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Sample records for crystalline colloidal array

  1. Optofluidic encapsulation of crystalline colloidal arrays into spherical membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Jeon, Seog-Jin; Yang, Seung-Man

    2008-05-07

    Double emulsion droplets encapsulating crystalline colloidal arrays (CCAs) with a narrow size distribution were produced using an optofluidic device. The shell phase of the double emulsion was a photocurable resin that was photopolymerized downstream of the fluidic channel within 1 s after drop generation. The present optofluidic synthesis scheme was very effective for fabricating highly monodisperse spherical CCAs that were made structurally stable by in situ photopolymerization of the encapsulating shells. The shell thickness and the number of core emulsion drops could be controlled by varying the flow rates of the three coflowing streams in the dripping regime. The spherical CCAs confined in the shell exhibited distinct diffraction patterns in the visible range, in contrast to conventional film-type CCAs. As a result of their structure, the spherical CCAs exhibited photonic band gaps for normal incident light independent of the position on the spherical surface. This property was induced by heterogeneous nucleation at the smooth wall of the spherical emulsion drop during crystallization into a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. On the other hand, the solidified shells did not permit the penetration of ionic species, enabling the CCAs to maintain their structure in a continuous aqueous phase of high ionic strength for at least 1 month. In addition, the evaporation of water molecules inside the shell was slowed considerably when the core-shell microparticles were exposed to air: It took approximately 6 h for a suspension encapsulated in a thick shell to evaporate completely, which is approximately 1000 times longer than the evaporation time for water droplets with the same volume. Finally, the spherical CCAs additionally exhibited enhanced stability against external electric fields. The spherical geometry and high dielectric constant of the suspension contributed to reducing the electric field inside the shell, thereby inhibiting the electrophoretic movement of

  2. Colloidal-crystal-assisted patterning of crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Qi, Limin

    2010-04-06

    Colloidal crystals have shown great potential as versatile templates for the fabrication of patterned micro- and nanostructures with complex architectures and novel properties. The patterning of functional crystalline materials in two and three dimensions is essential to the realization of their applications in many technologically important fields. This article highlights some recent progress in the fabrication of 2D and 3D patterned crystalline materials with the assistance of colloidal crystals. By combining a bioinspired synthetic strategy based on a transient amorphous phase with a colloidal-crystal templating method, unique 3D ordered macroporous (3DOM) calcite single crystals can be created. Moreover, patterned arrays of regular ZnO nanopillars with controlled size, shape, and orientation can be fabricated via a facile wet chemical approach by using masks derived from monolayer colloidal crystals (MCC).

  3. Centrifugation-assisted Assembly of Colloidal Silica into Crack-Free and Transferrable Films with Tunable Crystalline Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen; Chen, Min; Yang, Shu; Wu, Limin

    2015-07-10

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles into colloidal films has many actual and potential applications. While various strategies have been developed to direct the assembly of colloidal particles, fabrication of crack-free and transferrable colloidal film with controllable crystal structures still remains a major challenge. Here we show a centrifugation-assisted assembly of colloidal silica spheres into free-standing colloidal film by using the liquid/liquid interfaces of three immiscible phases. Through independent control of centrifugal force and interparticle electrostatic repulsion, polycrystalline, single-crystalline and quasi-amorphous structures can be readily obtained. More importantly, by dehydration of silica particles during centrifugation, the spontaneous formation of capillary water bridges between particles enables the binding and pre-shrinkage of the assembled array at the fluid interface. Thus the assembled colloidal films are not only crack-free, but also robust and flexible enough to be easily transferred on various planar and curved substrates.

  4. Statics and dynamics of colloidal particles on optical tray arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We examine the statics and dynamics of charged colloids interacting with periodic optical trap arrays. In particular we study the regime where more than one colloid is confined in each trap, creating effective dimer, trimer, and higher order states called colloidal molecular crystals. The n-mer states have all effective orientational degree of freedom which can be controlled with an external driving field. In general, the external field causes a polarization effect where the orientation of the n-mers aligns with the external field, similar to liquid crystal systems. Additionally, under a rotating external drive the n-mers can rotate with the drive. In some cases a series of structural transitions in the colloidal crystal states occur in the rotating field due to a competition between the ordering of the colloidal molecular crystals and the polarization effect which orients the n-mers in the direction of the drive. We also show that for some parameters, the n-mers continuously rotate with the drive without witching, that depinning transitions can occur where the colloids jump from well to well, and that there are a number of distinct dynamical transitions between the phases. Finally, we illustrate colloidal orderings at fillings of more than four colloids per trap, indicating that it is possible to create higher order colloidal crystal cluster phases.

  5. Oxygen plasma etching-induced crystalline lattice transformation of colloidal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Wang, Fei; Song, Kai; Yang, Guoqiang; Tung, Chen-Ho

    2010-12-15

    This communication describes the transformation of a colloidal crystalline lattice that was realized via oxygen plasma etching of colloidal crystals made of SiO2@PMMA core-shell microspheres. The plasma etching of the colloidal crystals proceeded nonuniformly from the top to the bottom of the colloidal crystals. The PMMA shell was etched away by the oxygen plasma in a layer-by-layer manner, and the silica core was drawn into the pit formed by the neighboring spheres in the layer below. Consequently, the crystalline lattice was transformed while the order was maintained. Scanning electron microscopy images and reflection spectra further confirmed the change in the crystalline structures. Colloidal crystals with sc and bcc lattices can be fabricated if the ratio of the polymer shell thickness to the silica core diameter is equal to certain values. More importantly, this approach may be applicable to the fabrication of various assembly structures with different inorganic particles.

  6. Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Role of Colloids on the Radionuclide Migration in a Crystalline Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; Alonso, Ursula; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel; Mingarro, Manuel; Lopez, Trinidad [CIEMAT, Departamento de Medioambiente, Avenida Complutense, 22 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    In a deep geological repository (DGR) of high level radioactive waste, all the possible phenomena affecting radionuclide migration have to be studied to assess its security over time. Colloids can play an important role for contaminant transport if the following conditions are fulfilled: colloids exist in a non negligible concentration, they are mobile and stable in the environment of interest, and they are able to adsorb radionuclides irreversibly. In this study, different transport experiments where performed to improve the knowledge on the main mechanisms affecting the radionuclide migration in the presence of colloids in a crystalline medium. Firstly, colloid stability was analysed and then transport experiments in an artificial granite longitudinal fracture were carried out. Synthetic colloids of different size and bentonite clay colloids were used to evaluate the effects of colloid size, charge, and water flow rate on their mobility. Results showed that both major importance of the water flow rate on the mobility of colloids and their recovery and a higher interaction of smaller particles with the surface. Finally, the migration behaviour of Sr, and Sr adsorbed onto bentonite colloids was compared. The elution curves of Sr adsorbed onto colloid were significantly different from the ones of Sr alone, pointing out that sorption/desorption mechanisms must be taken into account to understand the radionuclide migration in the fracture in the presence of colloids. (authors)

  7. Superhydrophobic hierarchical arrays fabricated by a scalable colloidal lithography approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothary, Pratik; Dou, Xuan; Fang, Yin; Gu, Zhuxiao; Leo, Sin-Yen; Jiang, Peng

    2017-02-01

    Here we report an unconventional colloidal lithography approach for fabricating a variety of periodic polymer nanostructures with tunable geometries and hydrophobic properties. Wafer-sized, double-layer, non-close-packed silica colloidal crystal embedded in a polymer matrix is first assembled by a scalable spin-coating technology. The unusual non-close-packed crystal structure combined with a thin polymer film separating the top and the bottom colloidal layers render great versatility in templating periodic nanostructures, including arrays of nanovoids, nanorings, and hierarchical nanovoids. These different geometries result in varied fractions of entrapped air in between the templated nanostructures, which in turn lead to different apparent water contact angles. Superhydrophobic surfaces with >150° water contact angles and <5° contact angle hysteresis are achieved on fluorosilane-modified polymer hierarchical nanovoid arrays with large fractions of entrapped air. The experimental contact angle measurements are complemented with theoretical predictions using the Cassie's model to gain insights into the fundamental microstructure-dewetting property relationships. The experimental and theoretical contact angles follow the same trends as determined by the unique hierarchical structures of the templated periodic arrays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microcavity arrays for X-ray diffraction studies of ordering phenomena in confined colloid solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz, A.; David, C.; Guo, H.; Keymeulen, H.; Pfeiffer, F.; Wegdam, G.; Weitkamp, T.; van der Veen, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    We present a way to fabricate high-aspect-ratio silicon microcavity arrays which can be used for the investigation of confinement-induced ordering phenomena within colloid solutions. In these studies, the microcavity arrays serve as containers for confinement of the colloid. X-ray diffraction measur

  9. Fabrication of periodic gold nanocup arrays using colloidal lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vetter, Brent M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Alvine, Kyle J.

    2017-09-02

    Within recent years, the field of plasmonics has exploded as researchers have demonstrated exciting applications related to chemical and optical sensing in combination with new nanofabrication techniques. A plasmon is a quantum of charge density oscillation that lends nanoscale metals such as gold and silver unique optical properties. In particular, gold and silver nanoparticles exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances—collective charge density oscillations on the surface of the nanoparticle—in the visible spectrum. Here, we focus on the fabrication of periodic arrays of anisotropic plasmonic nanostructures. These half-shell (or nanocup) structures can exhibit additional unique light-bending and polarization dependent optical properties that simple isotropic nanostructures cannot. Researchers are interested in the fabrication of periodic arrays of nanocups for a wide variety of applications such as low-cost optical devices, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and tamper indication. We present a scalable technique based on colloidal lithography in which it is possible to easily fabricate large periodic arrays of nanocups using spin-coating and self-assembled commercially available polymeric nanospheres. Electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy from the visible to near-IR was performed to confirm successful nanocup fabrication. We conclude with a demonstration of the transfer of nanocups to a flexible, conformal adhesive film.

  10. Protective colloids and polylactic acid co-affecting the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of indomethacin encapsulated in microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S Y; Chen, K S; Teng, H H

    1999-01-01

    The co-effect of protective colloids and polylactic acid (PLA) on the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of indomethacin (IMC) in IMC-loaded PLA microspheres was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffractometry, to evaluate the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of IMC encapsulated in PLA microspheres. The surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), was also used as a dispersing agent. The results indicate that the polymorphism and crystallinity of IMC encapsulated in IMC-loaded PLA microspheres was dependent on the type of protective colloid and PLA used. The amorphous state and alpha-form of IMC were found in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres prepared using polysaccharide (pectin or beta-cyclodextrin) as a protective colloid or SDS as a dispersing agent. However, the amorphous and methylene chloride solvate of IMC seemed to exist in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres prepared with the proteins (gelatin or albumin), synthetic cellulose derivative (methyl cellulose or hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose) or the synthetic nonionic polymer (polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone or biosoluble polymer) as a protective colloid. PLA was found to express a certain crystallinity in microspheres and not be affected by the protective colloids, but it played a more important role in influencing the crystallization of IMC during microencapsulation than the protective colloids. No interaction occurred in the physical mixture of IMC and PLA, nor in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres.

  11. Modulating two-dimensional non-close-packed colloidal crystal arrays by deformable soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Junhu; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xuemin; Zhu, Difu; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xun; Yang, Bai

    2010-02-16

    We report a simple method to fabricate two-dimensional (2D) periodic non-close-packed (ncp) arrays of colloidal microspheres with controllable lattice spacing, lattice structure, and pattern arrangement. This method combines soft lithography technique with controlled deformation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer to convert 2D hexagonal close-packed (hcp) silica microsphere arrays into ncp ones. Self-assembled 2D hcp microsphere arrays were transferred onto the surface of PDMS stamps using the lift-up technique, and then their lattice spacing and lattice structure could be adjusted by solvent swelling or mechanical stretching of the PDMS stamps. Followed by a modified microcontact printing (microcp) technique, the as-prepared 2D ncp microsphere arrays were transferred onto a flat substrate coated with a thin film of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). After removing the PVA film by calcination, the ncp arrays that fell on the substrate without being disturbed could be lifted up, deformed, and transferred again by another PDMS stamp; therefore, the lattice feature could be changed step by step. Combining isotropic solvent swelling and anisotropic mechanical stretching, it is possible to change hcp colloidal arrays into full dimensional ncp ones in all five 2D Bravais lattices. This deformable soft lithography-based lift-up process can also generate patterned ncp arrays of colloidal crystals, including one-dimensional (1D) microsphere arrays with designed structures. This method affords opportunities and spaces for fabrication of novel and complex structures of 1D and 2D ncp colloidal crystal arrays, and these as-prepared structures can be used as molds for colloidal lithography or prototype models for optical materials.

  12. Soft glassy colloidal arrays in an ionic liquid: colloidal glass transition, ionic transport, and structural color in relation to microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuhide; Sano, Yuta; Inaba, Aya; Kondoh, Masashi; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2010-10-21

    The colloidal glass transition, ionic transport, and optical properties of soft glassy colloidal arrays (SGCAs) that consist of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-grafted silica nanoparticles (PMMA-g-NPs) and a room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)amide ([C(2)mim][NTf(2)]), were investigated. At lower particle concentrations, PMMA-g-NPs were well-suspended in the IL without any aggregation or sedimentation, and the dilute suspensions showed liquid-like behavior. However, above a certain particle concentration, the suspensions became solidified and exhibited different structural colors depending on the particle concentrations. The liquid-solid transition of the SGCAs was essentially caused by colloidal glass transition. Due to the soft repulsive interaction between the particles, the effective volume fraction of the particle (ϕ(eff)) required for colloidal glass transition was higher than that of the hard sphere system and found to be approximately 0.70-0.74. The SGCA had sufficient ionic conductivity, which was greater than 10(-3) S cm(-1) at room temperature, even in the highly concentrated region. For ionic transport of the cation and the anion in the SGCAs, the decrease in diffusivity observed with the addition of the particles (D(g)/D(0)) was slightly greater for the [NTf(2)] anion than that of the [C(2)mim] cation, suggesting that the [NTf(2)] anion preferentially interacts with the PMMA chains. The SGCAs showed homogeneous, nonbrilliant, and angle-independent structural colors above the glass transition volume fraction. In addition, the color of the SGCAs changed from red to green to blue as the particle concentration increased. A linear relationship was found between the maximum wavelength of the reflection spectra and the center-to-center distance in the SGCAs.

  13. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

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    Yuno Natsume

    Full Text Available Giant vesicles (GVs encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell.

  14. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell.

  15. Collective synchronization states in arrays of driven colloidal oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermerout, Romain; Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Giovanni M.; Kotar, Jurij; Cicuta, Pietro

    2012-10-01

    The phenomenon of metachronal waves in cilia carpets has been well known for decades; these waves are widespread in biology, and have fundamental physiological importance. While it is accepted that in many cases cilia are mainly coupled together by the hydrodynamic velocity field, a clear understanding of which aspects determine the collective wave properties is lacking. It is a difficult problem, because both the behavior of the individual cilia and their coupling together are nonlinear. In this work, we coarse-grain the degrees of freedom of each cilium into a minimal description in terms of a configuration-based phase oscillator. Driving colloidal particles with optical tweezers, we then experimentally investigate the coupling through hydrodynamics in systems of many oscillators, showing that a collective dynamics emerges. This work generalizes to a wider class of systems our recent finding that the non-equilibrium steady state can be understood based on the equilibrium properties of the system, i.e. the positions and orientations of the active oscillators. In this model system, it is possible to design configurations of oscillators with the desired collective dynamics. The other face of this problem is to relate the collective patterns found in biology to the architecture and behavior of individual active elements.

  16. Morphology-controlled 2D ordered microstructure arrays by surface modification of colloidal template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian-Hong; Leu, Ing-Chi; Chung, Yi-Wen; Hon, Min-Hsiung

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a convenient approach for fabricating two-dimensional, ordered TiO2 bowl-like structure and inverted-bowl-like structure patterns consisting of submicrometer arrays on a self-assembled monolayer film, for the first time using a surface-modified polystyrene colloidal monolayer as the template. Typically, the well-ordered two-dimensional TiO2 bowl-like structures were obtained by liquid phase deposition within the interstitial voids in assemblies of polystyrene spheres followed by the dissolution of the polystyrene template with dichloromethane. Otherwise, through a simple wet treatment by immersing in the sulfuric acid at 50 degrees C, the surface characteristics of polystyrene were turned from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The ordered inverted-bowl-like structures could be prepared on this treated surface. We believe that this method could be extendable to colloidal template with smaller dimensions, and to periodic arrays made of other materials.

  17. Combining the Masking and Scaffolding Modalities of Colloidal Crystal Templates: Plasmonic Nanoparticle Arrays with Multiple Periodicities

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shikuan; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mai, John D.; Liang, Wansheng; Xie, Yuliang; Chen, Yuchao; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Surface patterns with prescribed structures and properties are highly desirable for a variety of applications. Increasing the heterogeneity of surface patterns is frequently required. This work opens a new avenue toward creating nanoparticle arrays with multiple periodicities by combining two generally separately applied modalities (i.e., scaffolding and masking) of a monolayer colloidal crystal (MCC) template. Highly ordered, loosely packed binary and ternary surface patterns are realized by...

