WorldWideScience

Sample records for crystalline inclusion proteins

  1. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody against Crystalline Inclusion Protein of Entomopathogenic Bacterium%昆虫病原细菌Cip蛋白多克隆抗体的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游娟; 黄建林; 曹莉; 韩日畴

    2013-01-01

    Entomopathogenic Photorhabdus bacteria produce two types of intracellular crystalline inclusion proteins,CipA and CipB,as the nutrient resource for the symbiotic nematode.Based on constructed high-level prokaryotic expression system,recombinant Cip proteins were purified with a warm extract method and used as the antigens to immune New Zealand rabbits,respectively.The polyclonal antibodies with the titers of 1:6400 were raised and monitored by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Western blot assay confirmed that the antibodies could specifically recognize the inclusion proteins in Photorhabdus bacteria.Preparation of Cip polyclonal antibodies will be helpful to develop the immunological assay method of these proteins.%昆虫病原发光杆菌属(Photorhabdus)细菌产生2种胞内晶体蛋白CipA和CipB,为其共生线虫的生长发育提供营养.基于Cip蛋白已在大肠杆茵原核表达系统中得到稳定且高水平表达,以纯化的重组Cip蛋白为抗原,免疫新西兰大耳兔制备多克隆抗体,ELISA测定2种蛋白抗血清效价,均可达到1∶6400.Western blot分析显示,制备的抗体均可特异识别发光杆菌的胞内晶体蛋白.Cip蛋白多克隆抗体的制备为建立该类蛋白的免疫学检测方法奠定了基础.

  2. Micro-crystalline inclusions analysis by PIXE and RBS

    CERN Document Server

    Strivay, David; Gallien, J P; Grambole, D; Kouzmanov, Kalin

    2008-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the nuclear microprobe using a 3 MeV proton beam is the long range of particles (around 70 \\mu m in light matrices). The PIXE method, with EDS analysis and using the multilayer approach for treating the X-ray spectrum allows the chemistry of an intra-crystalline inclusion to be measured, provided the inclusion roof and thickness at the impact point of the beam (Z and e, respectively) are known (the depth of the inclusion floor is Z + e). The parameter Z of an inclusion in a mineral can be measured with a precision of around 1 \\mu m using a motorized microscope. However, this value may significantly depart from Z if the analyzed inclusion has a complex shape. The parameter e can hardly be measured optically. By using combined RBS and PIXE measurements, it is possible to obtain the geometrical information needed for quantitative elemental analysis. This paper will present measurements on synthetic samples to investigate the advantages of the technique, and also on natural solid and f...

  3. Evolution of Cellular Inclusions in Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiko Furusato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD consists of small, yellow-white, glistening intraretinal crystals in the posterior pole, tapetoretinal degeneration with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and “sclerosis” of the choroid; in addition, sparking yellow crystals in the superficial marginal cornea are also found in many patients. BCD is inherited as an autosomal-recessive trait (4q35-tel and usually has its onset in the third decade of life. This review focuses on the ultrastructure of cellular crystals and lipid inclusions of BCD.

  4. Preparation and characterization of the crystalline inclusion complexes between cyclodextrins and poly(1,3-dioxolane)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景烨; 颜德岳; 陈群

    2002-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of the crystalline inclusion complexes between a polymeric guest, poly(1,3-dioxolane) (PDXL), and small-molecular hosts, cyclodextrins (CDs) are reported. It is observed that the polymer guest can form crystalline inclusion complexes with three kinds of cyclodextrins, which may be attributed to the high oxygen atom density in PDXL chain. The crystalline inclusion complexes were characterized with FTIR , TGA, X-ray diffraction, SEM, 1H NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopes. It was found that the crystalline inclusion complexes have higher temperature stability than the pure CDs. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the crystalline inclusion complexes proved that they have columnar structures. 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the crystalline inclusion complexes indicate that CDs adopt a more symmetrical conformation in the complexes, while pure CDs assume a less symmetrical conformation in the crystal without a guest inside their cavities. The morphology of the crystal was

  5. Nutrition utilization of entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema sp.SY-5 on recombinant crystalline inclusion proteins%昆虫病原斯氏线虫SY-5对重组Cip晶体蛋白的营养利用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游娟; 黄建林; 曹莉; 韩日畴

    2012-01-01

    [目的]初生型Photorhabdus luminescens细菌产生两种胞内晶体蛋白CipA和CipB,为其共生的昆虫病原异小杆线虫提供营养.探索非共生的斯氏线虫对Cip蛋白的营养利用情况.[方法]在已构建重组Cip蛋白大肠杆菌表达体系的基础上,建立重组菌细胞与无菌斯氏SY-5线虫共培养系统,检测线虫的生长发育情况.[结果]Cip蛋白对目标线虫生长有显著支持作用:发育为成虫的比例达到65%-82%,雌虫的怀卵率为80%-95%,平均怀卵量为30-50粒,并显著降低各虫态的死亡率.[结论]Cip蛋白不仅为共生的异小杆线虫提供营养,亦能为斯氏线虫所利用.%Phase Ⅰ cells of Photorhabdus luminescens bacteria,symbiotically associated with entomopathogenic Heterorhabditis nematode,produce two types of intracellular crystalline inclusions,CipA and CipB,to support the symbiont.This study aimed to investigate the possible influence of Cip proteins on non-symbiotic Steinernema nematode.[Methods] Based on constructed Escherichia coli expression system of Cip proteins,co-culture system of recombinant E.coli bacteria and Steinernema sp.SY-5 nematode was set up.[Results] The Cip proteins significantly promoted the development of SY-5 nematode to make high adult rate of 65%-82%,gravid rate of 80%-95%,30-50 eggs per nematode,and low mortalities.[Conclusion] As the nutrient reserves for Heterorhabditis nematode,Cip proteins can be accepted and utilized by Steinernema nematode.The progress on these proteins will provide insights into the mechanisms governing bacteria-nematode symbiosis.

  6. 重组昆虫病原细菌Cip蛋白基因工程菌发酵条件的初步研究%Preliminary studies on fermentation of recombinant crystalline inclusion protein of entomopathogeic bacterium in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游娟; 黄建林; 曹莉; 韩日畴

    2012-01-01

    Two types of intracellular crystalline inclusion proteins produced by Photorhabdus bacteria named CipA and CipB are the key nutrient source for the novel biopesticide entomopathogeic Heterorhabditis nematodes. Based on constructed pET-15b-cipA and pET-15b-cipB, the protocaryotic expression and fermentation of recombinant Cip proteins were studied. When recombinant E. Coli BL21 (DE3 ) was induced in LB medium with 1 mmol/L IPTG added at OD600 0. 8 ~ 1. 0 for 8 hours, CipA and CipB expression constituted 30. 9% and 32. 6% of the total bacterial protein, respectively. Both recombinant strains showed stable plasmid inheritance and consistence. This research will be helpful for the fermentation of Cip on a large scale and promote the commercialization of nematode products.%昆虫病原细菌产生两种胞内晶体蛋白CipA和CipB,为新型的生物农药--昆虫病原线虫提供必需的营养.在已构建原核表达载体pET-15b-cipA和pET-15b-cipB的基础上,研究了这两种重组载体在不同宿主菌中的表达情况,重组菌的生长特性,摇瓶培养时表达重组Cip蛋白工程菌的发酵条件.结果显示:以E.coli BL21(DE3)为宿主菌,在LB培养基中培养至OD600为0.8~1.0时,1 mmol/L IPTG诱导8 h,CipA和CipB的表达量可达30.9%和32.6%,重组质粒具有良好的分离稳定性和结构稳定性.

  7. Preparation and characterization of the crystalline inclusion complexes between cyclodextrins and poly(1,3-dioxolane)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景烨; 颜德岳; 陈群

    2002-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of the crystalline inclusion complexes between a polymeric guest, poly(1,3-dioxolane)(PDXL), and small-molecular hosts, cyclodextrins(CDs) are reported. It is observed that the polymer guest can form crystalline inclusion complexes with three kinds of cyclodextrins, which May be attributed to the high oxygen atom density in PDXL chain. The crystalline inclusion complexes were characterized with FTIR , TGA, X-ray diffraction, SEM, 1H NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopes. It was found that the crystalline inclusion complexes have higher temperature stability than the pure CDs. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the crystalline inclusion complexes proved that they have columnar structures. 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the crystalline inclusion complexes indicate that CDs adopt a more symmetrical confor-mation in the complexes, while pure CDs assume a less symmetrical conformation in the crystal without a guest inside their cavities. The morphology of the crystal was observed by means of SEM.

  8. Inclusion of thiazyl radicals in porous crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Storm V; Barbour, Leonard J; Haynes, Delia A; Rawson, Jeremy M; Lloyd, Gareth O

    2011-08-24

    The incorporation of benzodithiazolyl (BDTA) and methylbenzodithiazolyl (MBDTA) radicals into porous hybrid frameworks via gas phase diffusion revealed that inclusion appeared selective for the MIL53(Al) framework against a range of other potential hosts. Both PXRD and EPR studies are consistent with retention of a π*-π* dimer motif for BDTA in MIL53(Al)@BDTA whereas MBDTA in MIL53(Al)@MBDTA appears to be monomeric. The guests are readily released by the addition of solvent (CH(2)Cl(2)).

  9. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  10. Tetrakis(dimethoxyphenyl)adamantane (TDA) and its inclusion complexes in the crystalline state: a versatile carrier for small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Alexander; Frey, Wolfgang; Richert, Clemens

    2015-06-08

    Molecular storage solutions for incorporating small molecules in crystalline matrices are of interest in the context of structure elucidation, decontamination, and slow release of active ingredients. Here we report the syntheses of 1,3,5,7-tetrakis(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)adamantane, 1,3,5,7-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)adamantane, 1,3,5,7-tetrakis(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)adamantane, and 1,3,5,7-tetrakis(4-methoxy-2-ethylphenyl)adamantane, together with their X-ray crystal structures. All four compounds crystallize readily. Only the octaether shows an unusual level of (pseudo)polymorphism in its crystalline state, combined with the ability to include a number of different small molecules in its crystal lattices. A total of 20 different inclusion complexes with guest molecules as different as ethanol or trifluorobenzene were found. For nitromethane and benzene, schemes for uptake and release are presented.

  11. Crystalline protein profiling and cry gene detection in Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated during epizootics in Cydia pomonella L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konecka Edyta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The composition of Bacillus thuringiensis crystalline inclusions was characterized in 18 strains: 12 isolates were obtained from the intestinal tract of Cydia pomonella larvae during epizootics, 2 isolates were cultured from Leucoma salicis larvae taken from their natural populations, and 4 reference strains. The number and molecular mass of B. thuringiensis crystalline proteins (Cry and Cyt was estimated by the sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The crystals contained 1-8 proteins with molecular masses of 36-155 kDa. The toxin profiles differed both quantatively and qualitatively. The B. thuringiensis MPU B9 isolate had the highest number and diversity of Cry toxins. The analysis of crystal composition by SDS-PAGE was insufficient to detect groups and subgroups of Cry proteins. We identified 20 groups and 3 subgroups of Cry and Cyt crystalline toxins. Only one epizootic strain harboured cry25. In single reference strains, the cry1H, cry10 and cry25 genes were found. We did not find any correlation between the occurrence of cry genes and electrophoretic protein profiles of crystalline toxins.

  12. Computer construction and analysis of protein models of the mutant γD-crystallin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Ke; SUN Zhao-hui; SHENTU Xing-chao; WANG Kai-jun; TAN Jian

    2005-01-01

    Background γD-crystallin plays an important role in human cataract formation. Being highly stable, γD-crystallin proteins are composed of two domains. In this study we constructed and analyzed protein models of the mutant γD-crystallin gene, which caused a special fasciculiform congenital cataract affecting a large Chinese family. Methods γD-crystallin protein structure was predicted by Swiss-Model software using bovine γD-crystallin as a template and Prospect software using human βb2-crystallin as a template. The models were observed with a Swiss-Pdb viewer.Results The mutant γD-crystallin structure predicted by the Swiss-Model software showed that proline23 was an exposed surface residue and P23T change made a decreased hydrogen bond distance between threonine23 and asparagine49. The mutant γD-crystallin structure predicted by the Prospect software showed that the P23T change exerted a significant effect on the protein's tertiary structure and yielded hydrogen bonds with aspartic acid21, asparagine24, asparagine49 and serine74.Conclusion The mutant γD-crystallin gene has a significant effect on the protein's tertiary structure, supporting that alteration of γ-crystallin plays an important role in human cataract formation.

  13. Solubilization and refolding of inclusion body proteins in reverse micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinogradov, A.A.; Kudryashova, E.V.; Levashov, A.V.; Dongen, van W.M.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Today, many valuable proteins can be obtained in sufficient amounts using recombinant DNA techniques. However, frequently the expression of recombinant proteins results in the accumulation of the product in dense amorphous deposits inside the cells, called inclusion bodies. The challenge then is to

  14. [In vitro renaturation of proteins from inclusion bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porowińska, Dorota; Marszałek, Ewelina; Wardęcka, Paulina; Komoszyński, Michał

    2012-06-11

    Recombinant proteins and enzymes are commonly used in many areas of our life, such as diagnostics, industry and medicine, due to heterologous synthesis in prokaryotic expression systems. However, a high expression level of foreign protein in bacteria cells results in formation of inactive and insoluble aggregates--inclusion bodies. Reactivation of aggregated proteins is a complex and time-consuming process. Every protein requires experimental optimization of the process conditions. The choice of the refolding method depends on the type of recombinant protein and its physical, chemical and biological properties. Recovery of the activity of proteins accumulated in inclusion bodies can be divided into 4 steps: 1) inclusion bodies isolation, 2) solubilization of aggregates, 3) renaturation, 4) purification of catalytically active molecules. Efficiency of the refolding process depends on many physical factors and chemical and biological agents. The above parameters determine the time of the folding and prevent protein aggregation. They also assist the folding and have an influence on the solubility and stability of native molecules. To date, dilution, dialysis and chromatography are the most often used methods for protein refolding.

  15.  In vitro renaturation of proteins from inclusion bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Porowińska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins and enzymes are commonly used in many areas of our life, such as diagnostics, industry and medicine, due to heterologous synthesis in prokaryotic expression systems. However, a high expression level of foreign protein in bacteria cells results in formation of inactive and insoluble aggregates – inclusion bodies.Reactivation of aggregated proteins is a complex and time-consuming process. Every protein requires experimental optimization of the process conditions. The choice of the refolding method depends on the type of recombinant protein and its physical, chemical and biological properties.Recovery of the activity of proteins accumulated in inclusion bodies can be divided into 4 steps: 1 inclusion bodies isolation, 2 solubilization of aggregates, 3 renaturation, 4 purification of catalytically active molecules.Efficiency of the refolding process depends on many physical factors and chemical and biological agents. The above parameters determine the time of the folding and prevent protein aggregation. They also assist the folding and have an influence on the solubility and stability of native molecules.To date, dilution, dialysis and chromatography are the most often used methods for protein refolding. 

  16. Effect of plant proteins and crystalline amino acid supplementation on postprandial plasma amino acid profiles and metabolic response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine; Larsen, Bodil Katrine; Holm, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The use of aquafeeds formulated with plant protein sources supplemented with crystalline amino acids (CAAs) is believed to influence amino acid (AA) uptake patterns and AA metabolic fate. Oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion rates were measured in rainbow trout (468.5 +/- A 86.5 g) force fed 0...... to be caused by an unbalanced dietary AA profile and CAA supplementation, rather than inclusion of plant protein concentrate....

  17. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  18. Amyloid-like protein inclusions in tobacco transgenic plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Villar-Piqué

    Full Text Available The formation of insoluble protein deposits in human tissues is linked to the onset of more than 40 different disorders, ranging from dementia to diabetes. In these diseases, the proteins usually self-assemble into ordered β-sheet enriched aggregates known as amyloid fibrils. Here we study the structure of the inclusions formed by maize transglutaminase (TGZ in the chloroplasts of tobacco transplastomic plants and demonstrate that they have an amyloid-like nature. Together with the evidence of amyloid structures in bacteria and fungi our data argue that amyloid formation is likely a ubiquitous process occurring across the different kingdoms of life. The discovery of amyloid conformations inside inclusions of genetically modified plants might have implications regarding their use for human applications.

  19. Search for conserved amino acid residues of the α-crystallin proteins of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiliaev, Nikita G; Selivanova, Olga M; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-04-01

    [Formula: see text]-crystallin is the major eye lens protein and a member of the small heat-shock protein (sHsp) family. [Formula: see text]-crystallins have been shown to support lens clarity by preventing the aggregation of lens proteins. We performed the bioinformatics analysis of [Formula: see text]-crystallin sequences from vertebrates to find conserved amino acid residues as the three-dimensional (3D) structure of [Formula: see text]-crystallin is not identified yet. We are the first who demonstrated that the N-terminal region is conservative along with the central domain for vertebrate organisms. We have found that there is correlation between the conserved and structured regions. Moreover, amyloidogenic regions also correspond to the structured regions. We analyzed the amino acid composition of [Formula: see text]-crystallin A and B chains. Analyzing the occurrence of each individual amino acid residue, we have found that such amino acid residues as leucine, serine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, histidine, isoleucine, glutamic acid, and valine change their content simultaneously in A and B chains in different classes of vertebrates. Aromatic amino acids occur more often in [Formula: see text]-crystallins from vertebrates than on the average in proteins among 17 animal proteomes. We obtained that the identity between A and B chains in the mammalian group is 0.35, which is lower than the published 0.60.

  20. Packaging protein drugs as bacterial inclusion bodies for therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villaverde Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A growing number of insights on the biology of bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs have revealed intriguing utilities of these protein particles. Since they combine mechanical stability and protein functionality, IBs have been already exploited in biocatalysis and explored for bottom-up topographical modification in tissue engineering. Being fully biocompatible and with tuneable bio-physical properties, IBs are currently emerging as agents for protein delivery into mammalian cells in protein-replacement cell therapies. So far, IBs formed by chaperones (heat shock protein 70, Hsp70, enzymes (catalase and dihydrofolate reductase, grow factors (leukemia inhibitory factor, LIF and structural proteins (the cytoskeleton keratin 14 have been shown to rescue exposed cells from a spectrum of stresses and restore cell functions in absence of cytotoxicity. The natural penetrability of IBs into mammalian cells (reaching both cytoplasm and nucleus empowers them as an unexpected platform for the controlled delivery of essentially any therapeutic polypeptide. Production of protein drugs by biopharma has been traditionally challenged by IB formation. However, a time might have arrived in which recombinant bacteria are to be engineered for the controlled packaging of therapeutic proteins as nanoparticulate materials (nanopills, for their extra- or intra-cellular release in medicine and cosmetics.

  1. Regulation of mouse small heat shock protein αb-crystallin gene by aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liu

    Full Text Available The stress-inducible small heat shock protein (shsp/αB-crystallin gene is expressed highly in the lens and moderately in other tissues. Here we provide evidence that it is a target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR transcription factor. A sequence (-329/-323, CATGCGA similar to the consensus xenobiotic responsive element (XRE, called here XRE-like, is present in the αBE2 region of αB-crystallin enhancer and can bind AhR in vitro and in vivo. αB-crystallin protein levels were reduced in retina, lens, cornea, heart, skeletal muscle and cultured muscle fibroblasts of AhR(-/- mice; αB-crystallin mRNA levels were reduced in the eye, heart and skeletal muscle of AhR(-/- mice. Increased AhR stimulated αB-crystallin expression in transfection experiments conducted in conjunction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT and decreased AhR reduced αB-crystallin expression. AhR effect on aB-crystallin promoter activity was cell-dependent in transfection experiments. AhR up-regulated αB-crystallin promoter activity in transfected HeLa, NIH3T3 and COS-7 cells in the absence of exogenously added ligand (TCDD, but had no effect on the αB-crystallin promoter in C(2C(12, CV-1 or Hepa-1 cells with or without TCDD. TCDD enhanced AhR-stimulated αB-crystallin promoter activity in transfected αTN4 cells. AhR could bind to an XRE-like site in the αB-crystallin enhancer in vitro and in vivo. Finally, site-specific mutagenesis experiments showed that the XRE-like motif was necessary for both basal and maximal AhR-induction of αB-crystallin promoter activity. Our data strongly suggest that AhR is a regulator of αB-crystallin gene expression and provide new avenues of research for the mechanism of tissue-specific αB-crystallin gene regulation under normal and physiologically stressed conditions.

  2. Structure and function of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins: established concepts and emerging ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, T H

    2000-06-01

    Small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins are defined by conserved sequence of approximately 90 amino acid residues, termed the alpha-crystallin domain, which is bounded by variable amino- and carboxy-terminal extensions. These proteins form oligomers, most of uncertain quaternary structure, and oligomerization is prerequisite to their function as molecular chaperones. Sequence modelling and physical analyses show that the secondary structure of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins is predominately beta-pleated sheet. Crystallography, site-directed spin-labelling and yeast two-hybrid selection demonstrate regions of secondary structure within the alpha-crystallin domain that interact during oligomer assembly, a process also dependent on the amino terminus. Oligomers are dynamic, exhibiting subunit exchange and organizational plasticity, perhaps leading to functional diversity. Exposure of hydrophobic residues by structural modification facilitates chaperoning where denaturing proteins in the molten globule state associate with oligomers. The flexible carboxy-terminal extension contributes to chaperone activity by enhancing the solubility of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis has yielded proteins where the effect of the change on structure and function depends upon the residue modified, the organism under study and the analytical techniques used. Most revealing, substitution of a conserved arginine residue within the alpha-crystallin domain has a major impact on quaternary structure and chaperone action probably through realignment of beta-sheets. These mutations are linked to inherited diseases. Oligomer size is regulated by a stress-responsive cascade including MAPKAP kinase 2/3 and p38. Phosphorylation of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins has important consequences within stressed cells, especially for microfilaments.

  3. Targeting protein homeostasis in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mhoriam; Machado, Pedro M; Miller, Adrian; Spicer, Charlotte; Herbelin, Laura; He, Jianghua; Noel, Janelle; Wang, Yunxia; McVey, April L; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Gallagher, Philip; Statland, Jeffrey; Lu, Ching-Hua; Kalmar, Bernadett; Brady, Stefen; Sethi, Huma; Samandouras, George; Parton, Matt; Holton, Janice L; Weston, Anne; Collinson, Lucy; Taylor, J Paul; Schiavo, Giampietro; Hanna, Michael G; Barohn, Richard J; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Greensmith, Linda

    2016-03-23

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) is the commonest severe myopathy in patients more than 50 years of age. Previous therapeutic trials have targeted the inflammatory features of sIBM but all have failed. Because protein dyshomeostasis may also play a role in sIBM, we tested the effects of targeting this feature of the disease. Using rat myoblast cultures, we found that up-regulation of the heat shock response with arimoclomol reduced key pathological markers of sIBM in vitro. Furthermore, in mutant valosin-containing protein (VCP) mice, which develop an inclusion body myopathy, treatment with arimoclomol ameliorated disease pathology and improved muscle function. We therefore evaluated arimoclomol in an investigator-led, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept trial in sIBM patients and showed that arimoclomol was safe and well tolerated. Although arimoclomol improved some IBM-like pathology in the mutant VCP mouse, we did not see statistically significant evidence of efficacy in the proof-of-concept patient trial.

  4. Targeting Protein Homeostasis in Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mhoriam; Machado, Pedro M.; Miller, Adrian; Spicer, Charlotte; Herbelin, Laura; He, Jianghua; Noel, Janelle; Wang, Yunxia; McVey, April L.; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Gallagher, Philip; Statland, Jeffrey; Lu, Ching-Hua; Kalmar, Bernadett; Brady, Stefen; Sethi, Huma; Samandouras, George; Parton, Matt; Holton, Janice L.; Weston, Anne; Collinson, Lucy; Taylor, J. Paul; Schiavo, Giampietro; Hanna, Michael G.; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Greensmith, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) is the commonest severe myopathy in patients over age 50. Previous therapeutic trials have targeted the inflammatory features of sIBM, but all have failed. Since protein dyshomeostasis may also play a role in sIBM, we tested the effects of targeting this feature of the disease. Using rat myoblast cultures, we found that up-regulation of the heat shock response with Arimoclomol reduced key pathological markers of sIBM in vitro. Furthermore, in mutant valosin-containing protein VCP mice, which develop an inclusion body myopathy (IBM), treatment with Arimoclomol ameliorated disease pathology and improved muscle function. We therefore evaluated the safety and tolerability of Arimoclomol in an investigator-lead, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept patient trial and gathered exploratory efficacy data which showed that Arimoclomol was safe and well tolerated. Although Arimoclomol improved some IBM-like pathology in vitro and in vivo in the mutant VCP mouse, we did not see statistically significant evidence of efficacy in this proof of concept patient trial. PMID:27009270

  5. Protein misfolding specifies recruitment to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersuker, Kirill; Brandeis, Michael; Kopito, Ron R

    2016-04-25

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) containing aggregated disease-associated proteins and polyubiquitin (poly-Ub) conjugates are universal histopathological features of neurodegenerative diseases. Ub has been proposed to target proteins to IBs for degradation via autophagy, but the mechanisms that govern recruitment of ubiquitylated proteins to IBs are not well understood. In this paper, we use conditionally destabilized reporters that undergo misfolding and ubiquitylation upon removal of a stabilizing ligand to examine the role of Ub conjugation in targeting proteins to IBs that are composed of an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin, the causative protein of Huntington's disease. We show that reporters are excluded from IBs in the presence of the stabilizing ligand but are recruited to IBs after ligand washout. However, we find that Ub conjugation is not necessary to target reporters to IBs. We also report that forced Ub conjugation by the Ub fusion degradation pathway is not sufficient for recruitment to IBs. Finally, we find that reporters and Ub conjugates are stable at IBs. These data indicate that compromised folding states, rather than conjugation to Ub, can specify recruitment to IBs.

  6. Phase Structure and Properties of a Biodegradable Block Copolymer Coalesced from It's Crystalline Inclusion Compound Formed with alpha-Cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Xintao; Wei, Min; Probeni, Francis; Bullions, Todd A.; Shin, I. Daniel; Tonelli, Alan E.

    2002-03-01

    A well-defined biodegradable block copolymer of poly(epsilon caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was synthesized and characterized and then included as a guest in an inclusion compound (IC) formed with the host alpha-cyclodextrin (CD). The PCL-b-PLLA block copolymer was subsequently coalesced from it's CD-IC crystals by either treatment with hot water (50 C) or an aqueous amylase solution at 25 C. The coalesced PCL-b-PLLA was examined by FTIR, DSC, TGA, and WAXD and was found to be much more homogeneosly organized, with much less segregation and crystallinity of the PCL and PLLA microphases. The morpholgy, crystallization kinetics, thermal behavior, and biodegradability of the coalesced PCL-b-PLLA block copolymer was studied by comparison to similar observations made on as-synthesized PCL-b-PLLA, PCL and PLLA homopolymers, and their solution-cast blend. The PCL and PLLA blocks are found to be more intimately mixed, with less phase segregation, in the coalesced diblock copolymer, and this leads to homogeneous bulk crystallization, which is not observed for the as-synthesized diblock copolymer. The coalesced PCL-b-PLLA was also found to be more quickly biodegraded (lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus)than the as-synthesized PCL-b-PLLA or the physical blend of PCL and PLLA homopolymers. Overall, the coalescence of the inherently phase segregated diblock copolymer PCL-b-PLLA results in a small amount of compact, chain-extended PCL and PLLA crystals embedded in an amorphous phase, largely consisting of well-mixed PCL and PLLA blocks. Thus, we have demonstrated that it is possible to control the morpholgy of a biodegradable diblock copolymer, thereby significantly modifying it's properties, by coalescence from it's CD-IC crystals.

  7. Utilization of crystalline and protein-bound amino acids by growing-finishing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Buxant, L.; Clausen, D.

    2016-01-01

    It was hypothesized that diets containing crystalline AA (CAA) and protein-bound AA had a comparable nitrogen retention rate, even though the CAA-based diet is optimized as having a standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of 100% for the CAA. Two isoenergetic diets were formulated to provide ident...

  8. Molecular cartography of proteins: surface relief analysis of the calf eye lens protein gamma-crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirgadze, Y u; Kurochkina, N; Nikonov, S

    1989-11-01

    Methods of calculating the protein molecular surface and different map representations are described. The maps are obtained by projection of the space-filling molecular model on the surface of the ellipsoid of inertia. A new approach to surface analysis is proposed which is based on the use of three general maps: an identification map with all residues outlined, a surface relief map and a coloured map with a specific colour for each of the surface atoms. Superposition of these maps greatly simplifies molecular surface analysis. The usefulness of such an approach has been demonstrated by the study of the relief of the calf eye lens protein gamma-crystallin II. Protrusions of the relief have been shown to be occupied generally by charged residues, but in some cases by the hydrophobic ones. It is interesting to note that in crystal medium the protruding residues are involved, in the majority of cases, in intermolecular contacts. The protruding regions have been found to be pseudosymmetrical to each other in accordance with the two-fold rotation axis of the molecule. However, the colours of these regions, i.e. the atoms of the corresponding side chains, differ greatly.

  9. Refolding techniques for recovering biologically active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2014-02-20

    Biologically active proteins are useful for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs and biomaterials in a biotechnology industry. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. As inclusion bodies contain relatively pure and intact proteins, protein refolding is an important process to obtain active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, conventional refolding methods, such as dialysis and dilution, are time consuming and, often, recovered yields of active proteins are low, and a trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. Recently, several approaches have been reported to refold these aggregated proteins into an active form. The strategies largely aim at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This review focuses on protein refolding techniques using chemical additives and laminar flow in microfluidic chips for the efficient recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies.

  10. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heegaard, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    , there is no subsequent remodelling of these fibers, nor removal of degraded lens fibers. Human tissue ultimately derives its (14)C content from the atmospheric carbon dioxide. The (14)C content of the lens proteins thus reflects the atmospheric content of (14)C when the lens crystallines were formed. Precise radiocarbon...... on a yearly basis this allows very accurate dating. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results allow us to conclude that the crystalline formation in the lens nucleus almost entirely takes place around the time of birth, with a very small, and decreasing, continuous formation throughout life. The close...... that the eye lens is a soft structure, subjected to almost continuous deformation, due to lens accommodation, yet its most important constituent, the lens crystalline, is never subject to turnover or remodelling once formed. The determination of the (14)C content of various tissues may be used to assess...

  11. Lactate dehydrogenase A as a highly abundant eye lens protein in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rheede, Teun; Amons, Reinout; Stewart, Niall; de Jong, Wilfried W

    2003-06-01

    Vertebrate eye lenses mostly contain two abundant types of proteins, the alpha-crystallins and the beta/gamma-crystallins. In addition, certain housekeeping enzymes are highly expressed as crystallins in various taxa. We now observed an unusual approximately 41-kd protein that makes up 16% to 18% of the total protein in the platypus eye lens. Its cDNA sequence was determined, which identified the protein as muscle-type lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A). It is the first observation of LDH-A as a crystallin, and we designate it upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin. Interestingly, the related heart-type LDH-B occurs as an abundant lens protein, known as epsilon-crystallin, in many birds and crocodiles. Thus, two members of the ldh gene family have independently been recruited as crystallins in different higher vertebrate lineages, suggesting that they are particularly suited for this purpose in terms of gene regulatory or protein structural properties. To establish whether platypus LDH-A/upsilon-crystallin has been under different selective constraints as compared with other vertebrate LDH-A sequences, we reconstructed the vertebrate ldh-a gene phylogeny. No conspicuous rate deviations or amino acid replacements were observed.

  12. Hemoglobin interactions with αB crystallin: a direct test of sensitivity to protein instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler J W Clark

    Full Text Available As a small stress response protein, human αB crystallin, detects protein destabilization that can alter structure and function to cause self assembly of fibrils or aggregates in diseases of aging. The sensitivity of αB crystallin to protein instability was evaluated using wild-type hemoglobin (HbA and hemoglobin S (HbS, the glutamate-6-valine mutant that forms elongated, filamentous aggregates in sickling red blood cells. The progressive thermal unfolding and aggregation of HbA and HbS in solution at 37°C, 50°C and 55°C was measured as increased light scattering. UV circular dichroism (UVCD was used to evaluate conformational changes in HbA and HbS with time at the selected temperatures. The changes in interactions between αB crystallin and HbA or HbS with temperature were analyzed using differential centrifugation and SDS PAGE at 37°C, 50°C and 55°C. After only 5 minutes at the selected temperatures, differences in the aggregation or conformation of HbA and HbS were not observed, but αB crystallin bound approximately 6% and 25% more HbS than HbA at 37°C, and 50°C respectively. The results confirmed (a the remarkable sensitivity of αB crystallin to structural instabilities at the very earliest stages of thermal unfolding and (b an ability to distinguish the self assembling mutant form of HbS from the wild type HbA in solution.

  13. Preparative Protein Production from Inclusion Bodies and Crystallization: A Seven-Week Biochemistry Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Megan J.; Snyder, W. Kalani; Westerman, Shelley; McFarland, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe how to produce and purify proteins from "Escherichia coli" inclusion bodies by adapting versatile, preparative-scale techniques to the undergraduate laboratory schedule. This 7-week sequence of experiments fits into an annual cycle of research activity in biochemistry courses. Recombinant proteins are expressed as inclusion bodies,…

  14. Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes for sensitive fluorescent assignment of protein inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingstedt, Therése; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nogalska, Anna; Prokop, Stefan; Häggqvist, Bo; Danielsson, Olof; Engel, W King; Askanas, Valerie; Heppner, Frank L; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2013-03-18

    Small hydrophobic ligands identifying intracellular protein deposits are of great interest, as protein inclusion bodies are the pathological hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Here we report that fluorescent amyloid ligands, termed luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), rapidly and with high sensitivity detect protein inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle tissue from patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). LCOs having a conjugated backbone of at least five thiophene units emitted strong fluorescence upon binding, and showed co-localization with proteins reported to accumulate in s-IBM protein inclusion bodies. Compared with conventional amyloid ligands, LCOs identified a larger fraction of immunopositive inclusion bodies. When the conjugated thiophene backbone was extended with terminal carboxyl groups, the LCO revealed striking spectral differences between distinct protein inclusion bodies. We conclude that 1) LCOs are sensitive, rapid and powerful tools for identifying protein inclusion bodies and 2) LCOs identify a wider range of protein inclusion bodies than conventional amyloid ligands. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Preparative Protein Production from Inclusion Bodies and Crystallization: A Seven-Week Biochemistry Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Megan J.; Snyder, W. Kalani; Westerman, Shelley; McFarland, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe how to produce and purify proteins from "Escherichia coli" inclusion bodies by adapting versatile, preparative-scale techniques to the undergraduate laboratory schedule. This 7-week sequence of experiments fits into an annual cycle of research activity in biochemistry courses. Recombinant proteins are expressed as inclusion bodies,…

  16. Observation of gold sub-nanocluster nucleation within a crystalline protein cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Basudev; Abe, Satoshi; Ueno, Takafumi

    2017-03-01

    Protein scaffolds provide unique metal coordination environments that promote biomineralization processes. It is expected that protein scaffolds can be developed to prepare inorganic nanomaterials with important biomedical and material applications. Despite many promising applications, it remains challenging to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of formation of metal nanoparticles in protein environments. In the present work, we describe a crystalline protein cage constructed by crosslinking treatment of a single crystal of apo-ferritin for structural characterization of the formation of sub-nanocluster with reduction reaction. The crystal structure analysis shows the gradual movement of the Au ions towards the centre of the three-fold symmetric channels of the protein cage to form a sub-nanocluster with accompanying significant conformational changes of the amino-acid residues bound to Au ions during the process. These results contribute to our understanding of metal core formation as well as interactions of the metal core with the protein environment.

  17. Observation of gold sub-nanocluster nucleation within a crystalline protein cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Basudev; Abe, Satoshi; Ueno, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    Protein scaffolds provide unique metal coordination environments that promote biomineralization processes. It is expected that protein scaffolds can be developed to prepare inorganic nanomaterials with important biomedical and material applications. Despite many promising applications, it remains challenging to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of formation of metal nanoparticles in protein environments. In the present work, we describe a crystalline protein cage constructed by crosslinking treatment of a single crystal of apo-ferritin for structural characterization of the formation of sub-nanocluster with reduction reaction. The crystal structure analysis shows the gradual movement of the Au ions towards the centre of the three-fold symmetric channels of the protein cage to form a sub-nanocluster with accompanying significant conformational changes of the amino-acid residues bound to Au ions during the process. These results contribute to our understanding of metal core formation as well as interactions of the metal core with the protein environment. PMID:28300064

  18. Strategies for the recovery of active proteins through refolding of bacterial inclusion body proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinas Ursula

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in generating active proteins through refolding of bacterial inclusion body proteins are summarized in conjunction with a short overview on inclusion body isolation and solubilization procedures. In particular, the pros and cons of well-established robust refolding techniques such as direct dilution as well as less common ones such as diafiltration or chromatographic processes including size exclusion chromatography, matrix- or affinity-based techniques and hydrophobic interaction chromatography are discussed. Moreover, the effect of physical variables (temperature and pressure as well as the presence of buffer additives on the refolding process is elucidated. In particular, the impact of protein stabilizing or destabilizing low- and high-molecular weight additives as well as micellar and liposomal systems on protein refolding is illustrated. Also, techniques mimicking the principles encountered during in vivo folding such as processes based on natural and artificial chaperones and propeptide-assisted protein refolding are presented. Moreover, the special requirements for the generation of disulfide bonded proteins and the specific problems and solutions, which arise during process integration are discussed. Finally, the different strategies are examined regarding their applicability for large-scale production processes or high-throughput screening procedures.

  19. Microfluidic chips with multi-junctions: an advanced tool in recovering proteins from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Active recombinant proteins are used for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. Protein refolding is an important process for obtaining active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, the conventional refolding method of dialysis or dilution is time-consuming and recovered active protein yields are often low, and a cumbersome trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. To circumvent these difficulties, we used controllable diffusion through laminar flow in microchannels to regulate the denaturant concentration. This method largely aims at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This Commentary introduces the principles of the protein refolding method using microfluidic chips and the advantage of our results as a tool for rapid and efficient recovery of active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies.

  20. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Lynnerup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye lens. Because the epithelial basement membrane (lens capsule completely encloses the lens, desquamation of aging cells is impossible, and due to the complete absence of blood vessels or transport of metabolites in this area, there is no subsequent remodelling of these fibers, nor removal of degraded lens fibers. Human tissue ultimately derives its (14C content from the atmospheric carbon dioxide. The (14C content of the lens proteins thus reflects the atmospheric content of (14C when the lens crystallines were formed. Precise radiocarbon dating is made possible by comparing the (14C content of the lens crystallines to the so-called bomb pulse, i.e. a plot of the atmospheric (14C content since the Second World War, when there was a significant increase due to nuclear-bomb testing. Since the change in concentration is significant even on a yearly basis this allows very accurate dating. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results allow us to conclude that the crystalline formation in the lens nucleus almost entirely takes place around the time of birth, with a very small, and decreasing, continuous formation throughout life. The close relationship may be further expressed as a mathematical model, which takes into account the timing of the crystalline formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Such a life-long permanence of human tissue has hitherto only been described for dental enamel. In confront to dental enamel it must be held in mind that the eye lens is a soft structure, subjected to almost continuous deformation, due to lens accommodation, yet its most important constituent, the lens crystalline, is never subject to turnover or remodelling once formed. The determination of the (14C content of various tissues may be used to assess turnover rates and degree of substitution (for example for brain cell DNA. Potential targets may be nervous tissues in terms of senile or pre

  1. Geochemistry of oil in fluid inclusions in a middle Proterozoic igneous intrusion: implications for the source of hydrocarbons in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutkiewicz, A. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Geosciences; Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Inst. of Marine Science; Volk, H.; George, S.C. [CSIRO Petroleum, North Ryde, NSW (Australia); Ridley, J. [Macquarie Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    2004-08-01

    The ca. 1280 Ma dolerite sill within the Mesoproterozoic Roper Group in the Roper Superbasin, Australia, contains evidence for at least two episodes of hydrocarbon migration represented, respectively, by solid bitumen with a ketone-rich extract, and a mixture of a high maturity gas-condensate and a lower maturity oil within oil-bearing fluid inclusions. The ketone isomers are formed by flash pyrolysis of kerogen during the intrusion of the dolerite sill [Org.Geochem. 21(1994) 829] and represent the first and oldest phase of hydrocarbon migration. The gas condensate and oil were subsequently trapped as a mixture within fluid inclusions at diagenetic temperatures and pressures of around 110 {sup o}C and 250 bars, significantly after cooling of the sill and likely during the Neoproterozoic reactivation of the Roper Superbasin. Either (1) these fluids migrated together and mixed in the reservoir or (2) an earlier oil charge was flushed by a later condensate charge and the oil-condensate mixture was trapped within single fluid inclusions. Oil inclusions occur chiefly within albitised zones of labradorite laths within the dolerite matrix, and within transcrystalline microfractures cutting vein calcite and rarely vein quartz. Oil inclusions trapped in the vein calcite are accompanied by hypersaline Ca/Mg brines. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of oil extracted from inclusions within the dolerite matrix shows that the oil is non-biodegraded and was therefore trapped relatively quickly within the host minerals. Trace amounts of biomarkers indicate that the inclusion oil is of a biogenic origin and excludes any abiotic processes that are apparent sources of hydrocarbons in many crystalline rocks. Monomethylalkanes, pentacyclic terpanes chiefly comprising hopanes and diahopanes, and very low concentrations of steranes and diasteranes indicate input from cyanobacterial organic matter with a minor contribution from eukaryotes. The hydrocarbons are likely derived from

  2. Alpha-Crystalline Protein Expression & Inducing of the Nonreplicating Persistence States of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M NajafiMosleh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI is caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis in a state of non-replicating persistence (NRP. Recent evidence suggests that some very specific adaptations to oxygen depletion occur that MTB undergoes to hypoxic RNP state. In this study the modified slowly stirred, limited Head Space Ratio (0.5HSR method was used to investigate the physiological response of MTB to different oxygen tension levels. Methods: For setting up the various NRP stages 100 susceptible & drugs resistant clinically isolated strains of MTB were cultivated in Dubos Albomin Tween medium via hypoxically, slow stirring 0.5 HSR method and the effects of isoniazid ,rifampin, pyrazinamide .ciprofloxacin & metronidazole against MTB were examined during NRP-1 and NRP-2 stages . The α-crystalline protein was detected during NRP-1 stage of the MTB cultures via performance of the suitable procedures for pellet preparation, washing and cell disruption and SDS-PAGE technique. Results: NRP-1, NRP-2 stages of MTB subjected to be test documentary were seen. The first three of the four drugs mentioned above affected the MTB at actively replicating period and the rifampin effect was continued slightly during NRP-1 stage. Meteronidazole was affected the MTB at anaerobic NRP-2 stage. α- crystalline protein was detected at NRP -1 stage but do not detect at aerated cultures. Conclusion: Induction of the α-crystalline protein during hypoxic shift-down of MTB metabolism, its function as a chaperone, suggests a critical role for this protein in the ability of MTB to persist without replicating in the hostile regions of the host's tissues. Therefore, understanding of the mechanisms of induction of factors associated with the hypoxic condition of tubercle bacilli that should be contribute to the development of strategies for identification of the new drugs targets and preventing the persistence states in human lesions must be critical for affective TB

  3. The lipid transfer protein CERT interacts with the Chlamydia inclusion protein IncD and participates to ER-Chlamydia inclusion membrane contact sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Derré

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens that reside in membrane bound compartment manipulate the host cell machinery to establish and maintain their intracellular niche. The hijacking of inter-organelle vesicular trafficking through the targeting of small GTPases or SNARE proteins has been well established. Here, we show that intracellular pathogens also establish direct membrane contact sites with organelles and exploit non-vesicular transport machinery. We identified the ER-to-Golgi ceramide transfer protein CERT as a host cell factor specifically recruited to the inclusion, a membrane-bound compartment harboring the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. We further showed that CERT recruitment to the inclusion correlated with the recruitment of VAPA/B-positive tubules in close proximity of the inclusion membrane, suggesting that ER-Inclusion membrane contact sites are formed upon C. trachomatis infection. Moreover, we identified the C. trachomatis effector protein IncD as a specific binding partner for CERT. Finally we showed that depletion of either CERT or the VAP proteins impaired bacterial development. We propose that the presence of IncD, CERT, VAPA/B, and potentially additional host and/or bacterial factors, at points of contact between the ER and the inclusion membrane provides a specialized metabolic and/or signaling microenvironment favorable to bacterial development.

  4. A Co-infection Model System and the Use of Chimeric Proteins to Study Chlamydia Inclusion Proteins Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Derré, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium associated with trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. During its intracellular developmental cycle, Chlamydia resides in a membrane bound compartment called the inclusion. A subset of Type III secreted effectors, the inclusion membrane proteins (Inc), are inserted into the inclusion membrane. Inc proteins are strategically positioned to promote inclusion interaction with host factors and organelles, a process required for bacterial replication, but little is known about Inc proteins function or host interacting partners. Moreover, it is unclear whether each Inc protein has a distinct function or if a subset of Inc proteins interacts with one another to perform their function. Here, we used IncD as a model to investigate Inc/Inc interaction in the context of Inc protein expression in C. trachomatis. We developed a co-infection model system to display different tagged Inc proteins on the surface of the same inclusion. We also designed chimeric Inc proteins to delineate domains important for interaction. We showed that IncD can self-interact and that the full-length protein is required for dimerization and/or oligomerization. Altogether our approach can be generalized to any Inc protein and will help to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which Chlamydia Inc proteins interact with themselves and/or host factors, eventually leading to a better understanding of C. trachomatis interaction with the mammalian host. PMID:28352612

  5. Refolding and simultaneous purification by three-phase partitioning of recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghava, Smita; Barua, Bipasha; Singh, Pradeep K.; Das, Mili; Madan, Lalima; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Bajaj, Kanika; Gopal, B.; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Munishwar N.

    2008-01-01

    Many recombinant eukaryotic proteins tend to form insoluble aggregates called inclusion bodies, especially when expressed in Escherichia coli. We report the first application of the technique of three-phase partitioning (TPP) to obtain correctly refolded active proteins from solubilized inclusion bodies. TPP was used for refolding 12 different proteins overexpressed in E. coli. In each case, the protein refolded by TPP gave either higher refolding yield than the earlier reported method or succeeded where earlier efforts have failed. TPP-refolded proteins were characterized and compared to conventionally purified proteins in terms of their spectral characteristics and/or biological activity. The methodology is scaleable and parallelizable and does not require subsequent concentration steps. This approach may serve as a useful complement to existing refolding strategies of diverse proteins from inclusion bodies. PMID:18780821

  6. Spinal motor neuron protein supersaturation patterns are associated with inclusion body formation in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciryam, Prajwal; Lambert-Smith, Isabella A; Bean, Daniel M; Freer, Rosie; Cid, Fernando; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Saunders, Darren N; Wilson, Mark R; Oliver, Stephen G; Morimoto, Richard I; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele; Favrin, Giorgio; Yerbury, Justin J

    2017-05-16

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a heterogeneous degenerative motor neuron disease linked to numerous genetic mutations in apparently unrelated proteins. These proteins, including SOD1, TDP-43, and FUS, are highly aggregation-prone and form a variety of intracellular inclusion bodies that are characteristic of different neuropathological subtypes of the disease. Contained within these inclusions are a variety of proteins that do not share obvious characteristics other than coaggregation. However, recent evidence from other neurodegenerative disorders suggests that disease-affected biochemical pathways can be characterized by the presence of proteins that are supersaturated, with cellular concentrations significantly greater than their solubilities. Here, we show that the proteins that form inclusions of mutant SOD1, TDP-43, and FUS are not merely a subset of the native interaction partners of these three proteins, which are themselves supersaturated. To explain the presence of coaggregating proteins in inclusions in the brain and spinal cord, we observe that they have an average supersaturation even greater than the average supersaturation of the native interaction partners in motor neurons, but not when scores are generated from an average of other human tissues. These results suggest that inclusion bodies in various forms of ALS result from a set of proteins that are metastable in motor neurons, and thus prone to aggregation upon a disease-related progressive collapse of protein homeostasis in this specific setting.

  7. Techno-economic evaluation of an inclusion body solubilization and recombinant protein refolding process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freydell, E.J.; Wielen, van der L.A.M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Ottens, M.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is normally accompanied by the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs). To obtain the protein product in an active (native) soluble form, the IBs must be first solubilized, and thereafter, the soluble, often denatured and reduced protein must be ref

  8. Shear stress-mediated refolding of proteins from aggregates and inclusion bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, TZ; Ormonde, CFG; Kudlacek, ST; Kunche, S; Smith, JN; Brown, WA; Pugliese, KM; Olsen, TJ; Iftikhar, M; Raston, CL; Weiss, GA

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. Recombinant protein overexpression of large proteins in bacteria often results in insoluble and misfolded proteins directed to inclusion bodies. We report the application of shear stress in micrometer-wide, thin fluid films to refold boiled hen egg white lysozyme, recombinant hen egg white lysozyme, and recombinant caveolin-1. Furthermore, the approach allowed refolding of a much larger protein, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). The reported metho...

  9. Aquareovirus NS80 recruits viral proteins to its inclusions, and its C-terminal domain is the primary driving force for viral inclusion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ling; Guo, Hong; Yan, Li-Ming; Liu, Huan; Fang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed in reovirus-infected cells are the sites of viral replication and assembly. Previous studies have suggested that the NS80 protein of aquareovirus may be involved in the formation of viral inclusion bodies. However, it remains unknown whether other viral proteins are involved in the process, and what regions of NS80 may act coordinately in mediating inclusion formation. Here, we observed that globular cytoplasmic inclusions were formed in virus-infected cells and viral proteins NS80 and NS38 colocalized in the inclusions. During transfection, singly expressed NS80 could form cytoplasmic inclusions and recruit NS38 and GFP-tagged VP4 to these structures. Further treatment of cells with nocodazole, a microtubule inhibitor, did not disrupt the inclusion, suggesting that inclusion formation does not rely on microtubule network. Besides, we identified that the region 530-742 of NS80 was likely the minimal region required for inclusion formation, and the C-tail, coiled-coil region as well as the conserved linker region were essential for inclusion phenotype. Moreover, with series deletions from the N-terminus, a stepwise conversion occurred from large condensed cytoplasmic to small nuclear inclusions, then to a diffused intracellular distribution. Notablely, we found that the nuclear inclusions, formed by NS80 truncations (471 to 513-742), colocalized with cellular protein β-catenin. These data indicated that NS80 could be a major mediator in recruiting NS38 and VP4 into inclusion structures, and the C-terminus of NS80 is responsible for inclusion formation.

