massive gas outflows are considered a key component in the process of galaxy formation and evolution. It is, therefore, not surprising that a lot of effort is going in quantifying their impact via detailed observations. This short contribution presents recent results obtained from HI and CO observations of different objects where the AGN - and in particular the radio jet - is likely playing an important role in producing the gas outflows. These preliminary results are reinforcing the conclusion that these outflows have a complex and multiphase structure where cold gas in different phases (atomic and molecular) is involved and likely represent a major component. These results will also provide important constraints for establishing how the interaction between AGN/radio jet and the surrounding ISM occurs and how efficiently the gas should cool to produce the observed properties of the outflowing gas. HI likely represents an intermediate phase in this process, while the molecular gas would be the final stage. Wh...

  15. Cosmographic constraints from The Raychaudhuri Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Crislane S.; Santos, Janilo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: There is nowadays a great debate about the mechanism behind the observed cosmic acceleration. In the absence of a fundamental new physical theory, capable of joining the macro and the microphysics, a number of cosmological scenarios have been risen presupposing the existence of new fields in nature, such as quintessence scalar field and Chaplygin gas, for example. The aim of these cosmological models is indeed to derive a smooth function H(z), the so called Hubble function, which describes the expansion history of the universe, and as a further step to confront predictions with the observations. However, there is a direct method to map the expansion history of the universe in a model independent way. Recently it has been shown that luminous red galaxies can provide us with direct measurements of the expansion rate H(z) using differential age techniques. Indeed, at the moment we have only 11 estimates of H(z) lying in the redshift interval 0.1 ≤ z ≥ 1.75; however, in the near future, it is expected ∼ 1, 000 values of the Hubble function. In this way, cosmography is becoming a promising branch in cosmology. Here we investigate and discuss the use of the Raychaudhury equation as a cosmographic description and relate the expansion rate Θ of a congruence of world lines with the evolution of the Hubble function H(z). As is well known, the Raychaudhury equation is central to the understanding of gravitational attraction in astrophysics and cosmology. Our assumptions are that the underlying geometry of the universe is a flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker one and that gravity has an attractive effect. For a comoving observer we find that the expansion rate of a congruence is given by Θ = -3/2(1 + z)dH{sup 2}/dz, which we use to compare with the computed derivatives of H(z) measurements. We use this equation in order to put constraints in the parameters of the cosmological models of quintessence scalar field and Chaplygin gas. (author)

  16. EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR FORMULATION OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HLW GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATYAS J; HUCKLEBERRY AR; VIENNA JD; RODRIGUEZ CA

    2012-03-07

    Historically, high-level waste (HLW) glasses have been formulated with a low liquideus temperature (T{sub L}), or temperature at which the equilibrium fraction of spinel crystals in the melt is below 1 vol % (T{sub 0.01}), nominally below 1050 C. These constraints cannot prevent the accumulation of large spinel crystals in considerably cooler regions ({approx} 850 C) of the glass discharge riser during melter idling and significantly limit the waste loading, which is reflected in a high volume of waste glass, and would result in high capital, production, and disposal costs. A developed empirical model predicts crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass, and thereby provides guidance in formulating crystal-tolerant glasses that would allow high waste loadings by keeping the spinel crystals small and therefore suspended in the glass.

  17. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  18. Mechanically worked single crystal article

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M. L.; Giamei, A. F.

    1985-07-09

    A single crystal nickel base superalloy component, such as a gas turbine blade is mechanically deformed at elevated temperature to improve the yield strength of a portion which is used at temperatures below 800/sup 0/ C., compared to a portion which is used at a higher temperature. A blade has a root which is deformed by 2-14% at 700/sup 0/-1100/sup 0/ C. and an airfoil which is not deformed. The root yield strength is increased 15-50% while the airfoil creep strength is maintained.

  19. Constraints on a possible variation of the fine structure constant from galaxy cluster data

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Alcaniz, J S; G., I E Sanchez; Busti, V C

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method to probe a possible time evolution of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements of the gas mass fraction ($f_{gas}$) in galaxy clusters. Taking into account a direct relation between variations of $\\alpha$ and violations of the distance-duality relation, we discuss constraints on $\\alpha$ for a class of dilaton runaway models. Although not yet competitive with bounds from high-$z$ quasar absorption systems, our constraints, considering a sample of 29 measurements of $f_{gas}$, in the redshift interval $0.14 < z < 0.89$, provide an independent estimate of $\\alpha$ variation at low and intermediate redshifts. Furthermore, current and planned surveys will provide a larger amount of data and thus allow to improve the limits on $\\alpha$ variation obtained in the present analysis.

  20. Phonological Constraint Induction in a Connectionist Network: Learning OCP-Place Constraints from Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, John; Tupper, Paul; Frisch, Stefan A.

    2013-01-01

    A significant problem in computational language learning is that of inferring the content of well-formedness constraints from input data. In this article, we approach the constraint induction problem as the gradual adjustment of subsymbolic constraints in a connectionist network. In particular, we develop a multi-layer feed-forward network that…

  1. Polymer constraint effect for electrothermal bimorph microactuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu Duc, T.; Lau, G.K.; Sarro, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on the analysis of the polymer constraint effect and its use for a micromachined electrothermal bimorph actuator. The actuated displacement is enhanced due to the polymer constraint effect. Both the thermal expansion and apparent Young’s modulus of the constrained polymer blocks a

  2. A model for strategy in constraint solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, J.J. van

    1997-01-01

    The use of constraints for the definition of graphical user interfaces has been recognized as a great concept. However, often many valuations of the variables will satisfy the constraints, and which particular valuation matches best with the expectation of the user cannot be decided without further

  3. Constraint solving for direct manipulation of features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, D.; Oliveira, P.; Noort, A.; Bidarra, R.

    2006-01-01

    In current commercial feature modeling systems, support for direct manipulation of features is not commonly available. This is partly due to the strong reliance of such systems on constraints, but also to the lack of speed of current constraint solvers. In this paper, an approach to the optimization

  4. A Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia Posso, Frank Darwin

    2001-01-01

    The tcc model is a formalism for reactive concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we propose a model of temporal concurrent constraint programming which adds to tcc the capability of modeling asynchronous and non-deterministic timed behavior. We call this tcc extension the ntcc calculus...

  5. Optimal Portfolio Choice with Wash Sale Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup Jensen, Bjarne; Marekwica, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    We analytically solve the portfolio choice problem in the presence of wash sale constraints in a two-period model with one risky asset. Our results show that wash sale constraints can heavily affect portfolio choice of investors with unrealized losses. The trading behavior of such investors...

  6. Supernova constraints on neutrino mass and mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srubabati Goswami

    2000-01-01

    In this article I review the constraints on neutrino mass and mixing coming from type-II supernovae. The bounds obtained on these parameters from shock reheating, -process nucleosynthesis and from SN1987A are discussed. Given the current constraints on neutrino mass and mixing the effect of oscillations of neutrinos from a nearby supernova explosion in future detectors will also be discussed.

