WorldWideScience

Sample records for crystalline ge nanoclusters

  1. Synthesis of crystalline Ge nanoclusters in PE-CVD-deposited SiO2 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leervad Pedersen, T.P.; Skov Jensen, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of evenly distributed Ge nanoclusters in plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour-deposited (PE-CVD) SiO2 thin films containing 8 at. % Ge is reported. This is of importance for the application of nanoclusters in semiconductor technology. The average diameter of the Ge nanoclusters can...

  2. Ge nanoclusters in PECVD-deposited glass caused only by heat treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Rørdam, Troels Peter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the formation of Ge nanoclusters in a multi-layer structure consisting of alternating thin films of Ge-doped silica glass and SiGe, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and post annealed at 1100 °C in N2 atmosphere. We studied the annealed samples...... embedded with Ge nanoclusters after annealing. These nanoclusters are crystalline and varied in size. There were no clusters in the Ge-doped glass layer. Raman spectra verified the existence of crystalline Ge clusters. The positional shift of the Ge vibrational peak with the change of the focus depth...

  3. Effect of Ge Content on the Formation of Ge Nanoclusters in Magnetron-Sputtered GeZrOx-Based Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomenkova, L; Lehninger, D; Kondratenko, O; Ponomaryov, S; Gudymenko, O; Tsybrii, Z; Yukhymchuk, V; Kladko, V; von Borany, J; Heitmann, J

    2017-12-01

    Ge-rich ZrO 2 films, fabricated by confocal RF magnetron sputtering of pure Ge and ZrO 2 targets in Ar plasma, were studied by multi-angle laser ellipsometry, Raman scattering, Auger electron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction for varied deposition conditions and annealing treatments. It was found that as-deposited films are homogeneous for all Ge contents, thermal treatment stimulated a phase separation and a formation of crystalline Ge and ZrO 2 . The "start point" of this process is in the range of 640-700 °C depending on the Ge content. The higher the Ge content, the lower is the temperature necessary for phase separation, nucleation of Ge nanoclusters, and crystallization. Along with this, the crystallization temperature of the tetragonal ZrO 2 exceeds that of the Ge phase, which results in the formation of Ge crystallites in an amorphous ZrO 2 matrix. The mechanism of phase separation is discussed in detail.

  4. Magnetic behavior of Si-Ge bond in SixGe4-x nano-clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahali, Masoud; Mehri, Ali

    2018-06-01

    The structure of SixGe4-x nano-clusters were optimized by MPW1B95 level of theory using MG3S and SDB-aug-cc-PVTZ basis set. The agreement of the calculated ionization and dissociation energies with experimental values validates the reported structures of nano-clusters and justifies the use of hybrid meta density functional method. Since the Si-Si bond is stronger than Si-Ge and Ge-Ge bonds, the Si-Si, Si-Ge, and Ge-Ge diagonal bonds determine the precedence of the stability in these nano-clusters. The hybrid meta density functional calculations were carried out to investigate the adsorption of CO on all possible SixGe4-x nano-clusters. It was found that the silicon atom generally makes a stronger bond with CO than germanium and thereby preferentially affects the shape of structures having higher multiplicity. In Si-Ge structures with higher spin more than 95% of spins accumulate on positions with less bonds to other atoms of the cluster. Through CO adsorption on these clusters bridge structures are made that behave as spin bridge which conduct the spin from the nano-cluster surface to the adsorbate atoms. A better understanding of bridged structures was achieved upon introducing the 'spin bridge' concept. Based on exhaustive spin density analysis, it was found that the reason for the extra negative charge on oxygen in the bridged structures is the relocation of spin from the surface through the bridge.

  5. The role of the surfaces in the photon absorption in Ge nanoclusters embedded in silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicotra Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The usage of semiconductor nanostructures is highly promising for boosting the energy conversion efficiency in photovoltaics technology, but still some of the underlying mechanisms are not well understood at the nanoscale length. Ge quantum dots (QDs should have a larger absorption and a more efficient quantum confinement effect than Si ones, thus they are good candidate for third-generation solar cells. In this work, Ge QDs embedded in silica matrix have been synthesized through magnetron sputtering deposition and annealing up to 800°C. The thermal evolution of the QD size (2 to 10 nm has been followed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques, evidencing an Ostwald ripening mechanism with a concomitant amorphous-crystalline transition. The optical absorption of Ge nanoclusters has been measured by spectrophotometry analyses, evidencing an optical bandgap of 1.6 eV, unexpectedly independent of the QDs size or of the solid phase (amorphous or crystalline. A simple modeling, based on the Tauc law, shows that the photon absorption has a much larger extent in smaller Ge QDs, being related to the surface extent rather than to the volume. These data are presented and discussed also considering the outcomes for application of Ge nanostructures in photovoltaics. PACS: 81.07.Ta; 78.67.Hc; 68.65.-k

  6. The role of the surfaces in the photon absorption in Ge nanoclusters embedded in silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Salvatore; Mirabella, Salvatore; Miritello, Maria; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Lo Savio, Roberto; Simone, Francesca; Spinella, Corrado; Terrasi, Antonio

    2011-02-11

    The usage of semiconductor nanostructures is highly promising for boosting the energy conversion efficiency in photovoltaics technology, but still some of the underlying mechanisms are not well understood at the nanoscale length. Ge quantum dots (QDs) should have a larger absorption and a more efficient quantum confinement effect than Si ones, thus they are good candidate for third-generation solar cells. In this work, Ge QDs embedded in silica matrix have been synthesized through magnetron sputtering deposition and annealing up to 800°C. The thermal evolution of the QD size (2 to 10 nm) has been followed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques, evidencing an Ostwald ripening mechanism with a concomitant amorphous-crystalline transition. The optical absorption of Ge nanoclusters has been measured by spectrophotometry analyses, evidencing an optical bandgap of 1.6 eV, unexpectedly independent of the QDs size or of the solid phase (amorphous or crystalline). A simple modeling, based on the Tauc law, shows that the photon absorption has a much larger extent in smaller Ge QDs, being related to the surface extent rather than to the volume. These data are presented and discussed also considering the outcomes for application of Ge nanostructures in photovoltaics.PACS: 81.07.Ta; 78.67.Hc; 68.65.-k.

  7. Ge nanoclusters in PECVD-deposited glass after heat treating and electron irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Rørdam, Troels Peter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the formation of Ge nanoclusters in silica glass thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). We studied the samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy after annealing. TEM investigation shows that the Ge nanoclusters...... at two areaswere formed by different mechanisms. The Ge nanoclusters formed in a single row along the interface of a silicon substrate and the silica glass film by annealing during high-temperature heat treatment. Ge nanoclusters did not initially form in the bulk of the film but could be subsequently...... formed by the electron-beam irradiation. The interface between the silicon substrate and the silica glass film was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The shift of the Raman peaks around 286.8 cm−1 and 495 cm−1 suggests that the interface is a Si1−xGex alloy film and that the composition x varies along...

  8. Effect of Ge Content on the Formation of Ge Nanoclusters in Magnetron-Sputtered GeZrOx-Based Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Khomenkova, L.; Lehninger, D.; Kondratenko, O.; Ponomaryov, S.; Gudymenko, O.; Tsybrii, Z.; Yukhymchuk, V.; Kladko, V.; von Borany, J.; Heitmann, J.

    2017-01-01

    Ge-rich ZrO2 films, fabricated by confocal RF magnetron sputtering of pure Ge and ZrO2 targets in Ar plasma, were studied by multi-angle laser ellipsometry, Raman scattering, Auger electron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction for varied deposition conditions and annealing treatments. It was found that as-deposited films are homogeneous for all Ge contents, thermal treatment stimulated a phase separation and a formation of crystalline Ge and ZrO2. The ?...

  9. Microscopic parameters of heterostructures containing nanoclusters and thin layers of Ge in Si matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Erenburg, S B; Stepina, N P; Nikiforov, A I; Nenashev, A V; Mazalov, L N

    2001-01-01

    GeK XAFS measurements have been performed using the total electron yield detection mode for pseudomorphous Ge films deposited on Si(0 0 1) substrate via molecular beam epitaxy at 300 deg. C. The samples have been produced by thrice repeating the growing procedure separated by deposition of blocking Si layers at 500 deg. C. The local microstructure parameters (interatomic distances, Ge coordination numbers) are linked to nanostructure morphology and adequate models are suggested and discussed. It was established that pseudomorphous 4-monolayer Ge films contain 50% of Si atoms on the average. Pyramid-like, pure Ge islands formed in the Stranski-Krastanov growth are characterized by the interatomic Ge-Ge distances of 2.41 A (by 0.04 A less than in bulk Ge) and the Ge-Si distances of 2.37 A. It was revealed that the pure Ge nanoclusters are covered by a 1-2-monolayer film with admixture on the average of a 50% Si atom impurity from blocking Si layers.

  10. GE NANOCLUSTERS IN PLANAR GLASS WAVEGUIDES DEPOSITED BY PECVD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haiyan, Ou; Olsen, Johnny H.; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    Germanium (Ge) has been widely used as the dopant in the core layer of planar glass waveguides to increase the refractive index because it gives a small propagation loss. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and flame hydrolysis deposition (FHD) are two main material deposition meth...

  11. The Relationship between Nanocluster Precipitation and Thermal Conductivity in Si/Ge Amorphous Multilayer Films: Effects of Cu Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ehsan Mohd Tamidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a molecular dynamics technique to simulate the relationship between nanocluster precipitation and thermal conductivity in Si/Ge amorphous multilayer films, with and without Cu addition. In the study, the Green-Kubo equation was used to calculate thermal conductivity in these materials. Five specimens were prepared: Si/Ge layers, Si/(Ge + Cu layers, (Si + Cu/(Ge + Cu layers, Si/Cu/Ge/Cu layers, and Si/Cu/Ge layers. The number of precipitated nanoclusters in these specimens, which is defined as the number of four-coordinate atoms, was counted along the lateral direction of the specimens. The observed results of precipitate formation were considered in relation to the thermal conductivity results. Enhancement of precipitation of nanoclusters by Cu addition, that is, densification of four-coordinate atoms, can prevent the increment of thermal conductivity. Cu dopant increases the thermal conductivity of these materials. Combining these two points, we concluded that Si/Cu/Ge is the best structure to improve the conversion efficiency of the Si/Ge amorphous multilayer films.

  12. Depth-resolution imaging of crystalline nanoclusters attached on and embedded in amorphous films using aberration-corrected TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Jun, E-mail: yamasaki@uhvem.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Mori, Masayuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hirata, Akihiko [Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Hirotsu, Yoshihiko [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuo [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    For observations of crystalline nanoclusters, the features and capabilities of depth-resolution imaging by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were investigated using image simulations and experiments for two types of samples. The first sample was gold clusters attached on an amorphous carbon film. The experimental through-focal series indicated that the focal plane for the cluster was shifted 3 nm from that for the supporting film. This difference is due to the depth-resolution imaging of the cluster and film, the mid-planes of which are separated by 3 nm along the depth direction (the electron incident direction). On the basis of this information, the three-dimensional configuration of the sample, such as the film thickness of 2 nm, was successfully illustrated. The second sample was a Zr{sub 66.7}Ni{sub 33.3} metallic glass including a medium-range-order (MRO) structure, which was approximately considered to be a crystalline cluster with a diameter of 1.6 nm. In the experimental through-focal series, the lattice fringe of the MRO cluster was visible at limited focal conditions. Image simulations reproduced well the focal conditions and also indicated a structural condition for the visualization that the embedded cluster must be apart from the mid-plane of the matrix film. Similar to the case of the first sample, this result can be explained by the idea that the “effective focal planes” for the film and cluster are at different heights. This type of depth-resolution phase contrast imaging is possible only in aberration-corrected TEM and when the sample has a simple structure and is sufficiently thin for the kinematical scattering approximation. - Highlights: • Depth-resolution imaging by aberration-corrected TEM was demonstrated. • Thickness of a carbon film supporting gold nano-crystals was successfully estimated. • A crystalline nanocluster embedded in an amorphous matrix was successfully observed. • It was clarified that

  13. Remote plasma enhanced chemical deposition of non-crystalline GeO2 on Ge and Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucovsky, Gerald; Zeller, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Non-crystalline GeO2 films remote were plasma deposited at 300 degrees C onto Ge substrates after a final rinse in NH4OH. The reactant precursors gas were: (i) down-stream injected 2% GeH4 in He as the Ge precursor, and (ii) up-stream, plasma excited O2-He mixtures as the O precursor. Films annealed at 400 degrees C displayed no evidence for loss of O resulting in Ge sub-oxide formation, and for a 5-6 eV mid-gap absorption associated with formation of GeOx suboxide bonding, x deposited on Ge and annealed at 600 degrees C and 700 degrees C display spectra indicative of loss of O-atoms, accompanied with a 5.5 eV absorption. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and many-electron theory are combined to describe symmetries and degeneracies for O-vacancy bonding defects. These include comparisons with remote plasma-deposited non-crystalline SiO2 on Si substrates with SiON interfacial layers. Three different properties of remote plasma GeO2 films are addressed comparisons between (i) conduction band and band edge states of GeO2 and SiO2, and (ii) electronic structure of O-atom vacancy defects in GeO2 and SiO2, and differences between (iii) annealing of GeO2 films on Ge substrates, and Si substrates passivated with SiON interfacial transition regions important for device applications.

  14. Irreversible altering of crystalline phase of phase-change Ge-Sb thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Shakhvorostov, D.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Raoux, S.; Jordan-Sweet, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The stability of the crystalline phase of binary phase-change Ge x Sb 1-x films is investigated over a wide range of Ge content. From Raman spectroscopy we find the Ge-Sb crystalline structure irreversibly altered after exposure to a laser beam. We show that with increasing beam intensity/temperature Ge agglomerates and precipitates out in the amount growing with x. A simple empirical relation links Ge precipitation temperature T Ge p to the rate of change dT cryst /dx of crystallization, with the precipitation easiest on the mid-range x plateau, where T cryst is nearly constant. Our findings point to a preferable 15% < or approx. x < 50% window, that may achieve the desired cycling/archival properties of a phase-change cell.

  15. Schottky barrier formation at amorphous-crystalline interfaces of GeSb phase change materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, H. J.; Eising, G.; ten Brink, Gert; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.; Pauza, A.

    2012-01-01

    The electrical properties of amorphous-crystalline interfaces in phase change materials, which are important for rewritable optical data storage and for random access memory devices, have been investigated by surface scanning potential microscopy. Analysis of GeSb systems indicates that the surface

  16. Black GE based on crystalline/amorphous core/shell nanoneedle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javey, Ali; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-03-04

    Direct growth of black Ge on low-temperature substrates, including plastics and rubber is reported. The material is based on highly dense, crystalline/amorphous core/shell Ge nanoneedle arrays with ultrasharp tips (.about.4 nm) enabled by the Ni catalyzed vapor-solid-solid growth process. Ge nanoneedle arrays exhibit remarkable optical properties. Specifically, minimal optical reflectance (<1%) is observed, even for high angles of incidence (.about.75.degree.) and for relatively short nanoneedle lengths (.about.1 .mu.m). Furthermore, the material exhibits high optical absorption efficiency with an effective band gap of .about.1 eV. The reported black Ge can have important practical implications for efficient photovoltaic and photodetector applications on nonconventional substrates.

  17. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of amorphous and crystalline Si-Ge alloys with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is a powerful probe to study the local structure around the atom of a specific element. In conventional EXAFS analysis, it has been known that reliable structures are obtained with the different values of absorption edge energy for different neighboring atoms. It is shown in this study that the Ge-K edge EXAFS resulting from the Ge-Ge and Ge-Si bonds in hydrogenated amorphous Si-Ge alloys was able to be excellently explained by a unique absorption edge energy value, provided that a newly developed formula based on the spherical wave function of photoelectrons is used. The microscopic structures of hydrogenated amorphous Si-Ge alloys and crystalline Si-Ge alloys have been determined using the EXAFS method. The lengths of Ge-Ge and Ge-Si bonds were constant throughout their entire composition range, and it was found that the length of Ge-Si bond was close to the average value of the bond lengths of both Ge and Si crystals. In crystalline Si-Ge alloys, it has been shown that the bonds relaxed completely, while the lattice constant varied monotonously with the composition. (Kako, I.)

  18. Enhancing crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency with SixGe1-x layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adnan; Cheow, S. L.; Azhari, A. W.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell represents a cost effective, environment-friendly, and proven renewable energy resource. Industrially manufacturing of c-Si solar has now matured in terms of efficiency and cost. Continuing cost-effective efficiency enhancement requires transition towards thinner wafers in near term and thin-films in the long term. Successful implementation of either of these alternatives must address intrinsic optical absorption limitation of Si. Bandgap engineering through integration with SixGe1-x layers offers an attractive, inexpensive option. With the help of PC1D software, role of SixGe1-x layers in conventional c-Si solar cells has been intensively investigated in both wafer and thin film configurations by varying Ge concentration, thickness, and placement. In wafer configuration, increase in Ge concentration leads to enhanced absorption through bandgap broadening with an efficiency enhancement of 8% for Ge concentrations of less than 20%. At higher Ge concentrations, despite enhanced optical absorption, efficiency is reduced due to substantial lowering of open-circuit voltage. In 5-25-μm thickness, thin-film solar cell configurations, efficiency gain in excess of 30% is achievable. Therefore, SixGe1-x based thin-film solar cells with an order of magnitude reduction in costly Si material are ideally-suited both in terms of high efficiency and cost. Recent research has demonstrated significant improvement in epitaxially grown SixGe1-x layers on nanostructured Si substrates, thereby enhancing potential of this approach for next generation of c-Si based photovoltaics.

  19. Atomic layer deposition of crystalline SrHfO3 directly on Ge (001) for high-k dielectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Ekerdt, John G.; Hu, Chengqing; Jiang, Aiting; Yu, Edward T.; Lu, Sirong; Smith, David J.; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The current work explores the crystalline perovskite oxide, strontium hafnate, as a potential high-k gate dielectric for Ge-based transistors. SrHfO 3 (SHO) is grown directly on Ge by atomic layer deposition and becomes crystalline with epitaxial registry after post-deposition vacuum annealing at ∼700 °C for 5 min. The 2 × 1 reconstructed, clean Ge (001) surface is a necessary template to achieve crystalline films upon annealing. The SHO films exhibit excellent crystallinity, as shown by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The SHO films have favorable electronic properties for consideration as a high-k gate dielectric on Ge, with satisfactory band offsets (>2 eV), low leakage current (<10 −5 A/cm 2 at an applied field of 1 MV/cm) at an equivalent oxide thickness of 1 nm, and a reasonable dielectric constant (k ∼ 18). The interface trap density (D it ) is estimated to be as low as ∼2 × 10 12  cm −2  eV −1 under the current growth and anneal conditions. Some interfacial reaction is observed between SHO and Ge at temperatures above ∼650 °C, which may contribute to increased D it value. This study confirms the potential for crystalline oxides grown directly on Ge by atomic layer deposition for advanced electronic applications

  20. Phonon Transport at Crystalline Si/Ge Interfaces: The Role of Interfacial Modes of Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Henry, Asegun

    2016-01-01

    We studied the modal contributions to heat conduction at crystalline Si and crystalline Ge interfaces and found that more than 15% of the interface conductance arises from less than 0.1% of the modes in the structure. Using the recently developed interface conductance modal analysis (ICMA) method along with a new complimentary methodology, we mapped the correlations between modes, which revealed that a small group of interfacial modes, which exist between 12–13 THz, exhibit extremely strong correlation with other modes in the system. It is found that these interfacial modes (e.g., modes with large eigen vectors for interfacial atoms) are enabled by the degree of anharmonicity near the interface, which is higher than in the bulk, and therefore allows this small group of modes to couple to all others. The analysis sheds light on the nature of localized vibrations at interfaces and can be enlightening for other investigations of localization. PMID:26979787

  1. Liquid-crystalline dendrimer Cu(II) complexes and Cu(0) nanoclusters based on the Cu(II) complexes: An electron paramagnetic resonance investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domracheva, N. E.; Mirea, A.; Schwoerer, M.; Torre-Lorente, L.; Lattermann, G.

    2007-07-01

    New nanostructured materials, namely, the liquid-crystalline copper(II) complexes that contain poly(propylene imine) dendrimer ligands of the first (ligand 1) and second (ligand 2) generations and which have a columnar mesophase and different copper contents (x = Cu/L), are investigated by EPR spectroscopy. The influence of water molecules and nitrate counterions on the magnetic properties of complex 2 (x = 7.3) is studied. It is demonstrated that water molecules can extract some of the copper ions from dendrimer complexes and form hexaaqua copper complexes with free ions. The dimer spectra of fully hydrated complex 2 (x = 7.3) are observed at temperatures T dendrimer copper(II) complex. The temperature-induced valence tautomerism attended by electron transport is revealed for the first time in blue dendrimer complexes 1 (x = 1.9) with a dimer structure. The activation energy for electron transport is estimated to be 0.35 meV. The coordination of the copper ion site (NO4) and the structural arrangement of green complexes 1 (x = 1.9) in the columnar mesophase are determined. Complexes of this type form linear chains in which nitrate counterions serve as bridges between copper centers. It is revealed that green complexes 1 (x = 1.9) dissolved in isotropic inert solvents can be oriented in the magnetic field (B 0 = 8000 G). The degree of orientation of these complexes is rather high (S z = 0.76) and close to that of systems with a complete ordering (S z = 1) in the magnetic field. Copper(0) nanoclusters prepared by reduction of complex 2 (x = 7.3) in two reducing agents (NaBH4, N2H4 · H2O) are examined. A model is proposed for a possible location of Cu(0) nanoclusters in a dendrimer matrix.

  2. Surface sensitive mode XAFS measurement of local structure of ordered Ge nanoclusters (quantum dots) on Si(0 0 1)

    CERN Document Server

    Erenburg, S B; Mazalov, L N; Nikiforov, A I; Stepina, N P; Nenashev, A V

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomorphous Ge films have been deposited on Si(0 0 1) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy at 300 deg. C up to the critical thickness of four monolayers. As a result of the following deposition pyramid-like Ge islands have been grown in Stranski-Krastanov mode. The islands revealing quantum dots (QD) properties are self-organized during the growth in uniform Ge nanostructures with lateral sizes approx 15 nm and height approx 1.5 nm. Ge K XAFS measurements have been performed using total electron yield detection mode. It was established that pseudomorphous 4-monolayer Ge films contain about 50% Si atoms. It has been found that the Ge QD are characterized by interatomic Ge-Ge distances of 2.41 A which is 0.04 A less than in bulk Ge.

  3. Effect of gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms on chemical bonding: A proposed mechanism for the formation of crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    Using first principle calculations, we study the atomic arrangement and bonding mechanism in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). It is found that the stability of GST depends on the gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms. The configurations with different concentration of Ge/Sb in layers have been analyzed by the partial density of state, electron localization function and Bader charge distribution. The s and p-states of Ge atom alter with different stacking configurations but there is no change in Sb and Te atom states. Our findings show that the bonding between Ge-Te is not only responsible for the stability of GST alloy but can also predict which composition can show generic features of phase change material. As the number of Ge atoms near to vacancy layer decreases, Ge donates more charge. A growth model has been proposed for the formation of crystalline phase which justifies the structure models proposed in the literature.

  4. Melting behavior of a model molecular crystalline GeI4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Asano, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    A model molecular crystalline GeI 4 was examined using molecular dynamics simulation. The model was constructed in such a way that rigid tetrahedral molecules interact with each other via Lennard-Jones potentials whose centers are located at the vertices of a tetrahedron. Because no other interaction that can “soften” the intermolecular interaction was introduced, the melting curve of the model crystalline material does not exhibit the anomaly that was found for the real substance. However, the current investigation is useful in that it could settle the upper bound of pressure below which the model can predict properties of the molecular liquid. Moreover, singularity-free nature of the melting curve allowed us to analytically treat the melting curve in the light of the Kumari-Dass-Kechin equation. As a result, we could definitely conclude that the well-known Simon equation for the melting curve is merely an approximate expression. The condition for the validity of Simon’s equation was identified. (author)

  5. Effect of Ge nanocluster assembly self-organization at pulsed irradiation by low-energy ions during heteroepitaxy on Si

    CERN Document Server

    Dvurechenskij, A V; Smagina, Z V

    2001-01-01

    Using the method of scanning microscopy one studied experimentally size distribution of Ge clusters formed in course of experiments of two types at Ge heteroepitaxy on Si(111): regular process of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE); pulse irradiation by approx = 200 eV energy Ge ions. The experiments were conducted at 350 deg C temperature. Pulse irradiation by an ion beam during heteroepitaxy was detected to result in reduction of the average size of Ge clusters, in compacting of their density and in reduction of mean square deviation from the average value in contrast to similar values in experiments devoted to regular MBE

  6. Atomic-scale study of the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition mechanism in GeTe thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovan, R.; Mokhles Gerami, A.; Mølholt, T. E.; Wiemer, C.; Longo, M.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Ncube, M.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Fanciulli, M.; Gislason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Weyer, G.

    The underlying mechanism driving the structural amorphous-to-crystalline transition in Group VI chalcogenides is still a matter of debate even in the simplest GeTe system. We exploit the extreme sensitivity of 57Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy, following dilute implantation of 57Mn (T½ = 1.5 min) at ISOLDE/CERN, to study the electronic charge distribution in the immediate vicinity  of the 57Fe probe substituting Ge (FeGe), and to interrogate the local environment of FeGe over the amorphous-crystalline phase transition in GeTe thin films. Our results show that the local structure  of as-sputtered amorphous GeTe is a combination of tetrahedral and defect-octahedral sites. The main effect of the crystallization is the conversion from tetrahedral to defect-free octahedral sites.  We discover that only the tetrahedral fraction in amorphous GeTe participates to the change of the FeGe-Te chemical bond...

  7. Low-temperature formation of crystalline Si:H/Ge:H heterostructures by plasma-enhanced CVD in combination with Ni-nanodots seeding nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yimin; Makihara, Katsunori; Takeuchi, Daichi; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Ohta, Akio; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline (µc) Si/Ge heterostructures were prepared on quartz substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from VHF inductively coupled plasma of SiH4 just after GeH4 employing Ni nanodots (NDs) as seeds for crystalline nucleation. The crystallinity of the films and the progress of grain growth were characterized by Raman scattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. When the Ge films were grown on Ni-NDs at 250 °C, the growth of µc-Ge films with crystallinity as high as 80% was realized without an amorphous phase near the Ge film/quartz substrate interface. After the subsequent Si film deposition at 250 °C, fine grains were formed in the early stages of film growth on µc-Ge films with compositional mixing (µc-Si0.85Ge0.15:H) caused by the release of large lattice mismatch between c-Si and c-Ge. With further increase in Si:H film thickness, the formation of large grain structures accompanied by fine grains was promoted. These results suggest that crystalline Si/Ge heterojunctions can be used for efficient carrier collection in solar cell application.

  8. Synthesis and temperature dependent Raman studies of large crystalline faces topological GeBi4Te7 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, Priyanath; Bera, G.; Turpu, G. R.; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Das, Pradip

    2018-05-01

    We present a study of structural and vibrational properties of topological insulator GeBi4Te7. Modified Bridgeman technique is employed to synthesize the single crystal with relatively large crystalline faces. Sharp (0 0 l) reflection confirms the high crystallinity of the single crystal. We have performed temperature dependent Raman measurement for both parallel and perpendicular to crystallographic c axis geometry. In parallel configuration we have observed seven Raman modes whereas in perpendicular geometry only four of these are identified. Appearance and disappearance of Raman modes having different intensities for parallel and perpendicular to c measurement attribute to the mode polarization. Progressive blue shift is observed with lowering temperature, reflects the increase in internal stress.

  9. Amorphous-crystalline interface evolution during Solid Phase Epitaxy Regrowth of SiGe films amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, D.; Piro, A.M.; Mirabella, S.; Bongiorno, C.; Romano, L.; Terrasi, A.; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy was combined with Time Resolved Reflectivity to study the amorphous-crystalline (a-c) interface evolution during Solid Phase Epitaxy Regrowth (SPER) of Si 0.83 Ge 0.17 films deposited on Si by Molecular Beam Epitaxy and amorphized with Ge + ion implantation. Starting from the Si/SiGe interface, a 20 nm thick layer regrows free of defects with the same SPER rate of pure Si. The remaining SiGe regrows with planar defects and dislocations, accompanied by a decrease of the SPER velocity. The sample was also studied after implantation with B or P. In these cases, the SPER rate raises following the doping concentration profile, but no difference in the defect-free layer thickness was observed compared to the un-implanted sample. On the other hand, B or P introduction reduces the a-c interface roughness, while B-P co-implantation produces roughness comparable to the un-implanted sample

  10. Diffusion and recrystallization of B implanted in crystalline and pre-amorphized Ge in the presence of F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, William; Kim, Taegon; Chou, Harry; Rai, Amritesh; Palard, Marylene; Benítez-Lara, Alfredo; Josefina Arellano-Jiménez, M.; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Dolocan, Andrei; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Although the diffusion control and dopant activation of Ge p-type junctions are straightforward when using B"+ implantation, the use of the heavier BF_2"+ ions or even BF"+ is still favored in terms of shallow junction formation and throughput—because implants can be done at higher energies, which can give higher beam currents and beam stability—and thus the understanding of the effect of F co-doping becomes important. In this work, we have investigated diffusion and end-of-range (EOR) defect formation for B"+, BF"+, and BF_2"+ implants in crystalline and pre-amorphized Ge, employing rapid thermal annealing at 600 °C and 800 °C for 10 s. It is demonstrated that the diffusion of B is strongly influenced by the temperature, the presence of F, and the depth of amorphous/crystalline interface. The B and F diffusion profiles suggest the formation of B–F complexes and enhanced diffusion by interaction with point defects. In addition, the strong chemical effect of F is found only for B in Ge, while such an effect is vanishingly small for samples implanted with F alone, or co-implanted with P and F, as evidenced by the high residual F concentration in the B-doped samples after annealing. After 600 °C annealing for 10 s, interstitial-induced compressive strain was still observed in the EOR region for the sample implanted with BF"+, as measured by X-ray diffraction. Further analysis by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy showed that the {311} interstitial clusters are the majority type of EOR defects. The impact of these {311} defects on the electrical performance of Ge p"+/n junctions formed by BF"+ implantation was evaluated.

  11. Characterization of crystallinity of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} epitaxial layers grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inuzuka, Yuki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ike, Shinichi; Asano, Takanori [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Takeuchi, Wakana [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Nakatsuka, Osamu, E-mail: nakatuka@alice.xtal.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Zaima, Shigeaki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2016-03-01

    The epitaxial growth of a Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layer was examined using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with two types of Ge precursors; tetra-ethyl-germane (TEGe) and tertiary-butyl-germane (TBGe); and the Sn precursor tri-butyl-vinyl-tin (TBVSn). Though the growth of a Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layer on a Ge(001) substrate by MOCVD has been reported, a high-Sn-content Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layer and the exploration of MO material combinations for Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} growth have not been reported. Therefore, the epitaxial growth of a Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layer on Ge(001) and Si(001) substrates was examined using these precursors. The Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers were pseudomorphically grown on a Ge(001) substrate, while the Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layer with a high degree of strain relaxation was obtained on a Si(001) substrate. Additionally, it was found that the two Ge precursors have different growth temperature ranges, where the TBGe could realize a higher growth rate at a lower growth temperature than the TEGe. The Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers grown using a combination of TBGe and TBVSn exhibited a higher crystalline quality and a smoother surface compared with the Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layer prepared by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. In this study, a Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} epitaxial layer with a Sn content as high as 5.1% on a Ge(001) substrate was achieved by MOCVD at 300 °C. - Highlights: • Tertiary-butyl-germane and tri-butyl-vinyl-tin are suitable for Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} MOCVD growth. • We achieved a Sn content of 5.1% in Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} epitaxial layer on Ge(001). • The Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers grown on Ge and Si by MOCVD have high crystalline quality.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of crystalline SrHfO{sub 3} directly on Ge (001) for high-k dielectric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Ekerdt, John G., E-mail: ekerdt@utexas.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Hu, Chengqing; Jiang, Aiting; Yu, Edward T. [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Lu, Sirong; Smith, David J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    The current work explores the crystalline perovskite oxide, strontium hafnate, as a potential high-k gate dielectric for Ge-based transistors. SrHfO{sub 3} (SHO) is grown directly on Ge by atomic layer deposition and becomes crystalline with epitaxial registry after post-deposition vacuum annealing at ∼700 °C for 5 min. The 2 × 1 reconstructed, clean Ge (001) surface is a necessary template to achieve crystalline films upon annealing. The SHO films exhibit excellent crystallinity, as shown by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The SHO films have favorable electronic properties for consideration as a high-k gate dielectric on Ge, with satisfactory band offsets (>2 eV), low leakage current (<10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 1 MV/cm) at an equivalent oxide thickness of 1 nm, and a reasonable dielectric constant (k ∼ 18). The interface trap density (D{sub it}) is estimated to be as low as ∼2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2 }eV{sup −1} under the current growth and anneal conditions. Some interfacial reaction is observed between SHO and Ge at temperatures above ∼650 °C, which may contribute to increased D{sub it} value. This study confirms the potential for crystalline oxides grown directly on Ge by atomic layer deposition for advanced electronic applications.

  13. Reversible electrical resistance switching in GeSbTe thin films : An electrolytic approach without amorphous-crystalline phase-change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, George; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Wouters, DJ; Hong, S; Soss, S; Auciello, O

    2008-01-01

    Besides the well-known resistance switching originating from the amorphous-crystalline phase-change in GeSbTe thin films, we demonstrate another switching mechanism named 'polarity-dependent resistance (PDR) switching'. 'Me electrical resistance of the film switches between a low- and high-state

  14. Positron confinement in embedded lithium nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kuriplach, J.

    2002-02-01

    Quantum confinement of positrons in nanoclusters offers the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the electronic structure of nanoclusters by application of positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques. In this work, positron confinement is investigated in lithium nanoclusters embedded in monocrystalline MgO. These nanoclusters were created by means of ion implantation and subsequent annealing. It was found from the results of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis that approximately 92% of the implanted positrons annihilate in lithium nanoclusters rather than in the embedding MgO, while the local fraction of lithium at the implantation depth is only 1.3 at. %. The results of two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation confirm the presence of crystalline bulk lithium. The confinement of positrons is ascribed to the difference in positron affinity between lithium and MgO. The nanocluster acts as a potential well for positrons, where the depth of the potential well is equal to the difference in the positron affinities of lithium and MgO. These affinities were calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method. This yields a positronic potential step at the MgO||Li interface of 1.8 eV using the generalized gradient approximation and 2.8 eV using the insulator model.

  15. Electrical properties of pseudo-single-crystalline Ge films grown by Au-induced layer exchange crystallization at 250 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, H.; Kudo, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamada, S.; Kanashima, T.; Tsunoda, I.; Nakashima, H.; Hamaya, K.

    2018-06-01

    We study the electrical properties of pseudo-single-crystalline Ge (PSC-Ge) films grown by a Au-induced layer exchange crystallization method at 250 °C. By inserting the SiNx layer between PSC-Ge and SiO2, we initiatively suppress the influence of the Ge/SiO2 interfacial defective layers, which have been reported in our previous works, on the electrical properties of the PSC-Ge layers. As a result, we can detect the influence of the ionized Au+ donors on the temperature-dependent hole concentration and Hall mobility. To further examine their electrical properties in detail, we also fabricate p-thin-film transistors (TFTs) with the PSC-Ge layer. Although the off-state leakage currents are suppressed by inserting the SiNx layer, the value of on/off ratio remains poor (leakage current although a nominal field effect mobility is enhanced up to ˜25 cm2/V s. Considering these features, we conclude that the Au contaminations into the PSC-Ge layer can affect the electrical properties and device performances despite a low-growth temperature of 250 °C. To achieve further high-performance p-TFTs, we have to suppress the Au contaminations into PSC-Ge during the Au-induced crystallization growth.

  16. Nature of phase transitions in crystalline and amorphous GeTe-Sb2Te3 phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, B; Sen, S; Clark, S M

    2011-09-28

    The thermodynamic nature of phase stabilities and transformations are investigated in crystalline and amorphous Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) (GST124) phase change materials as a function of pressure and temperature using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell. The phase transformation sequences upon compression, for cubic and hexagonal GST124 phases are found to be: cubic → amorphous → orthorhombic → bcc and hexagonal → orthorhombic → bcc. The Clapeyron slopes for melting of the hexagonal and bcc phases are negative and positive, respectively, resulting in a pressure dependent minimum in the liquidus. When taken together, the phase equilibria relations are consistent with the presence of polyamorphism in this system with the as-deposited amorphous GST phase being the low entropy low-density amorphous phase and the laser melt-quenched and high-pressure amorphized GST being the high entropy high-density amorphous phase. The metastable phase boundary between these two polyamorphic phases is expected to have a negative Clapeyron slope. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  17. A Review on Disorder-Driven Metal–Insulator Transition in Crystalline Vacancy-Rich GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang-Jing; Xu, Ya-Zhi; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Wuttig, Matthias; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Metal–insulator transition (MIT) is one of the most essential topics in condensed matter physics and materials science. The accompanied drastic change in electrical resistance can be exploited in electronic devices, such as data storage and memory technology. It is generally accepted that the underlying mechanism of most MITs is an interplay of electron correlation effects (Mott type) and disorder effects (Anderson type), and to disentangle the two effects is difficult. Recent progress on the crystalline Ge1Sb2Te4 (GST) compound provides compelling evidence for a disorder-driven MIT. In this work, we discuss the presence of strong disorder in GST, and elucidate its effects on electron localization and transport properties. We also show how the degree of disorder in GST can be reduced via thermal annealing, triggering a disorder-driven metal–insulator transition. The resistance switching by disorder tuning in crystalline GST may enable novel multilevel data storage devices. PMID:28773222

  18. Low Thermal Conductivity of Bulk Amorphous Si1- x Ge x Containing Nano-Sized Crystalline Particles Synthesized by Ball-Milling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Omprakash; Nishino, Shunsuke; Ghodke, Swapnil; Inukai, Manabu; Sobota, Robert; Adachi, Masahiro; Kiyama, Makato; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Santhanakrishnan, Harish; Ikeda, Hiroya; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2018-06-01

    Amorphous Si0.65Ge0.35 powder containing a small amount of nano-sized crystalline particles was synthesized by means of the mechanical alloying process. Hot pressing for 24 h under the pressure of 400 MPa at 823 K, which is below the crystallization temperature, allowed us to obtain bulk amorphous Si-Ge alloy containing a small amount of nanocrystals. The thermal conductivity of the prepared bulk amorphous Si-Ge alloy was extremely low, showing a magnitude of less than 1.35 Wm-1 K-1 over the entire temperature range from 300 K to 700 K. The sound velocity of longitudinal and transverse waves for the bulk amorphous Si0.65Ge0.35 were measured, and the resulting values were 5841 m/s and 2840 m/s, respectively. The estimated mean free path of phonons was kept at the very small value of ˜ 4.2 nm, which was mainly due to the strong scattering limit of phonons in association with the amorphous structure.

  19. CORRIGENDUM First principles study of crystalline and amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 and the effects of stoichiometric defects First principles study of crystalline and amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 and the effects of stoichiometric defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravati, S.; Bernasconi, M.; Kühne, T. D.; Krack, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2010-10-01

    The distributions of coordination numbers reported in the insets of figure 7 actually refer to a bonding cutoff of 3.2 Å for all pairs of atoms. The distributions of coordination numbers referred to in the paper with bonding cutoff equal to 3.2 Å for all pairs but Sb-Te for which the bonding cutoff was set to the outer edge of the pair correlation function of c-GST (3.4 Å at 300 K) are given below for the three compounds. figure 1 Figure 7. Distribution of coordination numbers of different species obtained by integration of the partial pair correlation functions for (from left to right) Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge2Sb1.8Te5 and Ge2.2Sb2Te5.

  20. Study of the structure and chemical bonding of crystalline Ge_4Sb_2Te_7 using first principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Satvinder; Tripathi, S. K.; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman

    2016-01-01

    The atomic arrangements and chemical bonding of stable Ge_4Sb_2Te_7 (GeTe rich), a phase-change material, have been investigated by means of ab initio total energy calculations. To study the atomic arrangement, GeTe block is considered into -TeSbTeSbTe- block and -Te-Te- layer in the stacking I and II respectively. The stacking I is energetically more stable than the stacking II. The reason for more stability of the stacking I has been explained. The chemical bonding has been studied with the electronic charge density distribution around the atomic bonds. The quantity of electronic charge loosed or gained by atoms has been calculated using the Bader charge analysis. The metallic character has been studied using band structures calculations. The band gap for the stacking I and II is 0.463 and 0.219 eV respectively.

  1. Thermodynamic and transport properties of single crystalline RCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm–Tm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Tai, E-mail: taikong@iastate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Cunningham, Charles E. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112 (United States); Taufour, Valentin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bud' ko, Sergey L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Buffon, Malinda L.C. [Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Lin, Xiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Emmons, Heather [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112 (United States); Canfield, Paul C., E-mail: canfield@ameslab.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Single crystals of RCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm–Tm) were grown using a self-flux method and were characterized by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction; anisotropic, temperature and field dependent magnetization; temperature and field dependent, in-plane resistivity; and specific heat measurements. In this series, the majority of the moment-bearing members order antiferromagnetically; YCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and LaCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are non-moment-bearing. Ce is trivalent in CeCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} at high temperatures, and exhibits an enhanced electronic specific heat coefficient due to the Kondo effect at low temperatures. In addition, CeCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} shows two low-temperature anomalies in temperature-dependent magnetization and specific heat measurements. Three members (R=Tb–Ho) have multiple phase transitions above 1.8 K. Eu appears to be divalent with total angular momentum L=0. Both EuCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and GdCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} manifest essentially isotropic paramagnetic properties consistent with J=S=7/2. Clear magnetic anisotropy for rare-earth members with finite L was observed, with ErCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and TmCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} manifesting planar anisotropy and the rest members manifesting axial anisotropy. The experimentally estimated crystal electric field (CEF) parameters B{sub 2}{sup 0} were calculated from the anisotropic paramagnetic θ{sub ab} and θ{sub c} values and follow a trend that agrees well with theoretical predictions. The ordering temperatures, T{sub N}, as well as the polycrystalline averaged paramagnetic Curie–Weiss temperature, Θ{sub avg}, for the heavy rare-earth members deviate from the de Gennes scaling, as the magnitude of both is the highest for Tb, which is sometimes seen for extremely axial systems. Except for SmCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, metamagnetic transitions were observed at 1.8 K for all members that ordered antiferromagnetically. - Highlights: • Single crystalline RCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm

  2. Theoretical assessment of the electro-optical features of the group III nitrides (B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and Ga{sub 12}N{sub 12}) and group IV carbides (C{sub 24}, Si{sub 12}C{sub 12} and Ge{sub 12}C{sub 12}) nanoclusters encapsulated with alkali metals (Li, Na and K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahmasebi, Elham [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad, Lorestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakerzadeh, Ehsan, E-mail: e.shakerzadeh@scu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biglari, Zeinab [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad, Lorestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Encapsulation of Li, Na and K narrow the HOMO–LUMO gaps of the clusters. • The group III nitrides nanoclusters strongly interacted with the alkali metals. • First hyperpolarizabilities remarkably enhance for B{sub 12}N{sub 12} encapsulated with Na/K. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to study the influence of alkali metals (Li, Na and K) encapsulation within the group III nitrides (B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and Ga{sub 12}N{sub 12}) and the group IV carbides (C{sub 24}, Si{sub 12}C{sub 12}and Ge{sub 12}C{sub 12}) nanoclusters. The encapsulation of Li, Na and K atoms is found to narrow the HOMO–LUMO gaps of the considered clusters. The electronic properties of these clusters, especially the group III nitrides nanoclusters, are strongly sensitive to interaction with the alkali metals. Moreover it is observed that the encapsulation of alkali metals enhances the first hyperpolarizabilities of B{sub 12}N{sub 12} nanocluster. Surprisingly, due to the alkali metals encapsulation within B{sub 12}N{sub 12} nanocluster, the first hyperpolarizability values are remarkably increased to 8505.49 and 122,503.76 a.u. for Na@B{sub 12}N{sub 12} and K@B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, respectively. Also the TD-DFT calculations at both CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and PBE0/6-311+G(d) levels of theory are also performed to investigate the origin of first hyperpolarizabilities.

  3. NanoClusters Enhance Drug Delivery in Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornputtapitak, Warangkana

    while milled ITZ NanoClusters maintained the crystalline character. Overall, NanoClusters prepared by various processes represent a potential engineered drug particle approach for inhalation therapy since they provide effective aerosol properties and stability due to the crystalline state of the drug powders. Future work will continue to explore formulation and delivery performance in vitro and in vivo..

  4. Towards III-V solar cells on Si: Improvement in the crystalline quality of Ge-on-Si virtual substrates through low porosity porous silicon buffer layer and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Baricordi, Stefano; Bernardoni, Paolo; Fin, Samuele; Guidi, Vincenzo; Vincenzi, Donato

    2014-01-01

    A comparison between the crystalline quality of Ge grown on bulk Si and on a low porosity porous Si (pSi) buffer layer using low energy plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is reported. Omega/2Theta coupled scans around the Ge and Si (004) diffraction peaks show a reduction of the Ge full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 22.4% in presence of the pSi buffer layer, indicating it is effective in improving the epilayer crystalline quality. At the same time atomic force microscopy analysis shows an increase in root means square roughness for Ge grown on pSi from 38.5 nm to 48.0 nm, as a consequence of the larger surface roughness of pSi compared to bulk Si. The effect of 20 minutes vacuum annealing at 580°C is also investigated. The annealing leads to a FWHM reduction of 23% for Ge grown on Si and of 36.5% for Ge on pSi, resulting in a FWHM of 101 arcsec in the latter case. At the same time, the RMS roughness is reduced of 8.8% and of 46.5% for Ge grown on bulk Si and on pSi, respectively. The biggest improvement in the crystalline quality of Ge grown on pSi with respect to Ge grown on bulk Si observed after annealing is a consequence of the simultaneous reorganization of the Ge epilayer and the buffer layer driven by energy minimization. A low porosity buffer layer can thus be used for the growth of low defect density Ge on Si virtual substrates for the successive integration of III-V multijunction solar cells on Si. The suggested approach is simple and fast –thus allowing for high throughput-, moreover is cost effective and fully compatible with subsequent wafer processing. Finally it does not introduce new chemicals in the solar cell fabrication process and can be scaled to large area silicon wafers

  5. Synthesis and characterization of colloidal fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sherry; Pfeiffer, Christian; Hollmann, Jana; Friede, Sebastian; Chen, Justin Jin-Ching; Beyer, Andreas; Haas, Benedikt; Volz, Kerstin; Heimbrodt, Wolfram; Montenegro Martos, Jose Maria; Chang, Walter; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2012-06-19

    Ultrasmall water-soluble silver nanoclusters are synthesized, and their properties are investigated. The silver nanoclusters have high colloidal stability and show fluorescence in the red. This demonstrates that like gold nanoclusters also silver nanoclusters can be fluorescent.

  6. Pressurized polyol synthesis of Al-doped ZnO nanoclusters with high electrical conductivity and low near-infrared transmittance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho-Nyun; Shin, Chi-Ho [Surface Technology R& BD Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Duck Kun [Department of Corporate Diagnosis, Small and Medium Business Corporation, Seoul 150-718 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haekyoung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyeongseok [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, Inha Technical College, Incheon 402-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Jong, E-mail: hjkim23@kitech.re.kr [Surface Technology R& BD Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Low-temperature pressurized polyol method synthesized Al-doped ZnO nanoclusters. • Reaction time affected the doping efficiency, resistivity, and NIR transmittance. • The near-IR blocking efficiency of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) nanoclusters reached 85%. • AZO nanocluster coatings could be used for heat reflectors or artificial glasses. - Abstract: In this study, a novel pressurized polyol method is proposed to synthesize aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) nanoclusters without utilizing additional thermal treatment to avoid the merging of nanoclusters. The size of the AZO nanoclusters range from 100 to 150 nm with a resistivity of 204 Ω cm. The AZO nanoclusters primarily consist of approximately 10-nm nanocrystals that form a spherically clustered morphology. A two-stage growth model has been proposed based on the results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images, nanocluster sizes, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The primary AZO nanocrystals first nucleate under pressurized conditions and then spontaneously aggregate into larger nanoclusters. Optically, the AZO nanoclusters exhibit a significant decrease in the near-infrared (NIR) transmittance compared to pure ZnO nanoparticles. The NIR blocking efficiency of AZO nanoclusters reached 85%. Moreover, the doping efficiency, resistivity, and NIR transmittance of AZO nanoclusters are influenced by the reaction time in the pressurized polyol solution. On the other hand, the reaction time has no effect on the particle size and crystallinity. An optically transparent coating for the AZO nanoclusters, which consisted of iso-propanol solvent and ultraviolet-curable acrylic binder, was also demonstrated.

  7. Real-time transmission electron microscope observation of gold nanoclusters diffusing into silicon at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Nakajima, Yuuki; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Endo, Junji; Collard, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Gold diffusion into silicon at room temperature was observed in real time with atomic resolution. Gold nanoclusters were formed on a silicon surface by an electrical discharge between a silicon tip and a gold coated tip inside an ultrahigh-vacuum transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimen chamber. At the moment of the gold nanocluster deposition, the gold nanoclusters had a crystalline structure. The crystalline structure gradually disappeared due to the interdiffusion between silicon and gold as observed after the deposition of gold nanoclusters. The shape of the nanocluster gradually changed due to the gold diffusion into the damaged silicon. The diffusion front between silicon and gold moved toward the silicon side. From the observations of the diffusion front, the gold diffusivity at room temperature was extracted. The extracted activation energy, 0.21 eV, matched the activation energy in bulk diffusion between damaged silicon and gold. This information is useful for optimizing the hybridization between solid-state and biological nanodevices in which gold is used as an adhesive layer between the two devices.

  8. Observing the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} non-volatile memory materials from ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.H.; Elliott, S.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Phase-change memory is a promising candidate for the next generation of non-volatile memory devices. This technology utilizes reversible phase transitions between amorphous and crystalline phases of a recording material, and has been successfully used in rewritable optical data storage, revealing its feasibility. In spite of the importance of understanding the nucleation and growth processes that play a critical role in the phase transition, this understanding is still incomplete. Here, we present observations of the early stages of crystallization in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} materials through ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. Planar structures, including fourfold rings and planes, play an important role in the formation and growth of crystalline clusters in the amorphous matrix. At the same time, vacancies facilitate crystallization by providing space at the glass-crystalline interface for atomic diffusion, which results in fast crystal growth, as observed in simulations and experiments. The microscopic mechanism of crystallization presented here may deepen our understanding of the phase transition occurring in real devices, providing an opportunity to optimize the memory performance of phase-change materials. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Fabrication and modification of metal nanocluster composites using ion and laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Osborne, D.H. Jr.; Magruder, R.H. III; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A.; Townsend, P.D.; Hole, D.E.; Leuchtner, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    Metal nanocluster composites have attractive properties for applications in nonlinear optics. However, traditional fabrication techniques -- using melt-glass substrates -- are severely constrained by equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics. This paper describes the fabrication of metal nanoclusters in both crystalline and glassy hosts by ion implantation and pulsed laser deposition. The size and size distribution of the metal nanoclusters can be modified by controlling substrate temperature during implantation, by subsequent thermal annealing, or by laser irradiation. The authors have characterized the optical response of the composites by absorption and third-order nonlinear-optical spectroscopies; electron and scanning-probe microscopies have been used to benchmark the physical characteristics of the composites. The outlook for controlling the structure and nonlinear optical response properties of these nanophase materials appears increasingly promising

  10. A scalable synthesis of highly stable and water dispersible Ag 44(SR)30 nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulHalim, Lina G.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Kothalawala, Nuwan; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Abbas, Sikandar Zameer; Amassian, Aram; Stellacci, Francesco; Dass, Amala; Hussain, Irshad; Bakr, Osman

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of atomically monodisperse thiol-protected silver nanoclusters [Ag44(SR)30] m, (SR = 5-mercapto-2-nitrobenzoic acid) in which the product nanocluster is highly stable in contrast to previous preparation methods. The method is one-pot, scalable, and produces nanoclusters that are stable in aqueous solution for at least 9 months at room temperature under ambient conditions, with very little degradation to their unique UV-Vis optical absorption spectrum. The composition, size, and monodispersity were determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and analytical ultracentrifugation. The produced nanoclusters are likely to be in a superatom charge-state of m = 4-, due to the fact that their optical absorption spectrum shares most of the unique features of the intense and broadly absorbing nanoparticles identified as [Ag44(SR) 30]4- by Harkness et al. (Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 4269). A protocol to transfer the nanoclusters to organic solvents is also described. Using the disperse nanoclusters in organic media, we fabricated solid-state films of [Ag44(SR)30]m that retained all the distinct features of the optical absorption spectrum of the nanoclusters in solution. The films were studied by X-ray diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy in order to investigate their crystallinity, atomic composition and valence band structure. The stability, scalability, and the film fabrication method demonstrated in this work pave the way towards the crystallization of [Ag44(SR)30]m and its full structural determination by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Moreover, due to their unique and attractive optical properties with multiple optical transitions, we anticipate these clusters to find practical applications in light-harvesting, such as photovoltaics and photocatalysis, which have been hindered so far by the instability of previous generations of the cluster. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Optical and structural characterization of Ge clusters embedded in ZrO2

    OpenAIRE

    Agocs, E; Zolnai, Z.; Rossall, A. K.; Van den Berg, Jakob; Fodor, B.; Lehninger, D.; Khomenkova, L.; Ponomaryov, S.; Gudymenko, O.; Yukhymchuk, V.; Kalas, B.; Heitmann, J.; Petrik, P.

    2017-01-01

    The change of optical and structural properties of Ge nanoclusters in ZrO2 matrix have been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry versus annealing temperatures. Radio-frequency top-down magnetron sputtering approach was used to produce the samples of different types, i.e. single-layers of pure Ge, pure ZrO2 and Ge-rich-ZrO2 as well as multi-layers stacked of 40 periods of 5-nm-Ge-rich-ZrO2 layers alternated by 5-nm-ZrO2 ones. Germanium nanoclusters in ZrO2 host were formed by rapid-therm...

  12. A Review on Disorder-Driven Metal-Insulator Transition in Crystalline Vacancy-Rich GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang-Jing; Xu, Ya-Zhi; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Wuttig, Matthias; Zhang, Wei

    2017-07-27

    Metal-insulator transition (MIT) is one of the most essential topics in condensed matter physics and materials science. The accompanied drastic change in electrical resistance can be exploited in electronic devices, such as data storage and memory technology. It is generally accepted that the underlying mechanism of most MITs is an interplay of electron correlation effects (Mott type) and disorder effects (Anderson type), and to disentangle the two effects is difficult. Recent progress on the crystalline Ge₁Sb₂Te₄ (GST) compound provides compelling evidence for a disorder-driven MIT. In this work, we discuss the presence of strong disorder in GST, and elucidate its effects on electron localization and transport properties. We also show how the degree of disorder in GST can be reduced via thermal annealing, triggering a disorder-driven metal-insulator transition. The resistance switching by disorder tuning in crystalline GST may enable novel multilevel data storage devices.

  13. First-principles study of crystalline and amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and the effects of stoichiometric defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravati, S; Bernasconi, M [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125, Milano (Italy); Kuehne, T D; Parrinello, M [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI Campus, Via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Krack, M [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)], E-mail: marco.bernasconi@mater.unimib.it

    2009-06-24

    Based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the structural, electronic and vibrational properties of cubic and amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST) phase change material, focusing in particular on the effects of defects in stoichiometry on the electronic properties. It turned out Ge/Sb deficiencies (excess) in the cubic phase induce a shift of the Fermi level inside the valence (conduction) bands. In contrast, the amorphous network is flexible enough to accommodate defects in stoichiometry, keeping the Fermi level pinned at the center of the bandgap (at zero temperature). Changes in the structural and electronic properties induced by the use of hybrid functionals (HSE03, PBE0) instead of gradient corrected functionals (PBE) are addressed as well. Analysis of vibrational spectra and Debye-Waller factors of cubic and amorphous GST is also presented.

  14. Investigations of the coherent hard photon yields from (50-300) GeV/c electrons/positrons in the strong crystalline fields of diamond, Si, and Ge crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the influence of strong fields on QED-processes like: Emission of coherent radiation and pair-production when multi-hundred GeV electrons/positrons and photons penetrate single crystals near axial/planar directions. The targets will be diamond, Si, Ge and W crystals.\\\\\\\\ QED is a highly developed theory and has been investigated experimentally in great detail. In recent years it has become technically possible to investigate QED-processes in very strong electromagnetic fields around the characteristic strong field E$_{0}$ = m$^{2}$c$^{3}$/eh = 1.32.10$^{16}$ V/cm. The work of such a field over the Compton length equals the electron mass. The theoretical description of QED in such fields is beyond the framework of perturbation theory. Such fields are only obtained in laboratories for a) heavy ion collisions b) interactions of multi-GeV electrons with extremely intense laser fields and in oriented crystals. In fact it turns out that crystals are unique for this type of e...

  15. Phenomenological model of nanocluster in polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksengendler, B.L.; Turaeva, N.N.; Azimov, J.; Rashidova, S.Sh.

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenological model of matrix nanoclusters is presented based on the Wood-Saxon potential used in nuclear physics. In frame of this model the following problems have been considered: calculation of width of diffusive layer between nanocluster and matrix, definition of Tamm surface electronic state taking into account the diffusive layer width, receiving the expression for specific magnetic moment of nanoclusters taking into account the interface width. (authors)

  16. Nanocluster production for solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Dosari, Haila M.; Ayesh, Ahmad I.

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of silver (Ag) and silicon (Si) nanoclusters that might be used for solar cell applications. Silver and silicon nanoclusters have been synthesized by means of dc magnetron sputtering and inert gas condensation inside an ultra-high vacuum compatible system. We have found that nanocluster size distributions can be tuned by various source parameters, such as the sputtering discharge power, flow rate of argon inert gas, and aggregation length. Quadrupole mass filter and transmission electron microscopy were used to evaluate the size distribution of Ag and Si nanoclusters. Ag nanoclusters with average size in the range of 3.6–8.3 nm were synthesized (herein size refers to the nanocluster diameter), whereas Si nanoclusters' average size was controlled to range between 2.9 and 7.4 nm by controlling the source parameters. This work illustrates the ability of controlling the Si and Ag nanoclusters' sizes by proper optimization of the operation conditions. By controlling nanoclusters' sizes, one can alter their surface properties to suit the need to enhance solar cell efficiency. Herein, Ag nanoclusters were deposited on commercial polycrystalline solar cells. Short circuit current (I SC ), open circuit voltage (V OC ), fill factor, and efficiency (η) were obtained under light source with an intensity of 30 mW/cm 2 . A 22.7% enhancement in solar cell efficiency could be measured after deposition of Ag nanoclusters, which demonstrates that Ag nanoclusters generated in this work are useful to enhance solar cell efficiency

  17. Possibility of superradiance by magnetic nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V I; Yukalova, E P

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of realizing spin superradiance by an assembly of magnetic nanoclusters is analyzed. The known obstacles for realizing such a coherent radiation by magnetic nanoclusters are their large magnetic anisotropy, strong dephasing dipole interactions, and an essential nonuniformity of their sizes. In order to give a persuasive conclusion, a microscopic theory is developed, providing an accurate description of nanocluster spin dynamics. It is shown that, despite the obstacles, it is feasible to organize such a setup that magnetic nanoclusters would produce strong superradiant emission

  18. Contribution to the study of electronic structure of crystalline semiconductors (Si, Ge, GaAs, Gap, ZnTe, ZnSe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhafs B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The band structure of semiconductors was described by several theorists since the Fifties. The main objective of the present paper is to do a comparative study between various families of semi-conductors IV (Si,Ge, III-V (GaAs, GaP and II-VI (ZnSe, ZnTe with both methods; tight Binding1 method and pseudo potential method2. This work enables us to understand as well as the mechanism of conduction process in these semiconductors and powers and limits of the above methods. The obtained results allow to conclude that both methods are in a good agreement to describe the morphology of band structures of the cited semiconductors. This encourages us to study in the future the electronic behaviour through the structure of bands for more complex systems such as the heterostructures.