  10. Refolding Techniques for Recovering Biologically Active Recombinant Proteins from Inclusion Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamaguchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biologically active proteins are useful for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs and biomaterials in a biotechnology industry. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. As inclusion bodies contain relatively pure and intact proteins, protein refolding is an important process to obtain active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, conventional refolding methods, such as dialysis and dilution, are time consuming and, often, recovered yields of active proteins are low, and a trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. Recently, several approaches have been reported to refold these aggregated proteins into an active form. The strategies largely aim at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This review focuses on protein refolding techniques using chemical additives and laminar flow in microfluidic chips for the efficient recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies.

  11. The absence of protein--sparing effects utilizing crystalline amino acids in stressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, N; Mills, C J; Grossi, C; Angers, J W; Jham, G; Zurawinsky, H; Nealon, T F

    1979-11-01

    The protein-sparing effects of the peripheral infusion of crystalline amino acids (PAA) was studied metabolically in selected surgical patients subjected to various degrees of stress. Twenty-one patients (sixteen cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, three with major abdominal traumatic injuries and four with paralytic ileus) were infused with 2 1/24 hours of a solution of 4.2% Travasol amino acids with only 5% glucose as a source of nonprotein calories. One-half of the cancer patients were also allowed ad libitum oral intake of a regular hospital diet or Vivonex-HN. The nutritional status was evaluated by measuring changes in body weight, serum albumin levels and nitrogen balance. Body weight decreased in only the trauma patients. When these solutions were the sole source of nutrients all patients were in negative nitrogen balance and had significant decreases in their serum albumin levels. Serum albumin levels were preserved only when extra sources of calories were provided. The infusion of the crystalline amino acids without adequate levels of nonprotein energy did not conserve protein in these stressed patients.

  12. EPR spectroscopy of protein microcrystals oriented in a liquid crystalline polymer medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Jorge; Figueirinhas, João Luis; Santos, Celina; Godinho, Maria Helena

    2004-10-01

    Correlation of the g-tensor of a paramagnetic active center of a protein with its structure provides a unique experimental information on the electronic structure of the metal site. To address this problem, we made solid films containing metalloprotein ( Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3) microcrystals. The microcrystals in a liquid crystalline polymer medium (water/hydroxypropylcellulose) were partially aligned by a shear flow. A strong orientation effect of the metalloprotein was observed by EPR spectroscopy and polarizing optical microscopy. The EPR spectra of partially oriented samples were simulated, allowing for molecular orientation distribution function determination. The observed effect results in enhanced sensitivity and resolution of the EPR spectra and provides a new approach towards the correlation of spectroscopic data, obtained by EPR or some other technique, with the three-dimensional structure of a protein or a model compound.

  13. Comparative Community Proteomics Demonstrates the Unexpected Importance of Actinobacterial Glycoside Hydrolase Family 12 Protein for Crystalline Cellulose Hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiras, Jennifer; Wu, Yu-Wei; Deng, Kai; Nicora, Carrie D.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Frey, Dario; Kolinko, Sebastian; Robinson, Errol W.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

    2016-08-23

    ABSTRACT

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are key enzymes in the depolymerization of plant-derived cellulose, a process central to the global carbon cycle and the conversion of plant biomass to fuels and chemicals. A limited number of GH families hydrolyze crystalline cellulose, often by a processive mechanism along the cellulose chain. During cultivation of thermophilic cellulolytic microbial communities, substantial differences were observed in the crystalline cellulose saccharification activities of supernatants recovered from divergent lineages. Comparative community proteomics identified a set of cellulases from a population closely related to actinobacteriumThermobispora bisporathat were highly abundant in the most active consortium. Among the cellulases fromT. bispora, the abundance of a GH family 12 (GH12) protein correlated most closely with the changes in crystalline cellulose hydrolysis activity. This result was surprising since GH12 proteins have been predominantly characterized as enzymes active on soluble polysaccharide substrates. Heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of the suite ofT. bisporahydrolytic cellulases confirmed that the GH12 protein possessed the highest activity on multiple crystalline cellulose substrates and demonstrated that it hydrolyzes cellulose chains by a predominantly random mechanism. This work suggests that the role of GH12 proteins in crystalline cellulose hydrolysis by cellulolytic microbes should be reconsidered.

    IMPORTANCECellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on earth, and its enzymatic hydrolysis is a key reaction in the global carbon cycle and the conversion of plant biomass to biofuels. The glycoside hydrolases that depolymerize crystalline cellulose have been primarily characterized from isolates. In this study, we demonstrate that adapting microbial consortia from compost to grow on crystalline cellulose

  14. Comparative Community Proteomics Demonstrates the Unexpected Importance of Actinobacterial Glycoside Hydrolase Family 12 Protein for Crystalline Cellulose Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiras, Jennifer; Wu, Yu-Wei; Deng, Kai; Nicora, Carrie D; Aldrich, Joshua T; Frey, Dario; Kolinko, Sebastian; Robinson, Errol W; Jacobs, Jon M; Adams, Paul D; Northen, Trent R; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W

    2016-08-23

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are key enzymes in the depolymerization of plant-derived cellulose, a process central to the global carbon cycle and the conversion of plant biomass to fuels and chemicals. A limited number of GH families hydrolyze crystalline cellulose, often by a processive mechanism along the cellulose chain. During cultivation of thermophilic cellulolytic microbial communities, substantial differences were observed in the crystalline cellulose saccharification activities of supernatants recovered from divergent lineages. Comparative community proteomics identified a set of cellulases from a population closely related to actinobacterium Thermobispora bispora that were highly abundant in the most active consortium. Among the cellulases from T. bispora, the abundance of a GH family 12 (GH12) protein correlated most closely with the changes in crystalline cellulose hydrolysis activity. This result was surprising since GH12 proteins have been predominantly characterized as enzymes active on soluble polysaccharide substrates. Heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of the suite of T. bispora hydrolytic cellulases confirmed that the GH12 protein possessed the highest activity on multiple crystalline cellulose substrates and demonstrated that it hydrolyzes cellulose chains by a predominantly random mechanism. This work suggests that the role of GH12 proteins in crystalline cellulose hydrolysis by cellulolytic microbes should be reconsidered. Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on earth, and its enzymatic hydrolysis is a key reaction in the global carbon cycle and the conversion of plant biomass to biofuels. The glycoside hydrolases that depolymerize crystalline cellulose have been primarily characterized from isolates. In this study, we demonstrate that adapting microbial consortia from compost to grow on crystalline cellulose generated communities whose soluble enzymes exhibit differential abilities to hydrolyze crystalline

  15. Structure-based druggability assessment of the mammalian structural proteome with inclusion of light protein flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Loving

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances reported over the last few years and the increasing availability of protein crystal structure data have greatly improved structure-based druggability approaches. However, in practice, nearly all druggability estimation methods are applied to protein crystal structures as rigid proteins, with protein flexibility often not directly addressed. The inclusion of protein flexibility is important in correctly identifying the druggability of pockets that would be missed by methods based solely on the rigid crystal structure. These include cryptic pockets and flexible pockets often found at protein-protein interaction interfaces. Here, we apply an approach that uses protein modeling in concert with druggability estimation to account for light protein backbone movement and protein side-chain flexibility in protein binding sites. We assess the advantages and limitations of this approach on widely-used protein druggability sets. Applying the approach to all mammalian protein crystal structures in the PDB results in identification of 69 proteins with potential druggable cryptic pockets.

  16. Assessing amino acid racemization variability in coral intra-crystalline protein for geochronological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Erica J.; Tomiak, Peter J.; Collins, Matthew J.; Hellstrom, John; Tudhope, Alexander W.; Lough, Janice M.; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.

    2012-06-01

    Over 500 Free Amino Acid (FAA) and corresponding Total Hydrolysed Amino Acid (THAA) analyses were completed from eight independently-dated, multi-century coral cores of massive Porites sp. colonies. This dataset allows us to re-evaluate the application of amino acid racemization (AAR) for dating late Holocene coral material, 20 years after Goodfriend et al. (GCA56 (1992), 3847) first showed AAR had promise for developing chronologies in coral cores. This re-assessment incorporates recent method improvements, including measurement by RP-HPLC, new quality control approaches (e.g. sampling and sub-sampling protocols, statistically-based data screening criteria), and cleaning steps to isolate the intra-crystalline skeletal protein. We show that the removal of the extra-crystalline contaminants and matrix protein is the most critical step for reproducible results and recommend a protocol of bleaching samples in NaOCl for 48 h to maximise removal of open system proteins while minimising the induced racemization. We demonstrate that AAR follows closed system behaviour in the intra-crystalline fraction of the coral skeletal proteins. Our study is the first to assess the natural variability in intra-crystalline AAR between colonies, and we use coral cores taken from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and Jarvis Island in the equatorial Pacific to explore variability associated with different environmental conditions and thermal histories. Chronologies were developed from THAA Asx D/L, Ala D/L, Glx D/L and FAA Asx D/L for each core and least squares Monte Carlo modelling applied in order to quantify uncertainty of AAR age determinations and assess the level of dating resolution possible over the last 5 centuries. AAR within colonies follow consistent stratigraphic aging. However, there are systematic differences in rates between the colonies, which would preclude direct comparison from one colony to another for accurate age estimation. When AAR age models are developed from

  17. Renal Light Chain Deposition Associated with the Formation of Intracellular Crystalline Inclusion Bodies in Podocytes: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-da; Dong, Zhe-yi; Zhang, Xue-guang; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zhong; Qiu, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an elderly woman with bone pain and proteinuria as the main clinical manifestations. The patient was diagnosed with the IgG κ type of multiple myeloma. Her renal pathology consisted of widespread κ light chain protein deposition associated with the formation of large quantities of rod-like crystals in podocytes. This phenomenon is very rare. We explored the significance of this crystal formation via a detailed and descriptive analysis and also performed a literature review, thus providing data to increase the available information about this type of disease.

  18. Nuclear inclusions mimicking poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 inclusions in a case of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia with a novel mutation in the valosin-containing protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Shiro; Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Takashi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Minami, Narihiro; Hayashi, Yukiko K

    2016-07-01

    A middle-aged Japanese man presented with slowly progressive asymmetric weakness of legs and arm but had neither ptosis nor dysphagia. He had a family history of similar condition suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. A muscle biopsy showed mixture of neurogenic atrophy and myopathy with rimmed vacuoles. Furthermore we found intranuclear inclusions that had a fine structure mimicking that of inclusions reported in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Immunohistochemical staining for polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1, which is identified within the nuclear inclusions of OPMD, demonstrated nuclear positivity in this case. However, OPMD was thought unlikely based on the clinical features and results of genetic analyses. Instead, a novel mutation in valosin-containing protein, c.376A>T (p.Ile126Phe), was revealed. A diagnosis of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia was made. This is the first report of polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1-positive nuclear inclusions in the muscle of this condition.

  19. Expression, localization and functional divergence of alphaB-crystallin and heat shock protein 27 in core myopathies and neurogenic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dirk; Matten, Jens; Reimann, Jens; Bönnemann, Carsten; Schröder, Rolf

    2002-09-01

    AlphaB-crystallin (alphaBC) and heat shock protein 27 (hsp 27) are members of the family of small heat shock proteins (shsps), which exert a role as molecular chaperones by binding unfolded or denatured proteins, thereby suppressing irreversible protein aggregation and consecutive cell damage. The essential role of shsps in human neuromuscular disorders is highlighted by the observation that a mutation of the human alphaBC gene causes an autosomal dominant "myofibrillar myopathy" characterized by alphaBC and desmin accumulation. Furthermore, an aberrant immunostaining of alphaBC was recently reported in sporadic inclusion body myositis. In the present study we analyzed the expression and localization of alphaB-crystallin and hsp 27 in various congenital myopathies by means of indirect immunofluorescence, immunogold electron microscopy and Western blotting. We demonstrate an increased immunoreactivity of alphaBC and hsp 27 in central and minicore lesions as well as in target fibers, which renders both shsps as reliable, but nonspecific, markers for core and target structures. In contrast, Western blotting demonstrated a normal expression level of alphaBC and hsp 27, which indicates that the increased immunostaining is not the result of an enhanced protein expression. Furthermore, thiocyanate-induced degradation of actin filaments led to a dramatic decrease of hsp 27 immunostaining in core and target lesions, whereas the increased alphaBC and desmin immunostaining was found to be even more enhanced. The latter findings imply a functional diversity of both shsps with a preferential association of hsp 27 with the actin microfilament system and alphaBC with the intermyofibrillar desmin cytoskeleton in human skeletal muscle.

  20. Inclusion of Yucca schidigera extract in diets with different protein levels for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Jéssica S; Zangerônimo, Márcio G; Ogoshi, Rosana C S; França, Janine; Costa, Adriano C; Almeida, Thomás N; Dos Santos, João P F; Pires, Carolina P; Chizzotti, Ana F; Leite, Carlos A L; Saad, Flávia M O B

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of inclusion of Yucca schidigera extract (YSE) in two diets with different levels of crude protein (CP) for dogs on facal odour, nutrient digestibility, ammonia concentration in feces and hematological and serum biochemical profiles. Twenty adults Beagles were used, distributed in a randomized block design in a 2 × 4 factorial design (two diets, 25% and 34% CP, and four YSE levels: 0, 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg) with five replicates, obtained during two experimental periods. The fecal odour reduced (P < 0.05) when 500 mg/kg of YSE was used in diets with higher CP. The inclusion of YSE reduced (P < 0.05) fecal ammonia, and the inclusion of 250 and 500 mg/kg YSE reduced intestinal gas. The inclusion of 750 mg/kg YSE increased the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and tended to increase the serum cholesterol concentration, regardless of the protein level of the diets. There was no effect on the digestibility of nutrients, fecal consistency, nitrogen balance and thickness of the intestinal wall. The inclusion of 500 mg/kg YSE is effective in reducing fecal odour in dogs receiving diets with 34% of CP. Regardless of the protein content, YSE reduces fecal ammonia, but may cause adverse effects if included at higher doses. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein gene in familial inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, K; Cervenáková, L; Dalakas, M C; Leon-Monzon, M; Isaacson, S H; Nagle, J W; Vasconcelos, O; Goldfarb, L G

    1995-08-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (A beta) occurs in some muscle fibers of patients with inclusion body myopathy and resembles the type of amyloid deposits seen in the affected tissues of patients with Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. Because mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been identified in patients with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease and Dutch-type cerebrovascular amyloidosis, we searched for mutations of the same region in patients with familial inclusion body myopathy. Sequencing of both alleles in 8 patients from four unrelated families did not reveal any mutations in these exons. The amyloid deposition in familial forms of inclusion body myopathy may be either due to errors in other gene loci, or it is secondary reflecting altered beta APP metabolism or myocyte degeneration and cell membrane degradation.

  2. Confinement to Organelle-Associated Inclusion Structures Mediates Asymmetric Inheritance of Aggregated Protein in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Spokoini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The division of the S. cerevisiae budding yeast, which produces one mother cell and one daughter cell, is asymmetric with respect to aging. Remarkably, the asymmetry of yeast aging coincides with asymmetric inheritance of damaged and aggregated proteins by the mother cell. Here, we show that misfolded proteins are retained in the mother cell by being sequestered in juxtanuclear quality control compartment (JUNQ and insoluble protein deposit (IPOD inclusions, which are attached to organelles. Upon exposure to stress, misfolded proteins accumulate in stress foci that must be disaggregated by Hsp104 in order to be degraded or processed to JUNQ and IPOD. Cells that fail to deliver aggregates to an inclusion pass on aggregates to subsequent generations.

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of a Major Lens Protein, Human γC-Crystallin: Role of the Dipole Moment in Protein Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Karuna; Pande, Ajay; Pande, Jayanti; Sarma, Siddhartha P

    2016-06-07

    A hallmark of the crystallin proteins is their exceptionally high solubility, which is vital for maintaining the high refractive index of the eye lens. Human γC-crystallin is a major γ-crystallin whose mutant forms are associated with congenital cataracts but whose three-dimensional structure is not known. An earlier study of a homology model concluded that human γC-crystallin has low intrinsic solubility, mainly because of the atypical magnitude and fluctuations of its dipole moment. On the contrary, the high-resolution tertiary structure of human γC-crystallin determined here shows unequivocally that it is a highly soluble, monomeric molecule in solution. Notable differences between the orientations and interactions of several side chains are observed upon comparison to those in the model. No evidence of the pivotal role ascribed to the effect of dipole moment on protein solubility was found. The nuclear magnetic resonance structure should facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the deleterious effects of cataract-associated mutations in human γC-crystallin.

  4. Structural similarity of a developmentally regulated bacterial spore coat protein to beta gamma-crystallins of the vertebrate eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, S; Harvey, T S; Eagle, S G; Inouye, S; Ikura, M

    1994-05-10

    The solution structure of Ca(2+)-loaded protein S (M(r) 18,792) from the Gram-negative soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus has been determined by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Protein S consists of four internally homologous motifs, arranged to produce two domains with a pseudo-twofold symmetry axis, overall resembling a triangular prism. Each domain consists of two topologically inequivalent "Greek keys": the second and fourth motifs form standard Greek keys, whereas the first and third motifs each contain a regular alpha-helix in addition to the usual four beta-strands. The structure of protein S is similar to those of the vertebrate eye lens beta gamma-crystallins, which are thought to be evolutionarily related to protein S. Both protein S and the beta gamma-crystallins function by forming stable multimolecular assemblies. However, protein S possesses distinctive motif organization and domain packing, indicating a different mode of oligomerization and a divergent evolutionary pathway from the beta gamma-crystallins.

  5. Inclusion body purification and protein refolding using microfiltration and size exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batas, B; Schiraldi, C; Chaudhuri, J B

    1999-02-19

    The presence of inclusion body impurities can affect the refolding yield of recombinant proteins, thus there is a need to purify inclusion bodies prior to refolding. We have compared centrifugation and membrane filtration for the washing and recovery of inclusion bodies of recombinant hen egg white lysozyme (rHEWL). It was found that the most significant purification occurred during the removal of cell debris. Moderate improvements in purity were subsequently obtained by washing using EDTA, moderate urea solutions and Triton X-100. Centrifugation between each wash step gave a purer product with a higher rHEWL yield. With microfiltration, use of a 0.45 micron membrane gave higher solvent fluxes, purer inclusion bodies and greater protein yield as compared with a 0.1 micron membrane. Significant flux decline was observed for both membranes. Second, we studied the refolding of rHEWL. Refolding from an initial concentration of 1.5 mg ml-1, by 100-fold batch dilution gave a 43% recovery of specific activity. Purified inclusion bodies gave rise to higher refolding yields, and negligible activity was observed after refolding partially purified material. Refolding rHEWL with a size exclusion chromatography based process gave rise to a refolding yield of 35% that corresponded to a 20-fold dilution.

  6. Crystallization and evaluation of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals for protein pH titration in the crystalline state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Wakari; Yagi, Daichi; Ishikawa, Takuya; Ohnishi, Yuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2008-05-01

    To observe the ionized status of the amino acid residues in proteins at different pH (protein pH titration in the crystalline state) by neutron diffraction, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5-8.0). Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined. At pH diagram, and at pH > 4.5 the border shifted to the right (higher precipitant concentration). The qualities of these crystals were characterized using the Wilson plot method. The qualities of all crystals at different pH were more or less equivalent (B-factor values within 25-40). It is expected that neutron diffraction analysis of these crystals of different pH provides equivalent data in quality for discussions of protein pH titration in the crystalline state of hen egg-white lysozyme.

  7. Role of the disaggregase ClpB in processing of proteins aggregated as inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zblewska, Kamila; Krajewska, Joanna; Zolkiewski, Michal; Kędzierska-Mieszkowska, Sabina

    2014-08-01

    Overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial systems often results in the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs), which is a major impediment in biochemical research and biotechnology. In principle, the activity of molecular chaperones could be employed to gain control over the IB formation and to improve the recombinant protein yields, but the potential of each of the major bacterial chaperones (DnaK/J, GroEL/ES, and ClpB) to process IBs has not been fully established yet. We investigated the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) of two aggregation-prone proteins, VP1LAC and VP1GFP, overproduced in Escherichiacoli in the presence and absence of the chaperone ClpB. We found that both ClpB isoforms, ClpB95 and ClpB80 accumulated in E. coli cells during the production of IBs. The amount of IB proteins increased in the absence of ClpB. ClpB supported the resolubilization and reactivation of the aggregated VP1LAC and VP1GFP in E. coli cells. The IB disaggregation was optimal in the presence of both ClpB95 and ClpB80. Our results indicate an essential role of ClpB in controlling protein aggregation and inclusion body formation in bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inclusion bodies enriched for p62 and polyubiquitinated proteins in macrophages protect against atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergin, Ismail; Bhattacharya, Somashubhra; Emanuel, Roy; Esen, Emel; Stokes, Carl J; Evans, Trent D; Arif, Batool; Curci, John A; Razani, Babak

    2016-01-05

    Autophagy is a catabolic cellular mechanism that degrades dysfunctional proteins and organelles. Atherosclerotic plaque formation is enhanced in mice with macrophages deficient for the critical autophagy protein ATG5. We showed that exposure of macrophages to lipids that promote atherosclerosis increased the abundance of the autophagy chaperone p62 and that p62 colocalized with polyubiquitinated proteins in cytoplasmic inclusions, which are characterized by insoluble protein aggregates. ATG5-null macrophages developed further p62 accumulation at the sites of large cytoplasmic ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies. Aortas from atherosclerotic mice and plaques from human endarterectomy samples showed increased abundance of p62 and polyubiquitinated proteins that colocalized with plaque macrophages, suggesting that p62-enriched protein aggregates were characteristic of atherosclerosis. The formation of the cytoplasmic inclusions depended on p62 because lipid-loaded p62-null macrophages accumulated polyubiquitinated proteins in a diffuse cytoplasmic pattern. Lipid-loaded p62-null macrophages also exhibited increased secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and had an increased tendency to undergo apoptosis, which depended on the p62 ubiquitin-binding domain and at least partly involved p62-mediated clearance of NLRP3 inflammasomes. Consistent with our in vitro observations, p62-deficient mice formed greater numbers of more complex atherosclerotic plaques, and p62 deficiency further increased atherosclerotic plaque burden in mice with a macrophage-specific ablation of ATG5. Together, these data suggested that sequestration of cytotoxic ubiquitinated proteins by p62 protects against atherogenesis, a condition in which the clearance of protein aggregates is disrupted.

  9. [An easy way to purify the inclusion body protein with high purity from prokaryotic expression cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhong, Qin-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sen; Dong, Hui-Fen

    2011-10-01

    To clone partial ORF of SjBMP and to construct the recombinant SjBMP-pET-28a(+) plasmids, and then to transform them into the competent cells E. coli BL21 (DE3), finally a positive clone was used to be induced by IPTG. The bacterial aggregates with target protein expressed as inclusion bodies were purified by the methods of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity purification under denaturation condition and SDS-PAGE gel extraction. The purified protein was used to immune rabbits and make antiserum against the SjBMP, and the antiserum were then used to identify the rSjBMP by Western blotting. The target protein obtained by Ni(2+)-NTA Agarose affinity purification was not pure with unspecific proteins, but the protein further purified by SDS-PAGE gel extraction and the dialysis bag horizontal electrophoresis was quite pure, and the recovery rate was more than 11.0%. Meanwhile, Western blotting was used to identify the recombinant SjBMP protein by antiserum, only a specific single strip appeared, which suggested the protein purified by this method kept its antigenicity, and could be used for common immunological studies. Therefore, the SDS-PAGE gel extraction combining with electroosmosis and dialysis recycling are good and easy to purify the inclusion body proteins.

  10. Kinetics of inclusion body formation and its correlation with the characteristics of protein aggregates in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Arun K; Murmu, Aruna; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand the structural determinants governing protein aggregation into inclusion bodies during expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) and asparaginase were expressed as inclusion bodies in E.coli and the kinetics of aggregate formation was analyzed in details. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were of smaller size (200 nm) and the size of the aggregates did not increase with induction time. In contrast, the seeding and growth behavior of hGH inclusion bodies were found to be sequential, kinetically stable and the aggregate size increased from 200 to 800 nm with induction time. Human growth hormone inclusion bodies showed higher resistance to denaturants and proteinase K degradation in comparison to those of asparaginase inclusion bodies. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were completely solubilized at 2-3 M urea concentration and could be refolded into active protein, whereas 7 M urea was required for complete solubilization of hGH inclusion bodies. Both hGH and asparaginase inclusion bodies showed binding with amyloid specific dyes. In spite of its low β-sheet content, binding with dyes was more prominent in case of hGH inclusion bodies than that of asparaginase. Arrangements of protein molecules present in the surface as well as in the core of inclusion bodies were similar. Hydrophobic interactions between partially folded amphiphillic and hydrophobic alpha-helices were found to be one of the main determinants of hGH inclusion body formation. Aggregation behavior of the protein molecules decides the nature and properties of inclusion bodies.

  11. Kinetics of inclusion body formation and its correlation with the characteristics of protein aggregates in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K Upadhyay

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to understand the structural determinants governing protein aggregation into inclusion bodies during expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH and asparaginase were expressed as inclusion bodies in E.coli and the kinetics of aggregate formation was analyzed in details. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were of smaller size (200 nm and the size of the aggregates did not increase with induction time. In contrast, the seeding and growth behavior of hGH inclusion bodies were found to be sequential, kinetically stable and the aggregate size increased from 200 to 800 nm with induction time. Human growth hormone inclusion bodies showed higher resistance to denaturants and proteinase K degradation in comparison to those of asparaginase inclusion bodies. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were completely solubilized at 2-3 M urea concentration and could be refolded into active protein, whereas 7 M urea was required for complete solubilization of hGH inclusion bodies. Both hGH and asparaginase inclusion bodies showed binding with amyloid specific dyes. In spite of its low β-sheet content, binding with dyes was more prominent in case of hGH inclusion bodies than that of asparaginase. Arrangements of protein molecules present in the surface as well as in the core of inclusion bodies were similar. Hydrophobic interactions between partially folded amphiphillic and hydrophobic alpha-helices were found to be one of the main determinants of hGH inclusion body formation. Aggregation behavior of the protein molecules decides the nature and properties of inclusion bodies.

  12. Kinetics of Inclusion Body Formation and Its Correlation with the Characteristics of Protein Aggregates in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Murmu, Aruna; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand the structural determinants governing protein aggregation into inclusion bodies during expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) and asparaginase were expressed as inclusion bodies in E.coli and the kinetics of aggregate formation was analyzed in details. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were of smaller size (200 nm) and the size of the aggregates did not increase with induction time. In contrast, the seeding and growth behavior of hGH inclusion bodies were found to be sequential, kinetically stable and the aggregate size increased from 200 to 800 nm with induction time. Human growth hormone inclusion bodies showed higher resistance to denaturants and proteinase K degradation in comparison to those of asparaginase inclusion bodies. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were completely solubilized at 2–3 M urea concentration and could be refolded into active protein, whereas 7 M urea was required for complete solubilization of hGH inclusion bodies. Both hGH and asparaginase inclusion bodies showed binding with amyloid specific dyes. In spite of its low β-sheet content, binding with dyes was more prominent in case of hGH inclusion bodies than that of asparaginase. Arrangements of protein molecules present in the surface as well as in the core of inclusion bodies were similar. Hydrophobic interactions between partially folded amphiphillic and hydrophobic alpha-helices were found to be one of the main determinants of hGH inclusion body formation. Aggregation behavior of the protein molecules decides the nature and properties of inclusion bodies. PMID:22479486

  13. The thermal structural transition of alpha-crystallin modulates subunit interactions and increases protein solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha crystallin is an oligomer composed of two types of subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin, and is the major constituent of human lens. The temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin, the main cause for eye lens opacification (cataract, is a two step-process, a nucleation followed by an aggregation phase, and a protective effect towards the aggregation is exhibited over the alpha crystallin phase transition temperature (Tc = 318.16 K. METHODS/RESULTS: To investigate if a modulation of the subunit interactions over Tc could trigger the protective mechanism towards the aggregation, we followed, by using simultaneously static and dynamic light scattering, the temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin. By developing a mathematical model able to uncouple the nucleation and aggregation processes, we find a previously unobserved transition in the nucleation rate constant. Its temperature dependence allows to determine fundamental structural parameters, the chemical potential (Δμ and the interfacial tension (γ of the aggregating phase, that characterize subunit interactions. CONCLUSIONS/GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The decrease of both Δμ and γ at Tc, and a relative increase in solubility, reveal a significative decrease in the strenght of alpha-crystallin subunits interactions, which protects from supramolecolar condensation in hypertermic conditions. On the whole, we suggest a general approach able to understand the structural and kinetic mechanisms involved in aggregation-related diseases and in drugs development and testing.

  14. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-08-08

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We've also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a "GST-like" S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution.

  15. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We’ve also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a “GST-like” S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  16. Multifunctional cellulolytic auxiliary activity protein HcAA10-2 from Hahella chejuensis enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatge, Sunil S; Telke, Amar A; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Keun-Woo; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Kim, Seon-Won

    2015-04-01

    The modular auxiliary activity (AA) family of proteins is believed to cause amorphogenesis in addition to oxidative cleavage of crystalline cellulose although the supporting evidence is limited. HcAA10-2 is a modular AA10 family protein (58 kDa) composed of a AA10 module and a family two carbohydrate binding module (CBM2), joined by a long stretch of 222 amino acids of unknown function. The protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of Avicel treated with HcAA10-2 provided evidence for the disruption of the cellulose microfibrils ("amorphogenesis") and reduction of the crystallinity index, resulting in a twofold increase of cellulase adsorption on the polysaccharide surface. HcAA10-2 exhibited weak endoglucanase-like activity toward soluble cellulose and cello-oligosaccharides with an optimum at pH 6.5 and 45 °C. HcAA10-2 catalyzed oxidative cleavage of crystalline cellulose released native and oxidized cello-oligosaccharides in the presence of copper and an electron donor such as ascorbic acid. Multiple sequence alignment indicated that His1, His109, and Phe197 in the AA10 module formed the conserved copper-binding site. The reducing sugar released from Avicel by the endoglucanase Cel5 and Celluclast accompanying HcAA10-2 was increased by four- and sixfold, respectively. Moreover, HcAA10-2 and Celluclast acted synergistically on pretreated wheat straw biomass resulting in a threefold increase in reducing sugar than Celluclast alone. Taken together, these results suggest that HcAA10-2 is a novel multifunctional modular AA10 protein possessing amorphogenesis, weak endoglucanase, and oxidative cleavage activities useful for efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose.

  17. Pmp-like proteins Pls1 and Pls2 are secreted into the lumen of the Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Ine; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2008-09-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis secretes effector proteins across the membrane of the pathogen-containing vacuole (inclusion) to modulate host cellular functions. In an immunological screen for secreted chlamydial proteins, we identified CT049 and CT050 as potential inclusion membrane-associated proteins. These acidic, nonglobular proteins are paralogously related to the passenger domain of the polymorphic membrane protein PmpC and, like other Pmp proteins, are highly polymorphic among C. trachomatis ocular and urogenital strains. We generated antibodies to these Pmp-like secreted (Pls) proteins and determined by immunofluorescence microscopy that Pls1 (CT049) and Pls2 (CT050) localized to globular structures within the inclusion lumen and at the inclusion membrane. Fractionation of membranes and cytoplasmic components from infected cells by differential and density gradient centrifugation further indicated that Pls1 and Pls2 associated with membranes distinct from the bulk of bacterial and inclusion membranes. The accumulation of Pls1 and, to a lesser extent, Pls2 in the inclusion lumen was insensitive to the type III secretion inhibitor C1, suggesting that this translocation system is not essential for Pls protein secretion. In contrast, Pls secretion and stability were sensitive to low levels of beta-lactam antibiotics, suggesting that a functional cell wall is required for Pls secretion from the bacterial cell. Finally, we tested the requirement for these proteins in Chlamydia infection by microinjecting anti-Pls1 and anti-Pls2 antibodies into infected cells. Coinjection of anti-Pls1 and -Pls2 antibodies partially inhibited expansion of the inclusion. Because Pls proteins lack classical sec-dependent secretion signals, we propose that Pls proteins are secreted into the inclusion lumen by a novel mechanism to regulate events important for chlamydial replication and inclusion expansion.

  18. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  19. Catalytically-active inclusion bodies-Carrier-free protein immobilizates for application in biotechnology and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ulrich; Jäger, Vera D; Diener, Martin; Pohl, Martina; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2017-09-20

    Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) consist of unfolded protein aggregates and represent inactive waste products often accumulating during heterologous overexpression of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli. This general misconception has been challenged in recent years by the discovery that IBs, apart from misfolded polypeptides, can also contain substantial amounts of active and thus correctly or native-like folded protein. The corresponding catalytically-active inclusion bodies (CatIBs) can be regarded as a biologically-active sub-micrometer sized biomaterial or naturally-produced carrier-free protein immobilizate. Fusion of polypeptide (protein) tags can induce CatIB formation paving the way towards the wider application of CatIBs in synthetic chemistry, biocatalysis and biomedicine. In the present review we summarize the history of CatIBs, present the molecular-biological tools that are available to induce CatIB formation, and highlight potential lines of application. In the second part findings regarding the formation, architecture, and structure of (Cat)IBs are summarized. Finally, an overview is presented about the available bioinformatic tools that potentially allow for the prediction of aggregation and thus (Cat)IB formation. This review aims at demonstrating the potential of CatIBs for biotechnology and hopefully contributes to a wider acceptance of this promising, yet not widely utilized, protein preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification and characterization of Inc766, an inclusion membrane protein in Chlamydophila abortus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vretou, Evangelia; Katsiki, Evangelia; Psarrou, Evgenia; Vougas, Kostantinos; Tsangaris, George Th

    2008-10-01

    We have identified the gene product of locus 766 in the transmembrane head region (TMH/Inc-region) in the Chlamydophila abortus genome by using mass spectrometry and a monoclonal antibody that reacted with the inclusion membrane. The identified protein at 32 kDa, termed Inc766, formed highly stable oligomers when solubilized in the absence of beta-mercaptoethanol. These oligomers were resistant to SDS, to heat denaturation and to 8M urea, but very sensitive to beta-mercaptoethanol, consistent with conformations resulting from protein-protein interactions stabilized through disulphide bonds. Mass spectrometry analysis of immunoprecipitated infected cell lysates indicated that a dimer at 56 kDa was the most prominent form in solution. Cross-linking with DSP provided supporting evidence for the formation of oligomers in situ. Inc766 was expressed at 20-24h post infection and its localization pattern in the extra-inclusion space was common in all C. abortus strains tested. Taken together, Inc766 displays unique biochemical and cellular features not encountered in other Incs from other Chlamydiaceae species. Future studies of the particular characteristics especially the interactive properties of Inc766 should contribute to our understanding of the relationship of the different chlamydial species with their respective hosts.

  1. Reconceptualizing the chlamydial inclusion as a pathogen-specified parasitic organelle: an expanded role for Inc proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Elizabeth R; Ouellette, Scot P

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia is an obligate intracellular pathogen that develops in the host cell in a vacuole termed the chlamydial inclusion. The prevailing concept of the chlamydial inclusion is of a parasitophorous vacuole. Here, the inclusion is the recipient of one-way host-pathogen interactions thus draining nutrients from the cell and negatively impacting it. While Chlamydia orchestrates some aspects of cell function, recent data indicate host cells remain healthy up until, and even after, chlamydial egress. Thus, while Chlamydia relies on the host cell for necessary metabolites, the overall function of the host cell, during chlamydial growth and development, is not grossly disturbed. This is consistent with the obligate intracellular organism's interest to maintain viability of its host. To this end, Chlamydia expresses inclusion membrane proteins, Incs, which serve as molecular markers for the inclusion membrane. Incs also contribute to the physical structure of the inclusion membrane and facilitate host-pathogen interactions across it. Given the function of Incs and the dynamic interactions that occur at the inclusion membrane, we propose that the inclusion behaves similarly to an organelle-albeit one that benefits the pathogen. We present the hypothesis that the chlamydial inclusion acts as a pathogen-specified parasitic organelle. This representation integrates the inclusion within existing subcellular trafficking pathways to divert a subset of host-derived metabolites thus maintaining host cell homeostasis. We review the known interactions of the chlamydial inclusion with the host cell and discuss the role of Inc proteins in the context of this model and how this perspective can impact the study of these proteins. Lessons learnt from the chlamydial pathogen-specified parasitic organelle can be applied to other intracellular pathogens. This will increase our understanding of how intracellular pathogens engage the host cell to establish their unique developmental niches.

  2. Neuronal inclusion protein TDP-43 has no primary genetic role in FTD and ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijselinck, Ilse; Sleegers, Kristel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Robberecht, Wim; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Vandenberghe, Rik; Sciot, Raf; Dermaut, Bart; Goossens, Dirk; van der Zee, Julie; De Pooter, Tim; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Santens, Patrick; De Jonghe, Peter; De Deyn, Peter P; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cruts, Marc

    2009-08-01

    The nuclear TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is deposited in ubiquitin-positive inclusions in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two clinicopathologically overlapping neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we excluded mutations and copy number variations in the gene encoding TDP-43 (TARDBP) from an extended series of 173 FTD and 237 ALS patients. Further, we did not identify association of common genetic variants in these patients. Our data implicate that TDP-43 has no primary genetic role in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying central nervous system neurodegeneration in these diseases.

  3. An ectromelia virus profilin homolog interacts with cellular tropomyosin and viral A-type inclusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Robert D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profilins are critical to cytoskeletal dynamics in eukaryotes; however, little is known about their viral counterparts. In this study, a poxviral profilin homolog, ectromelia virus strain Moscow gene 141 (ECTV-PH, was investigated by a variety of experimental and bioinformatics techniques to characterize its interactions with cellular and viral proteins. Results Profilin-like proteins are encoded by all orthopoxviruses sequenced to date, and share over 90% amino acid (aa identity. Sequence comparisons show highest similarity to mammalian type 1 profilins; however, a conserved 3 aa deletion in mammalian type 3 and poxviral profilins suggests that these homologs may be more closely related. Structural analysis shows that ECTV-PH can be successfully modelled onto both the profilin 1 crystal structure and profilin 3 homology model, though few of the surface residues thought to be required for binding actin, poly(L-proline, and PIP2 are conserved. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identified two proteins that interact with ECTV-PH within infected cells: alpha-tropomyosin, a 38 kDa cellular actin-binding protein, and the 84 kDa product of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR 148, which is the truncated VACV counterpart of the orthopoxvirus A-type inclusion (ATI protein. Western and far-western blots demonstrated that the interaction with alpha-tropomyosin is direct, and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that ECTV-PH and alpha-tropomyosin may colocalize to structures that resemble actin tails and cellular protrusions. Sequence comparisons of the poxviral ATI proteins show that although full-length orthologs are only present in cowpox and ectromelia viruses, an ~ 700 aa truncated ATI protein is conserved in over 90% of sequenced orthopoxviruses. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that ECTV-PH localizes to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed by both truncated and full-length versions of the viral ATI protein

  4. Capillary gel electrophoresis for the quantification and purity determination of recombinant proteins in inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-de la Garza, Carlos E; Perdomo-Abúndez, Francisco C; Campos-García, Víctor R; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2013-09-01

    In this work, a high-resolution CGE method for quantification and purity determination of recombinant proteins was developed, involving a single-component inclusion bodies (IBs) solubilization solution. Different recombinant proteins expressed as IBs were used to show method capabilities, using recombinant interferon-β 1b as the model protein for method validation. Method linearity was verified in the range from 0.05 to 0.40 mg/mL and a determination coefficient (r(2) ) of 0.99 was obtained. The LOQs and LODs were 0.018 and 0.006 mg/mL, respectively. RSD for protein content repeatability test was 2.29%. In addition, RSD for protein purity repeatability test was 4.24%. Method accuracy was higher than 90%. Specificity was confirmed, as the method was able to separate recombinant interferon-β 1b monomer from other aggregates and impurities. Sample content and purity was demonstrated to be stable for up to 48 h. Overall, this method is suitable for the analysis of recombinant proteins in IBs according to the attributes established on the International Conference for Harmonization guidelines. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Inclusion bodies as potential vehicles for recombinant protein delivery into epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liovic Mirjana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present the potential of inclusion bodies (IBs as a protein delivery method for polymeric filamentous proteins. We used as cell factory a strain of E. coli, a conventional host organism, and keratin 14 (K14 as an example of a complex protein. Keratins build the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. In order to build filaments, monomeric K14 needs first to dimerize with its binding partner (keratin 5, K5, which is then followed by heterodimer assembly into filaments. Results K14 IBs were electroporated into SW13 cells grown in culture together with a “reporter” plasmid containing EYFP labeled keratin 5 (K5 cDNA. As SW13 cells do not normally express keratins, and keratin filaments are built exclusively of keratin heterodimers (i.e. K5/K14, the short filamentous structures we obtained in this study can only be the result of: a if both IBs and plasmid DNA are transfected simultaneously into the cell(s; b once inside the cells, K14 protein is being released from IBs; c released K14 is functional, able to form heterodimers with EYFP-K5. Conclusions Soluble IBs may be also developed for complex cytoskeletal proteins and used as nanoparticles for their delivery into epithelial cells.

  6. Inclusion bodies as potential vehicles for recombinant protein delivery into epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liovic, Mirjana; Ozir, Mateja; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Peternel, Spela; Komel, Radovan; Zupancic, Tina

    2012-05-24

    We present the potential of inclusion bodies (IBs) as a protein delivery method for polymeric filamentous proteins. We used as cell factory a strain of E. coli, a conventional host organism, and keratin 14 (K14) as an example of a complex protein. Keratins build the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. In order to build filaments, monomeric K14 needs first to dimerize with its binding partner (keratin 5, K5), which is then followed by heterodimer assembly into filaments. K14 IBs were electroporated into SW13 cells grown in culture together with a "reporter" plasmid containing EYFP labeled keratin 5 (K5) cDNA. As SW13 cells do not normally express keratins, and keratin filaments are built exclusively of keratin heterodimers (i.e. K5/K14), the short filamentous structures we obtained in this study can only be the result of: a) if both IBs and plasmid DNA are transfected simultaneously into the cell(s); b) once inside the cells, K14 protein is being released from IBs; c) released K14 is functional, able to form heterodimers with EYFP-K5. Soluble IBs may be also developed for complex cytoskeletal proteins and used as nanoparticles for their delivery into epithelial cells.

  7. Inclusion bodies as potential vehicles for recombinant protein delivery into epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background We present the potential of inclusion bodies (IBs) as a protein delivery method for polymeric filamentous proteins. We used as cell factory a strain of E. coli, a conventional host organism, and keratin 14 (K14) as an example of a complex protein. Keratins build the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. In order to build filaments, monomeric K14 needs first to dimerize with its binding partner (keratin 5, K5), which is then followed by heterodimer assembly into filaments. Results K14 IBs were electroporated into SW13 cells grown in culture together with a “reporter” plasmid containing EYFP labeled keratin 5 (K5) cDNA. As SW13 cells do not normally express keratins, and keratin filaments are built exclusively of keratin heterodimers (i.e. K5/K14), the short filamentous structures we obtained in this study can only be the result of: a) if both IBs and plasmid DNA are transfected simultaneously into the cell(s); b) once inside the cells, K14 protein is being released from IBs; c) released K14 is functional, able to form heterodimers with EYFP-K5. Conclusions Soluble IBs may be also developed for complex cytoskeletal proteins and used as nanoparticles for their delivery into epithelial cells. PMID:22624805

  8. Influence of the crystalline state on photoinduced dynamics of photoactive yellow protein studied by ultraviolet-visible transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeremenko, Sergey; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Moffat, Keith; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2006-06-01

    Time-resolved ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy was used to characterize the photocycle transitions in single crystals of wild-type and the E-46Q mutant of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) with microsecond time resolution. The results were compared with the results of similar measurements on aqueous solutions of these two variants of PYP, with and without the components present in the mother liquor of crystals. The experimental data were analyzed with global and target analysis. Distinct differences in the reaction path of a PYP molecule are observed between these conditions when it progresses through its photocycle. In the crystalline state i), much faster relaxation of the late blue-shifted photocycle intermediate back to the ground state is observed; ii), this intermediate in crystalline PYP absorbs at 380 nm, rather than at 350-360 nm in solution; and iii), for various intermediates of this photocycle the forward reaction through the photocycle directly competes with a branching reaction that leads directly to the ground state. Significantly, with these altered characteristics, the spectroscopic data on PYP are fully consistent with the structural data obtained for this photoreceptor protein with time-resolved x-ray diffraction analysis, particularly for wild-type PYP.

  9. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Liming Yan; Jie Zhang; Hong Guo; Shicui Yan; Qingxiu Chen; Fuxian Zhang; Qin Fang

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsi...

  10. Employment of colorimetric enzyme assay for monitoring expression and solubility of GST fusion proteins targeted to inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mačinković, Igor S; Abughren, Mohamed; Mrkic, Ivan; Grozdanović, Milica M; Prodanović, Radivoje; Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija

    2013-12-01

    High levels of recombinant protein expression can lead to the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. These complex aggregates are commonly solubilized in strong denaturants, such as 6-8M urea, although, if possible, solubilization under milder conditions could facilitate subsequent refolding and purification of bioactive proteins. Commercially available GST-tag assays are designed for quantitative measurement of GST activity under native conditions. GST fusion proteins accumulated in inclusion bodies are considered to be undetectable by such assays. In this work, solubilization of recombinantly produced proteins was performed in 4M urea. The activity of rGST was assayed in 2M urea and it was shown that rGST preserves 85% of its activity under such denaturing conditions. A colorimetric GST activity assay with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was examined for use in rapid detection of expression targeted to inclusion bodies and for the identification of inclusion body proteins which can be solubilized in low concentrations of chaotropic agents. Applicability of the assay was evaluated by tracking protein expression of two GST-fused allergens of biopharmaceutical value in E. coli, GST-Der p 2 and GST-Mus a 5, both targeted to inclusion bodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Conformational dynamics of a crystalline protein from microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and diffuse X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E; Van Benschoten, Andrew H; Sauter, Nicholas K; Adams, Paul D; Fraser, James S; Terwilliger, Thomas C

    2014-12-16

    X-ray diffraction from protein crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering is limited to what is available in the mean electron density. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the electron density variations and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins. Previous studies using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to model diffuse scattering have been hindered by insufficient sampling of the conformational ensemble. To overcome this issue, we have performed a 1.1-μs MD simulation of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease, providing 100-fold more sampling than previous studies. This simulation enables reproducible calculations of the diffuse intensity and predicts functionally important motions, including transitions among at least eight metastable states with different active-site geometries. The total diffuse intensity calculated using the MD model is highly correlated with the experimental data. In particular, there is excellent agreement for the isotropic component of the diffuse intensity, and substantial but weaker agreement for the anisotropic component. Decomposition of the MD model into protein and solvent components indicates that protein-solvent interactions contribute substantially to the overall diffuse intensity. We conclude that diffuse scattering can be used to validate predictions from MD simulations and can provide information to improve MD models of protein motions.

  12. Bioactive glass 45S5 powders: effect of synthesis route and resultant surface chemistry and crystallinity on protein adsorption from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahniuk, Markian S; Pirayesh, Hamidreza; Singh, Harsh D; Nychka, John A; Unsworth, Larry D

    2012-12-01

    Despite its medical applications, the mechanisms responsible for the osseointegration of bioactive glass (45S5) have yet to be fully understood. Evidence suggests that the strongest predictor for osseointegration of bioactive glasses, and ceramics, with bone tissue as the formation of an apatitic calcium phosphate layer atop the implanted material, with osteoblasts being the main mediator for new bone formation. Most have tried to understand the formation of this apatitic calcium phosphate layer, and other bioresponses between the host and bioactive glass 45S5 using Simulated Body Fluid; a solution containing ion concentrations similar to that found in human plasma without the presence of proteins. However, it is likely that cell attachment is probably largely mediated via the adsorbed protein layer. Plasma protein adsorption at the tissue bioactive glass interface has been largely overlooked. Herein, we compare crystalline and amorphous bioactive glass 45S5, in both melt-derived as well as sol-gel forms. Thus, allowing for a detailed understanding of both the role of crystallinity and powder morphology on surface ions, and plasma protein adsorption. It was found that sol-gel 45S5 powders, regardless of crystallinity, adsorbed 3-5 times as much protein as the crystalline melt-derived counterpart, as well as a greater variety of plasma proteins. The devitrification of melt-cast 45S5 resulted in only small differences in the amount and variety of the adsorbed proteome. Surface properties, and not material crystallinity, play a role in directing protein adsorption phenomena for bioactive glasses given the differences found between crystalline melt-cast 45S5 and sol-gel derived 45S5.

  13. Petrology and geochemistry of igneous inclusions in recent Merapi deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chadwick, J.P.; Troll, V.R.; Waight, Tod Earle

    2013-01-01

    , geochemistry and geobarometric calculations. The inclusions may be classified into four main suites: (1) highly crystalline basaltic-andesite inclusions, (2) co-magmatic enclaves, (3) plutonic crystalline inclusions and (4) amphibole megacrysts. Highly crystalline basaltic-andesite inclusions and co...

  14. Online analysis of protein inclusion bodies produced in E. coli by monitoring alterations in scattered and reflected light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Christian; Ben-Dov, Nadav; Jochums, André; Li, Zhaopeng; Segal, Ester; Scheper, Thomas; Beutel, Sascha

    2016-05-01

    The online monitoring of recombinant protein aggregate inclusion bodies during microbial cultivation is an immense challenge. Measurement of scattered and reflected light offers a versatile and non-invasive measurement technique. Therefore, we investigated two methods to detect the formation of inclusion bodies and monitor their production: (1) online 180° scattered light measurement (λ = 625 nm) using a sensor platform during cultivation in shake flask and (2) online measurement of the light reflective interference using a porous Si-based optical biosensor (SiPA). It could be shown that 180° scattered light measurement allows monitoring of alterations in the optical properties of Escherichia coli BL21 cells, associated with the formation of inclusion bodies during cultivation. A reproducible linear correlation between the inclusion body concentration of the non-fluorescent protein human leukemia inhibitory factor (hLIF) carrying a thioredoxin tag and the shift ("Δamp") in scattered light signal intensity was observed. This was also observed for the glutathione-S-transferase-tagged green fluorescent protein (GFP-GST). Continuous online monitoring of reflective interference spectra reveals a significant increase in the bacterium refractive index during hLIF production in comparison to a non-induced reference that coincide with the formation of inclusion bodies. These online monitoring techniques could be applied for fast and cost-effective screening of different protein expression systems.