  7. On Noisy Extensions of Nonholonomic Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2016-12-01

    We propose several stochastic extensions of nonholonomic constraints for mechanical systems and study the effects on the dynamics and on the conservation laws. Our approach relies on a stochastic extension of the Lagrange-d'Alembert framework. The mechanical system we focus on is the example of a Routh sphere, i.e., a rolling unbalanced ball on the plane. We interpret the noise in the constraint as either a stochastic motion of the plane, random slip or roughness of the surface. Without the noise, this system possesses three integrals of motion: energy, Jellet and Routh. Depending on the nature of noise in the constraint, we show that either energy, or Jellet, or both integrals can be conserved, with probability 1. We also present some exact solutions for particular types of motion in terms of stochastic integrals. Next, for an arbitrary nonholonomic system, we consider two different ways of including stochasticity in the constraints. We show that when the noise preserves the linearity of the constraints, then energy is preserved. For other types of noise in the constraint, e.g., in the case of an affine noise, the energy is not conserved. We study in detail a class of Lagrangian mechanical systems on semidirect products of Lie groups, with "rolling ball type" constraints. We conclude with numerical simulations illustrating our theories, and some pedagogical examples of noise in constraints for other nonholonomic systems popular in the literature, such as the nonholonomic particle, the rolling disk and the Chaplygin sleigh.

  8. Filtering Algorithms for Global Chance Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hnich, B.; Rossi, R.; Tarim, S.A.; Prestwich, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Constraint Satisfaction Problems (SCSPs) are a powerful modeling framework for problems under uncertainty. To solve them is a PSPACE task. The only complete solution approach to date — scenario-based stochastic constraint programming — compiles SCSPs down into classical CSPs. This allows

  9. Network Design with Node Degree Balance Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Berliner; Crainic, Teodor Gabriel

    This presentation discusses an extension to the network design model where there in addition to the flow conservation constraints also are constraints that require design conservation. This means that the number of arcs entering and leaving a node must be the same. As will be shown the model has ...

  10. A Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia Posso, Frank Darwin

    2001-01-01

    The tcc model is a formalism for reactive concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we propose a model of temporal concurrent constraint programming which adds to tcc the capability of modeling asynchronous and non-deterministic timed behavior. We call this tcc extension the ntcc calculus...

  11. Singularity Analysis of Geometric Constraint Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭小波; 陈立平; 周凡利; 周济

    2002-01-01

    Singularity analysis is an important subject of the geometric constraint sat-isfaction problem. In this paper, three kinds of singularities are described and corresponding identification methods are presented for both under-constrained systems and over-constrained systems. Another special but common singularity for under-constrained geometric systems, pseudo-singularity, is analyzed. Pseudo-singularity is caused by a variety of constraint match ing of under-constrained systems and can be removed by improving constraint distribution. To avoid pseudo-singularity and decide redundant constraints adaptively, a differentiation algo rithm is proposed in the paper. Its correctness and efficiency have been validated through its practical applications in a 2D/3D geometric constraint solver CBA.

  12. Volcanological constraints of Archaean tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, P. C.; Ayres, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanological and trace element geochemical data can be integrated to place some constraints upon the size, character and evolutionary history of Archean volcanic plumbing, and hence indirectly, Archean tectonics. The earliest volcanism in any greenhouse belt is almost universally tholeitic basalt. Archean mafic magma chambers were usually the site of low pressure fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and later Cpx + or - an oxide phase during evolution of tholeitic liquids. Several models suggest basalt becoming more contaminated by sial with time. Data in the Uchi Subprovince shows early felsic volcanics to have fractionated REE patterns followed by flat REE pattern rhyolites. This is interpreted as initial felsic liquids produced by melting of a garnetiferous mafic source followed by large scale melting of LIL-rich sial. Rare andesites in the Uchi Subprovince are produced by basalt fractionation, direct mantle melts and mixing of basaltic and tonalitic liquids. Composite dikes in the Abitibi Subprovince have a basaltic edge with a chill margin, a rhyolitic interior with no basalt-rhyolite chill margin and partially melted sialic inclusions. Ignimbrites in the Uchi and Abitibi Subprovinces have mafic pumice toward the top. Integration of these data suggest initial mantle-derived basaltic liquids pond in a sialic crust, fractionate and melt sial. The inirial melts low in heavy REE are melts of mafic material, subsequently melting of adjacent sial produces a chamber with a felsic upper part underlain by mafic magma.

  13. Fast and Easy 3D Reconstruction with the Help of Geometric Constraints and Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annich, Afafe; El Abderrahmani, Abdellatif; Satori, Khalid

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to describe new method of 3D reconstruction from one or more uncalibrated images. This method is based on two important concepts: geometric constraints and genetic algorithms (GAs). At first, we are going to discuss the combination between bundle adjustment and GAs that we have proposed in order to improve 3D reconstruction efficiency and success. We used GAs in order to improve fitness quality of initial values that are used in the optimization problem. It will increase surely convergence rate. Extracted geometric constraints are used first to obtain an estimated value of focal length that helps us in the initialization step. Matching homologous points and constraints is used to estimate the 3D model. In fact, our new method gives us a lot of advantages: reducing the estimated parameter number in optimization step, decreasing used image number, winning time and stabilizing good quality of 3D results. At the end, without any prior information about our 3D scene, we obtain an accurate calibration of the cameras, and a realistic 3D model that strictly respects the geometric constraints defined before in an easy way. Various data and examples will be used to highlight the efficiency and competitiveness of our present approach.

  14. Interstellar Gas and a Dark Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Eric David; Randall, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a potentially powerful method for constraining or discovering a thin dark matter disk in the Milky Way. The method relies on the relationship between the midplane densities and scale heights of interstellar gas being determined by the gravitational potential, which is sensitive to the presence of a dark disk. We show how to use the interstellar gas parameters to set a bound on a dark disk and discuss the constraints suggested by the current data. However, current measurements for these parameters are discordant, with the uncertainty in the constraint being dominated by the molecular hydrogen midplane density measurement, as well as by the atomic hydrogen velocity dispersion measurement. Magnetic fields and cosmic ray pressure, which are expected to play a role, are uncertain as well. The current models and data are inadequate to determine the disk's existence, but taken at face value, may favor its existence depending on the gas parameters used.

  15. Photonics crystal fiber Raman sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuan; Bond, Tiziana C.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Li, Yat; Gu, Claire

    2012-11-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) employs a guiding mechanism fundamentally different from that in conventional index guiding fibers. In an HCPCF, periodic air channels in a glass matrix act as reflectors to confine light in an empty core. As a result, the interaction between light and glass can be very small. Therefore, HCPCF has been used in applications that require extremely low non-linearity, high breakdown threshold, and zero dispersion. However, their applications in optical sensing, especially in chemical and biological sensing, have only been extensively explored recently. Besides their well-recognized optical properties the hollow cores of the fibers can be easily filled with liquid or gas, providing an ideal sampling mechanism in sensors. Recently, we have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. This is because the confinement of both light and sample inside the hollow core enables direct interaction between the propagating wave and the analyte. In this paper, we report our recent work on using HCPCF as a platform for Raman or SERS in the detection of low concentration greenhouse gas (ambient CO2), biomedically significant molecules (e.g., glucose), and bacteria. We have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or SERS applications.