  18. {116} faceted anatase single-crystalline nanosheet arrays: facile synthesis and enhanced electrochemical performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Li, Xiaoning; Peng, Ranran; Zhai, Xiaofang; Yang, Shangfeng; Fu, Zhengping; Lu, Yalin

    2014-10-01

    Single-crystalline anatase TiO2 nanosheet arrays were synthesized on a transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate with a unique one-step alcohol-thermal process. The nanosheets were nearly vertically grown on the FTO substrate along their zone, and they were dominated by {116} facets. The as-fabricated {116} faceted single-crystalline anatase nanosheet arrays exhibit a much higher reduction capacity and a much better electrochemical reversibility than both {001} faceted anatase single-crystalline nanosheet arrays and P25 film. The results indicate a promising application potential for the new material in the photoelectrochemical field.Single-crystalline anatase TiO2 nanosheet arrays were synthesized on a transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate with a unique one-step alcohol-thermal process. The nanosheets were nearly vertically grown on the FTO substrate along their zone, and they were dominated by {116} facets. The as-fabricated {116} faceted single-crystalline anatase nanosheet arrays exhibit a much higher reduction capacity and a much better electrochemical reversibility than both {001} faceted anatase single-crystalline nanosheet arrays and P25 film. The results indicate a promising application potential for the new material in the photoelectrochemical field. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Photo of the large area STNA-116, FESEM images of STNA-001 and STNA-116 with a series of growth time, the enlarged XRD pattern, the simulated SAED pattern, the reflectance spectra, the cyclic voltammograms of P25 on the FTO substrate. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04248d

  19. Arrays of size and distance controlled platinum nanoparticles fabricated by a colloidal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzke, Achim; Vogel, Nicolas; Weiss, Clemens K.; Ziener, Ulrich; Plettl, Alfred; Landfester, Katharina; Ziemann, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Based on emulsion polymerization in the presence of a Pt complex, polystyrene (PS) particles were prepared exhibiting a well defined average diameter with narrow size-distribution. Furthermore, the colloids contain a controlled concentration of the Pt precursor complex. Optimized coating of Si substrates with such colloids leads to extended areas of hexagonally ordered close-packed PS particles. Subsequent application of plasma etching and annealing steps allows complete removal of the PS carriers and in parallel nucleation and growth of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) which are located at the original center of the PS colloids. In this way, hexagonally arranged spherical Pt NPs are obtained with controlled size and interparticle distances demonstrating variability and precision with so far unknown parameter scalability. This control is demonstrated by the fabrication of Pt NP arrays at a fixed particle distance of 185 nm while systematically varying the diameters between 8 and 15 nm. Further progress could be achieved by seeded emulsion polymerization. Here, Pt loaded PS colloids of 130 nm were used as seeds for a subsequent additional emulsion polymerization, systematically enlarging the diameter of the PS particles. Applying the plasma and annealing steps as above, in this way hexagonally ordered arrays of 9 nm Pt NPs could be obtained at distances up to 260 nm. To demonstrate their stability, such Pt particles were used as etching masks during reactive ion etching thereby transferring their hexagonal pattern into the Si substrate resulting in corresponding arrays of nanopillars.Based on emulsion polymerization in the presence of a Pt complex, polystyrene (PS) particles were prepared exhibiting a well defined average diameter with narrow size-distribution. Furthermore, the colloids contain a controlled concentration of the Pt precursor complex. Optimized coating of Si substrates with such colloids leads to extended areas of hexagonally ordered close-packed PS particles

  20. Black GE based on crystalline/amorphous core/shell nanoneedle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javey, Ali; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-03-04

    Direct growth of black Ge on low-temperature substrates, including plastics and rubber is reported. The material is based on highly dense, crystalline/amorphous core/shell Ge nanoneedle arrays with ultrasharp tips (.about.4 nm) enabled by the Ni catalyzed vapor-solid-solid growth process. Ge nanoneedle arrays exhibit remarkable optical properties. Specifically, minimal optical reflectance (black Ge can have important practical implications for efficient photovoltaic and photodetector applications on nonconventional substrates.

  1. Three-dimensional positioning and control of colloidal objects utilizing engineered liquid crystalline defect networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Asakura, K; Fukuda, J; Ozaki, M

    2015-05-21

    Topological defects in liquid crystals not only affect the optical and rheological properties of the host, but can also act as scaffolds in which to trap nano or micro-sized colloidal objects. The creation of complex defect shapes, however, often involves confining the liquid crystals in curved geometries or adds complex-shaped colloidal objects, which are unsuitable for device applications. Using topologically patterned substrates, here we demonstrate the controlled generation of three-dimensional defect lines with non-trivial shapes and even chirality, in a flat slab of nematic liquid crystal. By using the defect lines as templates and the electric response of the liquid crystals, colloidal superstructures are constructed, which can be reversibly reconfigured at a voltage as low as 1.3 V. Three-dimensional engineering of the defect shapes in liquid crystals is potentially useful in the fabrication of self-healing composites and in stabilizing artificial frustrated phases.

  2. Colloidal templating at a cholesteric-oil interface: assembly guided by an array of disclination lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintuvuori, J S; Pawsey, A C; Stratford, K; Cates, M E; Clegg, P S; Marenduzzo, D

    2013-05-03

    We simulate colloids (radius R ~ 1 μm) trapped at the interface between a cholesteric liquid crystal and an immiscible oil at which the helical order (pitch p) in the bulk conflicts with the orientation induced at the interface, stabilizing an ordered array of disclinations. For a weak anchoring strength W of the director field at the colloidal surface, this creates a template, favoring particle positions either on top of or midway between defect lines, depending on α=R/p. For small α, optical microscopy experiments confirm this picture, but for larger α no templating is seen. This may stem from the emergence at moderate W of a rugged energy landscape associated with defect reconnections.

  3. Cobalt-assisted in situ synthesis of crystalline bismuth nanoparticle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seok; Noh, Jin-Seo; Suh, Kwang S.

    2014-12-01

    Almost monodisperse, crystalline Bi nanoparticle arrays were synthesized using a newly developed method, magnetically assisted growth of Bi nanoparticles (MAGBINs). The MAGBIN utilizes co-sputtering from Bi and Co targets at an elevated temperature. Crystalline Bi nanoparticles with hexagonal morphology were formed in situ on a Si substrate with a thin surface oxide during this process. The size and density of Bi nanoparticles could be controlled by adjusting the relative powers applied to Bi and Co targets, and they showed opposite trends against the relative powers. Several physical processes such as Co agglomeration, element-selective growth, and Ostwald ripening were proposed to be involved in this Bi nanoparticle growth. The MAGBIN is a facile method to synthesize crystalline Bi nanoparticle arrays, which does not need any chemical agents, complex process, or lithography.

  4. Visual detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotolune by molecularly imprinted colloidal array photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Asher, Sanford A., E-mail: asher@pitt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Meng, Zihui, E-mail: m_zihui@yahoo.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yan, Zequn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Xue, Min, E-mail: minxue@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Qiu, Lili, E-mail: qiulili@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yi, Da [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China)

    2016-10-05

    Graphical abstract: Molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) was explored for the selective visual detection of TNT with color changing from green to red. And molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) were evaluated for the adsorption capacity and the imprinting efficiency. The MICA had excellent flexibility, reversibility and stability. It promised high potential for the visual semi-quantitative detection of other explosives. - Highlights: • Molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) was used to visually detect TNT. • The relationship of particle size, diffracted wavelength and color was discussed. • The adsorption capacity and imprinting efficiency of MICs were calculated. • MICA had short response time, high selectivity, good reversibility and stability. • MICA had high potential to be used in other customed visual explosive detection. - Abstract: We developed a photonic crystal (PhC) sensor for the quantification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in solution. Monodisperse (210 nm in diameter) molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) for TNT were prepared by the emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate and acrylamide in the presence of TNT as a template. The MICs were then self-assembled into close-packed opal PhC films. The adsorption capacity of the MICs for TNT was 64 mg TNT/g. The diffraction from the PhC depended on the TNT concentration in a methanol/water (3/2, v/v) potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH = 7.0, 30 mM). The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor was 1.03 μg. The color of the molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) changed from green to red with an 84 nm diffraction red shift when the TNT concentration increased to 20 mM. The sensor response time was 3 min. The PhC sensor was selective for TNT compared to similar compounds such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitromesitylene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, methylbenzene, 4-nitrophenol

  5. Fabrication of large-sized two-dimensional ordered surface array with well-controlled structure via colloidal particle lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinping; Ye, Lei; Qiu, Dong

    2014-06-17

    Epoxy resin coated glass slides were used for colloidal particle lithography, in order to prepare well-defined 2D surface arrays. Upon the assistance of a large-sized 2D colloidal single crystal as template, centimeter-sized ordered surface arrays of bowl-like units were obtained. Systematic studies revealed that the parameters of obtained surface arrays could be readily controlled by some operational factors, such as temperature, epoxy resin layer thickness, and template particle size. With epoxy resin substituting for normal linear polymer, the height/diameter ratio of bowls in the formed surface arrays can be largely increased. With further reactive plasma etching, the parameters of ordered surface arrays could be finely tuned through controlling etching time. This study provides a facile way to prepare large-sized 2D surface arrays with tunable parameters.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptide-Driven Colloidal Transformations in Liquid-Crystalline Nanocarriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontsarik, Mark; Buhmann, Matthias T; Yaghmur, Anan

    2016-01-01

    structure, inducing colloidal transformations to sponge and lamellar phases and micelles in a concentration-dependent manner. These investigations, together with in vitro evaluation studies using a clinically relevant bacterial strain, established the composition-nanostructure-activity relationship that can...... guide the design of new nanocarriers for antimicrobial peptides and may provide essential knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the bacterial membrane disruption with peptide-loaded nanostructures....

  7. Statistical interpretation of transient current power-law decay in colloidal quantum dot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibatov, R T, E-mail: ren_sib@bk.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, 432000, 42 Leo Tolstoy Street, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-01

    A new statistical model of the charge transport in colloidal quantum dot arrays is proposed. It takes into account Coulomb blockade forbidding multiple occupancy of nanocrystals and the influence of energetic disorder of interdot space. The model explains power-law current transients and the presence of the memory effect. The fractional differential analogue of the Ohm law is found phenomenologically for nanocrystal arrays. The model combines ideas that were considered as conflicting by other authors: the Scher-Montroll idea about the power-law distribution of waiting times in localized states for disordered semiconductors is applied taking into account Coulomb blockade; Novikov's condition about the asymptotic power-law distribution of time intervals between successful current pulses in conduction channels is fulfilled; and the carrier injection blocking predicted by Ginger and Greenham (2000 J. Appl. Phys. 87 1361) takes place.

  8. Antibacterial activity of single crystalline silver-doped anatase TiO2 nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Li, Meng; He, Xiaojing; Hang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yueyue; Yao, Xiaohong; Tang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Well-ordered, one-dimensional silver-doped anatase TiO2 nanowire (AgNW) arrays have been prepared through a hydrothermal growth process on the sputtering-deposited AgTi layers. Electron microscope analyses reveal that the as-synthesized AgNW arrays exhibit a single crystalline phase with highly uniform morphologies, diameters ranging from 85 to 95 nm, and lengths of about 11 μm. Silver is found to be doped into TiO2 nanowire evenly and mainly exists in the zerovalent state. The AgNW arrays show excellent efficient antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), and all of the bacteria can be killed within 1 h. Additionally, the AgNW arrays can still kill E. coli after immersion for 60 days, suggesting the long-term antibacterial property. The technique reported here is environmental friendly for formation of silver-containing nanostructure without using any toxic organic solvents.

  9. Enhanced magnetocrystalline anisotropy in an ultra-dense array of air-exposed crystalline cobalt nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, I. S.; Achkar, C.; Liakakos, N.; Pierrot, A.; Pierron-Bohnes, V.; Henry, Y.; Soulantica, K.; Respaud, M.; Blon, T.; Bailleul, M.

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic anisotropy of an ultradense array of crystalline cobalt nanowires is investigated by means of broadband ferromagnetic resonance and magnetic torque measurements. The array is grown epitaxially in solution on a Pt(111) film and consists of single crystalline metallic wires with a diameter of 6.2 nm and a center-to-center interwire distance of 9.6 nm. The shape anisotropy and the Co hexagonal compact structure with the c-axis along the wire axis combine with each other to impose a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy despite the high density of 8 × 1012 wires/in.2. The intrinsic uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy constants K1 and K2 are extracted from the ferromagnetic resonance and torque measurements using a mean field approach accounting for the interwire dipolar interactions. At room temperature, and despite air exposure, an unexpected increase of K1 and K2 of more than 40% with respect to the bulk is evidenced.

  10. Characterization and Optical Properties of the Single Crystalline SnS Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue GH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The SnS nanowire arrays have been successfully synthesized by the template-assisted pulsed electrochemical deposition in the porous anodized aluminum oxide template. The investigation results showed that the as-synthesized nanowires are single crystalline structures and they have a highly preferential orientation. The ordered SnS nanowire arrays are uniform with a diameter of 50 nm and a length up to several tens of micrometers. The synthesized SnS nanowires exhibit strong absorption in visible and near-infrared spectral region and the direct energy gapE gof SnS nanowires is 1.59 eV.

  11. Formation of organic crystalline nanopillar arrays and their application to organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirade, Masaya; Nakanotani, Hajime; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2011-01-01

    To enhance the performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, preparation of organic nanometer-sized pillar arrays is fascinating because a significantly large area of a donor/acceptor heterointerface having continuous conduction path to both anode and cathode electrodes can be realized. In this study, we grew cupper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystalline nanopillar arrays by conventional thermal gradient sublimation technique using a few-nanometer-sized trigger seeds composed of a CuPc and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) stacked layer. We optimized the pillar density by tuning crystal growth condition in order to apply it to OPV cells.

  12. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline droplet array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kaho; Iwai, Yosuke; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Nishiyama, Norikazu

    2016-08-01

    We numerically analyzed the light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline (CLC) droplet array by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method successfully reproduced the experimental light path observed in the complicated photonic structure of the CLC droplet array more accurately than the analysis of CLC droplets by geometric optics with Bragg condition, and this method help us understand the polarization of the propagating light waves. The FDTD method holds great promise for the design of various photonic devices composed of curved photonic materials like CLC droplets and microcapsules.

  13. Visual detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotolune by molecularly imprinted colloidal array photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Asher, Sanford A; Meng, Zihui; Yan, Zequn; Xue, Min; Qiu, Lili; Yi, Da

    2016-10-05

    We developed a photonic crystal (PhC) sensor for the quantification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in solution. Monodisperse (210nm in diameter) molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) for TNT were prepared by the emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate and acrylamide in the presence of TNT as a template. The MICs were then self-assembled into close-packed opal PhC films. The adsorption capacity of the MICs for TNT was 64mg TNT/g. The diffraction from the PhC depended on the TNT concentration in a methanol/water (3/2, v/v) potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.0, 30mM). The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor was 1.03μg. The color of the molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) changed from green to red with an 84nm diffraction red shift when the TNT concentration increased to 20mM. The sensor response time was 3min. The PhC sensor was selective for TNT compared to similar compounds such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitromesitylene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, methylbenzene, 4-nitrophenol, 2-nitroaniline, 3-aminophenol and 3-nitroaniline. The sensor showed high stability with little response change after three years storage. This sensor technology might be useful for the visual determination of TNT.

  14. Photochemical arrays formed by spatial compartmentalization of colloidal nanoparticles in a polymer-based hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, M. A.; Rajh, T.; Makarova, O. V.; Seifert, S.; Tiede, D. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.

    2000-01-13

    The development of practical strategies for the assembly of semiconductor and metal colloid nanoparticles into ordered architectures is an area of considerable current interest, since it offers an opportunity for exploiting the optical and electronic properties of these colloids for device development. Prior research has explored creating such organized nanoparticle assemblies by Langmuir-Blodgett techniques or controlled solvent evaporation on suitable substrates. These approaches suffer from several limitations, however, most notably the generation of relatively simple structures and the lack of structural tailorability, preventing full exploitation of these materials. More recently, directed assembly using chemisorption of streptavidin-biotin or thiol-derivatized gold nanoparticles onto substrates has been described. Alternative approaches to achieving two-dimensional confinement of nanoparticles that do not involve substrate-supported materials, but rather organize the nanoparticles into mesoscopically-ordered soft condensed matter, may offer the advantage of enhanced processability and may permit construction of nanocomposite structures based on functional nanoparticles embedded in a processable, polymer-based matrix. This work describes the development of an alternative strategy for constructing 2-D arrays of functional metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. The approach involves directing the organization of nanocrystals into a processable (i.e., by externally applied magnetic and electric fields) polymer-grafted lipid-based complex fluid. By altering the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles, they can be selectively placed into defined regions encapsulating matrix.

  15. Antibacterial activity of single crystalline silver-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiangyu, E-mail: zhangxiangyu@tyut.edu.cn; Li, Meng; He, Xiaojing; Hang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yueyue; Yao, Xiaohong; Tang, Bin, E-mail: tangbin@tyut.edu.cn

    2016-05-30

    Graphical abstract: The silver-doped TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays on titanium foil substrate were synthesized via a two-step process. It includes: deposition of AgTi films on titanium foil by magnetron sputtering; preparation of AgNW arrays on AgTi films via alkali (NaOH) hydrothermal treatment and ion-exchange with HCl, followed by calcinations. - Highlights: • Ag-doped TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays have been prepared by a duplex-treatment. • The duplex-treatment consisted of magnetron sputtering and hydrothermal growth. • Ag-doped nanowire arrays show excellent antibacterial activity against E. coli. - Abstract: Well-ordered, one-dimensional silver-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanowire (AgNW) arrays have been prepared through a hydrothermal growth process on the sputtering-deposited AgTi layers. Electron microscope analyses reveal that the as-synthesized AgNW arrays exhibit a single crystalline phase with highly uniform morphologies, diameters ranging from 85 to 95 nm, and lengths of about 11 μm. Silver is found to be doped into TiO{sub 2} nanowire evenly and mainly exists in the zerovalent state. The AgNW arrays show excellent efficient antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), and all of the bacteria can be killed within 1 h. Additionally, the AgNW arrays can still kill E. coli after immersion for 60 days, suggesting the long-term antibacterial property. The technique reported here is environmental friendly for formation of silver-containing nanostructure without using any toxic organic solvents.