  15. Self-assembled semi-crystallinity at parallel β-sheet nanocrystal interfaces in clustered MaSp1 (spider silk) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintya, Erly; Alam, Parvez

    2016-01-01

    In this communication, we use molecular dynamics methods to model the self-assembly of semi-crystalline domains at β-sheet nanocrystal interfaces in clusters of spider silk (MaSp1) proteins. Our research elucidates that the energetics at interfaces between crystalline and amorphous domains control effectively, the extent to which semi-crystalline domains can form at interfaces. Stability at nanocrystal interfaces is not linearly related to the internal (bulk) stability of the β-sheet nanocrystal. Rather, interfacial stability is found to be highly sensitive to the number of alanine repeat units that make up each sheet. Intriguingly, the most stable interface for the development of semi-crystallinity is built up of polyalanine β-sheets of a length similar to that which is spun naturally in spider dragline silk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Purification of inclusion bodies using PEG precipitation under denaturing conditions to produce recombinant therapeutic proteins from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Li, Ninghuan; Xie, Yueqing; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Xiaoyi; Cagliero, Cedric; Shi, Siwei; Zhu, Chencen; Luo, Han; Chen, Junsheng; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Menglin; Feng, Lei; Lu, Huili; Zhu, Jianwei

    2017-07-01

    It has been documented that the purification of inclusion bodies from Escherichia coli by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) may benefit subsequent refolding and recovery of recombinant proteins. However, loading volume and the high cost of the column limits its application in large-scale manufacturing of biopharmaceutical proteins. We report a novel process using polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation under denaturing conditions to replace SEC for rapid purification of inclusion bodies containing recombinant therapeutic proteins. Using recombinant human interleukin 15 (rhIL-15) as an example, inclusion bodies of rhIL-15 were solubilized in 7 M guanidine hydrochloride, and rhIL-15 was precipitated by the addition of PEG 6000. A final concentration of 5% (w/v) PEG 6000 was found to be optimal to precipitate target proteins and enhance recovery and purity. Compared to the previously reported S-200 size exclusion purification method, PEG precipitation was easier to scale up and achieved the same protein yields and quality of the product. PEG precipitation also reduced manufacturing time by about 50 and 95% of material costs. After refolding and further purification, the rhIL-15 product was highly pure and demonstrated a comparable bioactivity with a rhIL-15 reference standard. Our studies demonstrated that PEG precipitation of inclusion bodies under denaturing conditions holds significant potential as a manufacturing process for biopharmaceuticals from E. coli protein expression systems.

  17. The experimental herbicide CGA 325'615 inhibits synthesis of crystalline cellulose and causes accumulation of non-crystalline beta-1,4-glucan associated with CesA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, L; Xiang, F; Roberts, E; Kawagoe, Y; Greve, L C; Kreuz, K; Delmer, D P

    2001-07-01

    Developing cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers, cultured in vitro with their associated ovules, were used to compare the effects of two herbicides that inhibit cellulose synthesis: 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and an experimental thiatriazine-based herbicide, CGA 325'615. CGA 325'615 in nanomolar concentrations or DCB in micromolar concentrations causes inhibition of synthesis of crystalline cellulose. Unlike DCB, CGA 325'615 also causes concomitant accumulation of non-crystalline beta-1,4-glucan that can be at least partially solubilized from fiber walls with ammonium oxalate. The unusual solubility of this accumulated glucan may be explained by its strong association with protein. Treatment of the glucan fraction with protease changes its size distribution and leads to precipitation of the glucan. Treatment of the glucan fraction with cellulase digests the glucan and also releases protein that has been characterized as GhCesA-1 and GhCesA-2--proteins that are believed to represent the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase. The fact that cellulase treatment is required to release this protein indicates an extremely tight association of the glucan with the CesA proteins. In addition, CGA 325'615, but not DCB, also causes accumulation of CesA protein and a membrane-associated cellulase in the membrane fraction of fibers. In addition to the effects of CGA 325'615 on levels of both of these proteins, the level of both also shows coordinate regulation during fiber development, further suggesting they are both important for cellulose synthesis. The accumulation of non-crystalline glucan caused by CGA 325'615 mimics the phenotype of the cellulose-deficient rsw1 mutant of Arabidopsis that also accumulates an apparently similar glucan (T. Arioli, L. Peng, A.S. Betzner, J. Burn, W. Wittke, W. Herth, C. Camilleri, H. Hofte, J. Plazinski, R. Birch et al. [1998] Science 279: 717).

  18. Feeding reduced crude protein diets with crystalline amino acids supplementation reduce air gas emissions from housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q-F; Trottier, N; Powers, W

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reducing dietary CP by 1.5% and supplementing crystalline AA (CAA) to meet the standardized ileal digestible (SID) AA requirements for growing and finishing pigs decreases air emissions of ammonia (NH), nitrous oxide (NO), and carbon dioxide (CO) compared with an industry standard diet, without reducing growth performance. Seventy-two pigs were allocated to 12 rooms (6 pigs per room) and 2 diets (6 rooms per diet) formulated according to a 5-phase feeding program across the grow-finish period (107 d total). The diets consisted of a standard diet containing 18.5 to 12.2% CP or a reduced CP diet containing 17.5 to 11.0% CP + CAA over the course of the 5-phase feeding program. Gases (NH, NO, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nonmethane total hydrocarbon, and CO) and ventilation rates were measured continuously from the rooms. Compared with standard diet, ADG and feed conversion of pigs fed reduced CP + CAA diets did not differ (2.7 kg gain/d and 0.37 kg gain/kg feed, respectively). Compared with standard diet, feeding reduced CP + CAA diets decreased ( Feeding reduced CP diets formulated based on SID AA requirements for grow-finisher swine is effective in reducing NH emissions from housing compared with recent industry formulations and does not impact growth performances.

  19. The effect of protein acetylation on the formation and processing of inclusion bodies and endogenous protein aggregates in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczyńska-Wiśnik, Dorota; Moruno-Algara, María; Stojowska-Swędrzyńska, Karolina; Laskowska, Ewa

    2016-11-10

    Acetylation of lysine residues is a reversible post-translational modification conserved from bacteria to humans. Several recent studies have revealed hundreds of lysine-acetylated proteins in various bacteria; however, the physiological role of these modifications remains largely unknown. Since lysine acetylation changes the size and charge of proteins and thereby may affect their conformation, we assumed that lysine acetylation can stimulate aggregation of proteins, especially for overproduced recombinant proteins that form inclusion bodies. To verify this assumption, we used Escherichia coli strains that overproduce aggregation-prone VP1GFP protein. We found that in ΔackA-pta cells, which display diminished protein acetylation, inclusion bodies were formed with a delay and processed faster than in the wild-type cells. Moreover, in ΔackA-pta cells, inclusion bodies exhibited significantly increased specific GFP fluorescence. In CobB deacetylase-deficient cells, in which protein acetylation was enhanced, the formation of inclusion bodies was increased and their processing was significantly inhibited. Similar results were obtained with regard to endogenous protein aggregates formed during the late stationary phase in ΔackA-pta and ΔcobB cells. Our studies revealed that protein acetylation affected the aggregation of endogenous E. coli proteins and the yield, solubility, and biological activity of a model recombinant protein. In general, decreased lysine acetylation inhibited the formation of protein aggregates, whereas increased lysine acetylation stabilized protein aggregates. These findings should be considered during the designing of efficient strategies for the production of recombinant proteins in E. coli cells.

  20. In vitro refolding of heterodimeric CapZ expressed in E. coli as inclusion body protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, K; Vullhorst, D; Hinssen, H

    2000-02-01

    CapZ is a heterodimeric Ca(2+)-independent actin binding protein which plays an important role in organizing the actin filament lattice of cross-striated muscle cells. It caps the barbed end of actin filaments and promotes nucleation of actin polymerization, thereby regulating actin filament length. Here we report the expression of the two muscle-specific isoforms alpha2 and beta1, from chicken in Escherichia coli as individual subunits using the pQE60 expression vector and the subsequent renaturation of the functional CapZ heterodimer from inclusion bodies. Optimal renaturation conditions were obtained both by simultaneous refolding of urea-solubilized subunits and by rapid dilution into a buffer containing 20% glycerol, 5 mM EGTA, 2 mM DTT, 1 mM PMSF, and 100 mM Tris, pH 7.4. The refolding mixture was incubated for 24 h at 15 degrees C and the protein was concentrated by ultrafiltration. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant heterodimer revealed actin binding activities indistinguishable from those of native CapZ as purified from chicken skeletal muscle. Using the same protocol, we were able to refold the beta1, but not the alpha2 isoform as a single polypeptide, indicating a role for beta1 as a molecular template for the folding of alpha2. The reported recombinant approach leads to high yields of active heterodimer and allows the renaturation and characterization of the beta subunit.

  1. Expression and Identification of Inclusion Forming-related Domain of NS80 Nonstructural Protein of Grass Carp Reovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao FAN; Lan-lan ZHANG; Cheng-feng LEI; Qin FANG

    2009-01-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV), a double stranded RNA virus that infects aquatic animals, often with disastrous effects, belongs to the genus Aquareovirus and family Reoviridea. Similar to other reoviruses, genome replication of GCRV in infected cells occurs in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, also called viral factories. Sequences analysis revealed the nonstructural protein NS80, encoded by GCRV segment 4, has a high similarity with uNS in MRV(Mammalian orthoreoviruses), which may be associated with viral factory formation. To understand the function of the uNS80 protein in virus replication, the initial expression and identification of the immunogenicity of the GCRV NS80 protein inclusion forming-related region (335.742) was investigated in this study. It is shown that the over-expressed fusion protein was produced by inducing with IPTG at 28oC. In addition, serum specific rabbit antibody was obtained by using super purified recombinant NS80(335.742) protein as antigen. Moreover, the expressed protein was able to bind to anti-his-tag monoclonal antibody (mouse) and NS80(335-742) specific rabbit antibody. Further western blot analysis indicates that the antiserum could detect NS80 or NS80C protein expression in GCRV infected cells. This data provides a foundation for further investigation of the role of NS80 in viral inclusion formation and virion assembly.

  2. Production and purification of avian antibodies (IgYs from inclusion bodies of a recombinant protein central in NAD+ metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Moreno-González

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of hens for the production of polyclonal antibodies reduces animal intervention and moreover yields a higher quantity of antibodies than other animal models.  The phylogenetic distance between bird and mammal antigens, often leads to more specific avian antibodies than their mammalian counterparts.Since a large amount of antigen is required for avian antibody production, the use of recombinant proteins for this procedure has been growing faster over the last years. Nevertheless, recombinant protein production through heterologous systems frequently prompts the protein to precipitate, forming insoluble aggregates of limited utility (inclusion bodies. A methodology for the production of avian polyclonal antibodies, using recombinant protein from inclusion bodies is presented in this article.In order to produce the antigen, a recombinant Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase from Giardia intestinalis (His-GiNMNAT was expressed in Escherichia coli.  The protein was purified through solubilization from inclusion bodies prior to its renaturalization.  Antibodies were purified from egg yolk of immunized hens by water dilution, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation and thiophilic affinity chromatography.The purified antibodies were tested against His-GiNMNAT protein in Western blot essays. From one egg yolk, 14.4 mg of highly pure IgY were obtained; this antibody was able to detect 15ng of His-GiNMNAT.  IgY specificity was improved by means of antigen affinity purification, allowing its use for parasite protein recognition.

  3. Dielectrophoretic manipulation and solubility of protein nanofibrils formed from crude crystallins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domigan, Laura; Andersen, Karsten B.; Sasso, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Protein nanofibrils and nanotubes are now widely accepted as having potential for use in the field of bionanotechnology. For this to be a feasible alternative to existing technologies, there is a need for a commercially viable source. Previous work has identified amyloid fibrils formed from crude...

  4. The effect of mechanical grinding on the formation, crystalline changes and dissolution behaviour of the inclusion complex of telmisartan and β-cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, Paola Aline Amarante; Pinotti, Marihá; Andrade, George Ricardo Santana; da Costa, Nivan Bezerra; Olchanheski Junior, Luiz Renato; Fernandes, Daniel; de Campos, Carlos Eduardo Maduro; Stulzer, Hellen Karine

    2015-11-20

    Telmisartan (TEL) was entrapped into β-cyclodextrin aiming the improvement of its biopharmaceutical properties of low solubility. A solid state grinding process was used to prepare the molecular inclusion complex (MIC) for up to 30min. The inclusion ratio of drug and β-cyclodextrin was established as 1:2 and 1:3 (mol/mol) by phase solubility study and Job Plot. DSC, XRPD and FTIR confirmed the molecular interactions between TEL and β-cyclodextrin. Computer molecular modeling supports the presence of hydrogen bonds between guest and host and demonstrated the most probable complexes configuration. MIC_1:2_30 and MIC_1:3_30 enhanced the dissolution rate of the drug achieving a delivery rate comparable with the reference medicine available in the market (81% and 87% in 5min, for MIC_1:3_30 and Micardis(®), respectively). These formulations showed rapid and effective antihypertensive effect against angiotensin II in rats up to 180min, with statistically significant results against placebo and control in the first 30min after administration.

  5. Ultrastructural study of nuclear inclusions immunohistochemically positive for surfactant protein A in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with special reference to their morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shu-Hui; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Nonami, Yoshiki; Sasaguri, Shiro; Fujita, Jiro; Uomoto, Masashi; Tao, Fu-Shan; Kobayashi, Makoto; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the fine-structural nature of nuclear inclusions immunopositive for surfactant protein A (SP-A) antibody staining, a detailed ultrastructural study was performed, as well as immunohistochemical examination of pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Surgically resected tumor specimens from 31 patients were examined by immunohistochemistry focused on reactivity to SP-A and thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) antibodies. Only cases with >5% positive nuclear inclusions in cancer cells were considered positive, some of which were examined by electron microscopy. Immunohistochemically, 6 of 31 cases were doubly positive for SP-A and TTF-1 antibodies. On electron microscopy, SP-A-positive nuclei contained diffuse or globular fine granular substance as inclusions. Both types of globular and diffuse inclusions were sometimes connected to the inner nuclear membrane, in association with fragmented or stacked membranous structures. The findings of this study suggested that nuclear inclusions positive for SP-A antibody staining in adenocarcinomas of the lung were derived from accumulated content in the perinuclear cistern resembling pseudoinclusion processes and composed of proteins antigenically cross-reactive with SP-A.

  6. Whey protein aerogel as blended with cellulose crystalline particles or loaded with fish oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maede; Madadlou, Ashkan; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Whey protein hydrogels blended with nanocrystalline and microcrystalline cellulose particles (NCC and MCC, respectively) were prepared, followed by freeze-drying, to produce aerogels. NCC blending increased the Young's modulus, and elastic character, of the protein aerogel. Aerogels were microporous and mesoporous materials, as characterized by the pores sizing 1.2 nm and 12.2 nm, respectively. Blending with NCC decreased the count of both microporous and mesoporous-classified pores at the sub-100 nm pore size range investigated. In contrast, MCC blending augmented the specific surface area and pores volume of the aerogel. It also increased moisture sorption affinity of aerogel. The feasibility of conveying hydrophobic nutraceuticals by aerogels was evaluated through loading fish oil into the non-blended aerogel. Oil loading altered its microstructure, corresponding to a peak displacement in Fourier-transform infra-red spectra, which was ascribed to increased hydrophobic interactions. Surface coating of aerogel with zein decreased the oxidation susceptibility of the loaded oil during subsequent storage.

  7. The DNA repair-ubiquitin-associated HR23 proteins are constituents of neuronal inclusions in specific neurodegenerative disorders without hampering DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Steven; Severijnen, Lies-Anne; Wijgers, Nils; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Yousaf, Humaira; Kros, Johan M.; van Swieten, John; Oostra, Ben A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.; Vermeulen, Wim; Willemsen, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular inclusions play a profound role in many neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we report that HR23B and HR23A, proteins that are involved in both DNA repair and shuttling proteins to the 26S proteasome for degradation, accumulate in neuronal inclusions in brain from a mouse model for FXTAS,

  8. Purification and Refolding to Amyloid Fibrils of (His)6-tagged Recombinant Shadoo Protein Expressed as Inclusion Bodies in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaojing; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Moudjou, Mohammed; Vidic, Jasmina

    2015-12-19

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a powerful tool for the production of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. We use it to produce Shadoo, a protein belonging to the prion family. A chromatographic method for the purification of (His)6-tagged recombinant Shadoo expressed as inclusion bodies is described. The inclusion bodies are solubilized in 8 M urea and bound to a Ni(2+)-charged column to perform ion affinity chromatography. Bound proteins are eluted by a gradient of imidazole. Fractions containing Shadoo protein are subjected to size exclusion chromatography to obtain a highly purified protein. In the final step purified Shadoo is desalted to remove salts, urea and imidazole. Recombinant Shadoo protein is an important reagent for biophysical and biochemical studies of protein conformation disorders occurring in prion diseases. Many reports demonstrated that prion neurodegenerative diseases originate from the deposition of stable, ordered amyloid fibrils. Sample protocols describing how to fibrillate Shadoo into amyloid fibrils at acidic and neutral/basic pHs are presented. The methods on how to produce and fibrillate Shadoo can facilitate research in laboratories working on prion diseases, since it allows for production of large amounts of protein in a rapid and low cost manner.

  9. Shape deformation of lipid membranes by banana-shaped protein rods: Comparison with isotropic inclusions and membrane rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The assembly of curved protein rods on fluid membranes is studied using implicit-solvent meshless membrane simulations. As the rod curvature increases, the rods on a membrane tube assemble along the azimuthal direction first and subsequently along the longitudinal direction. Here, we show that both transition curvatures decrease with increasing rod stiffness. For comparison, curvature-inducing isotropic inclusions are also simulated. When the isotropic inclusions have the same bending rigidity as the other membrane regions, the inclusions are uniformly distributed on the membrane tubes and vesicles even for large spontaneous curvature of the inclusions. However, the isotropic inclusions with much larger bending rigidity induce shape deformation and are concentrated on the region of a preferred curvature. For high rod density, high rod stiffness, and/or low line tension of the membrane edge, the rod assembly induces vesicle rupture, resulting in the formation of a high-genus vesicle. A gradual change in the curvature suppresses this rupture. Hence, large stress, compared to the edge tension, induced by the rod assembly is the key factor determining rupture. For rod curvature with the opposite sign to the vesicle curvature, membrane rupture induces inversion of the membrane, leading to division into multiple vesicles as well as formation of a high-genus vesicle.

  10. Role of alpha-crystallin, early-secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein and culture filtrate protein 10 as novel diagnostic markers in osteoarticular tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Rizvi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarticular tuberculosis constitutes about 3% of all tuberculosis cases. Early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis is a challenging problem especially in the case of osteoarticular tuberculosis owing to the lower number of bacilli. However, an accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease results in an improved efficacy of the given treatment. Besides the limitations of conventional methods, nowadays molecular diagnostic techniques have emerged as a major breakthrough for the early diagnosis of tuberculosis with high sensitivity and specificity. Alpha-crystallin is a dominantly expressed protein responsible for the long viability of the pathogen during the latent phase under certain stress conditions such as hypoxia and nitric oxide stress. Two other proteins—early secreted antigenic target-6 and culture filtrate protein-10—show high expression in the active infective phase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this article, we focus on the different proteins expressed dominantly in latent/active tuberculosis, and which may be further used as prognostic biomarkers for diagnosing tuberculosis, both in latent and active phases.

  11. Endotoxin-free purification for the isolation of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus E2 protein from insoluble inclusion body aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahony Timothy J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein expression in Escherichia coli may result in the recombinant protein being expressed as insoluble inclusion bodies. In addition, proteins purified from E. coli contain endotoxins which need to be removed for in vivo applications. The structural protein, E2, from Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV is a major immunogenic determinant, and is an ideal candidate as a subunit vaccine. The E2 protein contains 17 cysteine residues creating difficulties in E. coli expression. In this report we outline a procedure for successfully producing soluble and endotoxin-free BVDV E2 protein from inclusion bodies (IB. Results The expression of a truncated form of BVDV-E2 protein (E2-T1 in E. coli resulted in predominantly aggregated insoluble IB. Solubilisation of E2-T1 with high purity and stability from IB aggregates was achieved using a strong reducing buffer containing 100 mM Dithiothreitol. Refolding by dialysis into 50 mM Tris (pH 7.0 containing 0.2% Igepal CA630 resulted in a soluble but aggregated protein solution. The novel application of a two-phase extraction of inclusion body preparations with Triton X-114 reduced endotoxin in solubilised E2-T1 to levels suitable for in vivo use without affecting protein yields. Dynamic light scattering analyses showed 37.5% of the protein was monomeric, the remaining comprised of soluble aggregates. Mice immunised with E2-T1 developed a high titre antibody response by ELISA. Western hybridisation analysis showed E2-T1 was recognised by sera from immunised mice and also by several BVDV-E2 polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Conclusion We have developed a procedure using E. coli to produce soluble E2-T1 protein from IB, and due to their insoluble nature we utilised a novel approach using Triton X-114 to efficiently remove endotoxin. The resultant protein is immunogenic and detectable by BVDV-E2 specific antibodies indicating its usefulness for diagnostic applications and as a subunit

  12. Modulating alignment of membrane proteins in liquid-crystalline and oriented gel media by changing the size and charge of phospholipid bicelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorieau, Justin L; Maltsev, Alexander S.; Louis, John M; Bax, Ad

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that alignment of a structured peptide or small protein solubilized in mixed phospholipid:detergent micelles or bicelles, when embedded in a compressed gel or liquid crystalline medium, can be altered by either changing the phospholipid aggregate shape, charge, or both together. For the hemagglutinin fusion peptide solubilized in bicelles, we show that bicelle shape and charge do not change its helical hairpin structure but impact its alignment relative to the alignment medium, both in charged compressed acrylamide gel and in liquid crystalline d (GpG). The method can be used to generate sets of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) that correspond to orthogonal alignment tensors, and holds promise for high-resolution structural refinement and dynamic mapping of membrane proteins. PMID:23508769

  13. Modulating alignment of membrane proteins in liquid-crystalline and oriented gel media by changing the size and charge of phospholipid bicelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorieau, Justin L.; Maltsev, Alexander S.; Louis, John M.; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We demonstrate that alignment of a structured peptide or small protein solubilized in mixed phospholipid:detergent micelles or bicelles, when embedded in a compressed gel or liquid crystalline medium, can be altered by either changing the phospholipid aggregate shape, charge, or both together. For the hemagglutinin fusion peptide solubilized in bicelles, we show that bicelle shape and charge do not change its helical hairpin structure but impact its alignment relative to the alignment medium, both in charged compressed acrylamide gel and in liquid crystalline d(GpG). The method can be used to generate sets of residual dipolar couplings that correspond to orthogonal alignment tensors, and holds promise for high-resolution structural refinement and dynamic mapping of membrane proteins.

  14. A simple strategy for the purification of native recombinant full-length human RPL10 protein from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Larissa M; Silva, Luana R; Alves, Joseane F; Marin, Nélida; Silva, Flavio Sousa; Morganti, Ligia; Silva, Ismael D C G; Affonso, Regina

    2014-09-01

    The L10 ribosomal protein (RPL10) plays a role in the binding of the 60 S and 40 S ribosomal subunits and in mRNA translation. The evidence indicates that RPL10 also has multiple extra-ribosomal functions, including tumor suppression. Recently, the presence of RPL10 in prostate and ovarian cancers was evaluated, and it was demonstrated to be associated with autistic disorders and premature ovarian failure. In the present work, we successfully cloned and expressed full-length human RPL10 (hRPL10) protein and isolated inclusion bodies containing this protein that had formed under mild growth conditions. The culture produced 376mg of hRPL10 protein per liter of induced bacterial culture, of which 102.4mg was present in the soluble fraction, and 25.6mg was recovered at approximately 94% purity. These results were obtained using a two-step process of non-denaturing protein extraction from pelleted inclusion bodies. We studied the characteristics of this protein using circular dichroism spectroscopy and by monitoring the changes induced by the presence or absence of zinc ions using fluorescence spectrometry. The results demonstrated that the protein obtained using these non-conventional methods retained its secondary and tertiary structure. The conformational changes induced by the incorporation of zinc suggested that this protein could interact with Jun or the SH3 domain of c-yes. The results suggested that the strategy used to obtain hRPL10 is simple and could be applied to obtaining other proteins that are susceptible to degradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Alternative preparation of inclusion bodies excludes interfering non-protein contaminants and improves the yield of recombinant proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    The goal of simple, high-yield expression and purification of recombinant human proinsulin has proven to be a considerable challenge. First, proinsulin forms inclusion bodies during bacterial expression. While this phenomenon can be exploited as a capture step, conventionally prepared inclusion bodies contain significant amounts of non-protein contaminants that interfere with subsequent chromatographic purification. Second, the proinsulin molecules within the inclusion bodies are incorrectly folded, and likely cross-linked to one another, making it difficult to quantify the amount of expressed proinsulin. Third, proinsulin is an intermediate between the initial product of ribosomal translation (preproinsulin) and the final product secreted by pancreatic beta cells (insulin). Therefore, to be efficiently produced in bacteria, it must be produced as an N-terminally extended fusion protein, which has to be converted to authentic proinsulin during the purification scheme. To address all three of these problems, while simultaneously streamlining the procedure and increasing the yield of recombinant proinsulin, we have made three substantive modifications to our previous method for producing proinsulin:.•Conditions for the preparation of inclusion bodies have been altered so contaminants that interfere with semi-preparative reversed-phase chromatography are excluded while the proinsulin fusion protein is retained at high yield.•Aliquots are taken following important steps in the procedure and the quantity of proinsulin-related polypeptide in the sample is compared to the amount present prior to that step.•Final purification is performed using a silica-based reversed-phase matrix in place of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based matrix.

  16. Intranuclear Inclusions in Renal Tubular Epithelium in Immunodeficient Mice Stain with Antibodies for Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 L1 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth McInnes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys from six immunodeficient mice examined by Cerberus Sciences and the Animal Resources Centre, displayed karyomegaly with pale eosinophilic, intranuclear inclusions upon histopathological examination. Electron microscopy performed on kidney tissue from 5/6 mice demonstrated margination of the chromatin in large nuclei. Laboratory tests were used to detect nucleic acid of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, circoviruses and anelloviruses (4/6 mice, a specific PCR was used to detect murine polyomavirus (1/6, and a panel of serological tests was used to detect seroconversion to major murine pathogens (1/6. All molecular and serological tests were negative. Immunohistochemistry using polyclonal anti-bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1 L1 antibody, Camvir monoclonal anti-papillomavirus antibody (directed against the seven amino acids GFGAMDF found in human papillomavirus (HPV 16 L1 protein, a commercially available mixture of two monoclonal antibodies, anti-BPV-1 L1/1H8 + Camvir antibodies, and a monoclonal anti-Hsc70 antibody revealed specific, positive staining of murine renal tubular epithelial intranuclear inclusions in 6/6 mice using the anti-BPV-1 L1 containing antibodies only. Methyl pyronin green, PAS and Feulgen histochemical reactions revealed that the intranuclear inclusions did not consist of RNA, DNA or carbohydrate. An immunohistochemical method now exists that can be used to confirm and evaluate suspected cases of murine inclusion body nephropathy.

  17. The Tobacco etch virus P3 protein forms mobile inclusions via the early secretory pathway and traffics along actin microfilaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Wei, Taiyun; Chowda-Reddy, R V; Sun, Guangyu; Wang, Aiming

    2010-02-05

    Plant potyviruses encode two membrane proteins, 6K and P3. The 6K protein has been shown to induce virus replication vesicles. However, the function of P3 remains unclear. In this study, subcellular localization of the Tobacco etch virus (TEV) P3 protein was investigated in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells. The TEV P3 protein localized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and formed punctate inclusions in association with the Golgi apparatus. The trafficking of P3 to the Golgi was mediated by the early secretory pathway. The Golgi-associated punctate structures originated from the ER exit site (ERES). Deletion analyses identified P3 domains required for the retention of P3 at the Golgi. Moreover, the P3 punctate structure was found to traffic along the actin filaments and colocalize with the 6K-containing replication vesicles. Taken together, these data support previous suggestions that P3 may play dual roles in virus movement and replication.

  18. The RNA-binding motif 45 (RBM45) protein accumulates in inclusion bodies in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions (FTLD-TDP) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Mahlon; Riascos, David; Kovalik, Tina; An, Jiyan; Krupa, Kelly; Krupa, Kristin; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Renton, Alan E; Traynor, Bryan J; Bowser, Robert

    2012-11-01

    RNA-binding protein pathology now represents one of the best characterized pathologic features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with TDP-43 or FUS pathology (FTLD-TDP and FTLD-FUS). Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we identified altered levels of the RNA-binding motif 45 (RBM45) protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of ALS patients. This protein contains sequence similarities to TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and fused-in-sarcoma (FUS) that are contained in cytoplasmic inclusions of ALS and FTLD-TDP or FTLD-FUS patients. To further characterize RBM45, we first verified the presence of RBM45 in CSF and spinal cord tissue extracts of ALS patients by immunoblot. We next used immunohistochemistry to examine the subcellular distribution of RBM45 and observed in a punctate staining pattern within nuclei of neurons and glia in the brain and spinal cord. We also detected RBM45 cytoplasmic inclusions in 91 % of ALS, 100 % of FTLD-TDP and 75 % of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases. The most extensive RBM45 pathology was observed in patients that harbor the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion. These RBM45 inclusions were observed in spinal cord motor neurons, glia and neurons of the dentate gyrus. By confocal microscopy, RBM45 co-localizes with ubiquitin and TDP-43 in inclusion bodies. In neurons containing RBM45 cytoplasmic inclusions we often detected the protein in a punctate pattern within the nucleus that lacked either TDP-43 or ubiquitin. We identified RBM45 using a proteomic screen of CSF from ALS and control subjects for candidate biomarkers, and link this RNA-binding protein to inclusion pathology in ALS, FTLD-TDP and AD.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic investigations on a βγ-crystallin domain of absent in melanoma 1 (AIM1), a protein from Homo sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravind, Penmatsa; Rajini, Bheemreddy; Sharma, Yogendra; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan, E-mail: sankar@ccmb.res.in [Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2006-03-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of AIM1g1, a βγ-crystallin domain of absent in melanoma (AIM1) protein from H. sapiens, is reported. AIM1g1 is a single βγ-crystallin domain from the protein absent in melanoma 1 (AIM1), which appears to play a role in the suppression of melanomas. This domain is known to bind calcium and its structure would help in identifying calcium-coordinating sites in vertebrate crystallins, which have hitherto been believed to have lost this ability during evolution. Crystallization of this domain was performed by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.86 Å and were found to belong to space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 54.98, c = 59.73 Å. Solvent-content analysis indicated the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit.

  20. Refolding and simultaneous purification of recombinant human proinsulin from inclusion bodies on protein-folding liquid-chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; Zhou, Huifang; Yang, Yicong; Li, Weimin; Wan, Yi; Wang, Lili

    2015-05-01

    Protein-folding liquid chromatography (PFLC) is an effective and scalable method for protein renaturation with simultaneous purification. However, it has been a challenge to fully refold inclusion bodies in a PFLC column. In this work, refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human proinsulin (rhPI) from inclusion bodies from Escherichia coli were investigated using the surface of stationary phases in immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The results indicated that both the ligand structure on the surface of the stationary phase and the composition of the mobile phase (elution buffer) influenced refolding of rhPI. Under optimized chromatographic conditions, the mass recoveries of IMAC column and HPSEC column were 77.8 and 56.8% with purifies of 97.6 and 93.7%, respectively. These results also indicated that the IMAC column fails to refold rhPI, and the HPSEC column enables efficient refolding of rhPI with a low-urea gradient-elution method. The refolded rhPI was characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The molecular weight of the converted human insulin was further confirmed with SDS-18% PAGE, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and the biological activity assay by HP-RPLC. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Structural Transformation of the Amyloidogenic Core Region of TDP-43 Protein Initiates Its Aggregation and Cytoplasmic Inclusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei-Lei; Che, Mei-Xia; Zhao, Jian; Zhou, Chen-Jie; Xie, Mu-Yun; Li, Hai-Yin; He, Jian-Hua; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa) is a major deposited protein in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia with ubiquitin. A great number of genetic mutations identified in the flexible C-terminal region are associated with disease pathologies. We investigated the molecular determinants of TDP-43 aggregation and its underlying mechanisms. We identified a hydrophobic patch (residues 318–343) as the amyloidogenic core essential for TDP-43 aggregation. Biophysical studies demonstrated that the homologous peptide formed a helix-turn-helix structure in solution, whereas it underwent structural transformation from an α-helix to a β-sheet during aggregation. Mutation or deletion of this core region significantly reduced the aggregation and cytoplasmic inclusions of full-length TDP-43 (or TDP-35 fragment) in cells. Thus, structural transformation of the amyloidogenic core initiates the aggregation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation of TDP-43. This particular core region provides a potential therapeutic target to design small-molecule compounds for mitigating TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:23689371

  2. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  3. Heat Treatment of Small Heat Shock Proteins α-Crystallin and Hsp16.3: Structural Changes vs. Chaperone-like Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛启龙; 柯丹霞; 昌增益

    2001-01-01

    Both α-crystallin from bovine eye lens and Hsp16.3 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are members of the small heat shock protein family, They were preincubated at 100 C for 15 min and then cooled on ice immediately. The chaperone-like activities of preheated proteins were measured at 37 C using DTT-treated insulin B chains as substrates. Both preheated proteins exhibited greatly enhanced chaperone-like activities, accompanied with almost unchanged secondary structures and surface hydrophobicity but with a minor change in tertiary structures. The dramatically enhanced chaperone-like activities of preheated α-crystallln and Hsp16.3 may have resulted from the irreversible change in the tertiary structure as detected by near-UV CD spectra.

  4. A novel molecular dynamics approach to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation on multimeric protein interface: the αB-Crystallin case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappori, Federica; Mattiazzi, Luca; Milanesi, Luciano; Merelli, Ivan

    2016-03-02

    Phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications (PTM) employed by cells to regulate several cellular processes. Studying the effects of phosphorylations on protein structures allows to investigate the modulation mechanisms of several proteins including chaperones, like the small HSPs, which display different multimeric structures according to the phosphorylation of a few serine residues. In this context, the proposed study is aimed at finding a method to correlate different PTM patterns (in particular phosphorylations at the monomers interface of multimeric complexes) with the dynamic behaviour of the complex, using physicochemical parameters derived from molecular dynamics simulations in the timescale of nanoseconds. We have developed a methodology relying on computing nine physicochemical parameters, derived from the analysis of short MD simulations, and combined with N identifiers that characterize the PTMs of the analysed protein. The nine general parameters were validated on three proteins, with known post-translational modified conformation and unmodified conformation. Then, we applied this approach to the case study of αB-Crystallin, a chaperone which multimeric state (up to 40 units) is supposed to be controlled by phosphorylation of Ser45 and Ser59. Phosphorylation of serines at the dimer interface induces the release of hexamers, the active state of αB-Crystallin. 30 ns of MD simulation were obtained for each possible combination of dimer phosphorylation state and average values of structural, dynamic, energetic and functional features were calculated on the equilibrated portion of the trajectories. Principal Component Analysis was applied to the parameters and the first five Principal Components, which summed up to 84 % of the total variance, were finally considered. The validation of this approach on multimeric proteins, which structures were known both modified and unmodified, allowed us to propose a new approach that

  5. Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dystrophy > Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy This information was developed by the ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy Defined What is Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy? ...

  6. The Inclusive Classroom: How Inclusive Is Inclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Claudette M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the position that inclusion is limited; inclusion does not go far enough. The inclusive classroom has been assessed to be of benefit both to the teacher and student. There are, however, limits set on inclusion. In most classrooms only children with learning disability are included omitting those with severe disabilities,…

  7. The first protein ever synthesized in vitro——a personal reminiscence of the total synthesis of crystalline insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YouShang

    2010-01-01

    @@ The total synthesis of crystalline bovine insulin started in 1958 was fully accomplished in 1965.This formidable task was a collaboration of the Institute of Biochemistry in Shanghai, the Institute of Organic Chemistry in Shanghai and the Department of Chemistry in Beijing University.It is difficult to say exactly how many people were involved in this project, as many contributors, e.g.Director Wang YingLai and Deputy Director Cao TianQin of the Institute of Biochemistry, were not included in the author list of the published papers.

  8. The quality of inclusion body protein%包涵体蛋白质的品质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚辉; 辛爱洁; 李素霞; 许建和

    2009-01-01

    包涵体(inclusion body,IB)曾被认为缺乏正确的分子结构.近年来,傅里叶变换红外光谱(FT-IR)成为对包涵体蛋白质进行结构分析的有效手段,利用傅里叶变换红外光谱对包涵体蛋白质进行结构分析,表明IB蛋白质含有天然或类天然结构.所滑的包涵体蛋白质的品质,是指与复性率相关的IB蛋白质状态,主要反映为包涵体蛋白质构象的差异性.影响包涵体蛋白质品质的,既有内因也有外因,分析其影响因素,将有助于调整重组蛋白质生产的最佳培养条件.活性包涵体是近年来包涵体研究领域最具意义的成就之一.对包涵体蛋白质品质的研究将对包'涵体蛋白质的复性以及活性包涵体的研究和应用具有重要意义.

  9. Recombinant 35-kDa inclusion membrane protein IncA as a candidate antigen for serodiagnosis of Chlamydophila pecorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Khalil Yousef; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Berri, Mustapha; Rodolakis, Annie

    2010-07-14

    Chlamydophila pecorum strains are commonly found in the intestine and vaginal mucus of asymptomatic ruminants and may therefore induce a positive serological response when the animals are tested for C. abortus. They have also been associated with different pathological diseases in ruminants, swine and koala. The aim of this study was to identify specific C. pecorum immunodominant antigens which could be used in ELISA tests allowing to distinguish between animals infected with C. pecorum and those infected with other chlamydial species. A gene encoding 35-kDa inclusion membrane protein incA of C. pecorum was isolated by immunoscreening of the C. pecorum DNA library using ovine anti-C. pecorum antibodies. The recombinant IncA protein did not react with a murine serum directed against C. abortus but did react with a specific monoclonal antibody of C. pecorum and toward several ovine serum samples obtained after experimental infection with different C. pecorum strains. This protein could be a good candidate for specific diagnosis of C. pecorum infection.

  10. Inclusion complexes of poly-. beta. -cyclodextrin: a model for pressure effects upon ligand-protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torgerson, P.M.; Drickamer, H.G.; Weber, G.

    1979-07-10

    Certain protein-ligand complexes are destabilized by application of pressures of the order of 5 to 10 kbar while others are stabilized. This divergent behavior is attributed to differences in compressibility of the protein binding sites. Pressure-stabilized binding is thought by us to be characteristic of soft binding sites, sites in which rotation about backbone bonds permits reduction of the site dimensions under pressure. In contradistinction, hard binding sites do not decrease their size when pressure is applied. As a model for this latter kind we have measured the changes in equilibrium with pressure of complexes of poly-..beta..-cyclodextrin with two fluorescent probes: 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate and 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylamino)naphthalene. The standard volume change upon formation of the complexes at 1 atm is similar in both (+9.3 mL/mol), and as expected the incompressibility of the cyclodextrin rings results in a site from which the probes are dissociated by pressure. On the assmption of incompressibility of the binding site, the experimental data permit the calculation of the pressure vs volume curves (compressibility curves) for the probes molecularly dispersed in water. These curves are in broad agreement with those of liquid aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in the low-pressure range (1 to 4 kbar) but indicate a reduced compressibility at the higher pressures. Considerations of relative compressibility offer a quantitative alternative to the usual qualitative discussion of the effects of high pressures upon proteins in terms of the participation of hydrophobic and other bonds.

  11. Estimation of the optimum standardized ileal digestible total sulfur amino acid to lysine ratio in late finishing gilts fed low protein diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiangfang; Liu, Xutong; Thacker, Philip; Qiao, Shiyan

    2016-01-01

    A total of 90 gilts were used to investigate the effects of various standard ileal digestible (SID) total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) to lysine (Lys) ratios on the performance and carcass characteristics of late finishing gilts receiving low crude protein (CP) diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids (CAA). Graded levels of crystalline methionine (Met) (0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8 or 1.1 g/kg) were added to the basal diet to produce diets providing SID TSAA to Lys ratios of 0.48, 0.53, 0.58, 0.63 or 0.68. At the termination of the experiment, 30 gilts (one pig per pen) with an average body weight (BW) of 120 kg were killed to evaluate carcass traits. Increasing the SID TSAA to Lys ratio increased average daily gain (ADG) (linear and quadratic effect, P < 0.05), improved feed conversion ratio (FCR) (linear and quadratic effect, P < 0.05) and decreased serum urea nitrogen (SUN) concentration (linear and quadratic effect, P < 0.05) of finishing gilts. No effects were obtained for carcass traits. The optimum SID TSAA to Lys ratios to maximize ADG as well as to minimize FCR and SUN levels were 0.57, 0.58 and 0.53 using a linear-break point model and 0.64, 0.62 and 0.61 using a quadratic model. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. HMGB1 and RAGE in skeletal muscle inflammation: Implications for protein accumulation in inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Ingrid E; Zschüntzsch, Jana; Kleinschnitz, Konstanze; Wrede, Arne; Gerhardt, Ellen; Balcarek, Peter; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Zierz, Stephan; Dalakas, Marinos C; Voll, Reinhard E; Schmidt, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation is associated with protein accumulation in IBM, but precise mechanisms are elusive. The "alarmin" HMGB1 is upregulated in muscle inflammation. Its receptor RAGE is crucial for β-amyloid-associated neurodegeneration. Relevant signaling via HMGB1/RAGE is expected in IBM pathology. By real-time-PCR, mRNA-expression levels of HMGB1 and RAGE were upregulated in muscle biopsies of patients with IBM and PM, but not in muscular dystrophy or non-myopathic controls. By immunohistochemistry, both molecules displayed the highest signal in IBM, where they distinctly co-localized to intra-fiber accumulations of β-amyloid and neurofilament/tau. In these fibers, identification of phosphorylated Erk suggested that relevant downstream activation is present upon HMGB1 signaling via RAGE. Protein expressions of HMGB1, RAGE, Erk and phosphorylated Erk were confirmed by Western blot. In a well established cell-culture model for pro-inflammatory cell-stress, exposure of human muscle-cells to IL-1β+IFN-γ induced cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 and subsequent release as evidenced by ELISA. Upregulation of RAGE on the cell surface was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and flow-cytometry. Recombinant HMGB1 was equally potent as IL-1β+IFN-γ in causing amyloid-accumulation and cell-death, and both were abrogated by the HMGB1-blocker BoxA. The findings strengthen the concept of unique interactions between degenerative and inflammatory mechanisms and suggest that HMGB1/RAGE signaling is a critical pathway in IBM pathology.

  13. Immunohistochemical detection of a unique protein within cells of snakes having inclusion body disease, a world-wide disease seen in members of the families Boidae and Pythonidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wen Chang

    Full Text Available Inclusion body disease (IBD is a worldwide disease in captive boa constrictors (boa constrictor and occasionally in other snakes of the families Boidae and Pythonidae. The exact causative agent(s and pathogenesis are not yet fully understood. Currently, diagnosis of IBD is based on the light microscopic identification of eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in hematoxylin and eosin stained tissues or blood smears. An antigenically unique 68 KDa protein was identified within the IBD inclusion bodies, called IBD protein. A validated immuno-based ante-mortem diagnostic test is needed for screening snakes that are at risk of having IBD. In this study, despite difficulties in solubilizing semi-purified inclusion bodies, utilizing hybridoma technology a mouse anti-IBD protein monoclonal antibody (MAB was produced. The antigenic specificity of the antibody was confirmed and validated by western blots, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical staining. Paraffin embedded tissues of IBD positive and negative boa constrictors (n=94 collected from 1990 to 2011 were tested with immunohistochemical staining. In boa constrictors, the anti-IBDP MAB had a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 100% in detecting IBD. The antibody also cross-reacted with IBD inclusion bodies in carpet pythons (Morelia spilota and a ball python (python regius. This validated antibody can serve as a tool for the development of ante-mortem immunodiagnostic tests for IBD.

  14. Immunohistochemical Detection of a Unique Protein within Cells of Snakes Having Inclusion Body Disease, a World-Wide Disease Seen in Members of the Families Boidae and Pythonidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Wen; Fu, Ann; Wozniak, Edward; Chow, Marjorie; Duke, Diane G.; Green, Linda; Kelley, Karen; Hernandez, Jorge A.; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion body disease (IBD) is a worldwide disease in captive boa constrictors (boa constrictor) and occasionally in other snakes of the families Boidae and Pythonidae. The exact causative agent(s) and pathogenesis are not yet fully understood. Currently, diagnosis of IBD is based on the light microscopic identification of eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in hematoxylin and eosin stained tissues or blood smears. An antigenically unique 68 KDa protein was identified within the IBD inclusion bodies, called IBD protein. A validated immuno-based ante-mortem diagnostic test is needed for screening snakes that are at risk of having IBD. In this study, despite difficulties in solubilizing semi-purified inclusion bodies, utilizing hybridoma technology a mouse anti-IBD protein monoclonal antibody (MAB) was produced. The antigenic specificity of the antibody was confirmed and validated by western blots, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical staining. Paraffin embedded tissues of IBD positive and negative boa constrictors (n=94) collected from 1990 to 2011 were tested with immunohistochemical staining. In boa constrictors, the anti-IBDP MAB had a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 100% in detecting IBD. The antibody also cross-reacted with IBD inclusion bodies in carpet pythons (Morelia spilota) and a ball python (python regius). This validated antibody can serve as a tool for the development of ante-mortem immunodiagnostic tests for IBD. PMID:24340066

  15. The small heat shock protein, HSP30, is associated with aggresome-like inclusion bodies in proteasomal inhibitor-, arsenite-, and cadmium-treated Xenopus kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saad; Khamis, Imran; Heikkila, John J

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, treatment of Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells with the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, or the environmental toxicants, sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride, induced the accumulation of the small heat shock protein, HSP30, in total and in both soluble and insoluble protein fractions. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed the presence of relatively large HSP30 structures primarily in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm. All three of the stressors promoted the formation of aggresome-like inclusion bodies as determined by immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy using a ProteoStat aggresome dye and additional aggresomal markers, namely, anti-γ-tubulin and anti-vimentin antibodies. Further analysis revealed that HSP30 co-localized with these aggresome-like inclusion bodies. In most cells, HSP30 was found to envelope or occur within these structures. Finally, we show that treatment of cells with withaferin A, a steroidal lactone with anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, and proteasomal inhibitor properties, also induced HSP30 accumulation that co-localized with aggresome-like inclusion bodies. It is possible that proteasomal inhibitor or metal/metalloid-induced formation of aggresome-like inclusion bodies may sequester toxic protein aggregates until they can be degraded. While the role of HSP30 in these aggresome-like structures is not known, it is possible that they may be involved in various aspects of aggresome-like inclusion body formation or transport.

  16. Crystalline Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D; Jiang, F -J; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We show that exotic phases arise in generalized lattice gauge theories known as quantum link models in which classical gauge fields are replaced by quantum operators. While these quantum models with discrete variables have a finite-dimensional Hilbert space per link, the continuous gauge symmetry is still exact. An efficient cluster algorithm is used to study these exotic phases. The $(2+1)$-d system is confining at zero temperature with a spontaneously broken translation symmetry. A crystalline phase exhibits confinement via multi-stranded strings between charge-anti-charge pairs. A phase transition between two distinct confined phases is weakly first order and has an emergent spontaneously broken approximate $SO(2)$ global symmetry. The low-energy physics is described by a $(2+1)$-d $\\mathbb{R}P(1)$ effective field theory, perturbed by a dangerously irrelevant $SO(2)$ breaking operator, which prevents the interpretation of the emergent pseudo-Goldstone boson as a dual photon. This model is an ideal candidat...

  17. IC-tagged proteins are able to interact with each other and perform complex reactions when integrated into muNS-derived inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Otero-Romero, Iria; Benavente, Javier; Martinez-Costas, Jose M

    2011-09-20

    We have recently developed a versatile tagging system (IC-tagging) that causes relocation of the tagged proteins to ARV muNS-derived intracellular globular inclusions. In the present study we demonstrate (i) that the IC-tag can be successfully fused either to the amino or carboxyl terminus of the protein to be tagged and (ii) that IC-tagged proteins are able to interact between them and perform complex reactions that require such interactions while integrated into muNS inclusions, increasing the versatility of the IC-tagging system. Also, our studies with the DsRed protein add some light on the structure/function relationship of the evolution of DsRed chromophore.

  18. The P2 of Wheat yellow mosaic virus rearranges the endoplasmic reticulum and recruits other viral proteins into replication-associated inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liying; Andika, Ida Bagus; Shen, Jiangfeng; Yang, Di; Chen, Jianping

    2014-06-01

    Viruses commonly modify host endomembranes to facilitate biological processes in the viral life cycle. Infection by viruses belonging to the genus Bymovirus (family Potyviridae) has long been known to induce the formation of large membranous inclusion bodies in host cells, but their assembly and biological roles are still unclear. Immunoelectron microscopy of cells infected with the bymovirus Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) showed that P1, P2 and P3 are the major viral protein constituents of the membranous inclusions, whereas NIa-Pro (nuclear inclusion-a protease) and VPg (viral protein genome-linked) are probable minor components. P1, P2 and P3 associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but only P2 was able to rearrange ER and form large aggregate structures. Bioinformatic analyses and chemical experiments showed that P2 is an integral membrane protein and depends on the active secretory pathway to form aggregates of ER membranes. In planta and in vitro assays demonstrated that P2 interacts with P1, P3, NIa-Pro or VPg and recruits these proteins into the aggregates. In vivo RNA labelling using WYMV-infected wheat protoplasts showed that the synthesis of viral RNAs occurs in the P2-associated inclusions. Our results suggest that P2 plays a major role in the formation of membranous compartments that house the genomic replication of WYMV.

  19. Obtaining Soluble Folded Proteins from Inclusion Bodies Using Sarkosyl, Triton X-100, and CHAPS: Application to LB and M9 Minimal Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiah, Michael A; Wright, Katharine M; Du, Haijuan

    2016-04-01

    This unit describes a straightforward and efficient method of using sarkosyl to solubilize and recover difficult recombinant proteins, such as GST- and His6 -tagged fusion proteins, that are overexpressed in E. coli. This protocol is especially useful for rescuing recombinant proteins overexpressed in M9 minimal medium. Sarkosyl added to lysis buffers helps with both protein solubility and cell lysis. Higher percentage sarkosyl (up to 10%) can extract >95% of soluble protein from inclusion bodies. In the case of sarkosyl-solubilized GST-fusion proteins, batch-mode affinity purification requires addition of a specific ratio of Triton X-100 and CHAPS, while sarkosyl-solubilized His6 -tagged fusion proteins can be directly purified on Ni(2+) resin columns. Proteins purified by this method could be widely used in biological assays, structure analysis and mass spectrum assay.