  16. Constraints on Crustal Viscosity from Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory measurements of the ductile deformation of crustal rocks demonstrate a range of crystal deformation mechanisms that may be represented by a viscous deformation law, albeit one in which the effective viscosity may vary by orders of magnitude, depending on temperature, stress, grain size, water content and other factors. In such measurements these factors can be separately controlled and effective viscosities can be estimated more or less accurately, though the measured deformation occurs on much shorter time scales and length scales than are typical of geological deformation. To obtain bulk measures of the in situ crustal viscosity law for actual geological processes, estimated stress differences are balanced against measured surface displacement or strain rates: at the continental scale, surface displacement and strain rates can be effectively measured using GPS, and stress differences can be estimated from the distribution of gravitational potential energy; this method has provided constraints on a depth-averaged effective viscosity for the lithosphere as a whole in regions that are actively deforming. Another technique measures the post-seismic displacements that are interpreted to occur in the aftermath of a large crustal earthquake. Stress-differences here are basically constrained by the co-seismic deformation and the elastic rigidity (obtained from seismic velocity) and the strain rates are again provided by GPS. In this technique the strain is a strong function of position relative to the fault, so in general the interpretation of this type of data depends on a complex calculation in which various simplifying assumptions must be made. The spatial variation of displacement history on the surface in this case contains information about the spatial variation of viscosity within the crust. Recent post-seismic studies have shown the potential for obtaining measurements of both depth variation and lateral variation of viscosity in the crust beneath

  17. Landfill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willumsen, H. (Crone and Koch, Viborg (Denmark))

    1990-08-01

    In most landfills, the refuse deposit usually has a high content of organic matter consisting of a mixture of household, industrial and garden waste. Immediately after the refuse has been placed in the landfill, aerobic decomposition of the organic waste begins. Once the oxygen has been exhausted, anaerobic decomposition begins. 'Biogas' is produced which has a methane content of approximately 50% and can be used as a fuel. The exploitation of landfill gas for energy purposes was initiated in the USA around 1975 and later in Europe. A landfill gas plant consists of a recovery system and a production system. A recovery system can consist of vertical perforated pipe wells, horizontal perforated pipes or ditches, or membrane covers to collect the generated gas. Under normal conditions it will not be necessary to process the gas except for the removal of water and other impurities (e.g. solid particles) if the gas is to be used in a boiler or engine. In the USA most often only power is produced, whereas in Europe the waste heat is normally exploited, making the plant function as a combined power and heating plant. It is also possible to upgrade the landfill gas to a methane content of nearly 100, after which it can be distributed with natural gas. There are several such plants in the USA. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  19. Training, constraints, and high-cycle magneto-mechanical properties of Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape-memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielus, M.; Chernenko, V. A.; Knowlton, W. B.; Kostorz, G.; Müllner, P.

    2008-05-01

    Magneto-mechanical experiments with a rotating magnetic field of 0.97 T were performed with a Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal. Periodic strains exceeding 1% were recorded over a hundred million magneto-mechanical cycles. The twin microstructure of the cycled crystal was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). In the center of the sample, no twin boundaries were found. At the sample edges, the microstructure shows a dense twin pattern. The results are compared with previous experiments of differently trained crystals. It is useful to distinguish between “ineffective training”, which results in a nearly self-accommodated martensite, and “effective training”, which results in a nearly single-variant crystal. The evolution of twin structure is discussed in terms of training, magneto-mechanical cycling, and extrinsic constraints imposed by the experimental setting. It is concluded that the response of a magnetic shape memory alloy to an alternating excitation depends strongly on the initial twin microstructure established through training. In particular, ineffective training results in a twin microstructure which can adapt to extrinsic constraints resulting in continued large periodic magnetic-field-induced deformation. In contrast, the twin microstructure of an effectively trained crystal can not adapt to extrinsic constraints resulting in early failure by fracture.

  20. Gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahan, E.; Eudaly, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This evaluation provides performance and cost data for commercially available simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. Intercooled, reheat, and compound cycles are discussed from theoretical basis only, because actual units are not currently available, except on a special-order basis. Performance characteristics investigated include unit efficiency at full-load and off-design conditions, and at rated capacity. Costs are tabulated for both simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. The output capacity of the gas turbines investigated ranges from 80 to 134,000 hp for simple units and from 12,000 to 50,000 hp for regenerative units.

  1. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  2. Gas hydrates. The energy source of the future?; Gashydraten. De energiebron van de toekomst?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Weering, T.C.E. [Nederlands Instituut voor Onderzoek der Zee NIOZ, ' t Horntje, Texel (Netherlands)

    1999-12-01

    On the bottom of the ice seas, along the edges of the oceans and near subsea mud volcanos and other soil structures where natural gas emerges, great gas reserves are found. These contain twice as much carbon as the known reserves of oil and gas worldwide. Only the technique of extracting the gas out of the crystals is still lacking. 1 ref.

  3. Hydrogeologic Constraints on Yucatan's Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehring, D O; Butler, J H

    1974-11-15

    The Republic of Mexico has an ambitious and effective national water program. The Secretaria de Recursos Hidraulicos (SRH), whose director has cabinet rank in the federal government, is one of the most professionally distinguished government agencies of its kind in the Americas. Resources for the Future, Inc., has been assisting the World Bank with a water planning study which the Bank is undertaking jointly with the Mexican government. The study is intended to provide guidelines for the development of government policies and projects designed to bring about the most efficient use of Mexico's water resources. However, to date, their study has not been directed toward the growing problems of the northern Yucatáan Peninsula which are discussed here. LeGrand (13) suggested that man has inherited a harsh environment in carbonate terranes. In the case of the northern Yucatán Peninsula, the physical environment creates a set of hydrogeologic constraints to future economic and social development. Planning for intermediate and long-range land use on the peninsula must be related directly to the limited and fragile groundwater source. Continued contamination will make future aquifer management a difficult challenge for federal, state, and territorial agencies. We conclude that any strategy for long-range land use in the study area should include establishment of a regional aquifermonitoring network for long-term measurements of key hydrogeologic parameters, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, water table elevations, and water quality. Information from this network would flow into a central facility for storage, interpretation, and analysis. At present the SRH is collecting some of these data. Expansion of the existing program to provide sound information for regional planning will greatly benefit present as well as future generations. If such a program is implemented, it will represent a model for regional planning in other tropical and subtropical karstic

  4. Natural Constraints to Species Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewitus, Eric; Morlon, Hélène

    2016-08-01

    Identifying modes of species diversification is fundamental to our understanding of how biodiversity changes over evolutionary time. Diversification modes are captured in species phylogenies, but characterizing the landscape of diversification has been limited by the analytical tools available for directly comparing phylogenetic trees of groups of organisms. Here, we use a novel, non-parametric approach and 214 family-level phylogenies of vertebrates representing over 500 million years of evolution to identify major diversification modes, to characterize phylogenetic space, and to evaluate the bounds and central tendencies of species diversification. We identify five principal patterns of diversification to which all vertebrate families hold. These patterns, mapped onto multidimensional space, constitute a phylogenetic space with distinct properties. Firstly, phylogenetic space occupies only a portion of all possible tree space, showing family-level phylogenies to be constrained to a limited range of diversification patterns. Secondly, the geometry of phylogenetic space is delimited by quantifiable trade-offs in tree size and the heterogeneity and stem-to-tip distribution of branching events. These trade-offs are indicative of the instability of certain diversification patterns and effectively bound speciation rates (for successful clades) within upper and lower limits. Finally, both the constrained range and geometry of phylogenetic space are established by the differential effects of macroevolutionary processes on patterns of diversification. Given these properties, we show that the average path through phylogenetic space over evolutionary time traverses several diversification stages, each of which is defined by a different principal pattern of diversification and directed by a different macroevolutionary process. The identification of universal patterns and natural constraints to diversification provides a foundation for understanding the deep-time evolution of