  16. Ectomycorrhizal Influence on Particle Size, Surface Structure, Mineral Crystallinity, Functional Groups, and Elemental Composition of Soil Colloids from Different Soil Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil, we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P>0.05. These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O–H stretching and bending, C–H stretching, C=O stretching, etc. by 3–26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz by 40–300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12–35% decreases in most functional groups, 15–55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P<0.05. These different responses sharply decreased element ratios (C : O, C : N, and C : Si in soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  17. Ectomycorrhizal influence on particle size, surface structure, mineral crystallinity, functional groups, and elemental composition of soil colloids from different soil origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Wang, Wenjie; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus) and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam) and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil), we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P > 0.05). These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O-H stretching and bending, C-H stretching, C=O stretching, etc.) by 3-26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz) by 40-300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12-35% decreases in most functional groups, 15-55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  18. DEFORMATION OF SOFT COLLOIDAL CRYSTALLINE STRUCTURE-THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCES BY SYNCHROTRON SMALL-ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING ON TENSILE STRETCHED POLYMERIC LATEX FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-qi Zhang; Yong-feng Men

    2009-01-01

    Films obtained via drying a polymeric latex dispersion are normally colloidal crystalline where latex particles are packed into a face centered cubic (fcc) structure.Different from conventional atomic crystallites or hard sphere colloidal crystallites,the crystalline structure of these films is normally deformable due to the low glass transition temperature of the latex particles.Upon tensile deformation,depending on the drawing direction with respect to the normal of specific crystallographic plane,one observes different crystalline structural changes.Three typical situations where crystallographic c-axis,body diagonal or face diagonal of the fcc structure of the colloidal crystallites being parallel to the stretching direction were investigated.Tilting angle and d-spacing of several crystallographic planes as a function of draw ratio at each situation were derived.Experimental evidences for such relationships were also given by considering in-situ synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering data of a typical latex film during stretching.It turns out that the experimental results are fully in accordance with the mathematical calculations.

  19. Laser-induced defect insertion in DNA-linked 2D colloidal crystal array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Erik; Kim, Sejong; Marcus, Harris L.; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2009-02-01

    Insertion of vacancies at predetermined sites within the lattice of colloidal crystals is a prerequisite in order to realize high-quality, opaline-based photonic devices. In this contribution, we demonstrate a novel methodology to afford controlled insertion of vacancies within two-dimensional (2D) opaline arrays. These 2D opaline arrays have been substrate-anchored with the help of DNA hybridization. This provides a heat-sensitive ‘adhesive’ between substrate and microspheres within a surrounding aqueous medium that enables tuning the hybridization strength of DNA linker as well as a mechanism to facilitate the removal of unbound microspheres. Focusing a laser beam onto the substrate/microsphere interface induces a localized heating event that detaches the irradiated microspheres, leaving behind vacancies. By repeating this process, line vacancies were successfully obtained. The effects of salt concentration, laser power, light-absorbing dyes, DNA length and refractive-index mismatch were investigated and found to correlate with heat-induced microsphere release.

  20. Arrays of metallic micro-/nano-structures by means of colloidal lithography and laser dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, C.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Delaporte, P.; Utéza, O.; Grojo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Long-range arrays of prismatoid metal nanostructures are fabricated by a hybrid methodology, i.e. using Langmuir microsphere films and laser-assisted dewetting. As the initial step, we use colloidal lithography. Monolayers of 1-5 μm polystyrene microspheres covered with a thermally evaporated Ag or Au thin film of controlled thickness (5-50 nm) are then used as masks to pattern the surface of quartz, BK7 glass or silicon substrates, typically in the order of cm2. When removing the spheres by physico-chemical means (ultrasound bath and solvent wash), the resulting surface shows an array of nm-size prismatoid structures (Fischer patterns), that can be further processed by laser. Thus, by using two different lasers (355-nm wavelength, 50-ps duration and 193-nm wavelength, 15-ns duration) for the metal dewetting, we control the shape of the deposited nanostructures. A detailed study is presented here on the reshaping of such metal structures through laser annealing. This new hybrid methodology expands the panel of microsphere-assisted technologies employed in preparing surface nanomaterials.

  1. Direct Growth of Crystalline Tungsten Oxide Nanorod Arrays by a Hydrothermal Process and Their Electrochromic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Hao; Hon, Min Hsiung; Leu, Ing-Chi

    2016-12-01

    Transparent crystalline tungsten oxide nanorod arrays for use as an electrochromic layer have been directly prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass via a facile tungsten film-assisted hydrothermal process using aqueous tungsten hexachloride solution. X-ray diffraction analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the phase and morphology of the grown nanostructures. Arrays of tungsten oxide nanorods with diameter of ˜22 nm and length of ˜240 nm were obtained at 200°C after 8 h of hydrothermal reaction. We propose a growth mechanism for the deposition of the monoclinic tungsten oxide phase in the hydrothermal environment. The tungsten film was first oxidized to tungsten oxide to provide seed sites for crystal growth and address the poor connection between the growing tungsten oxide and substrate. Aligned tungsten oxide nanorod arrays can be grown by a W thin film-assisted heterogeneous nucleation process with NaCl as a structure-directing agent. The fabricated electrochromic device demonstrated optical modulation (coloration/bleaching) at 632.8 nm of ˜41.2% after applying a low voltage of 0.1 V for 10 s, indicating the potential of such nanorod array films for use in energy-saving smart windows.

  2. Direct Growth of Crystalline Tungsten Oxide Nanorod Arrays by a Hydrothermal Process and Their Electrochromic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Hao; Hon, Min Hsiung; Leu, Ing-Chi

    2017-04-01

    Transparent crystalline tungsten oxide nanorod arrays for use as an electrochromic layer have been directly prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass via a facile tungsten film-assisted hydrothermal process using aqueous tungsten hexachloride solution. X-ray diffraction analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the phase and morphology of the grown nanostructures. Arrays of tungsten oxide nanorods with diameter of ˜22 nm and length of ˜240 nm were obtained at 200°C after 8 h of hydrothermal reaction. We propose a growth mechanism for the deposition of the monoclinic tungsten oxide phase in the hydrothermal environment. The tungsten film was first oxidized to tungsten oxide to provide seed sites for crystal growth and address the poor connection between the growing tungsten oxide and substrate. Aligned tungsten oxide nanorod arrays can be grown by a W thin film-assisted heterogeneous nucleation process with NaCl as a structure-directing agent. The fabricated electrochromic device demonstrated optical modulation (coloration/bleaching) at 632.8 nm of ˜41.2% after applying a low voltage of 0.1 V for 10 s, indicating the potential of such nanorod array films for use in energy-saving smart windows.

  3. Ag colloids and arrays for plasmonic non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to a quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Graham P; Higgins, Luke J; Karanikolas, Vasilios D; Wilson, Keith M; Coindreau, Jorge A Garcia; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z; Parbrook, Peter J; Bradley, A Louise

    2016-01-01

    Ag nanoparticles in the form of colloids and ordered arrays are used to demonstrate plasmon-mediated non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to quantum wells with varying top barrier thicknesses. Plasmon-mediated energy transfer efficiencies of up to ~25% are observed with the Ag colloids. The distance dependence of the plasmon-mediated energy transfer is found to follow the same d^{-4} dependence as the direct quantum dot to quantum well energy transfer. There is also evidence for an increase in the characteristic distance of the interaction, thus indicating that it follows a F\\"orster-like model with the Ag nanoparticle-quantum dot acting as an enhanced donor dipole. Ordered Ag nanoparticle arrays display plasmon-mediated energy transfer efficiencies up to ~21%. To explore the tunability of the array system, two arrays with different geometries are presented. It is demonstrated that changing the geometry of the array allows a transition from overall quenching of the acceptor quantum well emission to...

  4. Ag colloids and arrays for plasmonic non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to a quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Graham P.; Gough, John J.; Higgins, Luke J.; Karanikolas, Vasilios D.; Wilson, Keith M.; Garcia Coindreau, Jorge A.; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Parbrook, Peter J.; Bradley, A. Louise

    2017-03-01

    Non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) can be an efficient process of benefit to many applications including photovoltaics, sensors, light emitting diodes and photodetectors. Combining the remarkable optical properties of quantum dots (QDs) with the electrical properties of quantum wells (QWs) allows for the formation of hybrid devices which can utilize NRET as a means of transferring absorbed optical energy from the QDs to the QW. Here we report on plasmon-enhanced NRET from semiconductor nanocrystal QDs to a QW. Ag nanoparticles in the form of colloids and ordered arrays are used to demonstrate plasmon-mediated NRET from QDs to QWs with varying top barrier thicknesses. Plasmon-mediated energy transfer (ET) efficiencies of up to ∼25% are observed with the Ag colloids. The distance dependence of the plasmon-mediated ET is found to follow the same d ‑4 dependence as the direct QD to QW ET. There is also evidence for an increase in the characteristic distance of the interaction, thus indicating that it follows a Förster-like model with the Ag nanoparticle-QD acting as an enhanced donor dipole. Ordered Ag nanoparticle arrays display plasmon-mediated ET efficiencies up to ∼21%. To explore the tunability of the array system, two arrays with different geometries are presented. It is demonstrated that changing the geometry of the array allows a transition from overall quenching of the acceptor QW emission to enhancement, as well as control of the competition between the QD donor quenching and ET rates.

  5. Direct writing of large-area micro/nano-structural arrays on single crystalline germanium substrates using femtosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    A direct writing technique for fabricating micro/nano-structural arrays without using a multi-scanning process, multi-beam interference, or any assisted microlens arrays is reported. Various sub-wavelength micro/nano-structural arrays have been directly written on single crystalline germanium substrate surfaces using femtosecond laser pulses. The evolution of the multiscale surface morphology from periodic micro/nano-structures to V-shaped microgrooves has been achieved, and the relationship between array characteristics and laser polarization directions has been discussed. The self-organization model agrees well with the experimental results in this study.

  6. Amorphous and crystalline TiO2 nanotube arrays for enhanced Li-ion intercalation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongsheng; Cai, Chuan; Wang, Ying

    2011-04-01

    We have employed a simple process of anodizing Ti foils to prepare TiO2 nanotube arrays which show enhanced electrochemical properties for applications as Li-ion battery electrode materials. The lengths and pore diameters of TiO2 nanotubes can be finely tuned by varying voltage, electrolyte composition, or anodization time. The as-prepared nanotubes are amorphous and can be converted into anatase nanotubes with heat treatment at 480 degrees C. Rutile crystallites emerge in the anatase nanotube when the annealing temperature is increased to 580 degrees C, resulting in TiO2 nanotubes of mixed phases. The morphological features of nanotubes remain unchanged after annealing. Li-ion insertion performance has been studied for amorphous and crystalline TiO2 nanotube arrays. Amorphous nanotubes with a length of 3.0 microm and an outer diameter of 125 nm deliver a capacity of 91.2 microA h cm(-2) at a current density of 400 microA cm(-2), while those with a length of 25 microm and an outer diameter of 158 nm display a capacity of 533 microA h cm-2. When the 3-microm long nanotubes become crystalline, they deliver lower capacities: the anatase nanotubes and nanotubes of mixed phases show capacities of 53.8 microA h cm-2 and 63.1 microA h cm(-2), respectively at the same current density. The amorphous nanotubes show excellent capacity retention ability over 50 cycles. The cycled nanotubes show little change in morphology compared to the nanotubes before electrochemical cycling. All the TiO2 nanotubes demonstrate higher capacities than amorphous TiO2 compact layer reported in literature. The amorphous TiO2 nanotubes with a length of 1.9 microm exhibit a capacity five times higher than that of TiO2 compact layer even when the nanotube array is cycled at a current density 80 times higher than that for the compact layer. These results suggest that anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays are promising electrode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries.

  7. Fabrication of amorphous micro-ring arrays in crystalline silicon using ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Edfuf, Yasser; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Puerto, Daniel; Florian, Camilo; Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple way to fabricate amorphous micro-rings in crystalline silicon using direct laser writing. This method is based on the fact that the phase of a thin surface layer can be changed into the amorphous phase by irradiation with a few ultrashort laser pulses (800 nm wavelength and 100 fs duration). Surface-depressed amorphous rings with a central crystalline disk can be fabricated without the need for beam shaping, featuring attractive optical, topographical, and electrical properties. The underlying formation mechanism and phase change pathway have been investigated by means of fs-resolved microscopy, identifying fluence-dependent melting and solidification dynamics of the material as the responsible mechanism. We demonstrate that the lateral dimensions of the rings can be scaled and that the rings can be stitched together, forming extended arrays of structures not limited to annular shapes. This technique and the resulting structures may find applications in a variety of fields such as optics, nanoelectronics, and mechatronics.

  8. Control growth of single crystalline ZnO nanorod arrays and nanoflowers with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jiuju [College of Geography and Environmental Science, Zhejiang Normal University (China); Wang Zhenzhen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Normal University (China); Li Yongfang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Institute of Science and Technology (China); Chen Jianrong; Wang Aijun, E-mail: ajwang@zjnu.cn [College of Geography and Environmental Science, Zhejiang Normal University (China)

    2013-04-15

    Single crystalline vertical nanorod arrays and nanoflowers of ZnO have been grown in situ on cheap zinc foils under hydrothermal conditions, by means of hexamethylenetetramine and ethanolamine, respectively. Their morphologies and crystal structures are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The nanorods and flowers of ZnO grew along the {l_brace} 10 1-bar 1{r_brace} and {l_brace} 0001{r_brace} planes, respectively. Both types of ZnO display high photocatalytic ability toward the degradation of methylene orange under UV irradiation. The ZnO nanorods show better performance than that of the ZnO nanoflowers, and the {l_brace} 10 1-bar 1{r_brace} facets of the ZnO nanorods have higher photoactivity than that of the {l_brace} 000 1-bar {r_brace} or {l_brace} 10 1-bar 0{r_brace} crystal planes. This is because the weaker coordinated O atoms on the surface are more likely to be saturated by H atoms in aqueous solution, thereby releasing more free OH radicals.Graphical AbstractA facile method was developed for selective control synthesis of ZnO nanoflowers and nanorod arrays on Zinc foil, with the assistance of ethanolamine and the hexamethylenetetramine, respectively. The illustration shows the time evolution of the two ZnO structures.

  9. Significance of crystallinity on the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishanthi, S.T.; Iyyapushpam, S.; Sundarakannan, B. [Department of Physics, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli 627012, Tamil Nadu (India); Subramanian, E. [Department of Chemistry, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli 627012, Tamil Nadu (India); Pathinettam Padiyan, D., E-mail: dppadiyan@msuniv.ac.in [Department of Physics, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli 627012, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Increase in anodization time improves the crystallinity of nanotubes. • Higher crystalline one showed lower band gap for TiO{sub 2}. • Photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity depends on crystallinity. - Abstract: We report the significance of crystallinity on photoelectrochemical and the photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube arrays. The TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays are fabricated by electrochemical anodization of titanium substrates in fluoride based aqueous electrolyte for various anodization time. The degree of crystallinity and phase purity (anatase) is confirmed from X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra. High resolution scanning electron microscope is used to analyze the surface morphology of forming nanotubes. The UV–vis absorption spectrum shows the enhanced absorption in the visible region which is further confirmed using photoluminescence spectra. The photoelectrochemical properties of the prepared samples are studied from linear sweep photovoltammetry measurements and a maximum photocurrent density of 1.32 mA/cm{sup 2} is observed. The enhanced photoelectrochemical activity is attributed to the higher crystallinity which increases the charge carrier separation and extends its light absorption from ultraviolet to visible region owing to lower band gap of 2.751(7) eV.

  10. Effective SERS-active substrates composed of hierarchical micro/nanostructured arrays based on reactive ion etching and colloidal masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghua; Liu, Dilong; Hang, Lifeng; Li, Xinyang; Liu, Guangqiang; Cai, Weiping; Li, Yue

    2016-09-01

    A facile route has been proposed for the fabrication of morphology-controlled periodic SiO2 hierarchical micro/nanostructured arrays by reactive ion etching (RIE) using monolayer colloidal crystals as masks. By effectively controlling the experimental conditions of RIE, the morphology of a periodic SiO2 hierarchical micro/nanostructured array could be tuned from a dome-shaped one to a circular truncated cone, and finally to a circular cone. After coating a silver thin layer, these periodic micro/nanostructured arrays were used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates and demonstrated obvious SERS signals of 4-Aminothiophenol (4-ATP). In addition, the circular cone arrays displayed better SERS enhancement than those of the dome-shaped and circular truncated cone arrays due to the rougher surface caused by physical bombardment. After optimization of the circular cone arrays with different periodicities, an array with the periodicity of 350 nm exhibits much stronger SERS enhancement and possesses a low detection limit of 10-10 M 4-ATP. This offers a practical platform to conveniently prepare SERS-active substrates.