  19. Nanoclusters a bridge across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    Jena, Purusottam

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive book on Nanoclusters comprises sixteen authoritative chapters written by leading researchers in the field. It provides insight into topics that are currently at the cutting edge of cluster science, with the main focus on metal and metal compound systems that are of particular interest in materials science, and also on aspects related to biology and medicine. While there are numerous books on clusters, the focus on clusters as a bridge across disciplines sets this book apart from others. Delivers cutting edge coverage of cluster science Covers a broad range of topics in

  20. Structural investigation of the amorphous/crystalline interface by means of quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy on the systems a-Si/c-Si and a-Ge/c-Si; Strukturelle Untersuchung der amorph/kristallinen Grenzflaeche mittels quantitativer hochaufloesender Transmissionselektronenmikroskopie an den Systemen a-Si/c-Si und a-Ge/c-Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, K.

    2006-11-02

    In this Thesis the interfaces between covalently bonded crystalline and amorphous materials were studied with regard to the induced ordering in the amorphous material in the interfacial region by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM). The interface between amorphous germanium and crystalline silicon and the interface between amorphous and crystalline silicon served as material system. In order to quantify the influence of the crystalline order on the amorphous material, the HREM images were periodically averaged along the interface. The intensity components, which are correlated with the period of the lattice image, could thus be separated from the statistical intensity fluctuations, which are characteristic for images of amorphous materials. Since amorphous materials can only be described meaningful by statistical distribution functions, for the induced order a three-dimensional distribution function {rho}{sub 3D}(r) was taken as a basis, which describes the probability to find an atom in the amorphous material, if r=0 is the position of an atom in the crystal. Its two-dimensional projection, {rho}, can be determined using iterative image matching techniques on averaged experimental and simulated interface images. For the analyzed material systems {rho} exhibits lateral ordering as well as a pronounced layering in the vicinity of the interface. In the case of the a-Si/c-Si sample the mean orientation of bonds was 70.5 , as is in the case of the undistorted diamond lattice, while for the a-Ge/c-Si sample 65 resulted. The standard deviation for the distribution of the deviations from the mean bond angle yields for the a-Ge/c-Si sample in the first atomic layer a value of 11.3 and for the a-Si/c-Si sample 1.9 . These results suggest the conclusion, that the differences in these values are to be interpreted as the reaction of the amorphous material to the volume misfit. Although for both material systems 1.4 nm was calculated for the width

  1. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  2. Plasmon tsunamis on metallic nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, A A; Sunjic, M

    2012-03-14

    A model is constructed to describe inelastic scattering events accompanying electron capture by a highly charged ion flying by a metallic nanosphere. The electronic energy liberated by an electron leaving the Fermi level of the metal and dropping into a deep Rydberg state of the ion is used to increase the ion kinetic energy and, simultaneously, to excite multiple surface plasmons around the positively charged hole left behind on the metal sphere. This tsunami-like phenomenon manifests itself as periodic oscillations in the kinetic energy gain spectrum of the ion. The theory developed here extends our previous treatment (Lucas et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 013034) of the Ar(q+)/C(60) charge exchange system. We provide an analysis of how the individual multipolar surface plasmons of the metallic sphere contribute to the formation of the oscillatory gain spectrum. Gain spectra showing characteristic, tsunami-like oscillations are simulated for Ar(15+) ions capturing one electron in distant collisions with Al and Na nanoclusters.

  3. Surface mediated assembly of small, metastable gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettibone, John M.; Osborn, William A.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Talin, A. Alec; Bonevich, John E.; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2013-06-01

    The unique properties of metallic nanoclusters are attractive for numerous commercial and industrial applications but are generally less stable than nanocrystals. Thus, developing methodologies for stabilizing nanoclusters and retaining their enhanced functionality is of great interest. We report the assembly of PPh3-protected Au9 clusters from a heterogeneous mixture into films consisting of sub 3 nm nanocluster assemblies. The depositing nanoclusters are metastable in solution, but the resulting nanocluster assemblies are stabilized indefinitely in air or fresh solvent. The films exhibit distinct structure from Au nanoparticles observed by X-ray diffraction, and film dissolution data support the preservation of small nanoclusters. UV-Vis spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy are used to elucidate information regarding the nanocluster formation and assembly mechanism. Preferential deposition of nanocluster assemblies can be achieved on multiple substrates, including polymer, Cr, Si, SiO2, SiNx, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Unlike other vapor phase coating processes, nanocluster assembly on the MIL-68(In) MOF crystal is capable of preferentially coating the external surface and stabilizing the crystal structure in hydrothermal conditions, which should enhance their storage, separation and delivery capabilities.The unique properties of metallic nanoclusters are attractive for numerous commercial and industrial applications but are generally less stable than nanocrystals. Thus, developing methodologies for stabilizing nanoclusters and retaining their enhanced functionality is of great interest. We report the assembly of PPh3-protected Au9 clusters from a heterogeneous mixture into films consisting of sub 3 nm nanocluster assemblies. The depositing nanoclusters are metastable in solution, but the resulting nanocluster assemblies are stabilized indefinitely in air or fresh solvent. The

  4. Theoretical Studies of Nanoclusters (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-23

    nanoclusters. However, scanning transmission electron microscopy ( STEM ) measures show cluster inversion occurred to produce MgyCux(!) a) copper atoms b...methane (née CLL -1) as a potential explosive ingredient: a theoretical study”, Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics 38, 9-13 (2013). Jesus Paulo L

  5. Peptide-stabilized, fluorescent silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Simon; Vosch, Tom André Jos; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Few-atom silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can exhibit strong fluorescence; however, they require ligands to prevent aggregation into larger nanoparticles. Fluorescent AgNCs in biopolymer scaffolds have so far mainly been synthesized in solution, and peptides have only found limited use compared to DNA...

  6. Radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability in oxide dispersion strengthened materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribis, J.; Bordas, E.; Trocellier, P.; Serruys, Y.; de Carlan, Y.; Legris, A.

    2015-12-01

    ODS materials constitute a new promising class of structural materials for advanced fission and fusion energy application. These Fe-Cr based ferritic steels contain ultra-high density of dispersion-strengthening nanoclusters conferring excellent mechanical properties to the alloy. Hence, guarantee the nanocluster stability under irradiation remain a critical issue. Nanoclusters are non-equilibrium multicomponent compounds (YTiCrO) forming through a complex nucleation pathway during the elaboration process. In this paper, it is proposed to observe the response of these nanoclusters when the system is placed far from equilibrium by means of ion beam. The results indicate that the Y, Ti, O and Cr atoms self-organized so that nanoclusters coarsened but maintain their non-equilibrium chemical composition. It is discussed that the radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability emerges from cooperative effects: radiation-induced Ostwald ripening, permanent creation of vacancies in the clusters, and fast Cr diffusion mediated by interstitials.

  7. Radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability in oxide dispersion strengthened materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribis, J.; Bordas, E.; Trocellier, P.; Serruys, Y.; Carlan, Y. de; Legris, A.

    2015-01-01

    ODS materials constitute a new promising class of structural materials for advanced fission and fusion energy application. These Fe–Cr based ferritic steels contain ultra-high density of dispersion-strengthening nanoclusters conferring excellent mechanical properties to the alloy. Hence, guarantee the nanocluster stability under irradiation remain a critical issue. Nanoclusters are non-equilibrium multicomponent compounds (YTiCrO) forming through a complex nucleation pathway during the elaboration process. In this paper, it is proposed to observe the response of these nanoclusters when the system is placed far from equilibrium by means of ion beam. The results indicate that the Y, Ti, O and Cr atoms self-organized so that nanoclusters coarsened but maintain their non-equilibrium chemical composition. It is discussed that the radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability emerges from cooperative effects: radiation-induced Ostwald ripening, permanent creation of vacancies in the clusters, and fast Cr diffusion mediated by interstitials.

  8. Fluorescent Pressure Response of Protein-Nanocluster Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    composites as pressure sensitive indicators of brain damage. The PNC composites are made up of protein coated gold nanoclusters and a styrene-ethylene...enhancement of the BSA- protected gold nanoclusters and the corresponding conformational changes of protein, J Phys Chem C. 2013;117:639–647...public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This research focuses on the uses of polymer gold nanocluster (PNC

  9. Experimental measurements of U60 nanocluster stability in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Shannon L.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Gao, Yunyi; Liu, Tianbo; Burns, Peter C.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the aqueous behavior of isolated U60 nanoclusters (K16Li25[UO2(O2)OH]60)-19 was studied under several pH conditions and nanocluster concentrations to determine if the nanoclusters exhibit solid phase buffering behavior or if they exhibit behavior more like aqueous complexes. U60 is a cage cluster consisting of 60 (UO2)(O2)2(OH)2 uranyl polyhedral which share OH and O2 groups with their neighboring uranyl polyhedral, resulting in negatively charged cage clusters whose charge is at least partially offset by K+ and Li+ in the aqueous phase. Batch experiments to monitor nanocluster stability were conducted for 16 days at pH 7.5, 8.0 and 8.5 at nanocluster suspension concentrations of 1.4, 2.8 and 6.0 g/L. The aqueous concentrations of U, Li, and K, determined after 10 kDa molecular weight filtration, achieved steady-state with the nanoclusters within 24 h. The steady-state aqueous U, Li, and K concentrations were independent of solution pH, however they increased with increasing nanocluster concentration, indicating that the nanoclusters do not buffer the aqueous activities as a bulk solid phase would, but exhibit behavior that is more characteristic of dissolved aqueous complexes. The ion activity product (I.A.P.) value was calculated using two approaches: (1) treating the nanoclusters as a solid phase with an activity of one, and (2) treating the nanoclusters as aqueous complexes with a non-unit activity equal to their concentration in solution. The I.A.P. values that were calculated with non-unit activity for the nanoclusters exhibited significantly less variation as a function of nanocluster concentration compared to the I.A.P. values calculated with a nanocluster activity of one. The results yield a calculated log dissociation constant for the U60 nanoclusters of 9.2 + 0.2/-0.3 (1σ). Our findings provide a better understanding of the thermodynamic stability and behavior of U60 nanoclusters in aqueous systems, and can be used to estimate the

  10. Recent developments of anomalous X-ray scattering for non-crystalline materials with help of reverse Monte Carlo modeling: The example of GeSe{sub 2} glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Shinya [Center for Materials Research Using Third-Generation Synchrotron Facilities, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Pilgrim, Wolf-Christian [Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Berar, Jean-Francois [Institut Neel, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Joseph Fourier (CNRS/UJF), 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Kohara, Shinji [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Anomalous X-ray scattering (AXS) experiments on glassy GeSe{sub 2} were carried out at energies close to the Ge and Se K absorption edges in order to explore the atomic structure in the short- and intermediate-ranges. The partial structure factors, S{sub ij}(Q), and the corresponding partial pair-distribution functions, g{sub ij}(r), obtained with help of reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling, are in good agreement with the experimental results from neutron diffraction employing isotopic substitution (NDIS), and with the theoretical data from ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. The prepeak in the total structure factor, S(Q), indicating the existence of intermediate-range order (IRO), does not only result from Ge-Ge atomic correlations, but also contains Ge-Se correlations. From the atomic configuration obtained from RMC modeling, several structural parameters are discussed, such as partial coordination numbers, connections of the Ge(Se{sub 1/2}){sub 4} tetrahedra, and bond angle distributions. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of photosensitized zinc oxide nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakoshi, Kei; Yanagida, Shozo [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Capel, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    The authors have prepared and characterized photosensitized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoclusters, dispersed in methanol, using carboxylated coumarin dyes for surface adsorption. Femtosecond time-resolved emission spectroscopy allows the authors to measure the photo-induced charge carrier injection rate constant from the adsorbed photosensitizer to the n-type semiconductor nanocluster. These results are compared with other photosensitized semiconductors.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of mixed ligand chiral nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Guven, Zekiye P.

    2016-06-22

    Chiral mixed ligand silver nanoclusters were synthesized in the presence of a chiral and an achiral ligand. While the chiral ligand led mostly to the formation of nanoparticles, the presence of the achiral ligand drastically increased the yield of nanoclusters with enhanced chiral properties. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of mixed ligand chiral nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Guven, Zekiye P.; Ustbas, Burcin; Harkness, Kellen M.; Coskun, Hikmet; Joshi, Chakra Prasad; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Stellacci, Francesco; Bakr, Osman; Akbulut, Ozge

    2016-01-01

    Chiral mixed ligand silver nanoclusters were synthesized in the presence of a chiral and an achiral ligand. While the chiral ligand led mostly to the formation of nanoparticles, the presence of the achiral ligand drastically increased the yield of nanoclusters with enhanced chiral properties. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Molecular interactions in particular Van der Waals nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungclas, Hartmut; Schmidt, Lothar [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Chemistry Dept.; Komarov, Viacheslav V.; Popova, Anna M. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Chemistry Dept.; Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltzin Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2017-04-01

    A method is presented to analyse the interaction energies in a nanocluster, which is consisting of three neutral molecules bound by non-covalent long range Van der Waals forces. One of the molecules (M{sub 0}) in the nanocluster has a permanent dipole moment, whereas the two other molecules (M{sub 1} and M{sub 2}) are non-polar. Analytical expressions are obtained for the numerical calculation of the dispersion and induction energies of the molecules in the considered nanocluster. The repulsive forces at short intermolecular distances are taken into account by introduction of damping functions. Dispersion and induction energies are calculated for a nanocluster with a definite geometry, in which the polar molecule M{sub 0} is a linear hydrocarbon molecule C{sub 5}H{sub 10} and M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} are pyrene molecules. The calculations are done for fixed distances between the two pyrene molecules. The results show that the induction energies in the considered three-molecular nanocluster are comparable with the dispersion energies. Furthermore, the sum of induction energies in the substructure (M{sub 0}, M{sub 1}) of the considered nanocluster is much higher than the sum of induction energies in a two-molecular nanocluster with similar molecules (M{sub 0}, M{sub 1}) because of the absence of an electrostatic field in the latter case. This effect can be explained by the essential intermolecular induction in the three-molecular nanocluster.

  15. Self-organization of nanocluster δ-layers at ion-beam-mixed Si-SiO2 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2003-11-01

    This diploma thesis presents experimental evidence of a theoretical concept which predicts the self-organization of δ-layers of silicon nanoclusters in the buried oxide of a MOS-like structure. This approach of ''bottom-up'' structuring might be of eminent importance in view of future semiconductor memory devices. Unconventionally, a 15 nm thin SiO 2 layer, which is enclosed by a 50 nm poly-Si capping layer and the Si substrate, is irradiated with Si + ions. Ion impact drives the system to a state far from thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. the local composition of the target is modified to a degree unattainable in common processes. A region of SiO x (x 2 matrix at a distance of ∼3 nm from the Si substrate. The physical mechanisms of ion mixing of the two Si-SiO 2 interfaces and subsequent phase separation, which result in the desired sample structure, are elucidated from the viewpoint of computer simulations. In addition, experimental evidence is presented based on various methods, including TEM, RBS, and SIMS. A novel method of Si nanocluster decoration is of particular importance which applies Ge as contrast enhancing element in TEM studies of tiny Si nanoclusters. (orig.)

  16. Growth and structure of Si and Ge in vanadium oxide nanomesh on Pd(1 1 1) studied by STM and DFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Lap Hong; Hayazaki, Shinji; Ogawa, Kokushi; Yuhara, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied the growth and structure of Si and Ge in vanadium oxide nanomesh on Pd(1 1 1) by STM and DFT calculations. ► All the Si atoms formed isolated Si nanoclusters. ► Some Ge atoms formed monomer Ge nanodots on Pd(1 1 1), while the others formed isolated Ge nanoclusters. - Abstract: The growth of silicon (Si)/germanium (Ge) atoms in a well ordered (4 × 4) vanadium (V) oxide nanomesh on Pd(1 1 1) prepared by ultra-high-vacuum evaporation has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At the very beginning of the Si deposition, all of the Si atoms deposited were adsorbed on top of the V-oxide nanomesh, forming Si nanoclusters, and each Si atom formed was isolated other Si atoms. Two different adsorption sites for Si atoms were observed by STM. In the case of Ge deposition, some Ge atoms filled the vanadium oxide nanoholes, forming Ge nanodots on Pd(1 1 1), while the others were adsorbed on top of the V-oxide nanomesh, forming isolated Ge nanoclusters. The ab initio DFT total-energy calculations indicated that the Ge atoms occupying the nanohole were more stable than those adsorbed on the nanomesh. The simulated images were highly consistent with the experimental STM images with the exception of the Ge nanodots, which exhibited a large, uniform protrusion in the STM images. Therefore, the adsorbed atom might be mobile in the nanohole at room temperature, possibly as a result of interaction with the STM tip.

  17. Relaxation path of metastable nanoclusters in oxide dispersion strengthened materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribis, J., E-mail: joel.ribis@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thual, M.A. [LLB, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Guilbert, T.; Carlan, Y. de [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Legris, A. [UMET, CNRS/UMR 8207, Bât. C6, Univ. Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2017-02-15

    ODS steels are a promising class of structural materials for sodium cooled fast reactor application. The ultra-high density of the strengthening nanoclusters dispersed within the ferritic matrix is responsible of the excellent creep properties of the alloy. Fine characterization of the nanoclusters has been conducted on a Fe-14Cr-0.3Ti-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS material using High Resolution and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy. The nanoclusters exhibit a cubic symmetry possibly identified as f.c.c and display a non-equilibrium YTiCrO chemical composition thought to be stabilized by a vacancy supersaturation. These nanoclusters undergo relaxation towards the Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}-like state as they grow. A Cr shell is observed around the relaxed nano-oxides, this size-dependent shell may form after the release of Cr by the particles. The relaxation energy barrier appears to be higher for the smaller particles probably owing to a volume/surface ratio effect in reason to the full coherency of the nanoclusters. - Highlights: • The nanoclusters display a f.c.c. cubic symmetry and a non-equilibrium YTiCrO chemical composition. • During thermal annealing the coherent nanocluster transform into semi-coherent pyrochlore particles. • A Cr ring is observed around the relaxed pyrochlore type particles.

  18. Nanoclusters and Microparticles in Gases and Vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2012-01-01

    Research of processes involving Nanoclusters and Microparticleshas been developing fastin many fields of rescent research, in particular in materials science. To stay at the cutting edge of this development, a sound understanding of the processes is needed. In this work, several processes involving small particles are described, such as transport processes in gases, charging of small particles in gases, chemical processes, atom attachment and quenching of excited atomic particles on surfaces, nucleation, coagulation, coalescence and growth processes for particles and aggregates. This work pres

  19. Amorphous-to-crystalline transition in Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub (2-x)}Bi{sub x}Te{sub 11} phase-change materials for data recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, Roman, E-mail: roman.svoboda@upce.cz [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Karabyn, Vasyl [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Málek, Jiří [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Frumar, Miloslav [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Beneš, Ludvík; Vlček, Milan [Joint Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry of Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i. and the University of Pardubice 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-25

    Structural and thermokinetic analyses were used to study the crystallization behavior of Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub (2-x)}Bi{sub x}Te{sub 11}thin films, promising materials for phase-change memory recording applications. By exploring the full compositional range, it was found that the Sb→Bi substitution leads to a decrease of crystallization enthalpy and activation energy of the main crystallization phase-change process. These trends were explained in terms of the changing structural ordering within the recently proposed new phase-change atomic switching mechanism. All of the compositions exhibited very similar transformation kinetics, confirming the uniformity of the phase-change mechanisms involved. It was further shown that rapid energy delivery achieved during heating, in the case of all investigated materials, leads to a transition from the classical nucleation/growth-based formation of 3D crystallites towards an autocatalytic phase-change process with an enormously increased speed of crystallization. Rapidity of the crystallization process was quantified for all of the studied compositions based on a novel Index of Crystallization Rapidity criterion – the results provided by this criterion showed that the highest crystallization speed was produced by the Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 0.8}Bi{sub 1.2}Te{sub 11} composition, which therefore from this point of view appears to be a suitable candidate for the new generation of phase-change memory recording devices. - Highlights: • Crystallization behavior of Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub (2-x)}Bi{sub x}Te{sub 11} thin films was studied by DSC. • Sb → Bi substitution leads to a decrease of crystallization enthalpy and activation energy. • All compositions exhibited very similar transformation kinetics. • Rapidity of the crystallization process was quantified for the studied compositions. • Highest crystallization speed was produced by the Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 0.8}Bi{sub 1.2}Te{sub 11} composition.

  20. Controllable growth and magnetic properties of nickel nanoclusters electrodeposited on the ZnO nanorod template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yang; Zhao Dongxu; Shen Dezhen; Zhang Jiying; Wang Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    The ZnO nanorods were used as a template to fabricate nickel nanoclusters by electrodeposition. The ZnO nanorod arrays act as a nano-semiconductor electrode for depositing metallic and magnetic nickel nanoclusters. The growth sites of Ni nanoclusters could be controlled by adjusting the applied potential. Under -1.15 V the Ni nanoclusters could be grown on the tips of ZnO nanorods. On increasing the potential to be more negative the ZnO nanorods were covered by Ni nanoclusters. The magnetic properties of the electrodeposited Ni nanoclusters also evolved with the applied potentials.

  1. Controllable growth and magnetic properties of nickel nanoclusters electrodeposited on the ZnO nanorod template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Yang; Zhao Dongxu; Shen Dezhen; Zhang Jiying [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16 East Nan-Hu Road, Open Economic Zone, Changchun 130033 (China); Wang Xiaohua, E-mail: dxzhao2000@yahoo.com.c [National Key Laboratory of High Power Semiconductor Laser, Changchun University of Science and Technology, 7089 WeiXing Road, ChangChun 130022 (China)

    2009-12-09

    The ZnO nanorods were used as a template to fabricate nickel nanoclusters by electrodeposition. The ZnO nanorod arrays act as a nano-semiconductor electrode for depositing metallic and magnetic nickel nanoclusters. The growth sites of Ni nanoclusters could be controlled by adjusting the applied potential. Under -1.15 V the Ni nanoclusters could be grown on the tips of ZnO nanorods. On increasing the potential to be more negative the ZnO nanorods were covered by Ni nanoclusters. The magnetic properties of the electrodeposited Ni nanoclusters also evolved with the applied potentials.

  2. Single-fabrication-step Ge nanosphere/SiO2/SiGe heterostructures: a key enabler for realizing Ge MOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, P. H.; Peng, K. P.; Lin, H. C.; George, T.; Li, P. W.

    2018-05-01

    We report channel and strain engineering of self-organized, gate-stacking heterostructures comprising Ge-nanosphere gate/SiO2/SiGe-channels. An exquisitely-controlled dynamic balance between the concentrations of oxygen, Si, and Ge interstitials was effectively exploited to simultaneously create these heterostructures in a single oxidation step. Process-controlled tunability of the channel length (5–95 nm diameters for the Ge-nanospheres), gate oxide thickness (2.5–4.8 nm), as well as crystal orientation, chemical composition and strain engineering of the SiGe-channel was achieved. Single-crystalline (100) Si1‑x Ge x shells with Ge content as high as x = 0.85 and with a compressive strain of 3%, as well as (110) Si1‑x Ge x shells with Ge content of x = 0.35 and corresponding compressive strain of 1.5% were achieved. For each crystal orientation, our high Ge-content, highly-stressed SiGe shells feature a high degree of crystallinity and thus, provide a core ‘building block’ required for the fabrication of Ge-based MOS devices.

  3. Building machine learning force fields for nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, Claudio; Rossi, Kevin; Glielmo, Aldo; Fekete, Ádám; Gaston, Nicola; Baletto, Francesca; De Vita, Alessandro

    2018-06-01

    We assess Gaussian process (GP) regression as a technique to model interatomic forces in metal nanoclusters by analyzing the performance of 2-body, 3-body, and many-body kernel functions on a set of 19-atom Ni cluster structures. We find that 2-body GP kernels fail to provide faithful force estimates, despite succeeding in bulk Ni systems. However, both 3- and many-body kernels predict forces within an ˜0.1 eV/Å average error even for small training datasets and achieve high accuracy even on out-of-sample, high temperature structures. While training and testing on the same structure always provide satisfactory accuracy, cross-testing on dissimilar structures leads to higher prediction errors, posing an extrapolation problem. This can be cured using heterogeneous training on databases that contain more than one structure, which results in a good trade-off between versatility and overall accuracy. Starting from a 3-body kernel trained this way, we build an efficient non-parametric 3-body force field that allows accurate prediction of structural properties at finite temperatures, following a newly developed scheme [A. Glielmo et al., Phys. Rev. B 95, 214302 (2017)]. We use this to assess the thermal stability of Ni19 nanoclusters at a fractional cost of full ab initio calculations.

  4. Effect of Ge atoms on crystal structure and optoelectronic properties of hydrogenated Si-Ge films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianwei; Zhang, Jianjun; Ma, Ying; Yu, Yunwu; Zhao, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Optoelectronic and structural properties of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon-germanium (μc-Si1-xGex:H) alloys prepared by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) were investigated. When the Ge atoms were predominantly incorporated in amorphous matrix, the dark and photo-conductivity decreased due to the reduced crystalline volume fraction of the Si atoms (XSi-Si) and the increased Ge dangling bond density. The photosensitivity decreased monotonously with Ge incorporation under higher hydrogen dilution condition, which was attributed to the increase in both crystallization of Ge and the defect density.

  5. Passivation of cobalt nanocluster assembled thin films with hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, C.P.; Volodin, A.; Di Vece, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen passivation on bare and Pd capped cobalt nanocluster assembled thin films was studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) after exposure to ambient conditions. The nanoclusters are produced in a laser vaporization cluster...... source in which the helium carrier gas was mixed with hydrogen. RBS revealed that oxidation of the Co nanoclusters is considerably reduced by the presence of hydrogen during cluster formation. The capping did not modify the influence of the passivation. The hydrogen passivation method is especially...... effective in cases when capping of the films is not desirable, for example for magnetic studies. Clear differences in the magnetic domain structures between hydrogen passivated and non-passivated Co nanocluster films were demonstrated by MFM and are attributed to a difference in inter-cluster magnetic...

  6. Adsorption of small gas molecules on B36 nanocluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary Information. Journal of Chemical Sciences. Adsorption of small gas molecules on B36 nanocluster. YOUNES VALADBEIGI. *. , HOSSEIN FARROKHPOUR and MAHMOUD TABRIZCHI. Department of chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Iran. *. Corresponding Author: Younes ...

  7. Tunneling-Electron-Induced Light Emission from Single Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Gregory; Ho, W

    2016-09-14

    The coupling of tunneling electrons with the tip-nanocluster-substrate junction plasmon was investigated by monitoring light emission in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Gold atoms were evaporated onto the ∼5 Å thick Al2O3 thin film grown on the NiAl (110) surface where they formed nanoclusters 3-7 nm wide. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of these nanoclusters revealed quantum-confined electronic states. Spatially resolved photon imaging showed localized emission hot spots. Size dependent study and light emission from nanocluster dimers further support the viewpoint that coupling of tunneling electrons to the junction plasmon is the main radiative mechanism. These results showed the potential of the STM to reveal the electronic and optical properties of nanoscale metallic systems in the confined geometry of the tunnel junction.

  8. Switching a Nanocluster Core from Hollow to Non-hollow

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Joshi, Chakra Prasad; Alhilaly, Mohammad J.; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Modulating the structure-property relationship in atomically precise nanoclusters (NCs) is vital for developing novel NC materials and advancing their applications. While promising biphasic ligand-exchange (LE) strategies have been developed

  9. Faceted titania nanocrystals doped with indium oxide nanoclusters as a superior candidate for sacrificial hydrogen evolution without any noble-metal cocatalyst under solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoli, Vipin; Sibi, Malayil Gopalan; Banerjee, Biplab; Anand, Mohit; Maurya, Abhayankar; Farooqui, Saleem Akhtar; Bhaumik, Asim; Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-14

    Development of unique nanoheterostructures consisting of indium oxide nanoclusters like species doped on the TiO2 nanocrystals surfaces with {101} and {001} exposed facets, resulted in unprecedented sacrificial hydrogen production (5.3 mmol h(-1) g(-1)) from water using methanol as a sacrificial agent, under visible light LED source and AM 1.5G solar simulator (10.3 mmol h(-1) g(-1)), which is the highest H2 production rate ever reported for titania based photocatalysts, without using any noble metal cocatalyst. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the nanostructures reveals the presence of Ti-O-In and In-O-In like species on the surface of nanostructures. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) elemental mapping and EDX spectroscopy techniques combined with transmission electron microscope evidenced the existence of nanoheterostructures. XPS, EELS, EDX, and HAADF-STEM tools collectively suggest the presence of indium oxide nanoclusters like species on the surface of TiO2 nanostructures. These indium oxide nanocluster doped TiO2 (In2O3/T{001}) single crystals with {101} and {001} exposed facets exhibited 1.3 times higher visible light photocatalytic H2 production than indium oxide nanocluster doped TiO2 nanocrystals with only {101}facets (In2O3/T{101}) exposed. The remarkable photocatalytic activity of the obtained nanoheterostructures is attributed to the combined synergetic effect of indium oxide nanoclusters interacting with the titania surface, enhanced visible light response, high crystallinity, and unique structural features.

  10. Ab initio Investigation of Helium in Vanadium Oxide Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Thomas; Tea, Eric; Hin, Celine

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are strong candidate materials for the next generation of fission reactors and future fusion reactors. They are characterized by a large number density of oxide nanoclusters dispersed throughout a BCC iron matrix, where current oxide nanoclusters are primarily comprised of Y-Ti-O compounds. The oxide nanoclusters provide the alloy with high resistance to neutron irradiation, high yield strength and high creep strength at the elevated temperatures of a reactor environment. In addition, the oxide nanoclusters serve as trapping sites for transmutation product helium providing substantially increased resistance to catastrophic cracking and embrittlement. Although the mechanical properties and radiation resistance of the existing NFAs is promising, the problem of forming large scale reactor components continues to present a formidable challenge due to the high hardness and unpredictable fracture behavior of the alloys. An alternative alloy has been previously proposed and fabricated where vanadium is added in order to form vanadium oxide nanoclusters that serve as deflection sites for crack propagation. Although experiments have shown evidence that the fracture behavior of the alloys is improved, it is unknown whether or not the vanadium oxide nanoclusters are effective trapping sites for helium. We present results obtained using density functional theory investigating the thermodynamic stability of helium with the vanadium oxide matrix to make a comparison of trapping effectiveness to traditional Y-Ti-O compounds.

  11. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  12. Comparative study of the luminescence of structures with Ge nanocrystals formed by dry and wet oxidation of SiGe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RodrIguez, A; Ortiz, M I; Sangrador, J; RodrIguez, T; Avella, M; Prieto, A C; Torres, A; Jimenez, J; Kling, A; Ballesteros, C

    2007-01-01

    The luminescence emission of structures containing Ge nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix obtained by dry and wet oxidation of polycrystalline SiGe layers has been studied as a function of the oxidation time and initial SiGe layer thickness. A clear relationship between the intensity of the luminescence, the structure of the sample, the formation of Ge nanocrystals and the oxidation process parameters that allows us to select the appropriate process conditions to get the most efficient emission has been established. The evolution of the composition and thickness of the growing oxides and the remaining SiGe layer during the oxidation processes has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. For dry oxidation, the luminescence appears suddenly, regardless of the initial SiGe layer thickness, when all the Si of the SiGe has been oxidized and the remaining layer of the segregated Ge starts to be oxidized forming Ge nanocrystals. Luminescence is observed as long as Ge nanocrystals are present. For wet oxidation, the luminescence appears from the first stages of the oxidation, and is related to the formation of Ge-rich nanoclusters trapped in the mixed (Si and Ge) growing oxide. A sharp increase of the luminescence intensity for long oxidation times is also observed, due to the formation of Ge nanocrystals by the oxidation of the layer of segregated Ge. For both processes the luminescence is quenched when the oxidation time is long enough to cause the full oxidation of the Ge nanocrystals. The intensity of the luminescence in the dry oxidized samples is about ten times higher than in the wet oxidized ones for equal initial thickness of the SiGe layer

  13. Silver Nanocluster Reparative Effect in Hernioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay M. Anichkov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The acceleration of re-epithelialization and fibroblast differentiation were noted during the experiments with silver nanoclusters (SNs by interrupting the negative development of inflammation at the level of cytokines and promoting a positive course of reparative processes. The aim of this work was to elaborate the experimental model of prosthesis hernioplasty in subcutaneous and intraperitoneal locations of hernioprostheses with SNs, which allowed us to study the course of reparative reactions in all layers of the anterior abdominal wall. Material and Methods: We used a modified hernioprosthesis made from polyester fibers coated with a metal-polymer composition, including the stabilized SN in a concentration of 6.8 and 11.3 mg per 1 g of the hernioprosthesis mesh. During this research we used guinea pigs to study the in vivo tissue reactions. The clinical part of the study included the group of 212 patients who underwent removal of an inguinal hernia. We have identified various factors associated with infectious and toxic effects on the body by determining the level of the serum glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase (SGPT. Results: In implantation of the hernioprostheses, including the high concentration of SN in the laparotomy wound, the exudative component of the inflammation was weakly expressed. It was mostly the proliferative changes that took place. We did not find either CD8-positive type T lymphocytes or PAX5-positive type B activated cells in the exudate. Conclusion: Our research has shown that the use of hernioprostheses that include silver nanoclusters leads to the reduction of inflammation in the exudative phase and to a more favorable course of reparative processes.

  14. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  15. On the origin of anisotropic lithiation in crystalline silicon over germanium: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Yun [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hwang, Gyeong S., E-mail: gshwang@che.utexas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We examine the underlying reasons for the anisotropic lithiation of Si over Ge in the crystalline phase. • Crystalline Si is lithiated in a layer-by-layer fashion, yielding a sharp amorphous–crystalline interface. • Lithiated c-Ge exhibits a graded lithiation front, which proceeds much faster than that in c-Si. • Lithiation behavior tends to be subject to the stiffness and dynamics of the host matrix. • We reveal the origin and extended impacts of the anisotropic Si vs. isotropic Ge lithiation. - Abstract: Silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) are both recognized as a promising anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries. Si is abundant and best known for its superior gravimetric energy storage capacity, while Ge exhibits faster charge/discharge rates and better capacity retention. Recently, it was discovered that Si lithiation exhibits strong orientation dependence while Ge lithiation proceeds isotropically, although they have the same crystalline structure. To better understand the underlying reasons behind these distinctive differences, we examine and compare the lithiation behaviors at the Li{sub 4}Si/c-Si(1 1 0) and Li{sub 4}Ge/c-Ge(1 1 0) model systems using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In comparison to lithiated c-Si, where a sharp amorphous–crystalline interface remains and advances rather slowly, lithiated c-Ge tends to loose its crystallinity rapidly, resulting in a graded lithiation front of fast propagation speed. Analysis of the elastic responses and dynamics of the host Si and Ge lattices clearly demonstrate that from the beginning of the lithiation process, Ge lattice responds with more significant weakening as compared to the rigid Si lattice. Moreover, the more flexible Ge lattice is found to undergo facile atomic rearrangements during lithiation, overshadowing the original crystallographic characteristic. These unique properties of Ge thereby contribute synergistically to the rapid

  16. Study of nanocluster-assembled ZnO thin films by nanocluster-beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhiwei; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing [School of Electronic Science and Engieering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Tay, Beng Kang [School of Electronical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang (Singapore)

    2012-01-15

    Nanocluster-assembled ZnO thin films were obtained by nanocluster-beam deposition, in which nanoclusters were produced by a magnetron sputtering gas aggregation source. Two kinds of ZnO thin films were obtained using this method with the one grown under the on-line heating temperature of 700 C, and the other grown without on-line heating. Film microstructure and optical properties are investigated by various diagnostic techniques. It was found that both of film microstructure of ZnO thin films keep wurtzite structure as that of ZnO bulk materials. The averaged particle size for the film grown without on-line heating is around 6 nm, which is a little lower than that grown with the on-line heating. It was also found that as increasing the wavelength, both of the absorbance spectra for the films decrease sharply near ultra-visible to extend slowly to the visible and infrared wavelength range. For the film grown without on-line heating, the bandgap energy was estimated to 3.77 eV, while for the film grown with on-line heating, the bandgap energy was redshift to 3.71 eV. Similar behavior was also found for PL spectra analysis, where PL spectrum exhibited a peak centered at 3.31 eV without on-line heating, while it redshift to 3.20 eV with on-line heating. The mechanisms behind these behaviors were presented in this article. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Cluster perturbation theory for calculation of electronic properties of ensembles of metal nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumagulov, Yaroslav V.; Krasavin, Andrey V.; Kashurnikov, Vladimir A.

    2018-05-01

    The method is developed for calculation of electronic properties of an ensemble of metal nanoclusters with the use of cluster perturbation theory. This method is applied to the system of gold nanoclusters. The Greens function of single nanocluster is obtained by ab initio calculations within the framework of the density functional theory, and then is used in Dyson equation to group nanoclusters together and to compute the Greens function as well as the electron density of states of the whole ensemble. The transition from insulator state of a single nanocluster to metallic state of bulk gold is observed.

  18. Ultrafast, 2 min synthesis of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (d < 2 nm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew N.; Li, Dawei; Dass, Amala; Eah, Sang-Kee

    2012-06-01

    An ultrafast synthesis method is presented for hexanethiolate-coated gold nanoclusters (d gold nanoclusters are separated from the reaction byproducts fast and easily without any need for post-synthesis cleaning.An ultrafast synthesis method is presented for hexanethiolate-coated gold nanoclusters (d gold nanoclusters are separated from the reaction byproducts fast and easily without any need for post-synthesis cleaning. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details of gold nanocluster synthesis and mass-spectrometry. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30890h

  19. Atomically Precise Nanocluster Assemblies Encapsulating Plasmonic Gold Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Amrita; Fernandez, Ann Candice; Som, Anirban; Mondal, Biswajit; Natarajan, Ganapati; Paramasivam, Ganesan; Lahtinen, Tanja; Häkkinen, Hannu; Nonappa, Nonappa; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2018-04-01

    We present the self-assembled structures of atomically precise, ligand-protected noble metal nanoclusters leading to encapsulation of plasmonic gold nanorods (GNRs). Unlike highly sophisticated DNA nanotechnology, our approach demonstrates a strategically simple hydrogen bonding-directed self-assembly of nanoclusters leading to octahedral nanocrystals encapsulating GNRs. Specifically, we use the p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) protected atomically precise nanocluster, Na4[Ag44(pMBA)30] and pMBA functionalized GNRs. High resolution transmission and scanning transmission electron tomographic reconstructions suggest that the geometry of the GNR surface is responsible for directing the assembly of silver nanoclusters via H-bonding leading to octahedral symmetry. Further, use of water dispersible gold nanoclusters, Au~250(pMBA)n and Au102(pMBA)44 also formed layered shells encapsulating GNRs. Such cluster assemblies on colloidal particles present a new category of precision hybrids with diverse possibilities. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Large-area selective CVD epitaxial growth of Ge on Si substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sammak, A.; De Boer, W.; Nanver, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    Selective epitaxial growth of crystalline Ge on Si in a standard ASM Epsilon 2000 CVD reactor is investigated for the fabrication of Ge p+n diodes. At the deposition temperature of 700?C, most of the lattice mismatch-defects are trapped within first 300nm of Ge growth and good quality single crystal

  1. Nanocluster irradiation evolution in Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of dose rate and cascade morphology on nanocluster evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and the commercial ferritic/martensitic (F/M) alloys HCM12A and HT9. We present a large, systematic data set spanning the three alloys, three irradiating particle types, four orders of magnitude in dose rate, and doses ranging 1-100 displacements per atom over 400-500 °C. Nanoclusters are characterized using atom probe tomography. ODS oxide nanoclusters experience partial dissolution after irradiation due to inverse Ostwald ripening, while F/M nanoclusters undergo Ostwald ripening. Damage cascade morphology is indicative of nanocluster number density evolution. Finally, the effects of dose rate on nanocluster morphology provide evidence for a temperature dilation theory, which purports that a negative temperature shift is necessary for higher dose rate irradiations to emulate nanocluster evolution in lower dose rate irradiations.

  2. Straightforward and robust synthesis of monodisperse surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Varela-Aramburu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoclusters are small (1–3 nm nanoparticles with a high surface area that are useful for biomedical studies and drug delivery. The synthesis of small, surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters is greatly dependent on the reaction conditions. Here, we describe a straightforward, efficient and robust room temperature one-pot synthesis of 2 nm gold nanoclusters using thioglucose as a reducing and stabilizing agent, which was discovered by serendipity. The resultant monodisperse gold nanoclusters are more stable than those generated using some other common methods. The carboxylic acid contained in the stabilizing agent on the cluster surface serves as anchor for nanocluster functionalization. Alternatively, the addition of thiols serves to functionalize the nanoclusters. The resulting non-cytotoxic nanoclusters are taken up by cells and constitute a tuneable platform for biomedical applications including drug delivery.

  3. Co-deposition of silver nanoclusters and sputtered alumina for sensor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultes, Guenter; Schmidt, Michael; Truar, Marcel; Goettel, Dirk; Freitag-Weber, Olivia; Werner, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous thin films may be beneficial for sensoring devices. The electrical conductivity of nanoscale metallic particles being embedded in a matrix of non conducting material should exhibit higher sensitivity to mechanical stress and strain compared to homogeneous films. The production of heterogeneous films may follow different routes. This paper describes the attempt to embed Ag nanoclusters emitted from a gas aggregation cluster source into a growing matrix of alumina originating from sputter sources. The characteristics of the cluster source are first resumed, with their mean masses ranging from approx. 1000 to 100,000 atoms per cluster. The expelled and soft landed clusters are extensively examined by transmission electron microscopy verifying their crystalline form. Yet the use of a radio frequency driven sputter source for the embed material destroys and annihilates the Ag clusters even at very low sputter power. If a reactive direct current sputter process is performed within an oxidising sputter gas instead, the Ag clusters are oxidised to different oxides, but they survive as crystalline entities as verified by X-ray diffraction investigations. A simple subsequent heat treatment reduces the Ag oxides to metallic Ag clusters

  4. Growth of crystallized Ge films from VHF inductively-coupled plasma of H2-diluted GeH4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, T.; Makihara, K.; Murakami, H.; Higashi, S.; Miyazaki, S.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the Ge crystalline nucleation and film growth on quartz substrate at 250 deg. C from inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) of GeH 4 diluted with H 2 . The ICP was generated by supplying 60 MHz power to an external single-turn antenna which was placed on a quartz plate window of a stainless steel reactor and parallel to the substrate. We have found that the growth rate is significantly increased when the preferential growth of the (110) plane becomes pronounced after the formation of randomly-oriented crystalline network. The (110) oriented Ge films, of which average crystallinity is as high as 70%. The integrated intensity ratio of TO phonons in crystalline phase to those in disordered phase, were grown at a rate of ∼ 4.0 nm/s after the formation of amorphous incubation layer with a thickness of ∼ 0.1 μm on quartz

  5. Near-infrared emission from mesoporous crystalline germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucherif, Abderraouf; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard, E-mail: richard.ares@usherbrooke.ca [Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Innovation Technologique (3IT), Université de Sherbrooke, 3000 Boulevard Université, Sherbrooke, J1K OA5, Québec (Canada); Laboratoire Nanotechnologies Nanosystèmes (LN2)-CNRS UMI-3463, Université de Sherbrooke, 3000 Boulevard Université, Sherbrooke, J1K OA5, Québec (Canada); Korinek, Andreas [Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Mesoporous crystalline germanium was fabricated by bipolar electrochemical etching of Ge wafer in HF-based electrolyte. It yields uniform mesoporous germanium layers composed of high density of crystallites with an average size 5-7 nm. Subsequent extended chemical etching allows tuning of crystallites size while preserving the same chemical composition. This highly controllable nanostructure exhibits photoluminescence emission above the bulk Ge bandgap, in the near-infrared range (1095-1360nm) with strong evidence of quantum confinement within the crystallites.

  6. Synthesis of ultrasmall CsPbBr3 nanoclusters and their transformation to highly deep-blue-emitting nanoribbons at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yibing; Zhang, Qiang; Lv, Longfei; Han, Wenqian; Wu, Guanhong; Yang, Dong; Dong, Angang

    2017-11-16

    Discretely sized semiconductor clusters have attracted considerable attention due to their intriguing optical properties and self-assembly behaviors. While lead halide perovskite nanostructures have been recently intensively explored, few studies have addressed perovskite clusters and their self-assembled superstructures. Here, we report the room-temperature synthesis of sub-2 nm CsPbBr 3 clusters and present strong evidence that these ultrasmall perovskite species, obtained under a wide range of reaction conditions, possess a specific size, with optical properties and self-assembly characteristics resembling those of well-known II-VI semiconductor magic-sized clusters. Unlike conventional CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals, the as-synthesized CsPbBr 3 nanoclusters spontaneously self-assemble into a hexagonally packed columnar mesophase in solution, which can be further converted to single-crystalline CsPbBr 3 quantum nanoribbons with bright deep-blue emission at room temperature. Such a conversion of CsPbBr 3 nanoclusters to nanoribbons is found to be driven by a ligand-destabilization-induced crystallization and mesophase transition process. Our study will facilitate the investigation of perovskite nanoclusters and offer new possibilities in the low-temperature synthesis of anisotropic perovskite nanostructures.

  7. Enhanced pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using superparamagnetic nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrmohammadi, M; Qu, M; Emelianov, S Y; Yoon, K Y; Johnston, K P

    2011-01-01

    Recently, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging augmented with ultra-small magnetic nanoparticles has been introduced as a tool capable of imaging events at molecular and cellular levels. The sensitivity of a pMMUS system depends on several parameters, including the size, geometry and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Under the same magnetic field, larger magnetic nanostructures experience a stronger magnetic force and produce larger displacement, thus improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of pMMUS imaging. Unfortunately, large magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles are typically ferromagnetic and thus are very difficult to stabilize against colloidal aggregation. In the current study we demonstrate improvement of pMMUS image quality by using large size superparamagnetic nanoclusters characterized by strong magnetization per particle. Water-soluble magnetic nanoclusters of two sizes (15 and 55 nm average size) were synthesized from 3 nm iron precursors in the presence of citrate capping ligand. The size distribution of synthesized nanoclusters and individual nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissue mimicking phantoms containing single nanoparticles and two sizes of nanoclusters were imaged using a custom-built pMMUS imaging system. While the magnetic properties of citrate-coated nanoclusters are identical to those of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the magneto-motive signal detected from nanoclusters is larger, i.e. the same magnetic field produced larger magnetically induced displacement. Therefore, our study demonstrates that clusters of superparamagnetic nanoparticles result in pMMUS images with higher contrast and SNR.

  8. Electroactive mesoporous yttria stabilized zirconia containing platinum or nickel oxide nanoclusters: a new class of solid oxide fuel cell electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamak, M.; Coombs, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-02-01

    The electroactivity of surfactant-templated mesoporous yttria stabilized zirconia, containing nanoclusters of platinum or nickel oxide, is explored by alternating current (AC) complex impedance spectroscopy. The observed oxygen ion and mixed oxygen ion-electron charge-transport behavior for these materials, compared to the sintered-densified non-porous crystalline versions, is ascribed to the unique integration of mesoporosity and nanocrystallinity within the binary and ternary solid solution microstructure. These attributes inspire interest in this new class of materials as candidates for the development of improved performance solid oxide fuel cell electrodes. (orig.)

  9. Optical and structural characterization of Ge clusters embedded in ZrO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agocs, E.; Zolnai, Z.; Rossall, A. K.; van den Berg, J. A.; Fodor, B.; Lehninger, D.; Khomenkova, L.; Ponomaryov, S.; Gudymenko, O.; Yukhymchuk, V.; Kalas, B.; Heitmann, J.; Petrik, P.

    2017-11-01

    The change of optical and structural properties of Ge nanoclusters in ZrO2 matrix have been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry versus annealing temperatures. Radio-frequency top-down magnetron sputtering approach was used to produce the samples of different types, i.e. single-layers of pure Ge, pure ZrO2 and Ge-rich-ZrO2 as well as multi-layers stacked of 40 periods of 5-nm-Ge-rich-ZrO2 layers alternated by 5-nm-ZrO2 ones. Germanium nanoclusters in ZrO2 host were formed by rapid-thermal annealing at 600-800 °C during 30 s in nitrogen atmosphere. Reference optical properties for pure ZrO2 and pure Ge have been extracted using single-layer samples. As-deposited multi-layer structures can be perfectly modeled using the effective medium theory. However, annealed multi-layers demonstrated a significant diffusion of elements that was confirmed by medium energy ion scattering measurements. This fact prevents fitting of such annealed structure either by homogeneous or by periodic multi-layer models.

  10. Luminescent Metal Nanoclusters for Potential Chemosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthaiah Shellaiah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of metal nanocluster (M-NCs-based sensors for specific analyte detection have achieved significant progress in recent decades. Ultra-small-size (<2 nm M-NCs consist of several to a few hundred metal atoms and exhibit extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Similar to organic molecules, M-NCs display absorption and emission properties via electronic transitions between energy levels upon interaction with light. As such, researchers tend to apply M-NCs in diverse fields, such as in chemosensors, biological imaging, catalysis, and environmental and electronic devices. Chemo- and bio-sensory uses have been extensively explored with luminescent NCs of Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt as potential sensory materials. Luminescent bi-metallic NCs, such as Au-Ag, Au-Cu, Au-Pd, and Au-Pt have also been used as probes in chemosensory investigations. Both metallic and bi-metallic NCs have been utilized to detect various analytes, such as metal ions, anions, biomolecules, proteins, acidity or alkalinity of a solution (pH, and nucleic acids, at diverse detection ranges and limits. In this review, we have summarized the chemosensory applications of luminescent M-NCs and bi-metallic NCs.

  11. Catalytic photooxidation of pentachlorophenol using semiconductor nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILCOXON,JESS P.

    2000-04-17

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a toxic chlorinated aromatic molecule widely used as fungicide, a bactericide and a wood preservation, and thus ubiquitous in the environment. The authors report photo-oxidation of PCP using a variety of nanosize semiconductor metal oxides and sulfides in both aqueous and polar organic solvents and compare the photo-oxidation kinetics of these nanoclusters to widely studied bulk powders like Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2} and CdS. They study both the light intensity dependence of PCP photooxidation for nanosize SnO{sub 2} and the size dependence of PCP photooxidation for both nanosize SnO{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}. They find an extremely strong size dependence for the latter which they attribute to its size-dependent band gap and the associated change in redox potentials due to quantum confinement of the hole-electron pair. The authors show that nanosize MoS{sub 2} with a diameter of d=3.0 nm and an absorbance edge of {approximately}450 nm is a very effective photooxidation catalyst for complete PCP mineralization, even when using only visible light irradiation.

  12. Growth Mechanism and Surface Structure of Ge Nanocrystals Prepared by Thermal Annealing of Cosputtered GeSiO Ternary Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ge nanocrystals (Ge-ncs embedded in a SiO2 superlattice structure were prepared by magnetron cosputtering and postdeposition annealing. The formation of spherical nanocrystals was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and their growth process was studied by a combination of spectroscopic techniques. The crystallinity volume fraction of Ge component was found to increase with crystallite size, but its overall low values indicated a coexistence of crystalline and noncrystalline phases. A reduction of Ge-O species was observed in the superlattice during thermal annealing, accompanied by a transition from oxygen-deficient silicon oxide to silicon dioxide. A growth mechanism involving phase separation of Ge suboxides (GeOx was then proposed to explain these findings and supplement the existing growth models for Ge-ncs in SiO2 films. Further analysis of the bonding structure of Ge atoms suggested that Ge-ncs are likely to have a core-shell structure with an amorphous-like surface layer, which is composed of GeSiO ternary complex. The surface layer thickness was extracted to be a few angstroms and equivalent to several atomic layer thicknesses.

  13. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2015 and July 2016 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Los Alamos focused on two main activities during this period: Discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling to describe flow and radionuclide transport in complex fracture networks that are typical of crystalline rock environments, and a comprehensive interpretation of three different colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland between 2002 and 2013. Chapter 1 presents the results of the DFN work and is divided into three main sections: (1) we show results of our recent study on the correlation between fracture size and fracture transmissivity (2) we present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph for characterization of discrete fracture networks, and (3) we describe the Crystalline International work in support of the Swedish Task Force. Chapter 2 presents interpretation of the colloidfacilitated radionuclide transport experiments in the crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site.

  14. Deposition and characterization of Pt nanocluster films by means of gas aggregation cluster source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylián, Ondřej, E-mail: ondrej.kylian@gmail.com; Prokeš, Jan; Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Čechvala, Juraj; Kousal, Jaroslav; Pešička, Josef; Hanuš, Jan; Biederman, Hynek

    2014-11-28

    In this study we report on the deposition of Pt nanocluster films prepared by gas aggregation source that was operated with argon as working gas. The aim of this study was optimization of deposition process as well as determination of properties of deposited nanocluster films and their temporal stability. It was found that the production of Pt nanoclusters reached maximum value for pressure of 100 Pa and increases monotonously with magnetron current. The deposition rate at optimized deposition conditions was 0.7 nm of the Pt nanocluster film per second. Deposited films were porous and composed of 4 nm Pt nanoclusters. The nanoclusters were metallic and no sights of their oxidation were observed after 1 year on open air as witnessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Regarding the electrical properties, a dramatic decrease of the resistivity was observed with increasing amount of deposited nanoclusters. This decrease saturated for the films approximately 50 nm thick. Such behavior indicates transition between different mechanisms of electrical conductivity: charge hopping for thin discontinuous films and current conduction through conducting path formed when higher amount of nanoclusters is deposited. Different mechanisms of electrical conduction for thin and thick layers of Pt were confirmed by subsequent investigation of temperature dependence of resistivity. In addition, no changes in resistivity were observed after one year on open air that confirms stability of produced Pt nanocluster films. - Highlights: • Pt nanocluster films were deposited by gas aggregation nanocluster source. • Conditions leading to effective deposition of Pt nanocluster films were found. • Deposited nanocluster films have good temporal stability. • Electrical properties of Pt films were found to depend on their thickness.

  15. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  16. What Is Crystalline Silica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ceramic manufacturing and the tool and die, steel and foundry industries. Crystalline silica is used in manufacturing, household abrasives, adhesives, paints, soaps, and glass. Additionally, ...

  17. Density functional study of the decomposition pathways of SiH₃ and GeH₃ at the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, M; Montalenti, F; Bernasconi, M

    2012-03-14

    By means of first-principles calculations we studied the decomposition pathways of SiH₃ on Ge(100) and of GeH₃ on Si(100), of interest for the growth of crystalline SiGe alloys and Si/Ge heterostructures by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We also investigated H desorption via reaction of two adsorbed SiH₂/GeH₂ species (β₂ reaction) or via Eley-Rideal abstraction of surface H atoms from the impinging SiH₃ and GeH₃ species. The calculated activation energies for the different processes suggest that the rate-limiting step for the growth of Si/Ge systems is still the β₂ reaction of two SiH₂ as in the growth of crystalline Si.

  18. Structural Analyses of Phase Stability in Amorphous and Partially Crystallized Ge-Rich GeTe Films Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, Taehong; Mohamed, Ahmed Yousef; Yoo, Chanyoung; Park, Eui-Sang; Kim, Sanggyun; Yoo, Sijung; Lee, Han-Koo; Cho, Deok-Yong; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2017-11-29

    The local bonding structures of Ge x Te 1-x (x = 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7) films prepared through atomic layer deposition (ALD) with Ge(N(Si(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ) 2 and ((CH 3 ) 3 Si) 2 Te precursors were investigated using Ge K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The results of the X-ray absorption fine structure analyses show that for all of the compositions, the as-grown films were amorphous with a tetrahedral Ge coordination of a mixture of Ge-Te and Ge-Ge bonds but without any signature of Ge-GeTe decomposition. The compositional evolution in the valence band electronic structures probed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests a substantial chemical influence of additional Ge on the nonstoichiometric GeTe. This implies that the ALD process can stabilize Ge-abundant bonding networks like -Te-Ge-Ge-Te- in amorphous GeTe. Meanwhile, the XAS results on the Ge-rich films that had undergone post-deposition annealing at 350 °C show that the parts of the crystalline Ge-rich GeTe became separated into Ge crystallites and rhombohedral GeTe in accordance with the bulk phase diagram, whereas the disordered GeTe domains still remained, consistent with the observations of transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Therefore, amorphousness in GeTe may be essential for the nonsegregated Ge-rich phases and the low growth temperature of the ALD enables the achievement of the structurally metastable phases.

  19. "light-on" sensing of antioxidants using gold nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lianzhe; Deng, Lin; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Zhang, Dingyuan; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2014-01-01

    preservatives, and cosmetics has proved to be very vital. Gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) have a core size below 2 nm and contain several metal atoms. They have interesting photophysical properties, are readily functionalized, and are safe to use in various

  20. Distinct metal-exchange pathways of doped Ag25 nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Sinatra, Lutfan; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Atomically precise metal nanoclusters (NCs) containing more than one type of metal atom (i.e., doped or alloyed), due to synergistic effects, open new avenues for engineering the catalytic and optical properties of NCs in a manner that homometal NCs

  1. In-vitro Synthesis of Gold Nanoclusters in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    ARL-TN-0753 ● APR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory In-vitro Synthesis of Gold Nanoclusters in Neurons by Maggie Gillan and...longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TN-0753 ● APR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory In-vitro Synthesis of...