  5. Gas coning control for smart wells using a dynamic coupled well-reservoir simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemhuis, A.P.; Nennie, E.D.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Alberts, G.J.N.; Peters, E.; Joosten, G.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    A strong increase in gas inflow due to gas coning and the resulting bean-back because of Gas to Oil Ratio (GOR) constraints can severely limit oil production and reservoir drive energy. In this paper we will use a coupled reservoir-well model to demonstrate that oil production can be increased by us

  6. Gas coning control for smart wells using a dynamic coupled well-reservoir simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemhuis, A.P.; Nennie, E.D.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Alberts, G.J.N.; Peters, E.; Joosten, G.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    A strong increase in gas inflow due to gas coning and the resulting bean-back because of Gas to Oil Ratio (GOR) constraints can severely limit oil production and reservoir drive energy. In this paper we will use a coupled reservoir-well model to demonstrate that oil production can be increased by

  7. Gas gangrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also can be caused by group A streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Vibrio vulnificus . Clostridium is found nearly everywhere. As the bacteria grow inside the body, it makes gas and harmful substances (toxins) that can damage body tissues, cells, and blood ...

  8. Cosmographic Constraints and Cosmic Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Luongo, Orlando; Ruggeri, Alan Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    The problem of reproducing dark energy effects is reviewed here with particular interest devoted to cosmography. We summarize some of the most relevant cosmological models, based on the assumption that the corresponding barotropic equations of state evolve as the universe expands, giving rise to the accelerated expansion. We describe in detail the $\\Lambda$CDM ($\\Lambda$-Cold Dark Matter) and $\\omega$CDM models, considering also some specific examples, e.g., Chevallier-Polarsky-Linder, the Chaplygin gas and the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati cosmological model. Finally, we consider the cosmological consequences of $f(\\mathcal{R})$ and $f(\\mathcal{T})$ gravities and their impact on the framework of cosmography. Keeping these considerations in mind, we point out the \\emph{model-independent} procedure related to cosmography, showing how to match the series of cosmological observables to the free parameters of each model. We critically discuss the role played by cosmography, as a \\emph{selection criterion} to check whet...

  9. Energy constraints in ambipolar diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2007-05-21

    The evolution of a weakly ionized collisional gas produces an energy decay proportional to a moment of the Lorentz force. Although the existence of asymptotic limit states is not guaranteed, if they exist they must be force-free ones. It is proved that in a number of simple geometries and boundary conditions, this limit state is necessarily trivial. Another point concerns the possibility of large transfers between the kinetic and magnetic energies in this process. It is found that the magnetic energy variation is bounded by a constant times the maximum of the velocity, and that both variation rates are bounded by a function of the square root of the total energy variation. Since this is very small for most advanced times, in the limit t->{approx} there is no transfer between the different types of energy: They all tend to become stationary.

  10. Crystal structure and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-04-01

    The notion of structure is central to the subject of chemistry. This review traces the development of the idea of crystal structure since the time when a crystal structure could be determined from a three-dimensional diffraction pattern and assesses the feasibility of computationally predicting an unknown crystal structure of a given molecule. Crystal structure prediction is of considerable fundamental and applied importance, and its successful execution is by no means a solved problem. The ease of crystal structure determination today has resulted in the availability of large numbers of crystal structures of higher-energy polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs. These structural libraries lead to the concept of a crystal structure landscape. A crystal structure of a compound may accordingly be taken as a data point in such a landscape.

  11. Electronic polarizability of ionic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, O. V.; Maksimov, E. G.

    1992-01-01

    The electronic polarizability of ionic crystals is considered in the framework of the Gordon-Kim electron gas model. First a polarization of a single ion is calculated by using the modified Sternheimer approach. Then the interaction between two ions with dipole momenta p n and p n' is studied using the Thomas-Fermi type approximation for the energy functional. By expressing the total energy as a functional of the polarizations p n instead of an electric field E and minimizing this functional with respect to p n linear equations for p n are obtained. Solution of these equations leads to the Clausius-Mossotti type expression for dielectric constant ∈ ∞ of ionic crystals in terms of a cell polarizability. It is shown that the cell polarizability can not be expressed in terms of an averaged ion polarizability only but includes also some non-local contributions due to a short-range interactions between ions. Numerical calculations lead to a good agreement with experimental data for a number of ionic crystals.

  12. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  13. CONSTRAINT EFFECT IN FRACTURE WHAT IS IT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P; Prof. Yuh J. Chao, P

    2008-10-29

    The meaning of the phrase 'constraint effect in fracture' has changed in the past two decades from 'contained plasticity' to a broader description of 'dependence of fracture toughness value on geometry of test specimen or structure'. This paper will first elucidate the fundamental mechanics reasons for the apparent 'constraint effects in fracture', followed by outlining a straightforward approach to overcoming this problem in both brittle (elastic) and ductile (elastic-plastic) fracture. It is concluded by discussing the major difference in constraint effect on fracture event in elastic and elastic-plastic materials.

  14. QCD unitarity constraints on Reggeon Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We point out that the unitarity of QCD imposes meaningful constraints on a possible form of the QCD Reggeon Field Theory. We show that neither the BFKL nor JIMWLK nor Braun's Hamiltonian satisfy the said constraints. In a toy, zero transverse dimensional case we construct a model that satisfies the analogous constraint and show that at infinite energy it indeed tends to a "black disk limit" as opposed to the model with triple Pomeron vertex only, routinely used as a toy model in the literature

  15. QCD unitarity constraints on Reggeon Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovner, Alex [Physics Department, University of Connecticut,2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Levin, Eugene [Departemento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María,and Centro Científico-Tecnológico de Valparaíso,Avda. Espana 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Department of Particle Physics, Tel Aviv University,Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Lublinsky, Michael [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Physics Department, University of Connecticut,2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2016-08-04

    We point out that the s-channel unitarity of QCD imposes meaningful constraints on a possible form of the QCD Reggeon Field Theory. We show that neither the BFKL nor JIMWLK nor Braun’s Hamiltonian satisfy the said constraints. In a toy, zero transverse dimensional case we construct a model that satisfies the analogous constraint and show that at infinite energy it indeed tends to a “black disk limit' as opposed to the model with triple Pomeron vertex only, routinely used as a toy model in the literature.