  20. MB109 as bioactive human bone morphogenetic protein-9 refolded and purified from E. coli inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Mario Meng-Chiang; Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Jeon, Yun-Hui; Kim, Subin; Yoon, So-Mi; Choe, Senyon

    2014-02-24

    The development of chemical refolding of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily ligands has been instrumental to produce the recombinant proteins for biochemical studies and exploring the potential of protein therapeutics. The osteogenic human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (hBMP-2) and its Drosophila DPP homolog were the early successful cases of refolding into functional form. Despite the similarity in their three dimensional structure and amino acid sequences, several other TGF-β superfamily ligands could not be refolded readily by the same methods. Here, we report a comprehensive study on the variables of a rapid-dilution refolding method, including the concentrations of protein, salt, detergent and redox agents, pH, refolding duration and the presence of aggregation suppressors and host-cell contaminants, in order to identify the optimal condition to refold human BMP-9 (hBMP-9). To produce a recombinant form of hBMP-9 in E. coli cells, a synthetic codon-optimized gene was designed to encode the mature domain of hBMP-9 (Ser320 - Arg429) directly behind the first methionine, which we herein referred to as MB109. An effective purification scheme was also developed to purify the refolded MB109 to homogeneity with a final yield of 7.8 mg from 100 mg of chromatography-purified inclusion bodies as a starting material. The chemically refolded MB109 binds to ALK1, ActRIIb and BMPRII receptors with relatively high affinity as compared to other Type I and Type II receptors based on surface plasmon resonance analysis. Smad1-dependent luciferase assay in C2C12 cells shows that the MB109 has an EC50 of 0.61 ng/mL (25 pM), which is nearly the same as hBMP-9. MB109 is prone to be refolded as non-functional dimer and higher order multimers in most of the conditions tested, but bioactive MB109 dimer can be refolded with high efficiency in a narrow window, which is strongly dependent on the pH, refolding duration, the presence of aggregation suppressors and the

  1. αB-Crystallin R120G variant causes cardiac arrhythmias and alterations in the expression of Ca(2+) -handling proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qibin; Sanbe, Atsushi; Zhang, Xingwei; Liu, Jun-Ping; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    Mutations of αB-crystallin (CryαB), a small heat shock protein abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscles, are known to cause desmin-related myopathies. The CryαB R120G allele has been linked to a familial desminopathy and, in transgenic mice, causes a sudden death at about 28 weeks of age. To investigate the mechanisms of the sudden cardiac arrest of CryαB R120G transgenic mice, we prepared protein samples from left ventricular tissues of two different age groups (10 and 28 weeks) and examined Ca(2+) -handling proteins. Expression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) 2, phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2 and calsequestrin 2 was significantly decreased in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In addition, low heart rate variability, including heart rate, total power and low frequency, was observed and continuous electrocardiogram monitoring revealed cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, atrioventricular block and atrial flutter, in 28-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In contrast, expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like protein, inositol requirement 1 and X-box binding protein 1 were increased significantly in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαBR120G transgenic mice, suggesting that the CryαBR120G transgenic mice exhibit increased ER stress compared with wild-type mice. Together, the data suggest that the CryαB R120G dominant variant induces ER stress and impairs Ca(2+) regulation, leading to ageing-related cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias and decreased autonomic tone with shortened lifespan.

  2. Production of soluble truncated spike protein of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli through refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Da-Chuan; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Bok, Jin-Duck; Cho, Chong-Su; Hong, Zhong-Shan; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of highly pathogenic variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) strains, from 2013 to 2014, in North American and Asian countries have greatly threatened global swine industry. Therefore, development of effective vaccines against PEDV variant strains is urgently needed. Recently, it has been reported that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of S1 domain of PEDV spike protein is responsible for binding to the 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a possible sugar co-receptor. Therefore, the NTD of S1 domain could be an attractive target for the development of subunit vaccines. In this study, the NTD spanning amino acid residues 25-229 (S25-229) of S1 domain of PEDV variant strain was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in the form of inclusion bodies (IBs). S25-229 IBs were solubilized in 20 mM sodium acetate (pH 4.5) buffer containing 8 M urea and 1 mM dithiothreitol with 95% yield. Solubilized S25-229 IBs were refolded by 10-fold flash dilution and purified by one-step cation exchange chromatography with >95% purity and 20% yield. The CD spectrum of S25-229 showed the characteristic pattern of alpha helical structure. In an indirect ELISA, purified S25-229 showed strong reactivity with mouse anti-PEDV sera. In addition, immunization of mice with 20 μg of purified S25-229 elicited highly potent serum IgG titers. Finally, mouse antisera against S25-229 showed immune reactivity with native PEDV S protein in an immunofluorescence assay. These results suggest that purified S25-229 may have potential to be used as a subunit vaccine against PEDV variant strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of the crystalline state on photoinduced dynamics of photoactive yellow protein studied by ultraviolet-visible transient absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, S.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Moffat, K.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy was used to characterize the photocycle transitions in single crystals of wild-type and the E-46Q mutant of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) with microsecond time resolution. The results were compared with the results of similar measurements on aqueous

  4. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Filaments Can Tolerate the Incorporation of Assembly-compromised GFAP-δ, but with Consequences for Filament Organization and αB-Crystallin Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, Ming-Der; Wen, Shu-Fang; Gibbon, Terry; Middeldorp, Jinte; Sluijs, Jacqueline; Hol, Elly M.

    2008-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene is alternatively spliced to give GFAP-α, the most abundant isoform, and seven other differentially expressed transcripts including GFAP-δ. GFAP-δ has an altered C-terminal domain that renders it incapable of self-assembly in vitro. When titrated with GFAP-α, assembly was restored providing GFAP-δ levels were kept low (∼10%). In a range of immortalized and transformed astrocyte derived cell lines and human spinal cord, we show that GFAP-δ is naturally part of the endogenous intermediate filaments, although levels were low (∼10%). This suggests that GFAP filaments can naturally accommodate a small proportion of assembly-compromised partners. Indeed, two other assembly-compromised GFAP constructs, namely enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-tagged GFAP and the Alexander disease–causing GFAP mutant, R416W GFAP both showed similar in vitro assembly characteristics to GFAP-δ and could also be incorporated into endogenous filament networks in transfected cells, providing expression levels were kept low. Another common feature was the increased association of αB-crystallin with the intermediate filament fraction of transfected cells. These studies suggest that the major physiological role of the assembly-compromised GFAP-δ splice variant is as a modulator of the GFAP filament surface, effecting changes in both protein– and filament–filament associations as well as Jnk phosphorylation. PMID:18685083

  5. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Hung Tan; Shu-Chun Cheng; Yu-Tung Liu; Cheng-Guo Wu; Min-Han Lin; Chiao-Che Chen; Chao-Hsiung Lin; Chi-Yuan Chou

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could hav...

  6. Building Inclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeanet Kullberg; Isik Kulu-Glasgow

    2009-01-01

    The social inclusion of immigrants and ethnic minorities is a central issue in many European countries. Governments face challenges in ensuring housing for immigrants, delivering public services, promoting neighbourhood coexistence and addressing residential segregation. The Building Inclusion proje

  7. Study on Method of Purification of GST-tagged Proteins from Inclusion Bodies%GST融合蛋白包涵体纯化方法的探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季林; 刘佩娟; 王毅; 赵勇; 毛峰峰; 赵善民; 尚淑琴; 师长宏

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to study the method of purification of GST-tagged proteins from inclusion bodies. The vector PGEX-4T1-Rpfd expressed Rpfd -GST fusion protein was transformed into E. Coli DH5a and protein expression was induced with IPTG. The effect of these factors is observed on the impact of protein purification by comparing lysis with guanidine hydrochloride and pretreatment with Novagen Protein Refolding Kit, and adjusting the different types of protein refolding solution. The active GST fusion protein can be efficiently purified, through removing soluble protein after ultrasonic treatment, and then using the reaction mixture containing 20 mmol Tris-HCl and 0.1 mmol DTT for rehabilitation. To remove soluble protein expression and change the formula of protein refolding solutions can, effectively improve protein purification of GST-tagged proteins from inclusion bodies.%探讨GST融合蛋白包涵体纯化的方法.将表达Rpfd与GST融合蛋白的质粒PGEX-4T1 -Rpfd转入大肠杆菌DH5a,IPTG诱导表达目的蛋白.通过比较盐酸胍裂解和Novagen蛋白折叠试剂盒预处理,及调整不同类型蛋白复性液,观察上述因素对GST融合蛋白包涵体纯化效果的影响.结果:超声后先去除可溶性表达,再使用20 mmolris-HC1和0.1 mmol DTT进行复性,可获得高效纯化,具有活性的GST融合蛋白.对于GST包涵体蛋白进行纯化时,去除可溶性表达蛋白,改变蛋白复性液的成分,可有效提高蛋白纯化效果.

  8. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  9. Numerical study of the phase separation in binary lipid membrane containing protein inclusions under stationary shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Bo; Shi, Hui-Ji; Niu, Li-Sha

    2009-03-26

    The phase separation of lipids is believed to be responsible for the formation of lipid rafts in biological cell membrane. In the present work, a continuum model and a particle model are constructed to study the phase separation in binary lipid membrane containing inclusions under stationary shear flow. In each model, employing the cell dynamical system (CDS) approach, the kinetic equations of the confusion-advection process are numerically solved. Snapshot figures of the phase morphology are performed to intuitively display such phase evolving process. Considering the effects from both the inclusions and the shear flow, the time growth law of the characteristic domain size is discussed.

  10. Inclusive Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Judy; Burnette, Jane

    1994-01-01

    This review of five recent (1992 and 1993) books and journal articles is intended to illuminate characteristics of inclusive schools. The review defines inclusion as more than merely regular class placement for students with disabilities, to include a philosophy which celebrates diversity and the provision of a continuum of educational options.…

  11. Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Lukischa

    2008-01-01

    The placement and education of students with disabilities in the general education classroom has generated a challenge and varied opinions for educators, families, and service providers. It is likely that with recent litigation and legislation which supports inclusion and increasing pressure from advocates of inclusion, the trend towards including…

  12. Inhibition of the Expression of the Small Heat Shock Protein αB-Crystallin Inhibits Exosome Secretion in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangalum, Rajendra K; Bhat, Ankur M; Kohan, Sirus A; Bhat, Suraj P

    2016-06-17

    Exosomes carry cell type-specific molecular cargo to extracellular destinations and therefore act as lateral vectors of intercellular communication and transfer of genetic information from one cell to the other. We have shown previously that the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin (αB) is exported out of the adult human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE19) packaged in exosomes. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of the expression of αB via shRNA inhibits exosome secretion from ARPE19 cells indicating that exosomal cargo may have a role in exosome biogenesis (synthesis and/or secretion). Sucrose density gradient fractionation of the culture medium and cellular extracts suggests continued synthesis of exosomes but an inhibition of exosome secretion. In cells where αB expression was inhibited, the distribution of CD63 (LAMP3), an exosome marker, is markedly altered from the normal dispersed pattern to a stacked perinuclear presence. Interestingly, the total anti-CD63(LAMP3) immunofluorescence in the native and αB-inhibited cells remains unchanged suggesting continued exosome synthesis under conditions of impaired exosome secretion. Importantly, inhibition of the expression of αB results in a phenotype of the RPE cell that contains an increased number of vacuoles and enlarged (fused) vesicles that show increased presence of CD63(LAMP3) and LAMP1 indicating enhancement of the endolysosomal compartment. This is further corroborated by increased Rab7 labeling of this compartment (RabGTPase 7 is known to be associated with late endosome maturation). These data collectively point to a regulatory role for αB in exosome biogenesis possibly via its involvement at a branch point in the endocytic pathway that facilitates secretion of exosomes.

  13. Social inclusion and inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsela Robo

    2014-07-01

    In line with global debate on social inclusion and exclusion, the author brings the way this debate has now pervaded both the official and development policy discourse in Albania.Social inclusion is considered as one of the priorities of the current government, with poverty reduction as its main focus, which will be ensured not only through economic development. In the end, the article focuses on the role of education as a very important and useful tool for ensuring social inclusion.Social inclusion through education, in particular through vocational education, considered by the author as the only way towards sustainable development of Albanian society.

  14. Crystalline podocytopathy and tubulopathy without overt glomerular proteinuria in a patient with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jeong Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline nephropathy is a rare yet well-known condition associated with multiple myeloma and other light chain–secreting disorders. Paraproteins that are resistant to proteolysis crystallize within proximal tubular cells and cause light-chain proximal tubulopathy, which presents clinically as Fanconi syndrome. Podocytes are rarely affected, and the crystalline inclusions within podocytes are typically precipitated, yielding significant glomerular proteinuria. Here we report a case of extensive crystalline inclusions primarily within podocytes and proximal tubules that presented only with Fanconi syndrome and renal insufficiency. Despite the presence of extensive crystalline inclusions in podocytes and diffuse foot process effacement, the patient had no clinical evidence suggestive of podocyte injury.

  15. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2015 and July 2016 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Los Alamos focused on two main activities during this period: Discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling to describe flow and radionuclide transport in complex fracture networks that are typical of crystalline rock environments, and a comprehensive interpretation of three different colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland between 2002 and 2013. Chapter 1 presents the results of the DFN work and is divided into three main sections: (1) we show results of our recent study on the correlation between fracture size and fracture transmissivity (2) we present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph for characterization of discrete fracture networks, and (3) we describe the Crystalline International work in support of the Swedish Task Force. Chapter 2 presents interpretation of the colloidfacilitated radionuclide transport experiments in the crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site.

  16. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  17. Water-structuring technology with the molecular chaperone proteins: indicated application of the α-crystallin domains and imidazole-containing peptidomimetics in cosmetic skin care systems or dermatological therapeutic drug carrier formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady M; Nikolayeva, Juliana G; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-01-01

    Changes in structural proteins and hydration during aging are responsible for altered skin morphologic and mechanical properties manifested as wrinkling, sagging, loss of elasticity, and apparent dryness. Impairment in protein hydration may add to the ultrastructural, mechanical, and biochemical changes in structural proteins in the aged skin. At Innovative Vision Products, Inc., we have pioneered a molecular chaperone protein-activated therapeutic or cosmetic platform to enable simultaneous analysis of water-binding and structuring characteristics for biology-related or skin aging and skin disease-related pathways. This cutting-edge technology has changed the hydration of proteins in photoaged skin which so that they are more compact and interact with water to limited degree. The mechanisms of skin diseases, aging, and cellular and signaling pathways mediated by targeting with molecular chaperone protein(s) are considered. Skin lesions that are growing, spreading, or pigmented, and those that occur on exposed areas of skin are likely to be treated by these emerging pharmacological chaperones that could have cosmetic or dermatological benefits. Examples of such chaperones are anti-/trans-glycation-imidazole-containing peptidomimetic(s) (natural L-carnosine derivatives and mimetics) combined with the molecular chaperone protein α-crystallin derived from a natural source, brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) cysts, or with recombinant human αA-crystallin. This patented biotechnology represents an efficient tool with which to mitigate the consequences of free radical-induced skin damage. The article is organized to provide in one place all of the relevant technical information, such as high-performance nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance application tools, and to describe the entire process from sample preparation to data analysis, which is moving from biological studies to biotechnology batches of the product. The proposed biotechnology results in

  18. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  19. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  20. Assessment of the effect of methionine supplementation and inclusion of hydrolyzed wheat protein in milk protein-based milk replacers on the performance of intensively fed Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J J; Hwang, G H; Saito, A; Vermeire, D A; Drackley, J K

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare 2 milk replacers containing only milk proteins with or without supplemental Met, and to compare a milk replacer containing hydrolyzed wheat protein at 4.5% of dry matter (DM) and supplemental Lys and Met against the 2 all-milk-protein formulas, by assessing their effect on the growth performance, efficiency, and plasma urea nitrogen of pre-weaning Holstein calves. Thus, 57 Holstein calves were allotted to the following 3 treatments: (1) a skim milk plus whey protein concentrate-based milk replacer (SMWP) containing about 2.6% Lys and 0.6% Met on a DM basis; (2) SMWP + M based on skim milk and whey proteins, containing about 2.6% Lys, and supplemental Met to reach 0.9% on a DM basis; and (3) a skim milk plus whey protein concentrate plus 4.5% of the DM as hydrolyzed wheat protein based milk replacer (HWP + LM) where the wheat protein replaced 50% of the whey protein concentrate, and also contained supplemental Lys and Met to match the profile of SMWP + M (i.e., Lys 2.6 and Met 0.9% on DM basis). No difference in any of the responses was observed by supplementing the milk protein based formula with Met or when hydrolyzed wheat protein was added to the formula. Results indicate that (1) a milk replacer based on skim milk protein and whey protein with a Lys concentration of ~2.6% does not benefit from Met supplementation, and (2) milk replacer containing 4.5% of the DM as hydrolyzed wheat protein and supplemented with Lys and Met can support the same growth performance as milk protein-based formulas.

  1. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  2. Inclusive pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Morten Timmermann; Skov Mortensen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    This article will present a case for a shift in perspective in inclusive education research towards a continentally inspired approach. Drawing on the age old distinction between continental and Anglo-American educational research the aim is to flesh out what a shift to a continental approach will...

  3. Inclusive pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Morten Timmermann; Skov Mortensen, Stig

    This article will present a case for a shift in perspective in inclusive education research towards a continentally inspired approach. Drawing on the age old distinction between continental and Anglo-American educational research the aim is to flesh out what a shift to a continental approach will...

  4. Inclusion Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Colver, David

    2010-01-01

    Inclusion analysis is the name given by Operis to a black box testing technique that it has found to make the checking of key financial ratios calculated by spreadsheet models quicker, easier and more likely to find omission errors than code inspection.

  5. ARE INCLUSIVE DESIGNERS DESIGNING INCLUSIVELY?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A large body of literature exists relating to Inclusive Design. The literature can be divided into theory concerning methodology and case studies concerning practice. With such a large body of theoretical literature available, the question arises as to how closely practice matches that theory....... This paper is a survey of the methods used in the execution of self-declared inclusively design products based on an analysis of academic papers, posters and oral presentations. The case studies are divided into two groups, product design and assistive technology. Design steps were assigned to six categories...

  6. Solution NMR refinement of a metal ion bound protein using metal ion inclusive restrained molecular dynamics methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Wang Bing [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry and the Quantum Theory Project (United States); Lee, Chul Won [Chonnam National University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Guerra, Alfredo J.; Giedroc, David P., E-mail: giedroc@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Merz, Kenneth M., E-mail: kmerz1@gmail.com [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry and the Quantum Theory Project (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational sampling in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies.

  7. Oxidative refolding from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher A; Lee, Chung A; Fremont, Daved H

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes the growth and purification of bacterial inclusion body proteins with an option to selenomethionine label the targeted protein through feedback inhibition of methionine biosynthesis in common (non-auxotrophic) strains of E. coli. The method includes solubilization of inclusion body proteins by chemical denaturation and disulfide reduction, renaturation of the solubilized material through rapid dilution by pulsed injection into refolding buffer containing arginine and a mixture of oxidized and reduced glutathione, recovery of the recombinant protein using a stirred cell concentrator, and removal of the aggregated or misfolded fraction by passage over size-exclusion chromatography. The quality of the resulting protein can be assessed by SDS-PAGE.

  8. Continuous processing of recombinant proteins: Integration of inclusion body solubilization and refolding using simulated moving bed size exclusion chromatography with buffer recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellhoefer, Martin; Sprinzl, Wolfgang; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-12-06

    An integrated process which combines continuous inclusion body dissolution with NaOH and continuous matrix-assisted refolding based on closed-loop simulated moving bed size exclusion chromatography was designed and experimentally evaluated at laboratory scale. Inclusion bodies from N(pro) fusion pep6His and N(pro) fusion MCP1 from high cell density fermentation were continuously dissolved with NaOH, filtered and mixed with concentrated refolding buffer prior to refolding by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). This process enabled an isocratic operation of the simulated moving bed (SMB) system with a closed-loop set-up with refolding buffer as the desorbent buffer and buffer recycling by concentrating the raffinate using tangential flow filtration. With this continuous refolding process, we increased the refolding and cleavage yield of both model proteins by 10% compared to batch dilution refolding. Furthermore, more than 99% of the refolding buffer of the raffinate could be recycled which reduced the buffer consumption significantly. Based on the actual refolding data, we compared throughput, productivity, and buffer consumption between two batch dilution refolding processes - one using urea for IB dissolution, the other one using NaOH for IB dissolution - and our continuous refolding process. The higher complexity of the continuous refolding process was rewarded with higher throughput and productivity as well as significantly lower buffer consumption compared to the batch dilution refolding processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Melting and solidification of bismuth inclusions in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft, N.B.; Bohr, J.; Buras, B.

    1995-01-01

    Supercooling of crystalline bismuth inclusions in aluminium crystals has been observed and studied with different techniques: x-ray diffraction, in situ Rutherford backscattering/channelling spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The results of the measurements with different experime......Supercooling of crystalline bismuth inclusions in aluminium crystals has been observed and studied with different techniques: x-ray diffraction, in situ Rutherford backscattering/channelling spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The results of the measurements with different...

  10. Effect of inclusion of hydroxycinnamic and chlorogenic acids from green coffee bean in β-cyclodextrin on their interactions with whey, egg white and soy protein isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budryn, Grażyna; Pałecz, Bartłomiej; Rachwał-Rosiak, Danuta; Oracz, Joanna; Zaczyńska, Donata; Belica, Sylwia; Navarro-González, Inmaculada; Meseguer, Josefina María Vegara; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to characterise the interactions of hydroxycinnamic and chlorogenic acids (CHAs) from green coffee, with isolates of proteins from egg white (EWP), whey (WPC) and soy (SPI), depending on pH and temperature. The binding degree was determined by liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector and an ultrahigh resolution hybrid quadruple-time-of-flight mass spectrometer with ESI source (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). As a result of binding, the concentration of CHAs in proteins ranged from 9.44-12.2, 11.8-13.1 and 12.1-14.4g/100g for SPI, WPC and EWP, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of protein-ligand interactions were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and energetics of interactions at the atomic level by molecular modelling. The amount of CHAs released during proteolytic digestion was in the range 0.33-2.67g/100g. Inclusion of CHAs with β-cyclodextrin strongly limited these interactions to a level of 0.03-0.06g/100g.

  11. The potato mop-top virus TGB2 protein and viral RNA associate with chloroplasts and viral infection induces inclusions in the plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham H Cowan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The potato mop-top virus (PMTV triple gene block 2 (TGB2 movement protein fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP-TGB2 was expressed under the control of the PMTV subgenomic promoter from a PMTV vector. The subcellular localisations and interactions of mRFP-TGB2 were investigated using confocal imaging (CLSM and biochemical analysis. The results revealed associations with membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, mobile granules, small round structures (1-2 µm in diameter and chloroplasts. Expression of mRFP-TGB2 in epidermal cells enabled cell-to-cell movement of a TGB2 defective PMTV reporter clone, indicating that the mRFP-TGB2 fusion protein was functional and required for cell-to-cell movement. Protein-lipid interaction assays revealed an association between TGB2 and lipids present in chloroplasts, consistent with microscopical observations where the plastid envelope was labelled later in infection. To further investigate the association of PMTV infection with chloroplasts, ultrastructural studies of thin sections of PMTV-infected potato and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves by electron microscopy revealed abnormal chloroplasts with cytoplasmic inclusions and terminal projections. Viral coat protein, genomic RNA and fluorescently-labelled TGB2 were detected in plastid preparations isolated from the infected leaves, and viral RNA was localised to chloroplasts in infected tissues. The results reveal a novel association of TGB2 and vRNA with chloroplasts, and suggest viral replication is associated with chloroplast membranes, and that TGB2 plays a novel role in targeting the virus to chloroplasts.

  12. Evaluation of standardized ileal digestible valine:lysine, total lysine:crude protein, and replacing fish meal, meat and bone meal, and poultry byproduct meal with crystalline amino acids on growth performance of nursery pigs from seven to twelve kilograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemechek, J E; Tokach, M D; Dritz, S S; Goodband, R D; DeRouchey, J M

    2014-04-01

    Five experiments were conducted to evaluate replacing fish meal, meat and bone meal, and poultry byproduct meal with crystalline AA for 7- to 12-kg pigs. In all experiments, pigs (PIC TR4 × 1050) were fed a common diet for 3 d postweaning, treatment diets for 14 d (d 0 to 14), and, again, a common diet for 14 d (d 14 to 28). Treatment diets were corn-soybean meal based and formulated to contain 1.30% standardized ileal digestible (SID) Lys. Experiment 1 evaluated replacing dietary fish meal with crystalline AA. For the 6 treatments, crystalline Lys, Met, Thr, Trp, Ile, Val, Gln, and Gly all increased to maintain minimum AA ratios as fish meal decreased (4.50, 3.60, 2.70, 1.80, and 0.90 to 0.00%). There was no difference in ADG, ADFI, or G:F among treatments, validating a low-CP, AA-fortified diet for subsequent experiments. Experiment 2 evaluated deleting crystalline AA from a low-CP, AA-fortified diet with 6 treatments: 1) a positive control similar to the diet validated in Exp. 1, 2) positive control with l-Ile deleted, 3) positive control with l-Trp deleted, 4) positive control with l-Val deleted, 5) positive control with l-Gln and l-Gly deleted, and 6) positive control with l-Ile, l-Trp, l-Val, l-Gln, and l-Gly deleted (NC). Pigs fed the positive control or Ile deleted diet had improved (P meal was adjusted as a source of dispensable N to achieve the target Lys:CP. There were no differences in growth performance among pigs fed different Lys:CP diets. Experiment 4 evaluated increasing SID Val:Lys with Val at 57.4, 59.9, 62.3, 64.7, 67.2, and 69.6% of Lys. Average daily gain and ADFI increased (quadratic, P meal, meat and bone meal, or poultry byproduct meal). Low- and high-crystalline AA diets contained 4.5 or 1% fish meal, 6 or 1.2% meat and bone meal, and 6 or 1% poultry byproduct meal, respectively. No AA × protein source interactions were observed. From d 0 to 14, no differences in growth performance among protein sources was found, whereas increasing

  13. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J.; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils.Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ThT fluorescence graphs of buffers and solvents used for

  14. X-ray powder pattern analysis of cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus inclusion bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, X.; Sun, Y.K.; McCrae, M.A.; Rossmann, M.G. (Purdue Univ., West lafayette, IN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus is an insect reovirus which is occluded in crystalline inclusion bodies that form in the mid-gut of certain insects. Inclusion bodies of cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus from Bombyx mori were isolated and purified. These crystalline bodies, about 1-3 microns in linear size, were compacted in a capillary tube while immersed in buffer. X-ray diffraction photographs showed powder rings, extending to 8.2 A resolution, which could be indexed with a cell measuring a = b = 49.9 +/- 0.4 A, c = 41.5 +/- 0.4 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The polyhedrin protein, which is the major component of the inclusion body, has a molecular weight of about 30,000 daltons and, hence, there are probably two molecules in the unit cell. Thus, the unit cell is monoclinic or possibly triclinic. A Patterson derived from the measured powder pattern intensities, assuming monoclinic symmetry, could be interpreted in terms of a molecule with two larger globes. Such a structure is roughly consistent with the breakdown of the polyhedrin into two larger fragments of molecular weight 17,000 and 14,000 when raising the pH to near 10. Under these conditions the inclusion bodies disintegrate, releasing virus and catalyzing the proteolysis of the polyhedrin.

  15. Protein aggregate myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregate myopathies (PAM are an emerging group of muscle diseases characterized by structural abnormalities. Protein aggregate myopathies are marked by the aggregation of intrinsic proteins within muscle fibers and fall into four major groups or conditions: (1 desmin-related myopathies (DRM that include desminopathies, a-B crystallinopathies, selenoproteinopathies caused by mutations in the, a-B crystallin and selenoprotein N1 genes, (2 hereditary inclusion body myopathies, several of which have been linked to different chromosomal gene loci, but with as yet unidentified protein product, (3 actinopathies marked by mutations in the sarcomeric ACTA1 gene, and (4 myosinopathy marked by a mutation in the MYH-7 gene. While PAM forms 1 and 2 are probably based on impaired extralysosomal protein degradation, resulting in the accumulation of numerous and diverse proteins (in familial types in addition to respective mutant proteins, PAM forms 3 and 4 may represent anabolic or developmental defects because of preservation of sarcomeres outside of the actin and myosin aggregates and dearth or absence of other proteins in these actin or myosin aggregates, respectively. The pathogenetic principles governing protein aggregation within muscle fibers and subsequent structural sarcomeres are still largely unknown in both the putative catabolic and anabolic forms of PAM. Presence of inclusions and their protein composition in other congenital myopathies such as reducing bodies, cylindrical spirals, tubular aggregates and others await clarification. The hitherto described PAMs were first identified by immunohistochemistry of proteins and subsequently by molecular analysis of their genes.

  16. Sequential tentacle grafting and charge modification for enhancing charge density of mono-sized beads for facilitated protein refolding and purification from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ran; Yang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-20

    We have previously found that addition of like-charged media in a refolding solution can greatly enhance the refolding of pure proteins by suppressing protein aggregation. Herein, negatively charged mono-sized microspheres with sulfonic groups were fabricated to explore the facilitating effect of like-charged media on the refolding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs). A sequential polymer-tentacle grafting and sulfonate modification strategy was developed to increase the charge density of mono-sized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (pGMA) beads (2.4μm). Namely, GMA was first grafted onto the beads by grafting polymerization to form poly(GMA) tentacles on the pGMA beads, and then the epoxy groups on the tentacles were converted into sulfonic groups by modification with sodium sulfite. By this fabrication strategy, the charge density of the beads reached 793μmol/g, about 2.8 times higher than that modified without prior grafting of the pGMA beads (285μmol/g). The negatively charged beads of different charge densities were used for facilitating the refolding of like-charged EGFP from IBs. The refolding yield as well as refolding rate increased with increasing charge density. The anti-aggregation effects of urea and like-charged microspheres were synergetic. In addition, partial purification of EGFP was achieved because the ion-exchange adsorption led to 52% removal of positively charged contaminant proteins in the refolded solution. Finally, reusability of the tentacle beads was demonstrated by repetitive EGFP refolding and recovery cycles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbonic inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Kerkhof, Alfons; Thiéry, Régis

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the phase relations in carbonic fluid inclusions with pure, binary and ternary mixtures of the system CO 2-CH 4-N 2, compositions, which are frequently found in geological materials. Phase transitions involving liquid, gas and solid phases in the temperature range between -192°C and 31°C are discussed and presented in phase diagrams ( PT, TX and VX projections). These diagrams can be applied for the interpretation of microthermometry data in order to determine fluid composition and molar volume (or density).

  18. Novel ATPase activity of the polyprotein intermediate, Viral Protein genome-linked-Nuclear Inclusion-a protease, of Pepper vein banding potyvirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, Chhavi [Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Savithri, Handanahal S., E-mail: bchss@biochem.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pepper vein banding potyvirus VPg harbors Walker motifs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VPg exhibits ATPase activity in the presence of NIa-Pro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plausible structural and functional interplay between VPg and NIa-Pro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional relevance of prolonged presence of VPg-Pro during infection. -- Abstract: Potyviruses temporally regulate their protein function by polyprotein processing. Previous studies have shown that VPg (Viral Protein genome-linked) of Pepper vein banding virus interacts with the NIa-Pro (Nuclear Inclusion-a protease) domain, and modulates the kinetics of the protease. In the present study, we report for the first time that VPg harbors the Walker motifs A and B, and the presence of NIa-Pro, especially in cis (cleavage site (E191A) VPg-Pro mutant), is essential for manifestation of the ATPase activity. Mutation of Lys47 (Walker motif A) and Asp88:Glu89 (Walker motif B) to alanine in E191A VPg-Pro lead to reduced ATPase activity, confirming that this activity was inherent to VPg. We propose that potyviral VPg, established as an intrinsically disordered domain, undergoes plausible structural alterations upon interaction with globular NIa-Pro which induces the ATPase activity.

  19. Liquid Crystalline Materials for Biological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Aaron M; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2012-03-13

    Liquid crystals have a long history of use as materials that respond to external stimuli (e.g., electrical and optical fields). More recently, a series of investigations have reported the design of liquid crystalline materials that undergo ordering transitions in response to a range of biological interactions, including interactions involving proteins, nucleic acids, viruses, bacteria and mammalian cells. A central challenge underlying the design of liquid crystalline materials for such applications is the tailoring of the interface of the materials so as to couple targeted biological interactions to ordering transitions. This review describes recent progress toward design of interfaces of liquid crystalline materials that are suitable for biological applications. Approaches addressed in this review include the use of lipid assemblies, polymeric membranes containing oligopeptides, cationic surfactant-DNA complexes, peptide-amphiphiles, interfacial protein assemblies and multi-layer polymeric films.

  20. Inclusive Education in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永芳

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned about inclusive education in China,which is exemplified bythe following aspects:creating inclusive culture,producing inclusive policies and evolving inclusivepractice.Also,problems related to the inclusion are identified in this paper.

  1. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  2. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig

  3. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig d

  4. Two groups of S-layer proteins, SLP1s and SLP2s, in Bacillus thuringiensis co-exist in the S-layer and in parasporal inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Peng, Donghai; Zheng, Jinshui; Guo, Gang; Tian, Longjun; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2011-05-01

    We screened four B. thuringiensis strains whose parasporal inclusions contained the S-layer protein (SLP), and cloned two slp genes from each strain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated these SLPs could be divided into two groups, SLP1s and SLP2s. To confirm whether SLPs were present in the S-layer or as a parasporal inclusion, strains CTC and BMB1152 were chosen for further study. Western blots with whole-cell associated proteins from strains CTC and BMB1152 in the vegetative phase showed that SLP1s and SLP2s were constituents of the S-layer. Immunofluorescence utilizing spore-inclusion mixtures of strains CTC and BMB1152 in the sporulation phase showed that SLP1s and SLP2s were also constituents of parasporal inclusions. When heterogeneously expressed in the crystal negative strain BMB171, four SLPs from strains CTC and BMB1152 could also form parasporal inclusions. This temporal and spatial expression is not an occasional phenomenon but ubiquitous in B. thuringiensis strains.

  5. FTD/ALS-associated poly(GR) protein impairs the Notch pathway and is recruited by poly(GA) into cytoplasmic inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dejun; Abdallah, Abbas; Li, Zhaodong; Lu, Yubing; Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2015-10-01

    C9ORF72 repeat expansion is the most common genetic mutation in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Abnormal dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs) generated from repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation of repeat-containing RNAs are thought to be pathogenic; however, the mechanisms are unknown. Here we report that (GR)80 and (PR)80 are toxic in neuronal and non-neuronal cells in Drosophila. In contrast to reported shorter poly(GR) forms, (GR)80 is mostly localized throughout the cytosol without detectable accumulation in the nucleolus, accompanied by suppression of Notch signaling and cell loss in the wing. Some Notch target genes are also downregulated in brains and iPSC-derived cortical neurons of C9ORF72 patients. Increased Notch expression largely suppressed (GR)80-induced cell loss in the wing. When co-expressed in Drosophila, HeLa cells, or human neurons, (GA)80 recruited (GR)80 into cytoplasmic inclusions, partially decreasing the toxicity of (GR)80 and restoring Notch signaling in Drosophila. Thus, different DPRs have opposing roles in cell loss and we identify the Notch pathway as one of the receptor signaling pathways that might be compromised in C9ORF72 FTD/ALS.

  6. The role of hyaluronic acid inclusion on the energetics of encapsulation and release of a protein molecule from chitosan-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadi, Sonia; Alatorre-Meda, Manuel; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Taboada, Pablo; Remuñán-López, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    The synergistic effects of the polysaccharides chitosan (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) formulated into hybrid nanoparticles are promising for drug delivery. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the molecular interactions involved in the TPP-assisted ionotropic gelation of CS hybrid nanoparticles with the objective of investigating the impact of HA inclusion on the particle formulation and on the in vitro release of insulin (INS) as a protein cargo. To do that, an in-depth thermodynamic study was carried out by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Such analysis allowed us to elucidate the type and extent of interactions established by INS within the hybrid nanoparticles and to get further knowledge on the nature of its release mechanism in vitro. Overall, INS release from the CS nanoparticles was thermodynamically driven, and when including HA a weaker INS binding to the nanoparticles, hence, a faster release rate in vitro were observed. As a negative polyelectrolyte, HA might have sterically blocked the activated sites of CS, such as the amino groups, through chain entanglement, thereby, attenuating the competitive binding interactions of INS. As a consequence, INS might have experienced a spatial exclusion onto the surface of the hybrid nanoparticles to a greater extent which, in turn, would explain its initial abrupt release.

  7. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...

  8. Relationship of the syntheses of spore coat protein and parasporal crystal protein in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, A I; Tyrell, D J; Fitz-James, P C; Bulla, L A

    1982-01-01

    Two major classes of polypeptides were extracted from the spore surface of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki: the 134,000-dalton protoxin that is the major component of the crystalline inclusion and spore coat polypeptides very similar to those found on Bacillus cereus spores. The quantity of spore coat polypeptides produced was reduced when compared with that produced by certain acrystalliferous mutants or by B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. The latter organism produced an inclusion toxic to mosquito larvae, but deposited very little of the inclusion protein on the spore surface. The reduction in spore coat protein in B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was also seen in freeze-etched electron micrographs of spores. B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki spores germinated rather slowly when compared with related species, a property previously correlated with a deficiency or defect of the spore coat. Many mutants of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki unable to form a crystalline inclusion were nontoxic and lacked a well-defined spore coat. Other mutants isolated either directly from the wild type or from coat-deficient mutants produced spores that were identical to those produced by the closely related species. Bacillus cereus, on the basis of morphology, germination rate, and the size and antigenicity of the spore coat polypeptides. Most of the protein extractable from the inclusion produced by B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was about 26,000 daltons, considerably smaller than the major polypeptide extractable from other inclusions. Some of the B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis inclusion protein was found on the spore surface, but the majority of the extractable spore coat protein was the same size and antigenicity as that found on B. cereus spores. The B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores germinated at a rate close to that of B. cereus, especially when the spores were formed at 37 degrees C, and the morphology of the spore surface was very similar to

  9. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy.

  10. Refolding in high hydrostatic pressure of recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies in Escherichia Coli; Renaturacao em altas pressoes hidrostaticas de proteinas recombinantes agregadas em corpos de inclusao produzidos em Escherichia Coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balduino, Keli Nunes

    2009-07-01

    The expression of proteins as inclusion bodies in bacteria is a widely used alternative for production of recombinant protein. However, the aggregation is a problem often encountered during refolding of these proteins. High hydrostatic pressure are able to solubilise the inclusion bodies in the presence of low concentrations of denaturant reagents, encouraging refolding protein with high efficiency and reduce costs. This work aims to refolding of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli from inclusion bodies using high hydrostatic pressure. Three toxins, all featuring five or more disulfide bonds were studied: NXH8, Natterin 2 and Bothropstoxin 1. Suspensions of inclusion bodies of the three proteins were pressurized to 2000 bars for 16 hours. The buffers were optimized for refolding of the three proteins. The buffer used in the refolding of NXH8 was 50 mM Tris HCl, pH 9.0 with proportion of 1GSH: 4GSSG at a concentration of 6 mM and 2 M GdnHCl. Inclusion bodies were used in O.D. (A600nm) of 0.5. After refolding process, dialysis was performed at pH 7.0. The final yield of obtaining soluble NXH8 was 40% (28,6 mg of soluble NXH8/L of culture medium). The refolding of Bothropstoxin 1 was obtained in refolding buffer of Tris HCl 50 mM, pH 7,5 with proportion of 2 GSH: GSSG 3 and concentration of 3 mM and 1 M GdnHCl. Use with a suspension of O.D. (A600nm) of 0.5. The final yield of recovery of Bothropstoxin 1 refolded was 32% (9,2 mg of refolded Bothropstoxin 1/L of culture medium). The refolding of Natterin 2 was performed in the refolding buffer: 20 mM Tris HCl pH 9.0 at a ratio of 2 GSH: 3GSSG and concentration of 10 mM and 1 M GdnHCl and inclusion bodies O.D. (A600nm) of 6.0. The yield of Natterin 2 refolded was 20% (3,7 mg/L of culture medium). Physico-chemical and biological analysis were performed by SDS-PAGE, western blot, scanning electron microscopy, biological tests in vivo and in vitro and structural. The analysis conducted in NXH8 did not show

  11. Alpha-Crystallin: The Quest For A Homogeneous Quaternary Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Alpha A and alpha B crystallins are key members of the small heat-shock protein family. In addition to being a major structural protein of the lens, they are constitutively found in many other cells, where their function to is not completely understood. Alpha B crystallin is also known to be over-expressed in many neurological diseases. To date, all efforts to crystallize alpha A or alpha B have failed. Thus, high-resolution data on the tertiary and quaternary structure of alpha crystallin is not available. The main reason for this failure seems to be the polydisperse nature of alpha crystallin. This review deals mainly with the polydisperse properties of alpha crystallin and the influence of post-translational modification, chemical modifications, truncations and mutation on its quaternary structure. PMID:18703051

  12. Crystalline systems. [Book chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, L.D.

    The use of two double resonance methods, electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) in the study of free radicals in solids is reviewed. Included are descriptions of how crystalline-phase ENDOR is used to determine small hyperfine splittings, quadrupoly couplings, and reaction mechanisms or radical formation and how crystalline phase ELDOR is used to determine large hyperfine splittings, to identify radicals with large quadrupole moments and to study spin exchange processes. The complementary role played by the ENDOR and ELDOR spectroscopy in the separation of overlapping EPR spectra, in the study of proton-deuterium exchange, in the study of methyl groups undergoing tunneling rotation, and in the determination of the rates of intermolecular motion are dealt with. 13 figures, 1 table. (DP)

  13. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  14. Investigation of the phase morphology of bacterial PHA inclusion bodies by contrast variation SANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, R.A. [ANSTO Institute for Environmental Research, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: robert.russell@ansto.gov.au; Holden, P.J. [ANSTO Institute for Environmental Research, NSW 2234 (Australia); Garvey, C.J. [ANSTO Institute for Environmental Research, NSW 2234 (Australia); Wilde, K.L. [ANSTO Institute for Environmental Research, NSW 2234 (Australia); Hammerton, K.M. [ANSTO Institute for Environmental Research, NSW 2234 (Australia); Foster, L.J. [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, UNSW, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    Under growth-limiting conditions, many bacteria are able to metabolise excess organic acids into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and store these polymers as intracellular inclusions until the return of favourable conditions. Various models have been proposed for the macromolecular organisation of the boundary layer surrounding the polymer, and contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study its organisation. Inclusions formed by Pseudomonas oleovorans under hydrogenating conditions showed lowest scattering intensity at ca. 20% D{sub 2}O. The inclusions consist of protein and membrane lipids in the boundary layer and polyhydroxyoctanoate (lipid) in the inclusion body. At 20% D{sub 2}O the contributions of lipids were contrast matched with the solvent, indicating that lipids contributed the bulk of the scattering intensity observed at other D{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O ratios. These results are inconsistent with a model of the boundary layer which proposed outer and inner layers of crystalline protein lattice sandwiching a membrane lipid membrane layer [E.S. Stuart, R.W. Lenz, R.C. Fuller, Can J Microbiol 41(Suppl 1) (1995) 84-93], and is more consistent with a model consisting of a lipid monolayer containing embedded proteins [U. Pieper-furst, M.H. Madkour, F. Mayer, A. Steinbuchel, J. Bacteriol. 176 (1994) 4328-4337.] By altering the H/D content of the precursors, we were able to collect SANS data from preparations of both deuterated and H/D copolymer inclusions, where initial PHA produced was hydrogenated followed by deuteration. Deuterated inclusions showed minimum intensity above 90% D{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O whereas the sequentially produced copolymer (assumed to be in a core/shell arrangement) displayed minimum scattering some 20% lower, which is consistent with the increased hydrogenation of the boundary layer expected from its synthesis during supply of hydrogenated followed by deuterated precursors.

  15. Investigation of the phase morphology of bacterial PHA inclusion bodies by contrast variation SANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, R. A.; Holden, P. J.; Garvey, C. J.; Wilde, K. L.; Hammerton, K. M.; Foster, L. J.

    2006-11-01

    Under growth-limiting conditions, many bacteria are able to metabolise excess organic acids into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and store these polymers as intracellular inclusions until the return of favourable conditions. Various models have been proposed for the macromolecular organisation of the boundary layer surrounding the polymer, and contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study its organisation. Inclusions formed by Pseudomonas oleovorans under hydrogenating conditions showed lowest scattering intensity at ca. 20% D 2O. The inclusions consist of protein and membrane lipids in the boundary layer and polyhydroxyoctanoate (lipid) in the inclusion body. At 20% D 2O the contributions of lipids were contrast matched with the solvent, indicating that lipids contributed the bulk of the scattering intensity observed at other D 2O/H 2O ratios. These results are inconsistent with a model of the boundary layer which proposed outer and inner layers of crystalline protein lattice sandwiching a membrane lipid membrane layer [E.S. Stuart, R.W. Lenz, R.C. Fuller, Can J Microbiol 41(Suppl 1) (1995) 84-93], and is more consistent with a model consisting of a lipid monolayer containing embedded proteins [U. Pieper-furst, M.H. Madkour, F. Mayer, A. Steinbuchel, J. Bacteriol. 176 (1994) 4328-4337.] By altering the H/D content of the precursors, we were able to collect SANS data from preparations of both deuterated and H/D copolymer inclusions, where initial PHA produced was hydrogenated followed by deuteration. Deuterated inclusions showed minimum intensity above 90% D 2O/H 2O whereas the sequentially produced copolymer (assumed to be in a core/shell arrangement) displayed minimum scattering some 20% lower, which is consistent with the increased hydrogenation of the boundary layer expected from its synthesis during supply of hydrogenated followed by deuterated precursors.

  16. Inclusions in DKDP crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The shape and the size of inclusions in DKDP crystal have been observed and measured microscopically.Three kinds of inclusions were found and the components of the inclusions were measured. The formation mechanisms were proposed and discussed.``

  17. Estimation of the standardized ileal digestible valine to lysine ratio required for 25- to 120-kilogram pigs fed low crude protein diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X T; Ma, W F; Zeng, X F; Xie, C Y; Thacker, P A; Htoo, J K; Qiao, S Y

    2015-10-01

    Four 28-d experiments were conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestible (SID) valine (Val) to lysine (Lys) ratio required for 26- to 46- (Exp. 1), 49- to 70- (Exp. 2), 71- to 92- (Exp. 3), and 94- to 119-kg (Exp. 4) pigs fed low CP diets supplemented with crystalline AA. The first 3 experiments utilized 150 pigs (Duroc × Landrace × Large White), while Exp. 4 utilized 90 finishing pigs. Pigs in all 4 experiments were randomly allocated to 1 of 5 diets with 6 pens per treatment (3 pens of barrows and 3 pens of gilts) and 5 pigs per pen for the first 3 experiments and 3 pigs per pen for Exp. 4. Diets for all experiments were formulated to contain SID Val to Lys ratios of 0.55, 0.60, 0.65, 0.70, or 0.75. In Exp. 1 (26 to 46 kg), ADG increased (linear, = 0.039; quadratic, = 0.042) with an increasing dietary Val:Lys ratio. The SID Val:Lys ratio to maximize ADG was 0.62 using a linear broken-line model and 0.71 using a quadratic model. In Exp. 2 (49 to 70 kg), ADG increased (linear, = 0.021; quadratic, = 0.042) as the SID Val:Lys ratio increased. G:F improved (linear, = 0.039) and serum urea nitrogen (SUN) decreased (linear, = 0.021; quadratic, = 0.024) with an increased SID Val:Lys ratio. The SID Val:Lys ratios to maximize ADG as well as to minimize SUN levels were 0.67 and 0.65, respectively, using a linear broken-line model and 0.72 and 0.71, respectively, using a quadratic model. In Exp. 3 (71 to 92 kg), ADG increased (linear, = 0.007; quadratic, = 0.022) and SUN decreased (linear, = 0.011; quadratic, = 0.034) as the dietary SID Val:Lys ratio increased. The SID Val:Lys ratios to maximize ADG as well as to minimize SUN levels were 0.67 and 0.67, respectively, using a linear broken-line model and 0.72 and 0.74, respectively, using a quadratic model. In Exp. 4 (94 to 119 kg), ADG increased (linear, = 0.041) and G:F was improved (linear, = 0.004; quadratic, = 0.005) as the dietary SID Val:Lys ratio increased. The SID Val:Lys ratio to maximize G:F was 0

  18. Homology models of human gamma-crystallins: structural study of the extensive charge network in gamma-crystallins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Asmat; Zaidi, Zafar H

    2003-01-17

    The lens is composed of highly stable and long-lived proteins, the crystallins which are divided into alpha-, beta-, and gamma-crystallins. Human gamma-crystallins belong to the betagamma superfamily. A large number of gamma-crystallins have been sequenced and have been found to share remarkable sequence homology with each other. Some of the gamma-crystallins from various sources have also been elucidated structurally by X-ray crystallographic or NMR spectroscopic experiments. Their three-dimensional structures are also similar having consisted of two domains each possessing two Greek key motifs. In this study we have constructed the comparative or homology models of the four major human gamma-crystallins, gammaA-,gammaB-, gammaC-, and gammaD-crystallins and studied the charge network in these crystallins. Despite an overall structural similarity between these crystallins, differences in the ion pair formation do exist which is partly due to the differences in their primary sequence and partly due to the structural orientation of the neighboring amino acids. In this study, we present an elaborate analysis of these charged interactions and their formation or loss with respect to the structural changes.

  19. Crystalline mesoporous metal oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo Yue; Wuzong Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of many types of mesoporous silicas, such as SBA-15, KIT-6, FDU-12 and SBA-16, porous crystalline transition metal oxides, such as Cr2O3, Co3O4, In2O3, NiO, CeO2, WO3, Fe2O3 and MnO2, have been synthesized using the mesoporous silicas as hard templates. Several synthetic methods have been developed. These new porous materials have high potential applications in catalysis, Li-ion rechargeable batteries and gas sensors. This article gives a brief review of the research of porous crystals of metal oxides in the last four years.