  2. Organization of copper nanoclusters in Langmuir–Blodgett films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stable nanoclusters of Cu were synthesized using Langmuir–Blodgett films of octadecylsuccinic acid (ODSA) as template. The Langmuir–Blodgett films of ODSA formed from subphase containing copper ions were first subjected to sulphidation (S) using sodium sulphide and then hydrogenated (H) using hydrogen gas.

  3. Enhanced electrochemical water oxidation: the impact of nanoclusters and nanocavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Cao, C.; Bieberle, A.

    2017-01-01

    The structures of transition metal surfaces and metal oxides are commonly believed to have a significant effect on the catalytic reactions. Density functional theory calculations are therefore used in this study to investigate the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) over nanostructured, i.e. nanocluster

  4. Nanoclustering as a dominant feature of plasma membrane organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.; Torreno-Pina, J.A.; Thompson, N.; Jacobson, K.

    2014-01-01

    Early studies have revealed that some mammalian plasma membrane proteins exist in small nanoclusters. The advent of super-resolution microscopy has corroborated and extended this picture, and led to the suggestion that many, if not most, membrane proteins are clustered at the plasma membrane at

  5. Evolution of embedded lithium nanoclusters in lithium implanted alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaikwad, P.V.; Sharma, S.K.; Mukherjee, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Kshirsagar, A.; Pujari, P.K.

    2016-01-01

    High dose of ion implantation followed by annealing is considered a feasible way to generate thermally stable nanoclusters inside a transparent host matrix. Low energy (50 keV) Li ions have been implanted into single crystals of alumina with different fluence (1 × 10"1"5–1 × 10"1"7 ions/cm"2). The samples have been annealed at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1100 °C in air in step of 100 °C. Depth dependent Doppler broadening measurements have been carried out using high purity germanium detector coupled to a variable energy slow positron beam. Fractional area in the central and wing regions of Doppler broadened annihilation radiation spectrum, namely, S- and W- parameters, were evaluated from each spectrum. Any variation in positron annihilation probability with valence and core electrons which occurs on trapping of positrons at a defect site is reflected in these parameters. The effect of ion fluence and annealing temperature on evolution of defects and formation of embedded Li nanoclusters have been studied by indexing the variation in line shape S- (W-) parameter as a function of positron implantation depth. These studies supplemented by theoretical calculations confirm that with annealing up to 700 °C, vacancy clusters are created due to the aggregation of vacancies wherein Li nanoclusters are formed. On annealing at higher temperature, there is evidence for the breakdown of these Li clusters leaving behind vacancy clusters in the samples. - Highlights: • Embedded Li nanoclusters are efficiently created by annealing Li implanted Al_2O_3 crystal. • Depth dependent DBAR is a suitable method to characterize embedded nanoclusters. • The formation of Li nanoclusters is assisted by vacancy migration to form clusters. • At very high annealing temperature (>1000 °C), Li nanoclusters undergo breakdown. • e"+ annihilation at V_A_l site shows a unique observation i.e. a reduction in S-parameter.

  6. An Investigation of Electronic Structure and Aromaticity in Medium-Sized Nanoclusters of Gold-Doped Germanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic property and aromaticity of endohedrally doped and clusters are investigated using the density-functional theory (DFT within the hybrid B3LYP method. The calculated results reveal that the two clusters have high thermodynamic stability reflected by reaction energy. At the same time, it could be hoped that their high stability may arise from the closed-shell spherical aromaticity with eight -electrons satisfying the counting rule with . A popular nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICSs calculation on basis of magnetic shieldings is also performed to confirm the aromaticity of the three-dimensional nanoclusters with largely negative NICS values. In addition, the electronic features and chemical bonding of the two clusters are analyzed with the help of the density of states (DOS and electron localization function (ELF, and the majority of Ge–Ge bonds on the cage show more covalent characters.

  7. Hydrophilic magnetic nanoclusters with thermo-responsive properties and their drug controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerod, Siraprapa; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis and drug controlled release properties of thermo-responsive magnetic nanoclusters grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm)) and poly(NIPAAm-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PEGMA) copolymers were described. These magnetic nanoclusters were synthesized via an in situ radical polymerization in the presence of acrylamide-grafted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Poly(NIPAAm) provided thermo-responsive properties, while PEGMA played a role in good water dispersibility to the nanoclusters. The ratios of PEGMA to NIPAAm in the (co)polymerization in the presence of the MNPs were fine-tuned such that the nanoclusters with good water dispersibility, good magnetic sensitivity and thermo responsiveness were obtained. The size of the nanoclusters was in the range of 50–100 nm in diameter with about 100–200 particles/cluster. The nanoclusters were well dispersible in water at room temperature and can be suddenly agglomerated when temperature was increased beyond the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (32 °C). The release behavior of an indomethacin model drug from the nanoclusters was also investigated. These novel magnetic nanoclusters with good dispersibility in water and reversible thermo-responsive properties might be good candidates for the targeting drug controlled release applications. - Highlights: • Nanoclusters with good water dispersibility and magnetic response were prepared. • They were grafted with thermo-responsive poly(NIPAAm) and/or poly(PEGMA). • Poly(NIPAAm) provided thermo-responsive properties to the nanoclusters. • Poly(PEGMA) provided good water dispersibilityto the nanoclusters. • Accelerated and controllable releases of a drug from the nanoclusters were shown

  8. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Matulionyte; Dominyka Dapkute; Laima Budenaite; Greta Jarockyte; Ricardas Rotomskis

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. The...

  9. Fabrication of Ge-on-insulator wafers by Smart-CutTM with thermal management for undamaged donor Ge wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munho; Cho, Sang June; Jayeshbhai Dave, Yash; Mi, Hongyi; Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Yoon, Jung U.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2018-01-01

    Newly engineered substrates consisting of semiconductor-on-insulator are gaining much attention as starting materials for the subsequent transfer of semiconductor nanomembranes via selective etching of the insulating layer. Germanium-on-insulator (GeOI) substrates are critically important because of the versatile applications of Ge nanomembranes (Ge NMs) toward electronic and optoelectronic devices. Among various fabrication techniques, the Smart-CutTM technique is more attractive than other methods because a high temperature annealing process can be avoided. Another advantage of Smart-CutTM is the reusability of the donor Ge wafer. However, it is very difficult to realize an undamaged Ge wafer because there exists a large mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion among the layers. Although an undamaged donor Ge wafer is a prerequisite for its reuse, research related to this issue has not yet been reported. Here we report the fabrication of 4-inch GeOI substrates using the direct wafer bonding and Smart-CutTM process with a low thermal budget. In addition, a thermo-mechanical simulation of GeOI was performed by COMSOL to analyze induced thermal stress in each layer of GeOI. Crack-free donor Ge wafers were obtained by annealing at 250 °C for 10 h. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated similarly favorable crystalline quality of the Ge layer in GeOI compared to that of bulk Ge. In addition, Ge p-n diodes using transferred Ge NM indicate a clear rectifying behavior with an on and off current ratio of 500 at ±1 V. This demonstration offers great promise for high performance transferrable Ge NM-based device applications.

  10. Gate-stack engineering for self-organized Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe-shell MOS capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting eLai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the first-of-its-kind, self-organized gate-stack heterostructure of Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe-shell on Si fabricated in a single step through the selective oxidation of a SiGe nano-patterned pillar over a Si3N4 buffer layer on a Si substrate. Process-controlled tunability of the Ge-dot size (7.5−90 nm, the SiO2 thickness (3−4 nm, and as well the SiGe-shell thickness (2−15 nm has been demonstrated, enabling a practically-achievable core building block for Ge-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS devices. Detailed morphologies, structural, and electrical interfacial properties of the SiO2/Ge-dot and SiO2/SiGe interfaces were assessed using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and temperature-dependent high/low-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements. Notably, NiGe/SiO2/SiGe and Al/SiO2/Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe MOS capacitors exhibit low interface trap densities of as low as 3-5x10^11 cm^-2·eV^-1 and fixed charge densities of 1-5x10^11 cm^-2, suggesting good-quality SiO2/SiGe-shell and SiO2/Ge-dot interfaces. In addition, the advantage of having single-crystalline Si1-xGex shell (x > 0.5 in a compressive stress state in our self-aligned gate-stack heterostructure has great promise for possible SiGe (or Ge MOS nanoelectronic and nanophotonic applications.

  11. Mass spectrometric identification of Au68(SR)34 molecular gold nanoclusters with 34-electron shell closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Amala

    2009-08-26

    The molecular formula Au(68)(SCH(2)CH(2)Ph)(34) has been assigned to the 14 kDa nanocluster using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The 34-electron shell closing in a macroscopically obtained thiolated gold nanocluster is demonstrated. The Au(68) nanocluster is predicted to have a 49 atom Marks decahedral core with 19 inner core atoms and 30 outer atoms chelating with the staple motifs. The nanoclusters' predicted formulation is [Au](19+30) [Au(SR)(2)](11) [Au(2)(SR)(3)](4).

  12. Electrostatic Interactions Positively Regulate K-Ras Nanocluster Formation and Function▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Sarah J.; Ariotti, Nicholas; Goodall, Andrew; Parton, Robert G.; Hancock, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The organization of Ras proteins into plasma membrane nanoclusters is essential for high-fidelity signal transmission, but whether the nanoscale enviroments of different Ras nanoclusters regulate effector interactions is unknown. We show using high-resolution spatial mapping that Raf-1 is recruited to and retained in K-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. In contrast, Raf-1 recruited to the plasma membrane by H-Ras is not retained in H-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. Similarly, upon epidermal growth factor receptor activation, Raf-1 is preferentially recruited to K-Ras-GTP and not H-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. The formation of K-Ras-GTP nanoclusters is inhibited by phosphorylation of S181 in the C-terminal polybasic domain or enhanced by blocking S181 phosphorylation, with a concomitant reduction or increase in Raf-1 plasma membrane recruitment, respectively. Phosphorylation of S181 does not, however, regulate in vivo interactions with the nanocluster scaffold galectin-3 (Gal3), indicating separate roles for the polybasic domain and Gal3 in driving K-Ras nanocluster formation. Together, these data illustrate that Ras nanocluster composition regulates effector recruitment and highlight the importance of lipid/protein nanoscale environments to the activation of signaling cascades. PMID:18458061

  13. Formation of Ge dot or film in Ge/Si heterostructure by using sub-monolayer carbon deposition on top and in-situ post annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Yuhki, E-mail: itoh.yuhki@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Kawashima, Tomoyuki; Washio, Katsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Effects of carbon (C) atoms on solid-phase epitaxial growth of Ge on Si(100) have been studied. C and Ge layers were deposited on Si(100) substrates at low temperature (150–300 °C) by using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and subsequently annealed at 650 °C in the MBE chamber. The surface morphology after annealing changed depending on deposited amounts of C and deposition temperature of Ge. Ge dots were formed for small amounts of C while smooth Ge films were formed by large amounts of C varying with the Ge deposition temperature. The surface morphology after annealing was also affected by the as-deposited Ge crystallinity. The change in surface morphology depending on the amounts of deposited C was considered to be affected by the formation of Ge–C bonds which relieved the misfit strain between Ge and Si. The crystallinity of Ge deteriorated with increasing C coverage due to the incorporation of insoluble C atoms in the shape of both dots and films. - Highlights: • Effects of carbon on solid-phase epitaxy of C/Ge/Si(100) were studied. • Surface morphology changed depending on C amounts and Ge deposition temperature. • Solid-phase growth of Ge changed from large dots to smooth films with C coverage. • Transition of surface morphology was affected by the formation of Ge–C bonds.

  14. Electromagnetic processes in strong crystalline fields

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    We propose a number of new investigations on aspects of radiation from high energy electron and positron beams (10-300 GeV) in single crystals and amorphous targets. The common heading is radiation emission by electrons and positrons in strong electromagnetic fields, but as the setup is quite versatile, other related phenomena in radiation emission can be studied as well. The intent is to clarify the role of a number of important aspects of radiation in strong fields as e.g. observed in crystals. We propose to measure trident 'Klein-like' production in strong crystalline fields, 'crystalline undulator' radiation, 'sandwich' target phenomena, LPM suppression of pair production as well as axial and planar effects in contributions of spin to the radiation.

  15. The Effects of Annealing Temperatures on Composition and Strain in Si x Ge1-x Obtained by Melting Growth of Electrodeposited Ge on Si (100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Mastura Shafinaz Zainal; Morshed, Tahsin; Chikita, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yuki; Muta, Shunpei; Anisuzzaman, Mohammad; Park, Jong-Hyeok; Matsumura, Ryo; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Sadoh, Taizoh; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-02-24

    The effects of annealing temperatures on composition and strain in Si x Ge 1- x , obtained by rapid melting growth of electrodeposited Ge on Si (100) substrate were investigated. Here, a rapid melting process was performed at temperatures of 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C for 1 s. All annealed samples show single crystalline structure in (100) orientation. A significant appearance of Si-Ge vibration mode peak at ~400 cm -1 confirms the existence of Si-Ge intermixing due to out-diffusion of Si into Ge region. On a rapid melting process, Ge melts and reaches the thermal equilibrium in short time. Si at Ge/Si interface begins to dissolve once in contact with the molten Ge to produce Si-Ge intermixing. The Si fraction in Si-Ge intermixing was calculated by taking into account the intensity ratio of Ge-Ge and Si-Ge vibration mode peaks and was found to increase with the annealing temperatures. It is found that the strain turns from tensile to compressive as the annealing temperature increases. The Si fraction dependent thermal expansion coefficient of Si x Ge 1- x is a possible cause to generate such strain behavior. The understanding of compositional and strain characteristics is important in Ge/Si heterostructure as these properties seem to give significant effects in device performance.

  16. The Effects of Annealing Temperatures on Composition and Strain in SixGe1−x Obtained by Melting Growth of Electrodeposited Ge on Si (100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Mastura Shafinaz Zainal; Morshed, Tahsin; Chikita, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yuki; Muta, Shunpei; Anisuzzaman, Mohammad; Park, Jong-Hyeok; Matsumura, Ryo; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Sadoh, Taizoh; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-01-01

    The effects of annealing temperatures on composition and strain in SixGe1−x, obtained by rapid melting growth of electrodeposited Ge on Si (100) substrate were investigated. Here, a rapid melting process was performed at temperatures of 1000, 1050 and 1100°C for 1 s. All annealed samples show single crystalline structure in (100) orientation. A significant appearance of Si-Ge vibration mode peak at ~00 cm−1 confirms the existence of Si-Ge intermixing due to out-diffusion of Si into Ge region. On a rapid melting process, Ge melts and reaches the thermal equilibrium in short time. Si at Ge/Si interface begins to dissolve once in contact with the molten Ge to produce Si-Ge intermixing. The Si fraction in Si-Ge intermixing was calculated by taking into account the intensity ratio of Ge-Ge and Si-Ge vibration mode peaks and was found to increase with the annealing temperatures. It is found that the strain turns from tensile to compressive as the annealing temperature increases. The Si fraction dependent thermal expansion coefficient of SixGe1−x is a possible cause to generate such strain behavior. The understanding of compositional and strain characteristics is important in Ge/Si heterostructure as these properties seem to give significant effects in device performance. PMID:28788521

  17. The Effects of Annealing Temperatures on Composition and Strain in SixGe1−x Obtained by Melting Growth of Electrodeposited Ge on Si (100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastura Shafinaz Zainal Abidin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of annealing temperatures on composition and strain in SixGe1−x, obtained by rapid melting growth of electrodeposited Ge on Si (100 substrate were investigated. Here, a rapid melting process was performed at temperatures of 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C for 1 s. All annealed samples show single crystalline structure in (100 orientation. A significant appearance of Si-Ge vibration mode peak at ~400 cm−1 confirms the existence of Si-Ge intermixing due to out-diffusion of Si into Ge region. On a rapid melting process, Ge melts and reaches the thermal equilibrium in short time. Si at Ge/Si interface begins to dissolve once in contact with the molten Ge to produce Si-Ge intermixing. The Si fraction in Si-Ge intermixing was calculated by taking into account the intensity ratio of Ge-Ge and Si-Ge vibration mode peaks and was found to increase with the annealing temperatures. It is found that the strain turns from tensile to compressive as the annealing temperature increases. The Si fraction dependent thermal expansion coefficient of SixGe1−x is a possible cause to generate such strain behavior. The understanding of compositional and strain characteristics is important in Ge/Si heterostructure as these properties seem to give significant effects in device performance.

  18. The role of SiGe buffer in growth and relaxation of Ge on free-standing Si(001) nano-pillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaumseil, P; Kozlowski, G; Schubert, M A; Yamamoto, Y; Bauer, J; Schülli, T U; Tillack, B; Schroeder, T

    2012-09-07

    We study the growth and relaxation processes of Ge nano-clusters selectively grown by chemical vapor deposition on free-standing 90 nm wide Si(001) nano-pillars with a thin Si(0.23)Ge(0.77) buffer layer. We found that the dome-shaped SiGe layer with a height of about 28 nm as well as the Ge dot deposited on top of it partially relaxes, mainly by elastic lattice bending. The Si nano-pillar shows a clear compliance behavior-an elastic response of the substrate on the growing film-with the tensile strained top part of the pillar. Additional annealing at 800 °C leads to the generation of misfit dislocation and reduces the compliance effect significantly. This example demonstrates that despite the compressive strain generated due to the surrounding SiO(2) growth mask it is possible to realize an overall tensile strain in the Si nano-pillar and following a compliant substrate effect by using a SiGe buffer layer. We further show that the SiGe buffer is able to improve the structural quality of the Ge nano-dot.

  19. A possible mechanism of ultrafast amorphization in phase-change memory alloys: an ion slingshot from the crystalline to amorphous position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolobov, A V; Mishchenko, A S; Fons, P; Yakubenya, S M; Tominaga, J

    2007-01-01

    We propose that the driving force of the ultrafast crystalline-to-amorphous transition in phase-change memory alloys is caused by strained bonds existing in the (metastable) crystalline phase. For the prototypical example of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , we demonstrate that upon breaking of the longer Ge-Te bond by photoexcitation, a Ge ion is shot from an octahedral crystalline to a tetrahedral amorphous position by the uncompensated force of strained short bonds. Subsequent lattice relaxation stabilizes the tetrahedral surroundings of the Ge atoms and ensures the long-term stability of the optically induced phase

  20. Photoemission Studies of Si Quantum Dots with Ge Core: Dots formation, Intermixing at Si-clad/Ge-core interface and Quantum Confinement Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Yudi Darma

    2008-01-01

    Spherical Si nanocrystallites with Ge core (~20nm in average dot diameter) have been prepared by controlling selective growth conditions of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) on ultrathin SiO2 using alternately pure SiH4 and 5% GeH4 diluted with He. XPS results confirm the highly selective growth of Ge on the pregrown Si dots and subsequently complete coverage by Si selective growth on Ge/Si dots. Compositional mixing and the crystallinity of Si dots with Ge core as a function of ...

  1. Crystalline color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Bowers, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2001-01-01

    In any context in which color superconductivity arises in nature, it is likely to involve pairing between species of quarks with differing chemical potentials. For suitable values of the differences between chemical potentials, Cooper pairs with nonzero total momentum are favored, as was first realized by Larkin, Ovchinnikov, Fulde, and Ferrell (LOFF). Condensates of this sort spontaneously break translational and rotational invariance, leading to gaps which vary periodically in a crystalline pattern. Unlike the original LOFF state, these crystalline quark matter condensates include both spin-zero and spin-one Cooper pairs. We explore the range of parameters for which crystalline color superconductivity arises in the QCD phase diagram. If in some shell within the quark matter core of a neutron star (or within a strange quark star) the quark number densities are such that crystalline color superconductivity arises, rotational vortices may be pinned in this shell, making it a locus for glitch phenomena

  2. Size-dependent structure of CdSe nanoclusters formed after ion implantation in MgO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huis, MA; van Veen, A; Schut, H; Eijt, SWH; Kooi, BJ; De Hosson, JTM

    The band gap as well as the optical and structural properties of semiconductor CdSe nanoclusters change as a function of the nanocluster size. Embedded CdSe nanoclusters in MgO were created by means of sequential Cd and Se ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. Changes during annealing were

  3. Size effect on the adsorption and dissociation of CO{sub 2} on Co nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haiyan; Cao, Dapeng; Fisher, Adrian [International Research Center for Soft Matter, State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Johnston, Roy L. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Cheng, Daojian, E-mail: chengdj@mail.buct.edu.cn [International Research Center for Soft Matter, State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Co{sub 13}, Co{sub 38} and Co{sub 55} nanoclusters were predicted as the high-symmetry structures. • CO{sub 2} dissociation on the size-selected Co{sub 13}, Co{sub 38} and Co{sub 55} nanoclusters was studied. • Co{sub 55} nanocluster possesses the highest activity relevant to CO{sub 2} dissociation. • A non-monotonous behavior of the dissociation barrier of CO{sub 2} with the size was found. - Abstract: Spin-polarized density functional theory calculations were carried out to study the adsorption and dissociation properties of CO{sub 2} on size-selected Co{sub 13}, Co{sub 38} and Co{sub 55} nanoclusters. Based on genetic algorithm method, Co{sub 13}, Co{sub 38} and Co{sub 55} nanoclusters were predicted as the most stable high-symmetry structures among these Co{sub n} (n = 2–58) nanoclusters from the Gupta potential. For the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, CO and O on size-selected Co{sub 13}, Co{sub 38} and Co{sub 55} nanoclusters, the lowest adsorption strength is found for all the different adsorbates on Co{sub 55} nanocluster. For the dissociation of CO{sub 2} on these size-selected Co nanoclusters, the largest Co{sub 55} nanocluster possesses the greatest catalytic activity for the dissociation of CO{sub 2}, with the smallest reaction barrier of 0.38 eV. Our results reveal a non-monotonous behavior of the catalytic activities of Co nanoclusters on size, which is of fundamental interest for the design of new Co catalysts for the conversion of CO{sub 2}.

  4. A nanocluster-based fluorescent sensor for sensitive hemoglobin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongqin; Meng, Huijie; Tu, Yifeng; Yan, Jilin

    2017-08-01

    In this report, a fluorescence sensor for sensitive detection of hemoglobin was developed. Gold nanoclusters were first synthesized with bovine serum albumin. It was found that both hydrogen peroxide and hemoglobin could weakly quench the fluorescence from the gold nanoclusters, but when these two were applied onto the nanolcusters simultaneously, a much improved quenching was resulted. This enhancing effect was proved to come from the catalytic generation of hydroxyl radical by hemoglobin. Under an optimized condition, the quenching linearly related to the concentration of hemoglobin in the range of 1-250nM, and a limit of detection as low as 0.36nM could be obtained. This provided a sensitive means for the quantification of Hb. The sensor was then successfully applied for blood analyses with simple sample pretreatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The expanding universe of thiolated gold nanoclusters and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-en

    2013-08-21

    Thiolated gold nanoclusters form a universe of their own. Researchers in this field are constantly pushing the boundary of this universe by identifying new compositions and in a few "lucky" cases, solving their structures. Such solved structures, even if there are only few, provide important hints for predicting the many identified compositions that are yet to be crystallized or structure determined. Structure prediction is the most pressing issue for a computational chemist in this field. The success of the density functional theory method in gauging the energetic ordering of isomers for thiolated gold clusters has been truly remarkable, but to predict the most stable structure for a given composition remains a great challenge. In this feature article from a computational chemist's point of view, the author shows how one understands and predicts structures for thiolated gold nanoclusters based on his old and new results. To further entertain the reader, the author also offers several "imaginative" structures, claims, and challenges for this field.

  6. Theory of Nanocluster Size Distributions from Ion Beam Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C.W.; Yi, D.O.; Sharp, I.D.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-06-13

    Ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters is studied via both kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the self-consistent mean-field solution to a set of coupled rate equations. Both approaches predict the existence of a steady state shape for the cluster size distribution that depends only on a characteristic length determined by the ratio of the effective diffusion coefficient to the ion flux. The average cluster size in the steady state regime is determined by the implanted species/matrix interface energy.

  7. Chemical- or radiation-assisted selective dealloying in bimetallic nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattei, G.; De Marchi, G.; Maurizio, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Sada, C.; Bello, V.; Battaglin, G.

    2003-01-01

    A selective dealloying in bimetallic nanoclusters prepared by ion implantation has been found upon thermal annealing in oxidizing atmosphere or irradiation with light ions. In the first process, the incoming oxygen interacts preferentially with copper promoting Cu 2 O formation, therefore extracting copper from the alloy. In the second process the irradiation with Ne ions promotes a preferential extraction of Au from the alloy, resulting in the formation of Au-enriched 'satellite' nanoparticles around the original Au x Cu 1-x cluster

  8. Chiral Gold Nanoclusters: Atomic Level Origins of Chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chenjie; Jin, Rongchao

    2017-08-04

    Chiral nanomaterials have received wide interest in many areas, but the exact origin of chirality at the atomic level remains elusive in many cases. With recent significant progress in atomically precise gold nanoclusters (e.g., thiolate-protected Au n (SR) m ), several origins of chirality have been unveiled based upon atomic structures determined by using single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The reported chiral Au n (SR) m structures explicitly reveal a predominant origin of chirality that arises from the Au-S chiral patterns at the metal-ligand interface, as opposed to the chiral arrangement of metal atoms in the inner core (i.e. kernel). In addition, chirality can also be introduced by a chiral ligand, manifested in the circular dichroism response from metal-based electronic transitions other than the ligand's own transition(s). Lastly, the chiral arrangement of carbon tails of the ligands has also been discovered in a very recent work on chiral Au 133 (SR) 52 and Au 246 (SR) 80 nanoclusters. Overall, the origins of chirality discovered in Au n (SR) m nanoclusters may provide models for the understanding of chirality origins in other types of nanomaterials and also constitute the basis for the development of various applications of chiral nanoparticles. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. UV luminescence of dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyeong Seop; Kim, Jun Myung; Sohn, So Hyeong; Han, Noh Soo; Park, Seung Min [Dept. of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Size-dependent luminescence color is one of the interesting properties of metal nanocrystals, whose sizes are in the dimension of the Fermi wavelength of an electron. Despite the short Fermi wavelength of electrons in gold (-0.7 nm), luminescence of gold nanoclusters has been reported to range from the near-infrared to near-ultraviolet, depending on the number of atoms in the nanoclusters. The photoluminescence of G4-OH (Au) obtained by the excitation of 266 nm showed UV emission in addition to the well-known blue emission. The higher intensity and red-shifted emission of the gold nanoclusters was distinguished from the emission of dendrimers. The UV emission at 352 nm matched the emission energy of Au{sub 4} in the spherical jellium model, rather than the planar Au{sub 8}, which supported the emission of Au{sub 4} formed in G4-OH. Despite the change of [HAuCl{sub 4} ]/[G4-OH], the relative population between Au{sub 4} and Au{sub 8} was similar in G4-OH(Au), which indicated that the closed electronic and geometric structures stabilized the magic number of Au{sub 4}.

  10. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  11. Efficient tunable luminescence of SiGe alloy sheet polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogg, G.; Meyer, A. J.-P.; Miesner, C.; Brandt, M. S.; Stutzmann, M.

    2001-01-01

    Crystalline SiGe alloy sheet polymers were topotactically prepared from epitaxially grown calcium germanosilicide Ca(Si 1-x Ge x ) 2 precursor films in the whole composition range. These polygermanosilynes are found to be a well-defined mixture of the known siloxene and polygermyne sheet polymers with the OH groups exclusively bonded to silicon. The optical properties determined by photoluminescence and optical reflection measurements identify the mixed SiGe sheet polymers as direct semiconductors with efficient luminescence tunable in the energy range between 2.4 and 1.3 eV. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  12. Pt, Co–Pt and Fe–Pt alloy nanoclusters encapsulated in virus capsids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, M; Eloi, J-C; Jones, S E Ward; Schwarzacher, W; Verwegen, M; Cornelissen, J J L M

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured Pt-based alloys show great promise, not only for catalysis but also in medical and magnetic applications. To extend the properties of this class of materials, we have developed a means of synthesizing Pt and Pt-based alloy nanoclusters in the capsid of a virus. Pure Pt and Pt-alloy nanoclusters are formed through the chemical reduction of [PtCl 4 ] − by NaBH 4 with/without additional metal ions (Co or Fe). The opening and closing of the ion channels in the virus capsid were controlled by changing the pH and ionic strength of the solution. The size of the nanoclusters is limited to 18 nm by the internal diameter of the capsid. Their magnetic properties suggest potential applications in hyperthermia for the Co–Pt and Fe–Pt magnetic alloy nanoclusters. This study introduces a new way to fabricate size-restricted nanoclusters using virus capsid. (paper)

  13. A Comparative XAFS Study of Gold-thiolate Nanoparticles and Nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrier, D M; Chatt, A; Zhang, P; Sham, T K

    2013-01-01

    Tiopronin-capped gold nanoparticles and gold nanoclusters of sizes 3.0 and 1.5 nm, respectively, were investigated with XAFS at the gold L 3 -edge. The specific EXAFS fitting procedure is discussed for obtaining reliable fit parameters for each system. The difficulties and challenges faced when analysing EXAFS data for gold nanoparticles and nanoclusters are also mentioned. Fitting results for gold nanoparticles reveal a small amount of surface Au-thiolate interactions with a large Au-Au metal core. For gold nanoclusters, only a one-shell fit was obtainable. Instead of Au-Au metal core, long-range interactions are expected for gold nanoclusters. Tiopronin-capped gold nanoclusters are proposed to be polymeric in nature, which helps explain the observed red luminescence.

  14. pH-Induced transformation of ligated Au25 to brighter Au23 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkielewicz, Magdalena; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Bertorelle, Franck; Dagany, Xavier; Bansal, Ashu K; Sajjad, Muhammad T; Samuel, Ifor D W; Sanader, Zeljka; Rozycka, Miroslawa; Wojtas, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Antoine, Rodolphe; Ozyhar, Andrzej; Samoc, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters have recently attracted considerable attention due to their size-dependent luminescence characterized by a long lifetime and large Stokes shift. However, the optimization of nanocluster properties such as the luminescence quantum yield is still a challenge. We report here the transformation of Au25Capt18 (Capt labels captopril) nanoclusters occurring at low pH and yielding a product with a much increased luminescence quantum yield which we have identified as Au23Capt17. We applied a simple method of treatment with HCl to accomplish this transformation and we characterized the absorption and emission of the newly created ligated nanoclusters as well as their morphology. Based on DFT calculations we show which Au nanocluster size transformations can lead to highly luminescent species such as Au23Capt17.

  15. The formation of Cr2O3 nanoclusters over graphene sheet and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaghmanesh, Samira; Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Partoens, Bart; Neyts, Erik C.

    2017-11-01

    Carbon supported metal oxide nanoparticles hold promise for various future applications in diverse areas including spintronics, catalysis and biomedicine. These applications, however, typically depend on the structure and morphology of the nanoparticles. In this contribution, we employ classical molecular dynamic simulations based on a recently developed force field to study the structural properties of Cr2O3 nanoclusters over graphene and carbon nanotubes. We observe that Cr2O3 nanoclusters tend to aggregate over both freestanding graphene and carbon nanotubes and form larger nanoclusters. These large nanoclusters are characterized by their worm-like shape with a lattice constant similar to that of bulk Cr2O3. We also investigate the structural deformation induced in graphene due to the presence of Cr2O3 nanoclusters.

  16. Synthesis and Doping of Ligand-Protected Atomically-Precise Metal Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Aljuhani, Maha A.

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly expanding research in nanotechnology has led to exciting progress in a versatile array of applications from medical diagnostics to catalysis. This success resulted from the manipulation of the desired properties of nanomaterials by controlling their size, shape, and composition. Among the most thriving areas of research about nanoparticle is the synthesis and doping of the ligand-protected atomically-precise metal nanoclusters. In this thesis, we developed three different novel metal nanoclusters, such as doped Ag29 with five gold (Au) atoms leading to enhance its quantum yield with remarkable stability. We also developed half-doped (alloyed) cluster of Ni6 nanocluster with molybdenum (Mo). This enabled enhanced stability and better catalytic activity. The third metal nanocluster that we synthesized was Au28 nanocluster by using di-thiolate as the ligand stabilizer instead of mono-thiolate. The new metal clusters obtained have been characterized by spectroscopic, electrochemical and crystallographic methods.

  17. Generalized rate-equation analysis of excitation exchange between silicon nanoclusters and erbium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, A. J.; Wojdak, M.; Ahmad, I.; Loh, W. H.; Oton, C. J.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the use of rate equations to analyze the sensitization of erbium luminescence by silicon nanoclusters. In applying the general form of second-order coupled rate-equations to the Si nanocluster-erbium system, we find that the photoluminescence dynamics cannot be described using a simple rate equation model. Both rise and fall times exhibit a stretched exponential behavior, which we propose arises from a combination of a strongly distance-dependent nanocluster-erbium interaction, along with the finite size distribution and indirect band gap of the silicon nanoclusters. Furthermore, the low fraction of erbium ions that can be excited nonresonantly is a result of the small number of ions coupled to nanoclusters

  18. Local charge trapping in Ge nanoclustersdetected by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratenko, S.V., E-mail: kondr@univ.kiev.ua [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 64/13 Volodymyrska Str., 01601, Kyiv (Ukraine); Lysenko, V.S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 41 Prospect Nauki, 03028, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kozyrev, Yu. N. [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 GeneralaNaumova Str. 03164, Kiev (Ukraine); Kratzer, M. [Institute of Physics, MontanuniversitätLeoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700, Leoben (Austria); Storozhuk, D.P.; Iliash, S.A. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 64/13 Volodymyrska Str., 01601, Kyiv (Ukraine); Czibula, C. [Institute of Physics, MontanuniversitätLeoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700, Leoben (Austria); Teichert, C., E-mail: teichert@unileoben.ac.at [Institute of Physics, MontanuniversitätLeoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700, Leoben (Austria)

    2016-12-15

    The understanding of local charge trapping on the nanoscale is crucial for the design of novel electronic devices and photodetectors based on SiGe nanoclusters (NCs). Here, the local spatial distribution of the surface potential of the Ge NCs was detected using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Different surface potentials between Ge NCs and the wetting layer (WL) surface were detected at room temperature. Changes of the local contact potential differences (CPD) were studied after injection of electrons or holes into single Ge NCs on top of the Si layer using a conductive atomic force microscopy tip. The CPD image contrast was increased after electron injection by applying a forward bias to the n-tip/i-Ge NC/p-Si junction. Injecting holes into a single Ge NC was also accompanied by filling of two-dimensional states in the surrounding region, which is governed by leakage currents through WL or surface states and Coulomb charging effects. A long retention time of holes trapped by the Ge NC was found.

  19. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  20. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...... phase behavior and it was possible to convert one such compound partly into its vinylheptafulvene (VHF) isomer upon irradiation with light when in the liquid crystalline phase. This conversion resulted in an increase in the molecular alignment of the phase. In time, the meta-stable VHF returns...... to the DHA where the alignment is maintained. The systematic structural variation has revealed that a biaryl spacer between the DHA and the alkyl chain is needed for liquid crystallinity and that the one aromatic ring in the spacer cannot be substituted by a triazole. This work presents an important step...

  1. Thermal expansion of the superconducting ferromagnet UCoGe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasparini, A.; Huang, Y.K.; Hartbaum, J.; v. Löhneysen, H.; de Visser, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report measurements of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion, α(T), of the superconducting ferromagnet UCoGe. The data taken on a single-crystalline sample along the orthorhombic crystal axes reveal a pronounced anisotropy with the largest length changes along the b axis. The large values

  2. Synthesis and characterization of germanium monosulphide (GeS)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the growth of germanium monosulphide (GeS) single crystals by vapour phase technique using different transporting agents. The single crystallinity and composition of the grown crystals have been verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) ...

  3. Metal - Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a f...

  4. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  5. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  6. Polymer stabilized Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe alloy nanoclusters: Structural and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, L.; Mandal, A.R. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan-731 235 (India); Mandal, S.K., E-mail: sk_mandal@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan-731 235 (India)

    2010-04-15

    We report here the structural and magnetic behaviors of nickel-silver (Ni-Ag) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoclusters stabilized with polymer (polypyrrole). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates Ni-Ag nanoclusters to stabilize in core-shell configuration while that of Ni-Fe nanoclusters in a mixed type of geometry. Structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the possibility of alloying in such bimetallic nanoclusters to some extent even at temperatures much lower than that of bulk alloying. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra clearly reveal two different absorption behaviors: one is ascribed to non-isolated Ni{sup 2+} clusters surrounded by either silver or iron giving rise to a broad signal, other (very narrow signal) being due to the isolated superparamagnetic Ni{sup 2+} clusters or bimetallic alloy nanoclusters. Results obtained for Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe nanoclusters have been further compared with the behavior exhibited by pure Ni nanoclusters in polypyrrole host. Temperature dependent studies (at 300 and 77 K) of EPR parameters, e.g. linewidth, g-value, line shape and signal intensity indicating the significant influence of surrounding paramagnetic silver or ferromagnetic iron within polymer host on the EPR spectra have been presented.

  7. Polymer stabilized Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe alloy nanoclusters: Structural and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, L.; Mandal, A. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2010-04-01

    We report here the structural and magnetic behaviors of nickel-silver (Ni-Ag) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoclusters stabilized with polymer (polypyrrole). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates Ni-Ag nanoclusters to stabilize in core-shell configuration while that of Ni-Fe nanoclusters in a mixed type of geometry. Structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the possibility of alloying in such bimetallic nanoclusters to some extent even at temperatures much lower than that of bulk alloying. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra clearly reveal two different absorption behaviors: one is ascribed to non-isolated Ni 2+ clusters surrounded by either silver or iron giving rise to a broad signal, other (very narrow signal) being due to the isolated superparamagnetic Ni 2+ clusters or bimetallic alloy nanoclusters. Results obtained for Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe nanoclusters have been further compared with the behavior exhibited by pure Ni nanoclusters in polypyrrole host. Temperature dependent studies (at 300 and 77 K) of EPR parameters, e.g. linewidth, g-value, line shape and signal intensity indicating the significant influence of surrounding paramagnetic silver or ferromagnetic iron within polymer host on the EPR spectra have been presented.

  8. Polymer stabilized Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe alloy nanoclusters: Structural and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, L.; Mandal, A.R.; Mandal, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    We report here the structural and magnetic behaviors of nickel-silver (Ni-Ag) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoclusters stabilized with polymer (polypyrrole). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates Ni-Ag nanoclusters to stabilize in core-shell configuration while that of Ni-Fe nanoclusters in a mixed type of geometry. Structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the possibility of alloying in such bimetallic nanoclusters to some extent even at temperatures much lower than that of bulk alloying. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra clearly reveal two different absorption behaviors: one is ascribed to non-isolated Ni 2+ clusters surrounded by either silver or iron giving rise to a broad signal, other (very narrow signal) being due to the isolated superparamagnetic Ni 2+ clusters or bimetallic alloy nanoclusters. Results obtained for Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe nanoclusters have been further compared with the behavior exhibited by pure Ni nanoclusters in polypyrrole host. Temperature dependent studies (at 300 and 77 K) of EPR parameters, e.g. linewidth, g-value, line shape and signal intensity indicating the significant influence of surrounding paramagnetic silver or ferromagnetic iron within polymer host on the EPR spectra have been presented.

  9. Microwave-heating synthesis and sensing applications of bright gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Ding-Fei; Xiang, Yang; Wang, Xu [Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Xue-Feng, E-mail: yxf@whu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We establish a microwave-heating method to synthesize protein-stabilized Au nanoclusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained Au nanoclusters show bright red fluorescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Au nanoclusters can be used as efficient fluorescence probe for Cu{sup 2+} ion sensing. -- Abstract: A rapid microwave-heating method has been developed for the synthesis of bright Au nanoclusters by using bull serum albumin as the template in an aqueous environment. The reaction time needed is only 7.0 min, and the weight of the products at one batch can reach 15 g. The Au nanoclusters exhibit bright fluorescence at {approx}613 nm with quantum yield of {approx}6.0%. By adjusting the pH value, the products can be controlled to precipitate or re-disperse in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the Au nanoclusters have exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity in the determination of Cu{sup 2+} ions in water. These results suggest an efficient method for obtaining metal nanoclusters for the detection and sensing applications.

  10. A DFT study for the structural and electronic properties of Zn m Se n nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Phool Singh; Pandey, Dheeraj Kumar

    2012-09-01

    An ab initio study has been performed for the stability, structural and electronic properties of 19 small zinc selenide Zn m Se n ( m + n = 2-4) nanoclusters. Out of these nanoclusters, one nanocluster is found to be unstable due to its imaginary vibrational frequency. A B3LYP-DFT/6-311G(3df) method is used in the optimization of the geometries of the nanoclusters. We have calculated the zero point energy (ZPE), which is ignored by the other workers. The binding energies (BE), HOMO-LUMO gaps and bond lengths have been obtained for all the optimized nanoclusters. For the same value of ` m' and ` n', we designate the most stable structure the one, which has maximum final binding energy (FBE) per atom. The adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA), dipole moments and charge on atoms have been investigated for the most stable nanoclusters. For the same value of ` m' and ` n', the nanocluster containing maximum number of Se atoms is found to be most stable.

  11. Morphological and magnetic properties of cobalt nanoclusters electrodeposited onto HOPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, M.; Rios-Reyes, C.H.; Mendoza-Huizar, L.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the morphological and magnetic properties of cobalt nanoclusters obtained from two different sulphate electrolyte solutions were studied. The aggregates were electrodeposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrodes in overpotential conditions, in order to investigate the cationic influence on the final properties of the aggregates. In both cases, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy showed random isolated clusters on the electrode surface, where size variations were determined by the electrolyte solution. By using magnetic force microscopy, the distribution of the electrodeposited magnetic material was more clearly observed which gave some insights on the growth mechanism of these aggregates.

  12. Ion implantation induced conducting nano-cluster formation in PPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Patnaik, A.; Ghosh, G.; Dhara, S.

    1997-01-01

    Conversion of polymers and non-polymeric organic molecules from insulating to semiconducting materials as an effect of energetic ion implantation is an established fact. Formation of nano-clusters enriched with carbonaceous materials are made responsible for the insulator-semiconductor transition. Conduction in these implanted materials is observed to follow variable range hopping (VRH) mechanism. Poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide) [PPO] compatible in various proportion with polystyrene is used as a high thermal resistant insulating polymer. PPO has been used for the first time in the ion implantation study

  13. Enantioselective silver nanoclusters: Preparation, characterization and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrag, Mostafa, E-mail: mostafafarrag@aun.edu.eg

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report a new wet-synthesis method to separate some water-soluble chiral silver nanoclusters with high yield. The cluster material was obtained by the reduction of silver nitrate with NaBH{sub 4} in the presence of three ligands L-penicillamine (L-pen), D-penicillamine (D-pen) and racemic mixture of penicillamine (rac-pen), functioning as capping ligand. For characterizing all silver cluster samples, the particle size was assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their average chemical formula was determined from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental analysis (EA). The particles sizes of all three clusters are 2.1 ± 0.2 nm. The optical properties of the samples were studied by four different methods: UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The spectra are dominated by the typical and intense plasmon peak at 486 nm accompanied by a small shoulder at 540 nm. Infrared spectroscopy was measured for the free ligand and protected silver nanoclusters, where the disappearance of the S-H vibrational band (2535–2570 cm{sup −1}) in the silver nanoclusters confirmed anchoring of ligand to the cluster surface through the sulfur atom. PL studies yielded the fluorescent properties of the samples. The main focus of this work, however, lies in the chirality of the particles. For all silver clusters CD spectra were recorded. While for clusters capped with one of the two enantiomers (D- or L-form) typical CD spectra were observed, no significant signals were detected for a racemic ligand mixture. Furthermore, silver clusters show quite large asymmetry factors (up to 3 × 10{sup −4}) in comparison to most other ligand protected clusters. These large factors and bands in the visible range of the spectrum suggest a strong chiral induction from the ligand to the metal core. Textural features of the

  14. Ultrafast coherence transfer in DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Bogh, Sidsel Ammitzbøll; Carro, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters of a few tens of atoms or less have come into prominence over the last several years due to very strong absorption and efficient emission. Applications in microscopy and sensing have already been realized, however little is known about the excited-state structure...... and dynamics in these clusters. Here we report on a multidimensional spectroscopy investigation of the energy-level structure and the early-time relaxation cascade, which eventually results in the population of an emitting state. We find that the ultrafast intramolecular relaxation is strongly coupled...

  15. Effect of quencher, denaturants, temperature and pH on the fluorescent properties of BSA protected gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chib, Rahul, E-mail: Rahul.chib@live.unthsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Butler, Susan [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Raut, Sangram [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Shah, Sunil; Borejdo, Julian [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Gryczynski, Zygmunt [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Gryczynski, Ignacy, E-mail: ignacy.gryczynski@unthsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we have synthesized BSA protected gold nanoclusters (BSA Au nanocluster) and studied the effect of quencher, protein denaturant, pH and temperature on the fluorescence properties of the tryptophan molecule of the BSA Au nanocluster and native BSA. We have also studied their effect on the peak emission of BSA Au nanoclusters (650 nm). The photophysical characterization of a newly developed fluorophore in different environments is absolutely necessary to futher develop their biomedical and analytical applications. It was observed from our experiments that the tryptophan in BSA Au nanoclusters is better shielded from the polar environment. Tryptophan in native BSA showed a red shift in its peak emission wavelength position. Tryptophan is a highly polarity sensitive dye and a minimal change in its microenvironment can be easily observed in its photophysical properties. - Highlights: • Tryptophan is easily accessible in native BSA compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • Guanidine HCL denatures native BSA more compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • High temperature decreases the quantum yield of tryptophan and BSA Au nanocluster. • Emission wavelength of BSA Au nanoclusters remains constant with increasing pH. • BSA Au nanoclusters are robust to the changes in their environments.

  16. Effect of quencher, denaturants, temperature and pH on the fluorescent properties of BSA protected gold nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chib, Rahul; Butler, Susan; Raut, Sangram; Shah, Sunil; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized BSA protected gold nanoclusters (BSA Au nanocluster) and studied the effect of quencher, protein denaturant, pH and temperature on the fluorescence properties of the tryptophan molecule of the BSA Au nanocluster and native BSA. We have also studied their effect on the peak emission of BSA Au nanoclusters (650 nm). The photophysical characterization of a newly developed fluorophore in different environments is absolutely necessary to futher develop their biomedical and analytical applications. It was observed from our experiments that the tryptophan in BSA Au nanoclusters is better shielded from the polar environment. Tryptophan in native BSA showed a red shift in its peak emission wavelength position. Tryptophan is a highly polarity sensitive dye and a minimal change in its microenvironment can be easily observed in its photophysical properties. - Highlights: • Tryptophan is easily accessible in native BSA compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • Guanidine HCL denatures native BSA more compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • High temperature decreases the quantum yield of tryptophan and BSA Au nanocluster. • Emission wavelength of BSA Au nanoclusters remains constant with increasing pH. • BSA Au nanoclusters are robust to the changes in their environments.

  17. Protein mediated synthesis of fluorescent Au-nanoclusters for metal sensory coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Manja; Raff, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescent Au-nanocluster were successfully synthesized and used for the selective detection of Cu{sup 2} {sup +}. The synthesized Au-BSA-nanoclusters remain functional also after immobilization and show high thermal stability. Additionally, the transfer of the protein mediated Au-nanocluster synthesis route to S-layer proteins was achieved. (The presented work is part of the project BIONEWS dealing with long-term stable cells for the set-up and regeneration of sensor and actor materials for strategic relevant metals, in particular rare earth elements).

  18. Size-Dependent Specific Surface Area of Nanoporous Film Assembled by Core-Shell Iron Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji Antony

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous films of core-shell iron nanoclusters have improved possibilities for remediation, chemical reactivity rate, and environmentally favorable reaction pathways. Conventional methods often have difficulties to yield stable monodispersed core-shell nanoparticles. We produced core-shell nanoclusters by a cluster source that utilizes combination of Fe target sputtering along with gas aggregations in an inert atmosphere at 7∘C. Sizes of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters are observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The specific surface areas of the porous films obtained from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET process are size-dependent and compared with the calculated data.

  19. Crystalline structure of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to find the crystalline structure of metals on the basis of the existing theory of metals. The considerations are limited to the case of free crystals, that is, not subjected to any stresses and with T=0. The energy of the crystal lattice has been defined and the dependence of each term on structures and other properties of metals has been described. The energy has been used to find the values of crystalline structure parameters as the values at which the energy has an absolute minimum. The stability of the structure has been considered in cases of volume changes and shearing deformations. A semiqualitative description has been obtained which explains characteristic properties of one-electron metals. (S.B.)

  20. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  1. High quality Ge epilayer on Si (1 0 0) with an ultrathin Si1-x Ge x /Si buffer layer by RPCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Guo, Qinglei; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Anli; Wang, Bei; Li, Ya; Wang, Gang

    2017-07-01

    The authors report a method to grow high quality strain-relaxed Ge epilayer on a combination of low temperature Ge seed layer and Si1-x Ge x /Si superlattice buffer layer by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition system without any subsequent annealing treatment. Prior to the growth of high quality Ge epilayer, an ultrathin Si1-x Ge x /Si superlattice buffer layer with the thickness of 50 nm and a 460 nm Ge seed layer were deposited successively at low temperature. Then an 840 nm Ge epilayer was grown at high deposition rate with the surface root-mean-square roughness of 0.707 nm and threading dislocation density of 2.5  ×  106 cm-2, respectively. Detailed investigations of the influence of ultrathin low-temperature Si1-x Ge x /Si superlattice buffer layer on the quality of Ge epilayer were performed, which indicates that the crystalline quality of Ge epilayer can be significantly improved by enhancing the Ge concentration of Si1-x Ge x /Si superlattice buffer layer.

  2. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Li, Xiao-Ping

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ molecular dynamics (MD) methods, commonly used in condensed matter physics, we have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. We include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations using MD methods has been performed to obtain the equilibrium crystalline beam structure. The effect of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Schiffer et al. depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  3. Experimental measurements of U24Py nanocluster behavior in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Shannon L.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E.S.; Fein, Jeremy B. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Dembowski, Mateusz [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Burns, Peter C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2016-07-01

    Uranyl peroxide nanoclusters may impact the mobility and partitioning of uranium at contaminated sites and could be used in the isolation of uranium during the reprocessing of nuclear waste. Their behavior in aqueous systems must be better understood to predict the environmental fate of uranyl peroxide nanoclusters and for their use in engineered systems. The aqueous stability of only one uranyl peroxide nanocluster, U60 (K{sub 16}Li{sub 44}[UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2})OH]{sub 60}), has been studied to date [Flynn, S. L., Szymanowski, J. E. S., Gao, Y., Liu, T., Burns, P. C., Fein, J. B.: Experimental measurements of U60 nanocluster stability in aqueous solution. Geochemica et Cosmochimica Acta 156, 94-105 (2015)]. In this study, we measured the aqueous stability of a second uranyl peroxide nanocluster, U24Py (Na{sub 30}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 24}(O{sub 2}){sub 24}(HP{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 6}(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 6}]), in batch systems as a function of time, pH, and nanocluster concentration, and then compared the aqueous behavior of U24Py to U60 to determine whether the size and morphology differences result in differences in their aqueous behaviors. Systems containing U24Py nanoclusters took over 30 days to achieve steady-state concentrations of monomeric U, Na, and P, illustrating slower reaction kinetics than parallel U60 systems. Furthermore, U24Py exhibited lower stability in solution than U60, with an average of 72% of the total mass in each nanocluster suspension being associated with the U24Py nanocluster, whereas 97% was associated with the U60 nanocluster in parallel experiments [Flynn, S. L., Szymanowski, J. E. S., Gao, Y., Liu, T., Burns, P. C., Fein, J. B.: Experimental measurements of U60 nanocluster stability in aqueous solution. Geochemica et Cosmochimica Acta 156, 94-105 (2015)]. The measurements from the batch experiments were used to calculate ion activity product (IAP) values for the reaction between the U24Py nanocluster and its constituent monomeric

  4. Inhibitive formation of nanocavities by introduction of Si atoms in Ge nanocrystals produced by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, R. S.; Shang, L.; Liu, X. H.; Zhang, Y. J. [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Wang, Y. Q., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); College of Physics Science, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Ross, G. G.; Barba, D., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [INRS-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2014-05-28

    Germanium nanocrystals (Ge-nc) were successfully synthesized by co-implantation of Si and Ge ions into a SiO{sub 2} film thermally grown on (100) Si substrate and fused silica (pure SiO{sub 2}), respectively, followed by subsequent annealing at 1150 °C for 1 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations show that nanocavities only exist in the fused silica sample but not in the SiO{sub 2} film on a Si substrate. From the analysis of the high-resolution TEM images and electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra, it is revealed that the absence of nanocavities in the SiO{sub 2} film/Si substrate is attributed to the presence of Si atoms inside the formed Ge-nc. Because the energy of Si-Ge bonds (301 kJ·mol{sup −1}) are greater than that of Ge-Ge bonds (264 kJ·mol{sup −1}), the introduction of the Si-Ge bonds inside the Ge-nc can inhibit the diffusion of Ge from the Ge-nc during the annealing process. However, for the fused silica sample, no crystalline Si-Ge bonds are detected within the Ge-nc, where strong Ge outdiffusion effects produce a great number of nanocavities. Our results can shed light on the formation mechanism of nanocavities and provide a good way to avoid nanocavities during the process of ion implantation.

  5. Electromagnetic processes in strong crystalline fields - NA63 Status Report

    CERN Document Server

    Ugerhoj, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    Results obtained in the framework of the NA63 experiment cite{Ande05} at CERN are reported. Analysis of the trident production in the strong crystalline fields of single Ge crystals is completed. Yields in the random ('amorphous') orientation are in good agreement with calculations, and in the aligned case the production is enhanced by about a factor 3 compared to a Ge amorphous material. Results on the formation lengths of several microns for the production of GeV photons from ultrarelativistic electrons have been published. In 2008 we performed a measurement of resonance phenomena in structured targets and studied a possible change in restricted energy loss in thin solid state detectors, for sufficiently high values of the Lorentz factor. The plans for 2009 are to study the 'semi-bare electron' from radiation emission in thin targets and to study the spin-flip mechanisms in radiation emission, relevant for beamstrahlung phenomena in future linear colliders such as CLIC.

  6. Coherent radiation by quantum dots and magnetic nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    The assemblies of either quantum dots or magnetic nanoclusters are studied. It is shown that such assemblies can produce coherent radiation. A method is developed for solving the systems of nonlinear equations describing the dynamics of such assemblies. The method is shown to be general and applicable to systems of different physical nature. Despite mathematical similarities of dynamical equations, the physics of the processes for quantum dots and magnetic nanoclusters is rather different. In a quantum dot assembly, coherence develops due to the Dicke effect of dot interactions through the common radiation field. For a system of magnetic clusters, coherence in the spin motion appears due to the Purcell effect caused by the feedback action of a resonator. Self-organized coherent spin radiation cannot arise without a resonator. This principal difference is connected with the different physical nature of dipole forces between the objects. Effective dipole interactions between the radiating quantum dots, appearing due to photon exchange, collectivize the dot radiation. While the dipolar spin interactions exist from the beginning, yet before radiation, and on the contrary, they dephase spin motion, thus destroying the coherence of moving spins. In addition, quantum dot radiation exhibits turbulent photon filamentation that is absent for radiating spins

  7. Formation of nanoclusters of gadolinium atoms in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliev, Kh.M.; Saparniyazova, Z.M.; Ismajlov, K.A.; Madzhitov, M.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    A technology of stage wise low temperature diffusion of gadolinium into silicon that makes it possible to form nanoclusters of impurity atoms with a significant magnetic moment distributed throughout the volume of the material has been developed. It is shown that, unlike the samples obtained by high temperature diffusion doping, the samples prepared by the new technology do not have surface erosion, and alloys and silicides are not formed in the near surface region. Nanoclusters of impurity atoms of gadolinium in the volume of the crystal lattice of the silicon are studied using an MIK-5 infrared microscope. It is found that, in the stage wise low temperature diffusion, the temperature and time of the diffusion have an effect not only on the depth of penetration of the impurities but also on the sizes of the resulting clusters; these factors can also prevent the formation of clusters. The study of the effect of low temperature treatments on the size and distribution of clusters shows that, upon annealing in the temperature range of 500-700 degrees Celsius, the ordering of the clusters of gadolinium impurity atoms is observed. A further increase in the annealing temperature leads to the destruction of gadolinium clusters in the silicon bulk. (authors)

  8. Fluorescence enhancement of DNA-silver nanoclusters from guanine proximity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-chih [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, Jaswinder [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Hyojong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jennifer S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-templated, silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) are a versatile set of fluorophores and have already been used for live cell imaging, detection of specific metal ions, and single-nucleotide variation identification. Compared to commonly used organic dyes, these fluorescent nanoclusters have much better photostability and are often a few times brighter. Owing to their small size, simple preparation, and biocompatibility (i.e. made of nontoxic metals), DNA/Ag NCs should find more applications in biological imaging and chemical detection in the years to come. While clearly promising as new fluorophores, DNA/Ag NCs possess a unique and poorly understood dynamic process not shared by organic dyes or photoluminescent nanocrystals - the conversion among different NC species due to silver oxidation/reduction or NC regrouping. While this environmental sensitivity can be viewed as a drawback, in the appropriate context, it can be used as a sensor or reporter. Often reversible, conversions among different NC species have been found to depend upon a number of factors, including time, temperature, oxygen and salt content. In this communication, we report significant fluorescence enhancement of DNA/Ag NCs via interactions with guanine-rich DNA sequences. Moreover, we demonstrated this property can be used for sensitive detection of specific target DNA from a human oncogene (i.e. Braf gene).

  9. RBS-study of GexSi1-x Compounds Formed by Variable Dose Ge Implantation into Si Wafers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous and relaxed epitaxial GeSi films are prepared by Ge-implantation into Si(111 wafers of both 60 keV and 200 keV energetic Ge+-ions with appropriate dose, followed by post-implantation thermal annealing, comprising a single final annealing at a temperature of 900 °C. The implantation dose was varied between 10(14 and 10(17 atoms cm-2. Rutherford backscattering (RBS and channeling analysis was applied in order to explore the formation of a single crystalline Si-Ge compound layer, both prior and after the thermal treatment. The depth and the thickness of the implanted layer, as well as their molar composition and crystalline quality was determined, and it was found that a single crystalline Si-Ge alloy layer was created, with both depth and mole fraction depending on the ion energy and the ion dose.