  11. Enhanced sub-micron colloidal particle separation with interdigitated microelectrode arrays using mixed AC/DC dielectrophoretic scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Vikhram V; Shannon, Mark A; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-04-01

    Dielectrophoretic separation of particles finds a variety of applications in the capture of species such as cells, viruses, proteins, DNA from biological systems, as well as other organic and inorganic contaminants from water. The ability to capture particles is constrained by poor volumetric scaling of separation force with respect to particle diameter, as well as the weak penetration of electric fields in the media. In order to improve the separation of sub-micron colloids, we present a scheme based on multiple interdigitated electrode arrays under mixed AC/DC bias. The use of high frequency longitudinal AC bias breaks the shielding effects through electroosmotic micromixing to enhance electric fields through the electrolyte, while a transverse DC bias between the electrode arrays enables penetration of the separation force to capture particles from the bulk of the microchannel. We determine the favorable biasing conditions for field enhancement with the help of analytical models, and experimentally demonstrate the improved capture from sub-micron colloidal suspensions with the mixed AC/DC electrostatic excitation scheme over conventional AC-DEP methods.

  12. On the failure of upscaling the single-collector efficiency to the transport of colloids in an array of collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2016-07-01

    Defining the removal efficiency of a filter is a key aspect for colloid transport in porous media. Several efforts were devoted to derive accurate correlations for the single-collector removal efficiency, but its upscaling to the entire porous medium is still a challenging topic. A common approach involves the assumption of deposition being independent of the history of transport, that is, the collector efficiency is uniform along the porous medium. However, this approach was shown inadequate under unfavorable deposition conditions. In this work, the authors demonstrate that it is not adequate even in the simplest case of favorable deposition. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were run in a vertical array of 50 identical spherical collectors. Particle transport was numerically solved by analyzing a broad range of parameters. The results evidenced that when particle deposition is not controlled by Brownian diffusion, nonexponential concentration profiles are retrieved, in contrast with the assumption of uniform efficiency. If sedimentation and interception dominate, the efficiency of the first sphere is significantly higher compared to the others, and then declines along the array down to an asymptotic value. Finally, a correlation for the upscaled removal efficiency of the entire array was derived.

  13. Dopamine-assisted rapid fabrication of nanoscale protein arrays by colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaki, Ryosuke; Bennetsen, Dines T; Bald, Ilko; Foss, Morten

    2012-06-12

    The development of cost-effective methodologies for the precise nanometer-scale positioning of biomolecules permits the low-cost production of various biofunctional devices for a range of biomedical and nanotechnological applications. By combining colloidal lithography and the mussel-inspired multifunctional polydopamine coating, we present a novel parallel benchtop method that allows rapid nanoscale patterning of proteins without the need for electrically powered equipment in the fabrication process. The PDA-immobilized binary nanopattern consisting of BSA surrounded by PLL-g-PEG is fabricated over a large area, and the integrity of the pattern is confirmed using AFM and FM.

  14. Colloidal quantum dot Vis-SWIR imaging: demonstration of a focal plane array and camera prototype (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Ethan J. D.; Gregory, Christopher W.; Temple, Dorota S.; Lewis, Jay S.

    2015-08-01

    RTI has developed a photodiode technology based on solution-processed PbS colloidal quantum dots (CQD). These devices are capable of providing low-cost, high performance detection across the Vis-SWIR spectral range. At the core of this technology is a heterojunction diode structure fabricated using techniques well suited to wafer-scale fabrication, such as spin coating and thermal evaporation. This enables RTI's CQD diodes to be processed at room temperature directly on top of read-out integrated circuits (ROIC), without the need for the hybridization step required by traditional SWIR detectors. Additionally, the CQD diodes can be fabricated on ROICs designed for other detector material systems, effectively allowing rapid prototype demonstrations of CQD focal plane arrays at low cost and on a wide range of pixel pitches and array sizes. We will show the results of fabricating CQD arrays directly on top of commercially available ROICs. Specifically, the ROICs are a 640 x 512 pixel format with 15 µm pitch, originally developed for InGaAs detectors. We will show that minor modifications to the surface of these ROICs make them suitable for use with our CQD detectors. Once completed, these FPAs are then assembled into a demonstration camera and their imaging performance is evaluated. In addition, we will discuss recent advances in device architecture and processing resulting in devices with room temperature dark currents of 2-5 nA/cm^2 and sensitivity from 350 nm to 1.7 μm. This combination of high performance, dramatic cost reduction, and multi-band sensitivity is ideally suited to expand the use of SWIR imaging in current applications, as well as to address applications which require a multispectral sensitivity not met by existing technologies.

  15. Whispering-gallery mode lasing from patterned molecular single-crystalline microcavity array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Ding, Ran; Lu, Shi-Yang; Yang, Yue-De; Chen, Qi-Dai; Feng, Jing; Huang, Yong-Zhen; Sun, Hong-Bo; Fang, Honghua

    2013-01-01

    Organic single-crystalline materials have attracted great attention for laser applications. However, the fabrication of laser resonators and pattern of crystals are still intractable problems. Organic single crystals have been limited to fundamental property studies despite their superior photonic c

  16. 26+ Year Old Photovoltaic Power Plant: Degradation and Reliability Evaluation of Crystalline Silicon Modules -- South Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakonu, Kolapo

    As the use of photovoltaic (PV) modules in large power plants continues to increase globally, more studies on degradation, reliability, failure modes, and mechanisms of field aged modules are needed to predict module life expectancy based on accelerated lifetime testing of PV modules. In this work, a 26+ year old PV power plant in Phoenix, Arizona has been evaluated for performance, reliability, and durability. The PV power plant, called Solar One, is owned and operated by John F. Long's homeowners association. It is a 200 kW dc, standard test conditions (STC) rated power plant comprised of 4000 PV modules or frameless laminates, in 100 panel groups (rated at 175 kW ac). The power plant is made of two center-tapped bipolar arrays, the north array and the south array. Due to a limited time frame to execute this large project, this work was performed by two masters students (Jonathan Belmont and Kolapo Olakonu) and the test results are presented in two masters theses. This thesis presents the results obtained on the south array and the other thesis presents the results obtained on the north array. Each of these two arrays is made of four sub arrays, the east sub arrays (positive and negative polarities) and the west sub arrays (positive and negative polarities), making up eight sub arrays. The evaluation and analyses of the power plant included in this thesis consists of: visual inspection, electrical performance measurements, and infrared thermography. A possible presence of potential induced degradation (PID) due to potential difference between ground and strings was also investigated. Some installation practices were also studied and found to contribute to the power loss observed in this investigation. The power output measured in 2011 for all eight sub arrays at STC is approximately 76 kWdc and represents a power loss of 62% (from 200 kW to 76 kW) over 26+ years. The 2011 measured power output for the four south sub arrays at STC is 39 kWdc and represents a power

  17. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  18. Synthesis, structure and photoelectrochemical properties of single crystalline silicon nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalchiele, E.A., E-mail: dalchiel@fing.edu.u [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Herrera y Reissig 565, C.C. 30, 11000 Montevideo (Uruguay); Martin, F.; Leinen, D. [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad Asociada al CSIC), Departamentos de Fisica Aplicada and Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, E29071 Malaga (Spain); Marotti, R.E. [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Herrera y Reissig 565, C.C. 30, 11000 Montevideo (Uruguay); Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad Asociada al CSIC), Departamentos de Fisica Aplicada and Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, E29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-01-31

    In the present work, n-type silicon nanowire (n-SiNW) arrays have been synthesized by self-assembly electroless metal deposition (EMD) nanoelectrochemistry. The synthesized n-SiNW arrays have been submitted to scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and optical studies. Initial probes of the solar device conversion properties and the photovoltaic parameters such as short-circuit current, open-circuit potential, and fill factor of the n-SiNW arrays have been explored using a liquid-junction in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system under white light. Moreover, a direct comparison between the PEC performance of a polished n-Si(100) and the synthesized n-SiNW array photoelectrodes has been done. The PEC performance was significantly enhanced on the n-SiNWs photoelectrodes compared with that on polished n-Si(100).

  19. Single crystalline cylindrical nanowires – toward dense 3D arrays of magnetic vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-03-31

    Magnetic vortex-based media have recently been proposed for several applications of nanotechnology; however, because lithography is typically used for their preparation, their low-cost, large-scale fabrication is a challenge. One solution may be to use arrays of densely packed cobalt nanowires that have been efficiently fabricated by electrodeposition. In this work, we present this type of nanoscale magnetic structures that can hold multiple stable magnetic vortex domains at remanence with different chiralities. The stable vortex state is observed in arrays of monocrystalline cobalt nanowires with diameters as small as 45 nm and lengths longer than 200 nm with vanishing magnetic cross talk between closely packed neighboring wires in the array. Lorentz microscopy, electron holography and magnetic force microscopy, supported by micromagnetic simulations, show that the structure of the vortex state can be adjusted by varying the aspect ratio of the nanowires. The data we present here introduce a route toward the concept of 3-dimensional vortex-based magnetic memories.

  20. Impurity induced crystallinity and optical emissions in ZnO nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, N. R.; Acharya, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the growth of ZnO nanocrystallites doped with impurities such as B, N and S by green chemistry route using ultrasound. The effect of intrinsic defects and impurity doping on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures has been studied and discussed. Characterization studies carried out using x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the change in lattice parameters and crystallinity of ZnO in the presence of dopant. This has been explained on the basis of the dopant substitution at regular anion and interstitial sites. Study on surface morphology by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) shows a change from particle-like structure to aligned nanorods nucleated at definite sites. Elemental analysis such as x-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) has been carried out to ascertain the dopant configuration in ZnO. This has been corroborated by the results obtained from FTIR and Raman studies. UV-vis light absorption and PL studies show an expansion of the band gap which has been explained on the basis of Moss-Burstein shift in the electronic band gap of ZnO by impurity incorporation. The optical emissions corresponding to excitonic transition and defect centres present in the band gap of ZnO is found to shift towards lower/higher wavelength sides. New PL bands observed have been assigned to the transitions related to the impurity states present in the band gap of ZnO along with intrinsic defects.

  1. 分子印迹胶体阵列检测对硝基苯酚%Detection of p-Nitrophenol Using Molecularly Imprinted Colloidal Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛飞; 王一飞; 王秋鸿; 孟子晖; 薛敏; 黄舒悦; 芦薇

    2012-01-01

    以对硝基苯酚(p-NP)为印迹模板,丙烯酰胺为功能单体,制备单分散的对硝基苯酚分子印迹胶体微球.通过垂直沉降法将分子印迹胶体微球自组装为分子印迹胶体阵列,采用胶带将分子印迹胶体阵列粘贴固定.固定于胶带上的分子印迹胶体阵列膜显示出良好的稳定性,而且对目标分子p-NP具有明显的光学响应.分子印迹微球吸附目标分子发生溶胀,引起胶体阵列溶涨,分子印迹胶体阵列( MICA)反射峰位置发生移动.实验结果显示,MICA随着p-NP浓度增加,反射峰红移近60 nm,MICA表面颜色由红色逐渐变为蓝紫色;而非印迹胶体阵列红移量只约40 nm.MICA简化了光子晶体凝胶传感材料的制备步骤,为开发新型高性能生化传感器材料提供了新思路.%p-Nitrophenol molecularly imprinted colloidal microspheres were prepared by polymerization of functional monomers (acrylamide, AM) and template ( p-nitrophenol, p-NP) in poly (methyl methacrylate, PMMA) pre-polymerization solution. Molecular imprinted colloidal array (MICA) was prepared using the molecularly imprinted colloidal microspheres by self-assembly and then fixed by an adhesive tape. The MICA on the adhesive tape is easy to handle and has strong stability. This material senses P-nitrophenol in aqueous solution by shifting reflection wavelength. The adsorption of p-nitrophenol into molecularly imprinted colloidal microspheres would swell the microspheres, thus leading to a reflection peak red shift. The reflection peak red shifted nearly 60 nm when the concentration of p-NP increases from 0 mmol/L to 30 mmol/L, while non-imprinted molecularly imprinted colloidal array (NICA) red shifted about 40 nm. The color of MICA changed from red to blue-violet. This method simplifies the preparation of photonic crystal material which is an efficient substance for developing high performance chemical/biological sensors.

  2. Hybrid nanostructures of well-organized arrays of colloidal quantum dots and a self-assembled monolayer of gold nanoparticles for enhanced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoying; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials comprised of well-organized arrays of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in close proximity to metal nanoparticles (NPs) represent an appealing system for high-performance, spectrum-tunable photon sources with controlled photoluminescence. Experimental realization of such materials requires well-defined QD arrays and precisely controlled QD-metal interspacing. This long-standing challenge is tackled through a strategy that synergistically combines lateral confinement and vertical stacking. Lithographically generated nanoscale patterns with tailored surface chemistry confine the QDs into well-organized arrays with high selectivity through chemical pattern directed assembly, while subsequent coating with a monolayer of close-packed Au NPs introduces the plasmonic component for fluorescence enhancement. The results show uniform fluorescence emission in large-area ordered arrays for the fabricated QD structures and demonstrate five-fold fluorescence amplification for red, yellow, and green QDs in the presence of the Au NP monolayer. Encapsulation of QDs with a silica shell is shown to extend the design space for reliable QD/metal coupling with stronger enhancement of 11 times through the tuning of QD-metal spatial separation. This approach provides new opportunities for designing hybrid nanomaterials with tailored array structures and multiple functionalities for applications such as multiplexed optical coding, color display, and quantum transduction.

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Colloidal Array for Detection of Explosives%分子印迹纳米胶体阵列检测爆炸物的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芦薇; 薛飞; 黄舒悦; 孟子晖; 薛敏

    2012-01-01

    The molecularly imprinted colloidal microspheres with good monodispersity were prepared by using trinitrotoluene (TNT) as template, and acrylamide as monomer and polymerizing by emulsion polymerization. The colloidal microspheres were self-assembled into array by vertical deposition method on a quartz slide, and then molecularly-imprinted colloidal array (MICA) which had opal structure was peeled off and immobilized on glue tape. In this research, the influence of different detection environments on optical response of MICA was discussed, as well as the specific adsorption capacity in response of the optimum testing environment. The results showed that the response of TNT at the concentration of 20 mmol/L in methanol-aqueous (7:3, V/V) solution reached a redshift of 24 nm, which was 1. 4 times of non-molecularly-imprinted colloidal array and 23 times of its analogues. MICA simplified the preparation process of photonic crystals sensor, and represented a noval highly selective, real-time "naked-eye" detection method for explosive.%以三硝基甲苯(TNT)为模板,丙烯酰胺为功能单体,采用乳液聚合法制备具有单分散性的TNT分子印迹胶体小球.通过垂直沉降法自组装,并用胶带将得到的具有蛋白石结构的分子印迹胶体阵列(MICA)固化.研究其在不同比例的甲醇/水溶液中的光学响应,并在最优检测环境下进行特异性吸附实验.实验表明,当甲醇/水的体积比为7∶3,TNT浓度为20 mmol/L时,反射峰红移近24 nm,为非印迹胶体阵列红移量的1.4倍,为TNT结构类似物的23倍.MICA在实现对光子晶体传感器制备简化的同时,提供了对TNT进行快速裸眼检测的可能性.

  4. TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Lewis, Laura H., E-mail: lhlewis@neu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Luo, Si [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 and Department of Chemistry, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 117944 (United States); Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Arena, Dario A. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O{sub 2} (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H{sub 2} (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO{sub 2} nanotube samples partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (∼5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes regardless of their length. However, the annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H{sub 2}-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O{sub 2}-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H{sub 2}-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti{sup 3+} and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the

  5. Water flattens graphene wrinkles: laser shock wrapping of graphene onto substrate-supported crystalline plasmonic nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaowu; Lee, Seunghyun; Kumar, Prashant; Nian, Qiong; Wang, Wenqi; Irudayaraj, Joseph; Cheng, Gary J

    2015-12-21

    Hot electron injection into an exceptionally high mobility material can be realized in graphene-plasmonic nanoantenna hybrid nanosystems, which can be exploited for several front-edge applications including photovoltaics, plasmonic waveguiding and molecular sensing at trace levels. Wrinkling instabilities of graphene on these plasmonic nanostructures, however, would cause reactive oxygen or sulfur species to diffuse and react with the materials, decrease charge transfer rates and block intense hot-spots. No ex situ graphene wrapping technique has been explored so far to control these wrinkles. Here, we present a method to generate seamless integration by using water as a flyer to transfer the laser shock pressure to wrap graphene onto plasmonic nanocrystals. This technique decreases the interfacial gap between graphene and the covered substrate-supported plasmonic nanoparticle arrays by exploiting a shock pressure generated by the laser ablation of graphite and the water impermeable nature of graphene. Graphene wrapping of chemically synthesized crystalline gold nanospheres, nanorods and bipyramids with different field confinement capabilities is investigated. A combined experimental and computational method, including SEM and AFM morphological investigation, molecular dynamics simulation, and Raman spectroscopy characterization, is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique. Graphene covered gold bipyramid exhibits the best result among the hybrid nanosystems studied. We have shown that the hybrid system fabricated by laser shock can be used for enhanced molecular sensing. The technique developed has the characteristics of tight integration, and chemical/thermal stability, is instantaneous in nature, possesses a large scale and room temperature processing capability, and can be further extended to integrate other 2D materials with various 0-3D nanomaterials.