  20. Pointlike Inclusion Interactions in Tubular Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid, Afshin; Idema, Timon

    2016-09-01

    Membrane tubes and tubular networks are ubiquitous in living cells. Inclusions like proteins are vital for both the stability and the dynamics of such networks. These inclusions interact via the curvature deformations they impose on the membrane. We analytically study the resulting membrane mediated interactions in strongly curved tubular membranes. We model inclusions as constraints coupled to the curvature tensor of the membrane tube. First, as special test cases, we analyze the interaction between ring- and rod-shaped inclusions. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we further show how pointlike inclusions interact to form linear aggregates. To minimize the curvature energy of the membrane, inclusions self-assemble into either line- or ringlike patterns. Our results show that the global curvature of the membrane strongly affects the interactions between proteins embedded in it, and can lead to the spontaneous formation of biologically relevant structures.

  1. Limits to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  2. Limits to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  3. Social imaginaries and inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this entry is to introduce inclusion as a sociological concept consistent with which exclusion is an internal part of inclusion. When exclusion is the basis of inclusion, the establishment of communities will always involve both inclusion and exclusion processes. Similarly......, the development of inclusive schools and inclusive learning environments will involve both inclusion and exclusion processes. With this starting point, international educational research knowledge about inclusive schools and inclusive learning environments in general will be related to the fundamental dilemma...... that inclusion on the one hand may be seen to be about human rights, solidarity, and democracy, and on the other hand, it is about ensuring the cohesion of neoliberal society by means of every person’s obligation to realize one’s potential through learning, development, and education regardless of one’s needs...

  4. Index of Financial Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Mandira Sarma

    2008-01-01

    The promotion of an inclusive financial system is considered a policy priority in many countries. While the importance of financial inclusion is widely recognized, the literature lacks a comprehensive measure that can be used to measure the extent of financial inclusion across economies. This paper attempts to fill this gap by proposing an index of financial inclusion (IFI). The IFI is a multi-dimensional index that captures information on various dimensions of financial inclusion in one sing...

  5. Liquid crystalline order in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Blumstein, Alexandre

    1978-01-01

    Liquid Crystalline Order in Polymers examines the topic of liquid crystalline order in systems containing rigid synthetic macromolecular chains. Each chapter of the book provides a review of one important area of the field. Chapter 1 discusses scattering in polymer systems with liquid crystalline order. It also introduces the field of liquid crystals. Chapter 2 treats the origin of liquid crystalline order in macromolecules by describing the in-depth study of conformation of such macromolecules in their unassociated state. The chapters that follow describe successively the liquid crystalli

  6. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper-Krom, S.; Juenemann, K.; Jansen, A.H.; Wiemhoefer, A.; van den Nieuwendijk, R.; Smith, D.L.; Hink, M.A.; Bates, G.P.; Overkleeft, H.; Ovaa, H.; Reits, E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that th

  7. Protein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  8. COLD DRAWING IN CRYSTALLINE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    alcohols, phenol) in Nylon 6 produced changes in the crystalline structure as well as plasticizer action; these two effects must therefore be carefully...distinguished. Changes in the crystalline structure were followed by changes in the infrared spectrum. Dynamic mechanical and thermogravimetric analysis

  9. Crystalline Bioceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A strong interest in the use of ceramics for biomedical engineering applications developed in the late 1960´s. Used initially as alternatives to metallic materials in order to increase the biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics; bioactive or surface reactive bioceramics and bioresorbable ceramics. This review will only refer to bioceramics “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials constituted for nonmetallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidated by thermal treatments of powders to high temperatures. Leaving bioglasses, glass-ceramics and biocements apart, since, although all of them are obtained by thermal treatments to high temperatures, the first are amorphous, the second are obtained by desvitrification of a glass and in them vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases and the third are consolidated by means of a hydraulic or chemical reaction to room temperature. A review of the composition, physiochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of crystalline bioceramics is given, based on the literature data and on the own experience of the authors.

    A finales de los años sesenta se despertó un gran interés por el uso de los materiales cerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. Inicialmente utilizados como una alternativa a los materiales metálicos, con el propósito de incrementar la biocompatibilidad de los implantes, las biocerámicas se han convertido en una clase diversa de biomateriales, incluyendo actualmente tres tipos: cerámicas cuasi inertes; cerámicas bioactivas o reactivas superficialmente y cerámicas reabsorbibles o biodegradables. En la presente revisión se hace referencia a las biocerámicas en sentido estricto, es decir, a aquellos materiales constitutitos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados

  10. Foresighting for Inclusive Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Andersen, Allan; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    We propose that foresight can contribute to inclusive development by making innovation policy processes more inclusive, which in turn makes innovation systems more inclusive. Processes of developing future-oriented innovation policies are often unsuccessful and rarely inclusive. We conceptualize ...... and processes in two foresight cases in two emerging economies - Brazil and South Korea. Although the research is exploratory and the results tentative, the empirical studies support our main propositions....

  11. Inclusion : Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Wiebren S.; Otten, Sabine; van der Zee, Karen I.; Jans, Lise

    In the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal

  12. Inclusion: Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, W.S.; Otten, S.; Van der Zee, K.I.; Jans, L.

    2014-01-01

    n the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal

  13. Inclusion: Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansens, Wiebren S.; Otten, Sabine; van der Zee, Karen; Jans, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal

  14. Inclusive Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Mohammad Tariq; Burnip, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on inclusive education in Bangladesh for children with special needs. Bangladesh is not behind other developed countries in enacting laws and declarations in favour of inclusive education, but a lack of resources is the main barrier in implementing inclusive education. Special education and integrated education models exist in…

  15. Footstep towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Faiza; Zafar, Aneeka; Naz, Tayyaba

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive education is a rising trend in the world. The first step towards inclusive education is providing the awareness to the general education teachers. This study focused to investigate the general education teachers of primary and secondary level awareness about the special education and inclusive education. This study is descriptive method…

  16. Towards Inclusive Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, K. Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Social inclusion is the process that will enable every person in society to participate in normal activities of societies they live in, including education, employment, public services and social recreational activities. For the development of an inclusive society, preparation of younger generation also needs to be inclusive. Our schools must…

  17. Inclusion in Middle Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Derrick; Ashley, Mandi; Hayes, Brandalyn

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to provide school districts within Tennessee with more research about how weekly hours of inclusion impact student achievement. Specifically, researchers examined which models of inclusion were in use in two school districts in Tennessee, administrators' and teachers' perceptions of inclusion, and whether or…

  18. Inclusion: Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansens, Wiebren S.; Otten, Sabine; Zee, van der Karen I.; Jans, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal disti

  19. Inclusion: Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, W.S.; Otten, S.; Van der Zee, K.I.; Jans, L.

    2014-01-01

    n the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal distin

  20. Inclusion : Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Wiebren S.; Otten, Sabine; van der Zee, Karen I.; Jans, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal disti

  1. Level of PICALM, a key component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is correlated with levels of phosphotau and autophagy-related proteins and is associated with tau inclusions in AD, PSP and Pick disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Kunie; Tomimura, Karen; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Suain, Valérie; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Ndjim, Marième; Vergara, Cristina; Belkouch, Mounir; Potier, Marie-Claude; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in PICALM, a key component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery, have been identified as genetic susceptibility loci for late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). We previously reported that PICALM protein levels were decreased in AD brains and that PICALM was co-localised with neurofibrillary tangles in LOAD, familial AD with PSEN1 mutations and Down syndrome. In the present study, we analysed PICALM expression, cell localisation and association with pathological cellular inclusions in other tauopathies and in non-tau related neurodegenerative diseases. We observed that PICALM was associated with neuronal tau pathology in Pick disease and in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and co-localised with both 3R and 4R tau positive inclusions unlike in corticobasal degeneration (CBD) or in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)-MAPT P301L. PICALM immunoreactivities were not detected in tau-positive tufted astrocytes in PSP, astrocytic plaques in CBD, Lewy bodies in Lewy body disease, diffuse type (LBD) and in TDP-43-positive inclusions in FTLD. In the frontal cortex in tauopathies, the ratio of insoluble to soluble PICALM was increased while the level of soluble PICALM was decreased and was inversely correlated with the level of phosphotau. PICALM decrease was also significantly correlated with increased LC3-II and decreased Beclin-1 levels in tauopathies and in non-tau related neurodegenerative diseases. These results suggest that there is a close relationship between abnormal PICALM processing, tau pathology and impairment of autophagy in human neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Bietti crystalline dystrophy Bietti crystalline dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a disorder in which numerous ...

  3. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Crystalline and Non-Crystalline Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parrott, Edward P. J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy of crystalline and non-crystalline solids is probably one of the most active research fields within the terahertz community. Many potential applications, amongst which spectral recognition is probably one of the most prominent, have significantly stimulated the development...... selected examples, the potential the technique holds for various different applications. A particular focus will be given to data analysis and, in particular, how we may account for effects resulting from non-ideal sample preparation....

  4. Amorphization of Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline ice by irradiation in the 10-50 K temperature range with 5 keV electrons at a dose of ~140 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. Our experiments showed that some of the 1.65-micrometer band survived the irradiation, to a degree that depends on the temperature, demonstrating that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. At 50 K, recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most known objects in the solar system, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites, and Kuiper belt objects, are equal to or above 50 K, this might explain why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

  5. Liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the recent developments in the field of liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes. The role of trivalent lanthanide ions as the central metal ion in metallomesogens is considered. An outlook for the future is given.

  6. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.

    2012-01-01

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso-

  7. Inclusion of protein hydrolysates in the diet of white seabream (Diplodus sargus) larvae: impacts on skeleton quality and larvae proteome expression

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of dietary protein hydrolysate on larval skeleton quality and larvae proteome expression, triplicate groups of white seabream (Diplodus sargus) larvae were co-fed from first-feeding onwards with live feed and three microencapsulated diets ir differing only on the molecular weight of their protein hydrolysate fraction.

  8. Administration of Poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and Avian Beta Defensin as Adjuvants in Inactivated Inclusion Body Hepatitis Virus and its Hexon Protein-Based Experimental Vaccine Formulations in Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Arshud; Tipu, Masroor; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andy; Gerdts, Volker; Tikoo, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) is one of the major infectious diseases adversely affecting the poultry industry of the United States and Canada. Currently, no effective and safe vaccine is available for the control of IBH virus (IBHV) infection in chickens. However, based on the excellent safety and immunogenic profiles of experimental veterinary vaccines developed with the use of new generation adjuvants, we hypothesized that characterization of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV or its capsid protein hexon as antigens, along with poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and avian beta defensin 2 (ABD2) as vaccine adjuvants, will be helpful in development of an effective and safe vaccine formulation for IBH. Our data demonstrated that experimental administration of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV and a mixture of PCEP with or without ABD2 as an adjuvant induced significantly higher antibody responses compared with other vaccine formulations, while hexon protein-based vaccine formulations showed relatively lower levels of antibody responses. Thus, a vaccine formulation containing inactivated IBHV with PCEP or a mixture of PCEP and ABD2 (with a reduced dosage of PCEP) as an adjuvant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate. However, in order to overcome the risks associated with whole virus inactivated vaccines, characterization of additional viral capsid proteins, including fiber protein and penton of IBHV along with hexon protein in combination with more new generation adjuvants, will be helpful in further improvements of vaccines against IBHV infection.

  9. Congenital cataract causing mutants of αA-crystallin/sHSP form aggregates and aggresomes degraded through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilangovan Raju

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations of human αA-crystallin cause congenital cataract by protein aggregation. How mutations of αA-crystallin cause disease pathogenesis through protein aggregation is not well understood. To better understand the cellular events leading to protein aggregation, we transfected cataract causing mutants, R12C, R21L, R21W, R49C, R54C, R116C and R116H, of human αA-crystallin in HeLa cells and examined the formation of intracellular protein aggregates and aggresomes by confocal microscopy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: YFP-tagged human αA-wild-type (αA-wt was sub-cloned and the mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. The αA-wt and the mutants were individually transfected or co-transfected with CFP-tagged αA-wt or αB-wild-type (αB-wt in HeLa cells. Overexpression of these mutants forms multiple small dispersed cytoplasmic aggregates as well as aggresomes. Co-expression of αB-wt with these mutants significantly inhibited protein aggregates where as co-expression with αA-wt enhanced protein aggregates which seems to be due to co-aggregation of the mutants with αA-wt. Aggresomes were validated by double immunofluorescence by co-localization of γ-tubulin, a centrosome marker protein with αA-crystallin. Furthermore, increased ubiquitination was detected in R21W, R116C and R116H as assessed by western blot analyses. Immunostaining with an ubiquitin antibody revealed that ubiquitin inclusions in the perinuclear regions were evident only in R116C transfected cells. Pulse chase assay, after cycloheximide treatment, suggested that R116C degraded faster than the wild-type control. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mutants of αA-crystallin form aggregates and aggresomes. Co-expression of αA-wt with the mutants increased aggregates and co-expression of αB-wt with the mutants significantly decreased the aggregates. The mutant, R116C protein degraded faster than wild-type control and increased ubiquitination was evident in R

  10. PhaP Is Involved in the Formation of a Network on the Surface of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Inclusions in Cupriavidus necator H16▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Douglas; Sein, Vicki; Martinez, Edgar; Augustine, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) inclusions are polymeric storage inclusions formed in some bacterial species when carbon levels are high but levels of another essential nutrient, such as nitrogen, are low. Though much is known about PHA synthesis, little is known about inclusion structure. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to elucidate the structure of PHA inclusions at the nanoscale level, including the characterization of different layers of structure. AFM data suggest that underneath the inclusion envelope, there is a 2- to 4-nm-thick network layer that resides on top of a harder layer that is likely to be a crystalline lamellar polymer. The network is comprised of ∼20-nm-wide linear segments and junctions that are typically formed by the joining of three to four of the linear segments. In some cases, ∼50-nm globular structures that are raised ∼1 to 2 nm above the network are present at the junctions. These globular structures always have a central pore that is ∼15 nm in diameter. To determine if the major surface protein of PHA inclusions, PhaP, is involved in the structure of this network, inclusions from Cupriavidus necator H16 ΔphaP were examined. No network structure was detected. Instead, apparently random globular structures were found on the surfaces of the inclusions. When PhaP levels were reconstituted in this strain by the addition of phaP on a plasmid, the network was also reconstituted, albeit in a slightly different arrangement from that of the wild-type network. We conclude that PhaP participates in the formation of the inclusion network. PMID:17981962

  11. Recent Progress in Renaturation of Inclusion Bodies of Prokaryotically Expressed Snake Venom Proteins%蛇毒蛋白原核表达包涵体复性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓飞; 裴剑竹; 杜国俊; 杨章民

    2011-01-01

    Insoluble, inactive inclusion bodies are often fomed during prokaryotic expression of foreign genes. The formation of these deposits represents a major obstacle for the production of biologically active proteins for further investigation and application. However, after solubilization, isolation and refolding under suitable condition, inclusion bodies can convert to active proteins in vitro. So far, about eighteen snake venom proteins of eleven species in Viperidae and Elapidae (including metalloproteinases, phospholipase A2s, β-Bungarotoxin,cardiotoxins, serine proteases, nerve growth factors, C-type lectins) have been expressed in E. coli and successfully refolded by means of dilution, dialysis or chromatography. The refolding techniques for inclusion bodies of prokaryotically expressed snake venom proteins is summarized.%外源基因在大肠杆菌中表达后常形成不溶性的无活性包涵体.包涵体的形成已经成为研究和应用活性蛋白质生产的主要障碍.然而,在合适的条件下,包涵体经过溶解、纯化、复性过程后可在体外重新折叠成有活性的蛋白质.迄今,已对蝰科、眼镜蛇科11种毒蛇的18个基因(包括金属蛋白酶、PLA2、β-银环蛇毒素、心脏素素、丝氨酸蛋白酶、神经生长因子、C-型凝集素等)成功进行了原核表达,采用稀释复性、透析复性和层析复性三种方法成功进行了包涵体复性.着重就蛇毒蛋白原核表达后包涵体复性所用的方法予以综述.

  12. Foresighting for Inclusive Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Allan Dahl; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2017-01-01

    We propose that foresight can contribute to inclusive development by making innovation systems more inclusive. Processes of developing future oriented innovation policies are often unsuccessful and rarely inclusive. We conceptualize such processes as foresighting. We focus on how the ex-ante design...... of policymaking processes affects the actual process with a focus on inclusion, and we discuss how it affects policy effectiveness and innovation system transformation. Our argument is that processes of policymaking must be inclusive to affect and transform innovation systems because a set of distributed actors......, rather than ministries and innovation agencies, is the gatekeepers of change. From this perspective, inclusion is a precondition rather than an obstacle for transformation. Based on the notion of innovation system foresight, we develop an analytical framework that we use to study design and processes...

  13. Bott periodicity of inclusions

    CERN Document Server

    Mare, Augustin-Liviu

    2011-01-01

    When looking at Bott's original proof of his periodicity theorem for the stable homotopy groups of the orthogonal and unitary groups, one sees in the background a differential geometric periodicity phenomenon. We show that this geometric phenomenon extends to the standard inclusion of the orthogonal group into the unitary group. This explains the periodicity of the group homomorphisms between stable homotopy groups which are induced by the inclusion map. Standard inclusions between other classical Riemannian symmetric spaces are also discussed.

  14. Recombinant Rhipicephalus appendiculatus gut (Ra86 and salivary gland cement (Trp64 proteins as candidate antigens for inclusion in tick vaccines: protective effects of Ra86 on infestation with adult R. appendiculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saimo M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Saimo1,2,*, David O Odongo3,4,*, Stephen Mwaura3, Just M Vlak1, Anthony J Musoke5, George W Lubega2, Richard P Bishop3, Monique M van Oers11Laboratory of Virology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands; 2School of Veterinary Medicine, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; 3International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya; 4School of Biological Sciences, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya; 5Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Onderstepoort, Pretoria, South Africa *These two authors made an equal contribution to this workAbstract: Rhipicephalus appendiculatus gut protein Ra86 (variants Ra85A and Ra92A and the salivary gland cement protein (Trp64 were expressed in the baculovirus-insect cell system. The recombinant gut proteins expressed as soluble proteins and the recombinant cement protein, as insoluble inclusion bodies, were used to immunize rabbits, which were then challenged with larval, nymphal, and adult stages of R. appendiculatus ticks. High tick mortality (23.3% occurred on adult ticks that fed on rabbits vaccinated with the gut proteins, compared with 1.9% mortality in ticks that fed on unvaccinated naïve control rabbits. The mean weight of engorged female ticks was significantly reduced by 31.5% in rabbits vaccinated with the Ra86 recombinant protein compared with controls, as was egg production. Marked effects on these parameters were also observed in adult ticks as a result from vaccination using Trp64, but these were not statistically significant. For both antigens, there was no demonstrable effect on larval or nymphal ticks. This study demonstrates for the first time the protective efficacy of a homolog of Boophilus microplus Bm86 in reducing tick infestation by the adult stage of the three-host tick R. appendiculatus. The results demonstrate the potential of Ra86 for vaccine development against this tick and for the control of East Coast fever.Keywords: baculovirus, Ra85A, Ra92A, Boophilus

  15. Inclusion of mPRISM potential for polymer-induced protein interactions enables modeling of second osmotic virial coefficients in aqueous polymer-salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhut, Marcel; Brandenbusch, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of therapeutic proteins is a challenging task. Key information needed to estimate applicable workup strategies (e.g. crystallization) are the interactions of the proteins with other components in solution. This information can be deduced from the second osmotic virial coefficient B22 , measurable by static light scattering. Thermodynamic models are very valuable for predicting B22 data for different process conditions and thus decrease the experimental effort. Available B22 models consider aqueous salt solutions but fail for the prediction of B22 if an additional polymer is present in solution. This is due to the fact that depending on the polymer concentration protein-protein interactions are not rectified as assumed within these models. In this work, we developed an extension of the xDLVO model to predict B22 data of proteins in aqueous polymer-salt solutions. To show the broad applicability of the model, lysozyme, γ-globulin and D-xylose ketol isomerase in aqueous salt solution containing polyethylene glycol were considered. For all proteins considered, the modified xDLVO model was able to predict the experimentally observed non-monotonical course in B22 data with high accuracy. When used in an early stage in process development, the model will contribute to an efficient and cost effective downstream processing development.

  16. [Research progress in relative crystallin genes of congenital cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D D; Yang, H J; Yi, J L

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cataract is the common cause of visual disability in children. Nearly one third of congenital cataract cases may have a related genetic mutation. With the development of molecular genetics, especially gentechnik, more and more genes, such as crystallin genes, membrane protein genes, eytoskeletal protein genes and regulatory protein genes have been confirmed to participate in the process of congenital cataract. Furthermore, crystallin genes account for most of these genes and the crystallin has the highest amount of the whole protein in lens.It has been found that nearly one hundred mutations in crystallin genes are associated with the onset of congenital cataract. Researchers are exploring how these mutations further affect the function of cellular biology and eventually lead to cataract. Although more and more research results gradually reveal the pathogenesis of congenital cataract from the level of gene and protein, the specific pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent progression about inherited congenital cataract related with crysallin genes is summarized in this review.

  17. Measuring Attitudes Toward Inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Kunz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The considerable worldwide demand for an inclusive education system has driven Switzerland to reconsider the approach of segregated schooling for children with Special Educational Needs (SEN. Recently, an agreement was signed among the states with the intention to adopt a more inclusive practice in school. There is evidence suggesting that an inclusive practice established at policy level is not enough, as many times it becomes teacher’s effort to translate the policies in classroom setting. The effectiveness of inclusive practices can be tightly related to the attitude of teachers, parents and students to inclusion of children with SEN in mainstreaming classes. Attitude towards inclusion is an observable construct but it presents difficulties in terms of measurement. For this purpose, in order to evaluate the attitude to inclusion of teachers, parents and students, an American Scale, the 11-items Parent Attitude to Inclusion (Palmer et al., 1998a, 1998b, 2001 and the version for teachers (Stanley, Grimbeek, Bryer, Beamisch, 2003; Bryer, Grimbeek, Beamish, Stanley, 2004, has been slightly modified and translated into German language. The resulting scales have been used to collect data in Switzerland in two regions. Results show that the German version of the scale can be potentially used for reliable measurement of attitudes toward inclusion in German speaking countries.

  18. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  19. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  20. MULTIDIMENSIONALITY OF INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Semenovskikh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the phenomenon of "multidime nsionality of inclusion", which is considered by the author  in  two  dimensions:  "vertical"  and  "horizontal". "Vertical" dimensional model includes five fu ndamental systems functioning inclusive society: social, economic, institutional, territorial and symbolic. "Horizontal" multidimensionality of inclusion – the inclusion of a person in group activities, his su bjective feeling. The author gives a classification of socio-cultural markers of inclusion in University of Tyumen, with an emphasis on availability and motivation of quality education, additional educational opportunities,  professional  training  (described  by the course "Tutor in inclusive education". The tutor in the inclusive educational environment – the person  having  the  higher  vocational  education  in  the field of special pedagogy and psychology; experience  of  pedagogical,  practical  activities  with  persons with limited opportunities of health; having practical  ideas  of  those  spheres  of  activity  which have a direct bearing on their training. The tutor in inclusion is the reflexive and reflexing personality understanding and holding a framework of the pr ofessional activity. The tutor, during the work with the resource card of the person is also neutral. "The multidimensionality of inclusion" is a metaphor, the translational motion vector from inclusive education to inclusive society.

  1. Inclusive Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Mike

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the theme of inclusion. Inclusion is one of the themes within the recent Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) publication: "Engaging mathematics for all learners" and the author had the good fortune to participate in this project. This involved working with five schools which, frivolously, all had a…

  2. Understanding Inclusion in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamas, Christoforos

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for understanding inclusion in Cyprus. The evidence base is the result of a six-month qualitative research study in five Cypriot mainstream primary schools. Despite the rhetoric in favour of inclusion, it seems that the Cypriot educational system is still highly segregating in its philosophy and does not fully…

  3. What Counts as Inclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, E.; Nel, N.

    2012-01-01

    In the years since the publication in South Africa of White Paper Six: Special needs education (Department of Education (DoE) 2001) various schools in the state and independent sectors have begun to implement inclusive policies and practices. With reference to the Guidelines for full-service/inclusive schools issued in 2009, and by discussing a…

  4. Understanding Inclusion in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamas, Christoforos

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for understanding inclusion in Cyprus. The evidence base is the result of a six-month qualitative research study in five Cypriot mainstream primary schools. Despite the rhetoric in favour of inclusion, it seems that the Cypriot educational system is still highly segregating in its philosophy and does not fully…

  5. Towards Inclusive Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Mel

    1997-01-01

    Uses classroom vignettes to examine reasons why schools in the United Kingdom are not yet generally successful in including students with disabilities and suggests simple ways that ordinary teachers can implement inclusive practices. These include the importance of teamwork, a school climate which encourages inclusive practices, and teacher…

  6. Index for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allister

    2005-01-01

    Index for Inclusion is a programme to assist in developing learning and participation in schools. It was written by Tony Booth and Mel Ainscow from the Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education, UK. Central Normal School was pleased to have the opportunity to trial this programme.

  7. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  8. Crystalline 'Genes' in Metallic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yang; Ye, Zhuo; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Ott, Ryan T; Kramer, M J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The underlying structural order that transcends the liquid, glass and crystalline states is identified using an efficient genetic algorithm (GA). GA identifies the most common energetically favorable packing motif in crystalline structures close to the alloy's Al-10 at.% Sm composition. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid structures using a cluster-alignment method which reveals the average topology. Conventional descriptions of the short-range order, such as Voronoi tessellation, are too rigid in their analysis of the configurational poly-types when describing the chemical and topological ordering during transition from undercooled metallic liquids to crystalline phases or glass. Our approach here brings new insight into describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter physics.

  9. Positronium diffusion in crystalline polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, J. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-12-16

    The analysis in four components of the positron lifetime spectra of nine different and structurally well characterised lamellar polyethylene samples has allowed to associate the two longest-lived components to positronium annihilation in the crystalline and amorphous phases. Further assumption on positronium tunneling through the interface between both phases, and a simple geometrical model, led to a value for the positronium diffusion coefficient in the crystalline phase of the order of 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2}/s. Interfaces have thicknesses around 1.5 nm and are shallow traps for positronium. (orig.).

  10. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  11. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  12. Location of catalase in crystalline peroxisomes of methanol-grown Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, Ineke; Roggenkamp, Rainer; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the intraperoxisomal location of catalase in peroxisomes of methanol-grown Hansenula polymorpha by (immuno)cytochemical means. In completely crystalline peroxisomes, in which the crystalline matrix is composed of octameric alcohol oxidase (AO) molecules, most of the catalase protein

  13. Effect of inclusion of different levels of silage on rumen microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers fed on rice straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Truong Giang Nguyen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Leucaena leucocephala (Leucaena is a perennial tropical legume that can be directly grazed or harvested and offered to ruminants as hay, silage, or fresh. However, Leucaena contain phenolic compounds, which are considered anti-nutritional factors as these may reduce intake, digestibility and thus animal performance. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to determine effects of Leucaena silage (LS feeding levels on rumen microbial populations, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers. Methods Four, rumen fistulated dairy steers with initial weight of 167±12 kg were randomly assigned to receive dietary treatments according to a 4×4 Latin square design. Treatments were as followings: T1 = untreated rice straw (RS; Control, T2 = 70% RS+30% LS, T3 = 40% RS+60% LS, and T4 = 100% LS. Dairy steers were fed rice straw and LS ad libitum and supplemented with concentrate at 0.2% of body weight/d. Results Results revealed that the rumen microbial population, especially cellulolytic, proteolytic bacteria and fungal zoospores were enhanced in steers that received 60% of LS (p0.05. Protozoal population was linearly decreased with increasing level of LS (p<0.05. Moreover, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis were enhanced by LS feeding (p<0.05 and were the highest in 60% LS group. Conclusion Based on this study, it could be concluded that replacement of RS with 60% LS significantly improved microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in diary steers.

  14. Effect of inclusion of different levels of Leucaena silage on rumen microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers fed on rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien Truong Giang; Wanapat, Metha; Phesatcha, Kampanat; Kang, Sungchhang

    2017-02-01

    Leucaena leucocephala (Leucaena) is a perennial tropical legume that can be directly grazed or harvested and offered to ruminants as hay, silage, or fresh. However, Leucaena contain phenolic compounds, which are considered anti-nutritional factors as these may reduce intake, digestibility and thus animal performance. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to determine effects of Leucaena silage (LS) feeding levels on rumen microbial populations, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers. Four, rumen fistulated dairy steers with initial weight of 167±12 kg were randomly assigned to receive dietary treatments according to a 4×4 Latin square design. Treatments were as followings: T1 = untreated rice straw (RS; Control), T2 = 70% RS+30% LS, T3 = 40% RS+60% LS, and T4 = 100% LS. Dairy steers were fed rice straw and LS ad libitum and supplemented with concentrate at 0.2% of body weight/d. Results revealed that the rumen microbial population, especially cellulolytic, proteolytic bacteria and fungal zoospores were enhanced in steers that received 60% of LS (p0.05). Protozoal population was linearly decreased with increasing level of LS (p<0.05). Moreover, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis were enhanced by LS feeding (p<0.05) and were the highest in 60% LS group. Based on this study, it could be concluded that replacement of RS with 60% LS significantly improved microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in diary steers.

  15. Dating the time of birth: a radiocarbon calibration curve for human eye lens crystallines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heinemeier, Jan; Heegaard, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon bomb-pulse dating has been used to measure the formation age of human eye-lens crystallines. Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye-lens that consist of virtually inert tissue. The experimental data show that the radiocarbon ages to a large extent reflect the time of birth......, in accordance with expectations. Moreover, it has been possible to develop an age model for the formation of the eye-lens crystallines. From this model a radiocarbon calibration curve for lens crystallines has been calculated. As a consequence, the time of birth of humans can be determined with an accuracy...

  16. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  17. Assessment of inclusive education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the way teachers, in teams can work with assessing the inclusive practice in their own classes. In 2012 a joint effort between CEPRA, teachers and school administrators from the municipality of Hjørring developed a dialog based model for continually assessing...... the quality of the learning environment in regard to inclusion – this model draws heavily on the logic and mindset of ECERS (Early child environment program). This article will relate the rationale of the assessment model called “Dialoger om Kvalitet” (dialogues on quality) to LSP’s definition of inclusion...

  18. Inclusion in Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Allan Galis

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available This study of reform policy focused on inclusive education in the 1990s in the state of Georgia, United States of America. Program modifications including, individualizing instructional methods, adapting the instructional environment, and lowering maximum class size emerged as significant issues. We found that policies related to these areas were compounded by the less experienced educators not readily accepting change strategies for serving students. Apparently younger educators are engrossed in surviving daily routine and have difficulty coping with the complex demands of change. Regular education teachers have difficulty with the idea of inclusion. Legal aspects dealing inclusion need clarification, especially for regular education teachers.

  19. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  20. βB1-crystallin: thermodynamic profiles of molecular interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika B Dolinska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β-Crystallins are structural proteins maintaining eye lens transparency and opacification. Previous work demonstrated that dimerization of both βA3 and βB2 crystallins (βA3 and βB2 involves endothermic enthalpy of association (∼8 kcal/mol mediated by hydrophobic interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thermodynamic profiles of the associations of dimeric βA3 and βB1 and tetrameric βB1/βA3 were measured using sedimentation equilibrium. The homo- and heteromolecular associations of βB1 crystallin are dominated by exothermic enthalpy (-13.3 and -24.5 kcal/mol, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Global thermodynamics of βB1 interactions suggest a role in the formation of stable protein complexes in the lens via specific van der Waals contacts, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges whereas those β-crystallins which associate by predominately hydrophobic forces participate in a weaker protein associations.

  1. Evidence on Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyssegaard, Camilla Brørup; Larsen, Michael Søgaard

    The purpose of this publication is to examine existing research on inclusion to identify strategies of inclusion that have generated positive effects. To do so it is necessary to understand the effect of the applied strategies. One approach, which is being discussed, is to use evidence to determine...... which methods have proven more effective than others. The desire to gain insight into research on inclusion forms the basis of the current systematic review. The task was to determine which strategies primary research has found to be most effective for inclusion purposes. We have solved this task...... by addressing the existing research with the following question: What is the effect of including children with special needs in mainstream teaching in basic school, and which of the applied educational methods have proved to have a positive effect?...

  2. Inclusive or managed democracy?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mozambique's commitments to build an inclusive democracy, corruption unmasks ..... and the adoption of electoral and administrative rules that allow it to exist as .... In 2005, citizens were killed, injured and houses destroyed during a.

  3. Can we build inclusion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette; Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of children with special needs in kindergartens and preschools may be approached from different angles. This paper raises the question of whether the physical framework of kindergartens makes any difference for daily life at the kindergarten at all, and whether it can support inclusion...... of some children with special needs. Hence the title – can we build inclusion? In the literature of Universal Design, accommodation and design features seldom reflect the less visible disabilities. The paper is based on a research project initiated to investigate how more or less space influences daily...... on the answers in the interviews, we found support for answering the question in the title in the affirmative; we can build inclusion! This is because the teachers' experience indicated that, if there was sufficient space per child, there were fewer conflicts and the children managed to stay in the same activity...

  4. Phase diagrams of binary crystalline-crystalline polymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkar, Rushikesh A; Kyu, Thein

    2006-08-17

    A thermodynamically self-consistent theory has been developed to establish binary phase diagrams for two-crystalline polymer blends by taking into consideration all interactions including amorphous-amorphous, crystal-amorphous, amorphous-crystal, and crystal-crystal interactions. The present theory basically involves combination of the Flory-Huggins free energy for amorphous-amorphous isotropic mixing and the Landau free energy of polymer solidification (e.g., crystallization) of the crystalline constituents. The self-consistent solution via minimization of the free energy of the mixture affords determination of eutectic, peritectic, and azeotrope phase diagrams involving various coexistence regions such as liquid-liquid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid coexistence regions bound by liquidus and solidus lines. To validate the present theory, the predicted eutectic phase diagrams have been compared with the reported experimental binary phase diagrams of blends such as polyethylene fractions as well as polycaprolactone/trioxane mixtures.

  5. Crystalline structures in human pancreatic beta cell adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Kawai, T; Tanaka, T; Fujii, M; Takahashi, M; Miyashita, T

    1978-05-01

    An electron microscopic observation on a pancreatic tumor removed from a 34-year-old woman revealed the fine structural morphology of a functional beta cell adenoma. Characteristic PAS positive crystalline structures were frequently observed in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. They were not bounded by a membrane and had a rectangular or irregular hexagonal shape. Highly regular patterns were seen as such as lattice or honeycomb and parallel ripple structures. They are similar to the Reinke's crystal or crystalline structures reported in human hepatocytes suffering from several different diseases and considered as a protein-carbohydrate complex. Occasionally, small paracrystalline structures appeared to indicate an immature type of these structures in the opaque fine fibrillar mass. Crystalline or paracrystalline structures were not detected in the normal pancreatic tissue removed with the tumor from the patient.

  6. Limitations of inclusive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A; Wilson, Edward O

    2013-12-10

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed.

  7. Solitary myeloma with massive extracellular crystalline structures--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y G; Yang, K H; Gang, S J; Kim, B K; Kim, S M

    1991-06-01

    We describe a case of solitary myeloma showing cystic change filled with massive crystalline structures in a 54-year-old woman. A bone X-ray showed a solitary cystic osteolytic lesion in the right iliac bone. Serum and urine protein electrophoresis showed no demonstrable M-protein, and bone-marrow aspirates did not show any myeloma cells. Histologic examination of the tumor revealed aggregation of plasma cells with massive extracellular infiltration of the rhomboid-shaped crystalline structures. In immunoperoxidase staining, both these crystalline structures and the cytoplasms of the myeloma cells demonstrated a positive reaction for lambda light chain. By electron microscope, the large extracellular crystalline structures were observed, and we found unique rhomboid or rectangular-shaped crystalline structures in the cytoplasms of the myeloma cells.

  8. Photocontrollable liquid-crystalline actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haifeng [Top Runner Incubation Center for Academia-Industry Fusion and Department of Materials and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Ikeda, Tomiki [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R1-11, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2011-05-17

    Coupling photochromic molecules with liquid crystalline (LC) materials enables one to reversibly photocontrol unique LC features such as phase transition, photoalignment, and molecular cooperative motion. LC elastomers show photomechanical and photomobile properties, directly converting light energy into mechanical energy. In well-defined LC block copolymers, regular patternings of nanostructures in macroscopic scales are fabricated by photo-manipulation of LC actuators. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Liquid Crystalline Esters of Dibenzophenazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin John Anthony Bozek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of esters of 2,3,6,7-tetrakis(hexyloxydibenzo[a,c]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid was prepared in order to probe the effects of the ester groups on the liquid crystalline behavior. These compounds exhibit columnar hexagonal phases over broad temperature ranges. Variations in chain length, branching, terminal groups, and the presence of cyclic groups were found to modify transition temperatures without substantially destabilizing the mesophase range.

  10. EXAFS studies of crystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, G.S.; Georgopoulos, P.

    1982-01-01

    The application of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique to the study of crystalline materials is discussed, and previously published work on the subject is reviewed with 46 references being cited. The theory of EXAFS, methods of data analysis, and the experimental techniques, including those based on synchrotron and laboratory facilities are all discussed. Absorption and fluorescence methods of detecting EXAFS also receive attention. (BLM)

  11. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  12. ADVANCES IN LIQUID CRYSTALLINE POLYESTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. J. Jackson

    1992-01-01

    Advances have been made in understanding the interactions of composition, molecular weight,liquid crystallinity, orientation, and three-dimensional crystallinity on the properties of injection-molded and melt-spun liquid crystalline polyesters (LCP's). Two classes of potentially low-cost LCP's were compared : (1) semiflexible LCP's prepared from 1,6-hexanediol and the dimethyl ester of either trans-4, 4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid or 4.4 ′-biphenyldicarboxylic acid and (2) all-aromatic LCP's prepared from terephthalic acid, 2, 6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid, the diacetate of hydroquinone,and the acetate of p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The effects of composition on the plastic properties of the 4-component all-aromatic LCP's were determined with the aid of a 3 × 3 factorial statistically designed experiment, the generation of equations with a computer program, and the plotting of three-dimensional figures and contour diagrams. The effects of absolute molecular weight (Mw) on the tensile strengths of the semiflexible LCP's and one of the all-aromatic LCP's having an excellent balance of plastic properties were also compared, and it was observed that the semiflexible LCP's required Mw's about 4 times higher than the all-aromatic LCP to attain a given strength. Persistence lengths and molecular modeling were used to explain these differences.

  13. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  14. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  15. Solitary myeloma with massive extracellular crystalline structures--a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Y. G.; Yang, K. H.; Gang, S. J.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a case of solitary myeloma showing cystic change filled with massive crystalline structures in a 54-year-old woman. A bone X-ray showed a solitary cystic osteolytic lesion in the right iliac bone. Serum and urine protein electrophoresis showed no demonstrable M-protein, and bone-marrow aspirates did not show any myeloma cells. Histologic examination of the tumor revealed aggregation of plasma cells with massive extracellular infiltration of the rhomboid-shaped crystalline structur...

  16. Use of the design-of-experiments approach for the development of a refolding technology for progenipoietin-1, a recombinant human cytokine fusion protein from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Denis M; Buckley, John J; Johnson, Gary V; Rathore, Anurag; Gustafson, Mark E

    2009-07-14

    Optimization of refolding conditions for progenipoietin was performed. The molecule has five disulfide bonds and, hence, is a challenge to refold. Variables studied included pH, DTT (dithiothreitol) concentration, cystine concentration, urea concentration, protein concentration, dissolution hold time and oxygen availability. In view of the complexity of the reaction with respect to the number of parameters that can impact the refold efficiency, some variables were examined via single-parameter studies, whereas others were looked at via a DOE (design of experiments) approach. The DOE approach allowed us to look at the effect of these variables over wide ranges, as well as their interactions, in a very efficient manner. We were able to obtain a maximal refolding efficiency of 57%, defined as a percentage of correctly folded, bioactive dimer protein from inclusion-body slurries produced from Escherichia coli. The final method involved dissolution of IBs for 30 min at 2 mg/ml protein, 6 M urea, 2 mM DTT and 50 mM Tris (pH 10.2) for approx. 30 min, followed by the addition of 4 mM cystine just prior to a 10-fold dilution with 50 mM Tris (pH 10.2) buffer and reaction for 72 h at 2-10 degrees C. The use of the DOE approach allowed us to understand the interactions between the various parameters, in particular those between cystine and urea concentrations. The results were used to create a process model that demonstrated satisfactory accuracy and that could be used during commercialization of the product.

  17. Evidence of yttrium silicate inclusions in YSZ-porcelain veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Brian R; Griggs, Jason A; Neidigh, John; Piascik, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    This report introduces the discovery of crystalline defects that can form in the porcelain veneering layer when in contact with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). The focus was on dental prostheses and understanding the defects that form in the YSZ/porcelain system; however the data reported herein may have broader implications toward the use and stability of YSZ-based ceramics in general. Specimens were cut from fully sintered YSZ plates and veneering porcelain was applied (porcelain veneer. Local EDAX (SEM) was performed in the regions of visible inclusions and showed significant increases in yttrium concentration. TEM specimens also showed apparent inclusions in the porcelain and selected area electron diffraction was performed on these regions and found the inclusions to be crystalline and identified as either yttrium-silicate (Y2 SiO5 ) or yttrium-disilicate (Y2 Si2 O7 ). Micro-CT data showed that yttrium-silicate precipitates were distributed throughout the thickness of the porcelain veneer. Future studies are needed to determine whether many of the premature failures associated with this materials system may be the result of crystalline flaws that form as a result of high temperature yttrium diffusion near the surfaces of YSZ.

  18. TOWARDS AN INCLUSIVE SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía López Menéndez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays schools have to direct all efforts towards the comprehensive development of all students whatever their individual characteristics and their environment; they have to give a quality educational attention a qualified educational attention to the diversity in all their schools. This article presents an approach on the possibilities of developing a self-assessment using the Guide: "Index for Inclusion": “Index for Inclusion” published in the United kingdom by Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education (CSIE Tony Booth - Mel Ainscow (2002. This guide is a simple tool intended for schools to evaluate their reality in relation to important aspects of school organization and teaching-learning from the perspective of inclusion. From this self-assessment they can design specific programs to guide their educacional practice.

  19. Creative activity and inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemanov A.Yu.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to analyze the inclusion potential of art creative activity, namely of theatre performance, in people with disabilities. The article provides examples of disagreements in understanding the significance of these art activities for exercising the rights of people with disabilities to contribute to culture and art and some problems arising here. The conclusion is made that theatre art performed by people with disabilities is gradually changing its function: from being a means of self-affirmation to the determination of its specific place in overall theatre process. These changes confirm the inclusion potential of theatre art activity.

  20. Mathematics Teaching and Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    was intended to focus on the challenge for all schools today - the challenge of being the inclusive school for all! The programme included plenary lectures, paper presentations, workshops, network meetings, "walk and talk" and social events. There were around 100 participants from all Nordic countries (Denmark......This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Nordic Research Conference on Special Needs Education in Mathematics, which took place in Rebild organised by Aalborg University in November 23-25, 2005. The theme of the conference was Mathematics Education and Inclusion. The conference theme...

  1. Linguistic Diversity and Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, Ingrid; Takahashi, Kimie

    2011-01-01

    This introduction provides the framework for the special issue by describing the social inclusion agenda of neoliberal market democracies. While the social inclusion agenda has been widely adopted, social inclusion policies are often blind to the ways in which language proficiency and language ideologies mediate social inclusion in linguistically…

  2. Linguistic Diversity and Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, Ingrid; Takahashi, Kimie

    2011-01-01

    This introduction provides the framework for the special issue by describing the social inclusion agenda of neoliberal market democracies. While the social inclusion agenda has been widely adopted, social inclusion policies are often blind to the ways in which language proficiency and language ideologies mediate social inclusion in linguistically…

  3. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  4. Raising Achievement through Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, Swedish authorities introduced open publication of comparisons of students' results at the end of compulsory school. In this study, we investigated a municipality that had succeeded in breaking a negative trend from a bottom position in the ranking in 2007 to a top position in 2010, apparently through inclusive practices. The purpose of…

  5. Anthropology and inclusive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.; Nooteboom, G.

    Although the term inclusive development is still rare in anthropological texts, it is a key element of anthropology’s relation to development. Concerns of in/exclusion, unequal power relations and (lack of) voice are central here. Anthropology’s encounter with development primarily focuses on a

  6. Mathematics Teaching and Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Nordic Research Conference on Special Needs Education in Mathematics, which took place in Rebild organised by Aalborg University in November 23-25, 2005. The theme of the conference was Mathematics Education and Inclusion. The conference theme...

  7. Inclusion Forum, 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Maxine

    1994-01-01

    These two newsletter issues focus on training strategies for developing more inclusive programs for children with disabilities and for developing collaborative programs. An interview with Dr. Barbara Wolfe addresses successful inservice teacher training strategies. Additional information in the first issue includes guidelines for empowering…

  8. Penile Epidermal Inclusion Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Shazly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of epidermal inclusion cyst in a 32-year-old male. This was a complication of circumcision that was neglected over years to form stones and urethrocutaneous fistula. Complete excision of the cyst and repair of the fistula were performed successfully. Histopathological examination confirmed our diagnosis.

  9. Collaborative Support for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanahuja-Gavaldà, Josep M.; Olmos-Rueda, Patricia; Morón-Velasco, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in Catalonia, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly in regular schools although their presence, participation, learning and success are unequal. Barriers towards inclusion often depend on how to organise supporting at regular schools and the teachers' collaboration during this process. In this paper, the support…

  10. Bulk nano-crystalline alloys

    OpenAIRE

    T.-S. Chin; Lin, C. Y.; Lee, M.C.; R.T. Huang; S. M. Huang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Fe–B–Y–Nb–Cu, 2 mm in diameter, were successfully annealed to become bulk nano-crystalline alloys (BNCAs) with α-Fe crystallite 11–13 nm in size. A ‘crystallization-and-stop’ model was proposed to explain this behavior. Following this model, alloy-design criteria were elucidated and confirmed successful on another Fe-based BMG Fe–B–Si–Nb–Cu, 1 mm in diameter, with crystallite sizes 10–40 nm. It was concluded that BNCAs can be designed in general by the proposed cr...

  11. Intracellular inclusion bodies in 14 patients with B cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, O.; Thielemans, C; Steenssens, L; M. de Waele; HIJMANS, W; Van Camp, B

    1984-01-01

    Two types of intracytoplasmic inclusion were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in 12 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and two patients with a leukaemic phase of well differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma. Further analysis with light- and electron microscopy, showed that most inclusion bodies were rod-like crystalline structures. However, in three patients they consisted of amorphous vesicular precipitates. Immunological studies revealed the presence of immunoglobulins of the ...

  12. The Effect of Attractive Interactions and Macromolecular Crowding on Crystallins Association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Wei

    Full Text Available In living systems proteins are typically found in crowded environments where their effective interactions strongly depend on the surrounding medium. Yet, their association and dissociation needs to be robustly controlled in order to enable biological function. Uncontrolled protein aggregation often causes disease. For instance, cataract is caused by the clustering of lens proteins, i.e., crystallins, resulting in enhanced light scattering and impaired vision or blindness. To investigate the molecular origins of cataract formation and to design efficient treatments, a better understanding of crystallin association in macromolecular crowded environment is needed. Here we present a theoretical study of simple coarse grained colloidal models to characterize the general features of how the association equilibrium of proteins depends on the magnitude of intermolecular attraction. By comparing the analytic results to the available experimental data on the osmotic pressure in crystallin solutions, we identify the effective parameters regimes applicable to crystallins. Moreover, the combination of two models allows us to predict that the number of binding sites on crystallin is small, i.e. one to three per protein, which is different from previous estimates. We further observe that the crowding factor is sensitive to the size asymmetry between the reactants and crowding agents, the shape of the protein clusters, and to small variations of intermolecular attraction. Our work may provide general guidelines on how to steer the protein interactions in order to control their association.

  13. Inclusive Physical Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Charlotte; Rostbøll, Solveig Fogh

    2015-01-01

    and is often a bad experience for students who do not have the required skills or the necessary competitive mentality. The purpose of the study is to generate increased knowledge of how to work with inclusive education in PE in schools. The aims of the study are to identify groups of “outsiders” and to find......EN317 - Inclusive Physical Education - with a focus on active and successful participation Charlotte Østergaard, Solveig Fogh Rostbøll, Department of School and Learning, Metropolitan University College (DK) chao@phmetropol.dk The Danish School Reform 2014 intends to raise the amount and intensity...... of PA in schools. A considerable percentage of Danish children do not participate in PA and are marginalized in PE lessons. One of the primary problems is that PE in Danish schools is characterized by a performative culture. Several studies confirm that PE is characterized by performative ideals...

  14. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment.