  10. Ge nano-layer fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tiecheng; Dun Shaobo; Hu Qiang; Zhang Songbao; An Zhu; Duan Yanmin; Zhu Sha; Wei Qiangmin; Wang Lumin

    2006-01-01

    A Ge nano-layer embedded in the surface layer of an amorphous SiO 2 film was fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation. The component, phase, nano-structure and luminescence properties of the nano-layer were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering, glancing incident X-ray diffraction, laser Raman scattering, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The relation between nano-particle characteristics and ion fluence was also studied. The results indicate that nano-crystalline Ge and nano-amorphous Ge particles coexist in the nano-layer and the ratio of nano-crystalline Ge to nano-particle Ge increases with increasing ion fluence. The intensity of photoluminescence from the nano-layer increases with increasing ion fluence also. Prepared with certain ion fluences, high-density nano-layers composed of uniform-sized nano-particles can be observed

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanoclusters of ZnS Comprised on Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide cationic (CTAB surfactant was used as template for the synthesis of nanoclusters of ZnS composed of nanowires, by hydrothermal method. The structural and morphological studies were performed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM techniques. The synthesized ZnS nanoclusters are composed of nanowires and high yield on the substrate was observed. The ZnS nanocrystalline consists of hexagonal phase and polycrystalline in nature. The chemical composition of ZnS nanoclusters composed of nanowires was studied by X-ray photo electron microscopy (XPS. This investigation has shown that the ZnS nanoclusters are composed of Zn and S atoms.

  12. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanoclusters of ZnS Comprised on Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Khun, Kimleang; Liu, Xianjie; Willander, Magnus

    2013-09-09

    Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide cationic (CTAB) surfactant was used as template for the synthesis of nanoclusters of ZnS composed of nanowires, by hydrothermal method. The structural and morphological studies were performed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The synthesized ZnS nanoclusters are composed of nanowires and high yield on the substrate was observed. The ZnS nanocrystalline consists of hexagonal phase and polycrystalline in nature. The chemical composition of ZnS nanoclusters composed of nanowires was studied by X-ray photo electron microscopy (XPS). This investigation has shown that the ZnS nanoclusters are composed of Zn and S atoms.

  13. Multilayered nanoclusters of platinum and gold: insights on electrodeposition pathways, electrocatalysis, surface and bulk compositional properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkwizu, TS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical, surface and bulk compositional properties of multilayered nanoclusters of Pt and Au, electrochemically deposited on glassy carbon under conditions involving sequential surface–limited redox–replacement reactions (performed at open...

  14. Mechanical stability of titanium and plasma polymer nanoclusters in nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palesch, E. [Institute of Materials Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Brno (Czech Republic); Marek, A. [HVM Plasma, spol. s r.o., Prague (Czech Republic); Solar, P.; Kylian, O. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Vyskocil, J. [HVM Plasma, spol. s r.o., Prague (Czech Republic); Biederman, H. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Cech, V., E-mail: cech@fch.vutbr.cz [Institute of Materials Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical stability of nanoclusters embedded in nanocomposite coatings was investigated by scratch and wear tests supported by atomic force microscopy using surface topography mode. Titanium and plasma polymer nanoclusters were deposited on planar substrates (glass, titanium) using a magnetron-based gas aggregation cluster source. The deposited clusters were overcoated with a thin titanium film of different thicknesses to stabilize the position of the clusters in the nanocomposite coating. Nanotribological measurements were carried out to optimize the thickness of the overcoating film for sufficient interfacial adhesion of the cluster/film system. - Highlights: ► Titanium and plasma polymer nanoclusters were overcoated with thin titanium film. ► The mechanical stability of nanoclusters was characterized by nanotribological tests. ► The film thickness was optimized to stabilize the position of the clusters in coating.

  15. A colloidal assembly approach to synthesize magnetic porous composite nanoclusters for efficient protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Lan, Fang; Yi, Qiangying; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2015-10-01

    A combination strategy of the inverse emulsion crosslinking approach and the colloidal assembly technique is first proposed to synthesize Fe3O4/histidine composite nanoclusters as new-type magnetic porous nanomaterials. The nanoclusters possess uniform morphology, high magnetic content and excellent protein adsorption capacity, exhibiting their great potential for bio-separation.A combination strategy of the inverse emulsion crosslinking approach and the colloidal assembly technique is first proposed to synthesize Fe3O4/histidine composite nanoclusters as new-type magnetic porous nanomaterials. The nanoclusters possess uniform morphology, high magnetic content and excellent protein adsorption capacity, exhibiting their great potential for bio-separation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05800g

  16. Pure white-light emitting ultrasmall organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Meghan B; Lawrence, Katie N; Dutta, Poulami; Siegel, Amanda P; Sardar, Rajesh

    2016-10-14

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites, direct band-gap semiconductors, have shown tremendous promise for optoelectronic device fabrication. We report the first colloidal synthetic approach to prepare ultrasmall (∼1.5 nm diameter), white-light emitting, organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite nanoclusters. The nearly pure white-light emitting ultrasmall nanoclusters were obtained by selectively manipulating the surface chemistry (passivating ligands and surface trap-states) and controlled substitution of halide ions. The nanoclusters displayed a combination of band-edge and broadband photoluminescence properties, covering a major part of the visible region of the solar spectrum with unprecedentedly large quantum yields of ∼12% and photoluminescence lifetime of ∼20 ns. The intrinsic white-light emission of perovskite nanoclusters makes them ideal and low cost hybrid nanomaterials for solid-state lighting applications.

  17. Encapsulation of nanoclusters in dried gel materials via an inverse micelle/sol gel synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Anthony; Yamanaka, Stacey A.; Kawola, Jeffrey S.; Showalter, Steven K.; Loy, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    A dried gel material sterically entrapping nanoclusters of a catalytically active material and a process to make the material via an inverse micelle/sol-gel synthesis. A surfactant is mixed with an apolar solvent to form an inverse micelle solution. A salt of a catalytically active material, such as gold chloride, is added along with a silica gel precursor to the solution to form a mixture. To the mixture are then added a reducing agent for the purpose of reducing the gold in the gold chloride to atomic gold to form the nanoclusters and a condensing agent to form the gel which sterically entraps the nanoclusters. The nanoclusters are normally in the average size range of from 5-10 nm in diameter with a monodisperse size distribution.

  18. Synthesis and Optical Properties of a Dithiolate/Phosphine-Protected Au28 Nanocluster

    KAUST Repository

    Aljuhani, Maha A.; Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Sinatra, Lutfan; Basset, Jean-Marie; Mohammed, Omar F.; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    While monothiols and simple phosphines are commonly exploited for size-controlled synthesis of atomically precise gold nanoclusters (NCs), dithiols or dithiol-phosphine combinations are seldom applied. Herein, we used a dithiol (benzene-1,3-dithiol

  19. Synthesis of Co–Al layered double hydroxide nanoclusters as reduction nanocatalyst in aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs have attracted attention as green materials due to their catalytic ability in benign aqueous solvents. We here demonstrate the synthesis of colloidal Co–Al LDH nanoclusters with an average size of <10 nm via a facile liquid-phase reaction for the enhancement of the catalytic activity. To the best of our knowledge, the present LDH is the smallest Co–Al LDH with an extremely large surface area and stability in an aqueous solvent, forming a stable and concentrated colloidal solution as high as 40 g/L. We investigated the formation mechanism, and the catalytic activity of Co–Al LDH nanoclusters. The Co–Al LDH nanoclusters showed 47 times higher rate of the reduction of dye molecules in the aqueous media than standard Co–Al LDH particles with a micrometer size. LDH nanoclusters demonstrated here are promising green nanocatalysts for the aqueous reaction processes.

  20. Magnetic properties of MnAs nanoclusters embedded in a GaAs semiconductor matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, Pham Nam; Takahashi, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    We have clarified fundamental magnetic properties of MnAs nanoclusters (10 nm in diameter) embedded in a thin GaAs matrix (referred to as GaAs:MnAs) through tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of a GaAs:MnAs thin film and a MnAs metal thin film as ferromagnetic electrodes. Although MnAs nanoclusters have coercive forces as small as 150 Oe at 7 K, they show unusually high blocking temperature, which is as large as 300 K. The remanent magnetization of the MnAs nanocluster system linearly decreases with increasing temperature. Those magnetic behaviors cannot be explained by the non-interacting particle model, revealing the important existence of dipolar interactions in MnAs nanocluster system

  1. Synthesis and Doping of Ligand-Protected Atomically-Precise Metal Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Aljuhani, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    by controlling their size, shape, and composition. Among the most thriving areas of research about nanoparticle is the synthesis and doping of the ligand-protected atomically-precise metal nanoclusters. In this thesis, we developed three different novel metal

  2. Amorphous inclusions during Ge and GeSn epitaxial growth via chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gencarelli, F., E-mail: federica.gencarelli@imec.be [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Shimura, Y. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kumar, A. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vincent, B.; Moussa, A.; Vanhaeren, D.; Richard, O.; Bender, H. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vandervorst, W. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Caymax, M.; Loo, R. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heyns, M. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we discuss the characteristics of particular island-type features with an amorphous core that are developed during the low temperature epitaxial growth of Ge and GeSn layers by means of chemical vapor deposition with Ge{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Although further investigations are needed to unambiguously identify the origin of these features, we suggest that they are originated by the formation of clusters of H and/or contaminants atoms during growth. These would initially cause the formation of pits with crystalline rough facets over them, resulting in ring-shaped islands. Then, when an excess surface energy is overcome, an amorphous phase would nucleate inside the pits and fill them. Reducing the pressure and/or increasing the growth temperature can be effective ways to prevent the formation of these features, likely due to a reduction of the surface passivation from H and/or contaminant atoms. - Highlights: • Island features with amorphous cores develop during low T Ge(Sn) CVD with Ge{sub 2}H{sub 6.} • These features are thoroughly characterized in order to understand their origin. • A model is proposed to describe the possible evolution of these features. • Lower pressures and/or higher temperatures avoid the formation of these features.

  3. Study of Ge loss during Ge condensation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Z.Y.; Di, Z.F.; Ye, L.; Mu, Z.Q.; Chen, D.; Wei, X.; Zhang, M.; Wang, X.

    2014-01-01

    Ge loss during Ge condensation process was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. This work reveals that Ge loss can be attributed to the Ge oxidation at SiO 2 /SiGe interface, Ge diffusion in SiO 2 layers and Ge trapped at buried SiO 2 /Si interface. During Ge condensation process, with the increase of the Ge content, the Si atoms become insufficient for selective oxidation at the oxide/SiGe interface. Consequently, the Si and Ge are oxidized simultaneously. When the Ge composition in SiGe layer increases further and approaches 100%, the Ge atoms begin to diffuse into the top SiO 2 layer and buried SiO 2 layer. However, the X-ray photoelectron spectrometry analysis manifests that the chemical states of the Ge in top SiO 2 layer are different from those in buried SiO 2 layer, as the Ge atoms diffused into top SiO 2 layer are oxidized to form GeO 2 in the subsequent oxidation step. With the increase of the diffusion time, a quantity of Ge atoms diffuse through buried SiO 2 layer and pile up at buried SiO 2 /Si interface due to the interfacial trapping. The SiO 2 /Si interface acts like a pump, absorbing Ge from a Ge layer continuously through a pipe-buried SiO 2 layer. With the progress of Ge condensation process, the quantity of Ge accumulated at SiO 2 /Si interface increases remarkably. - Highlights: • Ge loss during Ge condensation process is attributed to the Ge oxidation at SiO 2 /SiGe interface. • Ge diffusion in SiO 2 layers and Ge trapped at buried SiO 2 /Si interface • When Ge content in SiGe layer approaches 100%, Ge diffusion into the SiO 2 layer is observed. • Ge then gradually diffuses through buried SiO 2 layer and pile up at SiO 2 /Si interface

  4. Stable silver nanoclusters electrochemically deposited on nitrogen-doped graphene as efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shi; Chen, Man; Dong, Haifeng; He, Bingyu; Lu, Huiting; Su, Lei; Dai, Wenhao; Zhang, Qiaochu; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-01

    Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusually high catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) due to their small size and unique electronic structures. However, controllable synthesis of stable metal nanoclusters is a challenge, and the durability of metal clusters suffers from the deficiency of dissolution, aggregation, and sintering during catalysis reactions. Herein, silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) (diameter , which is vital in high performance fuel cells, batteries and nanodevices.

  5. Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-13

    affected by the environment of the stabilizing protein, allowing these hybrid systems to act as sensors in many applications.2,9,14–19 This has led...Biosens Bioelectron. 2012;32:297–299. 8. Joseph D, Geckeler KE. Synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters using egg white proteins. Colloids Surf...Chang HW, Chien YC, Hsiao JK, Cheng JT, Chou PT. Insulin -directed synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters: preservation of insulin bioactivity and

  6. Kernel Tuning and Nonuniform Influence on Optical and Electrochemical Gaps of Bimetal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lizhong; Yuan, Jinyun; Xia, Nan; Liao, Lingwen; Liu, Xu; Gan, Zibao; Wang, Chengming; Yang, Jinlong; Wu, Zhikun

    2018-03-14

    Fine tuning nanoparticles with atomic precision is exciting and challenging and is critical for tuning the properties, understanding the structure-property correlation and determining the practical applications of nanoparticles. Some ultrasmall thiolated metal nanoparticles (metal nanoclusters) have been shown to be precisely doped, and even the protecting staple metal atom could be precisely reduced. However, the precise addition or reduction of the kernel atom while the other metal atoms in the nanocluster remain the same has not been successful until now, to the best of our knowledge. Here, by carefully selecting the protecting ligand with adequate steric hindrance, we synthesized a novel nanocluster in which the kernel can be regarded as that formed by the addition of two silver atoms to both ends of the Pt@Ag 12 icosohedral kernel of the Ag 24 Pt(SR) 18 (SR: thiolate) nanocluster, as revealed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Interestingly, compared with the previously reported Ag 24 Pt(SR) 18 nanocluster, the as-obtained novel bimetal nanocluster exhibits a similar absorption but a different electrochemical gap. One possible explanation for this result is that the kernel tuning does not essentially change the electronic structure, but obviously influences the charge on the Pt@Ag 12 kernel, as demonstrated by natural population analysis, thus possibly resulting in the large electrochemical gap difference between the two nanoclusters. This work not only provides a novel strategy to tune metal nanoclusters but also reveals that the kernel change does not necessarily alter the optical and electrochemical gaps in a uniform manner, which has important implications for the structure-property correlation of nanoparticles.

  7. WORKSHOP: Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following pioneer work by specialists at the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory some ten years ago, interest developed in the possibility of 'freezing' ion beams in storage rings by pushing cooling (to smooth out beam behaviour) to its limits, the final goal being to lock the ions into a neat crystal pattern. After advances by groups working on laser cooled ions in traps, and with several cooling rings now in operation, a workshop on crystalline ion beams was organized recently by the GSI (Darmstadt) Laboratory and held at Wertheim in Germany

  8. In-situ Ga doping of fully strained Ge1-xSnx heteroepitaxial layers grown on Ge(001) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Nakatsuka, O.; Vincent, B.; Gencarelli, F.; Clarysse, T.; Vandervorst, W.; Caymax, M.; Loo, R.; Jensen, A.; Petersen, D.H.; Zaima, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the Ga and Sn content dependence of the crystallinity and electrical properties of Ga-doped Ge 1-x Sn x layers that are heteroepitaxially grown on Ge(001) substrates. The doping of Ga to levels as high as the solubility limit of Ga at the growth temperature leads to the introduction of dislocations, due to the increase in the strain of the Ge 1-x Sn x layers. We achieved the growth of a fully strained Ge 0.922 Sn 0.078 layer on Ge with a Ga concentration of 5.5 × 10 19 /cm 3 without any dislocations and stacking faults. The resistivity of the Ga-doped Ge 1-x Sn x layer decreased as the Sn content was increased. This decrease was due to an increase in the carrier concentration, with an increase in the activation level of Ga atoms in the Ge 1-x Sn x epitaxial layers being induced by the introduction of Sn. As a result, we found that the resistivity for the Ge 0.950 Sn 0.050 layer annealed at 600°C for 1 min is 3.6 times less than that of the Ga-doped Ge/Ge sample. - Highlights: ► Heavy Ga-doping into fully strained GeSn layers without the introduction of dislocations ► The uniform Ga depth profile allowed the introduction of Sn ► The decrease in resistivity with an increase in the activation level of Ga was caused by the introduction of Sn

  9. Thermal annealing studies of GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys with multiple interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Bragaglia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A high degree of vacancy ordering is obtained by annealing amorphous GeTe-Sb2Te3 (GST alloys deposited on a crystalline substrate, which acts as a template for the crystallization. Under annealing the material evolves from amorphous to disordered rocksalt, to ordered rocksalt with vacancies arranged into (111 oriented layers, and finally converts into the stable trigonal phase. The role of the interface in respect to the formation of an ordered crystalline phase is studied by comparing the transformation stages of crystalline GST with and without a capping layer. The capping layer offers another crystallization interface, which harms the overall crystalline quality.

  10. Iron/iron oxide core-shell nanoclusters for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang You; Antony, Jiji; Sharma, Amit; Nutting, Joseph; Sikes, Daniel; Meyer, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. Most magnetic particles or beads currently used in biomedical applications are based on ferromagnetic iron oxides with very low specific magnetic moments of about 20-30 emu/g. Here we report a new approach to synthesize monodispersed core-shell nanostructured clusters with high specific magnetic moments above 200 emu/g. Iron nanoclusters with monodispersive size of diameters from 2 nm to 100 nm are produced by our newly developed nanocluster source and go to a deposition chamber, where a chemical reaction starts, and the nanoclusters are coated with iron oxides. HRTEM Images show the coatings are very uniform and stable. The core-shell nanoclusters are superparamagnetic at room temperature for sizes less than 15 nm, and then become ferromagnetic when the cluster size increases. The specific magnetic moment of core-shell nanoclusters is size dependent, and increases rapidly from about 80 emu/g at the cluster size of around 3 nm to over 200 emu/g up to the size of 100 nm. The use of high magnetic moment nanoclusters for biomedical applications could dramatically enhance the contrast for MRI, reduce the concentration of magnetic particle needs for cell separation, or make drug delivery possible with much lower magnetic field gradients

  11. Optical properties of multicomponent antimony-silver nanoclusters formed in silica by sequential ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuhr, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The linear and nonlinear optical properties of nanometer dimension metal colloids embedded in a dielectric depend explicitly on the electronic structure of the metal nanoclusters. The ability to control the electronic structure of the nanoclusters may make it possible to tailor the optical properties for enhanced performance. By sequential implantation of different metal ion species multi-component nanoclusters can be formed with significantly different optical properties than single element metal nanoclusters. The authors report the formation of multi-component Sb/Ag nanoclusters in silica by sequential implantation of Sb and Ag. Samples were implanted with relative ratios of Sb to Ag of 1:1 and 3:1. A second set of samples was made by single element implantations of Ag and Sb at the same energies and doses used to make the sequentially implanted samples. All samples were characterized using RBS and both linear and nonlinear optical measurements. The presence of both ions significantly modifies the optical properties of the composites compared to the single element nanocluster glass composites. In the sequentially implanted samples the optical density is lower, and the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption observed in the Ag implanted samples is not present. At the same time the nonlinear response of the these samples is larger than for the samples implanted with Sb alone, suggesting that the addition of Ag can increase the nonlinear response of the Sb particles formed. The results are consistent with the formation of multi-component Sb/Ag colloids

  12. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-02-10

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  13. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Matulionyte

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs and 2-(N-morpholino ethanesulfonic acid (MEScapped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  14. Improving the growth of Ge/Si islands by modulating the spacing between screen and accelerator grids in ion beam sputtering deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Rongfei; Yang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ge islands were prepared by ion beam sputtering with different grid-to-grid gaps. • Ge islands with larger sizes and low density are observed in 1-mm-spaced samples. • The island growth was determined by sputter energy and the quality of Si buffer. • The crystalline volume fraction of buffer must be higher than 72% to grow islands. - Abstract: Ge islands were fabricated on Si buffer layer by ion beam sputtering deposition with a spacing between the screen and accelerator grids of either 1 mm or 2 mm. The Si buffer layer exhibits mixed-phase microcrystallinity for samples grown with 1 mm spacing and crystallinity for those with 2 mm spacing. Ge islands are larger and less dense than those grown on the crystalline buffer because of the selective growth mechanism on the microcrystalline buffer. Moreover, the nucleation site of Ge islands formed on the crystalline Si buffer is random. Ge islands grown at different grid-to-grid gaps are characterized by two key factors, namely, divergence half angle of ion beam and crystallinity of buffer layer. High grid-to-grid spacing results in small divergence half angle, thereby enhancing the sputtering energy and redistribution of sputtered atoms. The crystalline volume fraction of the microcrystalline Si buffer was obtained based on the integrated intensity ratio of Raman peaks. The islands show decreased density with decreasing crystalline volume fraction and are difficult to observe at crystalline volume fractions lower than 72%.

  15. Improving the growth of Ge/Si islands by modulating the spacing between screen and accelerator grids in ion beam sputtering deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Bo [Institute of Optoelectronic Information Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Yunnan Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Materials and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Wang, Chong, E-mail: cwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institute of Optoelectronic Information Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Yunnan Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Materials and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Qiu, Feng; Wang, Rongfei [Institute of Optoelectronic Information Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Yunnan Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Materials and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Yang, Yu, E-mail: yuyang@ynu.edu.cn [Institute of Optoelectronic Information Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Yunnan Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Materials and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Ge islands were prepared by ion beam sputtering with different grid-to-grid gaps. • Ge islands with larger sizes and low density are observed in 1-mm-spaced samples. • The island growth was determined by sputter energy and the quality of Si buffer. • The crystalline volume fraction of buffer must be higher than 72% to grow islands. - Abstract: Ge islands were fabricated on Si buffer layer by ion beam sputtering deposition with a spacing between the screen and accelerator grids of either 1 mm or 2 mm. The Si buffer layer exhibits mixed-phase microcrystallinity for samples grown with 1 mm spacing and crystallinity for those with 2 mm spacing. Ge islands are larger and less dense than those grown on the crystalline buffer because of the selective growth mechanism on the microcrystalline buffer. Moreover, the nucleation site of Ge islands formed on the crystalline Si buffer is random. Ge islands grown at different grid-to-grid gaps are characterized by two key factors, namely, divergence half angle of ion beam and crystallinity of buffer layer. High grid-to-grid spacing results in small divergence half angle, thereby enhancing the sputtering energy and redistribution of sputtered atoms. The crystalline volume fraction of the microcrystalline Si buffer was obtained based on the integrated intensity ratio of Raman peaks. The islands show decreased density with decreasing crystalline volume fraction and are difficult to observe at crystalline volume fractions lower than 72%.

  16. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Li, Xiao-Ping; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ Molecular Dynamics method, commonly used in condensed matter physics, we have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. We include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations has been performed to obtain the equilibrium structure. The effects of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time-dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Rahman and Schiffer, depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  17. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Li, X.P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ the Molecular Dynamics method, commonly used in condensed matter physics, the authors have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. They include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations has been performed to obtain the equilibrium structure. The effects of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time-dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Rahman and Schiffer, depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  18. X-ray characterization of Ge dots epitaxially grown on nanostructured Si islands on silicon-on-insulator substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaumseil, Peter; Kozlowski, Grzegorz; Yamamoto, Yuji; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Schroeder, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    On the way to integrate lattice mismatched semiconductors on Si(001), the Ge/Si heterosystem was used as a case study for the concept of compliant substrate effects that offer the vision to be able to integrate defect-free alternative semiconductor structures on Si. Ge nanoclusters were selectively grown by chemical vapour deposition on Si nano-islands on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates. The strain states of Ge clusters and Si islands were measured by grazing-incidence diffraction using a laboratory-based X-ray diffraction technique. A tensile strain of up to 0.5% was detected in the Si islands after direct Ge deposition. Using a thin (∼10 nm) SiGe buffer layer between Si and Ge the tensile strain increases to 1.8%. Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of a regular grid of misfit dislocations in such structures. This clear experimental evidence for the compliance of Si nano-islands on SOI substrates opens a new integration concept that is not only limited to Ge but also extendable to semiconductors like III-V and II-VI materials.

  19. Fabrication of SGOI material by oxidation of an epitaxial SiGe layer on an SOI wafer with H ions implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xinli; Chen Zhijun; Wang Yongjin; Jin Bo; Zhang Feng; Zou Shichang

    2005-01-01

    SGOI materials were fabricated by thermal dry oxidation of epitaxial H-ion implanted SiGe layers on SOI wafers. The hydrogen implantation was found to delay the oxidation rate of SiGe layer and to decrease the loss of Ge atoms during oxidation. Further, the H implantation did not degrade the crystallinity of SiGe layer during fabrication of the SGOI

  20. Structural studies of gels and gel-glasses in the SiO2-GeO2 system using vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shyama P.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    1986-01-01

    GeO2 gel and gels in the SiO2-GeO2 system synthesized by the hydrolytic polycondensation of metal alkoxides have been studied by infrared and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The molecular structures, hydroxyl contents, and crystallinity of gels and gel-glasses in relation to the thermal history and GeO2 concentration were investigated. The binary compositions having up to 70 mol percent GeO2 were examined.

  1. Amorphous Ge quantum dots embedded in SiO2 formed by low energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J. P.; Huang, D. X.; Jacobson, A. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Makarenkov, B.; Chu, W. K.; Bahrim, B.; Rabalais, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, extremely small Ge nanodots embedded in SiO 2 , i.e., Ge-SiO 2 quantum dot composites, have been formed by ion implantation of 74 Ge + isotope into (0001) Z-cut quartz at a low kinetic energy of 9 keV using varying implantation temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and micro-Raman scattering show that amorphous Ge nanodots are formed at all temperatures. The formation of amorphous Ge nanodots is different from reported crystalline Ge nanodot formation by high energy ion implantation followed by a necessary high temperature annealing process. At room temperature, a confined spatial distribution of the amorphous Ge nanodots can be obtained. Ge inward diffusion was found to be significantly enhanced by a synergetic effect of high implantation temperature and preferential sputtering of surface oxygen, which induced a much wider and deeper Ge nanodot distribution at elevated implantation temperature. The bimodal size distribution that is often observed in high energy implantation was not observed in the present study. Cross-sectional TEM observation and the depth profile of Ge atoms in SiO 2 obtained from x-ray photoelectron spectra revealed a critical Ge concentration for observable amorphous nanodot formation. The mechanism of formation of amorphous Ge nanodots and the change in spatial distribution with implantation temperature are discussed

  2. Optical properties of crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forouhi, A.R.; Bloomer, I.

    1988-01-01

    A new formulation for the complex index of refraction, N(E) = n(E)-ik(E), as a function of photon energy E, for crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics is developed based on our previous derivation of N(E) for amorphous materials. The extinction coefficient k(E) is deduced from a one-electron model with finite lifetime for the excited electron state. The refractive index n(E) is then derived from the Kramers-Kronig relation as the Hilbert transform of k(E). It is shown that n(∞)>1. Excellent agreement is found between our equations for n(E) and k(E) and published measured values for crystalline Si, Ge, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb, SiC, cubic C, and α-SiO 2 , over a wide range of energies (∼0--20 eV). Far fewer parameters, all of which have physical significance, are required and they can be determined for a particular material from the position and strength of the peaks in the k spectrum

  3. Photoluminescence of phosphorus atomic layer doped Ge grown on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Nien, Li-Wei; Capellini, Giovanni; Virgilio, Michele; Costina, Ioan; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Seifert, Winfried; Srinivasan, Ashwyn; Loo, Roger; Scappucci, Giordano; Sabbagh, Diego; Hesse, Anne; Murota, Junichi; Schroeder, Thomas; Tillack, Bernd

    2017-10-01

    Improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) of Phosphorus (P) doped Ge by P atomic layer doping (ALD) is investigated. Fifty P delta layers of 8 × 1013 cm-2 separated by 4 nm Ge spacer are selectively deposited at 300 °C on a 700 nm thick P-doped Ge buffer layer of 1.4 × 1019 cm-3 on SiO2 structured Si (100) substrate. A high P concentration region of 1.6 × 1020 cm-3 with abrupt P delta profiles is formed by the P-ALD process. Compared to the P-doped Ge buffer layer, a reduced PL intensity is observed, which might be caused by a higher density of point defects in the P delta doped Ge layer. The peak position is shifted by ˜0.1 eV towards lower energy, indicating an increased active carrier concentration in the P-delta doped Ge layer. By introducing annealing at 400 °C to 500 °C after each Ge spacer deposition, P desorption and diffusion is observed resulting in relatively uniform P profiles of ˜2 × 1019 cm-3. Increased PL intensity and red shift of the PL peak are observed due to improved crystallinity and higher active P concentration.

  4. Monolithically Integrated Ge-on-Si Active Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifeng Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically integrated, active photonic devices on Si are key components in Si-based large-scale electronic-photonic integration for future generations of high-performance, low-power computation and communication systems. Ge has become an interesting candidate for active photonic devices in Si photonics due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS processing. In this paper, we present a review of the recent progress in Ge-on-Si active photonics materials and devices for photon detection, modulation, and generation. We first discuss the band engineering of Ge using tensile strain, n-type doping, Sn alloying, and separate confinement of Γ vs. L electrons in quantum well (QW structures to transform the material towards a direct band gap semiconductor for enhancing optoelectronic properties. We then give a brief overview of epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials growth, followed by a summary of recent investigations towards low-temperature, direct growth of high crystallinity Ge and GeSn alloys on dielectric layers for 3D photonic integration. Finally, we review the most recent studies on waveguide-integrated Ge-on-Si photodetectors (PDs, electroabsorption modulators (EAMs, and laser diodes (LDs, and suggest possible future research directions for large-scale monolithic electronic-photonic integrated circuits on a Si platform.

  5. Liquid crystalline order in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Blumstein, Alexandre

    1978-01-01

    Liquid Crystalline Order in Polymers examines the topic of liquid crystalline order in systems containing rigid synthetic macromolecular chains. Each chapter of the book provides a review of one important area of the field. Chapter 1 discusses scattering in polymer systems with liquid crystalline order. It also introduces the field of liquid crystals. Chapter 2 treats the origin of liquid crystalline order in macromolecules by describing the in-depth study of conformation of such macromolecules in their unassociated state. The chapters that follow describe successively the liquid crystalli

  6. Epitaxial graphene-encapsulated surface reconstruction of Ge(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gavin P.; Kiraly, Brian; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mannix, Andrew J.; Arnold, Michael S.; Hersam, Mark C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Bedzyk, Michael J.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding and engineering the properties of crystalline surfaces has been critical in achieving functional electronics at the nanoscale. Employing scanning tunneling microscopy, surface x-ray diffraction, and high-resolution x-ray reflectivity experiments, we present a thorough study of epitaxial graphene (EG)/Ge(110) and report a Ge(110) "6 × 2" reconstruction stabilized by the presence of epitaxial graphene unseen in group-IV semiconductor surfaces. X-ray studies reveal that graphene resides atop the surface reconstruction with a 0.34 nm van der Waals (vdW) gap and provides protection from ambient degradation.

  7. Crystalline lens radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Pasquier, D.; Castelain, B.; Lartigau, E.; Warnet, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    During more than a half of century, numerous compounds have been tested in different models against radiation-induced cataract. In this report, we will review the radioprotectors that have been already tested for non-human crystalline lens protection. We will focus on the most important published studies in this topic and the mechanisms of cyto-protection reported in. vitro and in. vivo from animals. The most frequent mechanisms incriminated in the cyto-protective effect are: free radical scavenging, limitation of lipid peroxidation, modulation of cycle progression increase of intracellular reduced glutathione pool, reduction of DNA strand breaks and limitation of apoptotic cell death. Arnifostine (or Ethyol) and anethole dithiolethione (or Sulfarlem), already used clinically as chemo- and radio-protectants, could be further test?r for ocular radioprotection particularly for radiation-induced cataract. (author)

  8. Eco-friendly (green) synthesis of magnetically active gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadasala, Naveen Reddy; Lin, Lu; Gilpin, Christopher; Wei, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Au-FexOy composite nanoparticles (NPs) are of great technological interest due to their combined optical and magnetic properties. However, typical syntheses are neither simple nor ecologically friendly, creating a challenging situation for process scale-up. Here we describe conditions for preparing Au-FexOy NPs in aqueous solutions and at ambient temperatures, without resorting to solvents or amphiphilic surfactants with poor sustainability profiles. These magnetic gold nanoclusters (MGNCs) are prepared in practical yields with average sizes slightly below 100 nm, and surface plasmon resonances that extend to near-infrared wavelengths, and sufficient magnetic moment (up to 6 emu g-1) to permit collection within minutes by handheld magnets. The MGNCs also produce significant photoluminescence when excited at 488 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicates a relatively even distribution of Fe within the MGNCs, as opposed to a central magnetic core.

  9. Gold Nanocluster-Mediated Cellular Death under Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Rius, Anna; Ivask, Angela; Das, Shreya; Penya-Auladell, Nuria; Fabregas, Laura; Fletcher, Nicholas L; Houston, Zachary H; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2017-11-29

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have become a promising nanomaterial for cancer therapy because of their biocompatibility and fluorescent properties. In this study, the effect of ultrasmall protein-stabilized 2 nm Au NCs on six types of mammalian cells (fibroblasts, B-lymphocytes, glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, and two types of prostate cancer cells) under electromagnetic radiation is investigated. Cellular association of Au NCs in vitro is concentration-dependent, and Au NCs have low intrinsic toxicity. However, when Au NC-incubated cells are exposed to a 1 GHz electromagnetic field (microwave radiation), cell viability significantly decreases, thus demonstrating that Au NCs exhibit specific microwave-dependent cytotoxicity, likely resulting from localized heating. Upon i.v. injection in mice, Au NCs are still present at 24 h post administration. Considering the specific microwave-dependent cytotoxicity and low intrinsic toxicity, our work suggests the potential of Au NCs as effective and safe nanomedicines for cancer therapy.

  10. Exploring Low Internal Reorganization Energies for Silicene Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablo-Pedro, Ricardo; Lopez-Rios, Hector; Mendoza-Cortes, Jose-L.; Kong, Jing; Fomine, Serguei; Van Voorhis, Troy; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. High-performance materials rely on small reorganization energies to facilitate both charge separation and charge transport. Here, we perform density-functional-theory calculations to predict small reorganization energies of rectangular silicene nanoclusters with hydrogen-passivated edges denoted by H-SiNC. We observe that across all geometries, H-SiNCs feature large electron affinities and highly stabilized anionic states, indicating their potential as n -type materials. Our findings suggest that fine-tuning the size of H-SiNCs along the "zigzag" and "armchair" directions may permit the design of novel n -type electronic materials and spintronics devices that incorporate both high electron affinities and very low internal reorganization energies.

  11. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin, E-mail: shuxlin@buaa.edu.cn; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-15

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  12. Electrically driven light emission from an array of Si nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzitello, K I; Martin, H O; Aldao, C M; Roman, H E

    2004-01-01

    Charge transport and light emission properties of an array of silicon nanoclusters (NCs), sandwiched between a p-type and an n-type doped silicon crystal, are studied theoretically by assuming that electrons and holes enter from the opposite sides of the array in response to an applied electric field. The size of the NCs considered ranges from 16 nm down to 3.6 nm and their spatial distribution is optimized so that light emission, resulting from radiative recombinations, is peaked in the visible red around 1.8 eV. The light emission efficiency is limited by the carrier hopping times and is found to be in the range 2-0.5%, for fields ranging from 100 kV cm -1 to 500 kV cm -1 , respectively

  13. Melting of Cu nanoclusters by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yanning; Bian, Xiufang; Chen, Ying

    2003-04-14

    We present a detailed molecular dynamics study of the melting of copper nanoclusters with up to 8628 atoms within the framework of the embedded-atom method. The finding indicates that there exists an intermediate nanocrystal regime above 456 atoms. The linear relation between the cluster size and its thermodynamics properties is obeyed in this regime. Melting first occurs at the surface of the clusters, leading to T{sub m,N}=T{sub m,Bulk}-{alpha}N{sup -1/3}, dropping from T{sub m,Bulk}=1360 K to T{sub m,456}=990 K. In addition, the size, surface energy as well as the root mean square displacement (RMSD) of the clusters in the intermediate regime have been investigated.

  14. Exploring Low Internal Reorganization Energies for Silicene Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Pablo-Pedro, Ricardo

    2017-08-17

    High-performance materials rely on small reorganization energies to facilitate both charge separation and charge transport. Here, we performed DFT calculations to predict small reorganization energies of rectangular silicene nanoclusters with hydrogen-passivated edges denoted by H-SiNC. We observe that across all geometries, H-SiNCs feature large electron affinities and highly stabilized anionic states, indicating their potential as n-type materials. Our findings suggest that fine-tuning the size of H-SiNCs along the zigzag and armchair directions may permit the design of novel n-type electronic materials and spinctronics devices that incorporate both high electron affinities and very low internal reorganization energies.

  15. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  16. Connections Between Theory and Experiment for Gold and Silver Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawardene, K. L. Dimuthu M.; Häkkinen, Hannu; Aikens, Christine M.

    2018-04-01

    Ligand-stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles are of tremendous current interest in sensing, catalysis, and energy applications. Experimental and theoretical studies have closely interacted to elucidate properties such as the geometric and electronic structures of these fascinating systems. In this review, the interplay between theory and experiment is described; areas such as optical absorption and doping, where the theory-experiment connections are well established, are discussed in detail; and the current status of these connections in newer fields of study, such as luminescence, transient absorption, and the effects of solvent and the surrounding environment, are highlighted. Close communication between theory and experiment has been extremely valuable for developing an understanding of these nanocluster systems in the past decade and will undoubtedly continue to play a major role in future years.

  17. Critical sizes and critical characteristics of nanoclusters, nanostructures and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzdalev, I.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Critical sizes and characteristics of nanoclusters and nanostructures are introduced as the parameters of nanosystems and nanomaterials. The next critical characteristics are considered: atomic and electronic 'magic number', critical size of cluster nucleation, critical size of melting-freezing of cluster, critical size of quantum (laser) radiation, critical sizes for the single electron conductivity, critical energy and magnetic field for the magnetic tunneling, critical cluster sizes for the giant magnetic resistance, critical size of the first order magnetic phase transition. The critical characteristics are estimated by thermodynamic approaches, by Moessbauer spectroscopy, AFM, heat capacity, SQUID magnetometry and other technique, The influence of cluster-cluster interactions, cluster-matrix interactions and cluster defects on cluster atomic dynamics, cluster melting, cluster critical sizes, Curie or Neel points and the character of magnetic phase transitions were investigated. The applications of critical size and critical characteristic parameters for the nanomaterial characterization are considered

  18. Modeling the photosensitizing properties of thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarias, Cloé; Adamo, Carlo; Perrier, Aurélie

    2016-03-21

    An accurate computational strategy for studying the structural, redox and optical properties of thiolated gold nanoclusters (GNCs) using (Time-Dependent) Density Functional Theory is proposed. The influence of the pseudopotential/basis set, solvent description and the choice of the functional has been investigated to model the structural and electronic properties of the Au25(SR)18(-) system, with R being an organic ligand. This study aims to describe with a comparable precision both the GNC and the organic ligands and rationalize the effect of coating on different GNC properties. Two differently coated GNCs have been considered: the system with R = CH2CH2Ph and the GNC coated with 17 alkyl chains (C6H13) and functionalized by one fluorophore pyrene derivative (CH2CH2(NH)(CO)Py). The computational protocol we propose should then be used to design more efficient metal cluster-sensitized solar cells.

  19. Groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmqvist, K.

    1990-06-01

    The aim of this project was to make detailed descriptions of the geological conditions and the different kinds of leakage in some tunnels in Sweden, to be able to describe the presence of ground water in crystalline bedrock. The studies were carried out in TBM tunnels as well as in conventionally drilled and blasted tunnels. Thanks to this, it has been possible to compare the pattern and appearance of ground water leakage in TBM tunnels and in blasted tunnels. On the basis of some experiments in a TBM tunnel, it has been confirmed that a detailed mapping of leakage gives a good picture of the flow paths and their aquiferous qualities in the bedrock. The same picture is found to apply even in cautious blasted tunnels. It is shown that the ground water flow paths in crystalline bedrock are usually restricted to small channels along only small parts of the fractures. This is also true for fracture zones. It has also been found that the number of flow paths generally increases with the degree of tectonisation, up to a given point. With further tectonisation the bedrock is more or less crushed which, along with mineral alteration, leaves only a little space left for the formation of water channels. The largest individual flow paths are usually found in fracture zones. The total amount of ground water leakage per m tunnel is also greater in fracture zones than in the bedrock between the fracture zones. In mapping visible leakage, five classes have been distinguished according to size. Where possible, the individual leak inflow has been measured during the mapping process. The quantification of the leakage classes made in different tunnels are compared, and some quantification standards suggested. A comparison of leakage in different rock types, tectonic zones, fractures etc is also presented. (author)

  20. Antimony segregation in Ge and formation of n-type selectively doped Ge films in molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurasov, D. V., E-mail: Inquisitor@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Antonov, A. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Schmagin, V. B.; Novikov, A. V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, GSP-105, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Spirin, K. E. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, GSP-105, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-14

    Antimony segregation in Ge(001) films grown by molecular beam epitaxy was studied. A quantitative dependence of the Sb segregation ratio in Ge on growth temperature was revealed experimentally and modeled theoretically taking into account both the terrace-mediated and step-edge-mediated segregation mechanisms. A nearly 5-orders-of-magnitude increase in the Sb segregation ratio in a relatively small temperature range of 180–350 °C was obtained, which allowed to form Ge:Sb doped layers with abrupt boundaries and high crystalline quality using the temperature switching method that was proposed earlier for Si-based structures. This technique was employed for fabrication of different kinds of n-type Ge structures which can be useful for practical applications like heavily doped n{sup +}-Ge films or δ-doped layers. Estimation of the doping profiles sharpness yielded the values of 2–5 nm per decade for the concentration gradient at the leading edge and 2–3 nm for the full-width-half-maximum of the Ge:Sb δ-layers. Electrical characterization of grown Ge:Sb structures revealed nearly full electrical activation of Sb atoms and the two-dimensional nature of charge carrier transport in δ-layers.

  1. Single ferromagnetic fluctuations in UCoGe revealed by 73Ge- and 59Co-NMR studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji; Aoki, Dai

    2018-02-01

    73Ge and 59Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements have been performed on a 73Ge-enriched single-crystalline sample of the ferromagnetic superconductor UCoGe in the paramagnetic state. The 73Ge NQR parameters deduced from NQR and NMR are close to those of another isostructural ferromagnetic superconductor URhGe. The Knight shifts of the Ge and Co sites are well scaled to each other when the magnetic field is parallel to the b or c axis. The hyperfine coupling constants of Ge are estimated to be close to those of Co. The large difference of spin susceptibilities between the a and b axes could lead to the different response of the superconductivity and ferromagnetism with the field parallel to these directions. The temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 at the two sites is similar to each other above 5 K. These results indicate that the itinerant U-5 f electrons are responsible for the ferromagnetism in this compound, consistent with previous studies. The similarities and differences in the three ferromagnetic superconductors are discussed.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattices: Toward artificial B20 skyrmion materials with tunable interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Esser, Bryan D.; Rowland, James; McComb, David W.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-06-01

    Skyrmions are localized magnetic spin textures whose stability has been shown theoretically to depend on material parameters including bulk Dresselhaus spin orbit coupling (SOC), interfacial Rashba SOC, and magnetic anisotropy. Here, we establish the growth of a new class of artificial skyrmion materials, namely B20 superlattices, where these parameters could be systematically tuned. Specifically, we report the successful growth of B20 superlattices comprised of single crystal thin films of FeGe, MnGe, and CrGe on Si(1 1 1) substrates. Thin films and superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are characterized through a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) distinguishes layers by elemental mapping and indicates good interface quality with relatively low levels of intermixing in the [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattice. This demonstration of epitaxial, single-crystalline B20 superlattices is a significant advance toward tunable skyrmion systems for fundamental scientific studies and applications in magnetic storage and logic.

  3. Electrical transport properties in Co nanocluster-assembled granular film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin-Fu; Wang, Lai-Sen; Wang, Xiong-Zhi; Zheng, Hong-Fei; Liu, Xiang; Xie, Jia; Qiu, Yu-Long; Chen, Yuanzhi; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2017-03-01

    A Co nanocluster-assembled granular film with three-dimensional cross-connection paralleled conductive paths was fabricated by using the plasma-gas-condensation method in a vacuum environment. The temperature-dependent longitudinal resistivity and anomalous Hall effect of this new type granular film were systematically studied. The longitudinal resistivity of the Co nanocluster-assembled granular film first decreased and then increased with increasing measuring temperature, revealing a minimum value at certain temperature, T min . In a low temperature region ( T governed the electrical transport process, and the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) showed an insulator-type behavior. The thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction progressively increased with increasing temperature, which led to a decrease in the longitudinal resistivity. In a high temperature region, the TCR showed a metallic-type behavior, which was primarily attributed to the temperature-dependent scattering. Different from the longitudinal resistivity behavior, the saturated anomalous Hall resistivity increased monotonically with increasing measuring temperature. The value of the anomalous Hall coefficient ( R S ) reached 2.3 × 10-9 (Ω cm)/G at 300 K, which was about three orders of magnitude larger than previously reported in blocky single-crystal Co [E. N. Kondorskii, Sov. Phys. JETP 38, 977 (1974)]. Interestingly, the scaling relation ( ρx y A ∝ ρx x γ ) between saturated anomalous Hall resistivity ( ρx y A ) and longitudinal resistivity ( ρ x x ) was divided into two regions by T min . However, after excluding the contribution of tunneling, the scaling relation followed the same rule. The corresponding physical mechanism was also proposed to explain these phenomena.

  4. Epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, Karthick

    2013-07-30

    Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials are considered as a prime candidate for optical and electrical data storage applications. With the application of an optical or electrical pulse, they can be reversibly switched between amorphous and crystalline state, thereby exhibiting large optical and electrical contrast between the two phases, which are then stored as information in the form of binary digits. Single crystalline growth is interesting from both the academic and industrial perspective, as ordered Ge-Sb-Te based metamaterials are known to exhibit switching at reduced energies. The present study deals with the epitaxial growth and analysis of Ge-Sb-Te based thin films. The first part of the thesis deals with the epitaxial growth of GeTe. Thin films of GeTe were grown on highly mismatched Si(111) and (001) substrates. On both the substrate orientations the film grows along [111] direction with an amorphous-to-crystalline transition observed during the initial stages of growth. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was studied in-vivo using azimuthal reflection high-energy electron diffraction scans and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. In the second part of the thesis epitaxy and characterization of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films are presented. The third part of the thesis deals with the epitaxy of ternary Ge-Sb-Te alloys. The composition of the films are shown to be highly dependent on growth temperatures and vary along the pseudobinary line from Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} to GeTe with increase in growth temperatures. A line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to reliably control the GeSbTe growth temperature. Growth was performed at different Ge, Sb, Te fluxes to study the compositional variation of the films. Incommensurate peaks are observed along the [111] direction by X-ray diffraction. The possibility of superstructural vacancy ordering along the [111] direction is discussed.

  5. Epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perumal, Karthick

    2013-01-01

    Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials are considered as a prime candidate for optical and electrical data storage applications. With the application of an optical or electrical pulse, they can be reversibly switched between amorphous and crystalline state, thereby exhibiting large optical and electrical contrast between the two phases, which are then stored as information in the form of binary digits. Single crystalline growth is interesting from both the academic and industrial perspective, as ordered Ge-Sb-Te based metamaterials are known to exhibit switching at reduced energies. The present study deals with the epitaxial growth and analysis of Ge-Sb-Te based thin films. The first part of the thesis deals with the epitaxial growth of GeTe. Thin films of GeTe were grown on highly mismatched Si(111) and (001) substrates. On both the substrate orientations the film grows along [111] direction with an amorphous-to-crystalline transition observed during the initial stages of growth. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was studied in-vivo using azimuthal reflection high-energy electron diffraction scans and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. In the second part of the thesis epitaxy and characterization of Sb 2 Te 3 thin films are presented. The third part of the thesis deals with the epitaxy of ternary Ge-Sb-Te alloys. The composition of the films are shown to be highly dependent on growth temperatures and vary along the pseudobinary line from Sb 2 Te 3 to GeTe with increase in growth temperatures. A line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to reliably control the GeSbTe growth temperature. Growth was performed at different Ge, Sb, Te fluxes to study the compositional variation of the films. Incommensurate peaks are observed along the [111] direction by X-ray diffraction. The possibility of superstructural vacancy ordering along the [111] direction is discussed.

  6. Electrical transport properties in Fe-Cr nanocluster-assembled granular films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong-Zhi; Wang, Lai-Sen; Zhang, Qin-Fu; Liu, Xiang; Xie, Jia; Su, A.-Mei; Zheng, Hong-Fei; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2017-09-01

    The Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films with Cr atomic fraction (x) ranging from 0 to 100 were fabricated by using a plasma-gas-condensation cluster deposition system. The TEM characterization revealed that the uniform Fe clusters were coated with a Cr layer to form a Fe-Cr core-shell structure. Then, the as-prepared Fe100-xCrx nanoclusters were randomly assembled into a granular film in vacuum environments with increasing the deposition time. Because of the competition between interfacial resistance and shunting effect of Cr layer, the room temperature resistivity of the Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films first increased and then decreased with increasing the Cr atomic fraction (x), and revealed a maximum of 2 × 104 μΩ cm at x = 26 at.%. The temperature-dependent longitudinal resistivity (ρxx), magnetoresistance (MR) effect and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) of these Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films were also studied systematically. As the x increased from 0 to 100, the ρxx of all samples firstly decreased and then increased with increasing the measuring temperature. The dependence of ρxx on temperature could be well addressed by a mechanism incorporated for the fluctuation-induced-tunneling (FIT) conduction process and temperature-dependent scattering effect. It was found that the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) had no legible scaling relation in Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films. However, after deducting the contribution of tunneling effect, the scaling relation was unambiguous. Additionally, the Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films revealed a small negative magnetoresistance (MR), which decreased with the increase of x. The detailed physical mechanism of the electrical transport properties in these Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films was also studied.

  7. Crystalline Bioceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A strong interest in the use of ceramics for biomedical engineering applications developed in the late 1960´s. Used initially as alternatives to metallic materials in order to increase the biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics; bioactive or surface reactive bioceramics and bioresorbable ceramics. This review will only refer to bioceramics “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials constituted for nonmetallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidated by thermal treatments of powders to high temperatures. Leaving bioglasses, glass-ceramics and biocements apart, since, although all of them are obtained by thermal treatments to high temperatures, the first are amorphous, the second are obtained by desvitrification of a glass and in them vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases and the third are consolidated by means of a hydraulic or chemical reaction to room temperature. A review of the composition, physiochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of crystalline bioceramics is given, based on the literature data and on the own experience of the authors.

    A finales de los años sesenta se despertó un gran interés por el uso de los materiales cerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. Inicialmente utilizados como una alternativa a los materiales metálicos, con el propósito de incrementar la biocompatibilidad de los implantes, las biocerámicas se han convertido en una clase diversa de biomateriales, incluyendo actualmente tres tipos: cerámicas cuasi inertes; cerámicas bioactivas o reactivas superficialmente y cerámicas reabsorbibles o biodegradables. En la presente revisión se hace referencia a las biocerámicas en sentido estricto, es decir, a aquellos materiales constitutitos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados

  8. Synthesis of biocompatible AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters and their applications in photocatalysis and mercury detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Shenna; Zhang, Lingyang; Huang, Haowen; Liu, Fengping; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a facile approach for preparation of AuAgS/Ag 2 S nanoclusters was developed. The unique AuAgS/Ag 2 S nanoclusters capped with biomolecules exhibit interesting excellent optical and catalytic properties. The fluorescent AuAgS/Ag 2 S nanoclusters show tunable luminescence depending on the nanocluster size. The apoptosis assay demonstrated that the AuAgS/Ag 2 S nanoclusters showed low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Therefore, the nanoclusters can be used not only as a probe for labeling cells but also for their photocatalytic activity for photodegradation of organic dye. Moreover, a highly selective and sensitive assay for detection of mercury including Hg 2+ and undissociated mercury complexes was developed based on the quenching fluorescent AuAgS/Ag 2 S nanoclusters, which provides a promising approach for determining various forms of Hg in the mercury-based compounds in environment. These unique nanoclusters may have potential applications in biological labeling, sensing mercury, and photodegradation of various organic pollutants in waste water.Graphical Abstract

  9. Optical transitions in Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells with Ge-rich barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, M.; Grilli, E.; Guzzi, M.; Virgilio, M.; Grosso, G.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.; von Känel, H.; Neels, A.

    2008-07-01

    Direct-gap and indirect-gap transitions in strain-compensated Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells with Ge-rich SiGe barriers have been studied by optical transmission spectroscopy and photoluminescence experiments. An sp3d5s∗ tight-binding model has been adopted to interpret the experimental results. Photoluminescence spectra and their comparison with theoretical calculations prove the existence of type-I band alignment in compressively strained Ge quantum wells grown on relaxed Ge-rich SiGe buffers. The high quality of the transmission spectra opens up other perspectives for application of these structures in near-infrared optical modulators.

  10. Room-Temperature Quantum Ballistic Transport in Monolithic Ultrascaled Al-Ge-Al Nanowire Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistani, Masiar; Staudinger, Philipp; Greil, Johannes; Holzbauer, Martin; Detz, Hermann; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2017-08-09

    Conductance quantization at room temperature is a key requirement for the utilizing of ballistic transport for, e.g., high-performance, low-power dissipating transistors operating at the upper limit of "on"-state conductance or multivalued logic gates. So far, studying conductance quantization has been restricted to high-mobility materials at ultralow temperatures and requires sophisticated nanostructure formation techniques and precise lithography for contact formation. Utilizing a thermally induced exchange reaction between single-crystalline Ge nanowires and Al pads, we achieved monolithic Al-Ge-Al NW heterostructures with ultrasmall Ge segments contacted by self-aligned quasi one-dimensional crystalline Al leads. By integration in electrostatically modulated back-gated field-effect transistors, we demonstrate the first experimental observation of room temperature quantum ballistic transport in Ge, favorable for integration in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor platform technology.

  11. Synthesis of indium nanoclusters and formation of thin film contacts on plastic substrates for organic and flexible electronics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Frank F; Bulkowski, Michal; Hsieh, K C

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we described the processes of synthesizing free-standing indium nanoclusters using inverse micelles and microemulsions as well as synthesizing organic-encapsulated indium nanoclusters using alkanethiols as the organic encapsulants. The synthesized organic-encapsulated indium nanoclusters have demonstrated the feasibilities to be used as plastic compatible soft metal contacts for emerging organic devices. The homogeneously distributed indium nanoclusters with sizes of 10-30 nm have been fabricated on a few different plastic substrates. By changing the alkanethiol carbon chain length and the sizes of the indium nanoclusters, the annealing temperature required to form low-resistance indium thin film conductors has been reduced to 80-100 deg. C, which is acceptable for a variety of organic thin films

  12. Self-trapping nature of Tl nanoclusters on the Si(111)-7x7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, C G; Kim, N D; Lee, G; Shin, S Y; Kim, J S; Chung, J W

    2008-01-01

    We have studied properties of thallium (Tl) nanoclusters formed on the Si(111)-7x7 surface at room temperature (RT) by utilizing photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) combined with first principles calculations. Our PES data reveal that the surface states stemming from the Si substrate remain quite inert with Tl adsorption producing no Tl-induced state until saturation at Tl coverage θ=0.21 monolayers. Such a behavior, in sharp contrast with the extremely reactive surface states upon the formation of Na or Li nanoclusters, together with the presence of a unique Tl-induced loss peak in HREELS spectra suggests no strong Si-Tl bonding, and is well understood in terms of gradual filling of Si dangling bonds with increasing θ. Our calculation further indicates the presence of several metastable atomic structures of Tl nanoclusters at RT rapidly transforming from one to another faster than 10 10 flippings per second. We thus conclude that the highly mobile Tl atoms form self-trapped nanoclusters within the attractive basins of the Si substrate at RT with several metastable phases. The mobile and multi-phased nature of Tl nanoclusters not only accounts for all the existing experimental observations available at present, but also provides an example of self-trapping of atoms in a nanometre-scale region

  13. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Au-Ag Alloy Nanoclusters with Controlled Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Sánchez-Ramírez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal solid-solution-like Au-Ag alloy nanoclusters of different compositions were synthesized through citrate reduction of mixed metal ions of low concentrations, without using any other protective or capping agents. Optical absorption of the alloy nanoclusters was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The position of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR absorption band of the nanoclusters could be tuned from 419 nm to 521 nm through the variation of their composition. Considering effective dielectric constant of the alloy, optical absorption spectra for the nanoclusters were calculated using Mie theory, and compared with the experimentally obtained spectra. Theoretically obtained optical spectra well resembled the experimental spectra when the true size distribution of the nanoparticles was considered. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM, high-angle annular dark field (HAADF imaging, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS revealed the true alloy nature of the nanoparticles with nominal composition being preserved. The synthesis technique can be extended to other bimetallic alloy nanoclusters containing Ag.

  14. Formation of functionalized nanoclusters by solvent evaporation and their effect on the physicochemical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Henry A; Giraldo, Luis F; Casanova, Herley

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of silica nanoclusters (SiNC), obtained by a solvent evaporation method and functionalized by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and MPS+octyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) (50/50wt/wt), on the rheological, mechanical and sorption properties of urethane dimethylacrylate (UDMA)/triethylenglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (80/20wt/wt) resins blend. Silica nanoparticles (SiNP) were silanized with MPS or MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) and incorporated in an UDMA-isopropanol mix to produce functionalized silica nanoclusters after evaporating the isopropanol. The effect of functionalized SiNC on resins rheological properties was determined by large and small deformation tests. Mechanical, thermal, sorption and solubility properties were evaluated for composite materials. The UDMA/TEGDMA (80/20wt/wt) resins blend with added SiNC (ca. 350nm) and functionalized with MPS showed a Newtonian flow behavior associated to their spheroidal shape, whereas the resins blend with nanoclusters silanized with MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) (ca. 400nm) showed a shear-thinning behavior due to nanoclusters irregular shape. Composite materials prepared with bare silica nanoclusters showed lower compressive strength than functionalized silica nanoclusters. MPS functionalized nanoclusters showed better mechanical properties but higher water sorption than functionalized nanoclusters with both silane coupling agents, MPS and OTMS. The solvent evaporation method applied to functionalized nanoparticles showed to be an alternative way to the sinterization method for producing nanoclusters, which improved some dental composite mechanical properties and reduced water sorption. The shape of functionalized silica nanoclusters showed to have influence on the rheological properties of SiNC resin suspensions and the mechanical and sorption properties of light cured composites. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SiGe layer thickness effect on the structural and optical properties of well-organized SiGe/SiO2 multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, E. M. F.; Toudert, J.; Rolo, A. G.; Parisini, A.; Leitão, J. P.; Correia, M. R.; Franco, N.; Alves, E.; Chahboun, A.; Martín-Sánchez, J.; Serna, R.; Gomes, M. J. M.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we report on the production of regular (SiGe/SiO2)20 multilayer structures by conventional RF-magnetron sputtering, at 350 °C. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, raman spectroscopy, and x-ray reflectometry measurements revealed that annealing at a temperature of 1000 °C leads to the formation of SiGe nanocrystals between SiO2 thin layers with good multilayer stability. Reducing the nominal SiGe layer thickness (t SiGe) from 3.5-2 nm results in a transition from continuous SiGe crystalline layer (t SiGe ˜ 3.5 nm) to layers consisting of isolated nanocrystals (t SiGe ˜ 2 nm). Namely, in the latter case, the presence of SiGe nanocrystals ˜3-8 nm in size, is observed. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was applied to determine the evolution of the onset in the effective optical absorption, as well as the dielectric function, in SiGe multilayers as a function of the SiGe thickness. A clear blue-shift in the optical absorption is observed for t SiGe ˜ 2 nm multilayer, as a consequence of the presence of isolated nanocrystals. Furthermore, the observed near infrared values of n = 2.8 and k = 1.5 are lower than those of bulk SiGe compounds, suggesting the presence of electronic confinement effects in the nanocrystals. The low temperature (70 K) photoluminescence measurements performed on annealed SiGe/SiO2 nanostructures show an emission band located between 0.7-0.9 eV associated with the development of interface states between the formed nanocrystals and surrounding amorphous matrix.