  16. Database queries and constraints via lifting problems

    CERN Document Server

    Spivak, David I

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown a tight relationship between databases and categories. In the present paper we extend that connection to show that certain queries and constraints correspond to the algebro-topological notion of lifting problems. In our formulation, each so-called SPARQL graph pattern query corresponds to a lifting problem, and each solution to the query corresponds to a lift. We interpret constraints within the same formalism and then investigate some formal properties of queries and constraints, e.g. their behavior under data migration functors.

  17. Constraint satisfaction problems CSP formalisms and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Ghedira, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    A Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) consists of a set of variables, a domain of values for each variable and a set of constraints. The objective is to assign a value for each variable such that all constraints are satisfied. CSPs continue to receive increased attention because of both their high complexity and their omnipresence in academic, industrial and even real-life problems. This is why they are the subject of intense research in both artificial intelligence and operations research. This book introduces the classic CSP and details several extensions/improvements of both formalisms a

  18. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  19. Crystallization from Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  20. CRYSTAL FILTER TEST SET

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRYSTAL FILTERS, *HIGH FREQUENCY, *RADIOFREQUENCY FILTERS, AMPLIFIERS, ELECTRIC POTENTIAL, FREQUENCY, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , INSTRUMENTATION, RADIOFREQUENCY, RADIOFREQUENCY AMPLIFIERS, TEST EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS

  1. Gravitational phase transitions with an exclusion constraint in position space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the statistical mechanics of a system of self-gravitating particles with an exclusion constraint in position space in a space of dimension d. The exclusion constraint puts an upper bound on the density of the system and can stabilize it against gravitational collapse. We plot the caloric curves giving the temperature as a function of the energy and investigate the nature of phase transitions as a function of the size of the system and of the dimension of space in both microcanonical and canonical ensembles. We consider stable and metastable states and emphasize the importance of the latter for systems with long-range interactions. For d ≤ 2, there is no phase transition. For d > 2, phase transitions can take place between a "gaseous" phase unaffected by the exclusion constraint and a "condensed" phase dominated by this constraint. The condensed configurations have a core-halo structure made of a "rocky core" surrounded by an "atmosphere", similar to a giant gaseous planet. For large systems there exist microcanonical and canonical first order phase transitions. For intermediate systems, only canonical first order phase transitions are present. For small systems there is no phase transition at all. As a result, the phase diagram exhibits two critical points, one in each ensemble. There also exist a region of negative specific heats and a situation of ensemble inequivalence for sufficiently large systems. We show that a statistical equilibrium state exists for any values of energy and temperature in any dimension of space. This differs from the case of the self-gravitating Fermi gas for which there is no statistical equilibrium state at low energies and low temperatures when d ≥ 4. By a proper interpretation of the parameters, our results have application for the chemotaxis of bacterial populations in biology described by a generalized Keller-Segel model including an exclusion constraint in position space. They also describe colloids at a fluid

  2. Twin domains in nickel-oxide type crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, V. S.

    1997-04-01

    NiO-type antiferromagnets, 2-valent oxides of 3d transition metals: MnO, CoO and NiO, are isomorphic in the paramagnetic state. They have a face-centered cubic lattice. Below the Neel temperature TN, magnetic ordering in these crystals is accompanied by a distortion of the cubic lattice. Although this distortion is very slight, it reduces the crystal symmetry. Because the cubic crystal has several equivalent directions which can become distortion axes, below TN the crystal undergoes twinning, splitting up into several macroscopic regions known as T-domains. Crystals were grown by three methods: Verneuil, epitaxy from the gas phase, and flux-melt growth. They were investigated via polarization microscopy, X-ray topography and antiferromagnetic resonance. The use of a variety of growth methods and investigating techniques made it possible to obtain reliable information about the structure of NiO-type crystals.

  3. Carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds: Theory and observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    For the most part, gas phase models of the chemistry of dense molecular clouds predict the abundances of simple species rather well. However, for larger molecules and even for small systems rich in carbon these models often fail spectacularly. Researchers present a brief review of the basic assumptions and results of large scale modeling of the carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds. Particular attention is to the influence of the gas phase C/O ratio in molecular clouds, and the likely role grains play in maintaining this ratio as clouds evolve from initially diffuse objects to denser cores with associated stellar and planetary formation. Recent spectral line surveys at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths along with selected observations in the submillimeter have now produced an accurate inventory of the gas phase carbon budget in several different types of molecular clouds, though gaps in our knowledge clearly remain. The constraints these observations place on theoretical models of interstellar chemistry can be used to gain insights into why the models fail, and show also which neglected processes must be included in more complete analyses. Looking toward the future, larger molecules are especially difficult to study both experimentally and theoretically in such dense, cold regions, and some new methods are therefore outlined which may ultimately push the detectability of small carbon chains and rings to much heavier species.

  4. Artistic Crystal Creations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In this inquiry-based, integrative art and science activity, Grade 5-8 students use multicolored Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) crystallizing solutions to reveal beautiful, cylindrical, 3-dimensional, needle-shaped structures. Through observations of the crystal art, students analyze factors that contribute to crystal size and formation, compare…

  5. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  6. Analysis of liquid crystal properties for photonic crystal fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Wei, Lei

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the bandgap structure of Liquid Crystal infiltrated Photonic Crystal Fibers depending on the parameters of the Liquid Crystals by means of finite element simulations. For a biased Liquid Crystal Photonic Crystal Fiber, we show how the tunability of the bandgap position depends...... on the Liquid Crystal parameters....

  7. Optimal accounting policies under financial constraints: aggressive versus conservative

    OpenAIRE

    Masatomo Akita; Yusuke Osaki

    2011-01-01

    We examine how severity of financial constraints influences firms' choices of accounting policies. This paper shows that firms with mild financial constraints choose an aggressive accounting policy and those with severe financial constraints choose a conservative accounting policy.

  8. Choco: an Open Source Java Constraint Programming Library

    OpenAIRE

    Jussien, Narendra; Rochart, Guillaume; Lorca, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Choco is a java library for constraint satisfaction problems (CSP), constraint programming (CP) and explanation-based constraint solving (e-CP). It is built on a event-based propagation mechanism with backtrackable structures.

  9. Democratic constraints on demographic policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, J S

    1984-01-01

    The discussion compares the population policies adopted in Sweden during the 1930s to raise fertiity and the policies considered in the US during the 1970s in response to the high fertility experienced in the 1950s. Both sets of policies recommended increased availability of birth control, more liberal abortion laws, and greater employment opportunities for women. It becomes evident that the constraints imposed by a democratic system of government translate into policy recommendations that place individual freedom of choice and equal opportunity for all citizens as higher goals than any specific demographic target. Consequently, the population commissions of Sweden and the US made similar suggestions on how to resolve their opposite demographic problems. The demographic situations in the 2 nations were antipodal, and the countries also had very different social climates. This additional disparity was insufficient to counterbalance the apparently overwhelming influence of the democratic political systems in making virtually identical policy recommendations. Yet, the contrasting social climates of Sweden in 1935 and the US in 1970-72 may explain the different reactions each commission received. In terms of the responses by both citizens and government officials to the commissions' reports, the Swedish commission was more successful. Practically all of their recommendations were enthusiastically received and quickly adopted by the Swedish Riksdag. Yet, when the criterion for success becomes whether or not a demographic target was met, it increased in the 1940s and then dropped again while the same social policies were in effect. Even before the US commission began its study, fertility in the US had fallen and continues to remain low. These findings suggest that commissions in democratic countries will most likely never recommend dramatic measures in population policy. Thus, it is questionable whether such commissions in democratic nations will totally fulfill the

  10. AUTOMATIC APPROACH TO PRODUCT CONCEPTUAL DESIGN BASED ON CONSTRAINT NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongjie; Xiao Renbin

    2004-01-01

    Product design is considered as the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), and a new design approach basedon constraint network is proposed and applied to make design automatic partially. By means of constraint extraction, constraint network construction and operation, constraint chains are acquired, and then the conceptual design scheme can be got by decoding the information stored in the design constraint chains, which provides a novelty method for mechanical product design automation. Shearing mechanism of shearing machine has been designed by this way.