  15. Light-Induced Phosphorylation of Crystallins in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Chung, Hyewon; Lee, Sung Haeng; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylations have essential regulatory roles in visual signaling. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of several proteins in the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in anti-apoptotic signaling under oxidative stress conditions, including light exposure. In this study, we used a phosphoprotein enrichment strategy to evaluate the light-induced phosphoproteome of primary bovine RPE cells. Phosphoprotein-enriched extracts from bovine RPE cells exposed to light or dark conditions for 1 hour were separated by 2D SDS-PAGE. Serine and tyrosine phosphorylation were visualized by 2D phospho western blotting and specific phosphorylation sites were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Light induced a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of beta crystallin A3 and A4. The most abundant light-induced up-regulated phosphoproteins were crystallins of 15–25-kDa, including beta crystallin S and zeta crystallin. Phosphorylation of beta crystallin suggests an anti-apoptotic chaperone function in the RPE. Other chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, and proteins involved in energy balance were expressed at higher levels in the dark. A detailed analysis of RPE phosphoproteins provides a molecular basis for understanding light-induced signal transduction and anti-apoptosis mechanisms. Our data indicates that phosphorylation of crystallins likely represents an important mechanism for RPE shielding from physiological and pathophysiological light-induced oxidative injury. PMID:21094180

  16. Inclusive Education in Italy: Description and Reflections on Full Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion of students with disabilities when appropriate is an important goal of special education for students with special needs. Full inclusion, meaning no education for any child in a separate setting, is held to be desirable by some, and Italy is likely the nation with an education system most closely approximating full inclusion on the…

  17. Inclusive Education in Italy: Description and Reflections on Full Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion of students with disabilities when appropriate is an important goal of special education for students with special needs. Full inclusion, meaning no education for any child in a separate setting, is held to be desirable by some, and Italy is likely the nation with an education system most closely approximating full inclusion on the…

  18. Isomerization of Asp residues plays an important role in αA-crystallin dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Takumi; Fujii, Noriko

    2016-03-01

    Aged cataract formation is caused by the accumulative precipitation of lens proteins incorporating diverse post-translational modifications. α-Crystallin, a major structural and functional lens protein, consists of a large polymeric structure that is dissociated and insolubilized with accumulative post-translational modifications. One such modification, isomerization of Asp, was recently identified in αB-crystallin monomers derived from aged lens. However, the distributions of Asp isomers in each lens fraction remain unknown. Here, α-crystallin fractions from aged lens were separated into heteropolymeric and monomeric forms to determine the Asp isomerization ratios in each fraction. Lens of four different ages were homogenized and centrifuged, and the soluble fraction was applied to size-exclusion chromatography. The heteropolymeric α-crystallin and monomeric crystallin fractions were obtained and concentrated. After trypsin digestion, each fraction was independently applied to liquid chromatography equipped with mass spectrometry to extract α-crystallin-derived peptides containing Asp isomers. The results showed that Asp58, Asp84 and Asp151 of αA-crystallin were highly isomerized in the monomeric fraction, but not isomerized to the same level in the heteropolymeric fraction. Each type of Asp isomerization increased in an age-dependent manner, was site-specific and was similar to previous results from lens water-insoluble fractions. These results imply that isomerization of Asp residues leads to dissociation of αA-crystallin from the heteropolymeric state and induces insolubilization in aged lens. Taken together, our findings suggest that isomerization of Asp might disrupt the higher order polymeric state of α-crystallin, resulting in decreased solubility and function, ultimately contributing to lens protein impairment and cataract formation with aging. © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Birefringence Measurements on Crystalline Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Christoph; Khalaidovski, Alexander; Steinlechner, Jessica; Nawrodt, Ronny; Schnabel, Roman; Lück, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline silicon has been proposed as a new test mass material in third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET). Birefringence can reduce the interferometric contrast and can produce dynamical disturbances in interferometers. In this work we use the method of polarisation-dependent resonance frequency analysis of Fabry-Perot-cavities containing silicon as a birefringent medium. Our measurements show a birefringence of silicon along the (111) axis of the order of $\\Delta\\, n \\approx 10^{-7}$ at a laser wavelength of 1550nm and room temperature. A model is presented that explains the results of different settings of our measurements as a superposition of elastic strains caused by external stresses in the sample and plastic strains possibly generated during the production process. An application of our theory on the proposed ET test mass geometry suggests no critical effect on birefringence due to elastic strains.

  20. Supporting Teachers in Inclusive Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekhina S.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article regards the issues of support provision to teachers involved in inclusive education as the main requirement for successful realization of inclusion. The methodological framework used in the study is a resource approach. The article describes the ways of extending the means of supporting teachers. The article also arguments for consolidating all the educators of inclusive schools into inclusive teams equally interested in joint work of administration and educators of intervention programs.

  1. Modulation of cytokines and transcription factors (T-Bet and GATA3 in CD4 enriched cervical cells of Chlamydia trachomatis infected fertile and infertile women upon stimulation with chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins B and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salhan Sudha

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial Inclusion membrane proteins (Incs, are involved in biochemical interactions with host cells and infecting Chlamydiae. We have previously reported the role of two Chlamydia trachomatis (CT Incs, namely IncB and IncC in generating host immunity in CT infected women. Emerging data shows involvement of Inc stimulated CD4 positive T cells in aiding host immunity in infected fertile and infertile women through the secretion of interferon gamma. However the lack of data on the intra-cytokine interplay to these Incs in infected cell milieu prompted us to investigate further. Methods A total of 14 CT-positive fertile, 18 CT-positive infertile women and 25 uninfected controls were enrolled in this study. CD8 depleted, CD4 enriched cervical cells were isolated and upon stimulation with IncB and IncC, modulation of cytokines (Interleukin (IL-1 Beta, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, Interferon-gamma, IL-12, IL-23, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha and Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and T cell lineage regulating transcription factors T-Bet and GATA3 was determined by real-time reverse-transcriptase (RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Significant higher expression (P Conclusion Overall our data shows that CT IncB and IncC are able to upregulate expression of cytokines, namely interferon-gamma, IL-12, IL-23 and GM-CSF in CT-positive fertile women while expression of IL-1 Beta, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10 were upregulated in CT-positive infertile women. Our study also suggests that Incs are able to modulate expression of T cell lineage determinants indicating their involvement in regulation of immune cells.

  2. Inclusive Education under Collectivistic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaba, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how inclusive education under collective culture is possible. Inclusive education, which more-or-less involves changing the current schools, has been denied, doubted or distorted by both policy-makers and practitioners of general and special education in Japan. Main reason for the setback in inclusive education can be…

  3. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  4. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  5. Miscibility of Semi-flexible Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Copolyesteramide with Polyamide 66

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Liquid crystalline polymer-polyamide 66 (LCP/PA66) blends were compounded by usingaBrabender mixing followed by compression moulding. The LCP employed was a semi-flexible liquid crystalline copolyesteramide based on 30% (molar fraction) of p-amino benzoic acid (ABA)and 70% (molar fraction) of poly (ethylene terephthalate)(PET). The LCP/PA66 blends wereinvestigated in terms of the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties. It was found that PA66and LCP components of the blends are miscible in the molten state, but are partially miscible inthe solid state. The inclusion of the semi-flexible LCP into PA66 retards the crystallization rateof PA66. Furthermore, the melting temperature and the degree of crystallinity of PA66 are reduced considerably due to the LCP addition.

  6. Measurement of the signs of methyl {sup 13}C chemical shift differences between interconverting ground and excited protein states by R{sub 1{rho}}: an application to {alpha}B-crystallin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Andrew J.; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion (CPMG RD) NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for quantifying the kinetics and thermodynamics of millisecond time-scale exchange processes involving the interconversion between a visible ground state and one or more minor, sparsely populated invisible 'excited' conformational states. Recently it has also become possible to determine atomic resolution structural models of excited states using a wide array of CPMG RD approaches. Analysis of CPMG RD datasets provides the magnitudes of the chemical shift differences between the ground and excited states, {Delta}{omega}, but not the sign. In order to obtain detailed structural insights from, for example, excited state chemical shifts and residual dipolar coupling measurements, these signs are required. Here we present an NMR experiment for obtaining signs of {sup 13}C chemical shift differences of {sup 13}CH{sub 3} methyl groups using weak field off-resonance R{sub 1{rho}} relaxation measurements. The accuracy of the method is established by using an exchanging system where the invisible, excited state can be converted to the visible, ground state by altering sample conditions so that the signs of {Delta}{omega} values obtained from the spin-lock approach can be validated against those measured directly. Further, the spin-lock experiments are compared with the established H(S/M)QC approach for measuring signs of chemical shift differences and the relative strengths of each method are discussed. In the case of the 650 kDa human {alpha}B-crystallin complex where there are large transverse relaxation differences between ground and excited state spins the R{sub 1{rho}} method is shown to be superior to more 'traditional' experiments for sign determination.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of bovine γB-crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, George; Mills, Jeffrey; Michel, Lea; Mathews, Kaylee; Zanet, John; Payan, Angel; van Nostrand, Keith; Kotlarchyk, Michael; Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Hamilton, John

    Anisotropy of shape and/or interactions play an important role in determining the properties of concentrated solutions of the eye lens protein, γB-crystallin, including its liquid-liquid phase transition. We are studying γB anisotropic interactions with use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) concentration- and temperature-dependent chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We analyze two-dimensional heteronuclear spin quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra on backbone nitrogen and attached hydrogen nuclei for CSPs, up to 3 percent volume fraction. Cumulative distribution functions of the CSPs show a concentration and temperature-dependent spread. Many peaks that are highly shifted with either concentration or temperature are close (i) crystal intermolecular contacts (ii) locations of cataractogenic point mutations of a homologous human protein, human γD-crystallin, and (iii) charged amino-acid residues. We also discuss the concentration- and temperature-dependence of NMR and quasielastic light scattering measurements of rotational and translational diffusion of γB crystallin in solution, affected by interprotein attractions. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  8. Singing and social inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Frederick Welch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated. Tackling social exclusion and promoting social inclusion are common concerns internationally, such as in the UK and the EC, and there are many diverse Government ministries and agencies globally that see the arts in general and music in particular as a key means by which social needs can be addressed. As part of a wider evaluation of a national, Government-sponsored music education initiative for Primary-aged children in England (‘Sing Up’, opportunity was taken by the authors, at the request of the funders, to assess any possible relationship between (a children’s developing singing behaviour and development and (b their social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated. Subsequently, it was possible to match data from n=6087 participants, drawn from the final three years of data collection (2008-2011, in terms of each child’s individually assessed singing ability (based on their singing behaviour of two well-known songs to create a 'normalised singing score' and their written responses to a specially-designed questionnaire that included a set of statements related to children’s sense of being socially included to which the children indicated their level of agreement on a seven-point Likert scale. Data analyses suggested that the higher the normalized singing development rating, the more positive the child’s self-concept and sense of being socially included, irrespective of singer age, sex and ethnicity.

  9. Singing and social inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Graham F.; Himonides, Evangelos; Saunders, Jo; Papageorgi, Ioulia; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive, and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Tackling social exclusion and promoting social inclusion are common concerns internationally, such as in the UK and the EC, and there are many diverse Government ministries and agencies globally that see the arts in general and music in particular as a key means by which social needs can be addressed. As part of a wider evaluation of a national, Government-sponsored music education initiative for Primary-aged children in England (“Sing Up”), opportunity was taken by the authors, at the request of the funders, to assess any possible relationship between (a) children's developing singing behavior and development and (b) their social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Subsequently, it was possible to match data from n = 6087 participants, drawn from the final 3 years of data collection (2008–2011), in terms of each child's individually assessed singing ability (based on their singing behavior of two well-known songs to create a “normalized singing score”) and their written responses to a specially-designed questionnaire that included a set of statements related to children's sense of being socially included to which the children indicated their level of agreement on a seven-point Likert scale. Data analyses suggested that the higher the normalized singing development rating, the more positive the child's self-concept and sense of being socially included, irrespective of singer age, sex and ethnicity. PMID:25120514

  10. Singing and social inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Graham F; Himonides, Evangelos; Saunders, Jo; Papageorgi, Ioulia; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive, and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Tackling social exclusion and promoting social inclusion are common concerns internationally, such as in the UK and the EC, and there are many diverse Government ministries and agencies globally that see the arts in general and music in particular as a key means by which social needs can be addressed. As part of a wider evaluation of a national, Government-sponsored music education initiative for Primary-aged children in England ("Sing Up"), opportunity was taken by the authors, at the request of the funders, to assess any possible relationship between (a) children's developing singing behavior and development and (b) their social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Subsequently, it was possible to match data from n = 6087 participants, drawn from the final 3 years of data collection (2008-2011), in terms of each child's individually assessed singing ability (based on their singing behavior of two well-known songs to create a "normalized singing score") and their written responses to a specially-designed questionnaire that included a set of statements related to children's sense of being socially included to which the children indicated their level of agreement on a seven-point Likert scale. Data analyses suggested that the higher the normalized singing development rating, the more positive the child's self-concept and sense of being socially included, irrespective of singer age, sex and ethnicity.

  11. Bietti crystalline dystrophy and choroidal neovascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; Parvizi, S; Mohamed, M D

    2011-02-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by the presence of crystals in the retina and is followed by retinal and choroidal degeneration. We present a novel finding of juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularisation in Bietti crystalline dystrophy and demonstrate a spectral domain optical coherence tomography image of this disorder.

  12. Designing Inclusive Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colfelt, Solvej

    2012-01-01

    CWUAAT -6.TH CAMBRIDGE WORKSHOP – 2012 Designing inclusive systems for real-world applications Abstracht: Denmark has planned huge investments in development in healthcare systems. Nearly 50 billion danish krones has been set aside on the stately budget for this purpose to be spent over the next 10...... hospital complexes ? The article will explore the fundament of wayshowing on the basis of prior research as well as on the basis of the results of a case study in a large existing danish hospital complex. The result points to signage being an inevitable factor but also that it is a factor that is not very...

  13. Study of Meteoritic Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mia Bjørg Stolberg

    . The manuscripts presented in this thesis have provided critical insights into the origin and distribution of short-lived radioisotopes as well as the formation and transport history of chondrules and, by extension, the precursor material to asteroidal and planetary bodies. The proposal of 26Al heterogeneity...... and the observation of a reduced initial abundance of 26Al in the accretion regions of chondrules and asteroidal bodies impacts our understanding of the accretion timescales of protoplanets in a significant way. Combining high-precision isotope measurements of multiple systems on individual meteoritic inclusions...

  14. Designing Inclusive Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colfelt, Solvej

    2012-01-01

    CWUAAT -6.TH CAMBRIDGE WORKSHOP – 2012 Designing inclusive systems for real-world applications Abstracht: Denmark has planned huge investments in development in healthcare systems. Nearly 50 billion danish krones has been set aside on the stately budget for this purpose to be spent over the next 10...... years. The primary part of the sum is to be used on new large hospital complexes. The 5 danish regions are the quarantor of healthcare quality and responsible for the projects of 5 new hospital complexes. The complexes are planned to be the size of willages of 5000-8000 inhabitants…. Finding your way...

  15. Politics of Inclusion and Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Siim, Birte

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the book is to analyse different politics of inclusion and empowerment and the different paradigms of inclusion/exclusion in order to underline the close link between politics of scoial equality and politics of recognition of ciultural difference. Politics of inclusion is thus...... identities. Politics of empowerment has to do with the agency and mobilisation dimension of social and political change. The title of the book "Politics of Inclusion and Empowerment" address the leitmotiv: namely to discuss plussumgame between politics of inclusion and politics of empowerment...

  16. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  17. Tailoring liquid crystalline lipid nanomaterials for controlled release of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, Nicole B; Boyd, Ben J; Dong, Yao-Da

    2015-11-10

    Lipid-based liquid crystalline materials are being developed as drug delivery systems. However, the use of these materials for delivery of large macromolecules is currently hindered by the small size of the water channels in these structures limiting control over diffusion behaviour. The addition of the hydration-modulating agent, sucrose stearate, to phytantriol cubic phase under excess water conditions incrementally increased the size of these water channels. Inclusion of oleic acid enabled further control of swelling and de-swelling of the matrix via a pH triggerable system where at low pH the hexagonal phase is present and at higher pH the cubic phase is present. Fine control over the release of various sized model macromolecules is demonstrated, indicating future application to controlled loading and release of large macromolecules such as antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2012-04-21

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-porous structures. In meso-porous materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.

  19. Renal pathophysiologic role of cortical tubular inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Zaher A; Stewart, Zachary S; Grzemski, Felicity A; Bobrowski, Walter F

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubular inclusion bodies are rarely associated with drug administration. The authors describe the finding of renal cortical tubular intranuclear and intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies associated with the oral administration of a norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor (NSRI) test article in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Rats were given an NSRI daily for 4 weeks, and kidney histopathologic, ultrastructural pathology, and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Round eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed histologically in the tubular epithelial cells of the renal cortex in male and female SD rats given the NSRI compound. No evidence of degeneration or necrosis was noted in the inclusion-containing renal cells. By ultrastructural pathology, inclusion bodies consisted of finely granular, amorphous, and uniformly stained nonmembrane-bound material. By immunohistochemistry, inclusion bodies stained positive for d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) protein. In addition, similar inclusion bodies were noted in the cytoplasmic tubular epithelial compartment by ultrastructural and immunohistochemical examination.  This is the first description of these renal inclusion bodies after an NSRI test article administration in SD rats. Such drug-induced renal inclusion bodies are rat-specific, do not represent an expression of nephrotoxicity, represent altered metabolism of d-amino acids, and are not relevant to human safety risk assessment.

  20. Hypericin-mediated photooxidative damage of α-crystallin in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Roberts, Joan E; Mason, Ronald P

    2013-07-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), a perennial herb native to Europe, is widely used for and seems to be effective in treatment of mild to moderate depression. Hypericin, a singlet oxygen-generating photosensitizer that absorbs in both the visible and the UVA range, is considered to be one of the bioactive ingredients of St. John's wort, and commercial preparations are frequently calibrated to contain a standard concentration. Hypericin can accumulate in ocular tissues, including lenses, and can bind in vitro to α-crystallin, a major lens protein. α-crystallin is required for lens transparency and also acts as a chaperone to ensure its own integrity and the integrity of all lens proteins. Because there is no crystallin turnover, damage to α-crystallin is cumulative over the lifetime of the lens and can lead to cataracts, the principal cause of blindness worldwide. In this work we study hypericin photosensitization of α-crystallin and detect extensive polymerization of bovine α-crystallin exposed in vitro to hypericin and UVA. We use fluorescence confocal microscopy to visualize binding between hypericin and α-crystallin in a human lens epithelial (HLE) cell line. Further, we show that UVA irradiation of hypericin-treated HLE cells results in a dramatic decrease in α-crystallin detection concurrent with a dramatic accumulation of the tryptophan oxidation product N-formylkynurenine (NFK). Examination of actin in HLE cells indicates that this cytoskeleton protein accumulates NFK resulting from hypericin-mediated photosensitization. This work also shows that filtration of wavelengths St. John's wort cannot adequately shield their lenses from hypericin-mediated photosensitized damage.

  1. Inclusive Business - What It Is All About? Managing Inclusive Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Golja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the challenges we face today, the inclusive business models are future business models through which the Millennium Development Goals can be fostered and strengthen. These are the models which, through their strategic orientation on inclusivity, include low income communities in their value chain. This can be done through combining variety of strategies which all have two common points – recognition of stakeholders and adjustment of the product to the target market. The paper presents the analysis of inclusive markets. Hence, the research results show the dispersion of inclusive businesses worldwide, type of the organization, sector coverage, and contribution to MDGs as well as the particular way of inclusion of low income communities in their value chain. The aim is to present how inclusive business benefits not only the low income societies, but the companies that operate in this way as well.

  2. Cloning and sequencing of complete -crystallin cDNA from embryonic lens of Crocodylus palustris

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman Agrawal; Reena Chandrashekhar; Anurag Kumar Mishra; Jetty Ramadevi; Yogendra Sharma; Ramesh K Aggarwal

    2002-06-01

    -Crystallin is a taxon-specific structural protein found in eye lenses. We present here the cloning and sequencing of complete -crystallin cDNA from the embryonic lens of Crocodylus palustris and establish it to be identical to the -enolase gene from non-lenticular tissues. Quantitatively, the -crystallin was found to be the least abundant crystallin of the crocodilian embryonic lenses. Crocodile -crystallin cDNA was isolated by RT-PCR using primers designed from the only other reported sequence from duck and completed by 5′- and 3′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) using crocodile gene specific primers designed in the study. The complete -crystallin cDNA of crocodile comprises 1305 bp long ORF and 92 and 409 bp long untranslated 5′-and 3′-ends respectively. Further, it was found to be identical to its putative counterpart enzyme -enolase, from brain, heart and gonad, suggesting both to be the product of the same gene. The study thus provides the first report on cDNA sequence of -crystallin from a reptilian species and also re-confirms it to be an example of the phenomenon of gene sharing as was demonstrated earlier in the case of peking duck. Moreover, the gene lineage reconstruction analysis helps our understanding of the evolution of crocodilians and avian species.

  3. INCLUSION BODY MYOSITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luh Yeni Laksmini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM merupakan penyakit inflamasi pada otot yang bersifat progresif dengan penyebab yang tidak diketahui dan tidak menunjukkan respon yang baik terhadap berbagai terapi. Gambaran histopatologi IBM ditandai dengan infiltrat sel-sel limfosit diantara ruangan endomisial, di dalam otot dan di sekitar otot dengan fokus-fokus inklusi di dalam miosit (rimmed vacuole serta beberapa serat otot terlihat atrofi dan nekrosis. Dilaporkan wanita, usia 46 tahun dengan IBM. Keluhan utama pasien berupa kelemahan pada kedua tangan, kaki kanan terasa berat jika diangkat sehingga susah berjalan. Pemeriksaan saraf sensorik ekstremitas dekstra dan sinistra dalam batas normal. Pemeriksaan enzim cretinine kinase meningkat secara dramatik. Pemeriksaan histopatologi dari biospi otot gastrocnemius menunjukkan gambaran yang sesuai untuk IBM dan telah dilakukan penanganan dengan pemberian oral methilprednisolon 3x32 mg dan mecobalmin 1x500ìg intravena, namun tidak menunjukkan respon yang baik terhadap terapi dan akhirnya pasien meninggal. [MEDICINA 2013;44:118-123].

  4. Can we build inclusion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette; Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    building and the strategies the pedagogues develop to fulfil their pedagogical intentions. But in one respect, the results gave more and other knowledge than anticipated at the setup of the project: By analysing the interviews, it became clear that especially for a group of children with special......A society is known by how it cares for the weak. This may be how it cares for wheel chair users but is may also be how it includes some children with special requirements in kindergartens or whether they are referred to special institutions. We expect most people would say that they go...... for an inclusive society – e.g. that a kindergarten should be for all children. But in practice this intention may be met by considerable challenges. So many factors influence the process. In this paper the question is raised, whether the physical frame of the kindergartens makes a difference for daily life...

  5. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  6. History of crystalline organic conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Keizo

    2017-05-01

    A brief view of crystalline organic conductor is presented. Since the discovery of TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane) in the mid 1970’s, pressure has been an indispensable tool to develop the physics of this field. From the aspect of charge transfer salt, TTF-TCNQ and its family was specified with partial charge transfer, two chain one-dimensional (1D) system, charge density wave (CDW) and commensurability. On the other hand, in (TMTSF)2X family (TMTSF: tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene, X: electron acceptor such as PF6, ClO4), complete charge transfer, one chain system, spin density wave (SDW), field-induced SDW, quantum Hall effect, superconductivity were discussed. Further, together with pressure itself, cooling rate was noticed to be important for low temperature properties. Recently, coming back to TTF-TCNQ family, i.e., HMTSF-TCNQ, whether or not field-induced CDW, instead of field-induced SDW, and quantum Hall effect is present was discussed (HMTSF: hexamethylene-tetraselenafulvalene). Whether or not the Fermiology in (TMTTF)2X under pressure is similar to that of (TMTSF)2X is discussed as well. In (BEDT-TTF)2X, new aspect of macroscopic polarization of α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 related to charge order is described. At the end, in contrast to the charge transfer salts, non-charge transfer salt, that is, single component conductor is presented as a new possible example of Dirac cone, which was deeply studied by many researchers in α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3, together with the theoretical calculation of its magnetic susceptibility (BEDT-TTF: bisethylenedithia-tetrathiafulvalene).

  7. Isolation and characterization of ancient hydrocarbon biomarkers from crystalline minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Carrasquillo, A.; Hallmann, C.; Sherman, L. S.; Waldbauer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon biomarker analysis is conventionally conducted on bitumen (soluble fossilized organic matter) extracted from sedimentary rocks using organic solvents. Biomarkers can also be generated by pyrolysis of kerogen (insoluble organic matter) in the same rocks. These approaches have met with much success where the organic matter has not seen significant levels of thermal metamorphism but more limited success when applied to thermally mature Archean rocks. Biomarkers have also been isolated from fluid inclusions of crystalline minerals and this approach has found wide application in petroleum exploration because of the capability of minerals that form crystals in reservoir rocks to trap organics from different episodes of fluid migration. Lastly, biogenic crystalline minerals are well known to trap organics including amino acids, fatty acids or hydrocarbons from those organisms that laid down the minerals. In fact, recent observations suggest that hydrocarbon biomarkers can be abundantly preserved in crystalline minerals where they may be protected over long periods of time and also distinguished from more recent generations of organics from endolithic organisms (modern) or anthropogenic (fossil hydrocarbon) contaminants. Here we report analyses of biomarker lipids trapped in fluid inclusions or otherwise having a "tight association" with the minerals in sedimentary rocks from Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic successions in Australia and Southern Africa. In particular, cores recovered from the Agouron Griqualand Drilling Project contain over 2500m of well-preserved late Archean Transvaal Supergroup sediments, dating from ca. 2.67 to 2.46Ga. Bitumen extracts of samples from these strata were obtained using clean drilling, sampling and handling protocols and without overprinting with contaminant hydrocarbons. Dissolution of the mineral matrix of extracted sediments, followed by another solvent extraction, yielded a second bitumen that comprised hydrocarbons that

  8. alphaB-crystallin promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing vascular survival during tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, Anna; Rylova, Svetlana; Dieterich, Lothar C; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Schiller, Petter; Wikner, Charlotte; Bohman, Svante; Botling, Johan; Lukinius, Agneta; Wawrousek, Eric F; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2008-02-15

    Selective targeting of endothelial cells in tumor vessels requires delineation of key molecular events in formation and survival of blood vessels within the tumor microenvironment. To this end, proteins transiently up-regulated during vessel morphogenesis were screened for their potential as targets in antiangiogenic tumor therapy. The molecular chaperone alphaB-crystallin was identified as specifically induced with regard to expression level, modification by serine phosphorylation, and subcellular localization during tubular morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of alphaB-crystallin expression did not affect endothelial proliferation but led to attenuated tubular morphogenesis, early activation of proapoptotic caspase-3, and increased apoptosis. alphaB-crystallin was expressed in a subset of human tumor vessels but not in normal capillaries. Tumors grown in alphaB-crystallin(-/-) mice were significantly less vascularized than wild-type tumors and displayed increased areas of apoptosis/necrosis. Importantly, tumor vessels in alphaB-crystallin(-/-) mice were leaky and showed signs of caspase-3 activation and extensive apoptosis. Ultrastructural analyses showed defective vessels partially devoid of endothelial lining. These data strongly implicate alphaB-crystallin as an important regulator of tubular morphogenesis and survival of endothelial cell during tumor angiogenesis. Hereby we identify the small heat shock protein family as a novel class of angiogenic modulators.

  9. Financial Stability and Financial Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Peter J; Pontines, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Developing economies are seeking to promote financial inclusion, i.e., greater access to financial services for low-income households and firms, as part of their overall strategies for economic and financial development. This raises the question of whether financial stability and financial inclusion are, broadly speaking, substitutes or complements. In other words, does the move toward greater financial inclusion tend to increase or decrease financial stability? A number of studies have sugge...

  10. Inclusion in a Polarised World

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This paper on inclusion was presented to the at the 2005 summer school of DEEEP (Development Education Exchange in Europe Project), Härnösand - Sweden, 5 - 12 June 2005. It addresses the significance of the concept of world civilisation. It assesses how meaning may be attached to the concept of inclusion in an economically polarised world. It develops a critique of the conception of economic inclusion, by means of an exploration of linguistic inclusion and the notion of ‘disability’. ‘...

  11. Inclusion bodies are a site of ebolavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Shabman, Reed S; Groseth, Allison; Herwig, Astrid; Weber, Michaela; Schudt, Gordian; Dolnik, Olga; Basler, Christopher F; Becker, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-11-01

    Inclusion bodies are a characteristic feature of ebolavirus infections in cells. They contain large numbers of preformed nucleocapsids, but their biological significance has been debated, and they have been suggested to be aggregates of viral proteins without any further biological function. However, recent data for other viruses that produce similar structures have suggested that inclusion bodies might be involved in genome replication and transcription. In order to study filovirus inclusion bodies, we fused mCherry to the ebolavirus polymerase L, which is found in inclusion bodies. The resulting L-mCherry fusion protein was functional in minigenome assays and incorporated into virus-like particles. Importantly, L-mCherry fluorescence in transfected cells was readily detectable and distributed in a punctate pattern characteristic for inclusion bodies. A recombinant ebolavirus encoding L-mCherry instead of L was rescued and showed virtually identical growth kinetics and endpoint titers to those for wild-type virus. Using this virus, we showed that the onset of inclusion body formation corresponds to the onset of viral genome replication, but that viral transcription occurs prior to inclusion body formation. Live-cell imaging further showed that inclusion bodies are highly dynamic structures and that they can undergo dramatic reorganization during cell division. Finally, by labeling nascent RNAs using click technology we showed that inclusion bodies are indeed the site of viral RNA synthesis. Based on these data we conclude that, rather than being inert aggregates of nucleocapsids, ebolavirus inclusion bodies are in fact complex and dynamic structures and an important site at which viral RNA replication takes place.

  12. Optical waveguides in hard crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, M.

    2005-01-01

    The recent results of our research group and collaborators in the field of fabrication, characterization, and applications of optical waveguides in hard crystalline materials, specifically in sapphire and Ti:sapphire, are reviewed.

  13. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  14. Inclusion in the East: Chinese Students' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 523 Chinese university students was given a questionnaire on their attitudes towards the inclusion of children with disabilities into regular classrooms. Factor analysis, analysis of variance, t-test and correlations were used to assess the respondents' general attitude towards inclusion, the factor structure of the attitudes, the…

  15. Enacting Inclusion : A Framework for Interrogating Inclusive Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Lani; Spratt, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the development and use of an analytical framework for interrogating the practice of newly qualified mainstream teachers recently graduated from a one-year Professional Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) that was informed by a concept of inclusive pedagogy. Inclusive pedagogy is an approach to teaching and learning that…

  16. In vivo human crystalline lens topography

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Sergio; Pérez Merino, Pablo; Gambra, Enrique; Castro, Alberto; Marcos, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Custom high-resolution high-speed anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to characterize three-dimensionally (3-D) the human crystalline lens in vivo. The system was provided with custom algorithms for denoising and segmentation of the images, as well as for fan (scanning) and optical (refraction) distortion correction, to provide fully quantitative images of the anterior and posterior crystalline lens surfaces. The method was tested on an artificial eye ...

  17. Revealing crystalline domains in a mollusc shell single-crystalline prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, F.; Godard, P.; Burghammer, M.; Chevallard, C.; Daillant, J.; Duboisset, J.; Allain, M.; Guenoun, P.; Nouet, J.; Chamard, V.

    2017-09-01

    Biomineralization integrates complex processes leading to an extraordinary diversity of calcareous biomineral crystalline architectures, in intriguing contrast with the consistent presence of a sub-micrometric granular structure. Hence, gaining access to the crystalline architecture at the mesoscale, that is, over a few granules, is key to building realistic biomineralization scenarios. Here we provide the nanoscale spatial arrangement of the crystalline structure within the `single-crystalline' prisms of the prismatic layer of a Pinctada margaritifera shell, exploiting three-dimensional X-ray Bragg ptychography microscopy. We reveal the details of the mesocrystalline organization, evidencing a crystalline coherence extending over a few granules. We additionally prove the existence of larger iso-oriented crystalline domains, slightly misoriented with respect to each other, around one unique rotation axis, and whose shapes are correlated with iso-strain domains. The highlighted mesocrystalline properties support recent biomineralization models involving partial fusion of oriented nanoparticle assembly and/or liquid droplet precursors.

  18. Designing Inclusive Systems Designing Inclusion for Real-world Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Clarkson, John; Robinson, Peter; Lazar, Jonathan; Heylighen, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The Cambridge Workshops on Universal Access and Assistive Technology (CWUAAT) are a series of workshops held at a Cambridge University College every two years. The workshop theme: “Designing inclusion for real-world applications” refers to the emerging potential and relevance of the latest generations of inclusive design thinking, tools, techniques, and data, to mainstream project applications such as healthcare and the design of working environments. Inclusive Design Research involves developing tools and guidance enabling product designers to design for the widest possible population, for a given range of capabilities. There are five main themes: •Designing for the Real-World •Measuring Demand And Capabilities •Designing Cognitive Interaction with Emerging Technologies •Design for Inclusion •Designing Inclusive Architecture In the tradition of CWUAAT, we have solicited and accepted contributions over a wide range of topics, both within individual themes and also across the workshop’s scope. ...

  19. Crystalline Silicon Dielectrics for Superconducting Qubit Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, David; Peng, Weina; Sendelbach, Steven; Eriksson, Mark; McDermott, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Superconducting qubit energy relaxation times are limited by microwave loss induced by a continuum of two-level state (TLS) defects in the dielectric materials of the circuit. State-of-the-art phase qubit circuits employ a micron-scale Josephson junction shunted by an external capacitor. In this case, the qubit T1 time is directly proportional to the quality factor (Q) of the capacitor dielectric. The amorphous capacitor dielectrics that have been used to date display intrinsic Q of order 10^3 to 10^4. Shunt capacitors with a Q of 10^6 are required to extend qubit T1 times well into the microsecond range. Crystalline dielectric materials are an attractive candidate for qubit capacitor dielectrics, due to the extremely low density of TLS defects. However, the robust integration of crystalline dielectrics with superconducting qubit circuits remains a challenge. Here we describe a novel approach to the realization of high-Q crystalline capacitor dielectrics for superconducting qubit circuits. The capacitor dielectric is a crystalline silicon nanomembrane. We discuss characterization of crystalline silicon capacitors with low-power microwave transport measurements at millikelvin temperatures. In addition, we report progress on integrating the crystalline capacitor process with Josephson qubit fabrication.

  20. [Heat-induced structural transition of alpha-crystallin in the eye lens tissue observed by small-angle X-ray scattering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivandin, A V

    2009-01-01

    Heat-induced structural transitions of crystallins in the eye lens tissue have been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering. It was shown that a short-time (approximately 1 min) incubation of the bovine eye lens tissue at a temperature of about 60 degrees C leads to a pronounced shift of the small-angle X-ray diffraction maximum due to the short-range order of alpha-crystallin oligomers. This shift indicates an increase in the molecular mass of alpha-crystallin oligomers. The results are evidence that, in the native surrounding and at the native concentration of alpha-crystallin, heat-induced transition of alpha-crystallin quaternary structure takes place. Earlier, this transition of alpha-crystallin has been observed only in solutions and gels of this protein. The results confirm the identity of alpha-crystallin properties in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Preparation and structural characterization of corn starch-aroma compound inclusion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Zhou, Yibin; Jin, Shanshan; Meng, Xin; Yang, Liping; Wang, Haisong

    2017-01-01

    Six corn starch inclusion complexes were synthesized using small nonpolar or weak polar aroma compounds (heptanolide, carvone and menthone) and small polar aroma compounds (linalool, heptanol and menthol). The objectives of this study were to (a) investigate the ability of corn starch to form inclusion complexes with these aroma compounds and (b) characterize the structure of the corn starch inclusion complexes. The resulting inclusion ratios were 75.6, 36.9, 43.8, 91.9, 67.2 and 54.7% for heptanolide, carvone, menthone, linalool, heptanol and menthol respectively. The inclusion complexes had laminated structures with a certain amount of holes or blocky constructions. Compared with gelatinized corn starch, the transition temperatures, peak temperatures and enthalpies of the inclusion complexes were significantly different. The major peak of CO at 1771 cm(-1) and significant peak shifts revealed the formation of inclusion complexes. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analyses revealed that the crystallinity of corn starch-polar aroma compound inclusion complexes increased. Based on cross-polarization magic angle spinning (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS (13) C NMR) results, novel peaks and chemical shifts were attributed to the presence of small aroma compounds, thereby confirming the formation of corn starch inclusion complexes. Small nonpolar and polar aroma compounds can be complexed to corn starch. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Accessibility and inclusion informational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Sena de Souza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discusses the role of information professionals in meeting the informational demands of people with disabilities in the information society. The librarian is crucial for the effectiveness and success in the informational inclusion of people with disabilities, considering also continuing education for their professional qualification.Objective: To provide reflections on the role of the librarian in serving users with disabilities, highlighting the need for improvement in information units, identified in the scientific literature with regard to accessibility.Methodology: Literature search, based on a review of literature in books and scientific papers, highlighting the main authors: Adams (2000, Mazzoni (2001 and Sassaki (1997, 2002, 2005.Results: The lack of informational access for people with disabilities hampers their social and political participation, hence, reduces its condition of citizenship.Conclusion: The librarian responsible for seeking continuing education, greater involvement in the events of the area and the constant search for job training, which will reflect on the best service the information needs of users with disabilities.

  3. Inclusion Body Myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Steven A

    2016-12-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an enigmatic progressive disease of skeletal muscle. This review provides a summary of the clinical and pathophysiologic aspects of IBM. The development of diagnostic blood testing for IBM followed from the discovery of a B-cell pathway in IBM muscle and circulating autoantibodies against NT5C1A, further establishing IBM's status as an autoimmune disease. The key role of cytotoxic T cells in IBM is further supported by the identification of a link between IBM and T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. The testing of research diagnostic criteria in patients is improving its accuracy. Increases in estimated prevalences may be due to a combination of true increases and improved recognition of disease. IBM has high unmet medical need. Advances in the mechanistic understanding of IBM as an autoimmune disease will drive effective therapeutic approaches. The identification of a B-cell pathway has resulted in the first identification of an IBM autoantigen and emphasized its status as an autoimmune disease. The recognition that large granular lymphocyte CD8+ T-cell expansions are present in both blood and muscle provides additional biomarkers for IBM and suggests a mechanistic relationship to the neoplastic disease T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia.

  4. Towards revealing the structure of bacterial inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a widely observed phenomenon in human diseases, biopharmaceutical production, and biological research. Protein aggregates are generally classified as highly ordered, such as amyloid fibrils, or amorphous, such as bacterial inclusion bodies. Amyloid fibrils are elongated filaments with diameters of 6-12 nm, they are comprised of residue-specific cross-beta structure, and display characteristic properties, such as binding with amyloid-specific dyes. Amyloid fibrils are associated with dozens of human pathological conditions, including Alzheimer disease and prion diseases. Distinguished from amyloid fibrils, bacterial inclusion bodies display apparent amorphous morphology. Inclusion bodies are formed during high-level recombinant protein production, and formation of inclusion bodies is a major concern in biotechnology. Despite of the distinctive morphological difference, bacterial inclusion bodies have been found to have some amyloid-like properties, suggesting that they might contain structures similar to amyloid-like fibrils. Recent structural data further support this hypothesis, and this review summarizes the latest progress towards revealing the structural details of bacterial inclusion bodies.

  5. Cataract-causing defect of a mutant γ-crystallin proceeds through an aggregation pathway which bypasses recognition by the α-crystallin chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L Moreau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transparency of the eye lens depends upon maintenance of the native state of the γ- and β-crystallins, which is aided by the abundant chaperones αA- and αB-crystallin. Mature onset cataract, the leading cause of blindness worldwide, involves the polymerization of covalently damaged or partially unfolded crystallins into light-scattering aggregates. A number of single amino acid substitutions and truncations of γ-crystallins result in congenital cataract in both humans and mice, though in many cases the coupling between the protein alterations and the accumulation of aggregates is poorly defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have studied the aggregation properties and chaperone interactions of human γD-crystallin carrying substitutions of two buried core mutants, I90F and V75D, which cause congenital cataract in mice. The in vitro aggregation pathway competing with productive refolding was not altered by either substitution. Furthermore, this aggregation pathway for both mutant proteins--originating from a partially folded intermediate--was efficiently suppressed by αB-crystallin. Thus the cataract pathology was unlikely to be associated with a direct folding defect. The native state of wild-type human γD-crystallin exhibited no tendency to aggregate under physiological conditions. However both I90F and V75D native-like proteins exhibited slow (days aggregation to high molecular weight aggregates under physiological conditions. The perturbed conformation of I90F was recognized and bound by both αA and αB chaperones. In contrast, the aggregation derived from the perturbed state of V75D was not suppressed by either chaperone, and the aggregating species were not bound by the chaperone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The cataract phenotype of I90F in mice may be due to premature saturation of the finite α- crystallin pool. The V75D aggregation pathway and its escape from chaperone surveillance and aggregation suppression

  6. Alpha B-crystallin improved survival of retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of acute ocular hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihong Wu; Layi Wang; Shike Hou

    2012-01-01

    Increased endogenous αB-crystallin protein levels have been shown to reduce cell apoptosis,although the effects of exogenous αB-crystallin protein remain poorly understood.The present study established an acute ocular hypertension model in the right eye of Sprague-Dawley rats.Fluorogold retrograde tracing and immunofluorescence methods showed that the number of retinal ganglion cells decreased in the right eyes and caspase-3 expression increased following acute ocular hypertension.Intravitreal injection of αB-crystallin in the right eye increased the number of retinal ganglion cells and reduced caspase-3 expression.Results demonstrated that exogenous αB-crystallin protein inhibited caspase-3 expression and improved retinal ganglion cell survival following acute ocular hypertension.

  7. Promoting Inclusive Education in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djietror, Beauty B. K.; Okai, Edward; Kwapong, Olivia A. T. Frimpong

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive education is critical for nation building. The government of Ghana has put in measures for promoting inclusion from basic through to tertiary level of education. Some of these measures include expansion of school facilities, implementation of the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE); the change of policy on girls who drop…

  8. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  9. Friendship in Inclusive Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Helena; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A.

    2009-01-01

    Social interaction and development of friendships between children with and without a disability are often proposed as potential outcomes of inclusive education. Physical activity specialists assert that exercise and sport environments may be conducive to social and friendship outcomes. This study investigated friendship in inclusive physical…

  10. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  11. Early Childhood Inclusion in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diken, Ibrahim H.; Rakap, Salih; Diken, Ozlem; Tomris, Gozde; Celik, Secil

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of young children with disabilities into regular preschool classrooms is a common practice that has been implemented for several decades in industrialized nations around the world, and many developing countries including Turkey have been developing and implementing laws, regulation, and services to support inclusion and teaching in…

  12. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  13. Social Inclusion and Metrolingual Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuji, Emi; Pennycook, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the implications of metrolingual language practices for how we understand social inclusion. A vision of social inclusion that includes bi- and multilingual capacities may comprise an appreciation of a diversity of languages other than English, and the skills and capabilities of multilingual language users, yet it is all…

  14. Social Inclusion and Metrolingual Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuji, Emi; Pennycook, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the implications of metrolingual language practices for how we understand social inclusion. A vision of social inclusion that includes bi- and multilingual capacities may comprise an appreciation of a diversity of languages other than English, and the skills and capabilities of multilingual language users, yet it is all…

  15. Influence of nano-inclusions' grain boundaries on crack propagation modes in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakasidis, T.E., E-mail: thkarak@uth.gr [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38834 Volos (Greece); Charitidis, C.A. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, 9 Heroon Polytechniou st., Zografos, 157 80 Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of nano-inclusions on materials' strength and toughness has attracted great interest in recent years. It has been shown that tuning the morphological and microstructural features of materials can tailor their fracture modes. The existence of a characteristic size of inclusions that favours the fracture mode (i.e. transgranular or intergranular) has been experimentally observed but also predicted by a 2D model based on energetic arguments which relates the crack propagation mode to the ratio of the interface area between the crystalline inclusion and the matrix with the area of the crystallite inclusion in a previous work. In the present work, a 3D model is proposed in order to extend the 2D model and take into account the influence of the size of grain boundary zone on the toughening/hardening behavior of the material as it was observed experimentally in the literature. The model relates crack propagation mode to the ratio of the volume of the grain boundary zone between the crystalline inclusion and the matrix with the volume of the nano-inclusion. For a ratio below a critical value, transgranular propagation is favoured while for larger values, intergranular propagation is favoured. We also demonstrate that the extent of the grain boundary region also can significantly affect this critical value. The results of the model are in agreement with the literature experimental observations related to the toughening/hardening behavior as a function of the size of crystalline inclusions as well as the width of the grain boundary regions.

  16. Politics of Inclusion and Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Siim, Birte

    2004-01-01

    identities. Politics of empowerment has to do with the agency and mobilisation dimension of social and political change. The title of the book "Politics of Inclusion and Empowerment" address the leitmotiv: namely to discuss plussumgame between politics of inclusion and politics of empowerment......The objective of the book is to analyse different politics of inclusion and empowerment and the different paradigms of inclusion/exclusion in order to underline the close link between politics of scoial equality and politics of recognition of ciultural difference. Politics of inclusion is thus...... theproductive/innovative linkage of politics of redistributuin and politics og resognition, whnich over a longer time span creates sustainable paths of democratic and social development, which increases the capacity to handle both conflicts about economic resources and life-chances and conflicts about...

  17. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O. [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seok-Seong, E-mail: sskang@ivi.int [Laboratory Sciences Division, International Vaccine Institute, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. {yields} The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. {yields} The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. {yields} Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  18. Simultaneous stereoinversion and isomerization at the Asp-4 residue in βB2-crystallin from the aged human eye lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Norihiko; Kawaguchi, Takehiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2011-10-11

    The lens proteins are composed of α-, β-, and γ-crystallins that interact with each other to maintain the transparency and refractive power of the lens. Because the lens crystallins are long-lived proteins, they undergo various post-translational modifications including racemization, isomerization, deamidation, oxidation, glycation, and truncation. In βB2-crystallin, which is the most abundant β-crystallin, the deamidation of asparagine and glutamine residues has been reported. Here, we found that the aspartyl (Asp) residue at position 4 of βB2-crystallin in the lenses of elderly human individuals undergoes a significant degree of inversion and isomerization to the biologically uncommon residue D-β-Asp. Surprisingly, the D/L ratio of β-Asp at position 4 in βB2-crystallin from elderly donors (67-77 year old) was 0.88-3.21. A D/L ratio of amino acids greater than 1.0 is defined as an inversion of configuration from the L- to D-form, rather than a racemization. These extremely high D/L ratios are equivalent to those of Asp-58 and Asp-151 (D/L ratio: 3.1 for Asp-58 and 5.7 for Asp-151) in αA-crystallin from elderly donors (~80 year old) as reported previously. Initially, we identified specific Asp residues in the β-crystallin family of proteins that undergo a high degree of inversion. These results show that the isomerization and inversion of Asp residues occurs both in the α- and β-crystallins of the lens. Inversion of these Asp residues directly affects the higher order structure of the protein. Hence, this modification may change crystallin-crystallin interactions and disrupt the function of crystallins in the lens.

  19. Isolation of cell-free bacterial inclusion bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Carmona Escarlata

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial inclusion bodies are submicron protein clusters usually found in recombinant bacteria that have been traditionally considered as undesirable products from protein production processes. However, being fully biocompatible, they have been recently characterized as nanoparticulate inert materials useful as scaffolds for tissue engineering, with potentially wider applicability in biomedicine and material sciences. Current protocols for inclusion body isolation from Escherichia coli usually offer between 95 to 99% of protein recovery, what in practical terms, might imply extensive bacterial cell contamination, not compatible with the use of inclusion bodies in biological interfaces. Results Using an appropriate combination of chemical and mechanical cell disruption methods we have established a convenient procedure for the recovery of bacterial inclusion bodies with undetectable levels of viable cell contamination, below 10-1 cfu/ml, keeping the particulate organization of these aggregates regarding size and protein folding features. Conclusions The application of the developed protocol allows obtaining bacterial free inclusion bodies suitable for use in mammalian cell cultures and other biological interfaces.

  20. Isolation of cell-free bacterial inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena

    2010-09-17

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are submicron protein clusters usually found in recombinant bacteria that have been traditionally considered as undesirable products from protein production processes. However, being fully biocompatible, they have been recently characterized as nanoparticulate inert materials useful as scaffolds for tissue engineering, with potentially wider applicability in biomedicine and material sciences. Current protocols for inclusion body isolation from Escherichia coli usually offer between 95 to 99% of protein recovery, what in practical terms, might imply extensive bacterial cell contamination, not compatible with the use of inclusion bodies in biological interfaces. Using an appropriate combination of chemical and mechanical cell disruption methods we have established a convenient procedure for the recovery of bacterial inclusion bodies with undetectable levels of viable cell contamination, below 10⁻¹ cfu/ml, keeping the particulate organization of these aggregates regarding size and protein folding features. The application of the developed protocol allows obtaining bacterial free inclusion bodies suitable for use in mammalian cell cultures and other biological interfaces.

  1. Inclusive education and social exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Bissoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is critically examining assumptions underlying the Inclusive Education concept, arguing that this can only be effectively considered when understood in a broader context of social inclusion and exclusion. Methodologically, this article relies on international documents and bibliographic references about Inclusive Education, that have been chosen by systematize and characterize different social and educational inclusive practices, encouraging the elaboration of a general overview on this topic. The results of this analysis conclude that it is essential for Inclusive Education that educational institutions review their goals and reasons of social existence. In the concluding remarks it is argued that education is better understood as the act of encouraging and welcoming the efforts of individuals in their attempts to engage in social networking, which sustains life. This includes the acceptance of other reality interpretations and understanding that educational action cannot be restricted by the walls of institutions. It requires the participation of the whole community. Action perspectives likely to promote social inclusion and inclusive education are suggested.

  2. Improved Josephson Qubits incorporating Crystalline Silicon Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanfeng; Maurer, Leon; Hover, David; Patel, Umeshkumar; McDermott, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Josephson junction phase quibts are a leading candidate for scalable quantum computing in the solid state. Their energy relaxation times are currently limited by microwave loss induced by a high density of two-level state (TLS) defects in the amorphous dielectric films of the circuit. It is expected that the integration of crystalline, defect-free dielectrics into the circuits will yield substantial improvements in qubit energy relaxation times. However, the epitaxial growth of a crystalline dielectric on a metal underlayer is a daunting challenge. Here we describe a novel approach in which the crystalline silicon nanomembrane of a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer is used to form the junction shunt capacitor. The SOI wafer is thermocompression bonded to the device wafer. The handle and buried oxide layers of the SOI are then etched away, leaving the crystalline silicon layer for subsequent processing. We discuss device fabrication issues and present microwave transport data on lumped-element superconducting resonators incorporating the crystalline silicon.