  16. Nanocrystals and Nanoclusters as Cocatalysts for Photocatalytic Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan

    2016-12-04

    studied for the photocatalytic H2 production in order to explore the synergistic effect of the plasmonic resonance from the Au nanoparticles and pn-junction between Cu2O and TiO2. Additionally, the plasmonic effect of the Au films was also studied and utilized in order to improve the PWS. Secondly, the nanoscaling of cocatalysts was studied in order to improve the efficiency thereof and to reduce the cost of the cocatalyst materials. Moreover, it is sought to explore the quantum size effect on the properties of the cocatalyst and their effect on the photocatalytic reaction. Atomically precise Au and Ni nanoclusters were employed in these studies. Au nanoclusters were studied in relation to the cocatalysts in the photocatalytic water splitting, and Ni nanoclusters were studied in relation to the cocatalysts in the electrocatalytic water oxidation. The results of these studies will provide new insights in relation to the strategy used in order to develop efficient cocatalysts for the purpose of photocatalytic water splitting.

  17. Neutron transmission through crystalline Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Kilany, M.; El-Mesiry, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The neutron transmission through crystalline Fe has been calculated for neutron energies in the range 10 4 < E<10 eV using an additive formula. The formula permits calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-section as a function of temperature and crystalline form. The obtained agreement between the calculated values and available experimental ones justifies the applicability of the used formula. A feasibility study on using poly-crystalline Fe as a cold neutron filter and a large Fe single crystal as a thermal one is given

  18. Anomalous activation of shallow B+ implants in Ge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, B.R.; Darby, B.L.; Rudawski, N.G.

    2011-01-01

    The electrical activation of B+ implantation at 2 keV to doses of 5.0×1013-5.0×1015 cm-2 in crystalline and pre-amorphized Ge following annealing at 400 °C for 1.0 h was studied using micro Hall effect measurements. Preamorphization improved activation for all samples with the samples implanted...... to a dose of 5.0×1015 cm-2 displaying an estimated maximum active B concentration of 4.0×1020 cm-3 as compared to 2.0×1020 cm-3 for the crystalline sample. However, incomplete activation was observed for all samples across the investigated dose range. For the sample implanted to a dose of 5.0×1013 cm -2......, activation values were 7% and 30%, for c-Ge and PA-Ge, respectively. The results suggest the presence of an anomalous clustering phenomenon of shallow B+ implants in Ge. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  19. Dislocation-free Ge Nano-crystals via Pattern Independent Selective Ge Heteroepitaxy on Si Nano-Tip Wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Capellini, Giovanni; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Niermann, Tore; Zaumseil, Peter; Katzer, Jens; Krause, Hans-Michael; Skibitzki, Oliver; Lehmann, Michael; Xie, Ya-Hong; von Känel, Hans; Schroeder, Thomas

    2016-03-04

    The integration of dislocation-free Ge nano-islands was realized via selective molecular beam epitaxy on Si nano-tip patterned substrates. The Si-tip wafers feature a rectangular array of nanometer sized Si tips with (001) facet exposed among a SiO2 matrix. These wafers were fabricated by complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible nanotechnology. Calculations based on nucleation theory predict that the selective growth occurs close to thermodynamic equilibrium, where condensation of Ge adatoms on SiO2 is disfavored due to the extremely short re-evaporation time and diffusion length. The growth selectivity is ensured by the desorption-limited growth regime leading to the observed pattern independence, i.e. the absence of loading effect commonly encountered in chemical vapor deposition. The growth condition of high temperature and low deposition rate is responsible for the observed high crystalline quality of the Ge islands which is also associated with negligible Si-Ge intermixing owing to geometric hindrance by the Si nano-tip approach. Single island as well as area-averaged characterization methods demonstrate that Ge islands are dislocation-free and heteroepitaxial strain is fully relaxed. Such well-ordered high quality Ge islands present a step towards the achievement of materials suitable for optical applications.

  20. Charge Carrier Dynamics at Silver Nanocluster-Molecular Acceptor Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Almansaf, Abdulkhaleq

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental understanding of interfacial charge transfer at donor-acceptor interfaces is very crucial as it is considered among the most important dynamical processes for optimizing performance in many light harvesting systems, including photovoltaics and photo-catalysis. In general, the photo-generated singlet excitons in photoactive materials exhibit very short lifetimes because of their dipole-allowed spin radiative decay and short diffusion lengths. In contrast, the radiative decay of triplet excitons is dipole forbidden; therefore, their lifetimes are considerably longer. The discussion in this thesis primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in charge separation (CS), charge transfer (CT), intersystem crossing (ISC) rate, triplet state lifetime, and carrier recombination (CR) at silver nanocluster (NCs) molecular-acceptors interfaces. A combination of steady-state and femto- and nanosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopies were used to investigate the charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Additionally, this thesis was prolonged to investigate some important factors that influence the charge carrier dynamics in Ag29 silver NCs donor-acceptor systems, such as the metal doping and chemical structure of the nanocluster and molecular acceptors. Interestingly, clear correlations between the steady-state measurements and timeresolved spectroscopy results are found. In the first study, we have investigated the interfacial charge transfer dynamics in positively charged meso units of 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra (1- methyl-4-pyridino)-porphyrin tetra (p-toluene sulfonate) (TMPyP) and neutral charged 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra (4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TPyP), with negatively charged undoped and gold (Au)- doped silver Ag29 NCs. Moreover, this study showed the impact of Au doping on the charge carrier dynamics of the system. In the second study, we have investigated the interfacial charge transfer dynamics in [Pt2 Ag23 Cl7 (PPh3

  1. Photoemission Studies of Si Quantum Dots with Ge Core: Dots formation, Intermixing at Si-clad/Ge-core interface and Quantum Confinement Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Darma

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Spherical Si nanocrystallites with Ge core (~20nm in average dot diameter have been prepared by controlling selective growth conditions of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD on ultrathin SiO2 using alternately pure SiH4 and 5% GeH4 diluted with He. XPS results confirm the highly selective growth of Ge on the pregrown Si dots and subsequently complete coverage by Si selective growth on Ge/Si dots. Compositional mixing and the crystallinity of Si dots with Ge core as a function of annealing temperature in the range of 550-800oC has been evaluated by XPS analysis and confirms the diffusion of Ge atoms from Ge core towards the Si clad accompanied by formation of GeOx at the Si clad surface. The first subband energy at the valence band of Si dot with Ge core has been measured as an energy shift at the top of the valence band density of state using XPS. The systematic shift of the valence band maximum towards higher binding energy with progressive deposition in the dot formation indicate the charging effect of dots and SiO2 layer by photoemission during measurements.

  2. Formation and growth of embedded indium nanoclusters by In2+ implantation in silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhana Raman, P.; Nair, K.G.M.; Kesavamoorthy, R.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Dhara, S.; Ravichandran, V.

    2007-01-01

    Indium nanoclusters are synthesized in an amorphous silica matrix using an ion-implantation technique. Indium ions (In 2+ ) with energy of 890 keV are implanted on silica to fluences in the range of 3 x 10 16 -3 x 10 17 cm -2 . The formation of indium nanoclusters is confirmed by optical absorption spectrometry and glancing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. A low frequency Raman scattering technique is used to study the growth of embedded indium nanoclusters in the silica matrix as a function of fluence and post-implantation annealing duration. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry studies show the surface segregation of implanted indium. Photoluminescence studies indicate the formation of a small quantity of indium oxide phase in the ion-implanted samples. (orig.)

  3. Cluster-to-cluster transformation among Au6, Au8 and Au11 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiuqing; Fu, Junhong; Lin, Xinzhang; Fu, Xuemei; Yan, Jinghui; Wu, Ren'an; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jiahui

    2018-05-22

    We present the cluster-to-cluster transformations among three gold nanoclusters, [Au6(dppp)4]2+ (Au6), [Au8(dppp)4Cl2]2+ (Au8) and [Au11(dppp)5]3+ (Au11). The conversion process follows a rule that states that the transformation of a small cluster to a large cluster is achieved through an oxidation process with an oxidizing agent (H2O2) or with heating, while the conversion of a large cluster to a small one occurs through a reduction process with a reducing agent (NaBH4). All the reactions were monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy and ESI-MS. This work may provide an alternative approach to the synthesis of novel gold nanoclusters and a further understanding of the structural transformation relationship of gold nanoclusters.

  4. Extension of the radiative lifetime of Wannier-Mott excitons in semiconductor nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to calculate the radiative lifetime of Wannier-Mott excitons in three-dimensional potential wells formed of direct-gap narrow-gap semiconductor nanoclusters in wide-gap semiconductors and assumed to be large compared to the exciton radius. Calculations are carried out for the InAs/GaAs heterosystem. It is shown that, as the nanocluster dimensions are reduced to values on the order of the exciton radius, the exciton radiative lifetime becomes several times longer compared to that in a homogeneous semiconductor. The increase in the radiative lifetime is more pronounced at low temperatures. Thus, it is established that the placement of Wannier-Mott excitons into direct-gap semiconductor nanoclusters, whose dimensions are of the order of the exciton radius, can be used for considerable extension of the exciton radiative lifetime

  5. XAFS studies of monodisperse Au nanoclusters formation in the etching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lina; Huang, Ting; Liu, Wei; Bao, Jie; Huang, Yuanyuan; Cao, Yuanjie; Yao, Tao; Sun, Zhihu; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the formation mechanism of gold nanoclusters is essential to the development of their synthetic chemistry. Here, by using x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, UV-Vis and MS spectra, the formation process of monodisperse Au 13 nanoclusters is investigated. We find that a critical step involving the formation of smaller Au 8 -Au 11 metastable intermediate clusters induced by the HCl + HSR etching of the polydisperse Au n precursor clusters occurs firstly. Then these intermediate species undergo a size-growth to Au 13 cores, followed by a slow structure rearrangement to reach the final stable structure. This work enriches the understanding of cluster formation chemistry and may guide the way towards the design and the controllable synthesis of nanoclusters. (paper)

  6. Synthesis of hydrophobic gold nanoclusters: growth mechanism study, luminescence property and catalytic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvam, Tamil Selvi; Chi, Kai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    One-pot synthesis of well dispersed, size-controlled gold nanoparticles with the average size of 10–15 nm and luminescent gold nanoclusters with average size of 1.7–2.0 nm were successfully achieved by thermal decomposition of gold organometallic precursor CH 3 AuPPh 3 in the presence of thiol surfactants in o-xylene. Only difference between the preparations of two types of Au nanoparticles is the amount of thiol surfactant employed. The mechanistic study of formation of gold nanoparticles was carried out by analyzing the samples at different reaction time intervals and revealed that two-staged growth process was involved. The nanoclusters showed strong red emission with the maximum intensity at about 600 nm. The maximum room temperature photoluminescence quantum yield was measured as 1.2%. The catalytic ability of the Au nanoclusters to promote Suzuki–Miyaura coupling involving the C–C bond formation was also investigated.

  7. Nanocluster metal films as thermoelectric material for radioisotope mini battery unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisyuk, P.V.; Krasavin, A.V.; Tkalya, E.V.; Lebedinskii, Yu.Yu.; Vasiliev, O.S.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Kozlova, T.I.; Fetisov, V.V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to studying the thermoelectric and structural properties of films based on metal nanoclusters (Au, Pd, Pt). The experimental results of the study of single nanoclusters’ tunneling conductance obtained with scanning tunneling spectroscopy are presented. The obtained data allowed us to evaluate the thermoelectric power of thin film consisting of densely packed individual nanoclusters. It is shown that such thin films can operate as highly efficient thermoelectric materials. A scheme of miniature thermoelectric radioisotope power source based on the thorium-228 isotope is proposed. The efficiency of the radioisotope battery using thermoelectric converters based on nanocluster metal films is shown to reach values up to 1.3%. The estimated characteristics of the device are comparable with the parameters of up-to-date radioisotope batteries based on nickel-63.

  8. Electrical isolation of dislocations in Ge layers on Si(001 substrates through CMOS-compatible suspended structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Ajit Shah, Maksym Myronov, Chalermwat Wongwanitwatana, Lewis Bawden, Martin J Prest, James S Richardson-Bullock, Stephen Rhead, Evan H C Parker, Terrance E Whall and David R Leadley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended crystalline Ge semiconductor structures are created on a Si(001 substrate by a combination of epitaxial growth and simple patterning from the front surface using anisotropic underetching. Geometric definition of the surface Ge layer gives access to a range of crystalline planes that have different etch resistance. The structures are aligned to avoid etch-resistive planes in making the suspended regions and to take advantage of these planes to retain the underlying Si to support the structures. The technique is demonstrated by forming suspended microwires, spiderwebs and van der Pauw cross structures. We finally report on the low-temperature electrical isolation of the undoped Ge layers. This novel isolation method increases the Ge resistivity to 280 Ω cm at 10 K, over two orders of magnitude above that of a bulk Ge on Si(001 layer, by removing material containing the underlying misfit dislocation network that otherwise provides the main source of electrical conduction.

  9. Energy levels of germanium, Ge I through Ge XXXII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugar, J.; Musgrove, A.

    1993-01-01

    Atomic energy levels of germanium have been compiled for all stages of ionization for which experimental data are available. No data have yet been published for Ge VIII through Ge XIII and Ge XXXII. Very accurate calculated values are compiled for Ge XXXI and XXXII. Experimental g-factors and leading percentages from calculated eigenvectors of levels are given. A value for the ionization energy, either experimental when available or theoretical, is included for the neutral atom and each ion. section

  10. Control of Ge1-x-ySixSny layer lattice constant for energy band alignment in Ge1-xSnx/Ge1-x-ySixSny heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Kurosawa, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2017-10-01

    The energy band alignment of Ge1-xSnx/Ge1-x-ySixSny heterostructures was investigated, and control of the valence band offset at the Ge1-xSnx/Ge1-x-ySixSny heterointerface was achieved by controlling the Si and Sn contents in the Ge1-x-ySixSny layer. The valence band offset in the Ge0.902Sn0.098/Ge0.41Si0.50Sn0.09 heterostructure was evaluated to be as high as 330 meV, and its conduction band offset was estimated to be 150 meV by considering the energy bandgap calculated from the theoretical prediction. In addition, the formation of the strain-relaxed Ge1-x-ySixSny layer was examined and the crystalline structure was characterized. The epitaxial growth of a strain-relaxed Ge0.64Si0.21Sn0.15 layer with the degree of strain relaxation of 55% was examined using a virtual Ge substrate. Moreover, enhancement of the strain relaxation was demonstrated by post-deposition annealing, where a degree of strain relaxation of 70% was achieved after annealing at 400 °C. These results indicate the possibility for enhancing the indirect-direct crossover with a strained and high-Sn-content Ge1-xSnx layer on a strain-relaxed Ge1-x-ySixSny layer, realizing preferable carrier confinement by type-I energy band alignment with high conduction and valence band offsets.

  11. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  12. Fluorescent silver nanoclusters for ultrasensitive determination of chromium(VI) in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian Rong; Zeng, Ai Lian; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fluorescent Ag nanoclusters were first applied to Cr(VI) detection. • The proposed method is simple, rapid, and environmentally friendly. • The sensor shows a wide linear range, low detection limit, and good selectivity. • The system can also be used for the indirect assay of total chromium and Cr(III). • The analyses in real water samples are satisfactory. - Abstract: In this work, a simple and sensitive Cr(VI) sensor is proposed based on fluorescent polyethyleneimine-stabilized Ag nanoclusters, which allows the determination over a wide concentration range of 0.1 nM–3.0 μM and with a detection limit as low as 0.04 nΜ and a good selectivity. The quenching mechanism was discussed in terms of the absorption and fluorescence spectra, suggesting that Cr(VI) is connected to Ag nanoclusters by hydrogen bond between the oxygen atom at the vertex of tetrahedron structure of Cr(VI) and the amino nitrogen of polyethyleneimine that surrounded Ag nanoclusters and electron transfer from Ag nanoclusters to highly electron-deficient Cr(VI) results in fluorescence quenching. Despite the failure to quench the fluorescence efficiently, Cr(III) can also be measured using the proposed Ag nanoclusters by being oxidized to Cr(VI) in alkaline solution (pH ∼9) containing H 2 O 2 . Therefore, our approach could be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution. In addition, Cr(VI) analysis in real water samples were satisfactory, indicating this method could be practically promising for chromium measurements.

  13. HP Ge planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornov, M.G.; Gurov, Yu.B.; Soldatov, A.M.; Osipenko, B.P.; Yurkowski, J.; Podkopaev, O.I.

    1989-01-01

    Parameters of planar detectors manufactured of HP Ge are presented. The possibilities to use multilayer spectrometers on the base of such semiconductor detectors for nuclear physics experiments are discussed. It is shown that the obtained detectors including high square ones have spectrometrical characteristics close to limiting possible values. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B+-implants in Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S.; Petersen, D. H.; Hansen, O.; Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F.; Romano, L.; Doyle, B. L.; Kontos, A.

    2012-01-01

    The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B + implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B + implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B + implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 × 10 13 to 5.0 × 10 15 cm −2 was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400–600 °C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 °C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H + beam by utilizing the 11 B(p, α)2α nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 °C.

  15. Bulky Counterions: Enhancing the Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence of Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorelle, Franck; Moulin, Christophe; Soleilhac, Antonin; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Dugourd, Philippe; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Brevet, Pierre-François; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-01-19

    Increasing fluorescence quantum yields of ligand-protected gold nanoclusters has attracted wide research interest. The strategy consisting in using bulky counterions has been found to dramatically enhance the fluorescence. In this Communication, we push forward this concept to the nonlinear optical regime. We show that by an appropriate choice of bulky counterions and of solvent, a 30-fold increase in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal at ≈600 nm for gold nanoclusters can be obtained. This would correspond to a TPEF cross-section in the range of 0.1 to 1 GM. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Polarization memory of white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in glass host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A S; Tikhomirov, V K; Moshchalkov, V V

    2012-09-10

    A mechanism for white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in oxyfluoride glass host has been revealed by studying a temperature dependence of its polarization memory. The spectral dependence of the polarization memory indicates the presence of a variety of Ag nanoclusters, particularly emitting in the blue, green and red. Temperature activated intercluster energy transfer has been found responsible for white luminescence. The means for increasing luminescence quantum yield have been suggested. This efficient white luminescence may be used in highly demanded devices, such as luminescent lamps, displays, color phosphors for LEDs, photovoltaic devices based on down shifting of solar spectrum.

  17. Absorption Spectra of CuGaSe2 and CuInSe2 Semiconducting Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2015-10-01

    The structural and optical properties of the chalcopyrite CunGanSe2n and CunInnSe2n nanoclusters (n = 2, 4, 6, and 8) are investigated as a function of the size using a combination of basin-hopping global optimization and time-dependent density functional theory. Although the lowest energy structures are found to show almost random geometries, the band gaps and absorption spectra still are subject to systematic blue shifts for decreasing cluster size in the case of CunGanSe2n, indicating strong electron confinement. The applicability of the nanoclusters in photovoltaics is discussed. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  18. Tetrahedral 1B4Sb nanoclusters in GaP:(B, Sb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elyukhin, V A, E-mail: elyukhin@cinvestav.m [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica-SEES, CINVESTAV-IPN, Avenida IPN 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C. P. 07360, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Self-assembling conditions of 1B4Sb tetrahedral nanoclusters in GaP doped with boron and Sb isoelectronic impurities are represented in the ultradilute and dilute limits of the boron and Sb contents, respectively. The fulfilled estimates demonstrated the preferential complete or almost complete allocation of boron atoms in 1B4Sb nanoclusters at temperatures of 500 {sup 0}C and 900 {sup 0}C, respectively. The significant decrease of the sum of the free energies of the constituent compounds is the main origin of self-assembling. The reduction of the strain energy is the additional cause of this phenomenon.

  19. Efficient Removal of Arsenic Using Magnetic Multi-Granule Nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungho; Cha, Jinmyung; Sim, Kyunjong; Lee, Jinkyu

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic multi-granule nanoclusters (MGNCs) were investigated as an inexpensive means to effectively remove arsenic from aqueous environment, particularly groundwater sources consumed by humans. Various size MGNCs were examined to determine both their capacity and efficiency for arsenic adsorption for different initial arsenic concentrations. The MGNCs showed highly efficient arsenic adsorption characteristics, thereby meeting the allowable safety limit of 10 μg/L (ppb), prescribed by the World Health Organization (WHO), and confirming that 0.4 g and 0.6 g of MGNCs were sufficient to remove 0.5 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L of arsenate (AsO 4 3- ) from water, respectively. Adsorption isotherm models for the MGNCs were used to estimate the adsorption parameters. They showed similar parameters for both the Langmuir and Sips models, confirming that the adsorption process in this work was active at a region of low arsenic concentration. The actual efficiency of arsenate removal was then tested against 1 L of artificial arsenic-contaminated groundwater with an arsenic concentration of 0.6 mg/L in the presence of competing ions. In this case, only 1.0 g of 100 nm MGNCs was sufficient to reduce the arsenic concentrations to below the WHO permissible safety limit for drinking water, without adjusting the pH or temperature, which is highly advantageous for practical field applications

  20. Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4: A Tetravalent Nanocluster

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulHalim, Lina G.

    2015-06-24

    The bottom-up assembly of nanoparticles into diverse ordered solids is a challenge because it requires nanoparticles, which are often quasi-spherical, to have interaction anisotropy akin to atoms and molecules. Typically, anisotropy has been introduced by changing the shape of the inorganic nanoparticle core. Here, we present the design, self-assembly, optical properties and total structural determination of Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4, an atomically precise tetravalent nanocluster (NC) (BDT: 1,3-benzenedithiols; TPP: triphenylphosphine). It features four unique tetrahedrally symmetrical binding surface sites facilitated by the supramolecular assembly of 12 BDT—wide footprint bidentate thiols—in the ligand shell. When each of these sites was selectively functionalized by a single phosphine ligand, particle stability, synthetic yield and the propensity to self-assemble into macroscopic crystals increased. The solid crystallized NCs have a substantially narrowed optical bandgap compared to that of the solution state, suggesting strong inter-particle electronic coupling occurs in the solid state.

  1. Peculiar features of heat capacity for Cu and Ni nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gafner, S. L.; Redel, L. V.; Gafner, Yu. Ya.; Samsonov, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    The heat capacity of copper and nickel clusters (from 2 to 6 nm in diameter) was investigated in the temperature range 200–800 K using molecular dynamics method and a modified tight-binding potential. The simulation results demonstrate a very good agreement with the available experimental data at T = 200 K and a fairy good agreement at higher temperatures. A number of regular trends are revealed in computer experiments which agree with the corresponding theoretical predictions. A conclusion is made that in the case of single free clusters the heat capacity may exceed the capacity of the corresponding bulk material. It is found that at 200 K, the copper nanocluster (D = 6 nm) heat capacity is higher by 10% and for nickel cluster by 13%. The difference diminishes with increasing the nanoparticles size proportionally to the relative number of surface atoms. A conclusion is made that very high values of the nanostructure heat capacity observed in laboratory experiments should not be attributed to free clusters, i.e., the effect in question is caused by other reasons.

  2. Mercury speciation with fluorescent gold nanocluster as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Yu; Yang, Ting; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ming-Li; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2018-05-11

    Fluorescent nanoparticles are widely used for sensing biologically significant species. However, it is rarely reported for the discrimination or speciation of metal species. In this work, we report for the first time the speciation of mercury (Hg 2+ ) and methylmercury (CH 3 Hg + ) by taking advantage of the fluorescence feature of folic acid-capped gold nanoclusters (FA-AuNCs). FA-Au NCs exhibit an average size of 2.08±0.15 nm and a maximum emission at λ ex /λ em = 280/440 nm with a quantum yield of 27.3%. It is interesting that Hg 2+ causes a significant quench on the fluorescence of FA-Au NCs, whereas CH 3 Hg + leads to a remarkable fluorescence enhancement. Based on this discriminative fluorescent response between Hg 2+ and CH 3 Hg + , a novel nanosensor for the speciation of CH 3 Hg + and Hg 2+ was developed, providing limits of detection (LOD) of 28 nM for Hg 2+ and 25 nM for CH 3 Hg + within 100-1000 nM. This sensing system is highly selective to mercury. Its practical applications were further demonstrated by the analysis of CH 3 Hg + and the speciation of mercury (CH 3 Hg + and Hg 2+ ) in environmental water and fish samples.

  3. Silver Nanoclusters: From Design Principles to Practical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Abdulhalim, Lina G.

    2015-12-08

    A strategy based on reticulating metal ions and organic ligands into atomically precise gold and silver nanoclusters (NCs) with high monodispersity has been advanced to a point that allows the design of NCs with strict stoichiometries, functionalities and valence. Of the Ag NCs discovered, Ag44 is the most studied, not only due to its high absorption that transcends the visible spectrum suitable for photovoltaics but also because of its long excited state lifetime, as revealed by nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A major principle discovered in this dissertation is the ability to produce Ag44 in scalable amounts and with high stability in addition to modulation of the functional groups of the organic ligands via a fast and complete ligand exchange process. This new discovery has led to the development of synthetic designs in which new sizes were obtained by varying the reaction parameters (e.g., ligands functionality, reaction temperature and time), namely, Ag29 using dithiols and phosphines. The synthesized NCs possess tetravalent functionalities that facilitate their crystallization and characterization. Furthermore, Ag29 glows red and is therefore a possible candidate for sensing and imaging applications.

  4. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-09

    The structure and chemical ordering of PtAu nanoclusters of 79, 135, and 201 atoms are studied via a combination of a basin hopping atom-exchange technique (to locate the lowest energy homotops at fixed composition), a symmetry orbit technique (to find the high symmetry isomers), and density functional theory local reoptimization (for determining the most stable homotop). The interatomic interactions between Pt and Au are derived from the empirical Gupta potential. The lowest energy structures show a marked tendency toward PtcoreAushell chemical ordering by enrichment of the more cohesive Pt in the core region and of Au in the shell region. We observe a preferential segregation of Pt atoms to (111) facets and Au atoms to (100) facets of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active sites. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. A strategy to find minimal energy nanocluster structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, José; Varas, Alejandro; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro; Kiwi, Miguel

    2013-11-05

    An unbiased strategy to search for the global and local minimal energy structures of free standing nanoclusters is presented. Our objectives are twofold: to find a diverse set of low lying local minima, as well as the global minimum. To do so, we use massively the fast inertial relaxation engine algorithm as an efficient local minimizer. This procedure turns out to be quite efficient to reach the global minimum, and also most of the local minima. We test the method with the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, for which an abundant literature does exist, and obtain novel results, which include a new local minimum for LJ13 , 10 new local minima for LJ14 , and thousands of new local minima for 15≤N≤65. Insights on how to choose the initial configurations, analyzing the effectiveness of the method in reaching low-energy structures, including the global minimum, are developed as a function of the number of atoms of the cluster. Also, a novel characterization of the potential energy surface, analyzing properties of the local minima basins, is provided. The procedure constitutes a promising tool to generate a diverse set of cluster conformations, both two- and three-dimensional, that can be used as an input for refinement by means of ab initio methods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4: A Tetravalent Nanocluster

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulHalim, Lina G.; Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Tang, Qing; Del Gobbo, Silvano; AbdulHalim, Rasha; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Jiang, De-en; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The bottom-up assembly of nanoparticles into diverse ordered solids is a challenge because it requires nanoparticles, which are often quasi-spherical, to have interaction anisotropy akin to atoms and molecules. Typically, anisotropy has been introduced by changing the shape of the inorganic nanoparticle core. Here, we present the design, self-assembly, optical properties and total structural determination of Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4, an atomically precise tetravalent nanocluster (NC) (BDT: 1,3-benzenedithiols; TPP: triphenylphosphine). It features four unique tetrahedrally symmetrical binding surface sites facilitated by the supramolecular assembly of 12 BDT—wide footprint bidentate thiols—in the ligand shell. When each of these sites was selectively functionalized by a single phosphine ligand, particle stability, synthetic yield and the propensity to self-assemble into macroscopic crystals increased. The solid crystallized NCs have a substantially narrowed optical bandgap compared to that of the solution state, suggesting strong inter-particle electronic coupling occurs in the solid state.

  7. "light-on" sensing of antioxidants using gold nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lianzhe

    2014-05-20

    Depletion of intracellular antioxidants is linked to major cytotoxic events and cellular disorders, such as oxidative stress and multiple sclerosis. In addition to medical diagnosis, determining the concentration of antioxidants in foodstuffs, food preservatives, and cosmetics has proved to be very vital. Gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) have a core size below 2 nm and contain several metal atoms. They have interesting photophysical properties, are readily functionalized, and are safe to use in various biomedical applications. Herein, a simple and quantitative spectroscopic method based on Au-NCs is developed to detect and image antioxidants such as ascorbic acid. The sensing mechanism is based on the fact that antioxidants can protect the fluorescence of Au-NCs against quenching by highly reactive oxygen species. Our method shows great accuracy when employed to detect the total antioxidant capacity in commercial fruit juice. Moreover, confocal fluorescence microscopy images of HeLa cells show that this approach can be successfully used to image antioxidant levels in living cells. Finally, the potential application of this "light-on" detection method in multiple logic gate fabrication was discussed using the fluorescence intensity of Au-NCs as output. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  8. Efficient Removal of Arsenic Using Magnetic Multi-Granule Nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seungho; Cha, Jinmyung; Sim, Kyunjong; Lee, Jinkyu [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Magnetic multi-granule nanoclusters (MGNCs) were investigated as an inexpensive means to effectively remove arsenic from aqueous environment, particularly groundwater sources consumed by humans. Various size MGNCs were examined to determine both their capacity and efficiency for arsenic adsorption for different initial arsenic concentrations. The MGNCs showed highly efficient arsenic adsorption characteristics, thereby meeting the allowable safety limit of 10 μg/L (ppb), prescribed by the World Health Organization (WHO), and confirming that 0.4 g and 0.6 g of MGNCs were sufficient to remove 0.5 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L of arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) from water, respectively. Adsorption isotherm models for the MGNCs were used to estimate the adsorption parameters. They showed similar parameters for both the Langmuir and Sips models, confirming that the adsorption process in this work was active at a region of low arsenic concentration. The actual efficiency of arsenate removal was then tested against 1 L of artificial arsenic-contaminated groundwater with an arsenic concentration of 0.6 mg/L in the presence of competing ions. In this case, only 1.0 g of 100 nm MGNCs was sufficient to reduce the arsenic concentrations to below the WHO permissible safety limit for drinking water, without adjusting the pH or temperature, which is highly advantageous for practical field applications.

  9. Towards understanding of poly-guanine activated fluorescent silver nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walczak, Sylwia; Morishita, Kiyoshi; Ahmed, Moin; Liu, Juewen

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the fluorescence of some DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can be significantly enhanced upon by hybridizing with a partially complementary DNA containing a G-rich overhang near the AgNCs. This discovery has found a number of analytical applications but many fundamental questions remain to be answered. In this work, the photostability of these activated AgNCs is reported. After adding the G-rich DNA activator, the fluorescence intensity peaks in ∼1 h and then starts to decay, where the decaying rate is much faster with light exposure. The lost fluorescence is recovered by adding NaBH 4 , suggesting that the bleaching is an oxidative process. Once activated, the G-rich activator can be removed while the AgNCs still maintain most of their fluorescence intensity. UV–vis spectroscopy suggests that new AgNC species are generated upon hybridization with the activator. The base sequence and length of the template DNA have also been varied, leading to different emission colors and color change after hybridization. G-rich aptamers can also serve as activators. Our results indicate that activation of the fluorescence by G-rich DNA could be a convenient method for biosensor development since the unstable NaBH 4 is not required for the activation step. (paper)

  10. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guevel, Xavier; Schneider, Marc; Daum, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals ( em = 695 nm). Structural investigation and photophysical measurements show a high population of clusters formed of 22-33 gold atoms covalently bound to the transferrin. In solutions with pH ranging from 5 to 10 and in buffer solutions (PBS, HEPES), those biolabelled proteins exhibit a good stability. No significant quenching effect of the fluorescent transferrin has been detected after iron loading of iron-free transferrin (apoTf) and in the presence of a specific polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 μg ml -1 -1 mg ml -1 ). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  11. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Natalya V; Nedolya, Anatoliy V

    2017-12-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in [Formula: see text] direction and after that in direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.The energy of the nanocluster was estimated at the different interatomic distances. As a result of simulation, the optimal interatomic distances of Fe-Ni-C nanocluster was chosen for the simulation, in which height of the potential barrier was maximal and face-centered cubic (FCC) nanocluster was the most stable.It is shown that there were three main positions of a nickel atom that significantly affected nanocluster's energy.The calculation results indicated that position of the carbon atom in the octahedral interstice was more energetically favorable than tetrahedral interstice in the case of FCC nanocluster. On the other side, the potential barrier was smaller in the direction [Formula: see text] than in the direction .This indicates that there are two ways for carbon atom to drift to the surface of the nanocluster.

  12. Phase-Change Memory Properties of Electrodeposited Ge-Sb-Te Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Kissling, Gabriela P.; Jolleys, Andrew; Bartlett, Philip N.; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. `Kees'

    2015-11-01

    We report the properties of a series of electrodeposited Ge-Sb-Te alloys with various compositions. It is shown that the Sb/Ge ratio can be varied in a controlled way by changing the electrodeposition potential. This method opens up the prospect of depositing Ge-Sb-Te super-lattice structures by electrodeposition. Material and electrical characteristics of various compositions have been investigated in detail, showing up to three orders of magnitude resistance ratio between the amorphous and crystalline states and endurance up to 1000 cycles.

  13. Si/Ge intermixing during Ge Stranski–Krastanov growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Portavoce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Stranski–Krastanov growth of Ge islands on Si(001 has been widely studied. The morphology changes of Ge islands during growth, from nucleation to hut/island formation and growth, followed by hut-to-dome island transformation and dislocation nucleation of domes, have been well described, even at the atomic scale, using techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Although it is known that these islands do not consist of pure Ge (due to Si/Ge intermixing, the composition of the Ge islands is not precisely known. In the present work, atom probe tomography was used to study the composition of buried dome islands at the atomic scale, in the three-dimensional space. The core of the island was shown to contain about 55 atom % Ge, while the Ge composition surrounding this core decreases rapidly in all directions in the islands to reach a Ge concentration of about 15 atom %. The Ge distribution in the islands follows a cylindrical symmetry and Ge segregation is observed only in the {113} facets of the islands. The Ge composition of the wetting layer is not homogeneous, varying from 5 to 30 atom %.

  14. Influence of the Localization of Ge Atoms within the Si(001(4 × 2 Surface Layer on Semicore One-Electron States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha I. Tkachuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption complexes of germanium on the reconstructed Si(001(4 × 2 surface have been simulated by the Si96Ge2Н84 cluster. For Ge atoms located on the surface layer, DFT calculations (B3LYP/6-31G** of their 3d semicore-level energies have shown a clear-cut correlation between the 3d5/2 chemical shifts and mutual arrangement of Ge atoms. Such a shift is positive when only one Ge atom penetrates into the crystalline substrate, while being negative for both penetrating Ge atoms. We interpret these results in terms of the charge distribution in clusters under consideration.

  15. Atomic structure of a peptide coated gold nanocluster identified using theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xu; Gao, Liang; Zhai, Jiao; Liu, Ru; Gao, Xueyun; Wang, Dongqi; Zhao, Lina

    2016-06-01

    Peptide coated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) have a precise molecular formula and atomic structure, which are critical for their unique applications in targeting specific proteins either for protein analysis or drug design. To date, a study of the crystal structure of peptide coated AuNCs is absent primarily due to the difficulty of obtaining their crystalline phases in an experiment. Here we study a typical peptide coated AuNC (Au24Peptide8, Peptide = H2N-CCYKKKKQAGDV-COOH, Anal. Chem., 2015, 87, 2546) to figure out its atomic structure and electronic structure using a theoretical method for the first time. In this work, we identify the explicit configuration of the essential structure of Au24Peptide8, Au24(Cys-Cys)8, using density functional theory (DFT) computations and optical spectroscopic experiments, where Cys denotes cysteine without H bonded to S. As the first multidentate ligand binding AuNC, Au24(Cys-Cys)8 is characterized as a distorted Au13 core with Oh symmetry covered by two Au(Cys-Cys) and three Au3(Cys-Cys)2 staple motifs in its atomic structure. The most stable configuration of Au24(Cys-Cys)8 is confirmed by comparing its UV-vis absorption spectrum from time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) calculations with optical absorption measurements, and these results are consistent with each other. Furthermore, we carry out frontier molecular orbital (FMO) calculations to elucidate that the electronic structure of Au24(Cys-Cys)8 is different from that of Au24(SR)20 as they have a different Au/S ratio, where SR represents alkylthiolate. Importantly, the different ligand coatings, Cys-Cys and SR, in Au24(Cys-Cys)8 and Au24(SR)20 cause the different Au/S ratios in the coated Au24. The reason is that the Au/S ratio is crucial in determining the size of the Au core of the ligand protected AuNC, and the size of the Au core corresponds to a specific electronic structure. By the adjustment of ligand coatings from alkylthiolate to peptide, the Au/S ratio

  16. Effect of cold rolling on the formation and distribution of nanoclusters during pre-aging in an Al–Mg–Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, A.; Sato, T.; Miller, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of high densities of dislocations on the formation behavior of two types of nano-scale clusters (nanoclusters), which are formed at room temperature or during pre-aging at ∼373 K in an Al–Mg–Si alloy, was investigated by atom probe tomography. Cold rolling was applied to modify the formation behavior and/or the characteristics of the nanoclusters and also the precipitation sequence, which involve both nanoclusters and a strengthening phase to improve the bake-hardening response. Nanoclusters formed during pre-aging tended to form along the dislocations. Cold rolling accelerated the preferential formation of the nanoclusters, whereas the number density of the nanoclusters decreased by cold rolling before pre-aging. However, the number density of the nanoclusters was considerably higher than that of the β″ phase. Cold rolling before pre-aging enhanced the age-hardenability the most compared with other processes such as the contemporary pre-aging process. It is considered that the nanoclusters along dislocations lead to the preferential transformation to the β″ phase and then the rapid growth of the β″ phase. The nanoclusters formed on dislocations are effective in improving the bake-hardening response for the duration of the bake-hardening process. The kinetics and the distribution of the nanoclusters were found to be affected by the dislocations which were induced by cold rolling.

  17. Size-dependent structure of CdSe nanoclusters formed after ion implantation in MgO

    OpenAIRE

    van Huis, MA; van Veen, A; Schut, H; Eijt, SWH; Kooi, BJ; De Hosson, JTM

    2005-01-01

    The band gap as well as the optical and structural properties of semiconductor CdSe nanoclusters change as a function of the nanocluster size. Embedded CdSe nanoclusters in MgO were created by means of sequential Cd and Se ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. Changes during annealing were monitored using optical absorption and positron annihilation spectroscopy. High-resolution TEM on cross-sections after annealing at a temperature of 1300 K showed that clusters with a size below 5...

  18. Formation of microcrystalline germanium (μc-Ge:H) films from inductively coupled plasma CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Makihara, K.; Higashi, S.; Miyazaki, S.

    2005-01-01

    Inductively coupled RF plasma of H 2 -diluted GeH 4 gas was applied to the growth of hydrogenated microcrystalline germanium (μc-Ge:H) films on quartz in a reactor with an external single-turn antenna placed on quartz plate window parallel to the substrate. The deposition rate, the crystallinity and the thickness of an amorphous incubation layer formed in the early stages of the film growth were evaluated as functions of GeH 4 concentration, gas flow rate, substrate temperature and the distance between the antenna and the grounded substrate susceptor. We demonstrated the growth of highly crystalized Ge films at a rate as high as 0.9 nm/s at 250 deg. C using a 8.3% GeH 4 diluted with H 2

  19. Structure and Spatial Distribution of Ge Nanocrystals Subjected to Fast Neutron Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Ionov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fast neutron irradiation on the structure and spatial distribution of Ge nanocrystals (NC embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix has been studied. The investigation was conducted by means of laser Raman Scattering (RS, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The irradiation of Ge- NC samples by a high dose of fast neutrons lead to a partial destruction of the nanocrystals. Full reconstruction of crystallinity was achieved after annealing the radiation damage at 8000C, which resulted in full restoration of the RS spectrum. HR-TEM images show, however, that the spatial distributions of Ge-NC changed as a result of irradiation and annealing. A sharp decrease in NC distribution towards the SiO2 surface has been observed. This was accompanied by XPS detection of Ge oxides and elemental Ge within both the surface and subsurface region.

  20. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H + in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H 2 . Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs

  1. The make up of crystalline bedrock - crystalline body and blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, M.; Huber, A.

    1986-01-01

    Statements of a geological nature can be made on the basis of investigations of the bedrock exposed in southern Black Forest and these can, in the form of prognoses, be applied to the crystalline Basement of northern Switzerland. Such statements relate to the average proportions of the main lithological groups at the bedrock surface and the surface area of the granite body. Some of the prognoses can be compared and checked with the results from the deep drilling programme in northern Switzerland. Further, analogical interferences from the situation in the southern Black Forest allow predictions to be made on the anticipated block structure of the crystalline Basement. (author)

  2. On the compliant behaviour of free-standing Si nanostructures on Si(001) for Ge nanoheteroepitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, Grzegorz

    2012-04-24

    Selective chemical vapor deposition Ge heteroepitaxy approaches for high quality Ge nanostructure growth with reasonable thermal budget must be developed for local Ge photonic module integration. A promising vision is offered by the compliant substrate effects within nanometer scale Ge/Si heteroepitaxial structures. Here, in contrast to the classical Ge deposition on bulk Si substrates, the thermal and lattice mismatch strain energy accumulated in the Ge epilayer is partially shifted to the free-standing Si nanostructure. This strain partitioning phenomenon is at the very heart of the nanoheteroepitaxy theory (NHE) and, if strain energy levels are correctly balanced, offers the vision to grow defect-free nanostructures of lattice mismatched semiconductors on Si. In case of the Ge/Si heterosystem with a lattice mismatch of 4.2%, the strain partitioning phenomenon is expected to be triggered when free-standing Si nanopillars with the width of 50 nm and below are used. In order to experimentally verify NHE with its compliant substrate effects, a set of free-standing Ge/Si nanostructures with diameter ranging from 150 to 50 nm were fabricated and investigated. The main limitation corresponds to a simultaneous detection of (a) the strain partitioning phenomenon between Ge and Si and (b) the absence of defects on the nano-scale. In this respect, synchrotron-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to study the epitaxial relationship, defect and strain characteristics with high resolution and sensitivity in a non-destructive way. Raman spectroscopy supported by finite element method calculations were used to investigate the strain distribution within a single Ge/Si nanostructure. Special focus was devoted to transmission electron microscopy to determine the quality of the Ge epilayer. It was found, that although high quality Ge nanoclusters can be achieved by thermal annealing on Si pillars bigger than 50 nm in width, no proof of strain partitioning

  3. Mushroom-free selective epitaxial growth of Si, SiGe and SiGe:B raised sources and drains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, J. M.; Benevent, V.; Barnes, J. P.; Veillerot, M.; Lafond, D.; Damlencourt, J. F.; Morvan, S.; Prévitali, B.; Andrieu, F.; Loubet, N.; Dutartre, D.

    2013-05-01

    We have evaluated various Cyclic Selective Epitaxial Growth/Etch (CSEGE) processes in order to grow "mushroom-free" Si and SiGe:B Raised Sources and Drains (RSDs) on each side of ultra-short gate length Extra-Thin Silicon-On-Insulator (ET-SOI) transistors. The 750 °C, 20 Torr Si CSEGE process we have developed (5 chlorinated growth steps with four HCl etch steps in-between) yielded excellent crystalline quality, typically 18 nm thick Si RSDs. Growth was conformal along the Si3N4 sidewall spacers, without any poly-Si mushrooms on top of unprotected gates. We have then evaluated on blanket 300 mm Si(001) wafers the feasibility of a 650 °C, 20 Torr SiGe:B CSEGE process (5 chlorinated growth steps with four HCl etch steps in-between, as for Si). As expected, the deposited thickness decreased as the total HCl etch time increased. This came hands in hands with unforeseen (i) decrease of the mean Ge concentration (from 30% down to 26%) and (ii) increase of the substitutional B concentration (from 2 × 1020 cm-3 up to 3 × 1020 cm-3). They were due to fluctuations of the Ge concentration and of the atomic B concentration [B] in such layers (drop of the Ge% and increase of [B] at etch step locations). Such blanket layers were a bit rougher than layers grown using a single epitaxy step, but nevertheless of excellent crystalline quality. Transposition of our CSEGE process on patterned ET-SOI wafers did not yield the expected results. HCl etch steps indeed helped in partly or totally removing the poly-SiGe:B mushrooms on top of the gates. This was however at the expense of the crystalline quality and 2D nature of the ˜45 nm thick Si0.7Ge0.3:B recessed sources and drains selectively grown on each side of the imperfectly protected poly-Si gates. The only solution we have so far identified that yields a lesser amount of mushrooms while preserving the quality of the S/D is to increase the HCl flow during growth steps.

  4. neutron transmission through crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mesiry, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the neutron transmission through crystalline materials. Therefore a study of pyrolytic graphite (PG) as a highly efficient selective thermal neutron filter and Iron single crystal as a whole one, as well as the applicability of using their polycrystalline powders as a selective cold neutron filters is given. Moreover, the use of PG and iron single crystal as an efficient neutron monochromator is also investigated. An additive formula is given which allows calculating the contribution of the total neutron cross-section including the Bragg scattering from different )(hkl planes to the neutron transmission through crystalline iron and graphite. The formula takes into account their crystalline form. A computer CFe program was developed in order to provide the required calculations for both poly- and single-crystalline iron. The validity of the CFe program was approved from the comparison of the calculated iron cross-section data with the available experimental ones. The CFe program was also adapted to calculate the reflectivity from iron single crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator The computer package GRAPHITE, developed in Neutron Physics laboratory, Nuclear Research Center, has been used in order to provide the required calculations for crystalline graphite in the neutron energy range from 0.1 meV to 10 eV. A Mono-PG code was added to the computer package GRAPHITE in order to calculate the reflectivity from PG crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator.

  5. Diverse topics in crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Draeseke, A.; Sessler, A.M.; Li, Xiao-Ping

    1995-01-01

    Equations of motion are presented, appropriate to interacting charged particles of diverse charge and mass, subject to the external forces produced by various kinds of magnetic fields and radio-frequency (rf) electric fields in storage rings. These equations are employed in the molecular dynamics simulations to study the properties of crystalline beams. The two necessary conditions for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams are summarized. The transition from ID to 2D, and from 2D to 3D is explored, and the scaling behavior of the heating rates is discussed especially in the high temperature limit. The effectiveness of various cooling techniques in achieving crystalline states has been investigated. Crystalline beams made of two different species of ions via sympathetic cooling are presented, as well as circulating ''crystal balls'' bunched in all directions by magnetic focusing and rf field. By numerically reconstructing the original experimental conditions of the NAP-M ring, it is found that only at extremely low beam intensities, outside of the range of the original measurement, proton particles can form occasionally-passing disks. The proposed New ASTRID ring is shown to be suitable for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams of all dimensions

  6. Formation of resonant bonding during growth of ultrathin GeTe films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ruining; Zhang, Wei; Momand, Jamo; Ronneberger, Ider; Boschker, Jos E.; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Kooi, Bart J.; Riechert, Henning; Wuttig, Matthias; Calarco, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    A highly unconventional growth scenario is reported upon deposition of GeTe films on the hydrogen passivated Si(111) surface. Initially, an amorphous film forms for growth parameters that should yield a crystalline material. The entire amorphous film then crystallizes once a critical thickness of

  7. Polarity-dependent reversible resistance switching in Ge-Sb-Te phase-change thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, George; De Hosson, Jeff T. M.; Pauza, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reversible resistance switching in a capacitorlike cell using a Ge-Sb-Te film that does not rely on amorphous-crystalline phase change. The polarity of the applied electric field switches the cell resistance between lower- and higher-resistance states, as was observed

  8. Enzymatic reduction of U60 nanoclusters by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qiang; Fein, Jeremy B. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a series of reduction experiments were conducted using a representative uranyl peroxide nanocluster, U60 (K{sub 16}Li{sub 44}[UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2})OH]{sub 60}) and a bacterial species, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that is capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction. U60 was reduced by S. oneidensis in the absence of O{sub 2}, but the reduction kinetics for U60 were significantly slower than was observed in this study for aqueous uranyl acetate, and were faster than was reported in previous studies for solid phase U(VI). Our results indicate that U60 aggregates bigger than 0.2 μm formed immediately upon mixing with the bacterial growth medium, and that these aggregates were gradually broken down during the process of reduction. Neither reduction nor dissolution of U60 was observed during 72 h of control experiments open to the atmosphere, indicating that the breakdown and dissolution of U60 aggregates is caused by the reduction of U60, and that S. oneidensis is capable of direct reduction of the U(VI) within the U60 nanoclusters, likely due to the adsorption of U60 aggregates onto bacterial cells. This study is first to show the reduction capacity of bacteria for uranyl peroxide nanoclusters, and the results yield a better understanding of the long term fate of uranium in environmental systems in which uranyl peroxide nanoclusters are present.

  9. Pinning of size-selected gold and nickel nanoclusters on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Vece, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/248753355; Paloma, S.; Palmer, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Size-selected gold and nickel nanoclusters are of interest from an electronic, catalytic, and biological point of view. These applications require the deposition of the clusters on a surface, and a key challenge is to retain the cluster size. Here controlled energy impact is used to immobilize the

  10. Spectroscopy of metal "superatom" nanoclusters and high-Tc superconducting pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-12-01

    A unique property of metal nanoclusters is the "superatom" shell structure of their delocalized electrons. The electronic shell levels are highly degenerate and therefore represent sharp peaks in the density of states. This can enable exceptionally strong electron pairing in certain clusters composed of tens to hundreds of atoms. In a finite system, such as a free nanocluster or a nucleus, pairing is observed most clearly via its effect on the energy spectrum of the constituent fermions. Accordingly, we performed a photoionization spectroscopy study of size-resolved aluminum nanoclusters and observed a rapid rise in the near-threshold density of states of several clusters (A l37 ,44 ,66 ,68 ) with decreasing temperature. The characteristics of this behavior are consistent with compression of the density of states by a pairing transition into a high-temperature superconducting state with Tc≳100 K. This value exceeds that of bulk aluminum by two orders of magnitude. These results highlight the potential of novel pairing effects in size-quantized systems and the possibility to attain even higher critical temperatures by optimizing the particles' size and composition. As a new class of high-temperature superconductors, such metal nanocluster particles are promising building blocks for high-Tc materials, devices, and networks.

  11. Electron microscopy and positron annihilation study of CdSe nanoclusters embedded in MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huis, M.A. van; Veen, A. van; Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    2004-01-01

    CdSe nanoclusters are created in MgO by means of co-implantation of 280 keV, 1 x 10 16 Cd ions cm -2 and 210 keV, 1 x 10 16 Se ions cm -2 in single crystals of MgO(0 0 1) and subsequent thermal annealing at a temperature of 1300 K. The structural properties and the orientation relationship between the CdSe and the MgO are investigated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The crystal structure of the nanoclusters depends on their size. The smallest nanoclusters with a size below 5 nm have the cubic rocksalt crystal structure. The larger nanoclusters have a different (most likely the cubic sphalerite) crystal structure. The defect evolution in the sample after ion implantation and during thermal annealing is investigated using Doppler broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). The defect evolution in samples co-implanted with Cd and Se is compared to the defect evolution in samples implanted with only Cd or only Se ions

  12. Definition of the size of nanoclusters of silver and palladium in carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volobuev, V.S.; Bashmakov, I.A.; Lukashevich, S.M.; Tolkacheva, E.A.; Tikhonova, T.F.; Lukashevich, M.G.; Kaputskij, F.N.

    2008-01-01

    Size of palladium and silver nanoclusters is carbon matrix prepared by heart treatment of metal-polymer precursor has been determined by means of XR diffractions study. It was shown that the cluster size increases with increasing annealing temperature from 700 to 900 degree Celsius by factor two. No structuring of carbon matrix was observed under clusters forming. (authors)

  13. Absorption Spectra of CuGaSe2 and CuInSe2 Semiconducting Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Singh, Nirpendra; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of the chalcopyrite CunGanSe2n and CunInnSe2n nanoclusters (n = 2, 4, 6, and 8) are investigated as a function of the size using a combination of basin-hopping global optimization and time-dependent density

  14. Metal Catalysts for Heterogeneous Catalysis: From Single Atoms to Nanoclusters and Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lichen; Corma, Avelino

    2018-05-23

    Metal species with different size (single atoms, nanoclusters, and nanoparticles) show different catalytic behavior for various heterogeneous catalytic reactions. It has been shown in the literature that many factors including the particle size, shape, chemical composition, metal-support interaction, and metal-reactant/solvent interaction can have significant influences on the catalytic properties of metal catalysts. The recent developments of well-controlled synthesis methodologies and advanced characterization tools allow one to correlate the relationships at the molecular level. In this Review, the electronic and geometric structures of single atoms, nanoclusters, and nanoparticles will be discussed. Furthermore, we will summarize the catalytic applications of single atoms, nanoclusters, and nanoparticles for different types of reactions, including CO oxidation, selective oxidation, selective hydrogenation, organic reactions, electrocatalytic, and photocatalytic reactions. We will compare the results obtained from different systems and try to give a picture on how different types of metal species work in different reactions and give perspectives on the future directions toward better understanding of the catalytic behavior of different metal entities (single atoms, nanoclusters, and nanoparticles) in a unifying manner.

  15. Nanomorphology of Polymer Frameworks and Their Role as Templates for Generating Size-Controlled Metal Nanoclusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Artuso, F.; D'Archivio, A. A.; Lora, S.; Jeřábek, Karel; Králik, E.; Corain, B.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 21 (2003), s. 5292-5296 ISSN 0947-6539 Grant - others:GA-(IT) 2001038991; VEGA(SK) 1/9142/02 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : nanoclusters * nano-structures * gel-type resin s Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.353, year: 2003

  16. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...

  17. Electron microscopy and positron annihilation study of CdSe nanoclusters embedded in MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huis, M.A. van E-mail: vanhuis@iri.tudelft.nl; Veen, A. van; Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    2004-06-01

    CdSe nanoclusters are created in MgO by means of co-implantation of 280 keV, 1 x 10{sup 16} Cd ions cm{sup -2} and 210 keV, 1 x 10{sup 16} Se ions cm{sup -2} in single crystals of MgO(0 0 1) and subsequent thermal annealing at a temperature of 1300 K. The structural properties and the orientation relationship between the CdSe and the MgO are investigated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The crystal structure of the nanoclusters depends on their size. The smallest nanoclusters with a size below 5 nm have the cubic rocksalt crystal structure. The larger nanoclusters have a different (most likely the cubic sphalerite) crystal structure. The defect evolution in the sample after ion implantation and during thermal annealing is investigated using Doppler broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). The defect evolution in samples co-implanted with Cd and Se is compared to the defect evolution in samples implanted with only Cd or only Se ions.

  18. Electron microscopy and positron annihilation study of CdSe nanoclusters embedded in MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Eijt, S. W. H.; Kooi, B. J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2004-06-01

    CdSe nanoclusters are created in MgO by means of co-implantation of 280 keV, 1 × 10 16 Cd ions cm -2 and 210 keV, 1 × 10 16 Se ions cm -2 in single crystals of MgO(0 0 1) and subsequent thermal annealing at a temperature of 1300 K. The structural properties and the orientation relationship between the CdSe and the MgO are investigated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The crystal structure of the nanoclusters depends on their size. The smallest nanoclusters with a size below 5 nm have the cubic rocksalt crystal structure. The larger nanoclusters have a different (most likely the cubic sphalerite) crystal structure. The defect evolution in the sample after ion implantation and during thermal annealing is investigated using Doppler broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). The defect evolution in samples co-implanted with Cd and Se is compared to the defect evolution in samples implanted with only Cd or only Se ions.

  19. The role of oxygen and water on molybdenum nanoclusters for electro catalytic ammonia production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob G. Howalt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of water often gives rise to oxygen adsorption on catalyst surfaces through decomposition of water and the adsorbed oxygen or hydroxide species often occupy important surfaces sites, resulting in a decrease or a total hindrance of other chemical reactions taking place at that site. In this study, we present theoretical investigations of the influence of oxygen adsorption and reduction on pure and nitrogen covered molybdenum nanocluster electro catalysts for electrochemical reduction of N2 to NH3 with the purpose of understanding oxygen and water poisoning of the catalyst. Density functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free energy profile for electrochemical protonation of O and N2 species on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoclusters. The calculations show that the molybdenum nanocluster will preferentially bind oxygen over nitrogen and hydrogen at neutral bias, but under electrochemical reaction conditions needed for nitrogen reduction, oxygen adsorption is severely weakened and the adsorption energy is comparable to hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption. The potentials required to reduce oxygen off the surface are −0.72 V or lower for all oxygen coverages studied, and it is thus possible to (reactivate (partially oxidized nanoclusters for electrochemical ammonia production, e.g., using a dry proton conductor or an aqueous electrolyte. At lower oxygen coverages, nitrogen molecules can adsorb to the surface and electrochemical ammonia production via the associative mechanism is possible at potentials as low as −0.45 V to −0.7 V.

  20. Silver and copper nanoclusters in the lustre decoration of Italian Renaissance pottery: an EXAFS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, S.; Borgia, I.; Brunetti, B.; Sgamellotti, A.; Giulivi, A.; D'Acapito, F.; Mazzoldi, P.; Sada, C.; Battaglin, G.