  11. Integrity Constraint Checking in Federated Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, Paul; Widom, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    A federated database is comprised of multiple interconnected databases that cooperate in an autonomous fashion. Global integrity constraints are very useful in federated databases, but the lack of global queries, global transaction mechanisms, and global concurrency control renders traditional const

  12. Einstein constraints on a characteristic cone

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne; Martín-García, José M

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the Cauchy problem on a characteristic cone, including its vertex, for the Einstein equations in arbitrary dimensions. We use a wave map gauge, solve the obtained constraints and show gauge conservation.

  13. Optimal portfolio strategies under a shortfall constraint

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation to insert the constraint into the resolution ... A numerical method is applied to obtain an approximate solution to the ... risk measure, has emerged as an industry standard with regulatory authorities, such as.

  14. Relationship between protein structure and geometrical constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Hansen, Jan; Brunak, Søren;

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate to what extent the structure of proteins can be deduced from incomplete knowledge of disulfide bridges, surface assignments, secondary structure assignments, and additional distance constraints. A cost function taking such constraints into account was used to obtain protein structures...... using a simple minimization algorithm. For small proteins, the approximate structure could be obtained using one additional distance constraint for each amino acid in the protein. We also studied the effect of using predicted secondary structure and surface assignments. The constraints used...... in this approach typically may be obtained from low-resolution experimental data. When using a cost function based on distances, half of the resulting structures will be mirrored, because the resulting structure and its mirror image will have the same cost. The secondary structure assignments were therefore...

  15. Biological constraints do not entail cognitive closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlerick, Michael

    2014-12-01

    From the premise that our biology imposes cognitive constraints on our epistemic activities, a series of prominent authors--most notably Fodor, Chomsky and McGinn--have argued that we are cognitively closed to certain aspects and properties of the world. Cognitive constraints, they argue, entail cognitive closure. I argue that this is not the case. More precisely, I detect two unwarranted conflations at the core of arguments deriving closure from constraints. The first is a conflation of what I will refer to as 'representation' and 'object of representation'. The second confuses the cognitive scope of the assisted mind for that of the unassisted mind. Cognitive closure, I conclude, cannot be established from pointing out the (uncontroversial) existence of cognitive constraints.

  16. Diffusion processes satisfying a conservation law constraint

    CERN Document Server

    Bakosi, J

    2014-01-01

    We investigate coupled stochastic differential equations governing N non-negative continuous random variables that satisfy a conservation principle. In various fields a conservation law requires that a set of fluctuating variables be non-negative and (if appropriately normalized) sum to one. As a result, any stochastic differential equation model to be realizable must not produce events outside of the allowed sample space. We develop a set of constraints on the drift and diffusion terms of such stochastic models to ensure that both the non-negativity and the unit-sum conservation law constraint are satisfied as the variables evolve in time. We investigate the consequences of the developed constraints on the Fokker-Planck equation, the associated system of stochastic differential equations, and the evolution equations of the first four moments of the probability density function. We show that random variables, satisfying a conservation law constraint, represented by stochastic diffusion processes, must have di...

  17. Dynamic shortfall constraints for optimal portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Luderer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a portfolio problem when a Tail Conditional Expectation constraint is imposed. The financial market is composed of n risky assets driven by geometric Brownian motion and one risk-free asset. The Tail Conditional Expectation is calculated for short intervals of time and imposed as risk constraint dynamically. The method of Lagrange multipliers is combined with the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation to insert the constraint into the resolution framework. A numerical method is applied to obtain an approximate solution to the problem. We find that the imposition of the Tail Conditional Expectation constraint when risky assets evolve following a log-normal distribution, curbs investment in the risky assets and diverts the wealth to consumption.

  18. Optimal portfolio strategies under a shortfall constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Akuma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We impose dynamically, a shortfall constraint in terms of Tail Conditional Expectation on the portfolio selection problem in continuous time, in order to obtain optimal strategies. The financial market is assumed to comprise n risky assets driven by geometric Brownian motion and one risk-free asset. The method of Lagrange multipliers is combined with the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation to insert the constraint into the resolution framework. The constraint is re-calculated at short intervals of time throughout the investment horizon. A numerical method is applied to obtain an approximate solution to the problem. It is found that the imposition of the constraint curbs investment in the risky assets.

  19. Constraint theory multidimensional mathematical model management

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, George J

    2017-01-01

    Packed with new material and research, this second edition of George Friedman’s bestselling Constraint Theory remains an invaluable reference for all engineers, mathematicians, and managers concerned with modeling. As in the first edition, this text analyzes the way Constraint Theory employs bipartite graphs and presents the process of locating the “kernel of constraint” trillions of times faster than brute-force approaches, determining model consistency and computational allowability. Unique in its abundance of topological pictures of the material, this book balances left- and right-brain perceptions to provide a thorough explanation of multidimensional mathematical models. Much of the extended material in this new edition also comes from Phan Phan’s PhD dissertation in 2011, titled “Expanding Constraint Theory to Determine Well-Posedness of Large Mathematical Models.” Praise for the first edition: "Dr. George Friedman is indisputably the father of the very powerful methods of constraint theory...

  20. Managing Constraint Generators in Retail Design Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Mia Borch; Haug, Anders

    Retail design concepts are complex designs meeting functional and aesthetic demands. During a design process a retail designer has to consider various constraint generators such as stakeholder interests, physical limitations and restrictions. Obviously the architectural site, legislators...

  1. A computer-aided molecular design framework for crystallization solvent design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunanithi, Arunprakash T.; Achenie, Luke E.K.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2006-01-01

    One of the key decisions in designing solution crystallization processes is the selection of solvents. In this paper, we present a computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) framework for the design and selection of solvents and/or anti-solvents for solution crystallization. The CAMD problem......, property requirements such as solubility, crystal morphology, flashpoint, toxicity, viscosity, normal boiling and melting point are posed as constraints. All the properties are estimated using group contribution methods. The MINLP model is then solved using a decomposition approach to obtain optimal...... solvent molecules. Solvent design and selection for two types of solution crystallization processes namely cooling crystallization and drowning out crystallization are presented. In the first case study, the design of single compound solvent for crystallization of ibuprofen, which is an important...