  3. Volatile Release From The Siberian Traps Inferred From Melt Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Rowe, Michael C.; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    The Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province is one of the largest known continental flood volcanic provinces in the Phanerozoic. The quantification of volatile degassing is particularly important because the Siberian Traps have often been invoked as a possible trigger for the end-Permian mass extinction (e.g. Campbell et al., 1992; Wignall, 2001). Volatile degassing provides a crucial mechanism to link mafic volcanic eruption with global environmental change. Mafic flood basalt magmas are expected to have low volatile contents (similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts). However, Siberian Traps magmas were chambered in and erupted through a thick sedimentary basin and may have interacted with, and obtained volatiles from, sedimentary lithologies such as limestone, coal, and evaporite. Melt inclusions from the Siberian Traps provide insight into the potential total volatile budget throughout the evolution of the large igneous province. These droplets of trapped melt may preserve volatile species that would otherwise have degassed at the time of eruption. We present data from the analysis of more than 100 melt inclusions, including both homogenized inclusions and rare glassy inclusions with low crystallinity. Many melt inclusions from tuffs and flows near the base of the Siberian Traps sequence are substantially enriched in chlorine and fluorine compared to Deccan Traps and Laki melt inclusions (Self et al., 2008; Thordarson et al., 1996). These inclusions record chlorine concentrations up to ~1400 ppm, and fluorine concentrations up to ~5000 ppm. Olivines from the Maymechinsky suite, recognized as the last extrusive products of Siberian Traps volcanism, contain melt inclusions with maximum sulfur concentrations in the range of ~5000 ppm and substantial concentrations of chlorine. Intrusive igneous rocks from the province also display significant volatile contents. A sill from the Ust-Ilimsk region yielded plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions which contain chlorine and fluorine

  4. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  5. Serum protein concentrations, including acute phase proteins, in calves with hepatogenous photosensitization Teores séricos de proteínas, inclusive proteínas de fase aguda, em bovinos com fotossensibilização hepatógena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Fagliari

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred 6- to 12-month-old Nelore calves were allotted into control group (G1; 50 healthy calves and photosensitization group (G2; n= 50. Blood samples were collected 12 to 24 hours after the onset of dermatitis (M1, and 15 to 30 days after that (M2, at time of resolution of clinical signs. Serum protein electrophoresis was performed by means of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Eighteen serum proteins with molecular weights ranging from 16,000 to 189,000 daltons (Da were identified in all calves. In M1 and M2 serum concentrations of proteins with molecular weights of 115,000Da (ceruloplasmin, 61,000Da (a1-antitrypsin, 45,000Da (haptoglobin, and 40,000Da (acid glycoprotein were significantly increased in calves. In conclusion, measurement of serum acute phase protein concentrations may be useful in monitoring the progression of bovine hepatogenous photosensitization, including guide probable alteration on therapeutic procedures.Foram examinados 100 bezerros da raça Nelore com 6 a 12 meses de idade, distribuídos em: grupo controle (G1; 50 bezerros sadios e grupo fotossensibilização (G2; n= 50. As amostras de sangue foram coletadas 12 a 24 horas após o início da dermatite (M1 e 15 a 30 dias após (M2, época da cura das lesões cutâneas. O proteinograma sérico foi obtido por eletroforese em gel de acrilamida. Em todos os bezerros foram identificadas 18 proteínas com pesos moleculares (PM entre 16.000 a 189.000 dáltons (Da. Em M1 e M2, as concentrações séricas das proteínas de PM 115.000Da (ceruloplasmina, 61.000Da (1-antitripsina, 45.000Da (haptoglobina e 40.000Da (glicoproteína ácida foram significativamente maiores em bezerros com fotossensibilização hepatógena em comparação com aquelas dos animais do grupo-controle. A determinação dos teores séricos de proteínas de fase aguda pode ser útil no monitoramento da progressão da fotossensibilização hepatógena em bovinos, inclusive orientando

  6. [Solubilization Specificities Interferon beta-1b from Inclusion Bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravko, A S; Kononova, N V; Bobruskin, A I

    2015-01-01

    A new solubilization method of recombinant interferon beta-1b (IFNβ-1b) from the inclusion bodies was developed. This method allows to extract the target protein selectively in the solutions of different alcohols, such as ethanol, propanol and isopropanol. It was shown that the more effective IFNβ-1b solubilization was achieved in the 55% propanol solution. This method allowed to extract the target protein from inclusion bodies around 85-90%, and significantly reduced Escherichia coli content in the solubilizate, in comparison with standard methods.

  7. Structural changes in bunched crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bussmann, M; Schätz, T; Habs, D

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the spatial distribution of bunched crystalline ion beams in the radio frequency quadrupole storage ring PALLAS are presented for different ratios of the longitudinal and the transverse confinement strengths. The length of highly elongated crystalline ion bunches and its dependence on the bunching voltage is compared to predictions for a one-dimensional ion string and three-dimensional space-charge-dominated beams. The length is found to be considerably shorter than that predicted by the models. Furthermore, the scaling of the length with the bunching voltage is shown to differ from the expected inverse cube root scaling. These differences can partially be attributed to the formation of a mixed crystalline structure. Additionally, a concise mapping of the structural transition from a string to a zig-zag configuration as a function of the ratio of the confinement strengths is presented, which in a similar way deviates from the predictions.

  8. Cooling and heating of crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, U; Bussmann, M; Habs, D

    2003-01-01

    The crystallization of ion beams has recently been established in the rf quadrupole storage ring PALLAS (PAul Laser CooLing Acceleration System) for laser-cooled sup 2 sup 4 Mg sup + ion beams at an energy of about 1 eV. Yet, unexpectedly sharp constraints had to be met concerning the confinement strength and the longitudinal laser cooling rate. In this paper, related and up to now unseen heating mechanisms are pinpointed for crystalline beams. The weak but inevitable diffusive transverse heating associated with the laser cooling process itself is investigated, possibly allowing the future measurement of the latent heat of the ion crystal. As a function of the beam velocity, the influence of bending shear on the attainability of larger crystalline structures is presented. Finally, rf heating of crystalline beams of different structure is studied for discontinuous cooling.

  9. Bio-based liquid crystalline polyesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsens, Carolus; Rastogi, Sanjay; Dutch Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The reported thin-film polymerization has been used as a screening method in order to find bio-based liquid crystalline polyesters with convenient melting temperatures for melt-processing purposes. An in depth study of the structural, morphological and chemical changes occurring during the ongoing polycondensation reactions of these polymers have been performed. Structural and conformational changes during polymerization for different compositions have been followed by time resolved X-ray and Infrared spectroscopy. In this study, bio-based monomers such as vanillic acid and 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid are successfully incorporated in liquid crystalline polyesters and it is shown that bio-based liquid crystalline polymers with high aromatic content and convenient processing temperatures can be synthesized. Special thanks to the Dutch Polymer Institute for financial support

  10. Promotion of powder crystallinity and its influence on the properties of Nd:YAG transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Benyuan; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Nian; Lu, Tiecheng; He, Junbao

    2017-02-01

    The Nd:YAG raw powders of various crystallinities were obtained from the co-precipitated precursor by calcining at 1100-1250 °C for 2-6 h. XRD, HRTEM and EDX were employed to analyze the powder crystallinity, e.g., its phases, changes of lattice constants, surface defects and morphologies. The subsequent ceramics were fabricated by simply vacuum sintering at 1780 °C for 10 h to well compare the initial intrinsic effect of various powder crystallinities. The induced defect states and corresponding properties of ceramics were explored and discussed. The results show that poorly crystallized powder involves a thick layer on particle surface, which is not well crystallized but can escape XRD detection. This poorly crystallized powder contributes more the inhomogeneous ceramic sintering and introduces more the defects in final ceramics, e.g., impure phase inclusions and dislocations. The results reveal that powder crystallinity should be promoted and considered as a further way to improve ceramic properties.

  11. Inclusão e governamentalidade Inclusion and governmentality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Veiga-Neto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo parte dos conceitos de governamento, biopoder, norma e governamentalidade para argumentar no sentido de que as políticas de inclusão - especialmente as políticas de inclusão escolar - são dispositivos biopolíticos para o governamento e o controle das populações. Tomam-se esses e outros conceitos foucaultianos como ferramentas analíticas para argumentar que é preciso examinar as políticas e práticas inclusivas sem assumir antecipadamente qualquer juízo de valor sobre elas. Entendendo a diferença como manifestação da diversidade, e o diferente como um exótico, um portador de algo que os outros não possuem, as políticas de inclusão - nos modos como vêm sendo formuladas e em parte executadas no Brasil - parecem ignorar a própria diferença. Assim, ao invés de promoverem uma educação para todos, elas correm o risco de realizar uma inclusão excludente das diferenças. Discute-se a distinção entre campanhas públicas e políticas de inclusão em termos dos âmbitos em que ambas se efetivam.Based on the concepts of government, biopower, norm and governmentality, this paper argues that the inclusion policies - especially those of school inclusion - are biopolitical devices to govern and control the populations. These and other concepts by Foucault are used as analytical tools to argue that we have to explore the including policies and practices without any previous value judgment on them. Since they understand the difference as a manifestation of diversity, and the different as the exotic, what carries something the others do not have, the inclusion policies - as they are being formulated and partly enforced in Brazil - seem to ignore difference itself. Thus, instead of promoting education for all, they may lead to an inclusion that excludes the differences. The text finally discusses the distinction between public campaigns and inclusion policies in terms of the settings in which both take place.

  12. Inclusion bodies: a new concept

    OpenAIRE

    García-Fruitós Elena

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, the understanding of inclusion body biology and consequently, of their properties and potential biotechnological applications have dramatically changed. Therefore, the development of new purification protocols aimed to preserve those properties is becoming a pushing demand.

  13. Inclusion bodies: a new concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fruitós, Elena

    2010-11-01

    In the last decades, the understanding of inclusion body biology and consequently, of their properties and potential biotechnological applications have dramatically changed. Therefore, the development of new purification protocols aimed to preserve those properties is becoming a pushing demand.

  14. Teacher preparedness for inclusive education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lynette

    education system, it is often asked whether educators in the class are prepared and ready for inclusive .... in the findings: the first being that teachers who include learners with cognitive disabilities ..... Class size is a problem. •. Lack of facilities.

  15. Inclusions and inhomogeneities under stress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Some general theorems, new and old, concerning the behaviour of elastic inclusions and inhomogeneities in bodies without or with external stress, are assembled. The principal new result is that arbitrary external tractions cannot influence the shape...

  16. EDUCATIONAL INCLUSION AND CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Molina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the basic principles of educational inclusion, focusingspecifically on the inclusion of disabled students in mainstream classrooms, and arguesthat inclusive education should be understood as a process of transforming traditionalschools into spaces of learning for all students. The article uses the lens of critical pedagogyto argue that exclusionary educational practices have been developed through themedicalization of learning disabilities which focused on the disability rather than theabilities of disabled students. Following the same line of thinking, the article providesscientific evidence to debunk myths related to the education of disabled students; especiallymyths that contributed to their exclusion from mainstream classrooms. Finally,based on the Learning Communities model, we provide some concrete strategies fortransforming mainstream classrooms into fully inclusive environments.

  17. Electronic processes in non-crystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mott, Nevill Francis

    2012-01-01

    Since the first edition of this highly successful book the field saw many great developments both in experimental and theoretical studies of electrical properties of non-crystalline solids. It became necessary to rewrite nearly the whole book, while the aims of the second edition remained the same: to set out the theoretical concepts, to test them by comparison with experiment for a wide variety of phenomena, and to apply them to non-crystalline materials. Sir Nevill Mott shared the1977 Nobel Prize for Physics, awarded for his research work in this field. The reissue of this book as part of th

  18. Photochromism of 36-Armed Liquid Crystalline Dendrimer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The photochromism of a 36-armed liquid crystalline dendrimer D6 was briefly described in this paper. The molar absorption coefficient, photoisomerization and photo back-isomerization of D6 in solution were investigated by UV/Vis absorption spectra. The results indicate that the photochromism and photo back-isomerization of D6 in chloroform (CHCl3) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solutions are in accordance with the first order kinetics. The photochromism rate constants of D6 are 10-1 s-1, it is 107 times larger than that of side-chain liquid crystalline polymers containing the same azobenzene moieties.

  19. Used fuel disposition in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Buck, E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eittman, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tinnacher, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tournassat, Christophe. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viswanathan, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Fuel Cycle Technology established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) in fiscal year 2010 (FY10) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level nuclear waste. The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media.

  20. Liquid crystalline thermosetting polyimides. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, A.E.; Huang, S.J. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Inst. of Materials Science

    1993-07-01

    Phase separation of rodlike reinforcing polymers and flexible coil matrix polymers is a common problem in formulating molecular composites. One way to reduce phase separation might be to employ liquid crystalline thermosets as the matrix material. In this work, functionally terminated polyimide oligomers which exhibit lyotropic liquid crystalline behavior were successfully prepared. Materials based on 2,2{prime}-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4,4{prime}-diaminobiphenyl and 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-biphenylenetetra-carboxylic dianhydride have been synthesized and characterized.

  1. Exact Topological Twistons in Crystalline Polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, E; Bazeia, D

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the presence of topological twistons in crystalline polyethylene. We describe crystalline polyethylene with a model that couples the torsional and longitudinal degrees of freedom of the polymeric chain by means of a system of two real scalar fields. This model supports topological twistons, which are described by exact and stable topological solutions that appear when the interaction between torsional and longitudinal fields is polynomial, containing up to the sixth power in the fields. We calculate the energy of the topological twiston, and the result is in very good agreement with the value obtained via molecular simulation.

  2. Observation of atomic collisions in crystalline solids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, R S; Gevers, R

    2013-01-01

    The Observation of Atomic Collisions in Crystalline Solids presents a critical account of the more important experiments which have provided the basis for a better understanding of atomic collision phenomena in crystalline solids. Collisions have been divided into two artificial regimes; primary collisions which deal with the interaction of the incident particles with the solid, and secondary collisions which deal with those events which occur as a result of lattice atoms recoiling from primary encounters. Although the book is intended principally for the experimentalist some simple theoretica

  3. Monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Christophe; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-05-01

    High porosity monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases can be obtained from syndiotactic polystyrene and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)oxide thermoreversible gels by removing the solvent with supercritical CO2. The presence of crystalline nanopores in the aerogels based on these polymers allows a high uptake associated with a high selectivity of volatile organic compounds from vapor phase or aqueous solutions even at very low activities. The sorption and the fast kinetics make these materials particularly suitable as sorption medium to remove traces of pollutants from water and moist air.

  4. Phytochelatins inhibit the metal-induced aggregation of alpha-crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuhisa; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Tsuji, Naoki; Bamba, Takeshi; Aso, Yoshikazu; Kudou, Motonori; Uchida, Yoshiki; Takagi, Masahiro; Harada, Kazuo; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2009-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are heavy-metal-binding peptides found in some eukaryotes. This study investigates the use of plant-derived PCs for the inhibition of metal-induced protein aggregation. The results of this study show that PCs inhibit zinc-induced alpha-crystallin aggregation, and suggest that PCs might be useful as anti-cataract agents.

  5. Structural Evolution of Human Recombinant alfaB-Crystallin under UV Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Fujii, Noriko; Morimoto, Yukio;

    2008-01-01

    External stresses cause certain proteins to lose their regular structure and aggregate. In order to clarify this abnormal aggregation process, a structural evolution of human recombinant aB-crystallin under UV irradiation was observed with in situ small-angle neutron scattering. The abnormal...

  6. ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund: Social Inclusion Survey: Staff Perceptions on Social Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Mary S. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    This paper is intended to contribute to the promotion of social inclusion as a cross-cutting priority in the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), a key issue in the Bank's Renewed Strategic Framework, as a key approach to reducing poverty and inequality in Latin America. It is based upon a staff opinion survey, designed and implemented under the framework of the IDB-UK ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund, to assess how staff view social inclusion as an operational approach. The results of th...

  7. ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund: Social Inclusion Survey: Staff Perceptions on Social Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Mary S. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    This paper is intended to contribute to the promotion of social inclusion as a cross-cutting priority in the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), a key issue in the Bank's Renewed Strategic Framework, as a key approach to reducing poverty and inequality in Latin America. It is based upon a staff opinion survey, designed and implemented under the framework of the IDB-UK ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund, to assess how staff view social inclusion as an operational approach. The results of th...

  8. Bacterial inclusion bodies as potential synthetic devices for pathogen recognition and a therapeutic substance release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talafová, Klaudia; Hrabárová, Eva; Chorvát, Dušan; Nahálka, Jozef

    2013-02-07

    Adhesins of pathogens recognise the glycans on the host cell and mediate adherence. They are also crucial for determining the tissue preferences of pathogens. Currently, glyco-nanomaterials provide potential tool for antimicrobial therapy. We demonstrate that properly glyco-tailored inclusion bodies can specifically bind pathogen adhesins and release therapeutic substances. In this paper, we describe the preparation of tailored inclusion bodies via the conjugation of indicator protein aggregated to form inclusion bodies with soluble proteins. Whereas the indicator protein represents a remedy, the soluble proteins play a role in pathogen recognition. For conjugation, glutaraldehyde was used as linker. The treatment of conjugates with polar lysine, which was used to inactivate the residual glutaraldehyde, inhibited unwanted hydrophobic interactions between inclusion bodies. The tailored inclusion bodies specifically interacted with the SabA adhesin from Helicobacter pylori aggregated to form inclusion bodies that were bound to the sialic acids decorating the surface of human erythrocytes. We also tested the release of indicator proteins from the inclusion bodies using sortase A and Ssp DNAB intein self-cleaving modules, respectively. Sortase A released proteins in a relatively short period of time, whereas the intein cleavage took several weeks. The tailored inclusion bodies are promising "nanopills" for biomedical applications. They are able to specifically target the pathogen, while a self-cleaving module releases a soluble remedy. Various self-cleaving modules can be enabled to achieve the diverse pace of remedy release.

  9. Inclusion of trans-resveratrol in methylated cyclodextrins: synthesis and solid-state structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Trollope

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The phytoalexin trans-resveratrol, 5-[(1E-2-(4-hydroxyphenylethenyl]-1,3-benzenediol, is a well-known, potent antioxidant having a variety of possible biomedical applications. However, its adverse physicochemical properties (low stability, poor aqueous solubility limit such applications and its inclusion in cyclodextrins (CDs has potential for addressing these shortcomings. Here, various methods of the attempted synthesis of inclusion complexes between trans-resveratrol and three methylated cyclodextrins (permethylated α-CD, permethylated β-CD and 2,6-dimethylated β-CD are described. Isolation of the corresponding crystalline 1:1 inclusion compounds enabled their full structure determination by X-ray analysis for the first time, revealing a variety of guest inclusion modes and unique supramolecular crystal packing motifs. The three crystalline inclusion complexes were also fully characterized by thermal analysis (hot stage microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. To complement the solid-state data, phase-solubility studies were conducted using a series of CDs (native and variously derivatised to establish their effect on the aqueous solubility of trans-resveratrol and to estimate association constants for complex formation.

  10. Mutation screening and genotype phenotype correlation of α-crystallin, γ-crystallin and GJA8 gene in congenital cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Tushar; Khokhar, Sudarshan; Kumar, Manoj; Kaur, Punit; Roy, Tara Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To screen α-crystallin (CRYAB), γ-crystallin (CRYGC and CRYGD), and Connexin 50 (Cx-50 or GJA8) genes in congenital cataract patients and controls. Methods Thirty clinically diagnosed congenital cataract cases below 3 years of age from northern India, presenting at Dr. R. P. Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi, India) were enrolled in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, all coding and exon/intron regions were amplified using PCR and direct sequencing was performed to detect any nucleotide variation. ProtScale and Discovery Studio programs were used for insilico and structural analysis of non-synonymous mutations. Results DNA sequencing analysis of CRYAB, CRYGC, CRYGD, and GJA8 showed a total of six variations of which two were novel (CRYGC:p.R48H and GJA8:p.L281C) and four have been previously reported (CRYAB: rs11603779T>G, GJA8: p.L268L, CRYGD: p.R95R, and c.T564C). Both the novel changes, in CRYGC and GJA8 were found in 16.6% of the patients. Previously reported nucleotide alterations (CRYGD:p.R95R and c.T564C) were found in 90% of the patients. Insilico and structural analysis data suggested that two novel non-synonymous mutations altered the stability and solvent accessibility of γC-crystallin and Cx-50 proteins which may lead to lens opacification. Conclusions We observed two novel nonsynonymous variations and four reported variations in CRYAB, CRYGC, CRYGD, and GJA8. The p.R48H variation in γC-crystallin may disrupt the normal structure of lens and can cause cataract. Cx50 is responsible for joining the lens cells into a functional syncytium and a mutation (p.L281C) in GJA8 may lead to lens opacification resulting in cataract formation. This study further expands the mutation spectrum of congenital cataract and help understanding how mutant proteins lead to opacification of lens. PMID:21423869

  11. Donor-hydrogen complexes in crystalline silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Z.N.; Niesen, L; Haas, C; Denteneer, P.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the study of Sb-H complexes in crystalline silicon, employing Sb-119 --> Sn-119 source Mossbauer spectroscopy and a low-energy H implantation technique. In addition to a visible component, we observe a large decrease of the Mossbauer intensity associated with

  12. Smeared gap equations in crystalline color superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggieri, M

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of HDET, we discuss an averaging procedure of the NJL quark-quark interaction lagrangian, treated in the mean field approximation, for the two flavor LOFF phase of QCD. This procedure gives results which are valid in domains where Ginzburg-Landau results may be questionable. We compute and compare the free energy for different LOFF crystalline structures.

  13. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wester, Ture; Weinzieri, Barbara

    The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells with fivefold symmetry in 3D space...

  14. Crystalline damage development during martensitic transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suiker, A.S.J.; Turteltaub, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    A recently developed thermo-mechanical model [1] is presented that can be used to simulate the interactions between martensitic phase transformations and crystalline damage growth at the austenitic grain level. Subgrain information is included in the model via the crystallographic theory of martensi

  15. Donor-hydrogen complexes in crystalline silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Z.N.; Niesen, L; Haas, C; Denteneer, P.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the study of Sb-H complexes in crystalline silicon, employing Sb-119 --> Sn-119 source Mossbauer spectroscopy and a low-energy H implantation technique. In addition to a visible component, we observe a large decrease of the Mossbauer intensity associated with th

  16. Topological crystalline insulator SnTe nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Bishnu R.; Dulal, Rajendra P.; Pegg, Ian L.; Philip, John

    2017-03-01

    Topological crystalline insulators are systems in which a band inversion that is protected by crystalline mirror symmetry gives rise to nontrivial topological surface states. SnTe is a topological crystalline insulator. It exhibits p-type conductivity due to Sn vacancies and Te antisites, which leads to high carrier density in the bulk. Thus growth of high quality SnTe is a prerequisite for understanding the topological crystalline insulating behavior. We have grown SnTe nanoribbons using a solution method. The width of the SnTe ribbons varies from 500 nm to 2 μm. They exhibit rock salt crystal structure with a lattice parameter of 6.32 Å. The solution method that we have adapted uses low temperature, so the Sn vacancies can be controlled. The solution grown SnTe nanoribbons exhibit strong semiconducting behavior with an activation energy of 240 meV. This activation energy matches with the calculated band gap for SnTe with a lattice parameter of 6.32 Å, which is higher than that reported for bulk SnTe. The higher activation energy makes the thermal excitation of bulk charges very difficult on the surface. As a result, the topological surfaces will be free from the disturbance caused by the thermal excitations

  17. γ-Crystallins of the chicken lens: remnants of an ancient vertebrate gene family in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingwei; Sagar, Vatsala; Len, Hoay-Shuen; Peterson, Katherine; Fan, Jianguo; Mishra, Sanghamitra; McMurtry, John; Wilmarth, Phillip A; David, Larry L; Wistow, Graeme

    2016-04-01

    γ-Crystallins, abundant proteins of vertebrate lenses, were thought to be absent from birds. However, bird genomes contain well-conserved genes for γS- and γN-crystallins. Although expressed sequence tag analysis of chicken eye found no transcripts for these genes, RT-PCR detected spliced transcripts for both genes in chicken lens, with lower levels in cornea and retina/retinal pigment epithelium. The level of mRNA for γS in chicken lens was relatively very low even though the chicken crygs gene promoter had lens-preferred activity similar to that of mouse. Chicken γS was detected by a peptide antibody in lens, but not in other ocular tissues. Low levels of γS and γN proteins were detected in chicken lens by shotgun mass spectroscopy. Water-soluble and water-insoluble lens fractions were analyzed and 1934 proteins (chicken lens proteome 30-fold. Although chicken γS is well conserved in protein sequence, it has one notable difference in leucine 16, replacing a surface glutamine conserved in other γ-crystallins, possibly affecting solubility. However, L16 and engineered Q16 versions were both highly soluble and had indistinguishable circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence and heat stability (melting temperature Tm ~ 65 °C) profiles. L16 has been present in birds for over 100 million years and may have been adopted for a specific protein interaction in the bird lens. However, evolution has clearly reduced or eliminated expression of ancestral γ-crystallins in bird lenses. The conservation of genes for γS- and γN-crystallins suggests they may have been preserved for reasons unrelated to the bulk properties of the lens.

  18. Crystalline polymorphism induced by charge regulation in ionic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Palmer, Liam C; Kewalramani, Sumit; Qiao, Baofu; Stupp, Samuel I; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2013-10-08

    The crystallization of molecules with polar and hydrophobic groups, such as ionic amphiphiles and proteins, is of paramount importance in biology and biotechnology. By coassembling dilysine (+2) and carboxylate (-1) amphiphiles of various tail lengths into bilayer membranes at different pH values, we show that the 2D crystallization process in amphiphile membranes can be controlled by modifying the competition of long-range and short-range interactions among the polar and the hydrophobic groups. The pH and the hydrophobic tail length modify the intermolecular packing and the symmetry of their crystalline phase. For hydrophobic tail lengths of 14 carbons (C14), we observe the coassembly into crystalline bilayers with hexagonal molecular ordering via in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. As the tail length increases, the hexagonal lattice spacing decreases due to an increase in van der Waals interactions, as demonstrated by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. For C16 and C18 we observe a reentrant crystalline phase transition sequence, hexagonal-rectangular-C-rectangular-P-rectangular-C-hexagonal, as the solution pH is increased from 3 to 10.5. The stability of the rectangular phases, which maximize tail packing, increases with increasing tail length. As a result, for very long tails (C22), the possibility of observing packing symmetries other than rectangular-C phases diminishes. Our work demonstrates that it is possible to systematically exchange chemical and mechanical energy by changing the solution pH value within a range of physiological conditions at room temperature in bilayers of molecules with ionizable groups.

  19. Potential of human γD-crystallin for hair damage repair: insights into the mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A; Matamá, T; Cruz, C F; Gomes, A C; Cavaco-Paulo, A M

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a new strategy to physically 'repair' chemically damaged hair. Hence the human eye γD-crystallin, a protein from the superfamily characterized structurally by the Greek key motif, was studied. The human γD-crystallin was chosen based on the ability of proteins belonging to this superfamily to be involved in the coating of specific structures. Two crystallins were used on the study, the wild type (Protein Data Bank ID: 1HK0) and the mutant protein. The mutant form was intended to induce a strong and quick protein polymerization as well to have new possible points of anchorage to hair. The ability of both crystallins to bind to damaged hair and even penetrate into its cortex was checked by fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore the reinforcement of hair mechanical resistance, the potential cytotoxic/inflammatory effect of crystallins were studied in order to have a fully comprehension about the protein based formulation. Although the chemical over-bleaching treatment induced a decrease of 20% on the resistance of the hair, the crystallins which bind and penetrate the hair fibre were able to recover and even to improve its mechanical properties when compared to the virgin hair. Moreover none of the crystallins displayed a toxic effect in fibroblasts for all the range of tested concentrations upon 72 h of exposure. The active aggregation process of mutant crystallin induced an inflammatory response in fibroblasts in the first 24 h of contact, measured by the amount of released pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 to the medium. In contrast contact with wild type crystallin did not lead to significant inflammation. Outcome from protein formulation characterization supports the hypothesis that the γD-crystallin it is able to recover and improve the mechanical properties of chemical damaged hair. Therefore it can be considered as a very promising strengthening agent for the

  20. Evidence for variable crystallinity in bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    Bivalve shells are used as important palaeoclimate proxy archives and monitor regional climate variations. The shells mostly exist of two crystalline polymorphic phases of calcium carbonate calcite (rombohedric) and aragonite (orthorhombic). Calcite is the most stable polymorph at standard conditions, whereas vaterite (hexagonal) is the least stable and only rarely found in these structures. Shells are characterized by organized structures and several micro architectures of mollusc shell structures have been identified: Nacre shows different types: columnar and bricked forms and consists of composite inorganic- organic at the nano-scale. They are well known to display a "brick and mortar" structure. By AFM and FIB/TEM methods it could be shown, that its nanostructure consists of the structures in the range of 50 - 100 nm [1, 2]. These structures are vesicles, consisting of CaCO3 and are individually coated by a membrane. Most probably, the mantle epithelian cells of the bivalve extrude CaCO3 vesicles. By Raman spectroscopic investigations the crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, as well as ACC were determined. For some species (Diplodon chilensis patagonicus, Hyriopsis cumingii) pure ACC (i.e. not intermingled with a crystalline phase) could be identified. The presence of an amorphous phase is generally deduced from the lack of definite lattice modes, whereas a broad Raman band in this region is to observe. In most of the cultured pearls (Pinctada maxima and genus Hyriopsis) the ν1-Raman band of ACC clearly displays an asymmetric shape and splits into two different bands according to a nanocrystalline and an amorphous fraction. The FWHMs of most of the crystalline fractions are too high for well crystallized materials and support the assumption of nanocrystalline calcium carbonate polymorph clusters in ACC. They are primarily composed of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) which is later transformed into a crystalline modification [3

  1. Becoming Inclusive: A Code of Conduct for Inclusion and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bonnie J; MacWilliams, Brent R; Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    There are increasing concerns about exclusionary behaviors and lack of diversity in the nursing profession. Exclusionary behaviors, which may include incivility, bullying, and workplace violence, discriminate and isolate individuals and groups who are different, whereas inclusive behaviors encourage diversity. To address inclusion and diversity in nursing, this article offers a code of conduct. This code of conduct builds on existing nursing codes of ethics and applies to nursing students and nurses in both educational and practice settings. Inclusive behaviors that are demonstrated in nurses' relationships with patients, colleagues, the profession, and society are described. This code of conduct provides a basis for measureable change, empowerment, and unification of the profession. Recommendations, implications, and a pledge to action are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-03

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  3. [The etiology and pathogenesis of sporadic inclusion body myositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Ken-Ya; Ito, Hidefumi

    2014-11-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) is the most common acquired muscle disease in older individuals. Muscle weakness and atrophy in the quadriceps, wrist flexor, and finger flexors are the typical clinical findings in sIBM. The etiology and pathogenesis of sIBM are still poorly understood; however, genetic factors, aging, and environmental factors might possibly play a role. The pathological characteristics of sIBM include two unique features: inflammatory changes in muscle fibers, and cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions containing several Alzheimer-type proteins. Based on these pathological findings, there is a continuing debate on whether sIBM is primarily a T cell-mediated inflammatory myositis or a myodegenerative disorder characterized by abnormal protein aggregation, presence of inclusions bodies, and secondary inflammation. Unfortunately, sIBM is also generally refractory to immune therapy.

  4. Strong guest binding by cyclodextrin hosts in competing nonpolar solvents and the unique crystalline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Toshiyuki; Iwamoto, Takuya; Fujino, Yoshinori; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Miyata, Mikiji; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2011-09-02

    6-O-Modified β-cyclodextrins, such as heptakis(6-O-triisopropylsilyl)-β-cyclodextrin (TIPS-β-CD) and heptakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-β-cyclodextrin (TBDMS-β-CD), formed 2:1 inclusion complexes with pyrene in benzene and cyclohexane with high association constants. The X-ray crystalline structure of the TIPS-β-CD-pyrene complex obtained from the benzene solution showed that one pyrene molecule was incorporated in the form of a sandwich-type complex with two benzene molecules within the cavity of the dimer formed by two TIPS-β-CD molecules.

  5. Effects of inclusion of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) leaves, a tannin-containing plant, in a low-protein diet on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of fat-tailed lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamiri, Mohammad Javad; Rajaei Sharifabadi, Hossein; Bagheri, Amir Sajjad; Solhjoo, Amanollah

    2015-03-01

    The protein-sparing effect of condensed tannins (CT) was investigated in growing lambs fed a low- or high-protein diet during a 50-day period. Isocaloric diets containing 106 g crude protein/kg dry matter (DM) (low protein; LP) or 138 g crude protein/kg DM (high protein; HP) were formulated using 70 % concentrate, 15 % corn silage, and 15 % dried licorice leaves, providing CT (4.1 g/kg DM). Twenty-four crossbred male lambs (3-4 months old, 23.9 ± 5.2 kg body weight) were assigned to one of four diets: LP with polyethylene glycol (PEG; 40 g/kg DM) supplementation (LP + PEG), LP without PEG supplementation (LP - PEG), HP with PEG supplementation (HP + PEG), and HP without PEG supplementation (HP - PEG). The effect of dietary crude protein level and CT on feed intake was not significant (P > 0.05). However, a positive effect on daily gain (P 0.05) in groups without PEG supplementation. These preliminary results suggest that the use of CT can minimize the negative effect of low-protein diets on FCR in lambs.

  6. Social inclusion and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobigo, Virginie; Stuart, Heather

    2010-09-01

    Recent research on approaches to improving social inclusion for people with mental disabilities is reviewed. We describe four approaches (or tools) that can be used to improve social inclusion for people with mental disabilities: legislation, community-based supports and services, antistigma/antidiscrimination initiatives, and system monitoring and evaluation. While legislative solutions are the most prevalent, and provide an important framework to support social inclusion, research shows that their full implementation remains problematic. Community-based supports and services that are person-centered and recovery-oriented hold considerable promise, but they are not widely available nor have they been widely evaluated. Antistigma and antidiscrimination strategies are gaining in popularity and offer important avenues for eliminating social barriers and promoting adequate and equitable access to care. Finally, in the context of the current human rights and evidence-based health paradigms, systematic evidence will be needed to support efforts to promote social inclusion for people with mental disabilities, highlight social inequities, and develop best practice approaches. Tools that promote social inclusion of persons with mental disabilities are available, though not yet implemented in a way to fully realize the goals of current disability discourse.

  7. Impact of crystalline quality on neuronal affinity of pristine graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliev, Farida; Briançon-Marjollet, Anne; Bouchiat, Vincent; Delacour, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Due to its outstanding mechanical and electrical properties as well as chemical inertness, graphene has attracted a growing interest in the field of bioelectric interfacing. Herein, we investigate the suitability of pristine, i.e. without a cell adhesive coating, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer graphene to act as a platform for neuronal growth. We study the development of primary hippocampal neurons grown on bare graphene (transferred on glass coverslip) for up to 5 days and show that pristine graphene significantly improves the neurons adhesion and outgrowth at the early stage of culture (1-2 days in vitro). At the later development stage, neurons grown on coating free graphene (untreated with poly-L-lysine) show remarkably well developed neuritic architecture similar to those cultured on conventional poly-L-lysine coated glass coverslips. This exceptional possibility to bypass the adhesive coating allows a direct electrical contact of graphene to the cells and reveals its great potential for chronic medical implants and tissue engineering. Moreover, regarding the controversial results obtained on the neuronal affinity of pristine graphene and its ability to support neuronal growth without the need of polymer or protein coating, we found that the crystallinity of CVD grown graphene plays an important role in neuronal attachment, outgrowth and axonal specification. In particular, we show that the decreasing crystalline quality of graphene tunes the neuronal affinity from highly adhesive to fully repellent.

  8. Comparison of Effects of Crystalline Tryptophane and Coated Tryptophane on Growth Performance, Protein Metabolism and Abilities of Digestion and Absorption of Juvenile Jian Carp (Cyprinus carpio var.Jian)%晶体色氨酸和包膜色氨酸对幼建鲤生长性能、蛋白质代谢及消化吸收能力影响的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐凌; 孙崇岩; 邝声耀; 冯琳; 周小秋

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to compare the effects of crystalline tryptophane and coated trypto-phane on growth performance, protein metabolism and the abilities of digestion and absorption of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var.Jian).A total of 300 juvenile Jian carp with an initial body weight of (7.73 ± 0 .03 ) g were randomly divided into 2 groups ( with 3 replicates per group and 50 fish per replicate) , and the fish in the 2 groups had been fed experimental diets containing crystalline tryptophane and coated tryptophane for 60 days, respectively.The tryptophane content was 0.25% both for 2 experimental diets.The results showed as follows: the specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio, protein retention rate and lipid retention rate in coated tryptophane group were significantly higher and the feed conversion ratio in coated tryptophane group was significantly lower than those in crystalline tryptophane group ( P<0 .05 ) .Compared with the crys-talline tryptophane, the coated tryptophane significantly improved the intestosomatic index, intestinal length in-dex, hepatosomatic index, intestinal protein content, hepatopancreas protein content and the fold heights of an-terior intestine, middle intestine and posterior intestine ( P <0.05 ); significantly increased the activities of trypsin and lipase in intestine and hepatopancreas ( P<0 .05 ); significantly increased the activities of Na +, K +-ATPase andγ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) in middle intestine and posterior intestine and alkaline phos-phatase (AKP) in anterior intestine, middle intestine and posterior intestine (P<0.05).Moreover, the con-centration of plasma ammonia and the activities of glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase ( GOT) and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase ( GPT ) in hepatopancreas and muscle in coated tryptophane group were significantly lower than those in crystalline tryptophane group ( P<0 .05 ) .The results of release rate of tryptophan in vitro showed that crystalline

  9. Mapping the solid-state properties of crystalline lysozyme during pharmaceutical unit-operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T

    2015-10-10

    Bulk crystallisation of protein therapeutic molecules towards their controlled drug delivery is of interest to the biopharmaceutical industry. The complexity of biotherapeutic molecules is likely to lead to complex material properties of crystals in the solid state and to complex transitions. This complexity is explored using batch crystallised lysozyme as a model. The effects of drying and milling on the solid-state transformations of lysozyme crystals were monitored using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), FT-Raman, and enzymatic assay. XRPD was used to characterise crystallinity and these data supported those of crystalline lysozyme which gave a distinctive DSC thermogram. The apparent denaturation temperature (Tm) of the amorphous lysozyme was ∼201 °C, while the Tm of the crystalline form was ∼187 °C. Raman spectra supported a more α-helix rich structure of crystalline lysozyme. This structure is consistent with reduced cooperative unit sizes compared to the amorphous lysozyme and is consistent with a reduction in the Tm of the crystalline form. Evidence was obtained that milling also induced denaturation in the solid-state, with the denatured lysozyme showing no thermal transition. The denaturation of the crystalline lysozyme occurred mainly through its amorphous form. Interestingly, the mechanical denaturation of lysozyme did not affect its biological activity on dissolution. Lysozyme crystals on drying did not become amorphous, while milling-time played a crucial role in the crystalline-amorphous-denatured transformations of lysozyme crystals. DSC is shown to be a key tool to monitor quantitatively these transformations.

  10. Morphological characterization of the AlphaA- and AlphaB-crystallin double knockout mouse lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady James P

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One approach to resolving some of the in vivo functions of alpha-crystallin is to generate animal models where one or both of the alpha-crystallin gene products have been eliminated. In the single alpha-crystallin knockout mice, the remaining alpha-crystallin may fully or partially compensate for some of the functions of the missing protein, especially in the lens, where both alphaA and alphaB are normally expressed at high levels. The purpose of this study was to characterize gross lenticular morphology in normal mice and mice with the targeted disruption of alphaA- and alphaB-crystallin genes (alphaA/BKO. Methods Lenses from 129SvEvTac mice and alphaA/BKO mice were examined by standard scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy methodologies. Results Equatorial and axial (sagittal dimensions of lenses for alphaA/BKO mice were significantly smaller than age-matched wild type lenses. No posterior sutures or fiber cells extending to the posterior capsule of the lens were found in alphaA/BKO lenses. Ectopical nucleic acid staining was observed in the posterior subcapsular region of 5 wk and anterior subcapsular cortex of 54 wk alphaA/BKO lenses. Gross morphological differences were also observed in the equatorial/bow, posterior and anterior regions of lenses from alphaA/BKO mice as compared to wild mice. Conclusion These results indicated that both alphaA- and alphaB-crystallin are necessary for proper fiber cell formation, and that the absence of alpha-crystallin can lead to cataract formation.

  11. Spectroscopic study of inclusions in gem corundum from Mercaderes, Cauca, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeug, Manuela; Rodríguez Vargas, Andrés Ignacio; Nasdala, Lutz

    2016-10-01

    Mineral inclusions in gem corundum from Mercaderes, Cauca, Colombia, were investigated non-destructively using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy, with special focus lying on phases containing radioactive elements. Besides abundant rutile, the minerals zircon, apatite, feldspar, and an epidote-group species, most probably allanite-(Ce), were found. The latter is detected easily from its characteristic Nd3+ emission pattern, which may prove useful in future provenance studies. Zircon inclusions range from well crystalline to moderately radiation damaged [FWHM (full width at half band maximum) of the ν 3(SiO4) Raman band 1.8-10.9 cm-1]. Both the zircon inclusions and their neighbouring host corundum are affected by compressive stress, which is assigned to (1) heterogeneous volume expansion of the host-inclusion couple upon pressure release during the uplift following primary growth and (2) volume expansion of the zircon inclusion due to the accumulation of self-irradiation damage. Internal stress of zircon inclusions averages 1.1 GPa. Heat treatment of corundum leads to structural reconstitution of zircon (narrowed zircon Raman bands with FWHMs in the range 1.8-2.7 cm-1) and accompanying stress release in the adjacent corundum (indicated by downshifts of the R 1 emission of Cr3+). The observation of broadened Raman band of zircon inclusions therefore allows one to exclude high-temperature enhancement of the host corundum.

  12. The Sociology of Social Inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Allman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at social inclusion from a sociological perspective. It argues that sociology complements biological and other natural order explanations of social stratification. The article interrogates a variety of forms of social integration, including ostracism within 5th century b.c. Greece, 19th-century solidarism, and Goffman’s mid-20th-century work on stigma. It does so to demonstrate how in each of these contexts, social inclusion and exclusion can function as apparati that problematize people on the margins, and by extension, contribute to their governance and control. The article proposes that sociology provides a valuable orientation from which to consider social inclusion because it illuminates how social integration maintains and manages the ways in which people move about and through their socially stratified worlds.

  13. Quality control of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schweder Thomas; Hecker Michael; Lin Hongying; Büttner Knut; Urlacher Vlada; Breitenstein Antje; Jürgen Britta; Neubauer Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are key intermediates for protein production. Their quality affects the refolding yield and further purification. Recent functional and structural studies have revealed that IBs are not dead-end aggregates but undergo dynamic changes, including aggregation, refunctionalization of the protein and proteolysis. Both, aggregation of the folding intermediates and turnover of IBs are influenced by the cellular situation and a number of well-studi...

  14. STIM1 Is a Novel Component of ER-Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Membrane Contact Sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Agaisse

    Full Text Available Productive developmental cycle of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis depends on the interaction of the replicative vacuole, named the inclusion, with cellular organelles. We have recently reported the formation of ER-Inclusion membrane contact sites (MCSs, where the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is in apposition to the inclusion membrane. These platforms contain the C. trachomatis inclusion membrane protein IncD, the mammalian ceramide transfer protein CERT and the ER resident proteins VAPA/B and were proposed to play a role in the non-vesicular trafficking of lipids to the inclusion. Here, we identify STIM1 as a novel component of ER-Inclusion MCSs. STIM1, an ER calcium (Ca2+ sensor that relocate to ER-Plasma Membrane (PM MCSs upon Ca2+ store depletion, associated with C. trachomatis inclusion. STIM1, but not the general ER markers Rtn3C and Sec61ß, was enriched at the inclusion membrane. Ultra-structural studies demonstrated that STIM1 localized to ER-Inclusion MCSs. Time-course experiments showed that STIM1, CERT and VAPB co-localized throughout the developmental cycle. By contrast, Orai1, the PM Ca2+ channel that interacts with STIM1 at ER-PM MCSs, did not associate with C. trachomatis inclusion. Upon ER Ca2+ store depletion, a pool of STIM1 relocated to ER-PM MCSs, while the existing ER-Inclusion MCSs remained enriched in STIM1. Finally, we have identified the CAD domain, which mediates STIM1-Orai1 interaction, as the minimal domain required for STIM1 enrichment at ER-Inclusion MCSs. Altogether this study identifies STIM1 as a novel component of ER-C. trachomatis inclusion MCSs. We discuss the potential role(s of STIM1 during the infection process.

  15. The Inclusion of Music/the Music of Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubet, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to situate music within inclusive education. Intersections of music--widely regarded as a "talent" or hyperability--and disability provide unique perspectives on social organisation in general and human valuation in particular. Music is a ubiquitous and an essential component of learning beginning in infancy.…

  16. The Contours of Inclusion: Inclusive Arts Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Don; Henderson, Bill; Barnum, Leah; Kronenberg, Deborah; Blair, Kati; Jenkins, Richard; Hurel, Nicole Agois

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to share models and case examples of the process of inclusive arts curriculum design and evaluation. The first section explains the conceptual and curriculum frameworks that were used in the analysis and generation of the featured case studies (i.e. Understanding by Design, Differentiated Instruction, and…

  17. Special Teaching for Special Children? Pedagogies for Inclusion. Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann, Ed.; Norwich, Brahm, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Some special needs groups (for example dyslexia) have argued strongly for the need for particular specialist approaches. In contrast, many proponents of inclusion have argued that "good teaching is good teaching for all" and that all children benefit from similar approaches. Both positions fail to scrutinise this issue rigorously and coherently,…

  18. A rapid and sensitive detection of D-Aspartic acid in Crystallin by chiral derivatized liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hajime; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Ito, Keisuke; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-10-07

    A method for the determination of D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) and its D/L ratio in peptides and proteins has been developed. This method was carried out with good separation of the D/L chiral peptide pairs by combination of a chiral derivatization and an ADME column separation. Furthermore, a cationic derivatization reagent, DBD-Py-NCS, increased the sensitivity of the ESI-MS/MS detection. To confirm the comprehensive peptide analysis, synthesized α-Crystallin tryptic peptides, which included D-Asp residues, were analyzed. The 5 pairs of D/L-Asp that included peptide diastereomers were well separated. Their peak resolutions were more than 1.5 and the results were reproducible (RSD<0.05, n=5). As an application of this method, we analyzed the α-Crystallin standard and UV irradiated α-Crystallin. After trypsin digestion and DBD-Py-NCS derivatization, the tryptic peptide derivatives were applied to LC-MS/MS. Based on the results of peptide sequence identification, almost all the tryptic peptides of the αA- and αB-Crystallin homologous subunits of α-Crystallin were detected as DBD-Py NCS derivatives. However, there was no D-Asp residue in the standard proteins. In the case of the UV irradiated α-Crystallin, Asp(76) and Asp(84) in the αA-Crystallin and Asp(96) in αB-Crystallin were racemized to D-Asp. These results show that this proposed chiral peptide LC-MS/MS method using chiral derivatization provides a rapid and sensitive analysis for post translational Asp racemization sites in aging proteins.

  19. Inhibition of Fusion of Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusions at 32°C Correlates with Restricted Export of IncA

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, K. A.; Fischer, E.; Hackstadt, T

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that develops within a parasitophorous vacuole termed an inclusion. The inclusion is nonfusogenic with lysosomes but intercepts lipids from a host cell exocytic pathway. Initiation of chlamydial development is concurrent with modification of the inclusion membrane by a set of C. trachomatis-encoded proteins collectively designated Incs. One of these Incs, IncA, is functionally associated with the homotypic fusion of inclusions. Incl...

  20. Goldenhar Syndrome and full inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Claus Dieter Stobäus; Carla Rejane Crixel Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the information included in Fernandes’ Monograph and opinions of his advisor (Stobäus), centered in interfaces with Special Education/Full Inclusion, pointing anatomic-functional elements of this Syndrome, reviewing difficulties encountered in full inclusion, by an interview with his mother and teacher. http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1984686X4444 Discutimos elementos da Monografia de Conclusão de Curso de Fernandes com opiniões de seu orientador (Stobäus), centrando em interfaces com...

  1. Inclusion body myositis and myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, K; Dalakas, M C

    1997-10-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis is a frequent, acquired, adult-onset vacuolar myopathy affecting proximal and distal muscles with a distinct, easily identifiable clinical pattern. Although its primary cause is still unknown, autoimmune, viral, and degenerative processes, alone or in combination, are being considered. A uniform and sustained therapeutic response using the currently available immunomodulatory agents has not yet been achieved. Hereditary, inherited noninflammatory rimmed vacuolar myopathies with similar histologic features, collectively called hereditary inclusion body myopathies, are being redefined with the use of molecular genetics. The implications of the recent advances in clinical and basic sciences are discussed in the present review.

  2. Exploring Preservice Teachers' Attitudes Towards Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, Isabel; Woronko, Dagmara; Zaretsky, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    This study responds to a call for research into existing teacher-education programmes and their impact on teacher candidates' attitudes. An inclusive education course that examined the difference between "soft inclusion" (inclusion which addresses the issue of place rather than substance of learning) and genuine inclusion was used to…

  3. Interpreting Inclusivity: An Endeavour of Great Proportions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlach, Richard George; Chambers, Dianne Joy

    2011-01-01

    Commencing with a historical account of how special needs education has informed the inclusivity debate, the authors consider the knotty problem of what is meant by inclusivity. An examination of the characteristics of inclusivity is then undertaken, and a functional school-based inclusivity framework--a three-faceted model--is proposed. The model…

  4. Shaped Ni nanoparticles with an unconventional hcp crystalline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chanyeon; Kim, Cheonghee; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2014-06-18

    Hourglass-shaped Ni nanoparticles were synthesized with a hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure. The unconventional crystalline structure could be stabilized by intensive utilization of hexadecylamine. The dense organic layer on the surface protected the meta-stable crystalline structure.

  5. Enhancement of photocatalytic performance of TiO{sub 2} produced by an alcohothermal approach through inclusion of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Changyuan, E-mail: hcy6257@163.com [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Surface Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); School of Materials and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Lu, Tiewen [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Surface Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chen, Fei [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Surface Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); School of Materials and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Zhang, Rongbin, E-mail: rbzhang@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Lian, Chengjiang; Zheng, Shizheng; Hu, Quanhong; Duo, Shuwang [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Surface Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); School of Materials and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • High crystallinity of TiO{sub 2} with exposed (0 0 1) facets was prepared by an alcohothermal approach through inclusion of water. • Water played an important role in conducting the size, shape, crystallinity, microstructure and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}. • High crystallinity of TiO{sub 2} could retard the recombination and promote the separation of electron–hole pairs. - Abstract: High crystallinity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) with exposed (0 0 1) facets was prepared by an alcohothermal method without the addition of any specific organic reagents, in which titanium isopropoxide was used as the titania precursor, water and ethanol (0.6/90–5/90, v/v) as the reaction medium. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements showed that water played an important role in conducting the size, shape, crystallinity and microstructure of TiO{sub 2} NPs. The photoluminescence spectroscopy and photocurrent measurements indicated that enhanced crystallinity could hinder effectively the recombination and promote significantly the separation of electron–hole pairs in TiO{sub 2} NPs. These will contribute to the enhancement of photocatalytic performance. Methyl orange photodegradation under UV light confirmed that high crystallinity of TiO{sub 2} NPs did exhibit a high photocatalytic activity due to the effective separation of photoinduced charges and exposure of highly reactive (0 0 1) facets.