    Lustre is one of the most important decorative techniques of the Medieval and Renaissance pottery of the Mediterranean basin, capable of producing brilliant metallic reflections and iridescence. Following the recent finding that the colour of lustre decorations is mainly determined by copper and silver nanoclusters dispersed in the glaze layer, the local environment of copper and silver atoms has been studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy on original samples of gold and red lustre. It has been found that, in gold lustre, whose colour is attributed mainly to the silver nanocluster dispersion, silver is only partially present in the metallic form and copper is almost completely oxidised. In the red lustre, whose colour is attributed mainly to the copper nanocluster dispersion, only a fraction of copper is present in the metallic form. EXAFS measurements on red lustre, carried out in the total electron yield mode to probe only the first 150 nm of the glaze layer, indicated that in some cases lustre nanoclusters may be confined in a very thin layer close to the surface.

  1. Phosphatidylserine and GTPase activation control Cdc42 nanoclustering to counter dissipative diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorel, Elodie; Ünlü, Caner; Jose, Mini; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; Meca, Julien; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; McCusker, Derek

    2018-04-18

    The anisotropic organization of plasma membrane constituents is indicative of mechanisms that drive the membrane away from equilibrium. However, defining these mechanisms is challenging due to the short spatio-temporal scales at which diffusion operates. Here, we use high-density single protein tracking combined with photoactivation localization microscopy (sptPALM) to monitor Cdc42 in budding yeast, a system in which Cdc42 exhibits anisotropic organization. Cdc42 exhibited reduced mobility at the cell pole, where it was organized in nanoclusters. The Cdc42 nanoclusters were larger at the cell pole than those observed elsewhere in the cell. These features were exacerbated in cells expressing Cdc42-GTP, and were dependent on the scaffold Bem1, which contributed to the range of mobility and nanocluster size exhibited by Cdc42. The lipid environment, in particular phosphatidylserine levels, also played a role in regulating Cdc42 nanoclustering. These studies reveal how the mobility of a Rho GTPase is controlled to counter the depletive effects of diffusion, thus stabilizing Cdc42 on the plasma membrane and sustaining cell polarity. Movie S1 Movie S1 sptPALM imaging of live yeast expressing Pil1-mEOS expressed at the genomic locus. Pil1-mEOS was simultaneously photo-converted with a 405 nm laser and imaged with a 561 nm laser using HiLo illumination. Images were acquired at 20 ms intervals, of which 300 frames are shown at 7 frames per second.

  2. Formation of ring-patterned nanoclusters by laser–plume interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    This article reports for the first time a unique study performed to regulate the ring diameter of nanoclusters fabricated during femtosecond laser ablation of solids and a mechanism is proposed for the formation of those ring clusters. The ring nanoclusters are made out of nanoparticles with a range of 10–30 nm. Our experimental studies showed the synthesis of ring nanoclusters with random diameter distribution on metals, nonmetals, and semiconductors, such as titanium, aluminum, glasses, ceramics, graphite, and silicon. To regulate the ring size, the effects of laser parameters, such as wavelength, pulse duration, pulse energy, and repetition rate on the ring diameter are analyzed. The influence of ablated materials and the background gas on ring size is also elaborated in this article. The motion of plume species under the influence of ponderomotive force on free electrons possibly played a key role in the formation of the ring-patterned nanoclusters. This study could help to understand the fundamentals in laser ablative nanosynthesis as well as to produce nanostructures with organized ring diameter that controls the density and porosity of those 3D nanostructures.

  3. {Fe6O2}-Based Assembly of a Tetradecanuclear Iron Nanocluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana G. Baca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tetradecanuclear FeIII pivalate nanocluster [Fe14O10(OH4(Piv18], comprising a new type of metal oxide framework, has been solvothermally synthesized from a hexanuclear iron pivalate precursor in dichlormethane/acetonitrile solution. Magnetic measurements indicate the presence of very strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the cluster core.

  4. Epitaxial growth of Si1−xGex alloys and Ge on Si(100) by electron-cyclotron-resonance Ar plasma chemical vapor deposition without substrate heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Naofumi; Sakuraba, Masao; Murota, Junichi; Sato, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    By using electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) Ar-plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) without substrate heating, the epitaxial growth process of Si 1−x Ge x alloy and Ge films deposited directly on dilute-HF-treated Si(100) was investigated. From the reflection high energy electron diffraction patterns of the deposited Si 1−x Ge x alloy (x = 0.50, 0.75) and Ge films on Si(100), it is confirmed that epitaxial growth can be realized without substrate heating, and that crystallinity degradation at larger film thickness is observed. The X-ray diffraction peak of the epitaxial films reveals the existence of large compressive strain, which is induced by lattice matching with the Si(100) substrate at smaller film thicknesses, as well as strain relaxation behavior at larger film thicknesses. The Ge fraction of Si 1−x Ge x thin film is in good agreement with the normalized GeH 4 partial pressure. The Si 1−x Ge x deposition rate increases with an increase of GeH 4 partial pressure. The GeH 4 partial pressure dependence of partial deposition rates [(Si or Ge fraction) × (Si 1−x Ge x thickness) / (deposition time)] shows that the Si partial deposition rate is slightly enhanced by the existence of Ge. From these results, it is proposed that the ECR-plasma CVD process can be utilized for Ge fraction control in highly-strained heterostructure formation of group IV semiconductors. - Highlights: • Si 1−x Ge x alloy and Ge were epitaxially grown on Si(100) without substrate heating. • Large strain and its relaxation behavior can be observed by X-ray diffraction. • Ge fraction of Si 1−x Ge x is equal to normalized GeH 4 partial pressure. • Si partial deposition rate is slightly enhanced by existence of Ge

  5. Antibacterial silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, M.; Perero, S. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 (Italy); Ferraris, S., E-mail: sara.ferraris@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 (Italy); Miola, M.; Vernè, E. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 (Italy); Skoglund, S. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Div. Surface and Corrosion Science, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 (Sweden); Blomberg, E. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Div. Surface and Corrosion Science, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 (Sweden); SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, P.O. Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Odnevall Wallinder, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Div. Surface and Corrosion Science, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 (Sweden)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A silver nanocluster-silica composite coating sputter-deposited onto stainless steel. • Good adhesion and resistance upon cleaning with NaOH, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and detergents. • Low release of silver ions and no release as silver nanoparticles. • Good antibacterial activity against S. aureus even after heating to 450 °C. • Good antibacterial activity shown during cheese production. - Abstract: A coating made of silver nanocluster/silica composites has been deposited, via a radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering technique, for the first time onto stainless steel (AISI 304L) with the aim to improve its antibacterial properties. Different thermal treatments after coating deposition have been applied in order to optimize the coating adhesion, cohesion and its antibacterial properties. Its applicability has been investigated at realistic conditions in a cheese production plant. The physico-chemical characteristics of the coatings have been analyzed by means of different bulk and surface analytical techniques. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to assess coating morphology, composition, surface roughness, wetting properties, size and local distribution of the nanoparticles within the coating. Tape tests were used to determine the adhesion/cohesion properties of the coating. The amount and time-dependence of released silver in solutions of acetic acid, artificial water, artificial tap water and artificial milk were determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The antibacterial effect of the coating was evaluated at different experimental conditions using a standard bacterial strain of Staphylococcus aureus in compliance with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and AATCC 147 standards. The Ahearn test was performed to measure the adhesion of bacteria to the coated stainless steel

  6. Antibacterial silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraris, M.; Perero, S.; Ferraris, S.; Miola, M.; Vernè, E.; Skoglund, S.; Blomberg, E.; Odnevall Wallinder, I.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A silver nanocluster-silica composite coating sputter-deposited onto stainless steel. • Good adhesion and resistance upon cleaning with NaOH, H_2SO_4 and detergents. • Low release of silver ions and no release as silver nanoparticles. • Good antibacterial activity against S. aureus even after heating to 450 °C. • Good antibacterial activity shown during cheese production. - Abstract: A coating made of silver nanocluster/silica composites has been deposited, via a radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering technique, for the first time onto stainless steel (AISI 304L) with the aim to improve its antibacterial properties. Different thermal treatments after coating deposition have been applied in order to optimize the coating adhesion, cohesion and its antibacterial properties. Its applicability has been investigated at realistic conditions in a cheese production plant. The physico-chemical characteristics of the coatings have been analyzed by means of different bulk and surface analytical techniques. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to assess coating morphology, composition, surface roughness, wetting properties, size and local distribution of the nanoparticles within the coating. Tape tests were used to determine the adhesion/cohesion properties of the coating. The amount and time-dependence of released silver in solutions of acetic acid, artificial water, artificial tap water and artificial milk were determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The antibacterial effect of the coating was evaluated at different experimental conditions using a standard bacterial strain of Staphylococcus aureus in compliance with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and AATCC 147 standards. The Ahearn test was performed to measure the adhesion of bacteria to the coated stainless steel surface

  7. Improvement in the photocurrent collection due to enhanced absorption of light by synthesizing staggered layers of silver nanoclusters in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Rout, Bibhudutta; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Lightbourne, Sherard; D’Souza, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The quest for increased efficiency of solar cells has driven the research in synthesizing photovoltaic cells involving Si based materials. The efficiency of solar cells involving crystalline Si is stalled around 25% for the last decade. Recently Shi et al. had shown that light trapping can be enhanced by fabricating double layers of Ag nanoparticles in silicon based materials. The light trapping is critically important in a photo devices such as solar cells in order to increase light absorption and efficiency. In the present work, we report enhancement in the absorption of light in Ag ion implanted Si substrates. Multiple low energies Ag ions, ranging from ∼80 keV to ∼30 keV, with different fluences ranging from ∼1 × 10 16 to ∼1 × 10 17 atoms/cm 2 were sequentially implanted into commercially available Si (100) substrates followed by post-thermal annealing to create different sizes of Ag nanoclusters (NC) at different depths in the top 100 nm of the Si. The absorbance of light is increased in Ag implanted Si with a significant increase in the current collection in I-V (current-voltage) photo switching measurements. The experimental photovoltaic cells fabricated with the Ag-implanted Si samples were optically characterized under AM (air mass) 1.5 solar radiation conditions (∼1.0 kW/m 2 ). An enhancement in the charge collection were measured in the annealed samples, where prominent Ag NCs were formed in the Si matrix compared to the as-implanted samples with amorphous layers. We believe the enhancement of the photo-current density from the samples with Ag NC is due to the improvement of efficiency of charge collection of e − -h + pairs produced by the incident light

  8. Distinct metal-exchange pathways of doped Ag25 nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-09-09

    Atomically precise metal nanoclusters (NCs) containing more than one type of metal atom (i.e., doped or alloyed), due to synergistic effects, open new avenues for engineering the catalytic and optical properties of NCs in a manner that homometal NCs cannot. Unfortunately, it is still a major challenge to controllably introduce multimetallic dopants in NCs, understanding the dopants\\' positions, mechanism, and synergistic effects. To overcome these challenges, we designed a metal-exchange approach involving NCs as molecular templates and metal ions as the source of the incoming dopant. In particular, two structurally similar monodoped silver-rich NCs, [MAg24(SR)(18)](2-) (M = Pd/Pt and SR: thiolate), were synthesized as templates to study their mechanistic transformation in response to the introduction of gold atoms. The controllable incorporation of Au atoms into the MAg24 framework facilitated the elucidation of distinct doping pathways through high-resolution mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Interestingly, gold replaced the central Pd atom of [PdAg24(SR)(18)](2-) clusters to produce predominantly bimetallic [AuAg24(SR)(18)](-) clusters along with a minor product of an [Au2Ag23(SR)(18)](-) cluster. In contrast, the central Pt atom remained intact in [PtAg24(SR)(18)](2-) clusters, and gold replaced the noncentral Ag atoms to form trimetallic [AuxPtAg24-x(SR)(18)](2-) NCs, where x = 1-2, with a portion of the starting [PtAg24(SR)(18)](2-) NCs remaining. This study reveals some of the unusual metal-exchange pathways of doped NCs and the important role played by the initial metal dopant in directing the position of a second dopant in the final product.

  9. Switching a Nanocluster Core from Hollow to Non-hollow

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-03-24

    Modulating the structure-property relationship in atomically precise nanoclusters (NCs) is vital for developing novel NC materials and advancing their applications. While promising biphasic ligand-exchange (LE) strategies have been developed primarily to attain novel NCs, understanding the mechanistic aspects involved in tuning the core and the ligand-shell of NCs in such biphasic processes is challenging. Here, we design a single phase LE process that enabled us to elucidate the mechanism of how a hollow NC (e.g., [Ag44(SR)30]4-, -SR: thiolate) converts into a non-hollow NC (e.g., [Ag25(SR)18]-), and vice versa. Our study reveals that the complete LE of the hollow [Ag44(SPhF)30]4- NCs (–SPhF: 4-fluorobenzenethiolate) with incoming 2,4-dimethylbenzenethiol (HSPhMe2) induced distortions in the Ag44 structure forming the non-hollow [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- by a disproportionation mechanism. While the reverse reaction of [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- with HSPhF prompted an unusual dimerization of Ag25, followed by a rearrangement step that reproduces the original [Ag44(SPhF)30]4-. Remarkably, both the forward and the backward reactions proceed through similar size intermediates that seem to be governed by the boundary conditions set by the thermodynamic and electronic stability of the hollow and non-hollow metal cores. Furthermore, the resizing of NCs highlights the surprisingly long-range effect of the ligands which are felt by atoms far deep in the metal core, thus opening a new path for controlling the structural evolution of nanoparticles.

  10. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2015-05-21

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  11. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Burlakov, Victor M.; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Joshi, Chakra Prasad; AbdulHalim, L; Black, David; Whetten, Robert; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  12. Application of ionizing radiation for metal nanoclusters synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smietanko-Chmielewska, D.K.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Possibility of ionizing radiation application in nanotechnology has been observed from very beginning when this field of science and technology was named. The lithography is based on electron and ion beam applications, and metal clusters synthesis by radiation induced radicals was reported many years ago. International Atomic Energy Agency was the first organization which has started coordinated programs on radiation applications in nanotechnology which are being continued in the frame of regional cooperation project RER8014. Some of applications led to patented technical solutions. Then review papers and chapters in the books have been published. The main applications beside of lithography deal with metal nanoclusters and nano-composites synthesis. Polymer composites containing metal nanoparticles have attracted a great interest due to their unique chemical and physical properties. 'Green' chemistry promotes application of natural fibers in such structures, among them cellulose is one of the most frequently used. However, cellulose fabric have ability to absorb moisture, so under certain conditions of humidity and temperature they can be subjected to microbial attack. One of the most popular and best known antibacterial agents is silver, which serves as a potential antibacterial material acting against an exceptionally broad spectrum of bacteria including activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were grown at the cellulose fibers surface by direct reduction of AgNO 3 with electron beam (EB) application. The big field of development concerns nano composites, possibility of e/X units application enlarge this possibility to industrial scale product manufacturing. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the IAEA, regional project RER/8/014 and by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education, project DPN/W14/IAEA/2009.

  13. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E

    2015-06-11

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures.

  14. Effects of stoichiometry on the transport properties of crystalline phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wuttig, Matthias; Mazzarello, Riccardo

    2015-09-03

    It has recently been shown that a metal-insulator transition due to disorder occurs in the crystalline state of the GeSb2Te4 phase-change compound. The transition is triggered by the ordering of the vacancies upon thermal annealing. In this work, we investigate the localization properties of the electronic states in selected crystalline (GeTe)x-(Sb2Te3)y compounds with varying GeTe content by large-scale density functional theory simulations. In our models, we also include excess vacancies, which are needed to account for the large carrier concentrations determined experimentally. We show that the models containing a high concentration of stoichiometric vacancies possess states at the Fermi energy localized inside vacancy clusters, as occurs for GeSb2Te4. On the other hand, the GeTe-rich models display metallic behavior, which stems from two facts: a) the tail of localized states shrinks due to the low probability of having sizable vacancy clusters, b) the excess vacancies shift the Fermi energy to the region of extended states. Hence, a stoichiometry-controlled metal-insulator transition occurs. In addition, we show that the localization properties obtained by scalar-relativistic calculations with gradient-corrected functionals are unaffected by the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling or the use of hybrid functionals.

  15. Exchange bias in reduced dimensions: cobalt nanocluster arrays underthe influence of nanometer thin MnPt capping layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sessi, V.; Hertenberger, S.; Zhang, J.; Schmitz, D.; Gsell, S.; Schreck, M.; Morel, R.; Brenac, A.; Honolka, Jan; Kern, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 12 (2014), "123903-1"-"123903-10" ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnetism * cobalt * nanoclusters * quenching * superparamagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  16. Shell model for REO{sub x} nanoclusters in amorphous SiO{sub 2}: charge trapping and electroluminescence quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiagulskyi, S.; Nazarov, A.; Tyagulskii, I.; Lysenko, V. [Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 41, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Rebohle, L.; Lehmann, J.; Skorupa, W. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf e.V., POB 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    In this work charge trapping and electroluminescence (EL) quenching in rare-earth (RE) implanted SiO{sub 2} on Si as a function of injected charge into the dielectric were studied. The blocking of the luminescent REO{sub X} nanoclusters from the hot exciting electrons by negative charge trapping in a defect region (shell) located in the vicinity of the REO{sub X} nanocluster/SiO{sub 2} interface is considered as the main mechanism of EL quenching for small size (up to 10 nm) REO{sub X} nanoclusters. It is suggested that the increase of the nanoclusters size results in disordering of the SiO{sub 2} matrix but in a decrease of local blocking for excitation of the luminescent centers. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. GePb Alloy Growth Using Layer Inversion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Hakimah; Mosleh, Aboozar; Alher, Murtadha; Banihashemian, Seyedeh Fahimeh; Ghetmiri, Seyed Amir; Al-Kabi, Sattar; Du, Wei; Li, Bauhoa; Yu, Shui-Qing; Naseem, Hameed A.

    2018-04-01

    Germanium-lead films have been investigated as a new direct-bandgap group IV alloy. GePb films were deposited on Si via thermal evaporation of Ge and Pb solid sources using the layer inversion metal-induced crystallization method for comparison with the current laser-induced recrystallization method. Material characterization of the films using x-ray diffraction analysis revealed highly oriented crystallinity and Pb incorporation as high as 13.5% before and 5.2% after annealing. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray mapping of the samples revealed uniform incorporation of elements and complete layer inversion. Optical characterization of the GePb films by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence techniques showed that annealing the samples resulted in higher crystalline quality as well as bandgap reduction. The bandgap reduction from 0.67 eV to 0.547 eV observed for the highest-quality material confirms the achievement of a direct-bandgap material.

  18. GePb Alloy Growth Using Layer Inversion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Hakimah; Mosleh, Aboozar; Alher, Murtadha; Banihashemian, Seyedeh Fahimeh; Ghetmiri, Seyed Amir; Al-Kabi, Sattar; Du, Wei; Li, Bauhoa; Yu, Shui-Qing; Naseem, Hameed A.

    2018-07-01

    Germanium-lead films have been investigated as a new direct-bandgap group IV alloy. GePb films were deposited on Si via thermal evaporation of Ge and Pb solid sources using the layer inversion metal-induced crystallization method for comparison with the current laser-induced recrystallization method. Material characterization of the films using x-ray diffraction analysis revealed highly oriented crystallinity and Pb incorporation as high as 13.5% before and 5.2% after annealing. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray mapping of the samples revealed uniform incorporation of elements and complete layer inversion. Optical characterization of the GePb films by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence techniques showed that annealing the samples resulted in higher crystalline quality as well as bandgap reduction. The bandgap reduction from 0.67 eV to 0.547 eV observed for the highest-quality material confirms the achievement of a direct-bandgap material.

  19. Selective epitaxial growth of Ge1-xSnx on Si by using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizu, Tomoya; Ike, Shinichi; Inuzuka, Yuki; Takeuchi, Wakana; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2017-06-01

    Selective epitaxial growth of Ge and Ge1-xSnx layers on Si substrates was performed by using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with precursors of tertiary-butyl-germane (t-BGe) and tri-butyl-vinyl-tin (TBVSn). We investigated the effects of growth temperature and total pressure during growth on the selectivity and the crystallinity of the Ge and Ge1-xSnx epitaxial layers. Under low total pressure growth conditions, the dominant mechanism of the selective growth of Ge epitaxial layers is the desorption of the Ge precursors. At a high total pressure case, it is needed to control the surface migration of precursors to realize the selectivity because the desorption of Ge precursors was suppressed. The selectivity of Ge growth was improved by diffusion of the Ge precursors on the SiO2 surfaces when patterned substrates were used at a high total pressure. The selective epitaxial growth of Ge1-xSnx layer was also realized using MOCVD. We found that the Sn precursors less likely to desorb from the SiO2 surfaces than the Ge precursors.

  20. Magnetic properties of the germanides RE3Pt4Ge6 (RE=Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eustermann, Fabian; Eilers-Rethwisch, Matthias; Renner, Konstantin; Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Poettgen, Rainer; Janka, Oliver; Oldenburg Univ.

    2017-01-01

    The germanides RE 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 (RE=Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy) have been synthesized by arc-melting of the elements followed by inductive annealing to improve the crystallinity and allow for structural order. The compounds have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction; additionally the structure of Y 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 has been refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data. It exhibits a (3+1)D modulated structure, indicating isotypism with Ce 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 . The crystal structure can be described as an intergrowth between YIrGe 2 - and CaBe 2 Ge 2 -type slabs along [100]. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements showed Pauli paramagnetism for Y 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 and Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for Pr 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 and Nd 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 . Sm 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 exhibits van Vleck paramagnetism, while antiferromagnetic ordering at T N =8.1(1) K and T N =11.0(1) K is observed for Gd 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 and Tb 3 Pt 4 Ge 6 , respectively.

  1. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both [ 3 H]NaBH 4 reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated

  2. Chiral ligand-protected gold nanoclusters: Considering the optical activity from a viewpoint of ligand dissymmetric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chirality is a geometric property of a physical, chemical, or biological object, which is not superimposable on its mirror image. Its significant presence has led to a strong demand in the development of chiral drugs, sensors, catalysts, and photofunctional materials. In recent years, chirality of nanoscale organic/inorganic hybrids has received tremendous attention owing to potential applications in chiral nanotechnology. In particular, with the recent progress in the syntheses and characterizations of atomically precise gold nanoclusters protected by achiral thiolates, atomic level origins of their chirality have been unveiled. On the other hand, chirality or optical activity in metal nanoclusters can also be introduced via the surface chiral ligands, which should be universal for the nanosystems. This tutorial review presents some optically-active metal (gold nanoclusters protected by chiral thiolates or phosphines, and their chiroptical (or circular dichroism; CD properties are discussed mostly from a viewpoint of the ligand dissymmetric field scheme. The examples are the gold nanoclusters protected by (R-/(S-2-phenylpropane-1-thiol, (R-/(S-mercaptosuccinic acid, phenylboronate-D/L-fructose complexes, phosphine sulfonate-ephedrinium ion pairs, or glutathione. Some methodologies for versatile asymmetric transformation and chiroptical controls of the nanocluster compounds are also described. In the dissymmetric field model as the origin of optical activity, the chiroptical responses of the gold nanoclusters are strongly associated with coupled oscillator and/or CD stealing mechanisms based on the concept of induced CD (ICD derived from a perturbation theory, so on this basis, some characteristic features of the observed CD responses of chiral ligand-protected gold nanoclusters are presented in detail. We believe that various kinds of origins of chirality found in ligand-protected gold nanoclusters may provide models for understanding those of

  3. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  4. Spiral patterns of gold nanoclusters in silicon (100) produced by metal vapour vacuum arc implantation of gold ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachalam, Dinesh Kumar; Sood, Dinesh Kumar; Bhargava, Suresh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Self-assembled gold nanoclusters are attractive building blocks for future nanoscale sensors and optical devices due to their exciting catalytic properties. In this work, we report direct bottom-up synthesis of spiral patterns of gold nanoclusters in silicon (100) substrates by Au ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. This unique phenomenon is observed only above a critical threshold implantation dose and annealing temperature. Systematic study by electron microscopy, analytical x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy shows the temperature- and time-dependent nucleation, growth of Au nanoclusters and evolution of the spiral patterns. The observed patterns of gold nanoclusters bear a resemblance to the spiral growth prevalent in some directionally solidified eutectic alloys. Based on this systematic study of the growth and morphology of nanoclusters, a tentative model has been proposed for the formation mechanism of this unusual self-assembled pattern in an amorphous Si/Au system. This model shows that melting of the implanted layer is essential and without which no spiral patterns are observed. A better understanding of this self-assembly process will open up new ways to fabricate ordered arrays of gold nanoclusters in silicon substrates for seeding selective growth of one-dimensional nanostructures

  5. Covalently linked multimers of gold nanoclusters Au102(p-MBA)44 and Au∼250(p-MBA)n.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Tanja; Hulkko, Eero; Sokołowska, Karolina; Tero, Tiia-Riikka; Saarnio, Ville; Lindgren, Johan; Pettersson, Mika; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2016-11-10

    We present the synthesis, separation, and characterization of covalently-bound multimers of para-mercaptobenzoic acid (p-MBA) protected gold nanoclusters. The multimers were synthesized by performing a ligand-exchange reaction of a pre-characterized Au 102 (p-MBA) 44 nanocluster with biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol (BPDT). The reaction products were separated using gel electrophoresis yielding several distinct bands. The bands were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealing monomer, dimer, and trimer fractions of the nanocluster. TEM analysis of dimers in combination with molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the nanoclusters are covalently bound via a disulfide bridge between BPDT molecules. The linking chemistry is not specific to Au 102 (p-MBA) 44 . The same approach yields multimers also for a larger monodisperse p-MBA-protected cluster of approximately 250 gold atoms, Au ∼250 (p-MBA) n . While the Au 102 (p-MBA) 44 is not plasmonic, the Au ∼250 (p-MBA) n nanocluster supports localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at 530 nm. Multimers of the Au ∼250 (p-MBA) n exhibit additional transitions in their UV-vis spectrum at 630 nm and 810 nm, indicating the presence of hybridized LSPR modes. Well-defined structures and relatively small sizes make these systems excellent candidates for connecting ab initio theoretical studies and experimental quantum plasmonics. Moreover, our work opens new possibilities in the controlled synthesis of advanced monodisperse nanocluster superstructures.

  6. Epitaxial Fe3Si/Ge/Fe3Si thin film multilayers grown on GaAs(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenichen, B.; Herfort, J.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.; Riechert, H.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate Fe 3 Si/Ge/Fe 3 Si/GaAs(001) structures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The bottom Fe 3 Si epitaxial film on GaAs is always single crystalline. The structural properties of the Ge film and the top Fe 3 Si layer depend on the substrate temperature during Ge deposition. Different orientation distributions of the grains in the Ge and the upper Fe 3 Si film were found. The low substrate temperature T s of 150 °C during Ge deposition ensures sharp interfaces, however, results in predominantly amorphous films. We find that the intermediate T s (225 °C) leads to a largely [111] oriented upper Fe 3 Si layer and polycrystal films. The high T s of 325 °C stabilizes the [001] oriented epitaxial layer structure, i.e., delivers smooth interfaces and single crystal films over as much as 80% of the surface area. - Highlights: • Fe 3 Si/Ge/Fe 3 Si/GaAs(001) structures are grown by MBE. • The bottom Fe 3 Si film is always single crystalline. • The properties of the Ge film depend on the substrate temperature during deposition. • Optimum growth conditions lead to almost perfect epitaxy of Ge on Fe 3 Si

  7. Ge/SiGe superlattices for nanostructured thermoelectric modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrastina, D.; Cecchi, S.; Hague, J.P.; Frigerio, J.; Samarelli, A.; Ferre–Llin, L.; Paul, D.J.; Müller, E.; Etzelstorfer, T.; Stangl, J.; Isella, G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics are presently used in a number of applications for both turning heat into electricity and also for using electricity to produce cooling. Mature Si/SiGe and Ge/SiGe heteroepitaxial growth technology would allow highly efficient thermoelectric materials to be engineered, which would be compatible and integrable with complementary metal oxide silicon micropower circuits used in autonomous systems. A high thermoelectric figure of merit requires that electrical conductivity be maintained while thermal conductivity is reduced; thermoelectric figures of merit can be improved with respect to bulk thermoelectric materials by fabricating low-dimensional structures which enhance the density of states near the Fermi level and through phonon scattering at heterointerfaces. We have grown and characterized Ge-rich Ge/SiGe/Si superlattices for nanofabricated thermoelectric generators. Low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been used to obtain nanoscale-heterostructured material which is several microns thick. Crystal quality and strain control have been investigated by means of high resolution X-ray diffraction. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the material and interface quality. Electrical conductivity has been characterized by the mobility spectrum technique. - Highlights: ► High-quality Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells for thermoelectric applications ► Mobility spectra of systems featuring a large number of parallel conduction channels ► Competitive thermoelectric properties measured in single devices

  8. Selective growth of Ge nanowires by low-temperature thermal evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli; Ozturk, Birol; Sutter, Peter

    2008-10-29

    High-quality single-crystalline Ge nanowires with electrical properties comparable to those of bulk Ge have been synthesized by vapor-liquid-solid growth using Au growth seeds on SiO(2)/Si(100) substrates and evaporation from solid Ge powder in a low-temperature process at crucible temperatures down to 700 °C. High nanowire growth rates at these low source temperatures have been identified as being due to sublimation of GeO from substantial amounts of GeO(2) on the powder. The Ge nanowire synthesis from GeO is highly selective at our substrate temperatures (420-500 °C), i.e., occurs only on Au vapor-liquid-solid growth seeds. For growth of nanowires of 10-20 µm length on Au particles, an upper bound of 0.5 nm Ge deposition was determined in areas of bare SiO(2)/Si substrate without Au nanoparticles.

  9. Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B+-implants in Ge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B+ implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B+ implants in Ge...... from 5.0 × 1013 to 5.0 × 1015 cm-2 was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 °C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed...... was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B+ implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging...

  10. Structure of 78Ge from the 76Ge(t,p)78Ge reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardouin, D.; Lebrun, C.; Guilbault, F.; Remaud, B.; Vergnes, M.N.; Rotbard, G.; Kumar, K.

    1978-01-01

    The 76 Ge(t,p) 78 Ge reaction has been performed at a bombarding energy of 17 MeV. Thirteen excited states below 3 MeV excitation are reported with Jsup(π) values obtained by comparison to DWBA analysis. A comparison to a dynamical deformation theory is made and the results suggest 78 Ge is a transitional nucleus nearing spherical shape due to the proximity of the N-50 closed shell

  11. Photoluminescence and electroluminescence from Ge/strained GeSn/Ge quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chung-Yi; Chang, Chih-Chiang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chih-Hsiung; Huang, Shih-Hsien [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liu, C. W., E-mail: chee@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); National Nano Device Labs, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yi-Chiau; Chung, Hua; Chang, Chorng-Ping [Applied Materials Inc., Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Ge/strained GeSn/Ge quantum wells are grown on a 300 mm Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition. The direct bandgap emission from strained GeSn is observed in the photoluminescence spectra and is enhanced by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} passivation due to the field effect. The electroluminescence of the direct bandgap emission of strained GeSn is also observed from the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GeSn metal-insulator-semiconductor tunneling diodes. Electroluminescence is a good indicator of GeSn material quality, since defects in GeSn layers degrade the electroluminescence intensity significantly. At the accumulation bias, the holes in the Ni gate electrode tunnel to the strained n-type GeSn layer through the ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and recombine radiatively with electrons. The emission wavelength of photoluminescence and electroluminescence can be tuned by the Sn content.

  12. 75 FR 47318 - GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ...] GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and.... Applicants: GE Asset Management Incorporated (``GEAM'') and GE Investment Distributors, Inc. (``GEID... of Investment Management, Office of Investment Company Regulation). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Atomically Precise Copper Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy-Ai Dang

    The reactivity of MCl3(eta1-TEMPO) (M = Fe, Al; TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) with a variety of lignin models, including 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohol, 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol and 1,2-diphenyl-2-methoxyethanol is investigated. FeCl3(TEMPO) is effective in cleanly converting these substrates to the corresponding aldehyde or ketone. AlCl3(eta1-TEMPO) is also able to oxidize these substrates, however in a few instances the products of over-oxidation are also observed. In contrast, 2-phenoxyethanol is not oxidized by MCl 3(eta1-TEMPO); instead it likely coordinates to the metal center, forming a 2-phenoxyethoxide complex. Oxidation of activated alkanes by MCl3(eta1-TEMPO) suggests that the reactions proceed via an initial 1-electron concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) event. Finally, reaction of TEMPO with FeBr3 in Et 2O results in oxidation of the solvent. The copper hydride clusters [Cu14H12(phen) 6(PPh3)4][X]2 (X = Cl, OTf) are obtained in good yields by reaction of [(Ph3P)CuH]6 with 1,10-phenanthroline, in the presence of a halide or pseudohalide source. [Cu14H 12(phen)6(PPh3)4][Cl]2 reacts with CO2 in CH2Cl2, in the presence of excess Ph3P, to form the formate complex, [(Ph3P)2Cu(kappa 2-O2CH)], along with [(phen)(Ph3P)CuCl]. [Cu25H22(PPh3)12]Cl and [Cu 18H17(PPh3)10]Cl, are isolated from the reaction of Cu(OAc) and CuCl with Ph2SiH2, in the presence of PPh3. [Cu25H22(PPh3) 12]Cl formally features partial Cu(0) character. Subsequent reaction with Ph2phen resulted in the isolation of [Cu29Cl 4H22(Ph2phen)12]Cl (Ph2phen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline), in good yields. A time-resolved kinetic evaluation of the formation of [Cu29Cl4H22(Ph 2phen)12]Cl reveals that the mechanism of cluster growth is initiated by rapid ligand exchange, followed by slower extrusion of CuCl monomer, transport, and subsequent capture by intact clusters. Two Cu26 nanoclusters, tentatively formulated as [Cu 26H17(PPh3)9(OAc)3] and [Cu26H22(PPh3)10(OAc)2], are

  14. Ferrofluids in liquid crystalline systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo Neto, A.M.; Liebert, L.

    1989-08-01

    It is a well-known fact that intermediate or mesomorphic phase may exist between the crystalline and the isotropic liquid phases. The symmetry properties of these mesophases are intermediate between those of a crystal and a liquid. In this paper, some aspects of the use of ferrofluids in thermotropic and lyotropic systems are studied both the experimental difficulties as well as the fundamental phypical phenomena involved. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  15. EELS from organic crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brydson, R; Seabourne, C R; Hondow, N; Eddleston, M D; Jones, W

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for providing light element chemical composition information from organic, crystalline pharmaceutical materials including theophylline and paracetamol and discuss how this type of data can complement transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron diffraction when investigating polymorphism. We also discuss the potential for the extraction of bonding information using electron loss near-edge structure (ELNES)

  16. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons

  17. Layered double hydroxide supported gold nanoclusters by glutathione-capped Au nanoclusters precursor method for highly efficient aerobic oxidation of alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lun; Dou, Liguang; Zhang, Hui

    2014-03-01

    M3Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH, M = Mg, Ni, Co) supported Au nanoclusters (AuNCs) catalysts have been prepared for the first time by using water-soluble glutathione-capped Au nanoclusters as precursor. Detailed characterizations show that the ultrafine Au nanoclusters (ca. 1.5 +/- 0.6 nm) were well dispersed on the surface of LDH with a loading of Au below ~0.23 wt% upon synergetic interaction between AuNCs and M3Al-LDH. AuNCs/Mg3Al-LDH-0.23 exhibits much higher catalytic performance for the oxidation of 1-phenylethanol in toluene than Au/Mg3Al-LDH(DP) by the conventional deposition precipitation method and can be applied for a wide range of alcohols without basic additives. This catalyst can also be reused without loss of activity or selectivity. The AuNCs/M(= Ni, Co)3Al-LDH catalysts present even higher alcohol oxidation activity than AuNCs/Mg3Al-LDH. Particularly, AuNCs/Ni3Al-LDH-0.22 exhibits the highest activity (46 500 h-1) for the aerobic oxidation of 1-phenylethanol under solvent-free conditions attributed to its strongest Au-support synergy. The excellent activity and stability of AuNCs/M3Al-LDH catalysts render these materials promising candidates for green base-free selective oxidation of alcohols by molecular oxygen.M3Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH, M = Mg, Ni, Co) supported Au nanoclusters (AuNCs) catalysts have been prepared for the first time by using water-soluble glutathione-capped Au nanoclusters as precursor. Detailed characterizations show that the ultrafine Au nanoclusters (ca. 1.5 +/- 0.6 nm) were well dispersed on the surface of LDH with a loading of Au below ~0.23 wt% upon synergetic interaction between AuNCs and M3Al-LDH. AuNCs/Mg3Al-LDH-0.23 exhibits much higher catalytic performance for the oxidation of 1-phenylethanol in toluene than Au/Mg3Al-LDH(DP) by the conventional deposition precipitation method and can be applied for a wide range of alcohols without basic additives. This catalyst can also be reused without loss of activity

  18. Graphene on insulating crystalline substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akcoeltekin, S; El Kharrazi, M; Koehler, B; Lorke, A; Schleberger, M

    2009-01-01

    We show that it is possible to prepare and identify ultra-thin sheets of graphene on crystalline substrates such as SrTiO 3 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaF 2 by standard techniques (mechanical exfoliation, optical and atomic force microscopy). On the substrates under consideration we find a similar distribution of single layer, bilayer and few-layer graphene and graphite flakes as with conventional SiO 2 substrates. The optical contrast C of a single graphene layer on any of those substrates is determined by calculating the optical properties of a two-dimensional metallic sheet on the surface of a dielectric, which yields values between C = -1.5% (G/TiO 2 ) and C = -8.8% (G/CaF 2 ). This contrast is in reasonable agreement with experimental data and is sufficient to make identification by an optical microscope possible. The graphene layers cover the crystalline substrate in a carpet-like mode and the height of single layer graphene on any of the crystalline substrates as determined by atomic force microscopy is d SLG = 0.34 nm and thus much smaller than on SiO 2 .

  19. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortiz, Marlen; Acosta-Torres, Laura S; Hernández-Padrón, Genoveva; Mendieta, Alicia I; Bernal, Rodolfo; Cruz-Vázquez, Catalina; Castaño, Victor M

    2012-10-22

    Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  20. Three-dimensional nanomechanical mapping of amorphous and crystalline phase transitions in phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Ilja; Huey, Bryan D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-13

    The nanostructure of micrometer-sized domains (bits) in phase-change materials (PCM) that undergo switching between amorphous and crystalline phases plays a key role in the performance of optical PCM-based memories. Here, we explore the dynamics of such phase transitions by mapping PCM nanostructures in three dimensions with nanoscale resolution by combining precision Ar ion beam cross-sectional polishing and nanomechanical ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) mapping. Surface and bulk phase changes of laser written submicrometer to micrometer sized amorphous-to-crystalline (SET) and crystalline-to-amorphous (RESET) bits in chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 PCM are observed with 10-20 nm lateral and 4 nm depth resolution. UFM mapping shows that the Young's moduli of crystalline SET bits exceed the moduli of amorphous areas by 11 ± 2%, with crystalline content extending from a few nanometers to 50 nm in depth depending on the energy of the switching pulses. The RESET bits written with 50 ps pulses reveal shallower depth penetration and show 30-50 nm lateral and few nanometer vertical wavelike topography that is anticorrelated with the elastic modulus distribution. Reverse switching of amorphous RESET bits results in the full recovery of subsurface nanomechanical properties accompanied with only partial topography recovery, resulting in surface corrugations attributed to quenching. This precision sectioning and nanomechanical mapping approach could be applicable to a wide range of amorphous, nanocrystalline, and glass-forming materials for 3D nanomechanical mapping of amorphous-crystalline transitions.

  1. Quadrupole effects in core and valence photoelectron emission from crystalline germanium measured via a spatially modulated x-ray interference field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E.J.; Woicik, J.C.; Pianetta, P.; Vartanyants, I.A.; Cooper, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    Near a crystal x-ray Bragg reflection, the incident and reflected x-ray beams that travel with opposite wave vectors create an x-ray standing-wave (XSW) interference field. The quadrupole (and higher order nondipole) contributions to the photoelectron emission matrix element differ for these two beams due to their different wave vectors. By monitoring the angle-resolved photoelectron yield as a function of photon energy near the (11-1) Bragg back-reflection condition of crystalline Ge, we measure the contribution of nondipole effects to Ge 3p, Ge 3d, and Ge valence-band (4s and 4p) XSW photoelectron emission. Significant changes due to nondipole emission are measured in both the apparent amplitude and phase of the Ge structure factor relative to the true Ge atomic distribution, and compared to theory

  2. Significant reduction of thermal conductivity in Si/Ge core-shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Giapis, Konstantinos P; Goicochea, Javier V; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2011-02-09

    We report on the effect of germanium (Ge) coatings on the thermal transport properties of silicon (Si) nanowires using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that a simple deposition of a Ge shell of only 1 to 2 unit cells in thickness on a single crystalline Si nanowire can lead to a dramatic 75% decrease in thermal conductivity at room temperature compared to an uncoated Si nanowire. By analyzing the vibrational density states of phonons and the participation ratio of each specific mode, we demonstrate that the reduction in the thermal conductivity of Si/Ge core-shell nanowire stems from the depression and localization of long-wavelength phonon modes at the Si/Ge interface and of high frequency nonpropagating diffusive modes.

  3. Ge nanocrystals embedded in ultrathin Si3N4 multilayers with SiO2 barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahariqushchi, R.; Gundogdu, Sinan; Aydinli, A.

    2017-04-01

    Multilayers of germanium nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in thin films of silicon nitride matrix separated with SiO2 barriers have been fabricated using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). SiGeN/SiO2 alternating bilayers have been grown on quartz and Si substrates followed by post annealing in Ar ambient from 600 to 900 °C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) as well as Raman spectroscopy show good crystallinity of Ge confined to SiGeN layers in samples annealed at 900 °C. Strong compressive stress for SiGeN/SiO2 structures were observed through Raman spectroscopy. Size, as well as NC-NC distance were controlled along the growth direction for multilayer samples by varying the thickness of bilayers. Visible photoluminescence (PL) at 2.3 and 3.1 eV with NC size dependent intensity is observed and possible origin of PL is discussed.

  4. Heteroepitaxial Growth of Vacuum-Evaporated Si-Ge Films on Nano structured Silicon Substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayu Wazira Azhari; Ayu Wazira Azhari; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Saleem Hussain Zaidi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a low-cost vacuum-evaporated technique is used in the heteroepitaxial growth of Si-Ge films. Three different surface variations are employed: for example polished Si, Si micro pyramids and Si nano pillars profiles. A simple metal-assisted chemical etching method is used to fabricate the Si nano pillars, with Ag acting as a catalyst. Following deposition, substrates are subjected to post-deposition thermal annealing at 1000 degree Celsius to improve the crystallinity of the Ge layer. Optical and morphological studies of surface area are conducted using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), Raman spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. From the infrared spectroscopy analysis, the energy bandgap for Si-Ge films is estimated to be around 0.94 eV. This high-quality Si-Ge film is most favourable for optics, optoelectronics and high-efficiency solar cell applications. (author)

  5. Boron diffusion in Ge+ premorphized and BF2 implanted Si(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, L.F.; Acosta-Ortiz, S.E.; Zou, L.X.; Regalado, L.E.; Sun, D.Z.; Wang, Z.G.

    1998-01-01

    The annealing behavior of Si implanted with Ge and then BF 2 has been characterized by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The results show that annealing at 600 Centigrade for 60 minutes can only remove a little damage induced by implantation and nearly no redistribution of Ge and B atoms has occurred during the annealing. The initial crystallinity of Si is fully recovered after annealing at 950 Centigrade for 60 minutes and accompanied by Ge diffusion. Very shallow boron junction depth has been formed. When annealing temperature rises to 1050 Centigrade, B diffusion enhances, which leads to a deep diffusion and good distribution of B atoms into the Si substrate. The X-ray diffraction (004) rocking curves from the samples annealed at 1050 Centigrade for 60 minutes display two Si Ge peaks, which may be related to the B concentration profiles. (Author)

  6. Phase change behaviors of Zn-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoxiang; Nie Qiuhua; Shen Xiang; Fu Jing; Xu Tiefeng; Dai Shixun; Wang, R. P.; Wu Liangcai

    2012-01-01

    Zn-doped Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 phase-change materials have been investigated for phase change memory applications. Zn 15.16 (Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 ) 84.84 phase change film exhibits a higher crystallization temperature (∼258 °C), wider band gap (∼0.78 eV), better data retention of 10 years at 167.5 °C, higher crystalline resistance, and faster crystallization speed compared with the conventional Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . The proper Zn atom added into Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 serves as a center for suppression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase transition, and fcc phase has high thermal stability partially due to the bond recombination among Zn, Sb, and Te atoms.

  7. Epitaxial Growth of Hard Ferrimagnetic Mn3Ge Film on Rhodium Buffer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Sugihara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mn\\(_3\\Ge has a tetragonal Heusler-like D0\\(_{22}\\ crystal structure, exhibiting a large uniaxial magnetic anisotropy and small saturation magnetization due to its ferrimagnetic spin structure; thus, it is a hard ferrimagnet. In this report, epitaxial growth of a Mn\\(_3\\Ge film on a Rh buffer layer was investigated for comparison with that of a film on a Cr buffer layer in terms of the lattice mismatch between Mn\\(_3\\Ge and the buffer layer. The film grown on Rh had much better crystalline quality than that grown on Cr, which can be attributed to the small lattice mismatch. Epitaxial films of Mn\\(_3\\Ge on Rh show somewhat small coercivity (\\(H_{\\rm c}\\ = 12.6 kOe and a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (\\(K_{\\rm u}\\ = 11.6 Merg/cm\\(^3\\, comparable to that of the film grown on Cr.

  8. Chemical states and optical properties of thermally evaporated Ge-Te and Ge-Sb-Te amorphous thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, D.; Shandhu, S. [Semiconductor Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University Amritsar (India); Thangaraj, R., E-mail: rthangaraj@rediffmail.com [Semiconductor Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University Amritsar (India)

    2012-07-15

    Thin amorphous films of Ge{sub 22}Sb{sub 22}Te{sub 56} and Ge{sub 50}Te{sub 50} have been prepared from their respective polycrystalline bulk on glass substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The amorphous nature of the films was checked with X-ray diffraction studies. Amorphous-to-crystalline transition of the films has been induced by thermal annealing and the structural phases have been identified by X-ray diffraction. The phase transformation temperature of the films was evaluated by temperature dependent sheet resistance measurement. The chemical structure of the amorphous films has been investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the role of Sb in phase change Ge{sub 22}Sb{sub 22}Te{sub 56} film is discussed. Survey and core level (Ge 3d, Te 3d, Te 4d, Sb 3p, Sb 3d, O 1s, C 1s) band spectra has been recorded and analyzed. For optical studies, the transmittance and the reflectance spectra were measured over the wavelength ranges 400-2500 nm using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The optical band gap, refractive index and extinction coefficient are also presented for thermally evaporated amorphous thin films.

  9. Cluster self-organization of germanate systems: suprapolyhedral precursor clusters and self-assembly of K2Nd4Ge4O13(OH)4, K2YbGe4O10(OH), K2Sc2Ge2O7(OH)2, and KScGe2O6(PYR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyushin, G.D.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    2008-01-01

    One performed the computerized (the TOPOS 4.0 software package) geometric and topological analyses of all known types of K, TR-germanates (TR = La-Lu, Y, Sc, In). The skeleton structure are shown as three-dimensional 3D, K, TR, Ge-patterns (graphs) with remote oxygen atoms. TR 4 3 3 4 3 3 + T 4 3 4 3, K 2 YbGe 4 O 14 (OH) pattern, TR 6 6 3 6 + T1 6 8 6 + T2 3 6 8, K 2 Sc 2 Ge 2 O 7 (OH) 2 , TR 6 4 6 4 + T 6 4 6 and KScGe 2 O 6 - TR 6 6 3 6 3 4 + T1 6 3 6 + T2 6 4 3 patterns served as crystal-forming 2D TR,Ge-patterns for K 2 Nd 4 Ge 4 O 13 (OH) 4 . One performed the 3D-simulation of the mechanism of self-arrangement of the crystalline structures: cluster-precursor - parent chain - microlayer - microskeleton (super-precursor). Within K 2 Nd 4 Ge 4 O 13 (OH) 4 , K 2 Sc 2 Ge 2 O 7 (OH) 2 and KScGe 2 O 6 one identified the invariant type of the cyclic hexapolyhedral cluster-precursor consisting of TR-octahedrons linked by diorthogroups stabilized by K atoms. For K 2 Nd 4 Ge 4 O 13 (OH) 4 one determined the type of the cyclic tetrapolyhedral cluster-precursor consisting of TR-octavertices linked by tetrahedrons. The cluster CN within the layer just for KScGe 2 O 6 water-free germanate (the PYR pyroxene analog) is equal to 6 (the maximum possible value), while in the rest OH-containing germanates it constitutes 4. One studied the formation mechanism of Ge-radicals in the form of Ge 2 O 7 and Ge 4 O 13 groupings, GeO 3 chain and the tubular structure consisting of Ge 8 O 20 fixed cyclic groupings [ru

  10. Rational design of monocrystalline (InP)(y)Ge(5-2y)/Ge/Si(100) semiconductors: synthesis and optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Patrick E; Chizmeshya, Andrew V G; Jiang, Liying; Beeler, Richard T; Poweleit, Christian D; Gallagher, James; Smith, David J; Menéndez, José; Kouvetakis, John

    2013-08-21

    In this work, we extend our strategy previously developed to synthesize functional, crystalline Si(5-2y)(AlX)y {X = N,P,As} semiconductors to a new class of Ge-III-V hybrid compounds, leading to the creation of (InP)(y)Ge(5-2y) analogues. The compounds are grown directly on Ge-buffered Si(100) substrates using gas source MBE by tuning the interaction between Ge-based P(GeH3)3 precursors and In atoms to yield nanoscale "In-P-Ge3" building blocks, which then confer their molecular structure and composition to form the target solids via complete elimination of H2. The collateral production of reactive germylene (GeH2), via partial decomposition of P(GeH3)3, is achieved by simple adjustment of the deposition conditions, leading to controlled Ge enrichment of the solid product relative to the stoichiometric InPGe3 composition. High resolution XRD, XTEM, EDX, and RBS indicate that the resultant monocrystalline (InP)(y)Ge(5-2y) alloys with y = 0.3-0.7 are tetragonally strained and fully coherent with the substrate and possess a cubic diamond-like structure. Molecular and solid-state ab initio density functional theory (DFT) simulations support the viability of "In-P-Ge3" building-block assembly of the proposed crystal structures, which consist of a Ge parent crystal in which the P atoms form a third-nearest-neighbor sublattice and "In-P" dimers are oriented to exclude energetically unfavorable In-In bonding. The observed InP concentration dependence of the lattice constant is closely reproduced by DFT simulation of these model structures. Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometry are also consistent with the "In-P-Ge3" building-block interpretation of the crystal structure, while the observation of photoluminescence suggests that (InP)(y)Ge(5-2y) may have important optoelectronic applications.

  11. Carbon surface diffusion and SiC nanocluster self-ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezoldt, J.; Trushin, Yu.V.; Kharlamov, V.S.; Schmidt, A.A.; Cimalla, V.; Ambacher, O.

    2006-01-01

    The process of the spatial ordering of SiC nanoclusters on the step edges on Si surfaces was studied by means of multi-scale computer simulation. The evolution of cluster arrays on an ideal flat surface and surfaces with terraces of various widths was performed by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations based on quantitative studies of potential energy surfaces (PES) by molecular dynamics (MD). PES analysis revealed that certain types of steps act as strong trapping centres for both Si and C adatoms stimulating clusters nucleation. Spatial ordering of the SiC nanoclusters at the terrace edges can be achieved if the parameters of the growth process (substrate temperature, carbon flux) and substrate (steps direction and terrace widths) are adjusted to the surface morphology. Temperature ranges for growth regimes with and without formation of cluster chains were determined. Cluster size distributions and the dependence of optimal terrace width for self ordering on the deposition parameters were obtained

  12. Site of Er ions in silica layers codoped with Si nanoclusters and Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrino, P.; Garrido, B.; Arbiol, J.; Garcia, C.; Lebour, Y.; Morante, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Silica layers implanted with Si and Er ions to various doses and annealed at 950 deg. C have been investigated by means of energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and high annular angle dark field (HAADF). EFTEM analysis reveals Si nanoclusters (Si-nc) with an average size around 3 nm for high Si content (15 at. %) whereas no clusters can be imaged for the lowest Si excess (5 at. %). Raman scattering supports that amorphous Si precipitates are present in all the samples. Moreover, the filtered images show that Er ions appear preferentially located outside the Si-nc. HAADF analysis confirms that the Er atoms form agglomerations of 5-10 nm size when the Er concentration exceeds 1x10 20 cm -3 . This observation correlates well with the reduction of the Er population excitable by Si nanoclusters, in the best case corresponding to 10% of the total. A suitable tuning of the annealing drastically reduces this deleterious effect

  13. Ab initio structural and electronic properties of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters in the ground and excited state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degoli, Elena; Bisi, O.; Ossicini, Stefano; Cantele, G.; Ninno, D.; Luppi, Eleonora; Magri, Rita

    2004-01-01

    Electronic and structural properties of small hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters as a function of dimension are calculated from ab initio technique. The effects induced by the creation of an electron-hole pair are discussed in detail, showing the strong interplay between the structural and optical properties of the system. The distortion induced on the structure after an electronic excitation of the cluster is analyzed together with the role of the symmetry constraint during the relaxation. We point out how the overall effect is that of significantly changing the electronic spectrum if no symmetry constraint is imposed to the system. Such distortion can account for the Stokes shift and provides a possible structural model to be linked to the four-level scheme invoked in the literature to explain recent results for the optical gain in silicon nanoclusters. Finally, formation energies for clusters with increasing dimension are calculated and their relative stability discussed

  14. First-principles investigation of strain effects on the energy gaps in silicon nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, X-H; Alizadeh, A; Bhate, N; Varanasi, K K; Kumar, S K; Nayak, S K

    2007-01-01

    First-principles density functional calculations were performed to study strain effects on the energy gaps in silicon nanoclusters with diameter ranging from 0.6 to 2 nm. Hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic strains have been found to affect the energy gaps differently. For the same strain energy density, non-hydrostatic strain leads to a significantly larger change in the energy gap of silicon clusters compared to that of the hydrostatic strain case. In contrast, hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic strain effects on the energy gaps of bulk Si or larger size Si quantum dots are comparable. Non-hydrostatic strains break the tetrahedral bonding symmetry in silicon, resulting in significant variation in the energy gaps due to the splitting of the degenerate orbitals in the clusters. Our results suggest that the combination of energy gaps and strains permits the engineering of photoluminescence in silicon nanoclusters and offers the possibility of designing novel optical devices and chemical sensors

  15. Plasmon transmutation: inducing new modes in nanoclusters by adding dielectric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fangfang; Ye, Jian; Liu, Na; Van Dorpe, Pol; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-09-12

    Planar clusters of coupled plasmonic nanoparticles support nanoscale electromagnetic "hot spots" and coherent effects, such as Fano resonances, with unique near and far field signatures, currently of prime interest for sensing applications. Here we show that plasmonic cluster properties can be substantially modified by the addition of individual, discrete dielectric nanoparticles at specific locations on the cluster, introducing new plasmon modes, or transmuting existing plasmon modes to new ones, in the resulting metallodielectric nanocomplex. Depositing a single carbon nanoparticle in the junction between a pair of adjacent nanodisks induces a metal-dielectric-metal quadrupolar plasmon mode. In a ten-membered cluster, placement of several carbon nanoparticles in junctions between multiple adjacent nanoparticles introduces a collective magnetic plasmon mode into the Fano dip, giving rise to an additional subradiant mode in the metallodielectric nanocluster response. These examples illustrate that adding dielectric nanoparticles to metallic nanoclusters expands the number and types of plasmon modes supported by these new mixed-media nanoscale assemblies.

  16. Interaction between rare-earth ions and amorphous silicon nanoclusters produced at low processing temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meldrum, A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada)]. E-mail: ameldrum@ualberta.ca; Hryciw, A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada); MacDonald, A.N. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada); Blois, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada); Clement, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2V4 (Canada); De Corby, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2V4 (Canada); Wang, J. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Li Quan [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-12-15

    Temperatures of 1000 deg. C and higher are a significant problem for the incorporation of erbium-doped silicon nanocrystal devices into standard silicon technology, and make the fabrication of contacts and reflectors in light emitting devices difficult. In the present work, we use energy-filtered TEM imaging techniques to show the formation of size-controlled amorphous silicon nanoclusters in SiO films annealed between 400 and 500 deg. C. The PL properties of such films are characteristic of amorphous silicon, and the spectrum can be controlled via a statistical size effect-as opposed to quantum confinement-that has previously been proposed for porous amorphous silicon. Finally, we show that amorphous nanoclusters sensitize the luminescence from the rare-earth ions Er, Nd, Yb, and Tm with excitation cross-sections similar in magnitude to erbium-doped silicon nanocrystal composites, and with a similar nonresonant energy transfer mechanism.

  17. The role of oxygen and water on molybdenum nanoclusters for electro catalytic ammonia production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2014-01-01

    are -0.72 V or lower for all oxygen coverages studied, and it is thus possible to (re)activate (partially) oxidized nanoclusters for electrochemical ammonia production, e.g., using a dry proton conductor or an aqueous electrolyte. At lower oxygen coverages, nitrogen molecules can adsorb to the surface...... and electrochemical ammonia production via the associative mechanism is possible at potentials as low as -0.45 V to -0.7 V. © 2014 Howalt and Vegge........ In this study, we present theoretical investigations of the influence of oxygen adsorption and reduction on pure and nitrogen covered molybdenum nanocluster electro catalysts for electrochemical reduction of N2 to NH3 with the purpose of understanding oxygen and water poisoning of the catalyst. Density...

  18. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge (100) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Beeman, J.W.; Emes, J.H.; Loretto, D.; Itoh, K.M.; Haller, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The author present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two (100) Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900 angstrom/surface to 300 angstrom/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500 angstrom/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300 angstrom/surface Au sample show epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200 angstrom/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150 angstrom across an interval of lmm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons

  19. Microstructure and magnetic behavior of Mn doped GeTe chalcogenide semiconductors based phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Adam Abdalla Elbashir; Cheng, Xiaomin; Abuelhassan, Hassan H.; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2017-06-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are the most promising candidates to be used as an active media in the universal data storage and spintronic devices, due to their large differences in physical properties of the amorphous-crystalline phase transition behavior. In the present study, the microstructure, magnetic and electrical behaviors of Ge0.94Mn0.06Te thin film were investigated. The crystallographic structure of Ge0.94Mn0.06Te thin film was studied sing X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HR-TEM). The XRD pattern showed that the crystallization structure of the film was rhombohedral phase for GeTe with a preference (202) orientation. The HR-TEM image of the crystalline Ge0.94Mn0.06Te thin film demonstrated that, there were two large crystallites and small amorphous areas. The magnetization as a function of the magnetic field analyses of both amorphous and crystalline states showed the ferromagnetic hysteretic behaviors. Then, the hole carriers concentration of the film was measured and it found to be greater than 1021 cm-3 at room temperature. Moreover, the anomalous of Hall Effect (AHE) was clearly observed for the measuring temperatures 5, 10 and 50 K. The results demonstrated that the magnitude of AHE decreased when the temperature was increasing.