  2. Freedom, Time Constraints and Progressive Taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Screpanti

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I present a measure of freedom for opportunity sets which are bounded by both budget and time constraints. Then I show that, in a society in which income is distributed more unequally than leisure time, a government aiming at leaving freedom distribution unaltered should apply progressive taxation. Since incomes bind freedom only partially when time constraints bind, taxing the rich reduces his freedom proportionally less than taxing the poor reduces his. Moreover, when incomes ...

  3. TRENDS AND CONSTRAINTS IN CLT IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoHongjie; NiChuanbin

    2004-01-01

    Communicative language teaching (CLT) is an in novationin English language teaching ( ELT ). That appeared in Britain in the late 1960s. As the country with the largest English learning population in the world, China also has become deeply involved in CLT. This essay attempts to sketch the trends of CLT in China, the constraints it met with, and outlines suggestions and measures taken to overcome the constraints.

  4. Constraint for the Existence of Ellipsoidal Vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yu-Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Under the spontaneous curvature model of lipid bilayers, the constraints for the existence of equilibrium axisym metric oblate and prolate ellipsoidal vesicles are obtained from the general shape equation. They degenerate either to the constraint for the existence of a spherical vesicle or to that of a circular cylindrical vesicle given by Ou-Yang and Helfrich [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59 (1987) 2486; 60(1988)120; Phys. Rev. A 39 (1989) 5280].

  5. Duality without constraint qualification in nonsmooth optimization

    OpenAIRE

    S. Nobakhtian

    2006-01-01

    We are concerned with a nonsmooth multiobjective optimization problem with inequality constraints. In order to obtain our main results, we give the definitions of the generalized convex functions based on the generalized directional derivative. Under the above generalized convexity assumptions, sufficient and necessary conditions for optimality are given without the need of a constraint qualification. Then we formulate the dual problem corresponding to the primal problem, and some duality res...

  6. Discontinuous gradient constraints and the infinity Laplacian

    CERN Document Server

    Juutinen, Petri; Rossi, Julio D

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by tug-of-war games and asymptotic analysis of certain variational problems, we consider a gradient constraint problem involving the infinity Laplace operator. We prove that this problem always has a solution that is unique if a certain regularity condition on the constraint is satisfied. If this regularity condition fails, then solutions obtained from game theory and $L^p$-approximation need not coincide.

  7. Constraint Cooling of Hot Rolled Coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-juan; ZHANG Chun-li

    2004-01-01

    The layer thermal conductivity during constraint cooling of hot rolled coil was described by using equivalent thermal conductivity model and finite element method. Two radial stress concentration zones in constraint cooled coil were shown by numerical analysis, and the tension stress was assumed to be the main factor to induce stress corrosion. The experimental results show that the longer the water cooling time is, the smaller the grain size and the more uniform the grains are.

  8. Team Decision Problems with Convex Quadratic Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Gattami, Ather

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider linear quadratic team problems with an arbitrary number of quadratic constraints in both stochastic and deterministic settings. The team consists of players with different measurements about the state of nature. The objective of the team is to minimize a quadratic cost subject to additional finite number of quadratic constraints. We first consider the problem of countably infinite number of players in the team for a bounded state of nature with a Gaussian distributi...

  9. Protein crystallization with paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  10. Generation Capacity Expansion with CO2 Emission and Transmission Constraints in an Oligopolistic Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.A.K. Abeygunawardana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The European Union is committed to cut Greenhouse Gas emissions (GHGs by 30% of 1990 levels by 2020; other countries are committed to make similar reductions under a global agreement. Some technical options are available on the supply side, to reduce GHG and other harmful emissions by the power sector. Therefore, it is important to analyze what type of power generation technologies will be chosen by companies under different CO2 mitigation targets. Several models look into Generation Expansion Planning in oligopolistic markets; however, they do not consider the impact of CO2 reduction targets and the transmission constraints together. This study presents a Generation Expansion planning model with transmission constraints for analyzing the implications of CO2 emission mitigation constraints for investment decisions in oligopolistic electricity markets. The results of the model are presented with reference to the Italian power sector, responsible for 32% of national CO2 emissions.

  11. Autonomous gliding entry guidance with geographic constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jie; Wu Xuzhong; Tang Shengjing

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel three-dimensional autonomous entry guidance for relatively high lift-to-drag ratio vehicles satisfying geographic constraints and other path constraints. The guidance is composed of onboard trajectory planning and robust trajectory tracking. For trajectory planning, a longitudinal sub-planner is introduced to generate a feasible drag-versus-energy profile by using the interpolation between upper boundary and lower boundary of entry corridor to get the desired trajectory length. The associated magnitude of the bank angle can be specified by drag profile, while the sign of bank angle is determined by lateral sub-planner. Two-reverse mode is utilized to satisfy waypoint constraints and dynamic heading error corridor is utilized to satisfy no-fly zone constraints. The longitudinal and lateral sub-planners are iteratively employed until all of the path constraints are satisfied. For trajectory tracking, a novel tracking law based on the active disturbance rejection control is introduced. Finally, adaptability tests and Monte Carlo simulations of the entry guidance approach are performed. Results show that the proposed entry guidance approach can adapt to different entry missions and is able to make the vehicle reach the prescribed target point precisely in spite of geographic constraints.

  12. Implementation of Complex Projects Using Constraint Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag Strak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During the implementation of the complex projects, all planned activities and resources must be taken into account. In general, it is necessary to assign the resources to the activities, but to also avoid simultaneous engagement of resources for multiple activities. In order to solve these problems, various techniques and methods are used. Mathematic and integer programming, genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, or taboo search are just some of the techniques used for solving this problem. Constraint programming comes from artificial intelligence i.e. papers from this area that occurred in 1960s and 1970s. Constraints exist in every segment of human environment. They represent a natural medium for expressing relations that exist in the physical world. Fulfilment of constraints is used in many different areas. Problems such as scheduling, allocations etc. are typical examples of constraints problems, where the basic concept of constraint programming can be applied. This paper considered implementation of the Bor Regional Development Project. Development of constraint programming was followed by the development of appropriate tools. B-Prolog was used in this paper. Many systems, including B-Prolog, enable interface with classic object-oriented languages, such as C++ or Java. One of the greatest advantages is the possibility of simple modelling, even for beginners in planning and implementation of the project.

  13. Improved Parameterized Algorithms for Constraint Satisfaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Eun Jung

    2010-01-01

    Results from inapproximability provide several sharp thresholds on the approximability of important optimization problems. We give several improved parameterized algorithms for solving constraint satisfaction problems above a tight threshold. Our results include the following: - Improved algorithms for any Constraint Satisfaction Problem: Take any boolean Max-CSP with at most $c$ variables per constraint such that a random assignment satisfies a constraint with probability $p$. There is an algorithm such that for every instance of the problem with $m$ constraints, the algorithm decides whether at least $pm+k$ constraints can be satisfied in $O(2^{(c(c+1)/2) k} m)$ time. This improves on results of [Alon et al., SODA 2010] and [Crowston et al., SWAT 2010]. We observe that an $O(2^{\\eps k + \\eps m})$ time algorithm for every $\\eps > 0$ would imply that 3SAT is in subexponential time, so it seems unlikely that our runtime dependence on $k$ can be significantly improved. Our proof also shows that every Max-$c$-CS...