  6. INCLUSIVE CULTURE IN PRE-SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena NOVACHEVSKA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education is a rational concept that refers to the overall and long-term transformation of institutional systems in society, especially in education. Along with the transformation, a number of important and unresolved issues still appear in both theory and practice, as the duty of pre-school institutions and schools is to educate every student in the mainstream education system. One of the most important aspects of inclusion is the inclusive culture. Regardless of the good inclusive policy and practice, one cannot talk about successful inclusion without a properly developed inclusive institutional culture.This paper is a contribution to the research considering the development of inclusive culture in three preschool institutions. It is based on the thinking and attitudes of the pre­school staff toward the necessity of developing and nurturing an inclusive culture. Successful inclusion of pupils with special needs in the mainstream school system cannot be conceived without an inclusive culture.

  7. Effects of green and red light in βL-crystallin and ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, J Horacio; Reynaga-Hernández, Elizabeth; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Montero-Morán, Gabriela; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Mercado-Uribe, Hilda

    2015-12-14

    The effects of visible light on biological systems have been widely studied. In particular, the alterations of blue light on the ocular lens have recently attracted much attention. Here, we present a study about the effects produced by green and red light on two different proteins: βL-crystallin and ovalbumin. Based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence emission measurements, we found that both wavelengths induce structural changes in these proteins. We also observed that βL-crystallin aggregates. Our work may advance our understanding about conformational and aggregation processes in proteins subjected to visible radiation and the possible relationship with cataracts. While blue light has been considered the only harmful component in the visible espectrum, our findings show the possibility that lower energy components may be also of some concern.

  8. Effect of Asp 96 isomerization on the properties of a lens αB-crystallin-derived short peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Takumi; Fujii, Noriko

    2015-12-10

    One of the major reasons for age-related cataract formation is an accumulation of insoluble lens proteins. In particular, higher-order α-crystallin aggregates, comprising αA and αB subunits, are insolubilized by the build up of various post-translational modifications over time. Although we previously found an exceptional amount of Asp96 isomerization in αB-crystallin from aged human lens, the biological effect remains unknown. To approximate the effect of Asp 96 isomerization in αB-crystallin, here residues 93-103 of αB-crystallin were chemically synthesized as peptides in which l-α-Asp was replaced with l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp, or D-β-Asp. The resulting peptides were then compared in a biological assay. The results showed that isomerization of Asp 96 altered both the local structure of peptide and its stability against enzymatic digestion. In addition, the synthesized peptides decreased the insoluble fraction of heated α-crystallin. The D-β-Asp-containing peptide further decreased heat-induced precipitation of α-crystallin, and a chaperone assay based on heated alcohol dehydrogenase implied differential interaction of the peptides with substrate depending on the Asp isomer present in each. Our results suggest that the formation of Asp isomers is likely to affect the higher-order oligomer structure of α-crystallin and thereby its chaperone functions in aged lens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electromagnetic Processes in strong Crystalline Fields

    CERN Multimedia

    Uggerhoj, U I; Mikkelsen, F K

    2007-01-01

    We propose a number of new investigations on aspects of radiation from high energy electron and positron beams (10-300 GeV) in single crystals and amorphous targets. The common heading is radiation emission by electrons and positrons in strong electromagnetic fields, but as the setup is quite versatile, other related phenomena in radiation emission can be studied as well. The intent is to clarify the role of a number of important aspects of radiation in strong fields as e.g. observed in crystals. We propose to measure trident 'Klein-like' production in strong crystalline fields, 'crystalline undulator' radiation, 'sandwich' target phenomena, LPM suppression of pair production as well as axial and planar effects in contributions of spin to the radiation.

  10. Liquid Crystalline Semiconductors Materials, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Stephen; O'Neill, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This is an exciting stage in the development of organic electronics. It is no longer an area of purely academic interest as increasingly real applications are being developed, some of which are beginning to come on-stream. Areas that have already been commercially developed or which are under intensive development include organic light emitting diodes (for flat panel displays and solid state lighting), organic photovoltaic cells, organic thin film transistors (for smart tags and flat panel displays) and sensors. Within the family of organic electronic materials, liquid crystals are relative newcomers. The first electronically conducting liquid crystals were reported in 1988 but already a substantial literature has developed. The advantage of liquid crystalline semiconductors is that they have the easy processability of amorphous and polymeric semiconductors but they usually have higher charge carrier mobilities. Their mobilities do not reach the levels seen in crystalline organics but they circumvent all of t...

  11. Radiation collimation in a thick crystalline undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistisen, Tobias Nyholm; Uggerhøj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Lauth, Werner; Klag, Pascal

    2017-05-01

    With the recent experimental confirmation of the existence of energetic radiation from a Small Amplitude, Small Period (SASP) crystalline undulator [T.N. Wistisen, K.K. Andersen, S. Yilmaz, R. Mikkelsen, J. Lundsgaard Hansen, U.I. Uggerhøj, W. Lauth, H. Backe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 254801 (2014)], the field of specially manufactured crystals, from which specific radiation characteristics can be obtained, has evolved substantially. In this paper we confirm the existence of the crystalline undulator radiation, using electrons of energies of 855 GeV from the MAinzer MIcrotron (MAMI) in a crystal that is approximately 10 times thicker than the previous one. Furthermore, we have measured a significant increase in enhancement, in good agreement with calculations, of the undulator peak by collimation to angles smaller than the natural opening angle of the radiation emission process, 1 /γ. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  12. Basic research challenges in crystalline silicon photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, J.H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    Silicon is abundant, non-toxic and has an ideal band gap for photovoltaic energy conversion. Experimental world record cells of 24 % conversion efficiency with around 300 {mu}m thickness are only 4 % (absolute) efficiency points below the theoretical Auger recombination-limit of around 28 %. Compared with other photovoltaic materials, crystalline silicon has only very few disadvantages. The handicap of weak light absorbance may be mastered by clever optical designs. Single crystalline cells of only 48 {mu}m thickness showed 17.3 % efficiency even without backside reflectors. A technology of solar cells from polycrystalline Si films on foreign substrates arises at the horizon. However, the disadvantageous, strong activity of grain boundaries in Si could be an insurmountable hurdle for a cost-effective, terrestrial photovoltaics based on polycrystalline Si on foreign substrates. This talk discusses some basic research challenges related to a Si based photovoltaics.

  13. Inclusive Education in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    C. Kenneth Tanner; Deborah Jan Vaughn Linscott; Susan Allan Galis

    1996-01-01

    School reform issues addressing inclusive education were investigated in this nationwide (United States) study. A total of 714 randomly selected middle school principals and teachers responded to concerns about inclusion, "degree of change needed in" and "importance of" collaborative strategies of teaching, perceived barriers to inclusion, and supportive activities and concepts for inclusive education. There was disagreement among teachers and principals regarding some aspects of inclusive ed...

  14. University Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajeet Rohatgi; Vijay Yelundur; Abasifreke Ebong; Dong Seop Kim

    2008-08-18

    The overall goal of the program is to advance the current state of crystalline silicon solar cell technology to make photovoltaics more competitive with conventional energy sources. This program emphasizes fundamental and applied research that results in low-cost, high-efficiency cells on commercial silicon substrates with strong involvement of the PV industry, and support a very strong photovoltaics education program in the US based on classroom education and hands-on training in the laboratory.

  15. Cystoid Macular Edema in Bietti's Crystalline Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Osman Saatci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man with progressive bilateral visual decline was diagnosed to have Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD. Fluorescein angiography revealed bilateral petaloid type late hyperfluorescence implicating concurrent cystoid macular edema (CME. Optical coherence tomography exhibited cystoid foveal lacunas OU. During the follow-up of six years, intraretinal crystals reduced in amount but CME persisted angiographically and tomographically. CME is among the rare macular features of BCD including subfoveal sensorial detachment, subretinal neovascular membrane, and macular hole.

  16. Concentration Transitions on the Crystalline Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Gorenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerical modeling of dilute 2D and 3D crystalline lattices are presented. The percolation thresholds for face-centered cubic (fcc, body-centered cubic (bcc and the simple cubic (sc lattices for the first, second and third coordination spheres are obtained by means of Monte Carlo (MC method. It is shown, that the mean value of the percolation cluster density has a minimum value at the percolation threshold.

  17. Cystoid Macular Edema in Bietti's Crystalline Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Osman Saatci; Hasan Can Doruk; Aylin Yaman

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with progressive bilateral visual decline was diagnosed to have Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD). Fluorescein angiography revealed bilateral petaloid type late hyperfluorescence implicating concurrent cystoid macular edema (CME). Optical coherence tomography exhibited cystoid foveal lacunas OU. During the follow-up of six years, intraretinal crystals reduced in amount but CME persisted angiographically and tomographically. CME is among the rare macular features of BCD in...

  18. Bietti’ Crystalline Retinal Dystrophy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Şahin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’ crystalline retinal dystrophy (BCD is a rare, auto­somal, recessively inherited disorder, characterized by the deposition of yellow crystals in the corneal limbus and retina. In this paper we aimed to present a pediatric case with BCD, with clinical, electrophysiological and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings and discuss BCD with the light of the literature. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 94-97

  19. Controlled synthesis of single-crystalline graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xueshen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the controlled synthesis of single-crystalline graphene on the back side of copper foil using CH4 as the precursor. The influence of growth time and the pressure ratio of CH4/H2 on the structure of graphene are examined. An optimized polymer-assisted method is used to transfer the synthesized graphene onto a SiO2/Si substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the graphene.

  20. The elastic properties of crystalline syndiotactic polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Unwin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the ultimate mechanical stiffness of a polymer is of considerable value because this provides a good indication of the effort which might justifiably be expended either in polymer synthesis or in polymer engineering to produce optimum polymer structures. Generally, the best mechanical properties are identified with those of the crystalline structure, so the problem is essentially one of measuring or predicting the crystal properties.

  1. Effect of polylactic acid crystallinity on its electret properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzhova, A. A.; Galikhanov, M. F.; Kuznetsova, N. V.; Petrov, V. A.; Khairullin, R. Z.

    2016-09-01

    Electret properties of the polylactic acid films with different degree of crystallinity due to different cooling and annealing conditions were studied. Samples with the higher degree of crystallinity showed more stable electret characteristics resulting from amorphous-crystalline interface boundary growth and capturing bigger amount of injected charge carriers by volume energy traps.

  2. Crystallinity in starch plastics: consequences for material properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Soest, J.J.G. van

    1997-01-01

    The processing of starches with biodegradable additives has made biodegradable plastics suitable for a number of applications. Starch plastics are partially crystalline as a result of residual crystallinity and the recrystallization of amylose and amylopectin. Such crystallinity is a key determinant

  3. Fracture of polypropylene: 2. the effect of the crystallinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, A.; Wal, A.; Mulder, J.J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crystallinity on the fracture behaviour of polypropylene was studied under impact conditions. The crystallinity was varied by taking low- and high-isotactic polypropylenes and mixtures thereof. The crystallinity ranged from 31 to 53 wt%. The fracture behaviour was studied as a function

  4. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLY-CRYSTALLINE SILICON THIN FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.F. Hu; H. Shen; Z.Y. Liu; L.S. Wen

    2003-01-01

    Poly-crystalline silicon thin film has big potential of reducing the cost of solar cells.In this paper the preparation of thin film is introduced, and then the morphology of poly-crystalline thin film is discussed. On the film we developed poly-crystalline silicon thin film solar cells with efficiency up to 6. 05% without anti-reflection coating.

  5. Inclusion in the Microsoft Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Since 1975, Microsoft has been a worldwide leader in software, services, and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential. Loren Mikola, the Disability Inclusion Program Manager at Microsoft, ensures that this technology also reaches and includes the special needs population and, through the hiring of individuals with…

  6. Inclusive Education and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the troubled, problematic and contested field of inclusive education, characterised by antagonisms between so-called inclusionists and special educationists; frustration, particularly among disability activists caused by the abstraction of the social model of disability and the expansion of the special educational needs…

  7. Grasping the Promise of Inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Fern

    A teacher and mother of a child with mental retardation examined the history and current status of the inclusion movement. A review of the historical background considers the origins of special education, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, major court cases, and requirements of the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with…

  8. Leveraging Technology for Educational Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sudha; Subramaniam, Radha

    2017-01-01

    The divides created by inequalities of income, lopsided growth and by the vicious circle of poverty has ensnared learning and delayed the planned strategies for educational inclusion. India's eighth Five-Year Plan prioritised and allocated increased funding for education with focus on reach-out to the remote interiors and rural India. However,…

  9. Error bounds for set inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Xiyin(郑喜印)

    2003-01-01

    A variant of Robinson-Ursescu Theorem is given in normed spaces. Several error bound theorems for convex inclusions are proved and in particular a positive answer to Li and Singer's conjecture is given under weaker assumption than the assumption required in their conjecture. Perturbation error bounds are also studied. As applications, we study error bounds for convex inequality systems.

  10. Students' responses to inclusive design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at how the use of inclusive design (ID) methods affects students' work processes in designing welfare technology. Work diaries showed students sub-divided their project: problem solving, data gathering and ideation, among others. This shows how the design problem was resolved...

  11. Inclusive Hard Diffraction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Proskuryakov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Recent data from the H1 and ZEUS experiments on hard inclusive diffraction are discussed. Results of QCD analyses of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering processes are reported. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive dijet measurements.

  12. Difference, inclusion, and mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Lourdes; Healy, Lulu; Skovsmose, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The round-table discussion on Difference, Inclusion and Mathematics Education was in included in the scientific programme of VI SIPEM in recognition and celebration of the emerging body of research into the challenges of building a culture of mathematics education which values and respects the di...

  13. Difference, inclusion, and mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Lourdes; Healy, Lulu; Skovsmose, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The round-table discussion on Difference, Inclusion and Mathematics Education was in included in the scientific programme of VI SIPEM in recognition and celebration of the emerging body of research into the challenges of building a culture of mathematics education which values and respects the di...

  14. Early Childhood Inclusion in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubešic, Marta; Šimleša, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    This article explains early childhood inclusion in Croatia from its beginnings up to challenges in current policy and practice. The first preschool education for children with disabilities dates back to the 1980s and was provided in special institutions. In the last 10 years, mainstream kindergartens have been enrolling children with disabilities…

  15. Early Childhood Inclusion in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Coral R.

    2016-01-01

    From the introduction of early intervention services in Australian in the mid-1970s, the families of children with intellectual and multiple disabilities have been encouraged to enroll their children in local preschools and childcare centers. Children with disabilities have also accessed a range of alternatives to full inclusion, such as reverse…

  16. Inclusive fitness theory and eusociality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbot, P.; Wrangham, R.; Abe, J.

    2011-01-01

    Arising from M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita & E. O. Wilson 466, 1057-1062 (2010); Nowak et al. reply. Nowak et al. argue that inclusive fitness theory has been of little value in explaining the natural world, and that it has led to negligible progress in explaining the evolution of eusociality. Howev...

  17. Taking Inclusion into the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Dorothy Kerzner; Gartner, Alan

    1998-01-01

    According to the reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1997), education of disabled children should produce outcomes akin to those expected of "regular" students, and disabled students should be educated with other kids. Implementing inclusive programs will require visionary leadership, educator collaboration,…

  18. Inclusive Education and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the troubled, problematic and contested field of inclusive education, characterised by antagonisms between so-called inclusionists and special educationists; frustration, particularly among disability activists caused by the abstraction of the social model of disability and the expansion of the special educational needs…

  19. Stamp forming optimization for formability and crystallinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donderwinkel, T. G.; Rietman, B.; Haanappel, S. P.; Akkerman, R.

    2016-10-01

    The stamp forming process is well suited for high volume production of thermoplastic composite parts. The process can be characterized as highly non-isothermal as it involves local quench-cooling of a molten thermoplastic composite blank where it makes contact with colder tooling. The formability of the thermoplastic composite depends on the viscoelastic material behavior of the matrix material, which is sensitive to temperature and degree of crystallinity. An experimental study was performed to determine the effect of temperature and crystallinity on the storage modulus during cooling for a woven glass fiber polyamide-6 composite material. An increase of two decades in modulus was observed during crystallization. As this will significantly impede the blank formability, the onset of crystallization effectively governs the time available for forming. Besides the experimental work, a numerical model is developed to study the temperature and crystallinity throughout the stamp forming process. A process window can be determined by feeding the model with the experimentally obtained data on crystallization.

  20. Liquid Crystalline Compositions as Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibaev, Petr; Murray, John; Tantillo, Anthony; Wenzlick, Madison; Howard-Jennings, Jordan

    2015-03-01

    Droplets and films of nematic and cholesteric liquid crystalline mixtures were studied as promising detectors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air. Under increasing concentration of VOC in the air the detection may rely on each of the following effects sequentially observed one after the other due to the diffusion of VOC inside liquid crystalline matrix: i. slight changes in orientation and order parameter of liquid crystal, ii. formation of bubbles on the top of the liquid crystalline droplet due to the mass transfer between the areas with different order parameter, iii. complete isotropisation of the liquid crystal. All three stages can be easily monitored by optical microscopy and photo camera. Detection limits corresponding to the first stage are typically lower by a factor of 3-6 than detection limits corresponding to the beginning of mass transfer and isotropisation. The prototype of a compact sensor sensitive to the presence of organic solvents in the air is described in detail. The detection limits of the sensor is significantly lower than VOC exposure standards. The qualitative model is presented to account for the observed changes related to the diffusion, changes of order parameter and isotropisation.

  1. Frequency of nuclear mutant huntingtin inclusion formation in neurons and glia is cell-type-specific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Anne H P; van Hal, Maurik; Op den Kelder, Ilse C; Meier, Romy T; de Ruiter, Anna-Aster; Schut, Menno H; Smith, Donna L; Grit, Corien; Brouwer, Nieske; Kamphuis, Willem; Boddeke, H W G M; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; van Roon, Willeke M C; Bates, Gillian P; Hol, Elly M; Reits, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a CAG expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene, leading to HTT inclusion formation in the brain. The mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) is ubiquitously expressed and therefore nuclear inclusions cou

  2. Primordial Compositions of Refractory Inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, L; Simon, S B; Rai, V K; Thiemens, M H; Hutcheon, I D; Williams, R W; Galy, A; Ding, T; Fedkin, A V; Clayton, R N; Mayeda, T K

    2008-02-20

    Bulk chemical and oxygen, magnesium and silicon isotopic compositions were measured for each of 17 Types A and B refractory inclusions from CV3 chondrites. After bulk chemical compositions were corrected for non-representative sampling in the laboratory, the Mg and Si isotopic compositions of each inclusion were used to calculate its original chemical composition assuming that the heavy-isotope enrichments of these elements are due to Rayleigh fractionation that accompanied their evaporation from CMAS liquids. The resulting pre-evaporation chemical compositions are consistent with those predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations for high-temperature nebular condensates but only if different inclusions condensed from nebular regions that ranged in total pressure from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -1} bar, regardless of whether they formed in a system of solar composition or in one enriched in OC dust relative to gas by a factor of ten relative to solar composition. This is similar to the range of total pressures predicted by dynamic models of the solar nebula for regions whose temperatures are in the range of silicate condensation temperatures. Alternatively, if departure from equilibrium condensation and/or non-representative sampling of condensates in the nebula occurred, the inferred range of total pressure could be smaller. Simple kinetic modeling of evaporation successfully reproduces observed chemical compositions of most inclusions from their inferred pre-evaporation compositions, suggesting that closed-system isotopic exchange processes did not have a significant effect on their isotopic compositions. Comparison of pre-evaporation compositions with observed ones indicates that 80% of the enrichment in refractory CaO + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to more volatile MgO + SiO{sub 2} is due to initial condensation and 20% due to subsequent evaporation for both Type A and Type B inclusions.

  3. αB-Crystallin. A Hybrid Solid-State/Solution-State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehle, Stefan [Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany); Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); van Rossum, Barth [Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Stout, Joseph R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Noguchi, Satoshi M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Falber, Katja [Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Rehbein, Kristina [Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Oschkinat, Hartmut [Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany); Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Klevit, Rachel E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rajagopal, Ponni [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2008-11-14

    Atomic-level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small heat-shock protein family, has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on an ~580-kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue 20-kDa subunits. An ~100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all small heat-shock proteins, and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α- crystallin domain constructs isolated from αB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and Cβ resonances have been obtained for residues 64–162 (α-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain by solid-state and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six β-strands in the α-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the α-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid-state and solution-state, indicating similar structures for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of intersubunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the α-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within αB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human α-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid-state and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra as a function of pH. The isolated α-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer–monomer transition over the pH range 7.5–6.8. This steep pHdependent switch may be important for αB to function optimally (e.g., to preserve the filament integrity

  4. Enhancement of crystallinity of cellulose produced by Escherichia coli through heterologous expression of bcsD gene from Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Elaheh; Babaipour, Valiollah; Deldar, Ali Asghar; Yakhchali, Bagher; Fatemi, Seyed Safa-Ali

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the crystallinity index of the cellulose produced by Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 after heterologous expression of the cellulose synthase subunit D (bcsD) gene of Gluconacetobacter xylinus BPR2001. The bcsD gene of G. xylinus BPR2001 was expressed in E. coli and its protein product was visualized using SDS-PAGE. FTIR analysis showed that the crystallinity index of the cellulose produced by the recombinants was 0.84, which is 17% more than that of the wild type strain. The increased crystallinity index was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The cellulose content was not changed significantly after over-expressing the bcsD. The bcsD gene can improve the crystalline structure of the bacterial cellulose but there is not any significant difference between the amounts of cellulose produced by the recombinant and wild type E. coli Nissle 1917.

  5. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  6. Epoxy + liquid crystalline epoxy coreacted network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchaipetch, Prakaipetch

    2000-10-01

    Molecular reinforcement through in-situ polymerization of liquid crystalline epoxies (LCEs) and a non-liquid crystalline epoxy has been investigated. Three LCEs: diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenol (DGE-DHBP) and digylcidyl ether of 4-hydroxyphenyl-4″-hydroxybiphenyl-4 '-carboxylate (DGE-HHC), were synthesized and blended with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBP-F) and subsequently cured with anhydride and amine curing agents. Curing kinetics were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Parameters for autocatalytic curing kinetics of both pure monomers and blended systems were determined. The extent of cure for both monomers was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The glass transitions were evaluated as a function of composition using DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results show that the LC constituent affects the curing kinetics of the epoxy resin and that the systems are highly miscible. The effects of molecular reinforcement of DGEBP-F by DGE-DHBP and DGE-HHC were investigated. The concentration of the liquid crystalline moiety affects mechanical properties. Tensile, impact and fracture toughness tests results are evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces shows changes in failure mechanisms compared to the pure components. Results indicate that mechanical properties of the blended samples are improved already at low concentration by weight of the LCE added into epoxy resin. The improvement in mechanical properties was found to occur irrespective of the absence of liquid crystallinity in the blended networks. The mechanism of crack study indicates that crack deflection and crack bridging are the mechanisms in case of LC epoxy. In case of LC modified epoxy, the crack deflection is the main mechanism. Moreover, the effect of coreacting an epoxy with a reactive monomer liquid crystalline epoxy as a matrix for glass fiber composites was investigated. Mechanical

  7. Femtosecond fluorescence spectra of tryptophan in human gamma-crystallin mutants: site-dependent ultrafast quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Jiejin; Toptygin, Dmitri; Tcherkasskaya, Olga; Callis, Patrik; King, Jonathan; Brand, Ludwig; Knutson, Jay R

    2009-11-25

    The eye lens Crystallin proteins are subject to UV irradiation throughout life, and the photochemistry of damage proceeds through the excited state; thus, their tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence lifetimes are physiologically important properties. The time-resolved fluorescence spectra of single Trps in human gammaD- and gammaS-Crystallins have been measured with both an upconversion spectrophotofluorometer on the 300 fs to 100 ps time scale, and a time correlated single photon counting apparatus on the 100 ps to 10 ns time scale, respectively. Three Trps in each wild type protein were replaced by phenylalanine, leading to single-Trp mutants: W68-only and W156-only of HgammaD- and W72-only and W162-only of HgammaS-Crystallin. These proteins exhibit similar ultrafast signatures: positive definite decay associated spectra (DAS) for 50-65 ps decay constants that indicate dominance of fast, heterogeneous quenching. The quenched population (judged by amplitude) of this DAS differs among mutants. Trps 68, 156 in human gammaD- and Trp72 in human gammaS-Crystallin are buried, but water can reach amide oxygen and ring HE1 atoms through narrow channels. QM-MM simulations of quenching by electron transfer predict heterogeneous decay times from 50-500 ps that agree with our experimental results. Further analysis of apparent radiative lifetimes allow us to deduce that substantial subpopulations of Trp are fully quenched in even faster (sub-300 fs) processes for several of the mutants. The quenching of Trp fluorescence of human gammaD- and gammaS-Crystallin may protect them from ambient light induced photo damage.

  8. Inclusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sheri

    1989-01-01

    This article stresses the importance of local PTA involving all parents in their programs, especially parents from minority groups. This article includes a checklist for rating local PTA. Also included is a brief case study of one PTA's successful efforts to increase the ethnic and language diversity of its membership. (IAH)

  9. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  10. Structural investigation of amylose complexes with small ligands: helical conformation, crystalline structure and thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bail, P; Rondeau, C; Buléon, A

    2005-03-01

    Crystalline amylose complexes were prepared with decanal, 1-butanol, menthone and alpha-naphtol. Their crystalline structure and the related helical conformation, determined by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and 13C CPMAS solid state NMR, were assigned to V6I, V6II, V6III and V8 types, respectively. It was possible to propose some hypotheses on the possible nature of interactions and especially intra-/inter-helical inclusion. Some shifts in the NMR C1 carbon signals were attributed to the presence of ligand in specific sites inside the structure for a same type of V6 helical conformation. Moreover, the crystallinity and polymorphic changes induced by desorption/rehydration were studied. A general increase of the carbon resonances sharpness upon rehydration has been observed, but also a V6II-V6I transition when decreasing the water content. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments were also performed to approach the thermostability of the four types of complex and also the way they form again after melting/cooling sequences.

  11. Characterization of gamma-crystallin from a catfish: structural characterization of one major isoform with high methionine by cDNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F M; Chang, W C; Lin, C H; Hsu, A L; Chiou, S H

    1995-04-01

    gamma-Crystallin is the major and most abundant lens protein present in the eye lens of most teleostean fishes. To facilitate structural characterization of gamma-crystallins isolated from the lens of the catfishes (Clarias fuscus), a cDNA mixture was synthesized from the poly(A)+mRNA isolated from fresh eye lenses, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was adopted to obtain cDNAs encoding various gamma-crystallins. Plasmids of transformed E. coli strain JM109 containing amplified gamma-crystallin cDNAs were purified and prepared for nucleotide sequencing by the dideoxynucleotide chain-termination method. Sequencing more than five clones containing DNA inserts of 0.52 kb revealed the presence of one major isoform with a complete reading frame of 534 base pairs, covering a gamma-crystallin (gamma M1) with a deduced protein sequence of 177 amino acids excluding the initiating methionine. It was of interest to find that this crystallin of pI 9.1 contains a high-methionine content of 15.3% in contrast to those gamma-crystallins of low-methionine content from most mammalian lenses. Sequence comparisons of catfish gamma M1-crystallin with those published sequences of gamma-crystallins from carp, bovine and mouse lenses indicate that there is approx. an 82% sequence homology between the catfish and the carp species of piscine class whereas only 51-58% homology is found between mammals and the catfish. Moreover the differences in the hydropathy profiles for these two groups of gamma-crystallins, i.e. one with a high-methionine content from teleostean fishes and the other with a low-methionine content from mammalian species, reflect a distinct variance in the polarity distributions of surface amino acids in these crystallins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Mbosi: An anomalous iron with unique silicate inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clarke, Roy S., Jr.; Wasson, John T.

    1996-09-01

    The Mbosi iron meteorite contains millimeter size silicate inclusions. Mbosi is an ungrouped iron meteorite with a Ge/Ga ratio >10, which is an anomalous property shared with the five-member IIF iron group, the Eagle Station pallasites and four other ungrouped irons. Neither the IIF group nor the four other ungrouped irons are known to have silicate inclusions. Chips from three Mbosi inclusions were studied, but most of the work concentrated on a whole 3.1 mm circular inclusion. This inclusion consists of a mantle and a central core of different mineralogies. The mantle is partially devitrified quartz-normative glass, consisting of microscopic crystallites of two pyroxenes and plagioclase, which are crystalline enough to give an x-ray powder diffraction pattern but not coarse enough to permit analyses of individual minerals. The core consists of silica. The bulk composition does not match any known meteorite type, although there is a similarity in mode of occurrence to quartz-normative silicate inclusions in some HE irons. Mbosi silicate appears to be unique. The bulk rare earth element (REE) pattern of the mantle is flat at ≅ 7×C1; the core is depleted in REE but shows a small positive Eu anomaly. The O-isotope composition of bulk silicate lies on a unit slope mixing line (parallel and close to the C3 mixing line) that includes the Eagle Station pallasites and the iron Bocaiuva (related to the IIF irons); all of these share the property of having Ge/Ga ratios >10. It is concluded that Mbosi silicate represents a silica-bearing source rock that was melted and injected into metal. Melting occurred early in the history of the parent body because the metal now shows a normal Widmanstätten structure with only minor distortion that was caused when the parent body broke up and released meteorites into interplanetary space. The cause of Ge/Ga ratios being >10 in these irons is unknown. The fact that silicates in Mbosi, Bocaiuva (related to IIF irons) and the Eagle

  13. DDA Modeling for the Mid-IR Absorption of Irregularly Shaped Crystalline Forsterite Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sean; Wooden, D. H.; Kelley, M. S.; Harker, D. E.; Woodward, C. E.; Murphy, J.

    2010-10-01

    An analysis of the Spitzer IRS spectra of the Deep Impact ejecta of comet 9P/Tempel 1 (Wooden et al. 2010, 42nd DPS Meeting) in conjunction with the dynamics of the ejecta grains (Kelley et al. 2010, 42nd DPS Meeting) strongly suggests that ecliptic comets have comae dominated by large (> 10 - 20 micron in radii) porous grains with Mg-rich crystal inclusions. In fact, Kelley et al. (2010) conclude that many ecliptic comets may be dominated by such grains with a high crystalline fraction, approximately 40% by mass, despite their generally weak silicate emission feature. To date, no model for the optical properties in the mid-IR of multi-mineralic large porous grains with silicate crystal inclusions, has been performed. We have initiated a program to compute the absorption and scattering efficiencies for these grains. Presented here are the 3 - 40 micron absorption efficiencies for models of sub-micron sized crystalline forsterite grains of irregular shape. We use the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) to create discrete targets of forsterite that can be included in large porous aggregates. Computations are performed on the NAS Pleiades supercomputer. Our calculated absorption efficiencies for individual grains of forsterite are in agreement with laboratory measurements (Tamanai et al. 2006; Koike et al. 2003) and the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) method by Harker et al. (2007). We find for discrete grains that grain shape has a strong effect on the peak location of a crystalline resonance and that mimicking the physical properties of forsterite is important. Also presented are the absorption efficiencies for simple multi-component aggregates and for collections of forsterite crystals of different size and shape to replicate laboratory samples. This research is supported by the NASA GSRP Program.

  14. The congenital cataract-linked A2V mutation impairs tetramer formation and promotes aggregation of βB2-crystallin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Xu

    Full Text Available β/γ-Crystallins, the major structural proteins in human lens, are highly conserved in their tertiary structures but distinct in the quaternary structures. The N- and C-terminal extensions have been proposed to play a crucial role in mediating the size of β-crystallin assembly. In this research, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the congenital hereditary cataract caused by the recently characterized A2V mutation in βB2-crystallin. Spectroscopic experiments indicated that the mutation did not affect the secondary and tertiary structures of βB2-crystallin. The mutation did not affect the formation of βB2/βA3-crystallin heteromer as well as the stability and folding of the heteromer, suggesting that the mutation might not interfere with the protein interacting network in the lens. However, the tetramerization of βB2-crystallin at high protein concentrations was retarded by the A2V mutation. The mutation slightly decreased the thermal stability and promoted the thermal aggregation of βB2-crystallin. Although it did not influence the stability of βB2-crystallin against denaturation induced by chemical denaturants and UV irradiation, the A2V mutant was more prone to be trapped in the off-pathway aggregation process during kinetic refolding. Our results suggested that the A2V mutation might lead to injury of lens optical properties by decreasing βB2-crystallin stability against heat treatment and by impairing βB2-crystallin assembly into high-order homo-oligomers.

  15. Friendship in inclusive physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Helena; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A

    2009-07-01

    Social interaction and development of friendships between children with and without a disability are often proposed as potential outcomes of inclusive education. Physical activity specialists assert that exercise and sport environments may be conducive to social and friendship outcomes. This study investigated friendship in inclusive physical education from the perspective of students with (n = 8) and without (n = 8) physical disabilities. All participants attended a reversely integrated school and were interviewed using a semistructured, open-ended format. An adapted version of Weiss, Smith, and Theeboom's (1996) interview guide exploring perceptions of peer relationships in the sport domain was used. Four conceptual categories emerged from the analysis: development of friendship, best friend, preferred physical activities and outcomes, and dealing with disability. The results demonstrated the key characteristics of best friends and the influential role they play.

  16. Inclusive breakup of Borromean nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Mahir S; Frederico, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We derive the inclusive breakup cross section of a three-fragment projectile nuclei, $a = b +x_1 + x_2$, in the spectator model. The resulting four-body cross section for observing $b$, is composed of the elastic breakup cross section which contains information about the correlation between the two participant fragments, and the inclusive non-elastic breakup cross section. This latter cross section is found to be a non-trivial four-body generalization of the Austern formula \\cite{Austern1987}, which is proportional to a matrix element of the form, $\\langle\\hat{\\rho}_{{x_1},{x_2}}\\left|\\left[W_{{x_1}} + W_{{x_2}} + W_{3B}\\right]\\right|\\hat{\\rho}_{{x_1}, {x_2}}\\rangle$. The new feature here is the three-body absorption, represented by the imaginary potential, $W_{3B}$. We analyze this type of absorption and supply ideas of how to calculate its contribution.

  17. STUDENTS’ RESPONSES TO INCLUSIVE DESIGN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at how students’ design process responds to the requirements of inclusive design. The background to the students´ brief was the concept of welfare technology. People wish to retain their customary life-style even as ageing brings with it a reduction in physical capability: loss....... This technology is designed help to citizens to be 'master of his or her own life' while off-setting capability changes due declining physical ability. Welfare technology includes smarter working practices or service concepts, which frees up labor resources and it also covers robotics, telemedicine, IT solutions...... and intelligent devices. This paper will show the results of students' work with the problem of changed demographics and emerging needs in products and services. In so doing it looks at how the use of inclusive design methods affects students´work processes. This is done by the use of work diaries which provided...

  18. Inclusive Design in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel ZAMFIR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Much instruction starts with abstract representations for which learners have insufficient foundation [1]. The British Standard, BS 7000-6:2005 Guide to Managing Inclusive Design, provides a comprehensive framework that can help all private enterprises, public sector and not-for-profit organizations, build a consistent approach to inclusive design into organizational culture as well as processes [2]. While courses, technology, and student services are typically designed for the narrow range of characteristics of the average student, the practice of universal design in education (UDE considers people with a broad range of characteristics in the design of all educational products and environments [3]. This paper has been designed to provide an overview about the curriculum paradigm consisting in the fusion of the technology and the classroom instruction in economic higher education.

  19. Inclusive distributions near kinematic thresholds

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, E

    2006-01-01

    The main challenge in computing inclusive cross sections and decay spectra in QCD is posed by kinematic thresholds. The threshold region is characterized by stringent phase-space constraints that are reflected in large perturbative corrections due to soft and collinear radiation as well as large non-perturbative effects. Major progress in addressing this problem was made in recent years by Dressed Gluon Exponentiation (DGE), a formalism that combines Sudakov and renormalon resummation in moment space. DGE has proven effective in extending the range of applicability of perturbation theory well into the threshold region and in identifying the relevant non-perturbative corrections. Here we review the method from a general perspective using examples from deep inelastic structure functions, event-shape distributions, heavy-quark fragmentation and inclusive decay spectra. A special discussion is devoted to the applications of DGE to radiative and semileptonic B decays that have proven valuable for the interpretatio...

  20. Application of preparative disk gel electrophoresis for antigen purification from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okegawa, Yuki; Koshino, Masanori; Okushima, Teruya; Motohashi, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Specific antibodies are a reliable tool to examine protein expression patterns and to determine the protein localizations within cells. Generally, recombinant proteins are used as antigens for specific antibody production. However, recombinant proteins from mammals and plants are often overexpressed as insoluble inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Solubilization of these inclusion bodies is desirable because soluble antigens are more suitable for injection into animals to be immunized. Furthermore, highly purified proteins are also required for specific antibody production. Plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase: EC 6.4.1.2) from Arabidopsis thaliana, which catalyzes the formation of malonyl-CoA from acetyl-CoA in chloroplasts, formed inclusion bodies when the recombinant protein was overexpressed in E. coli. To obtain the purified protein to use as an antigen, we applied preparative disk gel electrophoresis for protein purification from inclusion bodies. This method is suitable for antigen preparation from inclusion bodies because the purified protein is recovered as a soluble fraction in electrode running buffer containing 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate that can be directly injected into immune animals, and it can be used for large-scale antigen preparation (several tens of milligrams).

  1. Inhibition of copper-mediated aggregation of human γD-crystallin by Schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Priyanka; Muralidharan, Sai Brinda; Velappan, Anand Babu; Datta, Dhrubajyoti; Pratihar, Sanjay; Debnath, Joy; Ghosh, Kalyan Sundar

    2017-01-05

    Protein aggregation, due to the imbalance in the concentration of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions is found to be allied with various physiological disorders. Copper is known to promote the oxidative damage of β/γ-crystallins in aged eye lens and causes their aggregation leading to cataract. Therefore, synthesis of a small-molecule 'chelator' for Cu(2+) with complementary antioxidant effect will find potential applications against aggregation of β/γ-crystallins. In this paper, we have reported the synthesis of different Schiff bases and studied their Cu(2+) complexation ability (using UV-Vis, FT-IR and ESI-MS) and antioxidant activity. Further based on their copper complexation efficiency, Schiff bases were used to inhibit Cu(2+)-mediated aggregation of recombinant human γD-crystallin (HGD) and β/γ-crystallins (isolated from cataractous human eye lens). Among these synthesized molecules, compound 8 at a concentration of 100 μM had shown ~95% inhibition of copper (100 μM)-induced aggregation. Compound 8 also showed a positive cooperative effect at a concentration of 5-15 μM on the inhibitory activity of human αA-crystallin (HAA) during Cu(2+)-induced aggregation of HGD. It eventually inhibited the aggregation process by additional ~20%. However, ~50% inhibition of copper-mediated aggregation of β/γ-crystallins (isolated from cataractous human eye lens) was recorded by compound 8 (100 μM). Although the reductive aminated products of the imines showed better antioxidant activity due to their lower copper complexing ability, they were found to be non-effective against Cu(2+)-mediated aggregation of HGD.

  2. Student Engagement In Inclusive Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler

    There is general agreement that to thrive and learn at their best, students must be engaged. However, schools face a particular challenge to provide a suitable and engaging learning environment for SEN (special educational needs) students who are educated in general education classes. Using data......-students as for other students. This highlights the need for better inclusion initiatives aimed at strengthening engagement of SEN-students in regular classrooms....

  3. Impulsive differential inclusions with constrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzanko Donchev

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we study weak invariance of differential inclusions with non-fixed time impulses under compactness type assumptions. When the right-hand side is one sided Lipschitz an extension of the well known relaxation theorem is proved. In this case also necessary and sufficient condition for strong invariance of upper semi continuous systems are obtained. Some properties of the solution set of impulsive system (without constrains in appropriate topology are investigated.

  4. To homogenize, or not to homogenize, that is the question: Quartz-hosted melt inclusion analysis avenues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, C. N.; Roberge, J.; Todorov, T. I.; Hofstra, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt inclusions hosted in quartz can provide the only direct information about the pressure, temperature, and melt composition of pre-eruptive rhyolitic magmas, many of which are the precursors to mineralizing aqueous fluids [1]. With ideal, rapidly-quenched pumice samples, analysis of glassy quartz-hosted melt inclusions is relatively straightforward. These data can be directly interpreted to represent snapshots of metal and volatile concentrations during magma crystallization and degassing. However, most ore deposit-related igneous samples are non-ideal; being older, potentially hydrothermally altered, and often crystallized due to slow cooling in subvolcanic regions (e.g., porphyry-type deposits). In this case, analysis of crystalline melt inclusions in quartz is not straightforward and resulting data must be meticulously examined before interpretation. Many melt inclusions may have experienced post-entrapment modifications [1] such as diffusion of elements (e.g., H, Li, Na, Ag, Cu) [2], which may lead to changes in measured oxygen fugacity. Slowly cooled inclusions may crystallize, producing a heterogeneous "micro-rock" that cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic methods or electron microprobe. While crystallized inclusions can be homogenized in a high-temperature furnace, many new problems may arise such as inclusion decrepitation [3], diffusion of elements [2], and incorporation of too little or too much Si from the inclusion rim or host crystal. However, if unwanted homogenization effects are minimized by choosing ideal experimental conditions, then these homogenized inclusions can be analyzed by traditional FTIR and electron microprobe methods. The electron microprobe data from homogenized inclusions can be used as accurate internal standards for laser ablation-ICP-MS data reduction. Alternatively, crystalline inclusions can be directly analyzed for major and trace elements by laser ablation-ICP-MS [4], which considerably reduces sample preparation time, but

  5. Buckling Instability in Liquid Crystalline Physical Gels

    OpenAIRE

    Verduzco, Rafael; Meng, Guangnan; Kornfield, Julia A; Meyer, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    In a nematic gel we observe a low-energy buckling deformation arising from soft and semisoft elastic modes. We prepare the self-assembled gel by dissolving a coil–side-group liquid-crystalline polymer–coil copolymer in a nematic liquid crystal. The gel has long network strands and a precisely tailored structure, making it ideal for studying nematic rubber elasticity. Under polarized optical microscopy we observe a striped texture that forms when gels uniformly aligned at 35 °C are cooled to r...

  6. Crystalline silicotitanates for cesium/strontium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.; Miller, J.; Sherman, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST) has been developed that exhibits very high selectivity for cesium and strontium in the highly alkaline radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site and other DOE sites. Tests have also shown that CSTs have high selectivity for cesium in acidic and neutral solutions. The ESP is supporting an effort at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A & M University to further develop and characterize the important chemical and physical properties that will determine the applicability of CST to radioactive waste treatment at Hanford and other DOE facilities.

  7. The Poisson ratio of crystalline surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Falcioni, Marco; Bowick, Mark; Guitter, Emmanuel; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1996-01-01

    A remarkable theoretical prediction for a crystalline (polymerized) surface is that its Poisson ratio (\\sigma) is negative. Using a large scale Monte Carlo simulation of a simple model of such surfaces we show that this is indeed true. The precise numerical value we find is (\\sigma \\simeq -0.32) on a (128^2) lattice at bending rigidity (kappa = 1.1). This is in excellent agreement with the prediction (\\sigma = -1/3) following from the self-consistent screening approximation of Le Doussal and ...

  8. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Barthes, M. [Univ. Montpellier II (France)

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  9. LAMELLAR STRUCTURE OF THERMOTROPIC LIQUID CRYSTALLINE POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shouxi; JIN Yongze

    1994-01-01

    The lamellar structure of a thermotropic aromatic polyester with flexible spacer has been studied by using transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the lamellar structure could be observed in the crystalline samples ofthis semirigid polymer crystallized from different states. The thickness of lamellae is around 10 nm, which is similar to that of the conventional polymers of flexible chain molecules. The molecular chains in the lamellae are oriented in the thickness direction as determined by electron diffraction. The possibility of molecular chains folding in the lamellae has been discussed.

  10. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weizierl, Barbara; Wester, Ture

    2001-01-01

    Artikel på CD-Rom 8 sider. The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells....... The purpose of the paper is to investigate some possibilities for the application of Quasi-Crystal geometry for structures in architecture. The basis for the investigations is A: to use the Golden Cubes (the two different hexahedra consisting of rhombic facets where the length of the diagonals has the Golden...

  11. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy Of Glass-Crystalline Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, E.; Balkanski, M.

    1988-01-01

    Glass-crystalline transition is induced by laser irradiation on a GeSe bulk glass sample. The structural changes are detected by Raman spectroscopy. The speed of the crystallization process depends on the laser irradiation intensity. We have studied this crystallization process for three different powers of irradiation. It is found that the speed of crystallization increases with power. Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra were recorded during the transformation. From this data temperature was inferred at different stages of crystallization. The significance of this temperature is discussed.

  13. Determination of Crystallinity and Crystal Structure of Hylamer™ Polyethylene after in vivo Wear

    OpenAIRE

    Visentin, M; Stea, S.; De Clerico, M.; Reggiani, M.; Fagnano, C.; Squarzoni, S.; De Toni, A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Hylamer? polyethylene is a crystalline form of polyethylene of 70% crystallinity whereas conventional polyethylene (PE) has 50% crystallinity. Crystallinity is the percentage by weight of the crystalline phase present in the whole polymer, which comprises both amorphous and crystalline phases. Clinical experience has shown that Hylamer? components used in joint prostheses, if sterilized ...

  14. Determination of Crystallinity and Crystal Structure of Hylamer™ Polyethylene after in vivo Wear

    OpenAIRE

    Visentin, M; Stea, S.; Clerico, M; Reggiani, M.; Fagnano, C.; Squarzoni, S.; Toni, A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Hylamer? polyethylene is a crystalline form of polyethylene of 70% crystallinity whereas conventional polyethylene (PE) has 50% crystallinity. Crystallinity is the percentage by weight of the crystalline phase present in the whole polymer, which comprises both amorphous and crystalline phases. Clinical experience has shown that Hylamer? components used in joint prostheses, if sterilized ...

  15. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  16. [Inclusion Bodies are Formed in SFTSV-infected Human Macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cong; Song, Jingdong; Han, Ying; Li, Chuan; Qiu, Peihong; Liang, Mifang

    2016-01-01

    The severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a new member in the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae identified in China. The SFTSV is also the causative pathogen of an emerging infectious disease: severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. Using immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy, the intracellular distribution of nucleocapsid protein (NP) in SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells was investigated with serial doses of SFTSV at different times after infection. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultrafine intracellular structure of SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells at different times after infection. SFTSV NP could form intracellular inclusion bodies in infected THP-1 cells. The association between NP-formed inclusion bodies and virus production was analyzed: the size of the inclusion body formed 3 days after infection was correlated with the viral load in supernatants collected 7 days after infection. These findings suggest that the inclusion bodies formed in SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells could be where the SFTSV uses host-cell proteins and intracellular organelles to produce new viral particles.

  17. Imaging Modulated Reflections from a Semi-Crystalline State of Profilin:Actin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    Commensurate and incommensurate modulation in protein crystals remain terra incognita for crystallographers. While small molecule crystallographers have successfully wrestled with this type of structure, no modulated macromolecular structures have been determined to date. In this work, methods and strategies have been developed to collect and analyze data from modulated macromolecular crystals. Preliminary data using these methods are presented for a semi-crystalline state of profilin:actin.

  18. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous and crystalline α-cyclodextrin powders and the characterization of the complexes formed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2015-11-15

    Carbon dioxide complexation was undertaken into solid matrices of amorphous and crystalline α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) powders, under various pressures (0.4-1.6 MPa) and time periods (4-96 h). The results show that the encapsulation capacity of crystalline α-CD was significantly lower than that of amorphous α-CD at low pressure and short time (0.4-0.8 MPa and 4-24 h), but was markedly enhanced with an increase of pressure and prolongation of encapsulation time. For each pressure level tested, the time required to reach a near equilibrium encapsulation capacity of the crystalline powder was around 48 h, which was much longer than that of the amorphous one, which only required about 8h. The inclusion complex formation of both types of α-CD powders was confirmed by the appearance of a CO2 peak on the FTIR and NMR spectra. Moreover, inclusion complexes were also characterized by DSC, TGA, SEM and X-ray analyses.

  19. Topology of nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Ken; Sato, Masatoshi; Gomi, Kiyonori

    2016-05-01

    Topological classification in our previous paper [K. Shiozaki and M. Sato, Phys. Rev. B 90, 165114 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.165114] is extended to nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors. Using the twisted equivariant K theory, we complete the classification of topological crystalline insulators and superconductors in the presence of additional order-two nonsymmorphic space-group symmetries. The order-two nonsymmorphic space groups include half-lattice translation with Z2 flip, glide, twofold screw, and their magnetic space groups. We find that the topological periodic table shows modulo-2 periodicity in the number of flipped coordinates under the order-two nonsymmorphic space group. It is pointed out that the nonsymmorphic space groups allow Z2 topological phases even in the absence of time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries. Furthermore, the coexistence of the nonsymmorphic space group with time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries provides novel Z4 topological phases, which have not been realized in ordinary topological insulators and superconductors. We present model Hamiltonians of these new topological phases and analytic expressions of the Z2 and Z4 topological invariants. The half-lattice translation with Z2 spin flip and glide symmetry are compatible with the existence of boundaries, leading to topological surface gapless modes protected by the order-two nonsymmorphic symmetries. We also discuss unique features of these gapless surface modes.

  20. In vivo human crystalline lens topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Sergio; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Gambra, Enrique; de Castro, Alberto; Marcos, Susana

    2012-10-01

    Custom high-resolution high-speed anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to characterize three-dimensionally (3-D) the human crystalline lens in vivo. The system was provided with custom algorithms for denoising and segmentation of the images, as well as for fan (scanning) and optical (refraction) distortion correction, to provide fully quantitative images of the anterior and posterior crystalline lens surfaces. The method was tested on an artificial eye with known surfaces geometry and on a human lens in vitro, and demonstrated on three human lenses in vivo. Not correcting for distortion overestimated the anterior lens radius by 25% and the posterior lens radius by more than 65%. In vivo lens surfaces were fitted by biconicoids and Zernike polynomials after distortion correction. The anterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 10.27 to 14.14 mm, and the posterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 6.12 to 7.54 mm. Surface asphericities ranged from -0.04 to -1.96. The lens surfaces were well fitted by quadrics (with variation smaller than 2%, for 5-mm pupils), with low amounts of high order terms. Surface lens astigmatism was significant, with the anterior lens typically showing horizontal astigmatism ([Formula: see text] ranging from -11 to -1 µm) and the posterior lens showing vertical astigmatism ([Formula: see text] ranging from 6 to 10 µm).