  20. Crystallization behavior of Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 films in optical disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khulbe, Pramod K.; Hurst, Terril; Mansuripur, Masud; Horie, Michikazu

    2002-01-01

    We report laser-induced crystallization behavior of binary Sb-Te and ternary Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 thin film samples in a typical quadrilayer stack as used in phase-change optical disk data storage. Several experiments have been conducted on a two-laser static tester in which one laser operating in pulse mode writes crystalline marks on amorphous film or amorphous marks on crystalline film, while the second laser operating at low-power cw mode simultaneously monitors the progress of the crystalline or amorphous mark formation in real time in terms of the reflectivity variation. The results of this study show that the crystallization kinetics of this class of film is strongly growth dominant, which is significantly different from the crystallization kinetics of stochiometric Ge-Sb-Te compositions. In Sb-Te and Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 thin-film samples, the crystallization behavior of the two forms of amorphous states, namely, as-deposited amorphous state and melt-quenched amorphous state, remains approximately same. We have also presented experiments showing the effect of the variation of the Sb/Te ratio and Ge doping on the crystallization behavior of these films

  1. Ab initio study of structural, electronic, optical, and vibrational properties of ZnxSy (x + y = 2 to 5) nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, P. S.; Pandey, D. K.; Agrawal, S.; Agrawal, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    An ab initio study of the stability, structural, electronic. and optical properties has been performed for 46 zinc sulfide nanoclusters Zn x S y (x + y = n = 2 to 5). Five out of them are seen to be unstable as their vibrational frequencies are found to be imaginary. A B3LYP-DFT/6-311G(3df) method is employed to optimize the geometries and a TDDFT method is used for the study of the optical properties. The binding energies (BE), HOMO-LUMO gaps and the bond lengths have been obtained for all the clusters. For the ZnS 2 , ZnS 3 , and ZnS 4 nanoclusters, our stable structures are seen to be different from those obtained earlier by using the effective core potentials. We have also considered the zero point energy (ZPE) corrections ignored by the earlier workers. For a fixed value of n, we designate the most stable structure the one, which has maximum final binding energy per atom. The adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA), charges on the atoms, dipole moments, optical properties, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, relative infrared intensities, and Raman scattering activities have been investigated for the most stable structures. The nanoclusters containing large number of S atoms for each n is found to be most stable. The HOMO-LUMO gap decreases from n = 2-3 and then increases above n = 3. The IP and EA both fluctuate with the cluster size n. The optical absorption is quite weak in visible region but strong in the ultraviolet region in most of the nanoclusters except a few. The optical absorption spectrum or electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) is unique for every nanocluster and may be used to characterize a specific nanocluster. The growth of most stable nanoclusters may be possible in the experiments.

  2. Electron microscopy and positron annihilation study of CdSe nanoclusters embedded in MgO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huis, M.A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    CdSe nanoclusters are created in MgO by means of co-implantation of 280 keV, 1 x 10(16) Cd ions cm(-2) and 210 keV, 1 x 10(16) Se ions cm(-2) in single crystals of MgO(001) and subsequent thermal annealing at a temperature of 1300 K, The structural properties and the orientation relationship between

  3. Probing DNA-stabilized fluorescent silver nanocluster spectral heterogeneity by time-correlated single photon counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro, Miguel; Paolucci, Valentina; Hooley, Emma Nicole

    2016-01-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) are promising fluorophores whose photophysical properties and synthesis procedures have received increased attention in the literature. However, depending on the preparation conditions and the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNC samples can host a range...... the spectral heterogeneity of other fluorophores, such as luminescent colloidal nanoparticles, and to assess the reproducibility of a synthetic procedure containing an unknown distribution of emissive species....

  4. Solvent Effect on Redox Properties of Hexanethiolate Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanoclusters

    OpenAIRE

    Su, B; Zhang, M; Shao, Y; Girault, HH

    2006-01-01

    The capacitance of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs), CMPC, in solution has been theoretically reconsidered from an electrostatic viewpoint, in which an MPC is considered as an isolated charged sphere within two dielectric layers, the intrinsic coating monolayer, and the bulk solvent. The model predicts that the bulk solvent provides an important contribution to CMPC and influences the redox properties of MPCs. This theoretical prediction is then examined experimentally by comparin...

  5. Si, Ge and SiGe wires for sensor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinin, A.A.; Khoverko, Yu.M.; Ostrovskii, I.P.; Nichkalo, S.I.; Nikolaeva, A.A.; Konopko, L.A.; Stich, I.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance and magnetoresistance of Si, Ge and Si-Ge micro- and nanowires were studied in temperature range 4,2-300 K at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The wires diameters range from 200 nm to 20 μm. Ga-In gates were created to wires and ohmic I-U characteristics were observed in all temperature range. It was found high elastic strain for Ge nanowires (of about 0,7%) as well as high magnitude of magnetoresistance (of about 250% at 14 T), which was used to design multifunctional sensor of simultaneous measurements of strain and magnetic field intensity. (authors)

  6. Influence of the additive Ag for crystallization of amorphous Ge-Sb-Te thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki-Ho; Kim, Sung-Won; Seo, Jae-Hee [Faculty of Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Kwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Yong, E-mail: hyleee@chonnam.ac.k [Faculty of Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Kwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-29

    We have investigated the optical and amorphous-to-crystalline transition properties in four-types of chalcogenide thin films; Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11}, Ag-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and Ag-Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11}. Crystallization was caused by nano-pulse illumination ({lambda} = 658 nm) with power (P) of 1-17 mW and pulse duration (t) of 10-460 ns, and the morphologies of crystallized spots were observed by SEM and microscope. It was found that the crystallized spot nearby linearly increases in size with increasing the illuminating energy (E = P {center_dot} t) and eventually ablated out by over illumination. Changes in the optical transmittance of as-deposited and annealed films were measured using a UV-vis-IR spectrophotometer. In addition, a speed of amorphous-to-crystalline transition was evaluated by detecting the reflection response signals for the nano-pulse scanning. Conclusively, the Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11} film has a faster crystallization speed than the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film despite its higher crystallization temperature. The crystallization speed was largely improved by adding Ag in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film but not in Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11} film. To explain these results, we considered a heat confinement by electron hopping.

  7. First-principles study of nitrogen doping in cubic and amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravati, S.; Colleoni, D.; Mazzarello, R.; Kühne, T. D.; Krack, M.; Bernasconi, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the structural, electronic and vibrational properties of amorphous and cubic Ge2Sb2Te5 doped with N at 4.2 at.% by means of large scale ab initio simulations. Nitrogen can be incorporated in molecular form in both the crystalline and amorphous phases at a moderate energy cost. In contrast, insertion of N in the atomic form is very energetically costly in the crystalline phase, though it is still possible in the amorphous phase. These results support the suggestion that N segregates at the grain boundaries during the crystallization of the amorphous phase, resulting in a reduction in size of the crystalline grains and an increased crystallization temperature.

  8. Gradients of Rac1 Nanoclusters Support Spatial Patterns of Rac1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remorino, Amanda; De Beco, Simon; Cayrac, Fanny; Di Federico, Fahima; Cornilleau, Gaetan; Gautreau, Alexis; Parrini, Maria Carla; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Dahan, Maxime; Coppey, Mathieu

    2017-11-14

    Rac1 is a small RhoGTPase switch that orchestrates actin branching in space and time and protrusion/retraction cycles of the lamellipodia at the cell front during mesenchymal migration. Biosensor imaging has revealed a graded concentration of active GTP-loaded Rac1 in protruding regions of the cell. Here, using single-molecule imaging and super-resolution microscopy, we show an additional supramolecular organization of Rac1. We find that Rac1 partitions and is immobilized into nanoclusters of 50-100 molecules each. These nanoclusters assemble because of the interaction of the polybasic tail of Rac1 with the phosphoinositide lipids PIP2 and PIP3. The additional interactions with GEFs and possibly GAPs, downstream effectors, and other partners are responsible for an enrichment of Rac1 nanoclusters in protruding regions of the cell. Our results show that subcellular patterns of Rac1 activity are supported by gradients of signaling nanodomains of heterogeneous molecular composition, which presumably act as discrete signaling platforms. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Solventless acid-free synthesis of mesostructured titania: Nanovessels for metal complexes and metal nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dag, Oe.; Celik, Oe.; Ozin, G.A. [Department of Chemistry, Bilkent University, 06533 Ankara (Turkey); Soten, I.; Polarz, S.; Coombs, N. [Materials Chemistry Research Group, Chemistry Department, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2003-01-01

    A new and highly reproducible method to obtain mesostructured titania materials is introduced in this contribution. The mesostructured titania is obtained by employing self-assembled structures of non-ionic alkyl-poly(ethylene oxide) surfactants as templates. The materials are produced without additional solvents such as alcohols, or even water. Only the titanium(IV) ethoxide and the surfactant (C{sub 12}EO{sub 10}) are needed. Water, in the form of that attached to the surfactant and from the atmosphere, induces growth of titania nanoclusters in the synthesis sol. It is indicated that these nanoclusters interact with the surfactant EO-head groups to form a new titanotropic amphiphile. The new amphiphiles self-assemble into titanium nanocluster-surfactant hybrid lyotropic phases, which are transformed to the final mesostructured materials by further condensation of the titania network. The titania materials can be obtained also with noble-metal particles immobilized in the mesostructured framework. It is seen that when different metal salts are used as the metal precursors, different interactions with the titania walls are found. The materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), polarization optical microscopy (POM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, and micro-Raman analysis. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Synthesis and analysis of gold nanoclusters on silicon substrates by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.K.; Venkatachalam, D.K.; Bhargava, S.K.; Evans, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate the growth of silica nanowires on silicon substrates, two different seeding techniques: 1) ion implantation and 2) chemical deposition of as-synthesised gold colloids have been compared for the formation of catalysing gold nanoclusters. The prepared substrates of both types were analysed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at ANSTO to determine the amount of gold and its depth distribution. The topography of the substrates deposited with chemically synthesised gold nanoparticles were studied under SEM. The preliminary ion beam (RBS) analysis has shown ion implantation as a novel technique for seeding Au nanoclusters on silicon substrates facilitating growth of nanowires. This method holds a great potential for using any metal across the periodic table that can act as catalysing seed nanoclusters for nanowire growth. The use of chemical deposition as a seeding technique to deposit as-synthesised gold nanoparticles requires further investigations. RBS results show significant difference in the depth distribution of the gold nanoparticles on silicon substrates seeded by two different techniques. (author). 6 refs., 4 figs

  11. Rapid fluorescence assay for Sudan dyes using polyethyleneimine-coated copper nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Yu; Li, Jia Xing; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun; Qu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We report that the intensity of the blue fluorescence of copper nanoclusters coated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) is strongly reduced in the presence of the food dyestuffs Sudan I-IV. This finding was exploited in a label-free fluorescence assay for these Sudan dyes both in ethanol and aqueous solutions. The PEI-capped nanoclusters have an average diameter of 1.8 nm and are displaying, under 355 nm excitation, a blue emission at 480 nm that matches the absorption bands of the Sudan dyes. The clusters are stable in solution for at least 1 month. Under optimum conditions, this assay can be applied to the quantification of the dyes Sudan I, II, III, and IV, respectively, in the 0.1−30, 0.1–30, 0.1–25, and 0.1–25 μM concentration ranges, and the detection limits (3σ/slope) are 65, 70, 45, and 50 nM, respectively. The capability of reducing the fluorescence of the PEI-capped copper nanoclusters is directly related to the number of the functional groups in that Sudan III and IV give lower detection limits. This analytical scheme exhibits a remarkably high selectivity for the Sudan dyes over potentially interfering substances. The method was successfully applied to determine Sudan I, II, III, and IV in hot chilli powder. (author)

  12. Platinum nano-cluster thin film formed on glassy carbon and the application for methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Gang; Oyama, Munetaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    As an interesting platinum nanostructured material, a Pt nano-cluster film (PtNCF) attached on glassy carbon (GC) is reported. Through the reduction of PtCl 4 2- by ascorbic acid in the presence of GC substrate, a Pt thin continuous film composed of small nano-clusters which had a further agglomerated nanostructure of small grains could be attached on the GC surface. It was found that the electrocatalytic ability of PtNCF for the methanol oxidation was apparently higher than those of the Pt nano-clusters dispersedly attached on GC or indium in oxides. In addition, the electrocatalytic performance of PtNCF per Pt amount was superior to that of Pt black on GC. These results indicate that, in spite of the continuous nanostructures, nano-grains of PtNCF worked effectively for the catalytic electrolysis. The present PtNCF can be regarded as an interesting thin film material, which can be easily prepared by one-step chemical reduction

  13. Iron Oxide Colloidal Nanoclusters as Theranostic Vehicles and Their Interactions at the Cellular Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasia Kostopoulou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in surfactant-assisted chemical approaches have led the way for the exploitation of nanoscale inorganic particles in medical diagnosis and treatment. In this field, magnetically-driven multimodal nanotools that perform both detection and therapy, well-designed in size, shape and composition, are highly advantageous. Such a theranostic material—which entails the controlled assembly of smaller (maghemite nanocrystals in a secondary motif that is highly dispersible in aqueous media—is discussed here. These surface functionalized, pomegranate-like ferrimagnetic nanoclusters (40–85 nm are made of nanocrystal subunits that show a remarkable magnetic resonance imaging contrast efficiency, which is better than that of the superparamagnetic contrast agent Endorem©. Going beyond this attribute and with their demonstrated low cytotoxicity in hand, we examine the critical interaction of such nanoprobes with cells at different physiological environments. The time-dependent in vivo scintigraphic imaging of mice experimental models, combined with a biodistribution study, revealed the accumulation of nanoclusters in the spleen and liver. Moreover, the in vitro proliferation of spleen cells and cytokine production witnessed a size-selective regulation of immune system cells, inferring that smaller clusters induce mainly inflammatory activities, while larger ones induce anti-inflammatory actions. The preliminary findings corroborate that the modular chemistry of magnetic iron oxide nanoclusters stimulates unexplored pathways that could be driven to alter their function in favor of healthcare.

  14. Electronic Properties of Metallic Nanoclusters on Semiconductor Surfaces: Implications for Nanoelectronic Device Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Takhee; Liu Jia; Chen, N.-P.; Andres, R.P.; Janes, D.B.; Reifenberger, R.

    2000-01-01

    We review current research on the electronic properties of nanoscale metallic islands and clusters deposited on semiconductor substrates. Reported results for a number of nanoscale metal-semiconductor systems are summarized in terms of their fabrication and characterization. In addition to the issues faced in large-area metal-semiconductor systems, nano-systems present unique challenges in both the realization of well-controlled interfaces at the nanoscale and the ability to adequately characterize their electrical properties. Imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy as well as electrical characterization by current-voltage spectroscopy enable the study of the electrical properties of nanoclusters/semiconductor systems at the nanoscale. As an example of the low-resistance interfaces that can be realized, low-resistance nanocontacts consisting of metal nanoclusters deposited on specially designed ohmic contact structures are described. To illustrate a possible path to employing metal/semiconductor nanostructures in nanoelectronic applications, we also describe the fabrication and performance of uniform 2-D arrays of such metallic clusters on semiconductor substrates. Using self-assembly techniques involving conjugated organic tether molecules, arrays of nanoclusters have been formed in both unpatterned and patterned regions on semiconductor surfaces. Imaging and electrical characterization via scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy indicate that high quality local ordering has been achieved within the arrays and that the clusters are electronically coupled to the semiconductor substrate via the low-resistance metal/semiconductor interface

  15. Double surface plasmon enhanced organic light-emitting diodes by gold nanoparticles and silver nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Chung [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The buffer layer is inserted between PEDOT: PSS and the emitting layer in order to avoid that the nonradiative decay process of exciton is generated. • The silver nanoclusters will generate surface plasmon resonance effect, resulting that the localized electric field around the silver nanoclusters is enhanced. • When the recombination region of the excitons is too close to the nanoparticles of the hole-transport layer, the nonradiative quenching of excitons is generated. - Abstract: The influence of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and silver nanoclusters (SNCs) on the performance of organic light-emitting diodes is investigated in this study. The GNPs are doped into (poly (3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly (styrenesulfonate)) (PEDOT: PSS) and the SNCs are introduced between the electron-injection layer and cathode alumina. The power efficiency of the device, at the maximum luminance, with double surface plasmon resonance and buffer layer is about 2.15 times higher than that of the device without GNPs and SNCs because the absorption peaks of GNPs and SNCs are as good as the photoluminescence peak of the emission layer, resulting in strong surface plasmon resonance effect in the device. In addition, the buffer layer is inserted between PEDOT: PSS and the emitting layer in order to avoid that the nonradiative decay process of exciton is generated.

  16. First-principles calculated decomposition pathways for LiBH4 nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Quan; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Majzoub, Eric H.; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds

    2016-05-01

    We analyze thermodynamic stability and decomposition pathways of LiBH4 nanoclusters using grand-canonical free-energy minimization based on total energies and vibrational frequencies obtained from density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. We consider (LiBH4)n nanoclusters with n = 2 to 12 as reactants, while the possible products include (Li)n, (B)n, (LiB)n, (LiH)n, and Li2BnHn; off-stoichiometric LinBnHm (m ≤ 4n) clusters were considered for n = 2, 3, and 6. Cluster ground-state configurations have been predicted using prototype electrostatic ground-state (PEGS) and genetic algorithm (GA) based structural optimizations. Free-energy calculations show hydrogen release pathways markedly differ from those in bulk LiBH4. While experiments have found that the bulk material decomposes into LiH and B, with Li2B12H12 as a kinetically inhibited intermediate phase, (LiBH4)n nanoclusters with n ≤ 12 are predicted to decompose into mixed LinBn clusters via a series of intermediate clusters of LinBnHm (m ≤ 4n). The calculated pressure-composition isotherms and temperature-pressure isobars exhibit sloping plateaus due to finite size effects on reaction thermodynamics. Generally, decomposition temperatures of free-standing clusters are found to increase with decreasing cluster size due to thermodynamic destabilization of reaction products.

  17. Iron Oxide Colloidal Nanoclusters as Theranostic Vehicles and Their Interactions at the Cellular Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulou, Athanasia; Brintakis, Konstantinos; Fragogeorgi, Eirini; Anthousi, Amalia; Manna, Liberato; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Billotey, Claire; Ranella, Anthi; Loudos, George; Athanassakis, Irene; Lappas, Alexandros

    2018-05-09

    Advances in surfactant-assisted chemical approaches have led the way for the exploitation of nanoscale inorganic particles in medical diagnosis and treatment. In this field, magnetically-driven multimodal nanotools that perform both detection and therapy, well-designed in size, shape and composition, are highly advantageous. Such a theranostic material—which entails the controlled assembly of smaller (maghemite) nanocrystals in a secondary motif that is highly dispersible in aqueous media—is discussed here. These surface functionalized, pomegranate-like ferrimagnetic nanoclusters (40⁻85 nm) are made of nanocrystal subunits that show a remarkable magnetic resonance imaging contrast efficiency, which is better than that of the superparamagnetic contrast agent Endorem © . Going beyond this attribute and with their demonstrated low cytotoxicity in hand, we examine the critical interaction of such nanoprobes with cells at different physiological environments. The time-dependent in vivo scintigraphic imaging of mice experimental models, combined with a biodistribution study, revealed the accumulation of nanoclusters in the spleen and liver. Moreover, the in vitro proliferation of spleen cells and cytokine production witnessed a size-selective regulation of immune system cells, inferring that smaller clusters induce mainly inflammatory activities, while larger ones induce anti-inflammatory actions. The preliminary findings corroborate that the modular chemistry of magnetic iron oxide nanoclusters stimulates unexplored pathways that could be driven to alter their function in favor of healthcare.

  18. High-rate synthesis of phosphine-stabilized undecagold nanoclusters using a multilayered micromixer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hyung Dae; Chang, Chih-Hung; Garrison, Anna; Tseng, T; Paul, Brian K

    2010-01-01

    Growth in the potential applications of nanomaterials has led to a focus on the development of new manufacturing approaches for these materials. In particular, an increased demand due to the unique properties of nanomaterials requires a substantial yield of high-performance materials and a simultaneous reduction in the environmental impact of these processes. In this paper, a high-rate production of phosphine-stabilized undecagold nanoclusters was achieved using a layer-up strategy which involves the use of microlamination architectures; the patterning and bonding of thin layers of material (laminae) to create a multilayered micromixer in the range of 25-250 μm thick was used to step up the production of phosphine-stabilized undecagold nanoclusters. The continuous production of highly monodispersed phosphine-stabilized undecagold nanoclusters at a rate of about 11.8 (mg s -1 ) was achieved using a microreactor with a size of 1.687 cm 3 . This result is about 500 times over conventional batch syntheses based on the production rate per reactor volume.

  19. Low-temperature growth of polycrystalline Ge thin film on glass by in situ deposition and ex situ solid-phase crystallization for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, Chao-Yang; Weber, Juergen W.; Campbell, Patrick; Widenborg, Per I.; Song, Dengyuan; Green, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Poly-crystalline germanium (poly-Ge) thin films have potential for lowering the manufacturing cost of photovoltaic devices especially in tandem solar cells, but high crystalline quality would be required. This work investigates the crystallinity of sputtered Ge thin films on glass prepared by in situ growth and ex situ solid-phase crystallization (SPC). Structural properties of the films were characterized by Raman, X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible reflectance measurements. The results show the transition temperature from amorphous to polycrystalline is between 255 deg. C and 280 deg. C for in situ grown poly-Ge films, whereas the transition temperature is between 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C for films produced by SPC for a 20 h annealing time. The in situ growth in situ crystallized poly-Ge films at 450 deg. C exhibit significantly better crystalline quality than those formed by solid-phase crystallization at 600 deg. C. High crystalline quality at low substrate temperature obtained in this work suggests the poly-Ge films could be promising for use in thin film solar cells on glass.

  20. In situ fluorescence activation of DNA-silver nanoclusters as a label-free and general strategy for cell nucleus imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; Qiao, Zhenzhen; Yu, Yanru; Tang, Jinlu; He, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Hui; Ye, Xiaosheng; Lei, Yanli; Wang, Kemin

    2018-01-25

    A facile, general and turn-on nucleus imaging strategy was first developed based on in situ fluorescence activation of C-rich dark silver nanoclusters by G-rich telomeres. After a simple incubation without washing, nanoclusters could selectively stain the nucleus with intense red luminescence, which was confirmed using fixed/living cells and several cell lines.

  1. Uniaxially stressed Ge:Ga and Ge:Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubon, Jr., Oscar Danilo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The application of a large uniaxial stress to p-type Ge single crystals changes the character of both the valence band and the energy levels associated with the acceptors. Changes include the splitting of the fourfold degeneracy of the valence band top and the reduction of the ionization energy of shallow acceptors. In order to study the effect of uniaxial stress on transport properties of photoexcited holes, a variable temperature photo-Hall effect system was built in which stressed Ge:Ga and Ge:Be could be characterized. Results indicate that stress increases the lifetime and Hall mobility of photoexcited holes. These observations may help further the understanding of fundamental physical processes that affect the performance of stressed Ge photoconductors including the capture of holes by shallow acceptors.

  2. Saline groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampen, P.

    1992-11-01

    The State-of-art report describes research made on deep saline groundwaters and brines found in crystalline bedrock, mainly in site studies for nuclear waste disposal. The occurrence, definitions and classifications of saline groundwaters are reviewed with a special emphasis on the different theories concerning the origins of saline groundwaters. Studies of the saline groundwaters in Finland and Sweden have been reviewed more thoroughly. Also the mixing of different bodies of groundwaters, observations of the contact of saline groundwaters and permafrost, and the geochemical modelling of saline groundwaters as well as the future trends of research have been discussed. (orig.)

  3. Crystalline beams: The vertical zigzag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    This note is the continuation of our comprehensive investigation of Crystalline Beams. After having determined the equations of motion and the conditions for the formation of the simplest configuration, i.e. the string, we study the possibility of storing an intense beam of charged particles in a storage ring where they form a vertical zigzag. We define the equilibrium configuration, and examine the confinement conditions. Subsequently, we derive the transfer matrix for motion through various elements of the storage ring. Finally we investigate the stability conditions for such a beam

  4. Crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.G.; Clearfield, A.

    1976-01-01

    The ion exchange behaviour of seven crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates towards some of the alkali metal cations is described. Only two of the compounds (A and C) possess ion exchange properties in acidic solutions. Four others show some ion exchange characteristics in basic media with some of the alkali cations. Compound G does not behave as an ion exchanger in solutions of pH + , but show very little Na + uptake. Compound E undergoes ion exchange with Na + and Cs + , but not with Li+. Both Li + and Na + are sorbed by compounds A and C. The results are indicative of structures which show steric exclusion phenomena. (author)

  5. Reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped Si and Ge layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogumilowicz, Y.; Hartmann, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the in-situ boron (B) doping of germanium (Ge) and silicon (Si) in Reduced Pressure-Chemical Vapor Deposition. Three growth temperatures have been investigated for the B-doping of Ge: 400, 600 and 750 °C at a constant growth pressure of 13300 Pa (i.e. 100 Torr). The B concentration in the Ge:B epilayer increases linearly with the diborane concentration in the gaseous phase. Single-crystalline Ge:B layers with B concentrations in-between 9 ∙ 10 17 and 1 ∙ 10 20 cm −3 were achieved. For the in-situ B doping of Si at 850 °C, two dichlorosilane mass flow ratios (MFR) have been assessed: F[SiH 2 Cl 2 ]/F[H 2 ] = 0.0025 and F[SiH 2 Cl 2 ]/F[H 2 ] = 0.0113 at a growth pressure of 2660 Pa (i.e. 20 Torr). Linear boron incorporation with the diborane concentration in the gas phase has been observed and doping levels in-between 3.5 ∙ 10 17 and 1 ∙ 10 20 cm −3 were achieved. We almost kept the same ratio of B versus Si atoms in the gas phase and in the Si epilayer. By contrast, roughly half of the B atoms present in the gas phase were incorporated in the Ge:B layers irrespective of the growth temperature. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) allowed us to extract from the angular position of the Ge:B layer diffraction peak the substitutional B concentration. Values close to the B concentrations obtained by 4-probe resistivity measurements were obtained. Ge:B layers were smooth (< 1 m root mean square roughness associated with 20 × 20 μm 2 Atomic Force Microscopy images). Only for high F[B 2 H 6 ]/F[GeH 4 ] MFR (3.2 10 −3 ) did the Ge:B layers became rough; they were however still mono-crystalline (XRD). Above this MFR value, Ge:B layers became polycrystalline. - Highlights: • Boron doping of germanium and silicon in Reduced Pressure-Chemical Vapor Deposition • Linear boron incorporation in Ge:B and Si:B with the diborane flow • Single-crystal Ge:B layers with B concentrations in-between 9 ∙ 10 17 and 1 ∙ 10 20 cm −3 • Single-crystal Si

  6. Gold fillings unravel the vacancy role in the phase transition of GeTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinlong; Xu, Meng; Wang, Xiaojie; Lin, Qi; Cheng, Xiaomin; Xu, Ming; Tong, Hao; Miao, Xiangshui

    2018-02-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) is an important candidate for future memory devices. The crystalline phase of PCM materials contains abundant intrinsic vacancies, which plays an important role in the rapid phase transition upon memory switching. However, few experimental efforts have been invested to study these invisible entities. In this work, Au dopants are alloyed into the crystalline GeTe to fill the intrinsic Ge vacancies so that the role of these vacancies in the amorphization of GeTe can be indirectly studied. As a result, the reduction of Ge vacancies induced by Au dopants hampers the amorphization of GeTe as the activation energy of this process becomes higher. This is because the vacancy-interrupted lattice can be "repaired" by Au dopants with the recovery of bond connectivity. Our results demonstrate the importance of vacancies in the phase transition of chalcogenides, and we employ the percolation theory to explain the impact of these intrinsic defects on this vacancy-ridden crystal quantitatively. Specifically, the threshold of amorphization increases with the decrease in vacancies. The understanding of the vacancy effect sheds light on the long-standing puzzle of the mechanism of ultra-fast phase transition in PCMs. It also paves the way for designing low-power-consumption electronic devices by reducing the threshold of amorphization in chalcogenides.

  7. Local atomic structure and chemical order in amorphous SiGe:H and SiC:H alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarkiewicz, T.; Stapinski, T.

    1994-01-01

    The local structure and chemical ordering in amorphous hydrogenated silicon-germanium and silicon-carbon alloys were analyzed mainly with the help of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, Raman scattering and electron diffraction. Ge-Ge and Ge-Si distances were found to be independent of concentration and the composition of the first coordination shell around Ge is consistent with a random mixing of the two species in a-Si 1-x Ge:H alloy. The first-coordination-shell average bond lengths for Si-Si and SiC in a-Si 1-x C x :H are also constant with concentration x and the comparison of the first coordination shell composition around Si with average concentration indicates that the alloys tends to be chemically ordered. The degree of crystallinity in microcrystalline Si films determined by EXAFS is in agreement with that obtained in Raman scattering analysis. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs

  8. The role of minor alloying elements on the stability and dispersion of yttria nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, D.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Valsakumar, M.C.; Chandra, Sharat; Sundar, C.S.; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys derive their strength from the dispersion of oxide nanoclusters in the ferritic matrix. We have explored the relative role of minor alloying elements like Ti and Zr on the stability of nanoclusters of vacancy-Y-Ti-O by density functional theory calculations and shown that the binding energy of these clusters increases when we replace Ti with Zr. This could imply faster nucleation of the nanoclusters which, in turn, may lead to finer dispersion of nanoclusters resulting in improved performance of ferritic alloys. Further, we show a core/shell structure for these nanoclusters in which the core is enriched in Y, O, Ti while the shell is enriched in Cr.

  9. Stabilizing and Organizing Bi3 Cu4 and Bi7 Cu12 Nanoclusters in Two-Dimensional Metal-Organic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Linghao; Xia, Bowen; Zhang, Qiushi; Kuang, Guowen; Xu, Hu; Liu, Jun; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2018-04-16

    Multinuclear heterometallic nanoclusters with controllable stoichiometry and structure are anticipated to possess promising catalytic, magnetic, and optical properties. Heterometallic nanoclusters with precise stoichiometry of Bi 3 Cu 4 and Bi 7 Cu 12 can be stabilized in the scaffold of two-dimensional metal-organic networks on a Cu(111) surface through on-surface metallosupramolecular self-assembly processes. The atomic structures of the nanoclusters were resolved using scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. The nanoclusters feature highly symmetric planar hexagonal shapes and core-shell charge modulation. The clusters are arranged as triangular lattices with a periodicity that can be tuned by choosing molecules of different size. This work shows that on-surface metallosupramolecular self-assembly creates unique possibilities for the design and synthesis of multinuclear heterometallic nanoclusters. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Protein-templated gold nanoclusters based sensor for off-on detection of ciprofloxacin with a high selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Qian, Sihua; Chen, Junhui; Cai, Jie; Wu, Shuyan; Cai, Ziping

    2012-05-30

    In this contribution, bovine serum albumin stabilized gold nanoclusters as novel fluorescent probes were successfully utilized for the detection of ciprofloxacin for the first time. Our prepared gold nanoclusters exhibited strong emission with peak maximum at 635 nm. Cu(2+) was employed to quench the strong fluorescence of the gold nanoclusters, whereas the addition of ciprofloxacin caused the fluorescence intensity restoration of the Cu(2+)-gold nanoclusters system. The increase in fluorescence intensity of Cu(2+)-gold nanoclusters system caused by ciprofloxacin allows the sensitive detection of ciprofloxacin in the range of 0.4 ng mL(-1) to 50 ng mL(-1). The detection limit for ciprofloxacin is 0.3 ng mL(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The present sensor for ciprofloxacin detection possesses a low detection limit and wide linear range. In addition, the real samples were analyzed with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gold nanoclusters confined in a supercage of Y zeolite for aerobic oxidation of HMF under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaying; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Junjie; Song, Qi; Du, Zhongtian; Huang, Yizheng; Xu, Jie

    2013-10-11

    Au nanoclusters with an average size of approximately 1 nm size supported on HY zeolite exhibit a superior catalytic performance for the selective oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF) into 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA). It achieved >99 % yield of 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid in water under mild conditions (60 °C, 0.3 MPa oxygen), which is much higher than that of Au supported on metal oxides/hydroxide (TiO2 , CeO2 , and Mg(OH)2 ) and channel-type zeolites (ZSM-5 and H-MOR). Detailed characterizations, such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N2 -physisorption, and H2 -temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), revealed that the Au nanoclusters are well encapsulated in the HY zeolite supercage, which is considered to restrict and avoid further growing of the Au nanoclusters into large particles. The acidic hydroxyl groups of the supercage were proven to be responsible for the formation and stabilization of the gold nanoclusters. Moreover, the interaction between the hydroxyl groups in the supercage and the Au nanoclusters leads to electronic modification of the Au nanoparticles, which is supposed to contribute to the high efficiency in the catalytic oxidation of HMF to FDCA. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Ultrasmall Glutathione-Protected Gold Nanoclusters as Next Generation Radiotherapy Sensitizers with High Tumor Uptake and High Renal Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Luo, Zhentao; Chen, Jie; Song, Shasha; Yuan, Xun; Shen, Xiu; Wang, Hao; Sun, Yuanming; Gao, Kai; Zhang, Lianfeng; Fan, Saijun; Leong, David Tai; Guo, Meili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy is often the most straightforward first line cancer treatment for solid tumors. While it is highly effective against tumors, there is also collateral damage to healthy proximal tissues especially with high doses. The use of radiosensitizers is an effective way to boost the killing efficacy of radiotherapy against the tumor while drastically limiting the received dose and reducing the possible damage to normal tissues. Here, we report the design and application of a good radiosensitizer by using ultrasmall Au29-43(SG)27-37 nanoclusters (protecting shell. The GSH-coated Au29-43(SG)27-37 nanoclusters can escape the RES absorption, leading to a good tumor uptake (~8.1% ID/g at 24 h post injection). As a result, the as-designed Au nanoclusters led to a strong enhancement for radiotherapy, as well as a negligible damage to normal tissues. After the treatment, the ultrasmall Au29-43(SG)27-37 nanoclusters can be efficiently cleared by the kidney, thereby avoiding potential long-term side-effects caused by the accumulation of gold atoms in the body. Our data suggest that the ultrasmall peptide-protected Au nanoclusters are a promising radiosensitizer for cancer radiotherapy.

  13. Skyrmions and Novel Spin Textures in FeGe Thin Films and Artificial B20 Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adam Saied

    Skyrmions are magnetic spin textures that have a non-zero topological winding number associated with them. They have attracted much interest recently since they can be as small as 1 nm and could be the next generation of magnetic memory and logic. First, we grow epitaxial films of FeGe by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized the skyrmion properties. This had led us to image skyrmions in real-space with Lorentz transmission electron microscopy for the first time in the United States. Next, from an extensive series of thin and thick films, we have experimentally shown the existence of a magnetic surface state in FeGe and, consequently, any skyrmion material for the first time. Complementary theoretical calculations supported the existence of chiral bobbers--a surface state only predicted in 2015. Next, we fabricated for the first time a new class of skyrmion materials: B20 superlattices. These novel heterostructures of [FeGe/MnGe/CrGe] have now opened the door for tunable skyrmion systems with both Dresselhaus and Rashba Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Additionally, we perform resonant soft x-ray scattering to image magnetic spin textures in reciprocal space for FeGe thin films in transmission. We have accomplished the removal of substrate and left an isolated single-crystal FeGe film. Lastly, SrO is grown on graphene as a crystalline, atomically smooth, and pinhole free tunnel barrier for spin injection.

  14. Structural, thermal, and photoacoustic study of nanocrystalline Cr{sub 3}Ge produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prates, P. B.; Maliska, A. M.; Ferreira, A. S. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Trindade, S/N, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Poffo, C. M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus de Araranguá, 88900-000 Araranguá, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Borges, Z. V. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000 Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, Amazonas (Brazil); Lima, J. C. de, E-mail: fsc1jcd@fisica.ufsc.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Trindade, S/N, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Biasi, R. S. de [Seção de Engenharia Mecânica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-10-21

    A thermodynamic analysis of the Cr-Ge system suggested that it was possible to produce a nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase by mechanical alloying. The same analysis showed that, due to low activation energies, Cr-poor crystalline and/or amorphous alloy could also be formed. In fact, when the experiment was performed, Cr{sub 11}Ge{sub 19} and amorphous phases were present for small milling times. For milling times larger than 15 h these additional phases decomposed and only the nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase remained up to the highest milling time used (32 h). From the differential scanning calorimetry measurements, the Avrami exponent n was obtained, indicating that the nucleation and growth of the nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase may be restricted to one or two dimensions, where the Cr and Ge atoms diffuse along the surface and grain boundaries. In addition, contributions from three-dimensional diffusion with a constant nucleation rate may be present. The thermal diffusivity of the nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase was determined by photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy measurements.

  15. Improvement of photoluminescence from Ge layer with patterned Si3N4 stressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Katsuya; Okumura, Tadashi; Tani, Kazuki; Saito, Shin-ichi; Ido, Tatemi

    2014-01-01

    Lattice strain applied by patterned Si 3 N 4 stressors in order to improve the optical properties of Ge layers directly grown on a Si substrate was investigated. Patterned Si 3 N 4 stressors were fabricated by various methods and their effects on the strain and photoluminescence were studied. Although we found that when the stressor was fabricated by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the Ge waveguide was tensilely and compressively strained in the edge and center positions, respectively, and photoluminescence (PL) could be improved by decreasing the width of the waveguide, the crystallinity of the Ge waveguide was degraded by the thermal impact of the deposition process. Low-temperature methods were therefore used to make the patterned stressors. The tensile strain of the Ge layer increased from 0.14% to 0.2% when the stressor was grown by plasma enhanced CVD at 350 °C, but the effects of the increased tensile strain could not be confirmed because the Si 3 N 4 layer was unstable when irradiated with the excitation light used in photoluminescence measurements. Si 3 N 4 stressors grown by inductively coupled plasma CVD at room temperature increased the tensile strain of the Ge layer up to 0.4%, thus red-shifting the PL peak and obviously increasing the PL intensity. These results indicate that the Si 3 N 4 stressors fabricated by the room-temperature process efficiently improve the performance of Ge light-emitting devices. - Highlights: • Ge layers were directly grown on a Si substrate by low-temperature epitaxial growth. • Si 3 N 4 stressors were fabricated on the Ge layers by various methods. • Tensile strain of the Ge layers was improved by the Si 3 N 4 stressors. • Photoluminescence (PL) intensity was increased with the Si 3 N 4 stressors. • Red-shift of the PL spectra was observed from the tensile strained Ge layers

  16. The crystallization of amorphous Fe2MnGe powder prepared by ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Brueck, E.; Tegus, O.; Buschow, K.H.J.; Boer, F.R. de

    2003-01-01

    We synthesized for the first time the intermetallic compound Fe 2 MnGe. To avoid preferential evaporation of volatile components we exploited mechanical alloying. Amorphous Fe 2 MnGe alloy powder was prepared by planetary ball milling elemental starting materials. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A cubic D0 3 phase is formed at low temperature and transforms to a high-temperature hexagonal D0 19 phase. The apparent activation energy was determined by means of the Kissinger method

  17. Analysis of threshold current of uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jialin; Sun, Junqiang; Gao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2017-10-30

    We propose and design uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers with the stress along direction. The micro-bridge structure is adapted for introducing uniaxial stress in Ge/SiGe quantum well. To enhance the fabrication tolerance, full-etched circular gratings with high reflectivity bandwidths of ~500 nm are deployed in laser cavities. We compare and analyze the density of state, the number of states between Γ- and L-points, the carrier injection efficiency, and the threshold current density for the uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers. Simulation results show that the threshold current density of the Ge/SiGe quantum well laser is much higher than that of the bulk Ge laser, even combined with high uniaxial tensile stress owing to the larger number of states between Γ- and L- points and extremely low carrier injection efficiency. Electrical transport simulation reveals that the reduced effective mass of the hole and the small conduction band offset cause the low carrier injection efficiency of the Ge/SiGe quantum well laser. Our theoretical results imply that unlike III-V material, uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge outperforms a Ge/SiGe quantum well with the same strain level and is a promising approach for Si-compatible light sources.

  18. Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layers for low-voltage and low-noise Ge avalanche photodiodes on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Yuji; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Okazaki, Kota; Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Yamada, Koji; Wada, Kazumi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    A new structure is examined for low-voltage and low-noise Ge-based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) on Si, where a Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructure is used as the multiplication layer of a separate-absorption-carrier-multiplication structure. The Ge/SiGe heterojunction multiplication layer is theoretically shown to be useful for preferentially enhancing impact ionization for photogenerated holes injected from the Ge optical-absorption layer via the graded SiGe, reflecting the valence band discontinuity at the Ge/SiGe interface. This property is effective not only for the reduction of operation voltage/electric field strength in Ge-based APDs but also for the reduction of excess noise resulting from the ratio of the ionization coefficients between electrons and holes being far from unity. Such Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructures are successfully fabricated by ultrahigh-vacuum chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary pin diodes having a Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layer act reasonably as photodetectors, showing a multiplication gain larger than those for diodes without the Ge/SiGe heterojunction.

  19. Lateral topological crystalline insulator heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Niu, Chengwang; Ma, Yandong; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of lateral heterostructures fabricated by two-dimensional building blocks brings many exciting realms in material science and device physics. Enriching available nanomaterials for creating such heterostructures and enabling the underlying new physics is highly coveted for the integration of next-generation devices. Here, we report a breakthrough in lateral heterostructure based on the monolayer square transition-metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M  =  W, X  =  S/Se) modules. Our results reveal that the MX2 lateral heterostructure (1S-MX2 LHS) can possess excellent thermal and dynamical stability. Remarkably, the highly desired two-dimensional topological crystalline insulator phase is confirmed by the calculated mirror Chern number {{n}\\text{M}}=-1 . A nontrivial band gap of 65 meV is obtained with SOC, indicating the potential for room-temperature observation and applications. The topologically protected edge states emerge at the edges of two different nanoribbons between the bulk band gap, which is consistent with the mirror Chern number. In addition, a strain-induced topological phase transition in 1S-MX2 LHS is also revealed, endowing the potential utilities in electronics and spintronics. Our predictions not only introduce new member and vitality into the studies of lateral heterostructures, but also highlight the promise of lateral heterostructure as appealing topological crystalline insulator platforms with excellent stability for future devices.

  20. <300> GeV team

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    The 300 GeV team had been assembled. In the photograph are Hans Horisberger, Clemens Zettler, Roy Billinge, Norman Blackburne, John Adams, Hans-Otto Wuster, Lars Persson, Bas de Raad, Hans Goebel, Simon Van der Meer.

  1. Fluoride removal from double four-membered ring (D4R) units in As-synthesized Ge-containing zeolites

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiaolong; Ravon, Ugo; Tuel, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride anions can be removed from the framework of as-prepared Ge-containing zeolites ITQ-13 and ITQ-17 without modification of the crystallinity and crystal habit. By contrast to all-silica ITQ-13 for which fluoride could not get out from D4R

  2. Polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation microscopy of α-quartz like GeO2 (α-GeO2) polycrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Ibuki; Imakita, Kenji; Kitao, Akihiro; Fujii, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of polarized second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to determine crystallographic orientations of domains in polycrystalline films was demonstrated. Orientation of α-quartz like GeO 2 (α-GeO 2 ) domains in polycrystalline films were investigated by using polarized SHG and Raman microscopy. It was found that the SHG intensity of a α-GeO 2 polycrystalline film depends strongly on measurement points and excitation and detection polarizations, while the Raman intensity was almost uniform in the whole mapping area. Analyses of the SHG mappings in different polarization conditions allowed us to determine not only the size and shape of crystalline domains, but also the crystallographic orientations. (paper)

  3. Enhanced B doping in CVD-grown GeSn:B using B δ-doping layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, David; Vohra, Anurag; Loo, Roger; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Bhargava, Nupur; Margetis, Joe; Tolle, John

    2018-02-01

    Highly doped GeSn material is interesting for both electronic and optical applications. GeSn:B is a candidate for source-drain material in future Ge pMOS device because Sn adds compressive strain with respect to pure Ge, and therefore can boost the Ge channel performances. A high B concentration is required to obtain low contact resistivity between the source-drain material and the metal contact. To achieve high performance, it is therefore highly desirable to maximize both the Sn content and the B concentration. However, it has been shown than CVD-grown GeSn:B shows a trade-off between the Sn incorporation and the B concentration (increasing B doping reduces Sn incorporation). Furthermore, the highest B concentration of CVD-grown GeSn:B process reported in the literature has been limited to below 1 × 1020 cm-3. Here, we demonstrate a CVD process where B δ-doping layers are inserted in the GeSn layer. We studied the influence of the thickness between each δ-doping layers and the δ-doping layers process conditions on the crystalline quality and the doping density of the GeSn:B layers. For the same Sn content, the δ-doping process results in a 4-times higher B doping than the co-flow process. In addition, a B doping concentration of 2 × 1021 cm-3 with an active concentration of 5 × 1020 cm-3 is achieved.

  4. Size-dependent structure of CdSe nanoclusters formed after ion implantation in MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huis, M.A. van; Veen, A. van; Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    2005-01-01

    The band gap as well as the optical and structural properties of semiconductor CdSe nanoclusters change as a function of the nanocluster size. Embedded CdSe nanoclusters in MgO were created by means of sequential Cd and Se ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. Changes during annealing were monitored using optical absorption and positron annihilation spectroscopy. High-resolution TEM on cross-sections after annealing at a temperature of 1300 K showed that clusters with a size below 5 nm have the high-pressure rock-salt structure and are in a cube-on-cube orientation relation with MgO, whereas clusters larger than 5 nm adopt the stable wurtzite crystal structure and were observed in two different orientation relations with MgO

  5. Oxygen transport and GeO2 stability during thermal oxidation of Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, S. R. M.; Rolim, G. K.; Soares, G. V.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Krug, C.; Miotti, L.; Freire, F. L.; da Costa, M. E. H. M.; Radtke, C.

    2012-05-01

    Oxygen transport during thermal oxidation of Ge and desorption of the formed Ge oxide are investigated. Higher oxidation temperatures and lower oxygen pressures promote GeO desorption. An appreciable fraction of oxidized Ge desorbs during the growth of a GeO2 layer. The interplay between oxygen desorption and incorporation results in the exchange of O originally present in GeO2 by O from the gas phase throughout the oxide layer. This process is mediated by O vacancies generated at the GeO2/Ge interface. The formation of a substoichiometric oxide is shown to have direct relation with the GeO desorption.

  6. Chemical and structural arrangement of the trigonal phase in GeSbTe thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Antonio M; Privitera, Stefania M S; Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Bongiorno, Corrado; Calarco, Raffaella; Rimini, Emanuele

    2017-02-10

    The thermal and electrical properties of phase change materials, mainly GeSbTe alloys, in the crystalline state strongly depend on their phase and on the associated degree of order. The switching of Ge atoms in superlattice structures with trigonal phase has been recently proposed to develop memories with reduced switching energy, in which two differently ordered crystalline phases are the logic states. A detailed knowledge of the stacking plane sequence, of the local composition and of the vacancy distribution is therefore crucial in order to understand the underlying mechanism of phase transformations in the crystalline state and to evaluate the retention properties. This information is provided, as reported in this paper, by scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis of polycrystalline and epitaxial Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin samples, using the Z-contrast high-angle annular dark field method. Electron diffraction clearly confirms the presence of compositional mixing with stacking blocks of 11, 9 or 7 planes corresponding to Ge 3 Sb 2 Te 6 , Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , and GeSb 2 Te 4 , alloys respectively in the same trigonal phase. By increasing the degree of order (according to the annealing temperature, the growth condition, etc) the spread in the statistical distribution of the blocks reduces and the distribution of the atoms in the cation planes also changes from a homogenous Ge/Sb mixing towards a Sb-enrichment in the planes closest to the van der Waals gaps. Therefore we show that the trigonal phase of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , the most studied chalcogenide for phase-change memories, is actually obtained in different configurations depending on the distribution of the stacking blocks (7-9-11 planes) and on the atomic occupation (Ge/Sb) at the cation planes. These results give an insight in the factors determining the stability of the trigonal phase and suggest a dynamic path evolution that could have a key role in the switching mechanism of interfacial phase change memories

  7. Effects of doping in 25-atom bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for carbon–carbon coupling reaction of iodoanisole and phenylacetylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We here report the catalytic effects of foreign atoms (Cu, Ag, and Pt doped into well-defined 25-gold-atom nanoclusters. Using the carbon-carbon coupling reaction of p-iodoanisole and phenylacetylene as a model reaction, the gold-based bimetallic MxAu25−x(SR18 (–SR=–SCH2CH2Ph nanoclusters (supported on titania were found to exhibit distinct effects on the conversion of p-iodoanisole as well as the selectivity for the Sonogashira cross-coupling product, 1-methoxy-4-(2-phenylethynylbenzene. Compared to Au25(SR18, the centrally doped Pt1Au24(SR18 causes a drop in catalytic activity but with the selectivity retained, while the AgxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters gave an overall performance comparable to Au25(SR18. Interestingly, CuxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters prefer the Ullmann homo-coupling pathway and give rise to product 4,4′-dimethoxy-1,1′-biphenyl, which is in opposite to the other three nanocluster catalysts. Our overall conclusion is that the conversion of p-iodoanisole is largely affected by the electronic effect in the bimetallic nanoclusters’ 13-atom core (i.e., Pt1Au12, CuxAu13−x, and Au13, with the exception of Ag doping, and that the selectivity is primarily determined by the type of atoms on the MxAu12−x shell (M=Ag, Cu, and Au in the nanocluster catalysts.

  8. Fabrication and in vitro characterization of gadolinium-based nanoclusters for simultaneous drug delivery and radiation enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Shannon S.; Guo, Linghong; Sun, Xuejun; Shaw, Andrew R.; Yuan, Zhipeng; Löbenberg, Raimar; Roa, Wilson H.

    2016-09-01

    We report the synthesis of a gadolinium hydroxide (Gd(OH)3) nanorod based doxorubicin (Dox) delivery system that can enhance both magnetic resonance imaging contrast and radiation sensitivity. A simple and cost effective wet-chemical method was utilized in the presence of manganese (Mn) ions and Dox to produce the Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster structure. The Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster was composed of Mn-doped Gd(OH)3 nanorods arranged in parallel with Dox as a linker molecule between the adjacent nanorods. No other studies have utilized Dox as both the linker and therapeutic molecule in a nanostructure to date. The Gd(OH)3 nanorod is reported to have no significant cellular or in vivo toxicity, which makes it an ideal base material for this biomedical application. The Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster exhibited paramagnetic behavior and was stable in a colloidal solution. The nanocluster also enabled high Dox loading capacity and specifically released Dox in a sustained and pH-dependent manner. The positively charged Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanoclusters were readily internalized into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via endocytosis, which resulted in intracellular release of Dox. The released Dox in cells was effective in conferring cytotoxicity and inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells. Furthermore, a synergistic anticancer effect could be observed with radiation treatment. Overall, the Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster drug delivery system described herein may have potential utility in clinics as a multifunctional theranostic nanoparticle with combined benefits in both diagnosis and therapy in the management of cancer.

  9. Schottky spectra and crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestrikov, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we revise the current dependence of the Schottky noise power of a cooled proton beam previously measured at NAP-M. More careful study of experimental data indicates a linear decrease in the inverse Schottky noise power with an increase in the beam intensity (N). The root of this function determines a threshold current which occurs at N = N th ≅1.2 x 10 8 particles. The inspection of measured Schottky spectra shows that this threshold does not correspond to some collective instability of the measured harmonic of the linear beam density. The found value of N th does not depend on the longitudinal beam temperature. For the case of NAP-M lattice, the study of the spectral properties of the Schottky noise in the crystalline string predicts the current dependence of the equilibrium momentum spread of the beam, which qualitatively agrees with that, recalculated from the NAP-M data. (orig.)

  10. Elevated transition temperature in Ge doped VO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Anna; Magrez, Arnaud; Vitale, Wolfgang A.; Mocny, Piotr; Jeanneret, Patrick; Guibert, Edouard; Whitlow, Harry J.; Ionescu, Adrian M.; Schüler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Thermochromic GexV1-xO2+y thin films have been deposited on Si (100) substrates by means of reactive magnetron sputtering. The films were then characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), four-point probe electrical resistivity measurements, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. From the temperature dependent resistivity measurements, the effect of Ge doping on the semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in vanadium oxide thin films was investigated. The transition temperature was shown to increase significantly upon Ge doping (˜95 °C), while the hysteresis width and resistivity contrast gradually decreased. The precise Ge concentration and the film thickness have been determined by RBS. The crystallinity of phase-pure VO2 monoclinic films was confirmed by XRD. These findings make the use of vanadium dioxide thin films in solar and electronic device applications—where higher critical temperatures than 68 °C of pristine VO2 are needed—a viable and promising solution.

  11. Investigations of the R5(SixGe1-x)4 Intermetallic Compounds by X-Ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizhi Tan

    2008-01-01

    The XRMS experiment on the Gd 5 Ge 4 system has shown that, below the Neel temperature, T N = 127 K, the magnetic unit cells is the same as the chemical unit cell. From azimuth scans and the Q dependence of the magnetic scattering, all three Gd sites in the structure were determined to be in the same magnetic space group Pnma. The magnetic moments are aligned along the c-axis and the c-components of the magnetic moments at the three different sites are equal. The ferromagnetic slabs are stacked antiferromagnetically along the b-direction. They found an unusual order parameter curve in Gd 5 Ge 4 . A spin-reorientation transition is a possibility in Gd 5 Ge 4 , which is similar to the Tb 5 Ge 4 case. Tb 5 Ge 4 possesses the same Sm 5 Ge 4 -type crystallographic structure and the same magnetic space group as Gd 5 Ge 4 does. The difference in magnetic structure is that Tb 5 Ge 4 has a canted one but Gd 5 Ge 4 has nearly a collinear one in the low temperature antiferromagnetic phase. The competition between the magneto-crystalline anisotropy and the nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange interactions may allow a 3-dimensional canted antiferromagnetic structure in Tb 5 Ge 4 . The spin-reorientation transition in both Gd 5 Ge 4 and Tb 5 Ge 4 may arise from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy from the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and the dipolar interactions anisotropy

  12. Quinary wurtzite Zn-Ga-Ge-N-O solid solutions and their photocatalytic properties under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yinghao; Wu, Fangfang; Sun, Xiaoqin; Chen, Hongmei; Lv, Meilin; Ni, Shuang; Liu, Gang; Xu, Xiaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Wurtzite solid solutions between GaN and ZnO highlight an intriguing paradigm for water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen using solar energy. However, large composition discrepancy often occurs inside the compound owing to the volatile nature of Zn, thereby prescribing rigorous terms on synthetic conditions. Here we demonstrate the merits of constituting quinary Zn-Ga-Ge-N-O solid solutions by introducing Ge into the wurtzite framework. The presence of Ge not only mitigates the vaporization of Zn but also strongly promotes particle crystallization. Synthetic details for these quinary compounds were systematically explored and their photocatalytic properties were thoroughly investigated. Proper starting molar ratios of Zn/Ga/Ge are of primary importance for single phase formation, high particle crystallinity and good photocatalytic performance. Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen and oxygen production from water were achieved for these quinary solid solutions which is strongly correlated with Ge content in the structure. Apparent quantum efficiency for optimized sample approaches 1.01% for hydrogen production and 1.14% for oxygen production. Theoretical calculation reveals the critical role of Zn for the band gap reduction in these solid solutions and their superior photocatalytic acitivity can be understood by the preservation of Zn in the structure as well as a good crystallinity after introducing Ge.

  13. Fabrication of multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiOxGeNy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fei; Green, Martin A.; Conibeer, Gavin; Cho, Eun-Chel; Huang Yidan; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan; Flynn, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO x GeN y films have been fabricated on Si substrate by a (Ge + SiO 2 )/SiO x GeN y superlattice approach, using a rf magnetron sputtering technique with a Ge + SiO 2 composite target and subsequent thermal annealing in N 2 ambient at 750 deg. C for 30 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement indicated the formation of Ge nanocrystals with an average size estimated to be 5.4 nm. Raman scattering spectra showed a peak of the Ge-Ge vibrational mode downward shifted to 299.4 cm -1 , which was caused by quantum confinement of phonons in the Ge nanocrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that Ge nanocrystals were confined in (Ge + SiO 2 ) layers. This superlattice approach significantly improved both the size uniformity of Ge nanocrystals and their uniformity of spacing on the 'Z' growth direction

  14. How Does Amino Acid Ligand Modulate Au Core Structure and Characteristics in Peptide Coated Au Nanocluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hongkang; Zhao, Lina

    2018-03-01

    The atomic structures and the corresponding physicochemical properties of peptide coated Au nanoclusters determine their distinctive biological targeting applications. To learn the modulation of amino acid ligand on the atomic structure and electronic characteristics of coated Au core is the fundamental knowledge for peptide coated Au nanocluster design and construction. Based on our recent coated Au nanocluster configuration study (Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 11454), we built the typically simplified Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) system to more clearly learn the basic modulation information of amino acid ligand on Au core by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. There are two isomers as ligand adjacent bonding (Iso1) and diagonal bonding (Iso2) to Au13 cores. The geometry optimizations indicate the adjacent bonding Iso1 is more stable than Iso2. More important, the Au13 core of Iso1 distorts much more significantly than that of Iso2 by Cys-Au-Cys bonding through the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) analysis, which modulate their electronic characteristics in different ways. In addition, the frontier molecular orbital results of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) isomers confirm that the Au cores mainly determine the blue shifts of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) systems versus the original Au13 core in their UV-visible absorption spectrum studies. The configuration of Au13 core performs deformation under Cys-Au-Cys ligand modulation to reach new stability with distinct atomic structure and electronic properties, which could be the theory basis for peptide coated AuNCs design and construction.

  15. Expansion-limited aggregation of nanoclusters in a single-pulse laser-produced plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamaly, E. G.; Madsen, N. R.; Rode, A. V.; Golberg, D.

    2009-01-01

    Formation of carbon nanoclusters in a single-laser-pulse created ablation plume was studied both in vacuum and in a noble gas environment at various pressures. The developed theory provides cluster radius dependence on combination of laser parameters, properties of ablated material, and type and pressure of an ambient gas in agreement with experiments. The experiments were performed on carbon nanoclusters formed by laser ablation of graphite targets with 12 picosecond 532 nm laser pulses at MHz-range repetition rate in a broad range of ambient He, Ar, Kr, and Xe gas pressures from 2x10 -2 to 1500 Torr. The experimental results confirmed our theoretical prediction that the average size of the nanoparticles depends weakly on the type of the ambient gas used, and is determined exclusively by the single laser pulse parameters even at the repetition rate as high as 28 MHz with the time gap 36 ns between the pulses. The most important finding relates to the fact that in vacuum the cluster size is mainly determined by hydrodynamic expansion of the plume while in the ambient gas it is controlled by atomic diffusion in the gas. We demonstrate that the ultrashort pulses can be used for production of clusters with the size less than the critical value, which separates the particles with properties drastically different from those of a material in a bulk. The presented results of experiments on formation of carbon nanoclusters are in close agreement with the theoretical scaling. The developed theory is applicable for cluster formation from any monatomic material, such as silicon for example.