  6. An investigation into the doping and crystallinity of anodically fabricated titania nanotube arrays: Towards an efficient material for solar energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam Abdel-Motalib, Nageh Khalaf

    The primary focus of this dissertation was to improve the properties of the anodically fabricated TiO2 nanotube arrays; notably its band gap and crystallinity while retaining its tubular structure unaffected. The underlying hypothesis was that controlling the crystallinity and band gap while retaining the tubular structure will result in an enormous enhancement of the photoconversion capability of the material. To this end, a direct one-step facile approach for the in-situ doping of TiO2 nanotube arrays during their electrochemical fabrication in both aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes has been investigated. The effect of doping on the morphology, optical and photoelectrochemical properties of the fabricated nanotube arrays is discussed. In an effort to improve the crystallinity of the anodically fabricated TiO2 nanotube arrays while retaining the tubular morphology, novel processing routes have been investigated to fabricate crystalline TiO 2 nanotube array electrodes. For the sake of comparison, the nanotubes were annealed at high temperature using the conventionally used procedure. The samples were found to be stable up to temperatures around 580°C, however, higher temperatures resulted in crystallization of the titanium support which disturbed the nanotube architecture, causing it to partially and gradually collapse and densify. The maximum photoconversion efficiency for water splitting using 7 mum-TiO2 nanotube arrays electrodes annealed at 580°C was measured to be about 10% under UV illumination. We investigated the effect of subsequent low temperature crystallization step. Rapid infrared (IR) annealing was found to be an efficient technique for crystallizing the nanotube array films within a few minutes. The IR-annealed 7mum-nanotube array films showed significant photoconversion efficiencies (eta=13.13%) upon their use as photoanodes to photoelectrochemically split water under UV illumination. This was related, in part, to the reduction in the barrier

  7. Liquid crystal colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of "Condensed Matter Physics" focuses on the most recent developments in the study of a fascinating soft matter system, representing colloidal particles in a liquid crystalline environment. Furthermore, some articles address pioneering steps in the discovery of liquid crystals going back to 1861 paper by Julius Planer.

  8. Selective-area growth of periodic nanopyramid light-emitting diode arrays on GaN/sapphire templates patterned by multiple-exposure colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhuo; Wei, Tongbo; Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Chao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Guodong; Li, Jinmin; Wang, Junxi

    2017-03-17

    Gallium nitride-based nanopyramid light-emitting diodes are a promising technology to achieve highly efficient solid-state lighting and beyond. Here, periodic nanopyramid light-emitting diode arrays on gallium nitride/sapphire templates were fabricated by selective-area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and multiple-exposure colloidal lithography. The electric field intensity distribution of incident light going through polystyrene microspheres and photoresist are simulated using finite-different time-domain method. Nitrogen as the carrier gas and a low V/III ratio (ratio of molar flow rate of group-V to group-III sources) are found to be important in order to form gallium nitride nanopyramid. In addition, a broad yellow emission in photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra were observed. This phenomena showed the potential of nanopyramid light-emitting diodes to realize long wavelength visible emissions.

  9. Selective-area growth of periodic nanopyramid light-emitting diode arrays on GaN/sapphire templates patterned by multiple-exposure colloidal lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhuo; Wei, Tongbo; Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Chao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Guodong; Li, Jinmin; Wang, Junxi

    2017-03-01

    Gallium nitride-based nanopyramid light-emitting diodes are a promising technology to achieve highly efficient solid-state lighting and beyond. Here, periodic nanopyramid light-emitting diode arrays on gallium nitride/sapphire templates were fabricated by selective-area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and multiple-exposure colloidal lithography. The electric field intensity distribution of incident light going through polystyrene microspheres and photoresist are simulated using finite-different time-domain method. Nitrogen as the carrier gas and a low V/III ratio (ratio of molar flow rate of group-V to group-III sources) are found to be important in order to form gallium nitride nanopyramid. In addition, a broad yellow emission in photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra were observed. This phenomena showed the potential of nanopyramid light-emitting diodes to realize long wavelength visible emissions.

  10. Colloidal pen lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mianqi; Cai, Xiaojing; Chen, Ghenfu

    2015-02-04

    Colloidal pen lithography, a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe contact printing method, has been developed, which is based on self-assembled colloidal arrays embedded in a soft elastomeric stamp. Patterned protein arrays are demonstrated using this method, with a feature size ranging from 100 nm to several micrometers. A brief study into the specificity reorganization of protein gives evidence for the feasibility of this method for writing protein chips. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Colloidal organization

    CERN Document Server

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  12. Electrical characterization and modeling of 1T-1R RRAM arrays with amorphous and poly-crystalline HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Alessandro; Zambelli, Cristian; Olivo, Piero; Crespo-Yepes, Alberto; Martin-Martinez, Javier; Rodríguez, Rosana; Nafria, Monserrat; Perez, Eduardo; Wenger, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a comparison between 1T-1R RRAM arrays, manufactured either with amorphous or poly-crystalline Metal-Insulator-Metal cells, is reported in terms of performance, reliability, Set/Reset operations energy requirements, intra-cell and inter-cell variability during 10k endurance cycles and 100k read disturb cycles. The modeling of the 1T-1R RRAM array cells has been performed with two different approaches: (i) a physical model like the Quantum Point Contact (QPC) model was used to find the relationship between the reliability properties observed during the endurance and the read disturb tests with the conductive filament properties; (ii) a compact model to be exploited in circuit simulations tools which models the I-V characteristics of each memory cells technology.

  13. Nanoscale lateral displacement arrays for the separation of exosomes and colloids down to 20 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Benjamin H.; Smith, Joshua T.; Gifford, Stacey M.; Wang, Chao; Brink, Markus; Bruce, Robert L.; Austin, Robert H.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Astier, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) pillar arrays are an efficient technology to sort, separate and enrich micrometre-scale particles, which include parasites, bacteria, blood cells and circulating tumour cells in blood. However, this technology has not been translated to the true nanoscale, where it could function on biocolloids, such as exosomes. Exosomes, a key target of 'liquid biopsies', are secreted by cells and contain nucleic acid and protein information about their originating tissue. One challenge in the study of exosome biology is to sort exosomes by size and surface markers. We use manufacturable silicon processes to produce nanoscale DLD (nano-DLD) arrays of uniform gap sizes ranging from 25 to 235 nm. We show that at low Péclet (Pe) numbers, at which diffusion and deterministic displacement compete, nano-DLD arrays separate particles between 20 to 110 nm based on size with sharp resolution. Further, we demonstrate the size-based displacement of exosomes, and so open up the potential for on-chip sorting and quantification of these important biocolloids.

  14. Ordered crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanohexagon arrays for improving conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javed, Hafiz Muhammad Asif [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, International Center for Dielectric Research, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Que, Wenxiu, E-mail: wxque@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, International Center for Dielectric Research, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Yin, Xingtian; Xing, Yonglei; Liu, Xiaobin; Asghar, Ali; Shao, Jinyou [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, International Center for Dielectric Research, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Kong, Ling Bing, E-mail: ELBKong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-10-15

    Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanohexagon arrays were grown by using an anodization process of Ti foil in fluoride containing electrolytes. Photoanode based on the as-grown anatase TiO{sub 2} nanohexagon arrays for DSSCs showed a power photoconversion efficiency of 4.01% and incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 68%, which are significantly higher than those of the device based on anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays. This improvement in power conversion efficiency should be attributed to the fact that the nanotubes with hexagonal structure have higher surface area to allow the uploading of more dye molecules for light harvesting. Also, the spacing introduced inside the hexagon might allow the dye molecules to cover the interior of the walls. In addition, it is believed that the photoconversion efficiency can be further increased by optimizing the hexagonal structure through the electrochemical conditions. - Graphical abstract: Nanotubes with hexagonal structure have higher surface area to allow the uploading of more dye molecules for light harvesting in dye-sensitized solar cells. - Highlights: • A unique TiO{sub 2} nanohexagon arrays were grown by an anodization process. • Higher surface area for dye uploading provided by the hexagon structure. • TiO{sub 2} nanohexagon based photoanode has PCE of 4.01% and IPCE of 68%.

  15. Nanocrystalline calcitic lens arrays fabricated by self-assembly followed by amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ingo; Lee, Kyubock; Zolotoyabko, Emil; Werner, Peter; Shim, Tae Soup; Oh, You-Kwan; Fratzl, Peter; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-09-23

    Natural calcium carbonate-based nanocomposites often have superior physical properties and provide a comprehensive source for bioinspired synthetic materials. Here we present thermodynamically stable, transparent CaCO3 microlens arrays (MLA) produced by transforming an amorphous CaCO3 phase into nanocrystalline calcite. We analyze the structure and properties of crystallized MLA by X-ray scattering, transmitted and polarized light microscopy, and electron microscopy and find that MLA are crystallized in spherulite-like patterns without changing the shape of the microlens. The key finding is that nanocrystallinity of the calcite formed diminishes structural anisotropy on the wavelength scale and results in greatly reduced birefringent effects. The remnant preferred orientation of the optical axes of calcite crystals in the plane of the microlens arrays leads to some directionality of optical properties, which may be beneficial for technical applications.

  16. DNA- and AC electric field-assisted assembly of two-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals and their controlled defect insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sejong

    Photonic crystals (PC) are structures in which the refractive index is a periodic function in space. The ability of photonic crystals to localize and manipulate electromagnetic waves has attracted considerable attention from the scientific community. The self-assembly of monodisperse micrometer scale colloidal spheres into hexagonal closed-packed colloidal crystals provides a simple, fast, and cheap materials chemistry approach to PCs. Employing DNA supramolecular recognition, 2-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal monolayer was fabricated with monodisperse polystyrene colloidal microspheres. Amine-terminated DNA oligomers were covalently attached onto carboxy-decorated microspheres and enabled their DNA-functionalization while preserving their colloidal stability and organization properties. Following a capillary-force-assisted organization of DNA-decorated microspheres into close-packed 2D opaline arrays, the first monolayer was immobilized by DNA hybridization. Insertion of vacancies at predetermined sites within the lattice of colloidal crystals is a prerequisite in order to realize high-quality, opaline-based photonic devices. The previously obtained DNA-hybridization type binding of 2D-opaline arrays provides a heat-sensitive "adhesive" between substrate and microspheres within a surrounding aqueous medium that enables tuning the hybridization strength of DNA linker as well as a mechanism to facilitate the removal of unbound microspheres. Focusing a laser beam onto a single microsphere of the opaline array induces localized heating that enables the microsphere to detach, leaving behind vacancies. By repeating this process, line vacancies were successfully obtained. The effects of salt concentration, laser power, light-absorbing dyes, DNA length and refractive index mismatch were investigated and found to correlate with heat-induced DNA dehybridization. In addition, AC (alternating current) electrokinetic force was also utilized to obtain assembly of colloidal

  17. Growth of compact arrays of optical quality single crystalline ZnO nanorods by low temperature method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoranjan Ghosh; Ritwik Bhattacharyya; A K Raychaudhuri

    2008-06-01

    We report the synthesis and optical properties of compact and aligned ZnO nanorod arrays (dia, ∼ 50–200 nm) grown on a glass substrate with varying seed particle density. The suspension of ZnO nanoparticles (size, ∼ 15 nm) of various concentrations are used as seed layer for the growth of nanorod arrays via selfassembly of ZnO from solution. We studied the effect of various growth parameters (such as seeding density, microstructure of the seed layer) as well as the growth time on the growth and alignment of the nanorods. We find that the growth, areal density and alignment of the nanorods depend on the density of seed particles which can be controlled. It is observed that there is a critical density of the seed particles at which nanorod arrays show maximum preferred orientation along [002] direction. The minimum and maximum radius of the aligned nanorods synthesized by this method lie in the range 50–220 nm which depend on the seeding density and time of growth. These nanorods have a bandgap of 3.3 eV as in the case of bulk crystals and show emission in the UV region of the spectrum (∼ 400 nm) due to excitonic recombination and defect related emission in the visible region.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline ZnO nanorod arrays: Dependence of morphology and alignment on growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzez, Shrook A., E-mail: shurouq44@yahoo.com [Institutes of Nano-Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory (INOR), Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Hassan, Z.; Alimanesh, M.; Rasheed, Hiba S.; Sabah, Fayroz A.; Abdulateef, Sinan A. [Institutes of Nano-Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory (INOR), Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Hassan, J. J. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq)

    2016-07-06

    Highly oriented zinc oxide nanorod were successfully grown on seeded p-type silicon substrate by hydrothermal methode. The morphology and the crystallinty of ZnO c-axis (002) arrays were systematically studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The effect of seed layer pre-annealing on nanorods properties was explained according to the nucleation site of ZnO nanoparticles on silicon substrate. In addition, the variation of the equal molarity of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamine concentrations in the reaction vessel play a crucial role related to the ZnO nanorods.

  19. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2015 and July 2016 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Los Alamos focused on two main activities during this period: Discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling to describe flow and radionuclide transport in complex fracture networks that are typical of crystalline rock environments, and a comprehensive interpretation of three different colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland between 2002 and 2013. Chapter 1 presents the results of the DFN work and is divided into three main sections: (1) we show results of our recent study on the correlation between fracture size and fracture transmissivity (2) we present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph for characterization of discrete fracture networks, and (3) we describe the Crystalline International work in support of the Swedish Task Force. Chapter 2 presents interpretation of the colloidfacilitated radionuclide transport experiments in the crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site.

  20. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    generated by evaporation-induced nanoparticle crystallization or polymerization of ordered nanoparticle crystallization arrays. In particular, because microfluidics was used for the generation of the droplet templates, the development of spherical colloidal PhCs has progressed significantly. These new strategies not only ensure monodispersity, but also increase the structural and functional diversity of the PhC beads, paving the way for the development of advanced optoelectronic devices. In this Account, we present the research progress on spherical colloidal PhCs, including their design, preparation, and potential applications. We outline various types of spherical colloidal PhCs, such as close-packed, non-close-packed, inverse opal, biphasic or multiphasic Janus structured, and core-shell structured geometries. Based on their unique optical properties, applications of the spherical colloidal PhCs for displays, sensors, barcodes, and cell culture microcarriers are presented. Future developments of the spherical colloidal PhC materials are also envisioned.

  1. Colloidal polypyrrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  2. Predicting out-of-Equilibrium Phase Behavior in the Dynamic Self-Assembly of Colloidal Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James; Sherman, Zachary

    Crystals self-assembled from colloidal particles are useful in an array of well demonstrated applications. During fabrication however, gelation and glassification often leave these materials arrested in defective or disordered metastable states. We show how time-dependent, pulsed interparticle interactions can avoid kinetic barriers and yield well-ordered crystalline domains for a suspension of hard, spherical colloidal particles interacting through short-range attractions. This dynamic self-assembly process is analogous to the flashing Brownian rachet. Although this is an inherently unsteady, out-of-equilibrium process, we can predict its outcome using appropriate time averages of equilibrium equations of state. The predicted phase behavior is tested and validated by examining the fluid/crystal coexistence of such dynamically self-assembling dispersions in Brownian dynamics simulations of sedimentation equilibrium and homogeneous nucleation. We also show that our dynamic self-assembly scheme offers control and tunability over the crystal growth kinetics and can even stabilize nonequilibrium structures.

  3. Colloidal nematostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  4. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material’s morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications. PMID:28149954

  5. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian J; Parent, Lucas R; Overholts, Anna C; Beaucage, Peter A; Bisbey, Ryan P; Chavez, Anton D; Hwang, Nicky; Park, Chiwoo; Evans, Austin M; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Dichtel, William R

    2017-01-25

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material's morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications.

  6. Observation of a microcrystalline gel in colloids with competing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian Hui; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-12-14

    A stable short-range crystalline structure is observed in colloidal systems with competing short-range attractions and long-range repulsions. We term these structures "microcrystalline gels" as the microcrystals are embedded in a dense disordered network.

  7. Colloidal superballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and super

  8. Direct Low-Temperature Growth of Single-Crystalline Anatase TiO2 Nanorod Arrays on Transparent Conducting Oxide Substrates for Use in PbS Quantum-Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Suk; Han, Gill Sang; Park, So Yeon; Shin, Hee-Won; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Jeong, Sohee; Cho, In Sun; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-05-20

    We report on the direct growth of anatase TiO2 nanorod arrays (A-NRs) on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates that can be directly applied to various photovoltaic devices via a seed layer mediated epitaxial growth using a facile low-temperature hydrothermal method. We found that the crystallinity of the seed layer and the addition of an amine functional group play crucial roles in the A-NR growth process. The A-NRs exhibit a pure anatase phase with a high crystallinity and preferred growth orientation in the [001] direction. Importantly, for depleted heterojunction solar cells (TiO2/PbS), the A-NRs improve both electron transport and injection properties, thereby largely increasing the short-circuit current density and doubling their efficiency compared to TiO2 nanoparticle-based solar cells.

  9. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  10. Dynamics of Electrically Modulated Colloidal Droplet Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Ghosh, Udita Uday; Chakraborty, Suman; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-10-20

    Electrically actuated transport dynamics of colloidal droplets, on a hydrophobic dielectric film covering an array of electrodes, is studied here. Specifically, the effects of the size and electrical properties (zeta-potential) of the colloidal particles on such transport characteristics are investigated. For the colloidal droplets, the application of an electrical voltage leads to additional attenuation of the local dielectric-droplet interfacial tension. This is due to the electrically triggered enhanced colloidal particle adsorption at the dielectric-droplet interface, in the immediate vicinity of the droplet three-phase contact line (TPCL). The extent of such interfacial particle adsorption, and hence, the extent of the consequential reduction in the interfacial tension, is dictated by the combined effects of the three-phase contact line spreading, particle size, the interfacial electrostatic interaction between the colloidal particles (if charged) and the charged dielectric surface above the activated electrode, and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The electrical driving force of varying magnitude, stemming from this altered solid-liquid interfacial tension gradient in the presence of the colloidal particles, culminates in different droplet transport velocity and droplet transfer frequency for different colloidal droplets. We substantiate the inferences from our experimental results by a quasi-steady state force balance model for colloidal droplet transport. We believe that the present work will provide an accurate framework for determining the optimal design and operational parameters for digital microfluidic chips handling colloidal droplets, as encountered in a plethora of applications.