  14. 一种基于空芯光子晶体光纤的气体检测装置研究%Research on a Gas Detection Device Based on Hollow-core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐圣奇; 董长哲; 刘伟伟; 母国光

    2011-01-01

    Spectrum analysis technology has a broad prospect of application in air pollutant monitoring field.Based on the principle of absorption spectroscopy,this paper proposed a new experimental scheme of using hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for pollutant detecting in air.By measuring the absorptance of sample gases,such as methanol and trichloroethylene with different concentrations,it is found that the detection sensitivity of our experimental setup can achieve ppmv level according to the 3 sigma criteria.%光谱分析技术在大气污染检测领域具有广泛的应用前景。文章从吸收光谱的测量原理出发,提出一种基于空芯光子晶体光纤的气体检测装置实验方案,通过对不同浓度的甲醇和三氯乙烯样品进行测量,并根据3标准对测量结果进行分析,发现系统对甲醇和三氯乙烯的检测灵敏度可以达到ppmv量级。

  15. Neural Modeling and Control of Diesel Engine with Pollution Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Ouladsine, Mustapha; Dovifaaz, Xavier; 10.1007/s10846-005-3806-y

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a neural approach for modelling and control of a turbocharged Diesel engine. A neural model, whose structure is mainly based on some physical equations describing the engine behaviour, is built for the rotation speed and the exhaust gas opacity. The model is composed of three interconnected neural submodels, each of them constituting a nonlinear multi-input single-output error model. The structural identi?cation and the parameter estimation from data gathered on a real engine are described. The neural direct model is then used to determine a neural controller of the engine, in a specialized training scheme minimising a multivariable criterion. Simulations show the effect of the pollution constraint weighting on a trajectory tracking of the engine speed. Neural networks, which are ?exible and parsimonious nonlinear black-box models, with universal approximation capabilities, can accurately describe or control complex nonlinear systems, with little a priori theoretical knowledge. The present...

  16. Large lead tungstate crystals for calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, P

    2000-01-01

    PbWO//4 crystals have been selected for the CMS Experiment at LHC, rather than the higher light yield but bulkier CeF//3, because space is at a premium in the 4T supraconductive magnet. Early PbWO//4 samples exhibited severe low dose radiation damage, slow components or long term afterglow. Thus, major R&D efforts have been undertaken by the Russian and Chinese producers. Besides improving the control of the raw materials, the stoichiometry and the growth parameters, the R&D efforts explored two avenues: doping of the crystals and oxygen annealing. Both groups have produced full size crystals which satisfy the requirements of CMS, including the low production cost which is an overwhelming consideration and a severe constraint in the optimization of the production process. This paper concentrates on the development of Chinese crystals; it attempts to guide the reader through the complex development process by giving a very brief description of the main steps and issues addressed in the past five years,...

  17. Seeing is believing: Visualization of He distribution in zircon and implications for thermal history reconstruction on single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danišík, Martin; McInnes, Brent I. A.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; McDonald, Brad J.; Evans, Noreen J.; Becker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometry is an established radiometric dating technique used to place temporal constraints on a range of thermally sensitive geological events, such as crustal exhumation, volcanism, meteorite impact, and ore genesis. Isotopic, crystallographic, and/or mineralogical heterogeneities within analyzed grains can result in dispersed or anomalous (U-Th)/He ages. Understanding the effect of these grain-scale phenomena on the distribution of He in analyzed minerals should lead to improvements in data interpretation. We combine laser ablation microsampling and noble gas and trace element mass spectrometry to provide the first two-dimensional, grain-scale zircon He “maps” and quantify intragrain He distribution. These maps illustrate the complexity of intracrystalline He distribution in natural zircon and, combined with a correlated quantification of parent nuclide (U and Th) distribution, provide an opportunity to assess a number of crystal chemistry processes that can generate anomalous zircon (U-Th)/He ages. The technique provides new insights into fluid inclusions as potential traps of radiogenic He and confirms the effect of heterogeneity in parent-daughter isotope abundances and metamictization on (U-Th)/He systematics. Finally, we present a new inversion method where the He, U, and Th mapping data can be used to constrain the high- and low-temperature history of a single zircon crystal. PMID:28246632

  18. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  19. Multivariable adaptive optimization of a continuous bioreactor with a constraint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.K.

    1987-01-01

    A single-variable on-line adaptive optimization algorithm using a bilevel forgetting factor was developed. Also a modified version of this algorithm was developed to handle a quality constraint. Both algorithms were tested in simulation studies on a continuous bakers' yeast culture for optimization speed and accuracy, reoptimization capability, and long term operational stability. The above algorithms were extended to a multivariable on-line adaptive optimization and tested in simulated optimization studies with and without a constraint on the residual ethanol concentration. The dilution rate (D) and the temperature (T) were manipulated to maximize the cellular productivity (DX). It took about 80 hours to optimize the culture and the attained steady state was very close to the optimum. When tested with a big step change in the feed substrate concentration it took 60 to 80 hours to drive and maintain the cellular productivity close to the new optimum value. Long term operational stability was also tested. The multivariable algorithm was experimentally applied to an actual bakers' yeast culture. Only unconstrained optimization was carried out. The optimization required 50 to 90 hours. The attained steady state was D = 0.301 1/hr, T = 32.8 C, and DX = 1.500 g/l/hr. A fast inferential optimization algorithm based on one of the fast responding off-gas data, the carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER), was proposed. In simulation and experimental studies this new algorithm is 2 to 3 times faster in optimization speed.

  20. REDUCTION OF CONSTRAINTS FOR COUPLED OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raszewski, F.; Edwards, T.

    2009-12-15

    The homogeneity constraint was implemented in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to help ensure that the current durability models would be applicable to the glass compositions being processed during DWPF operations. While the homogeneity constraint is typically an issue at lower waste loadings (WLs), it may impact the operating windows for DWPF operations, where the glass forming systems may be limited to lower waste loadings based on fissile or heat load limits. In the sludge batch 1b (SB1b) variability study, application of the homogeneity constraint at the measurement acceptability region (MAR) limit eliminated much of the potential operating window for DWPF. As a result, Edwards and Brown developed criteria that allowed DWPF to relax the homogeneity constraint from the MAR to the property acceptance region (PAR) criterion, which opened up the operating window for DWPF operations. These criteria are defined as: (1) use the alumina constraint as currently implemented in PCCS (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {ge} 3 wt%) and add a sum of alkali constraint with an upper limit of 19.3 wt% ({Sigma}M{sub 2}O < 19.3 wt%), or (2) adjust the lower limit on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} constraint to 4 wt% (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {ge} 4 wt%). Herman et al. previously demonstrated that these criteria could be used to replace the homogeneity constraint for future sludge-only batches. The compositional region encompassing coupled operations flowsheets could not be bounded as these flowsheets were unknown at the time. With the initiation of coupled operations at DWPF in 2008, the need to revisit the homogeneity constraint was realized. This constraint was specifically addressed through the variability study for SB5 where it was shown that the homogeneity constraint could be ignored if the alumina and alkali constraints were imposed. Additional benefit could be gained if the homogeneity constraint could be replaced by the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and sum of