  16. Structural, electric and kinetic parameters of ternary alloys of GeSbTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Sanchez, E. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente 2000, Ap. Postal 13, Juriquilla, Queretaro, C. P. 76230, (Mexico)]. E-mail: m6007@ciateq.net.mx; Prokhorov, E.F. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente 2000, Ap. Postal 13, Juriquilla, Queretaro, C. P. 76230, (Mexico); Gonzalez-Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente 2000, Ap. Postal 13, Juriquilla, Queretaro, C. P. 76230, (Mexico); Mendoza-Galvan, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente 2000, Ap. Postal 13, Juriquilla, Queretaro, C. P. 76230, (Mexico)

    2005-01-03

    Thin amorphous films of GeSbTe have been widely employed in the technology used for phase change optical memory or compact disks. In this article, we report on measurements of resistance, transmittance, and X-ray diffraction in thin films with stoichiometric compositions of Ge{sub 1}Sb{sub 4}Te{sub 7}, Ge{sub 1}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}, Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, and Ge{sub 4}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 5.} The resistivity, lattice constant, and the temperature at which transformation from the amorphous phase to the cubic crystalline structure occurs were calculated for each stoichiometric composition, and the energy activation was determined, applying Kissinger's model. It was found that the Ge{sub 4}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 5} composition has the highest crystallization temperature (425 K), the highest resistivity (0.178 {omega} cm), the greatest E{sub a} (3.09 eV), and the lowest lattice constant (a=5.975 A) in the cubic phase at 170 deg C.

  17. Ex situ n+ doping of GeSn alloys via non-equilibrium processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prucnal, S.; Berencén, Y.; Wang, M.; Rebohle, L.; Böttger, R.; Fischer, I. A.; Augel, L.; Oehme, M.; Schulze, J.; Voelskow, M.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W.; Zhou, S.

    2018-06-01

    Full integration of Ge-based alloys like GeSn with complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor technology would require the fabrication of p- and n-type doped regions for both planar and tri-dimensional device architectures which is challenging using in situ doping techniques. In this work, we report on the influence of ex situ doping on the structural, electrical and optical properties of GeSn alloys. n-type doping is realized by P implantation into GeSn alloy layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) followed by flash lamp annealing. We show that effective carrier concentration of up to 1 × 1019 cm‑3 can be achieved without affecting the Sn distribution. Sn segregation at the surface accompanied with an Sn diffusion towards the crystalline/amorphous GeSn interface is found at P fluences higher than 3 × 1015 cm‑2 and electron concentration of about 4 × 1019 cm‑3. The optical and structural properties of ion-implanted GeSn layers are comparable with the in situ doped MBE grown layers.

  18. Stress-directed compositional patterning of SiGe substrates for lateral quantum barrier manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Swapnadip; Kaiser, Daniel; Sinno, Talid; Bonilla, Jose; Han, Sang M.

    2015-01-01

    While vertical stacking of quantum well and dot structures is well established in heteroepitaxial semiconductor materials, manipulation of quantum barriers in the lateral directions poses a significant engineering challenge. Here, we demonstrate lateral quantum barrier manipulation in a crystalline SiGe alloy using structured mechanical fields to drive compositional redistribution. To apply stress, we make use of a nano-indenter array that is pressed against a Si 0.8 Ge 0.2 wafer in a custom-made mechanical press. The entire assembly is then annealed at high temperatures, during which the larger Ge atoms are selectively driven away from areas of compressive stress. Compositional analysis of the SiGe substrates reveals that this approach leads to a transfer of the indenter array pattern to the near-surface elemental composition, resulting in near 100% Si regions underneath each indenter that are separated from each other by the surrounding Si 0.8 Ge 0.2 bulk. The “stress transfer” process is studied in detail using multiscale computer simulations that demonstrate its robustness across a wide range of applied stresses and annealing temperatures. While the “Si nanodot” structures formed here are not intrinsically useful as quantum structures, it is anticipated that the stress transfer process may be modified by judicious control of the SiGe film thickness and indenter array pattern to form more technologically useful structures

  19. Evolution of magnetism of Cr nanoclusters on a Au(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsis, Harry; Kioussis, Nicholas; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitri

    2004-03-01

    Advances in low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy under ultrahigh vacuum have provided new opportunities for investigating the magnetic structures of nanoclusters adsorbed on surfaces. Recent STM studies of Cr trimers on the Au(111) surface suggest a switching between two distinct electronic states. We have carried out ab initio electronic structure calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of isolated Cr atoms, Cr dimers and trimers in different geometry. We will present results for the evolution of magnetic behavior including noncollinear magnetism and provide insight in the connection between magnetism and geometry.

  20. Probing the Absorption and Emission Transition Dipole Moment of DNA Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooley, Emma Nicole; Carro Temboury, Miguel R.; Vosch, Tom André Jos

    2017-01-01

    Using single molecule polarization measurements, we investigate the excitation and emission polarization characteristics of DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (C24-AgNCs). Although small changes in the polarization generally accompany changes to the emission spectrum, the emission and excitation...... transition dipoles tend to be steady over time and aligned in a similar direction, when immobilized in PVA. The emission transition dipole patterns, observed for C24-AgNCs in defocused wide field imaging, match that of a single emitter. The small changes to the polarization and spectral shifting that were...

  1. Seed-mediated direct growth of CdSe nanoclusters on substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Shangke; Ebrahim, Shaker; Soliman, Moataz; Qiao Qiquan

    2013-01-01

    Different shapes of CdSe nanostructures were obtained by hydrothermal method with varied Se sources and buffer layers. Hexagonal nanoparticles of CdSe with Wurtzite structure were synthesized from Se powder resource, while CdSe nanoclusters with Wurtzite structure were grown from Na 2 SeO 3 aqueous solution resources at 165 °C using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant. Using ZnO nanoparticles as a seed layer, CdSe nanostructures only partially covered the indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. With ZnO/CdSe quantum dots composite seed layer, CdSe nanostructures fully covered the ITO substrates.

  2. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; AbdulHalim, Lina G.; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Soldan, Giada; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. DFT investigation of the interaction of gold nanoclusters with poly(amidoamine) PAMAM G0 dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarada, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between PAMAM G0 and gold nanoclusters Aun (n = 2, 4, 6, and 8) was studied theoretically at DFT level. Different coordination sites were explored, including internal and superficial coordination. All stable complexes exhibited external interaction with the amine or carbonyl site, while the core site coordination was not favored. The more stable binding of Aun was registered with the terminal amine group, while the binding at the amide site was relatively weaker. The vertical first ionization potential, electron affinity, Fermi level, and the HOMO-LUMO gap of PAMAM and Aun-PAMAM G0 complexes were also analyzed.

  4. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Dai, Qilin; Tang, Jinke; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Wu, Yaqiao

    2013-01-01

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr ( 2 O 3 and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (∼25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of σ-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs

  5. Dynamics of Oxidation of Aluminum Nanoclusters using Variable Charge Molecular-Dynamics Simulations on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Timothy; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Ogata, Shuji; Rodgers, Stephen

    1999-06-01

    Oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters is investigated with a parallel molecular-dynamics approach based on dynamic charge transfer among atoms. Structural and dynamic correlations reveal that significant charge transfer gives rise to large negative pressure in the oxide which dominates the positive pressure due to steric forces. As a result, aluminum moves outward and oxygen moves towards the interior of the cluster with the aluminum diffusivity 60% higher than that of oxygen. A stable 40 Å thick amorphous oxide is formed; this is in excellent agreement with experiments.

  6. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-10-29

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. The effect of silicon crystallographic orientation on the formation of silicon nanoclusters during anodic electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timokhov, D. F.; Timokhov, F. P.

    2009-01-01

    Possible ways for increasing the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon layers have been investigated. The effect of the anodization parameters on the photoluminescence properties for porous silicon layers formed on silicon substrates with different crystallographic orientations was studied. The average diameters for silicon nanoclusters are calculated from the photoluminescence spectra of porous silicon. The influence of the substrate crystallographic orientation on the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon is revealed. A model explaining the effect of the substrate orientation on the photoluminescence properties for the porous silicon layers formed by anode electrochemical etching is proposed.

  8. Super-oxidation of silicon nanoclusters: magnetism and reactive oxygen species at the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeshkin, Sergey; Baturin, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Evgeny; Matsko, Nikita; Uspenskii, Yurii; Naumova, Anastasia; Feya, Oleg; Schoonen, Martin A.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of silicon nanoclusters depending on the temperature and oxygen pressure is explored from first principles using the evolutionary algorithm, and structural and thermodynamic analysis. From our calculations of 90 SinOm clusters we found that under normal conditions oxidation does not stop at the stoichiometric SiO2 composition, as it does in bulk silicon, but goes further placing extra oxygen atoms on the cluster surface. These extra atoms are responsible for light emission, relevant to reactive oxygen species and many of them are magnetic. We argue that the super-oxidation effect is size-independent and discuss its relevance to nanotechnology and miscellaneous applications, including biomedical ones.

  9. Radiation Stability of Nanoclusters in Nano-structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain, Alicia G.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana; Shutthanandan, V.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered candidates for nuclear fission and fusion applications at high temperature and dose. The complex oxide nanoclusters in these alloys provide high-temperature strength and are expected to afford better radiation resistance. Proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiations have been performed to evaluate cluster stability in 14YWT and 9CrODS steel under a range of irradiation conditions. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used in this work to analyze the evolution of the oxide population.

  10. Hydrogen interactions with ZrCo nanoclusters: a first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattaraj, D.; Parida, S.C.; Dash, Smruti; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Majumder, C.

    2014-01-01

    Tritium is one of the fuels going to be used in fusion reactor program. But, this radioactive isotope should be stored safely. ZrCo intermetallic has been chosen as a tritium storage material in ITER program. It is important to study how hydrogen interacts with ZrCo in its different dimensions. In this study we have investigated the hydrogen interaction with the Zr m Co n (m+n = 2, 4 and 6) nanoclusters using the state-of-the-art first principles method

  11. New pathway for the formation of metallic cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compounds induced by an electric current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Jin; Cho, Ju-Young; Jeong, Min-Woo; Na, Sekwon; Joo, Young-Chang

    2016-02-23

    The novel discovery of a current-induced transition from insulator to metal in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeSb4Te7 have been studied by means of a model using line-patterned samples. The resistivity of cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compound was reduced by an electrical current (~1 MA/cm(2)), and the final resistivity was determined based on the stress current density, regardless of the initial resistivity and temperature, which indicates that the conductivity of Ge-Sb-Te compound can be modulated by an electrical current. The minimum resistivity of Ge-Sb-Te materials can be achieved at high kinetic rates by applying an electrical current, and the material properties change from insulating to metallic behavior without a phase transition. The current-induced metal transition is more effective in GeSb4Te7 than Ge2Sb2Te5, which depends on the intrinsic vacancy of materials. Electromigration, which is the migration of atoms induced by a momentum transfer from charge carriers, can easily promote the rearrangement of vacancies in the cubic phase of Ge-Sb-Te compound. This behavior differs significantly from thermal annealing, which accompanies a phase transition to the hexagonal phase. This result suggests a new pathway for modulating the electrical conductivity and material properties of chalcogenide materials by applying an electrical current.

  12. Metal-Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-04-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a fundamental advance in the fabrication of GST with out-of-plane stacking of ordered vacancy layers by means of three distinct methods: Molecular Beam Epitaxy, thermal annealing and application of femtosecond laser pulses. We assess the degree of vacancy ordering and explicitly correlate it with the MIT. We further tune the ordering in a controlled fashion attaining a large range of resistivity. Employing ordered GST might allow the realization of cells with larger programming windows.

  13. Metal - Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-04-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a fundamental advance in the fabrication of GST with out-of-plane stacking of ordered vacancy layers by means of three distinct methods: Molecular Beam Epitaxy, thermal annealing and application of femtosecond laser pulses. We assess the degree of vacancy ordering and explicitly correlate it with the MIT. We further tune the ordering in a controlled fashion attaining a large range of resistivity. Employing ordered GST might allow the realization of cells with larger programming windows.

  14. Toepassing geïntegreerde maatregelen geïnvestariseerd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne, B.

    2009-01-01

    Kennis over 'good practices' en 'best practices' van geïntegreerde bedrijfsstrategieën verspreidt zich snel over Europa. Dat is één van de conclusies van een inventarisatie binnen het project Endure. Het aanplanten van minder vatbare of resistente rassen blijkt weinig toegepast te worden in de

  15. Mn-doped Ge self-assembled quantum dots via dewetting of thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouassa, Mansour, E-mail: mansour.aouassa@yahoo.fr [LMON, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l’environnement Monastir 5019 (Tunisia); Jadli, Imen [LMON, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l’environnement Monastir 5019 (Tunisia); Bandyopadhyay, Anup [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Kim, Sung Kyu [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Karaman, Ibrahim [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Lee, Jeong Yong [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • We report the new fabrication approach for producing a self- assembled Mn dpoed Ge quantum dots (QDs) on SiO{sub 2} thin film with a Curie temperature above room temperature. These magnetic QDs are crystalline, monodisperse and have a well-defined shape and a controlled size. The investigation opens new routes for elaboration of self-assembled magnetic nanocrystals - Abstract: In this study, we demonstrate an original elaboration route for producing a Mn-doped Ge self-assembled quantum dots on SiO{sub 2} thin layer for MOS structure. These magnetic quantum dots are elaborated using dewetting phenomenon at solid state by Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) annealing at high temperature of an amorphous Ge:Mn (Mn: 40%) nanolayer deposed at very low temperature by high-precision Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy on SiO{sub 2} thin film. The size of quantum dots is controlled with nanometer scale precision by varying the nominal thickness of amorphous film initially deposed. The magnetic properties of the quantum-dots layer have been investigated by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the nanostructure of these materials. Obtained results indicate that GeMn QDs are crystalline, monodisperse and exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior with a Curie temperature (TC) above room temperature. They could be integrated into spintronic technology.

  16. Giant magnetocaloric effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2 alloy with low purity Gd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Santiago Alves

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd5(Ge1-xSi x, x < 4 based alloys are potential candidates for magnetic refrigeration in the range ~20 - ~290 K. However, one of the greatest obstacles for the use of that technology in large scale is the utilization of high pure Gd metal (99.99 wt. (% to produce the GdGeSi alloys, since the impurity elements decrease the intensity of the magnetocaloric effect (EMC¹. In this work, we prove that annealing of the Gd5Ge2Si2 can promote remarkable values for the EMC in comparison to those obtained for the alloy with high pure Gd. Also, the as cast alloy and the annealed alloy are not monophasic, but have at least two crystalline phases in their microstructure. Results for X-ray analysis, optical and electronic microscopy and magnetization measurements are reported.

  17. Effect of nitrogen doping on the thermal conductivity of GeTe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallica, Roberto; Longo, Massimo; Wiemer, Claudia [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Agrate Brianza (Italy); Varesi, Enrico; Fumagalli, Luca; Spadoni, Simona [Micron Semiconductor Italia, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    The 3{omega} method was employed to determine the effect of nitrogen doping (5 at.%) on the thermal conductivity of sputtered thin films of stoichiometric GeTe (a material of interest for phase change memories). It was found that nitrogen doping has a detrimental effect on the thermal conductivity of GeTe in both phases, but less markedly in the amorphous (-25%) than in the crystalline one (-40%). On the opposite, no effect could be detected on the measured thermal boundary resistance between these films and SiO{sub 2}, within the experimental error. Our results agree with those obtained by molecular dynamic simulation of amorphous GeTe. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Magnetic and thermodynamic properties of the Pr-based ferromagnet PrGe2-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Keisuke T.; Morioka, Naoya; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the magnetization, M, and specific heat, C, of ThSi2-type PrGe2-δ. A polycrystalline sample of PrGe2-δ was prepared by arc-melting. Magnetization divided by magnetic field, M / B, increased sharply and C showed a clear jump at the Curie temperature, TC, of 14.6 K; these results indicate that PrGe2-δ ordered ferromagnetically. The magnetic entropy at TC reached R ln 3, indicating a quasi-triplet crystalline electric field (CEF) ground state. The maximum value of magnetic entropy change was 11.5 J/K kg with a field change of 7 T, which is comparable to those of other right rare-earth based magnetocaloric materials. This large magnetic entropy change was attributed to the quasi-triplet ground state of the CEF.

  19. Crystalline silicotitanate gate review analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlahta, S.N.; Carreon, R.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) is an ion-exchange method for removing radioactive cesium from tank waste to allow the separation of the waste into high- and low-level fractions. The CST, originally developed Sandia National Laboratories personnel in association with Union Oil Products Corporation, has both a high affinity and selectivity for sorbing cesium-137 from highly alkaline or acidic solutions. For several years now, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded work to investigate applying CST to large-scale removal of cesium-137 from radioactive tank wastes. In January 1997, an expert panel sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area met to review the current state of the technology and to determine whether it was ready for routine use. The review also sought to identify any technical issues that must be resolved or additional CST development that must occur before full implementation by end-users. The CST Gate Review Group concluded that sufficient work has been done to close developmental work on CST and turn the remaining site-specific tasks over to the users. This report documents the review group''s findings, issues, concerns, and recommendations as well as responses from the Tanks Focus Area expert staff to specific pretreatment and immobilization issues

  20. Low temperature formation of higher-k cubic phase HfO{sub 2} by atomic layer deposition on GeO{sub x}/Ge structures fabricated by in-situ thermal oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R., E-mail: zhang@mosfet.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Huang, P.-C.; Taoka, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Takenaka, M.; Takagi, S. [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    We have demonstrated a low temperature formation (300 °C) of higher-k HfO{sub 2} using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on an in-situ thermal oxidation GeO{sub x} interfacial layer. It is found that the cubic phase is dominant in the HfO{sub 2} film with an epitaxial-like growth behavior. The maximum permittivity of 42 is obtained for an ALD HfO{sub 2} film on a 1-nm-thick GeO{sub x} form by the in-situ thermal oxidation. It is suggested from physical analyses that the crystallization of cubic phase HfO{sub 2} can be induced by the formation of six-fold crystalline GeO{sub x} structures in the underlying GeO{sub x} interfacial layer.

  1. Low temperature formation of higher-k cubic phase HfO2 by atomic layer deposition on GeOx/Ge structures fabricated by in-situ thermal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.; Huang, P.-C.; Taoka, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Takenaka, M.; Takagi, S.

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated a low temperature formation (300 °C) of higher-k HfO 2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on an in-situ thermal oxidation GeO x interfacial layer. It is found that the cubic phase is dominant in the HfO 2 film with an epitaxial-like growth behavior. The maximum permittivity of 42 is obtained for an ALD HfO 2 film on a 1-nm-thick GeO x form by the in-situ thermal oxidation. It is suggested from physical analyses that the crystallization of cubic phase HfO 2 can be induced by the formation of six-fold crystalline GeO x structures in the underlying GeO x interfacial layer

  2. Preparation, characterization and nonlinear absorption studies of cuprous oxide nanoclusters, micro-cubes and micro-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, H.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2012-07-01

    Cuprous oxide nanoclusters, micro-cubes and micro-particles were successfully synthesized by reducing copper(II) salt with ascorbic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide via a co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction and FTIR studies revealed that the formation of pure single-phase cubic. Raman and EPR spectral studies show the presence of CuO in as-synthesized powders of Cu2O. Transmission electron microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy data revealed that the morphology evolves from nanoclusters to micro-cubes and micro-particles by increasing the concentration of NaOH. Linear optical measurements show absorption peak maximum shifts towards red with changing morphology from nanoclusters to micro-cubes and micro-particles. The nonlinear optical properties were studied using open aperture Z-scan technique with 532 nm 6 ns laser pulses. Samples-exhibited both saturable as well as reverse saturable absorption. Due to confinement effects (enhanced band gap), we observed enhanced nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) in the case of nanoclusters compared to their micro-cubes and micro-particles.

  3. Highly selective GaN-nanowire/TiO2-nanocluster hybrid sensors for detection of benzene and related environment pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluri, Geetha S; Motayed, Abhishek; Davydov, Albert V; Oleshko, Vladimir P; Bertness, Kris A; Sanford, Norman A; Rao, Mulpuri V

    2011-01-01

    Nanowire-nanocluster hybrid chemical sensors were realized by functionalizing gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) with titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoclusters for selectively sensing benzene and other related aromatic compounds. Hybrid sensor devices were developed by fabricating two-terminal devices using individual GaN NWs followed by the deposition of TiO 2 nanoclusters using RF magnetron sputtering. The sensor fabrication process employed standard microfabrication techniques. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy using energy-dispersive x-ray and electron energy-loss spectroscopies confirmed the presence of the anatase phase in TiO 2 clusters after post-deposition anneal at 700 deg. C. A change of current was observed for these hybrid sensors when exposed to the vapors of aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and chlorobenzene mixed with air) under UV excitation, while they had no response to non-aromatic organic compounds such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, chloroform, acetone and 1,3-hexadiene. The sensitivity range for the noted aromatic compounds except chlorobenzene were from 1% down to 50 parts per billion (ppb) at room temperature. By combining the enhanced catalytic properties of the TiO 2 nanoclusters with the sensitive transduction capability of the nanowires, an ultra-sensitive and selective chemical sensing architecture is demonstrated. We have proposed a mechanism that could qualitatively explain the observed sensing behavior.

  4. Characterization and Application of DNA-templated Silver Nanoclusters and Polarized Spectroscopy of Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro-Temboury, Miguel R.

    In this thesis two different systems are investigated envisioning their potential applications: DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) and ionic self-assembled (ISA) nanostructures based on azo-dyes. Mainly Visible-NIR spectroscopy was used to probe electronic transitions with absorbance a...

  5. Fluorescent silver nanoclusters capped by polyethyleneimine with different molecular weights: Universal synthesis and application as a temperature sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Fei, E-mail: qufei3323@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165, Shandong (China); Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Intermediates and Analysis of Natural Medicine, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165, Shandong (China); Li, Qingjin [The Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165, Shandong (China); Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Intermediates and Analysis of Natural Medicine, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165, Shandong (China); You, Jinmao, E-mail: jmyou6304@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165, Shandong (China); Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Intermediates and Analysis of Natural Medicine, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165, Shandong (China); Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810001 (China)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, we developed a universal, applicable and simple synthetic method of Ag nanoclusters capped by polyethyleneimine (PEI) with different molecular weights (AgNC-PEIs), including Mw 600, 1300, 1800, 2000, 10,000, 25,000, 70,000, and 750,000. Using formaldehyde as the sole reducing agent, silver nanoclusters could be successfully prepared by using these templates. Subsequently, several characterization techniques were employed to investigate the properties of AgNC-PEIs, and the results suggested that these AgNC-PEIs had similar sizes, structures, and optical features. However, besides the common characteristics, different temperature sensitivities were found for these nanoclusters, in which AgNC-PEI 25000 was proper to be applied as a temperature sensor. With increasing temperature, the fluorescence quenched dramatically, and this change could be readily observed by naked eyes under UV light. Injection of these temperature sensitive nanoclusters into a glass tube, a simple thermometer could be fabricated easily, thus AgNC-PEI 25000 would be a promising candidate for temperature sensing as a visible indicator.

  6. Systematic Study on the Self-Assembled Hexagonal Au Voids, Nano-Clusters and Nanoparticles on GaN (0001.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puran Pandey

    Full Text Available Au nano-clusters and nanoparticles (NPs have been widely utilized in various electronic, optoelectronic, and bio-medical applications due to their great potentials. The size, density and configuration of Au NPs play a vital role in the performance of these devices. In this paper, we present a systematic study on the self-assembled hexagonal Au voids, nano-clusters and NPs fabricated on GaN (0001 by the variation of annealing temperature and deposition amount. At relatively low annealing temperatures between 400 and 600°C, the fabrication of hexagonal shaped Au voids and Au nano-clusters are observed and discussed based on the diffusion limited aggregation model. The size and density of voids and nano-clusters can systematically be controlled. The self-assembled Au NPs are fabricated at comparatively high temperatures from 650 to 800°C based on the Volmer-Weber growth model and also the size and density can be tuned accordingly. The results are symmetrically analyzed and discussed in conjunction with the diffusion theory and thermodynamics by utilizing AFM and SEM images, EDS maps and spectra, FFT power spectra, cross-sectional line-profiles and size and density plots.

  7. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Red-Light Emitting Au Nanoclusters with the Use of Egg White

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jinghan; Yan, Lei; Sang, Aohua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zheng, Baozhan; Xiao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We developed a simple, cost-effective, and eco-friendly method to synthesize gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with red fluorescence. The experiment was performed using HAuCl[subscript 4], egg white, Na[subscript 2]CO[subscript 3] (known as soda ash or washing soda), and a microwave oven. In our experiment, fluorescent AuNCs were prepared within a…

  8. Reductive Deprotection of Monolayer Protected Nanoclusters: An Efficient Route to Supported Ultrasmall Au Nanocatalysts for Selective Oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Das, S.; Goswami, A.; Hesari, M.; Al-Sharab, J. F.; Mikmeková, Eliška; Maran, F.; Asefa, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2014), s. 1473-1478 ISSN 1613-6810 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Keywords : gold nanoclusters * selective oxidation * heterogeneous nanocatalysis * styrene oxidation * borohydride reduction Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 8.368, year: 2014

  9. Polyoxotungstate nanoclusters supported on silica as an efficient solid-phase microextraction fiber of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolghasemi, Mir Mahdi; Yousefi, Vahid; Rafiee, Ezzat

    2014-01-01

    A highly porous silica-supported tungstophosphoric acid (PW) nanocluster was prepared for use in solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The PWs represent a class of discrete transition metal-oxide nanoclusters and their structures resemble discrete fragments of metal-oxide structures of definite size and shape. Transition metal-oxide nanoclusters display large structural diversity, and their monodisperse sizes can be tuned from several Ångstroms up to 10 nm. The highly porous silica-supported tungstophosphoric acid nanocluster material is found to be capable of efficiently extracting PAHs from aqueous sample solutions. The nanomaterial was immobilized on a stainless steel wire for fabrication of the SPME fiber. Following thermal desorption, the PAHs were quantified by GC-MS. Analytical merits include limits of detection that range from 0.02 to 0.1 pg mL −1 and a dynamic range as wide as from 0.001 to 100 ng mL −1 . Under optimum conditions, the repeatability for one fiber (n = 3), expressed as the relative standard deviation, is between 4.3 % and 8.6 %. The method is simple, rapid, and inexpensive. The thermal stability of the fiber and the high relative recovery make this method superior to conventional methods of extraction. (author)

  10. Theoretical Investigation of the Structural Stabilities of Ceria Surfaces and Supported Metal Nanocluster in Vapor and Aqueous Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhibo [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Liu, Ning [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Chen, Biaohua [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Li, Jianwei [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Mei, Donghai [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2018-01-25

    Understanding the structural stability and dynamics at the interface between the solid metal oxide and aqueous phase is significant in a variety of industrial applications including heterogeneous catalysis and environmental remediation. In the present work, the stabilities of three low-index ceria (CeO2) surfaces, i.e., (111), (110) and (100) in vapor and aqueous phases were studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Gibbs surface free energies as a function of temperature, water partial pressure, and water coverages were calculated using DFT based atomistic thermodynamic approach. On the basis of surface free energies, the morphology and exposed surface structures of the CeO2 nanoparticle were predicted using Wulff construction principle. It is found that the partially hydroxylated (111) and (100) are two major surface structures of CeO2 nanoparticles in vapor phase at ambient temperature (300 K). As the temperature increases, the fully dehydrated (111) surface gradually becomes the most dominant surface structure. While in aqueous phase, the exposed surface of the CeO2 nanoparticle is dominated by the hydroxylated (110) structure at 393 K. Finally, the morphology and stability of a cuboctahedron Pt13 nanocluster supported on CeO2 surfaces in both gas and aqueous phases were investigated. In gas phase, the supported Pt13 nanocluster has the tendency to wetting the CeO2 surface due to the strong metal-support interaction. The calculated interaction energies suggest the CeO2(110) surface provides the best stability for the Pt13 nanocluster. The CeO2 supported Pt13 nanoclusters are oxidized. Compared to the gas phase, the morphology of the CeO2 supported Pt13 nanocluster is less distorted due to the solvation effect provided by surrounding water molecules in aqueous phase. More electrons are transferred from the Pt13 nanocluster to the CeO2 support, implying the supported Pt13 nanocluster is further

  11. Neutron transmutation doped Ge bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.; Palaio, N. P.; Richards, P. L.; Rodder, M.

    1983-01-01

    Some conclusions reached are as follow. Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) of high quality Ge single crystals provides perfect control of doping concentration and uniformity. The resistivity can be tailored to any given bolometer operating temperature down to 0.1 K and probably lower. The excellent uniformity is advantaged for detector array development.

  12. Ultrafast crystallization and thermal stability of In-Ge doped eutectic Sb70Te30 phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Meiling; Miao Xiangshui; Ting Leehou; Shi Luping

    2008-01-01

    Effect of In and Ge doping in the form of In 2 Ge 8 Sb 85 Te 5 on optical and thermal properties of eutectic Sb 70 Te 30 alloys was investigated. Crystalline structure of In 2 Ge 8 Sb 85 Te 5 phase change material consists of a mixture of phases. Thermal analysis shows higher crystallization temperature and activation energy for crystallization. Isothermal reflectivity-time measurement shows a growth-dominated crystallization mechanism. Ultrafast crystallization speed of 30 ns is realized upon irradiation by blue laser beam. The use of ultrafast and thermally stable In 2 Ge 8 Sb 85 Te 5 phase change material as mask layer in aperture-type super-resolution near-field phase change disk is realized to increase the carrier-to-noise ratio and thermal stability

  13. Effect of Ge addition on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekan, M.; Shabestari, S.G.; Gholamipour, R.; Seyedein, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of the addition of a small amount of Ge on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 (at.%) bulk metallic glass were studied. The Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy has a surprising glass-forming ability (GFA), and the glassy rods up to 4 mm in diameter can be formed. Partial addition of Ge causes the crystalline phases precipitate in the glassy matrix of (Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 ) 100-x Ge x (x = 0, 1, 2) rods with a diameter of 4 mm. In uniaxial compression, Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 bulk metallic glass exhibit high strength of 1692 MPa and very limited plasticity of 0.05%. When Ge increases from 0 to 2 at.%, the strength decreases, but plastic strain increases about 2.5%. Fracture surface and shear bands of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  14. Glucose oxidase-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters as probes for glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xiaodong; Long, Yunfei; Wang, Jianxiu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A glucose oxidase/gold nanocluster conjugates formed by etching chemistry. ► Integration of the bioactivities and fluorescence properties within a single unit. ► These conjugates serve as novel fluorescent probe for glucose. -- Abstract: Creation and application of noble metal nanoclusters have received continuous attention. By integrating enzyme activity and fluorescence for potential applications, enzyme-capped metal clusters are more desirable. This work demonstrated a glucose oxidase (an enzyme for glucose)-functionalized gold cluster as probe for glucose. Under physiological conditions, such bioconjugate was successfully prepared by an etching reaction, where tetrakis (hydroxylmethyl) phosphonium-protected gold nanoparticle and thioctic acid-modified glucose oxidase were used as precursor and etchant, respectively. These bioconjugates showed unique fluorescence spectra (λ em max = 650 nm, λ ex max = 507 nm) with an acceptable quantum yield (ca. 7%). Moreover, the conjugated glucose oxidase remained active and catalyzed reaction of glucose and dissolved O 2 to produce H 2 O 2 , which quenched quantitatively the fluorescence of gold clusters and laid a foundation of glucose detection. A linear range of 2.0 × 10 −6 –140 × 10 −6 M and a detection limit of 0.7 × 10 −6 M (S/N = 3) were obtained. Also, another horseradish peroxidase/gold cluster bioconjugate was produced by such general synthesis method. Such enzyme/metal cluster bioconjugates represented a promising class of biosensors for biologically important targets in organelles or cells

  15. In vivo target bio-imaging of Alzheimer's disease by fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lanmei; Zhao, Chunqiu; Su, Meina; Li, Xiaoqi; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Hui; Amatore, Christian; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-07-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease which is difficult to cure. When Alzheimer's disease occurs, the level of zinc ions in the brain changes, and the relevant amount of zinc ions continue decreasing in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of Alzheimer's patients with disease exacerbation. In view of these considerations, we have explored a new strategy for the in vivo rapid fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease through target bio-labeling of zinc oxide nanoclusters which were biosynthesized in vivo in the Alzheimer's brain via intravenous injection of zinc gluconate solution. By using three-month-old and six-month-old Alzheimer's model mice as models, our observations demonstrate that biocompatible zinc ions could pass through the blood-brain barrier of the Alzheimer's disease mice and generate fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters (ZnO NCs) through biosynthesis, and then the bio-synthesized ZnO NCs could readily accumulate in situ on the hippocampus specific region for the in vivo fluorescent labeling of the affected sites. This study provides a new way for the rapid diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and may have promising prospects in the effective diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. One-step aqueous synthesis of fluorescent copper nanoclusters by direct metal reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Ujados, Mónica; Trapiella-Alfonso, Laura; Costa-Fernández, José M; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    A one-step aqueous synthesis of highly fluorescent water-soluble copper nanoclusters (CuNCs) is here described, based on direct reduction of the metal precursor with NaBH 4 in the presence of bidentate ligands (made of lipoic acid anchoring groups, appended with a poly(ethylene glycol) short chain). A complete optical and structural characterization was carried out: the optical emission was centred at 416 nm, with a luminescence quantum yield in water of 3.6% (the highest one reported so far in water for this kind of nanocluster). The structural characterization reveals a homogeneous size distribution (of 2.5 nm diameter) with spherical shape. The CuNCs obtained offer long-term stability (the luminescence emission remained unaltered after more than two months) under a broad range of chemical conditions (e.g. stored at pH 3–12 or even in a high ionic strength medium such as 1 M NaCl) and high photostability, keeping their fluorescence emission intact after more than 2 h of daylight and UV-light exposition. All those advantageous features warrant synthesized CuNCs being promising fluorescent nanoprobes for further developments including (bio)applications. (paper)

  17. Probing phosphate ion via the europium(III)-modulated fluorescence of gold nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Shou-Nian; Li, Chun-Mei; Gao, Bu-Hong; Kargbo, Osman; Zhou, Chan; Chen, Xi; Wan, Neng

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) were synthesized by a one-pot method using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid as a reducing and capping reagent. It is found that the red fluorescence of the Au-NCs is quenched by the introduction of Eu(III) at pH 7.0, but that fluorescence is restored on addition of phosphate. The Au-NCs were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence photographs. The effect of pH on fluorescence was studied in the range from pH 6 to 10 and is found to be strong. Based on these findings, we have developed an assay for phosphate. Ions such as citrate, Fe(CN) 6 3− , SO 4 2− , S 2 O 8 2− , Cl − , HS − , Br − , AcO − , NO 2 − , SCN − , ClO 4 − , HCO 3 − , NO 3 − , Cd 2+ , Ba 2+ , Zn 2+ , Mg 2+ , and glutamate do not interfere, but ascorbate and Fe 3+ can quench Au-NCs fluorescence. The fluorescent nanocluster probe responds to phosphate in the range from 0.18 to 250 μM, and the detection limit is 180 nM. The probe also responds to pyrophosphate and ATP. (author)

  18. Sizing protein-templated gold nanoclusters by time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleilhac, Antonin; Bertorelle, Franck; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-03-01

    Protein-templated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are very attractive due to their unique fluorescence properties. A major problem however may arise due to protein structure changes upon the nucleation of an AuNC within the protein for any future use as in vivo probes, for instance. In this work, we propose a simple and reliable fluorescence based technique measuring the hydrodynamic size of protein-templated gold nanoclusters. This technique uses the relation between the time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and the hydrodynamic volume, through the rotational correlation time. We determine the molecular size of protein-directed AuNCs, with protein templates of increasing sizes, e.g. insulin, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The comparison of sizes obtained by other techniques (e.g. dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering) between bare and gold clusters containing proteins allows us to address the volume changes induced either by conformational changes (for BSA) or the formation of protein dimers (for insulin and lysozyme) during cluster formation and incorporation.

  19. Sizing protein-templated gold nanoclusters by time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleilhac, Antonin; Bertorelle, Franck; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-03-15

    Protein-templated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are very attractive due to their unique fluorescence properties. A major problem however may arise due to protein structure changes upon the nucleation of an AuNC within the protein for any future use as in vivo probes, for instance. In this work, we propose a simple and reliable fluorescence based technique measuring the hydrodynamic size of protein-templated gold nanoclusters. This technique uses the relation between the time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and the hydrodynamic volume, through the rotational correlation time. We determine the molecular size of protein-directed AuNCs, with protein templates of increasing sizes, e.g. insulin, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The comparison of sizes obtained by other techniques (e.g. dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering) between bare and gold clusters containing proteins allows us to address the volume changes induced either by conformational changes (for BSA) or the formation of protein dimers (for insulin and lysozyme) during cluster formation and incorporation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recyclable fluorescent gold nanocluster membrane for visual sensing of copper(II) ion in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhijin; Luo, Fenqiang; Dong, Tongqing; Zheng, Liyan; Wang, Yaxian; Chi, Yuwu; Chen, Guonan

    2012-05-21

    Recently, metal-selective fluorescent chemosensors have attracted intense attention for their simple and real-time tracking of metal ions in environmental samples. However, most of the existing fluorescent sensors are one-off sensors and thus suffer from large amount of reagent consumption, significant experimental cost and raising the risk of environmental pollution. In this paper, we developed a green (low reagent consumption, low-toxicity reagent use), recyclable, and visual sensor for Cu(2+) in aqueous solution by using a fluorescent gold nanoclusters membrane (FGM) as the sensing unit, basing on our findings on gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) that the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated Au NCs exhibit excellent membrane-forming ability under the isoelectric point of BSA, and thus enable us to obtain a new type of sensing membrane (i.e. FGM) by denaturing Au NCs; the fluorescence of FGM can be significantly quenched by Cu(2+) ion, and the quenched fluorescence can be totally recovered by histidine; the as-prepared FGM is very stable and recyclable, which makes it an ideal sensing material.

  1. High Performance Electrocatalytic Reaction of Hydrogen and Oxygen on Ruthenium Nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Ruquan; Liu, Yuanyue; Peng, Zhiwei; Wang, Tuo; Jalilov, Almaz S.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Wei, Su-Huai; Tour, James M.

    2017-01-18

    The development of catalytic materials for the hydrogen oxidation, hydrogen evolution, oxygen reduction or oxygen evolution reactions with high reaction rates and low overpotentials are key goals for the development of renewable energy. We report here Ru(0) nanoclusters supported on nitrogen-doped graphene as high-performance multifunctional catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), showing activities similar to that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution. For HER performance in alkaline media, sample Ru/NG-750 reaches 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 8 mV with a Tafel slope of 30 mV dec-1. The high HER performance in alkaline solution is advantageous because most catalysts for ORR and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) also prefer alkaline solution environment whereas degrade in acidic electrolytes. For ORR performance, Ru/NG effectively catalyzes the conversion of O2 into OH- via a 4e process at a current density comparable to that of Pt/C. The unusual catalytic activities of Ru(0) nanoclusters reported here are important discoveries for the advancement of renewable energy conversion reactions.

  2. Design and mechanistic study of a novel gold nanocluster-based drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinzhen; Pan, Yiting; Chen, Tiankai; Du, Yuanxin; Ge, Honghua; Zhang, Buchang; Xie, Jianping; Yu, Haizhu; Zhu, Manzhou

    2018-05-22

    Chemically-triggered drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been extensively studied as they do not require specialized equipment to deliver the drug and can deeply penetrate human tissue. However, their syntheses are complicated and they tend to be cytotoxic, which restricts their clinical utility. In this work, the self-regulated drug loading and release capabilities of peptide-protected gold nanoclusters (Pep-Au NCs) are investigated using vancomycin (Van) as the model drug. Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) coated with a custom-designed pentapeptide are synthesized as drug delivery nanocarriers and loaded with Van - a spontaneous process reliant on the specific binding between Van and the custom-designed peptide. The Van-loaded Au NCs show comparable antimicrobial activity with Van on its own, and the number of Van released by the Pep-Au NCs is found to be proportional to the amount of bacteria present. The controlled nature of the Van release is very encouraging, and predominantly due to the stronger binding affinity of Van with bacteria than that with Au NCs. In addition, these fluorescent Au NCs could also be used to construct temperature sensors, which enable the in vitro and in vivo bioimaging.

  3. Heterogeneous Photodecolorization of Methyl Green Catalyzed by Fe(II-o-Phenanthroline/Zeolite Y Nanocluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Fe(II-orthophenatrolin, as doped with synthetic zeolite Y nanocluster (Na-Y via complexation process, after wet impregnation of parent zeolite with FeSO4 aqueous solution, was studied as a photocatalyst in decolorization of Methyl Green (MG under UV irradiation. The characterization of the synthesized zeolite nanocluster and the prepared catalyst was studied using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, thermal analysis, and SEM methods. The dye photodecolorization process was studied considering the influence of experimental parameters and it was observed that photoreactivity of the photocatalyst was varied with catalyst amount, initial dye concentration, pH of dye solution, temperature, and the presence of KBrO3. The optimal experimental parameters were obtained as follows: catalyst amount: 1 gL−1, dye concentration: 40 ppm, pH: 9, and active component value: 100 mg Fe(II-orthophenatrolin per g catalyst. The reusability of the intended catalyst was also investigated. The degradation process obeyed first-order kinetics.

  4. Hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of sodium borohydride using Ru(0) nanoclusters as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkar, S.; Zahmakiran, M.

    2005-01-01

    Sodium borohydride is stable in aqueous alkaline solution, however, it hydrolyses in water to hydrogen gas in the presence of suitable catalyst. By this way hydrogen can be generated safely for the fuel cells. Generating H 2 catalytically from NaBH 4 solutions has many advantages: NaBH 4 solutions are nonflammable, reaction products are environmentally benign, rate of H 2 generation is easily controlled, the reaction product NaBO 2 can be recycled, H 2 can be generated even at low temperatures. All of the catalysts that has been used in hydrolysis of sodium borohydride are bulk metals and they act as heterogeneous catalysts. The limited surface area of the heterogeneous catalysts causes lower catalytic activity as the activity of catalyst is directly related to its surface area. Thus, the use of metal nanoparticles with large surface area provides potential route to increase the catalytic activity. Here, we report, for the first time, the use of ruthenium(0) nanoclusters as catalyst in the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride liberating hydrogen gas. The ruthenium nanoparticles are generated from the reduction of ruthenium(III) chloride by sodium borohydride in water and stabilized by specific ligand. The ruthenium(0) nanoclusters are found to be highly active catalyst for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride

  5. Photoconductivity, photoluminescence and optical Kerr nonlinear effects in zinc oxide films containing chromium nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; García-Cruz, M.L.; Castañeda, L.; Rangel Rojo, R.; Tamayo-Rivera, L.; Maldonado, A.; Avendaño-Alejo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium doped zinc oxide thin solid films were deposited on soda–lime glass substrates. The photoconductivity of the material and its influence on the optical behavior was evaluated. A non-alkoxide sol–gel synthesis approach was used for the preparation of the samples. An enhancement of the photoluminescence response exhibited by the resulting photoconductive films with embedded chromium nanoclusters is presented. The modification in the photoconduction induced by a 445 nm wavelength was measured and then associated with the participation of the optical absorptive response. In order to investigate the third order optical nonlinearities of the samples, a standard time-resolved Optical Kerr Gate configuration with 80 fs pulses at 830 nm was used and a quasi-instantaneous pure electronic nonlinearity without the contribution of nonlinear optical absorption was observed. We estimate that from the inclusion of Cr nanoclusters into the sample results a strong optical Kerr effect originated by quantum confinement. The large photoluminescence response and the important refractive nonlinearity of the photoconductive samples seem to promise potential applications for the development of multifunctional all-optical nanodevices. - Highlights: ► Enhancement in photoluminescence for chromium doped zinc oxide films is presented. ► A strong and ultrafast optical Kerr effect seems to result from quantum confinement. ► Photoconductive properties for optical and optoelectronic functions were observed.

  6. Photoconductivity, photoluminescence and optical Kerr nonlinear effects in zinc oxide films containing chromium nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Torres, C., E-mail: crstorres@yahoo.com.mx [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, ESIME-Z, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, DF 07738 (Mexico); Garcia-Cruz, M.L. [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, A. P. J-48, Puebla 72570, Mexico (Mexico); Castaneda, L., E-mail: luisca@sirio.ifuap.buap.mx [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, A. P. J-48, Puebla 72570, Mexico (Mexico); Rangel Rojo, R. [CICESE/Depto. de Optica, A. P. 360, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Tamayo-Rivera, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, DF 01000 (Mexico); Maldonado, A. [Depto. de Ing. Electrica, CINVESTAV IPN-SEES, A. P. 14740, Mexico DF 07000 (Mexico); Avendano-Alejo, M., E-mail: imax_aa@yahoo.com.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. P. 70-186, 04510, DF (Mexico); and others

    2012-04-15

    Chromium doped zinc oxide thin solid films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates. The photoconductivity of the material and its influence on the optical behavior was evaluated. A non-alkoxide sol-gel synthesis approach was used for the preparation of the samples. An enhancement of the photoluminescence response exhibited by the resulting photoconductive films with embedded chromium nanoclusters is presented. The modification in the photoconduction induced by a 445 nm wavelength was measured and then associated with the participation of the optical absorptive response. In order to investigate the third order optical nonlinearities of the samples, a standard time-resolved Optical Kerr Gate configuration with 80 fs pulses at 830 nm was used and a quasi-instantaneous pure electronic nonlinearity without the contribution of nonlinear optical absorption was observed. We estimate that from the inclusion of Cr nanoclusters into the sample results a strong optical Kerr effect originated by quantum confinement. The large photoluminescence response and the important refractive nonlinearity of the photoconductive samples seem to promise potential applications for the development of multifunctional all-optical nanodevices. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement in photoluminescence for chromium doped zinc oxide films is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A strong and ultrafast optical Kerr effect seems to result from quantum confinement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoconductive properties for optical and optoelectronic functions were observed.

  7. In vivo self-bio-imaging of tumors through in situ biosynthesized fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianling; Zhang, Gen; Li, Qiwei; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Chongyang; Amatore, Christian; Wang, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in vivo allows non-invasive tumor diagnostic thus permitting a direct monitoring of cancer therapies progresses. It is established herein that fluorescent gold nanoclusters are spontaneously biosynthesized by cancerous cell (i.e., HepG2, human hepatocarcinoma cell line; K562, leukemia cell line) incubated with micromolar chloroauric acid solutions, a biocompatible molecular Au(III) species. Gold nanoparticles form by Au(III) reduction inside cells cytoplasms and ultimately concentrate around their nucleoli, thus affording precise cell imaging. Importantly, this does not occur in non-cancerous cells, as evidenced with human embryo liver cells (L02) used as controls. This dichotomy is exploited for a new strategy for in vivo self-bio-imaging of tumors. Subcutaneous injections of millimolar chloroauric acid solution near xenograft tumors of the nude mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma or chronic myeloid leukemia led to efficient biosynthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters without significant dissemination to the surrounding normal tissues, hence allowing specific fluorescent self-bio-marking of the tumors.

  8. Exploring luminescence-based temperature sensing using protein-passivated gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Essner, Jeremy B.; Baker, Gary A.

    2014-07-01

    We explore the analytical performance and limitations of optically monitoring aqueous-phase temperature using protein-protected gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Although not reported elsewhere, we find that these bio-passivated AuNCs show pronounced hysteresis upon thermal cycling. This unwanted behaviour can be eliminated by several strategies, including sol-gel coating and thermal denaturation of the biomolecular template, introducing protein-templated AuNC probes as viable nanothermometers.We explore the analytical performance and limitations of optically monitoring aqueous-phase temperature using protein-protected gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Although not reported elsewhere, we find that these bio-passivated AuNCs show pronounced hysteresis upon thermal cycling. This unwanted behaviour can be eliminated by several strategies, including sol-gel coating and thermal denaturation of the biomolecular template, introducing protein-templated AuNC probes as viable nanothermometers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplemental figures and experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02069c

  9. Hydraulic testing in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, K.E.; Andersson, J.E.; Carlsson, L.; Hansson, K.; Larsson, N.A.

    1986-12-01

    Swedish Geolocical Company (SGAB) conducted and carried out single-hole hydraulic testing in borehole Fi 6 in the Finnsjoen area of central Sweden. The purpose was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different methods applicable in crystalline rocks and to recommend methods for use in current and scheduled investigations in a range of low hydraulic conductivity rocks. A total of eight different methods of testing were compared using the same equipment. This equipment was thoroughly tested as regards the elasticity of the packers and change in volume of the test section. The use of a hydraulically operated down-hole valve enabled all the tests to be conducted. Twelve different 3-m long sections were tested. The hydraulic conductivity calculated ranged from about 5x10 -14 m/s to 1x10 -6 m/s. The methods used were water injection under constant head and then at a constant rate-of-flow, each of which was followed by a pressure fall-off period. Water loss, pressure pulse, slug and drill stem tests were also performed. Interpretation was carried out using standard transient evaluation methods for flow in porous media. The methods used showed themselves to be best suited to specific conductivity ranges. Among the less time-consuming methods, water loss, slug and drill stem tests usually gave somewhat higher hydraulic conductivity values but still comparable to those obtained using the more time-consuming tests. These latter tests, however, provided supplementary information on hydraulic and physical properties and flow conditions, together with hydraulic conductivity values representing a larger volume of rock. (orig./HP)

  10. Direct gap Ge1-ySny alloys: Fabrication and design of mid-IR photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senaratne, C. L.; Wallace, P. M.; Gallagher, J. D.; Sims, P. E.; Kouvetakis, J.; Menéndez, J.

    2016-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition methods were developed, using stoichiometric reactions of specialty Ge3H8 and SnD4 hydrides, to fabricate Ge1-ySny photodiodes with very high Sn concentrations in the 12%-16% range. A unique aspect of this approach is the compatible reactivity of the compounds at ultra-low temperatures, allowing efficient control and systematic tuning of the alloy composition beyond the direct gap threshold. This crucial property allows the formation of thick supersaturated layers with device-quality material properties. Diodes with composition up to 14% Sn were initially produced on Ge-buffered Si(100) featuring previously optimized n-Ge/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge1-zSnz type structures with a single defected interface. The devices exhibited sizable electroluminescence and good rectifying behavior as evidenced by the low dark currents in the I-V measurements. The formation of working diodes with higher Sn content up to 16% Sn was implemented by using more advanced n-Ge1-xSnx/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge1-zSnz architectures incorporating Ge1-xSnx intermediate layers (x ˜ 12% Sn) that served to mitigate the lattice mismatch with the Ge platform. This yielded fully coherent diode interfaces devoid of strain relaxation defects. The electrical measurements in this case revealed a sharp increase in reverse-bias dark currents by almost two orders of magnitude, in spite of the comparable crystallinity of the active layers. This observation is attributed to the enhancement of band-to-band tunneling when all the diode layers consist of direct gap materials and thus has implications for the design of light emitting diodes and lasers operating at desirable mid-IR wavelengths. Possible ways to engineer these diode characteristics and improve carrier confinement involve the incorporation of new barrier materials, in particular, ternary Ge1-x-ySixSny alloys. The possibility of achieving type-I structures using binary and ternary alloy combinations is discussed in detail, taking into account

  11. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice. Cosmic ray amorphisation cross-section and sputtering yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartois, E.; Augé, B.; Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Chabot, M.; Domaracka, A.; Ding, J. J.; Kamalou, O.; Lv, X. Y.; Rothard, H.; da Silveira, E. F.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. Aims: We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. Methods: We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). Results: The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic stopping power. Conclusions: The final state of cosmic ray irradiation for porous amorphous and crystalline ice, as monitored by infrared spectroscopy, is the same, but with a large difference in cross-section, hence in time scale in an astrophysical context. The cosmic ray water-ice sputtering rates compete with the UV photodesorption yields reported in the literature. The prevalence of direct cosmic ray sputtering over cosmic-ray induced photons photodesorption may be particularly true for ices strongly bonded to the ice mantles surfaces, such as hydrogen-bonded ice structures or more generally the so-called polar ices. Experiments performed at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) Caen, France. Part of this work has been financed by the French INSU-CNRS programme "Physique et Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire" (PCMI) and the ANR IGLIAS.

  12. Catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Ernest Evans; Li, Fang; Momade, Francis W.Y.; Kim, Hern

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen was generated from ammonia borane complex by hydrolysis using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes). The impregnation-chemical reduction method was used for the preparation of the supported catalyst. The nanocluster catalyst support was formed by in-situ oxidative polymerization of dopamine on the MWCNTs in alkaline solution at room temperature. The structural and physical–chemical properties of the nanocluster catalyst were characterized by FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope), XRD (X-ray diffraction) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The nanocluster catalyst showed good catalytic activity for the hydrogen generation from aqueous ammonia borane complex. A reusability test to determine the practical usage of the catalyst was also investigated. The result revealed that the catalyst maintained an appreciable catalytic performance and stability in terms of its reusability after three cycle of reuse for the hydrolysis reaction. Also, the activation energy for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane complex was estimated to be 50.41 kJmol −1 , which is lower than the values of some of the reported catalyst. The catalyst can be considered as a promising candidate in developing highly efficient portable hydrogen generation systems such as PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). - Highlights: • Co/Pdop-o-MWCNT (Pdop functionalized MWCNT supported cobalt nanocluster) catalyst was synthesized for hydrogen generation. • It is an active catalyst for hydrogen generation via hydrolysis of ammonia borane. • It showed good stability in terms of reusability for the hydrogen generation

  13. A simple route to the synthesis of single crystalline copper metagermanate nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei@ahut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhao, H.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Tan, W. [Henkel Huawei Electronics Co. Ltd., Lian' yungang, Jiangsu 222006 (China); Yu, H.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Chen, Y.W. [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Qianfeng; Fan, C.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China)

    2009-12-15

    Single crystalline copper metagermanate (CuGeO{sub 3}) nanowires with the diameter of 30-300 nm and length of longer than 100 {mu}m have been prepared by a simple hydrothermal deposition route. X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman analyses confirm that the nanowires are orthorhombic single crystals with a main growth direction along <101>. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a strong blue emission peak at 442 nm with a broad emission band. The blue emission may be ascribed to radiative recombination of oxygen vacancies and oxygen-germanium vacancies. The formation process of CuGeO{sub 3} nanowires is also discussed.

  14. Crystalline Chromium Doped Aluminum Oxide (RUBY) Use as a Luminescent Screen for Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K. A.; Gassner, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In the search for a better luminescent screen material, the authors tested pieces of mono-crystalline chromium doped aluminum oxide (more commonly known as a ruby) using a 24 GeV proton beam. Due to the large variations in beam intensity and species which are run at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), they hope to find a material which can sufficiently luminesce, is compatible in vacuum, and maintain its performance level over extended use. Results from frame grabbed video camera images using a variety of neutral density filters are presented

  15. Strain relaxation during solid-phase epitaxial crystallisation of Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} alloy layers with depth dependent G{sub e} compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Wahchung; Elliman, R G; Kringhoj, P [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    The solid-phase epitaxial crystallisation of depth dependent Ge{sub x}Si{sub lx} alloy layers produced by implanting Ge into Si substrates was studied. In-situ monitoring was done using time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) whilst post-anneal defect structures were characterised by Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS-C) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particular attention was directed at Ge concentrations above the critical concentration for the growth of fully strained layers. Strain relief is shown to be correlated with a sudden reduction in crystallisation velocity caused by roughening of the crystalline/amorphous interface. 11 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  16. Strain relaxation during solid-phase epitaxial crystallisation of Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} alloy layers with depth dependent G{sub e} compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Wahchung; Elliman, R.G.; Kringhoj, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    The solid-phase epitaxial crystallisation of depth dependent Ge{sub x}Si{sub lx} alloy layers produced by implanting Ge into Si substrates was studied. In-situ monitoring was done using time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) whilst post-anneal defect structures were characterised by Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS-C) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particular attention was directed at Ge concentrations above the critical concentration for the growth of fully strained layers. Strain relief is shown to be correlated with a sudden reduction in crystallisation velocity caused by roughening of the crystalline/amorphous interface. 11 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  17. GE Healthcare | College of Engineering & Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympiad Girls Who Code Club FIRST Tech Challenge NSF I-Corps Site of Southeastern Wisconsin UW-Milwaukee ; Talent GE Healthcare is the founding partner of the Center for Advanced Embedded Systems (CAES), formerly GE Healthcare's needs for talent. Business Corporate Partners ANSYS Institute GE Healthcare Catalyst

  18. Epitaxial growth of silicon and germanium on (100-oriented crystalline substrates by RF PECVD at 175 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauguin O.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the epitaxial growth of crystalline Si and Ge thin films by standard radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 175 °C on (100-oriented silicon substrates. We also demonstrate the epitaxial growth of silicon films on epitaxially grown germanium layers so that multilayer samples sustaining epitaxy could be produced. We used spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize the structure of the films (amorphous, crystalline. These techniques were found to provide consistent results and provided information on the crystallinity and constraints in such lattice-mismatched structures. These results open the way to multiple quantum-well structures, which have been so far limited to few techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy or MetalOrganic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

  19. The quest for crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, U; Bussmann, M; Habs, D

    2002-01-01

    The phase transition of an ion beam into its crystalline state has long been expected to dramatically influence beam dynamics beyond the limitations of standard accelerator physics. Yet, although considerable improvement in beam cooling techniques has been made, strong heating mechanisms inherent to existing high-energy storage rings have prohibited the formation of the crystalline state in these machines up to now. Only recently, laser cooling of low-energy beams in the table-top rf quadrupole storage ring PAaul Laser cooLing Acceleration System (PALLAS) has lead to the experimental realization of crystalline beams. In this article, the quest for crystalline beams as well as their unique properties as experienced in PALLAS will be reviewed.

  20. Mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report compiles and evaluates the hydrogeologic parameters describing the flow of groundwater and transport of solutes in fractured crystalline rocks. This report describes the processes of mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rocks, and compiles and evaluates the dispersion parameters determined from both laboratory and field tracer experiments. The compiled data show that extrapolation of the reliable test results performed over intermediate scales (10's of m and 10's to 100's of hours) to larger spatial and temporal scales required for performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock is not justified. The reliable measures of longitudinal dispersivity of fractured crystalline rock are found to range between 0.4 and 7.8 m