  11. The glass transition of hard spherical colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, P.N. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern (UK)); Van Megen, W. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia). Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1990-03-01

    When suspended in a liquid, hard spherical colloidal particles can show fluid, crystalline and glassy phases. A light scattering study of the dynamics of the metastable fluid and glassy phases is reported. Comparison is made with the predictions of mode-coupling theories applied to the glass transition of simple atomic systems. (orig.).

  12. Soil colloidal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  13. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  14. Towards Directional Colloidal Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Colloids are particles with a size on the scale of microns in at least one dimension. The central theme of this thesis is the synthesis of model colloids with anisotropic interactions - often called `patchy' colloids, as well as the search for new ways to assemble such colloids. Methods to build

  15. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  16. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  17. Dynamic Colloidal Molecules Maneuvered by Light-Controlled Janus Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yirong; Mou, Fangzhi; Feng, Yizheng; Che, Shengping; Li, Wei; Xu, Leilei; Guan, Jianguo

    2017-07-12

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a dynamic colloidal molecule that is capable of moving autonomously and performing swift, reversible, and in-place assembly dissociation in a high accuracy by manipulating a TiO2/Pt Janus micromotor with light irradiation. Due to the efficient motion of the TiO2/Pt Janus motor and the light-switchable electrostatic interactions between the micromotor and colloidal particles, the colloidal particles can be captured and assembled one by one on the fly, subsequently forming into swimming colloidal molecules by mimicking space-filling models of simple molecules with central atoms. The as-demonstrated dynamic colloidal molecules have a configuration accurately controlled and stabilized by regulating the time-dependent intensity of UV light, which controls the stop-and-go motion of the colloidal molecules. The dynamic colloidal molecules are dissociated when the light irradiation is turned off due to the disappearance of light-switchable electrostatic interaction between the motor and the colloidal particles. The strategy for the assembly of dynamic colloidal molecules is applicable to various charged colloidal particles. The simulated optical properties of a dynamic colloidal molecule imply that the results here may provide a novel approach for in-place building functional microdevices, such as microlens arrays, in a swift and reversible manner.

  18. Electrochromic and photonic devices utilizing polymer colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Goo Hwan

    Since polymer colloidal particles have small size and stable surface properties, these materials have characteristics such as the ability to self-assemble, the ease of functionalization, the flexible coupling with other materials, and the formation of the stable dispersion in a liquid that can be beneficial to the fabrication of the electro-optic and photonic devices to enhance the performance. The main objective of this research is the fabrication of electrochromic devices (ECDs) employing the intrinsically conducting polymer (ICP) colloidal particles as electroactive materials and the crystalline colloidal array (CCA)-based photonic devices using polystyrene (PS) colloidal particles as building blocks. The research reported here focuses on: (1) the fabrication of the patterned ECDs through the inkjet printing of the ICP colloidal particles; (2) the fabrication of the reflection-type ECDs employing the polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) as a reflection mirror; (3) the dynamic tuning of a photoluminescence (PL) dye through the coupling of a PL dye to the CCA. In the first part, polyaniline (PANI)-silica and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-silica composite particles having a diameter of 200-300 nm were synthesized, then converted to the ICP-ink via solvent exchange. This ICP-ink could be inkjet-printed on various substrates such as ITO-PET film, commercial transparency film, and cotton fabric using a commercial desktop inkjet printer. ECDs could be fabricated employing an inkjet printed PANI-silica or PEDOT-silica layer on an ITO-PET film as an electrochromic layer. These devices exhibit various color changes corresponding to applied potentials between +1V and -1V. In the spectroelectrochemical analysis PANI-based ECD presents up to 50% transmittance contrast ratio and PEDOT-based one shows up to 40% at lambda max. The switching time of the PANI-based device was 30 seconds and that of PEDOT-based ECD was 5 seconds. The PANI-based ECD could be

  19. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Book Description: Colloidal science and technology is one of the fastest growing research and technology areas. This book explores the cutting edge research in colloidal science and technology that will be usefull in almost every aspect of modern society. This book has a depth of information...... related to historical prospective, synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling and application of unique class of colloidal materials starting from colloidal gold to coated silica colloid and platinum, titania colloids. This book is unique in its design, content, providing depth of science about...... different colloidal materials and their applications in chemistry, physics, biological, medical sciences and environment. Graduate students, academic and industrial researchers and medical professionals will discover recently developed colloidal materials and their applications in many areas of human...

  20. The Silicon:Colloidal Quantum Dot Heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Masala, Silvia

    2015-10-13

    A heterojunction between crystalline silicon and colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is realized. A special interface modification is developed to overcome an inherent energetic band mismatch between the two semiconductors, and realize the efficient collection of infrared photocarriers generated in the CQD film. This junction is used to produce a sensitive near infrared photodetector. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  2. Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dystrophy > Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy This information was developed by the ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy Defined What is Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy? ...

  3. Used Fuel Disposal in Crystalline Rocks. FY15 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media. Chapter headings are as follows: Fuel matrix degradation model and its integration with performance assessments, Investigation of thermal effects on the chemical behavior of clays, Investigation of uranium diffusion and retardation in bentonite, Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: dependence on density, Sorption and desorption of plutonium by bentonite, Dissolution of plutonium intrinsic colloids in the presence of clay and as a function of temperature, Laboratory investigation of colloid-facilitated transport of cesium by bentonite colloids in a crystalline rock system, Development and demonstration of discrete fracture network model, Fracture continuum model and its comparison with discrete fracture network model.

  4. Molecular Recognition in the Colloidal World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elacqua, Elizabeth; Zheng, Xiaolong; Shillingford, Cicely; Liu, Mingzhu; Weck, Marcus

    2017-10-06

    Colloidal self-assembly is a bottom-up technique to fabricate functional nanomaterials, with paramount interest stemming from programmable assembly of smaller building blocks into dynamic crystalline domains and photonic materials. Multiple established colloidal platforms feature diverse shapes and bonding interactions, while achieving specific orientations along with short- and long-range order. A major impediment to their universal use as building blocks for predesigned architectures is the inability to precisely dictate and control particle functionalization and concomitant reversible self-assembly. Progress in colloidal self-assembly necessitates the development of strategies that endow bonding specificity and directionality within assemblies. Methodologies that emulate molecular and polymeric three-dimensional (3D) architectures feature elements of covalent bonding, while high-fidelity molecular recognition events have been installed to realize responsive reconfigurable assemblies. The emergence of anisotropic 'colloidal molecules', coupled with the ability to site-specifically decorate particle surfaces with supramolecular recognition motifs, has facilitated the formation of superstructures via directional interactions and shape recognition. In this Account, we describe supramolecular assembly routes to drive colloidal particles into precisely assembled architectures or crystalline lattices via directional noncovalent molecular interactions. The design principles are based upon the fabrication of colloidal particles bearing surface-exposed functional groups that can undergo programmable conjugation to install recognition motifs with high fidelity. Modular and versatile by design, our strategy allows for the introduction and integration of molecular recognition principles into the colloidal world. We define noncovalent molecular interactions as site-specific forces that are predictable (i.e., feature selective and controllable complementary bonding partners

  5. Effects of calcination treatment on the morphology, crystallinity, and photoelectric properties of all-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells assembled by TiO2 nanorod arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianmiao; Sun, Qiong; Li, Yang; Sui, Lina; Dong, Lifeng

    2013-11-14

    TiO2 has been extensively investigated due to its unique photoelectric properties. In this study, oriented single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanorod arrays were synthesized and then calcined at different temperatures in the atmosphere. The morphology and crystalline characterization indicated that the length of TiO2 nanorods increased rapidly and the nanorods became aggregated and fragile after calcination, yet the sintering treatment seemed to have almost no effect on the crystallinity. To obtain the all-solid-state, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), a newly reported solid inorganic semiconductor, CsSnI2.95F0.05, was employed as the electrolyte, and the Pt deposited on the conductive side of the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate was used as the counter-electrode. The effects of the calcination treatment on the photoelectric properties of the solar cells, including external quantum efficiency (EQE), open circuit voltage (V(OC)), short-circuit current (J(SC)), and photoelectric conversion efficiency (η), were investigated under the illumination of a solar simulator. As a result, all of the EQE, V(OC), J(SC), and η values of the cells first increased and then declined with the increase of calcination temperatures, and the highest η of 2.81% was obtained by the cell assembled with its TiO2 electrode sintered at 450 °C for 3 h, a value almost 2.5 times that of the non-sintered sample (1.1%).

  6. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  7. Rheological properties of Cubic colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2016-11-01

    Colloidal and non-colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in many industrial application. There are numerous studies on these systems to understand and relate their complex rheological properties to their microstructural evolution under deformation. Although most of the experimental and simulation studies are centered on spherical particles, in most of the industrial applications the geometry of the colloidal particles deviate from the simple hard sphere and more complex geometries exist. Recent advances in microfabrication paved the way to fabricate colloidal particles with complex geometries for applications in different areas such as drug delivery where the fundamental understanding of their dynamics has remained unexplored. In this study, using dissipative particle dynamics, we investigate the rheological properties of cubic (superball) particles which are modeled as the cluster of core-modified DPD particles. Explicit representation of solvent particles in the DPD scheme will conserve the full hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles. Rheological properties of these cubic suspensions are investigated in the dilute and semi-dilute regimes. The Einstein and Huggins coefficients for these particles with different superball exponent will be calculate which represent the effect of single particle's geometry and multibody interactions on viscosity, respectively. The response of these suspensions is investigated under simple shear and oscillatory shear where it is shown that under oscillation these particles tend to form crystalline structure giving rise to stronger shear-thinning behavior recently measured experimentally.

  8. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  9. DNA hybridization and ligation for directed colloidal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Margaret

    Colloidal assembly using DNA hybridization has been pursued as a means assemble non-conventional ordered colloidal structures. However, to date it is undetermined whether DNA hybridization can be used to achieve non-FCC colloidal crystals. Using microcontact printing techniques, we have fabricated covalently bound single stranded DNA (ssDNA) two-dimensional arrays on glass surfaces, which were used to direct the assembly of complementary DNA functionalized polystyrene colloids. Two of the hallmarks of DNA hybridization, sequence specificity and thermal reversibility, were demonstrated. Due to the periodicity of these arrays, laser diffraction was used to directly monitor these structures during assembly. To demonstrate the versatility of the 2D colloidal array assembled via DNA hybridization, a catalytic DNA sequence or DNAzyme was incorporated into the colloidal array system. By tethering the enzymatic strand to the patterned glass surface and the substrate strand to polystyrene colloids, we showed that the DNAzyme could prevent the assembly of the arrays when the required Pb2+ cofactor was provided. Attempts to assemble the colloid arrays and disassemble via the Pb2+-DNAzyme induced cleavage were unsuccessful, likely due to the incomplete cleavage of the multitude of hybridized linkages between each colloid and the surface. Since DNA is not only capable of catalyzing reactions, but also capable of being reacted upon by a variety of biological enzymes, we examined the use of DNA ligase as a means to control the assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids. A three-sequence linker system was used for the hybridization mediated assembly of colloids: one sequence was tethered to the surface of the glass slide or colloids, one was tethered to another colloid surface, and the linker sequence hybridizes simultaneously to both tethered sequences. Once hybridized, the two tethered fragments can be ligated using DNA ligase, resulting in a continuous sequence tethered on one end

  10. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  11. Colloid process engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  12. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    different colloidal materials and their applications in chemistry, physics, biological, medical sciences and environment. Graduate students, academic and industrial researchers and medical professionals will discover recently developed colloidal materials and their applications in many areas of human......Book Description: Colloidal science and technology is one of the fastest growing research and technology areas. This book explores the cutting edge research in colloidal science and technology that will be usefull in almost every aspect of modern society. This book has a depth of information...

  13. Observation of a microcrystalline gel in colloids with competing interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, T.; Groenewold, J.; Kegel, W.K.

    2009-01-01

    A stable short-range crystalline structure is observed in colloidal systems with competing short-range attractions and long-range repulsions. We term these structures ‘‘microcrystalline gels’’ as the microcrystals are embedded in a dense disordered network.

  14. Crystalline Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D; Jiang, F -J; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We show that exotic phases arise in generalized lattice gauge theories known as quantum link models in which classical gauge fields are replaced by quantum operators. While these quantum models with discrete variables have a finite-dimensional Hilbert space per link, the continuous gauge symmetry is still exact. An efficient cluster algorithm is used to study these exotic phases. The $(2+1)$-d system is confining at zero temperature with a spontaneously broken translation symmetry. A crystalline phase exhibits confinement via multi-stranded strings between charge-anti-charge pairs. A phase transition between two distinct confined phases is weakly first order and has an emergent spontaneously broken approximate $SO(2)$ global symmetry. The low-energy physics is described by a $(2+1)$-d $\\mathbb{R}P(1)$ effective field theory, perturbed by a dangerously irrelevant $SO(2)$ breaking operator, which prevents the interpretation of the emergent pseudo-Goldstone boson as a dual photon. This model is an ideal candidat...

  15. Problems in the production and use of 5 nm avidin-gold colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R E; Saelinger, C B

    1986-08-01

    Over the past 5 years we have encountered several problems in the production and use of 5 nm avidin-gold colloids for markers in electron microscopy. These problems include flocculation of colloids during reduction of chloroauric acid, insoluble gold pellets following ultracentrifugation, and non-specific binding of avidin-gold colloids to biological membranes. We are able to avoid these problems by: avoiding the use of crystalline chloroauric acid; succinoylating egg white avidin prior to adsorption on the gold sols; resuspending the pellets following ultracentrifugation in 5 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.5; and using the avidin-gold colloids within 4 weeks of production.

  16. Manipulation of colloidal crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermolen, E.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal particles (approximately a micrometer in diameter) that are dispersed in a fluid, behave thermodynamically similar to atoms and molecules: at low concentrations they form a fluid, while at high concentrations they can crystallize into a colloidal crystal to gain entropy. The analogy with m

  17. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  18. Fabrication of bioinspired nanostructured materials via colloidal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Han

    ultimate strains than nacre and pure GO paper (also synthesized by filtration). Specifically, it exhibits ˜30 times higher fracture energy than filtrated graphene paper and nacre, ˜100 times tougher than filtrated GO paper. Besides reinforced nanocomposites, we further explored the self-assembly of spherical colloids and the templating nanofabrication of moth-eye-inspired broadband antireflection coatings. Binary crystalline structures can be easily accomplished by spin-coating double-layer nonclose-packed colloidal crystals as templates, followed by colloidal templating. The polymer matrix between self-assembled colloidal crystal has been used as a sacrificial template to define the resulting periodic binary nanostructures, including intercalated arrays of silica spheres and polymer posts, gold nanohole arrays with binary sizes, and dimple-nipple antireflection coatings. The binary-structured antireflection coatings exhibit better antireflective properties than unitary coatings. Natural optical structures and nanocomposites teach us a great deal on how to create high performance artificial materials. The bottom-up technologies developed in this thesis are scalable and compatible with standard industrial processes, promising for manufacturing high-performance materials for the benefits of human beings.

  19. Colloids in Biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  20. Liquid crystal colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  1. Confocal microscopy of colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, V; Semwogerere, D; Weeks, Eric R [Department of Physics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Colloids have increasingly been used to characterize or mimic many aspects of atomic and molecular systems. With confocal microscopy these colloidal particles can be tracked spatially in three dimensions with great precision over large time scales. This review discusses equilibrium phases such as crystals and liquids, and non-equilibrium phases such as glasses and gels. The phases that form depend strongly on the type of particle interaction that dominates. Hard-sphere-like colloids are the simplest, and interactions such as the attractive depletion force and electrostatic repulsion result in more non-trivial phases which can better model molecular materials. Furthermore, shearing or otherwise externally forcing these colloids while under microscopic observation helps connect the microscopic particle dynamics to the macroscopic flow behaviour. Finally, directions of future research in this field are discussed. (topical review)

  2. Manipulating colloids with charges and electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunissen, M. E.

    2007-02-01

    This thesis presents the results of experimental investigations on a variety of colloidal suspensions. Colloidal particles are at least a hundred times larger than atoms or molecules, but suspended in a liquid they display the same phase behavior, including fluid and crystalline phases. Due to their relatively large size, colloids are much easier to investigate and manipulate, though. This makes them excellent condensed matter model systems. With this in mind, we studied micrometer-sized perspex (‘PMMA’) spheres, labeled with a fluorescent dye for high-resolution confocal microscopy imaging, and suspended in a low-polar mixture of the organic solvents cyclohexyl bromide and cis-decalin. This system offered us the flexibility to change the interactions between the particles from ‘hard-sphere-like’ to long-ranged repulsive (between like-charged particles), long-ranged attractive (between oppositely charged particles) and dipolar (in an electric field). We investigated the phase behavior of our suspensions as a function of the particle concentration, the ionic strength of the solvent and the particles’ charges. In this way, we obtained new insight in the freezing and melting behavior of like-charged and oppositely charged colloids. Interestingly, we found that the latter can readily form large crystals, thus defying the common belief that plus-minus interactions inevitably lead to aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrated that these systems can serve as a reliable model system for classical ionic matter (‘salts’), and that opposite-charge interactions can greatly facilitate the self-assembly of new structures with special properties for applications. On a slightly different note, we also studied electrostatic effects in mixtures of the cyclohexyl bromide solvent and water, both with and without colloidal particles present. This provided new insight in the stabilization mechanisms of oil-water emulsions and gave us control over the self-assembly of various

  3. Multimodal Plasmonics in Fused Colloidal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Teulle, Alexandre; Girard, C; Gurunatha, Kargal L; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen; Dujardin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the optical properties of noble metals down to the nanometer-scale is a key step towards fast and low-dissipative information processing. At the 10-nm length scale, metal crystallinity and patterning as well as probing of surface plasmon (SP) properties must be controlled with a challenging high level of precision. Here, we demonstrate that ultimate lateral confinement and delocalization of SP modes are simultaneously achieved in extended self-assembled networks comprising linear chains of partially fused gold nanoparticles. The spectral and spatial distributions of the SP modes associated with the colloidal superstructures are evidenced by performing monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy with a nanometer-sized electron probe. We prepare the metallic bead strings by electron beam-induced interparticle fusion of nanoparticle networks. The fused superstructures retain the native morphology and crystallinity but develop very low energy SP modes that are capable of supporting long range and s...

  4. Observation of a smecticlike crystalline structure in polydisperse colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen; Bryant, Gary; van Megen, William

    2003-06-27

    We present the results of crystallographic measurements on samples of two latexes: one with a relatively symmetric particle size distribution, and another with a highly skewed pseudobimodal distribution. For the skewed latex, crystallites are clearly visible, but they exhibit only a single Bragg reflection, indicating long-range order in only one direction. We propose a schematic model that explains this result in terms of stacks of planes, which are unregistered due to a high incidence of stacking faults caused by the incorporation of a large number of small particles.

  5. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-13

    Hongrui Jiang. Microfluidic sensing devices employing in situ-formed liquid crystal thin film for detection of biochemical interactions, Lab -on-a... Chip (06 2012) Daniel S. Miller, Nicholas L. Abbott,. Influence of droplet size, pH and ionic strength on endotoxin- triggered ordering transitions

  6. Rheology and dynamics of colloidal superballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, John R; Burton, George L; Blair, Daniel L; Hudson, Steven D

    2015-07-28

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis make it possible to generate a wide array of precisely controlled, non-spherical particles. This provides a unique opportunity to probe the role that particle shape plays in the dynamics of colloidal suspensions, particularly at higher volume fractions, where particle interactions are important. We examine the role of particle shape by characterizing both the bulk rheology and micro-scale diffusion in a suspension of pseudo-cubic silica superballs. Working with these well-characterized shaped colloids, we can disentangle shape effects in the hydrodynamics of isolated particles from shape-mediated particle interactions. We find that the hydrodynamic properties of isolated superballs are marginally different from comparably sized hard spheres. However, shape-mediated interactions modify the suspension microstructure, leading to significant differences in the self-diffusion of the superballs. While this excluded volume interaction can be captured with a rescaling of the superball volume fraction, we observe qualitative differences in the shear thickening behavior of moderately concentrated superball suspensions that defy simple rescaling onto hard sphere results. This study helps to define the unknowns associated with the effects of shape on the rheology and dynamics of colloidal solutions.

  7. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  8. Formation and stability of aluminosilicate colloids by coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Kirana Yuniati

    2011-02-15

    Colloids are ubiquitous in natural waters. Colloid-facilitated migration is of importance in safety assessment of a nuclear waste disposal. Aluminosilicate colloids are considered to be the kernel of aquatic colloids. Their stability is affected by a number of geochemical parameters. This work aims to study qualitatively and quantitatively the stability of aluminosilicate colloids formed by coprecipitation under various geochemical conditions, i.e. pH, concentration of Al and Si metal ions, ionic strength, and omnipresent cations (Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}). The work is performed by colorimetric method and laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). Two consecutive phase separations at 450 nm and 1 kDa are applied to separate the precipitates and colloids from the ionic species. By means of colorimetry, Si and Al can be detected down to 5.8 x10{sup -8} M and 7.4x10{sup -7} M, respectively. On the other hand, LIBD is able to quantify the colloidal size and its number density down to several ppt. Depending on the concentration of Al and Si metal ions, the formation trend of aluminosilicate colloid changes following its solubility curve. The lower the concentration, the higher the pH range in which the colloids start to emerge. Furthermore, the colloids are stable at higher Al and Si concentration and at low ionic strength. In the low pH range, cations provide different effects at low and high ionic strengths. At high ionic strength, the colloids are stable in the presence of a larger cation, while all cations exhibit similar effects at low ionic strength. However, in the high pH range, valence seems to have a stronger effect than ionic radius; colloids are more stable in the presence of monovalent cations than divalent ones. Meanwhile, XRD shows non- and/or poor crystalline structure of the aluminosilicate species. Nevertheless, results from XPS may suggest that the chemical composition (Si/Al ∼ 0.6) of the aluminosilicate precipitates is sillimanite or

  9. Assembly of Colloidal Materials Using Bioadhesive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Tohver, Valeria; Crocker, John C.; Weitz, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We have pursued the use of biological crosslinking molecules of several types to make colloidal materials at relatively low volume fraction of colloidal particles. The objective is to make binary alloys of colloidal particles, made of two different colloidal particles coated with complementary biological lock-and-key binding molecules, which assemble due to the biological specificity. The long-term goal is to use low affinity lock-and-key biological interactions, so that the can anneal to form crystalline states. We have used a variety of different surface chemistries in order to make colloidal materials. Our first system involved using selectin-carbohydrate (sialyl-Lewis) interactions; this chemistry is derived from immune system. This chemical interaction is of relatively low affinity, with timescales for dissociation of several seconds. Furthermore, the adhesion mediated by these molecules can be reversed by the chelation of calcium atoms; thus assembled structures can be disassembled reversibly. Our second system employed avidin-biotin chemistry. This well-studied system is of high affinity, and is generally irreversible on a laboratory time-scale. Thus, we would expect selectin-carbohydrate interactions at high molecular density and avidin-biotin interactions to give kinetically-trapped structures; however, at low densities, we would expect significant differences in the structure and dynamics of the two materials, owing to their very different release rates. We have also begun to use a third chemistry - DNA hybridization. By attaching single stranded DNA oligonucleotide chains to beads, we can drive the assembly of colloidal materials by hybridization of complementary DNA chains. It is well known that DNA adenosine-thymine (A-T) and guanine-cytosine (G-C) bases hybridize pairwise with a Gibbs free energy change of 1.7 kcal/mol per base; thus, the energy of the assembly can be modulated by altering the number of complementary bases in the DNA chains. Using

  10. Self-assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Theodorakis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal particles grafted with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA chains can self-assemble into a number of different crystalline structures, where hybridization of the ssDNA chains creates links between colloids stabilizing their structure. Depending on the geometry and the size of the particles, the grafting density of the ssDNA chains, and the length and choice of DNA sequences, a number of different crystalline structures can be fabricated. However, understanding how these factors contribute synergistically to the self-assembly process of DNA-functionalized nano- or micro-sized particles remains an intensive field of research. Moreover, the fabrication of long-range structures due to kinetic bottlenecks in the self-assembly are additional challenges. Here, we discuss the most recent advances from theory and experiment with particular focus put on recent simulation studies.

  11. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are searching for colloidal materials with specific physical properties to better understand our surrounding world.Until recently research in colloid science was mainly focused on spherical (isotropic) particles. Monodisperse spherical colloids serve as a model system as they exhibit similar phase behaviour as molecular and atomic systems. Nevertheless, in many cases the spherical shape is not sufficient to reach the desired research goals. Recently the more complex synthesis methods of anisotropic model colloids has strongly developed. This thesis should be regarded as a contribution to this research area. Anisotropic colloids can be used as a building block for complex structures and are expected not only to lead to the construction of full photonic band gap materials. They will also serve as new, more realistic, models systems for their molecular analogues. Therefore the term ‘molecular colloids” is sometimes used to qualify these anisotropic colloidal particles. In the introduction of this thesis, we give an overview of the main synthesis techniques for anisotropic colloids. Chapter 2 describes the method of etching silicon wafers to construct monodisperse silicon rods. They subsequently were oxidized and labeled (coated) with a fluorescent silica layer. The first explorative phase behaviour of these silica rods was studied. The particles showed a nematic ordering in charge stabilized suspensions. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of colloidal gold rods and the (mesoporous) silica coating of gold rods. Chapter 4 describes the physical and optical properties of these particles when thermal energy is added. This is compared to the case where the particles are irradiated with

  12. Medical applications of colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  13. Nucleation in food colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povey, Malcolm J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation in food colloids has been studied in detail using ultrasound spectroscopy. Our data show that classical nucleation theory (CNT) remains a sound basis from which to understand nucleation in food colloids and analogous model systems using n-alkanes. Various interpretations and modifications of CNT are discussed with regard to their relevance to food colloids. Much of the evidence presented is based on the ultrasound velocity spectrometry measurements which has many advantages for the study of nucleating systems compared to light scattering and NMR due to its sensitivity at low solid contents and its ability to measure true solid contents in the nucleation and early crystal growth stages. Ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy also responds to critical fluctuations in the induction region. We show, however, that a periodic pressure fluctuation such as a quasi-continuous (as opposed to a pulse comprising only a few pressure cycles) ultrasound field can alter the nucleation process, even at very low acoustic intensity. Thus care must be taken when using ultrasound techniques that the measurements do not alter the studied processes. Quasi-continuous ultrasound fields may enhance or suppress nucleation and the criteria to determine such effects are derived. The conclusions of this paper are relevant to colloidal systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals, cosmetics, and personal products.

  14. Binary colloidal crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christova-Zdravkova, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Binary crystals are crystals composed of two types of particles having different properties like size, mass density, charge etc. In this thesis several new approaches to make binary crystals of colloidal particles that differ in size, material and charge are reported We found a variety of crystal st

  15. Electrodynamics of colloids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minor, M.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to deepen the insight into the non-equilibrium properties of the electric double layer of colloidal systems. Of basic interest are the ionic mobilities in the different regions of the electric double layer as well as the potential at the plane of shear, i.e., the ele

  16. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  17. Optical Spectra and Color of Silver Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L. Dmitruk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In present work, the color features of the aqueous silver suspensions were investigated. Color systems CIE XYZ and CIELAB are considered. In the case of low concentrations of nanoparticles chromaticity coordinates were determined from the transmission spectra of the colloids. For high concentrations of nanoparticles, when the multiple scattering effects play a key role and the medium turns to be turbid, the color of nanoparticles was found using the Kubelka-Munk relation. Experimental data is compared with that calculated from the Mie theory. Color features of a planar array of non-interacting silver nanoparticles are discussed for the first time.

  18. Recent advances in polymer colloidal crystal lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumi, Seiichi

    2012-09-21

    Colloids with a size in the nanometres to micrometres range are frequently used in both fundamental research and industrial applications. In this context, colloidal crystals (CCs)-3D ordered arrays of monodispersed colloidal microparticles with a diameter of several hundred nanometres-have garnered a great deal of attention in the intriguing research realm of photonic crystals (PCs) due to the feasible and high-throughput 3D-PC fabrication with CCs. For optoelectronic applications, it is of prime importance to construct 3D-PCs with photonic band-gaps (PBGs) in the visible wavelength range. With regard to photonic device applications, many reports have been made on a wide variety of optical reflection sensors and displays using CCs that shift the visible PBG wavelength in response to external stimuli. This Minireview describes the research progress in the investigation of CCs and their laser applications. We highlight not only the research background of CCs as 3D-PCs, but also new potential applications of CCs as flexible and widely tunable lasers by low-threshold optical excitation.

  19. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  20. Rapid fabrication of large area binary polystyrene colloidal crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chun-Li; Yang, Rui-Xia; Yan, Wei-Guo; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Guang-Wu; Jia, Guo-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Binary colloidal crystals (BCCs) possess great potentials in tuning material and optical properties. In this paper, the combination of interface transferred method and spin-coating method is used to fabricate BCCs with different patterns via controlling the size ratio of small (S) to large (L) colloidal spheres and the spin speeds. It is found that BCCs formed LS2, LS4 and LS6 by changing the size ratio. In addition, there are some new and complicated structures, such as LS12, Janus arrays, formed at the low spin speed. This simple assembly method has potential to allow for the creation of optical metmaterials and the plasmonic structures with chiral optical properties.

  1. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S. (Materials Science Division)

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots

  2. Colloidal Thermal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotzadeh, Saba

    In this dissertation, a reversible system with a well controlled degree of particle aggregation was developed. By surface modification of colloidal silica with aminosilanes, interactions among the particles were tuned in a controlled way to produce stable sized clusters at different pH values ranges from well-disposed to a colloidal gel. N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (TMPE) monolayer on particle surface not only removes all the reactive sites to prevent chemical aggregation, also provides steric stabilization in the absence of any repulsion. After surface modification, electrokinetic behavior of silica particles were changed to that of amino groups, positive in acidic pH and neutral at basic pH values. By tuning the pH, the balance between electrostatic repulsion and hydrophobic interactions was reversibly controlled. As a result, clusters with different sizes were developed. The effect of clustering on the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions was quantified using silane-treated silica, a system engineered to exhibit reversible clustering under well-controlled conditions. Thermal conductivity of this system was measured by transient hot wire, the standard method of thermal conductivity measurements in liquids. We show that the thermal conductivity increases monotonically with cluster size and spans the entire range between the two limits of Maxwell's theory. The results, corroborated by numerical simulation, demonstrate that large increases of the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions are possible, yet fully within the predictions of classical theory. Numerical calculations were performed to evaluate the importance of structural properties of particles/aggregates on thermal conduction in colloidal particles. Thermal conductivity of non-spherical particles including hollow particles, cubic particles and rods was studied using a Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that anisotropic shapes, increase conductivity above that of isotropic

  3. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  4. Physical Mechanism Behind Enhanced Photoelectrochemical and Photocatalytic Properties of Superhydrophilic Assemblies of 3D-TiO2 Microspheres with Arrays of Oriented, Single-Crystalline TiO2 Nanowires as Building Blocks Deposited on Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Subha; Gupta, Preeti; Poddar, Pankaj

    2017-03-15

    In comparison to the one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor nanostructures, the hierarchical, three-dimensional (3D) microstructures, composed of the arrays of 1D nanostructures as building blocks, show quite unique physicochemical properties due to efficient photon capture and enhanced surface to volume ratio, which aid in advancing the performance of various optoelectronic devices. In this contribution, we report the fabrication of surfactant-free, radially assembled, 3D titania (rutile-phase) microsphere arrays (3D-TMSAs) composed of bundles of single-crystalline titania nanowires (NWs) directly on fluorine-doped conducting oxide (FTO) substrates with tunable architecture. The effects of growth parameters on the morphology of the 3D-TMSAs have been studied thoroughly. The 3D-TMSAs grown on the FTO-substrate showed superior photon-harvesting owing to the increase in light-scattering. The photocatalytic and photon to electron conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC), where the optimized 3D-TMSAs were used as an anode, showed around 44% increase in the photoconversion efficiency compared to that of Degussa P-25 as a result of the synergistic effect of higher surface area and enhanced photon scattering probability. The TMSA film showed superhydrophilicity without any prior UV irradiation. In addition, the presence of bundles of almost parallel NWs led to the formation of arrays of microcapacitors, which showed stable dielectric performance. The fabrication of single-crystalline, oriented, self-assembled TMSAs with bundles of titania nanowires as their building blocks deposited on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates has vast potential in the area of photoelectrochemical research.

  5. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  6. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  7. Fractal nematic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter. PMID:28117325

  8. Fractal nematic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  9. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks). PMID:28246633

  10. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-11-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of novel composite membranes composed of photonic crystals and TiO2 nanotube array films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junjie; Zhu, Huili; Wang, Aijun; Chen, Sheng-Li; Yuan, Yao

    2016-05-01

    Novel composite membranes composed of photonic crystals (PCs) and TiO2 nanotube array (TNA) films have been fabricated by combining the room temperature floating self-assembly (RTFSA) method, recently developed by our research group, and the liquid-phase deposition technique. By applying this combined procedure, polystyrene (PS) opal PC/TNA and TiO2 inverse opal PC/TNA composite membranes were prepared. Scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy analyses showed that the membrane samples possessed very high crystalline quality. Notably, the ordered packing of the PS microspheres from the top to the bottom of the opal PC film was not affected by the surface roughness of the porous TNA substrate. This is attributed to the self-assembly mechanism of the colloidal particles, which produces a three-dimensional ordered structure in the RTFSA method. Herein, the crystallization of the colloidal particles occurred at the surface of the colloidal suspension, and the crystal growth proceeded downward from the surface of the suspension to the substrate.

  12. Solid–liquid interfacial free energy of small colloidal hard-sphere crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cacciuto, A.; Auer, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2003-01-01

    Using free-energy calculations on small crystalline clusters, we estimate the free-energy density γSL for the solid–liquid equimolar interface of a system of hard-sphere colloids. By studying the behavior of a crystallite at coexistence, we determine the dependence of γSL on the radius of curvature

  13. Structure and stacking order in crystals of asymmetric dumbbell-like colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, Antara; Meijer, Janne-Mieke; Wolters, Joost R.; Kegel, Willem K.; Petukhov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The crystalline structure assembled out of charge-stabilized asymmetric dumbbell-like colloidal particles in ethyl alcohol by sedimentation has been probed using small-angle X-ray scattering with microradian resolution. The existence of plastic face-centered cubic crystals was inferred from the obse

  14. Kayaking and wagging of rigid rod-like colloids in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Y.G.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we report on Brownian dynamics simulations of colloidal suspensions of rigid spherocylinders in shear flow. A widely investigated topic, rod-like liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) in the nematic phase arouse much scientific interest, both theoretically and experimentally, not only

  15. Simple, Fast, and Cost-Effective Fabrication of Wafer-Scale Nanohole Arrays on Silicon for Antireflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, fast, and cost-effective method was developed in this paper for the high-throughput fabrication of nanohole arrays on silicon (Si, which is utilized for antireflection. Wafer-scale polystyrene (PS monolayer colloidal crystal was developed as templates by spin-coating method. Metallic shadow mask was prepared by lifting off the oxygen etched PS beads from the deposited chromium film. Nanohole arrays were fabricated by Si dry etching. A series of nanohole arrays were fabricated with the similar diameter but with different depth. It is found that the maximum depth of the Si-hole was determined by the diameter of the Cr-mask. The antireflection ability of these Si-hole arrays was investigated. The results show that the reflection decreases with the depth of the Si-hole. The deepest Si-hole arrays show the best antireflection ability (reflection 600 nm, which was about 28 percent of the nonpatterned silicon wafer’s reflection. The proposed method has the potential for high-throughput fabrication of patterned Si wafer, and the low reflectivity allows the application of these wafers in crystalline silicon solar cells.

  16. Colloidal plasmonic back reflectors for light trapping in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Manuel J.; Morawiec, Seweryn; Simone, Francesca; Priolo, Francesco; Crupi, Isodiana

    2014-04-01

    A novel type of plasmonic light trapping structure is presented in this paper, composed of metal nanoparticles synthesized in colloidal solution and self-assembled in uniform long-range arrays using a wet-coating method. The high monodispersion in size and spherical shape of the gold colloids used in this work allows a precise match between their measured optical properties and electromagnetic simulations performed with Mie theory, and enables the full exploitation of their collective resonant plasmonic behavior for light-scattering applications. The colloidal arrays are integrated in plasmonic back reflector (PBR) structures aimed for light trapping in thin film solar cells. The PBRs exhibit high diffuse reflectance (up to 75%) in the red and near-infrared spectrum, which can pronouncedly enhance the near-bandgap photocurrent generated by the cells. Furthermore, the colloidal PBRs are fabricated by low-temperature (<120 °C) processes that allow their implementation, as a final step of the cell construction, in typical commercial thin film devices generally fabricated in a superstrate configuration.

  17. [Compared with colloidal silica and porous silica as baicalin solid dispersion carrier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Ding, Dong-Mei; Wang, Jing; Sun, E; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai

    2014-07-01

    To compare the dissolution characteristics of colloidal silica and porous silica as the solid dispersion carrier, with baicalin as the model drug. The baicalin solid dispersion was prepared by the solvent method, with colloidal silica and porous silica as the carriers. In the in vitro dissolution experiment, the solid dispersion was identified by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning and X-ray diffraction. The solid dispersion carriers prepared with both colloidal silica and porous silica could achieve the purpose of rapid release. Along with the increase in the proportion of the carriers, the dissolution rate is accelerated to more than 80% within 60 min. Baicalin existed in the solid dispersion carriers in the non-crystalline form. The release behaviors of the baicalin solid dispersion prepared with two types of carrier were different. Among the two solid dispersion carriers, porous silica dissolved slowly than colloidal silica within 60 min, and they showed similar dissolutions after 60 min.

  18. Polymers and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurtenberger, P. [ETH Zurich, Inst. fuer Polymere, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  19. Polydispersity and gelation in concentrated colloids with competing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian Hui; Kuipers, Bonny W M; Tian, Wen-de; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K

    2015-01-14

    In colloids with competing short-range attractions and long-range repulsions, microcrystalline gels are experimentally formed under conditions where computer simulations point to a lamellar phase as the ground state. Here, upon applying a low-frequency alternating electric field, we bring the system from an initial gel state to a columnar-like state. While molecular dynamics simulations on monodisperse colloids reveal that a columnar structure spontaneously evolves towards a lamellar phase, the columnar-like state in experiments relaxes back to the initial disordered gel state once the electric field is switched off. Similarly, a columnar phase in molecular dynamics simulations decomposes into finite-size crystalline clusters as the relative polydispersity of the colloids is around 1.0%. We conclude that the experimentally observed melting of the columnar structure is driven by polydispersity. Moreover, further simulations reveal that the critical polydispersity required to destabilize a long-range ordered structure increases with the attraction range, pointing to the possibility of observing periodic structures in experiments if the attraction range is sufficiently long compared to the polydispersity of the colloids.

  20. Strain-responsive structural colored elastomers by fixing colloidal crystal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tatsunori; Katsura, Chihiro; Sugimoto, Hideki; Nakanishi, Eiji; Inomata, Katsuhiro

    2013-11-12

    Colloidal crystal assembly film was prepared by using monodispersed colloidal particles of cross-linked random copolymer of methyl methacrylate and ethyl acrylate prepared by soap-free emulsion polymerization. The colloidal crystal film exhibited structural color when swollen with ethyl acrylate monomer. The structural color was maintained even after polymerization of the swelling monomer and cross-linker, suggesting the colloidal crystalline order was successfully fixed and embedded in the matrix of poly(ethyl acrylate) elastomer. Stretching deformation of the structural colored elastomer induced a sensitive change to shorter wavelength color. Peak wavelength of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of the stretched elastomer revealed an excellent proportional relationship with film thickness. In the swollen colloidal crystal film, ethyl acrylate was absorbed in the colloidal particle; therefore, poly(ethyl acrylate) chain should be penetrating into the colloidal particle after the polymerization of the matrix elastomer. This interpenetrated polymer network structure was considered to be effective for the rubber-like elasticity and sensitive strain-responsive color-changing phenomena of the structural colored elastomer.

  1. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  2. 纳米阵列和纳米晶薄膜锡电极性质的电化学研究%Electrochemical Study of Nano-Array and Nano-Crystalline Tin Anode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇; 刘浪; 吴大平; 郭玉忠; 王剑华

    2012-01-01

    Tin nano-array electrodes were assembled by electrochemical deposition using alumina anodic oxide (AAO) as templates. Morphology and structure of the tin electrodes were characterized by SEM and XRD. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were applied to reveal the electrochemical performance of the electrodes used as anode of Li-ion battery. Compared to electrodes of tin film and tin foil from rolling, the electrodes of tin nano-arrays are very active. The EIS spectra of tin nano-array electrodes show different characters from electrodes of tin film and tin foil. A medium-frequency area has been found which is ascribed to the large charge transfer area across the electrode/electrolyte interface. The lithium ion transporting in solid-electrolyte ion surface layer are controlled by structure of electrodes. The surface resistances for nano-arrays observed from high frequency ace are between 19.8 and 14.6 Ω·cm2. The highest diffusion coefficient is 10-10 cm2·s-1 for nano-array electrode, at potential of 0.2 V. The nano-array structure can lead to high electrochemical activity of the electrodes.%采用氧化铝为模板的电化学沉积方法制备锡纳米阵列电极,用扫描电镜和X射线衍射仪表征电极微观形貌结构,并采用循环伏安和交流阻抗研究电极嵌锂过程,同时研究纳米晶锡薄膜电极和轧制锡箔电极.结果表明:纳米阵列电极与锡薄膜、锡箔电极具有不同交流阻抗谱特征,锡纳米阵列电极在中频区出现双电层阻抗,与其电解液/电极接触面积较大有关;不同微观结构形态下锡电极的电化学反应表面阻抗相差大于一个数量级,锡纳米阵列的表面膜电阻为19.8~14.6 Ω·cm2;锡纳米阵列电极上的锂离子扩散速率最大,0.2V嵌锂电位下扩散系数为10-10 cm2·s-1;采用纳米阵列结构使电极具有很高电的化学活性.

  3. Light-structured colloidal assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Antoine; Mena, Youssef; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Sacanna, Stefano; Palacci, Jeremie; Palacci lab Team; Sacanna lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled particles (SPP) are a key tool since they are of relative simplicity as compared to biological micro-entities and provide a higher level of control. They can convert an energy source into motion and work, and exhibit surprising non-equilibrium behavior. In our work, we focus on the manipulation of colloids using light. We exploit osmotic and phoretic effects to act on single and ensemble of colloids. The key mechanism relies on the photocatalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using hematite, which triggers the motion of colloids around it when illuminated. We use hematite particles and particles with photocatalytic inclusions (i.e. SPP). We first show that the interactions between hematite and colloidal tracers can be tuned by adjusting the chemical environment. Furthermore, we report a phototaxic behavior (migration in light gradient) of the particles. From this, we explore the effect of spatio-temporal modulation of the light to control the motion of colloids at the single particle level, and to generate self-assembled colloidal structures through time and space. The so-formed structures are maintained by phoretic and hydrodynamic forces resulting from the motion of each particles. Ultimately, a dynamic light modulation may be a route for the creation of active colloidal motion on a collective scale through the synchronization of the individual motions of SPP. This work is supported by NSF CAREER DMR 1554724.

  4. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  5. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microfluidic Control Using Colloidal Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terray, Alex; Oakey, John; Marr, David W. M.

    2002-06-01

    By manipulating colloidal microspheres within customized channels, we have created micrometer-scale fluid pumps and particulate valves. We describe two positive-displacement designs, a gear and a peristaltic pump, both of which are about the size of a human red blood cell. Two colloidal valve designs are also demonstrated, one actuated and one passive, for the direction of cells or small particles. The use of colloids as both valves and pumps will allow device integration at a density far beyond what is currently achievable by other approaches and may provide a link between fluid manipulation at the macro- and nanoscale.

  7. Colloids in Paints Colloids and Interface Science, Volume 6

    CERN Document Server

    Tadros, Tharwat F

    2011-01-01

    The first modern approach to relate fundamental research to the applied science of colloids, this series bridges academic research and practical applications, thus providing the information vital to both. Written by the very best scientists in their respective disciplines, this volume describes the role of colloids in paints, highlighting the importance of fundamental research in industrial applications.For surface, polymer and physicochemists, materials scientists, and chemical engineers.

  8. Are All Colloids Same? How to Select the Right Colloid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanya Mitra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The administration of intravenous fluids is one of the most common and universal interventions in medicine. Colloids are an alternative to the frequently used crystalloids, with highly variable use depending on a myriad of clinical variables. A colloid is defined as a high molecular weight (MW substance that largely remains in the intravas-eular compartment, thereby generating an oncotic pressure. Colloids are considered to have a greater intravaseular persistence when compared to crystalloids. All colloids, however, are clearly not the same. Differences in the physi-cochemical properties, pharmacokinetics and safety profile exist amongst various colloids. This review explores the different types of colloids, with their properties and usefulness as well as adverse effects. While all the available colloids are reviewed briefly (e.g., albumin, gelatin, dextran with respect to their pharmacology, indications, advan-tages and disadvantages, particular emphasis is laid on the hydroxyethyl starches (HES because of their rising prominence. It is shown that HES differ widely in their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties, composition, usefulness, and especially in their adverse effect profiles. The third generation HES (tetrastarches, in particular, seem to offer a unique combination of safety and efficacy. Several issues related to this are discussed in detail. This review of the available clinical data demonstrates that HES should not be regarded as one homogenous group, and data for one product should not be automatically extrapolated to another. Thus, among the synthetic colloids, the tetrastarches appear to offer the best currently available compromise between efficacy, safety profile, and cost. They also appear to be the best suited for use in the intensive care setting. Finally, balanced (rather than saline-based HES solutions appear promising as a plasma-adapted volume replacement strategy and may further refine the ongoing quest of

  9. Preparation and specific properties of single crystalline metallic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, Achim Walter; Milenkovic, Srdjan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Bello-Rodriguez, Belen; Smith, Andrew Jonathan; Chen, Ying [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Directional solidification of eutectics is a route to produce iso-oriented metallic single crystalline nanowires (NWs). Etching or electrochemical oxidation allows selective dissolution of either of the phases to produce NW arrays, isolated NWs, nanopore arrays and also derived structures by combining various process steps. A good understanding of the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the phase transformation and chemical reactions including electrodissolution, passivation, selective etching, complexing of reaction products and electrodeposition in the systems NiAl-X (X=Re, W, Mo), Ag-Cu and Fe-Au was reached. Functional devices based on these NWs, like high aspect ratio NW based STM tips, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), NW pH sensors and sensor arrays were constructed. Array of rhenium single crystalline NWs embedded in the NiAl matrix after partial dissolution of the matrix. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Self-assembly of colloidal rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prerna; Gibaud, Thoams; Ward, Andrew; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2013-03-01

    Interactions between nanometer-sized particles or molecules suspended in a bulk fluid are well understood. However, when such particles are embedded in a membrane, the inter-particle potential is significantly modified by membrane mediated forces and gives rise to novel phase behavior. Visualizing and manipulating such inclusions in a lipid bilayer is difficult due to the nanometer length scales involved. Here, we use a model system of micron sized colloidal membranes doped with molecules shorter or longer than that of the bulk. Surprisingly, the dopant molecules form self-limited finite size clusters. These clusters further self-organize into a wide variety of higher order structures such as hexagonal and square lattice arrays, lamellar patterns and saddle shaped surfaces. Understanding the phase behavior and measuring repulsive forces between such clusters may have implications for the similar mechanisms that operate in conventional lipid bilayers.

  11. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    tailor a random substrate potential for colloids [20] or to bind colloids optically [21]. External magnetic fields are typically used to create dipolar repulsions of colloids pending at an air-water interface. This provides an avenue to two-dimensional systems, where the freezing transition [22] and various transport phenomena through channels are the focus of recent research [23, 24]. Confinement typically leads to interfaces. The classical problem of the Tolman length for a fluid-fluid interface is reviewed in detail in [25]. In fact, colloid-polymer mixtures constitute ideal model systems for liquid-gas interfaces in various geometries [26] and are also suitable for measuring the Tolman length experimentally. Crystalline phases in confinement [27] and crystal-fluid interfaces [28] are even more complex due to the inhomogeneity of the solid phase. Also in the confined fluid phase, there are still open issues in slit-pore geometry. These include how to scale the interparticle distance [29] and how to measure hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles [30]. Other external fields which can be applied to colloids are gravity [31] and temperature [32]. An important field of recently emerging research is active colloidal particles (so-called microswimmers) which possess fascinating nonequilibrium properties; for recent reviews see [33-35]. Two examples are also included in this issue: an active deformable particle [36] moving in gravity and the collective turbulent swarming behaviour of dense self-propelled colloidal rod suspensions [37]. References [1]Löwen H 2001 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 13 R415 [2]Löwen H and Likos C N (ed) 2004 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 16 (special issue) [3]Löwen H 1976 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 20 404201 [4]Guu D, Dhont J K G, Vliegenthart G A and Lettinga M P 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464101 [5]Gupta S, Kundu S, Stellbrink J, Willner L, Allgaier J and Richter D 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464102 [6]Singh S P, Fedosov D A

  12. Colloidal gels: Clay goes patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem K.; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  13. Active colloids in complex fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Patteson, Alison E; Arratia, Paulo E

    2016-01-01

    We review recent work on active colloids or swimmers, such as self-propelled microorganisms, phoretic colloidal particles, and artificial micro-robotic systems, moving in fluid-like environments. These environments can be water-like and Newtonian but can frequently contain macromolecules, flexible polymers, soft cells, or hard particles, which impart complex, nonlinear rheological features to the fluid. While significant progress has been made on understanding how active colloids move and interact in Newtonian fluids, little is known on how active colloids behave in complex and non-Newtonian fluids. An emerging literature is starting to show how fluid rheology can dramatically change the gaits and speeds of individual swimmers. Simultaneously, a moving swimmer induces time dependent, three dimensional fluid flows, that can modify the medium (fluid) rheological properties. This two-way, non-linear coupling at microscopic scales has profound implications at meso- and macro-scales: steady state suspension proper...

  14. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-14

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  15. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-01

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  16. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...

  17. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  18. Optical absorption enhancement in silicon nanohole arrays for solar photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Eon; Chen, Gang

    2010-03-10

    We investigate silicon nanohole arrays as light absorbing structures for solar photovoltaics via simulation. To obtain the same ultimate efficiency as a standard 300 microm crystalline silicon wafer, we find that nanohole arrays require twelve times less silicon by mass. Moreover, our calculations show that nanohole arrays have an efficiency superior to nanorod arrays for practical thicknesses. With well-established fabrication techniques, nanohole arrays have great potential for efficient solar photovoltaics.

  19. Unexpected, spontaneous and selective formation of colloidal Pt 3Sn nanoparticles using organometallic Pt and Sn complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Boualleg, Malika

    2010-01-01

    The facile and selective synthesis of small crystalline Pt3Sn alloy nanoparticles was performed at room temperature under H2, using a colloidal approach without the use of extra-stabilizing ligands. The Pt 3Sn alloy was found to be obtained spontaneously as the unique phase regardless of the number of tin equivalents introduced. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Understanding the interfacial properties of nanostructured liquid crystalline materials for surface-specific delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yao-Da; Larson, Ian; Barnes, Timothy J; Prestidge, Clive A; Allen, Stephanie; Chen, Xinyong; Roberts, Clive J; Boyd, Ben J

    2012-09-18

    Nonlamellar liquid crystalline dispersions such as cubosomes and hexosomes have great potential as novel surface-targeted active delivery systems. In this study, the influence of internal nanostructure, chemical composition, and the presence of Pluronic F127 as a stabilizer, on the surface and interfacial properties of different liquid crystalline particles and surfaces, was investigated. The interfacial properties of the bulk liquid crystalline systems with coexisting excess water were dependent on the internal liquid crystalline nanostructure. In particular, the surfaces of the inverse cubic systems were more hydrophilic than that of the inverse hexagonal phase. The interaction between F127 and the bulk liquid crystalline systems depended on the internal liquid crystalline structure and chemical composition. For example, F127 adsorbed to the surface of the bulk phytantriol cubic phase, while for monoolein cubic phase, F127 was integrated into the liquid crystalline structure. Last, the interfacial adsorption behavior of the dispersed liquid crystalline particles also depended on both the internal nanostructure and the chemical composition, despite the dispersions all being stabilized using F127. The findings highlight the need to understand the specific surface characteristics and the nature of the interaction with colloidal stabilizer for understanding and optimizing the behavior of nonlamellar liquid crystalline systems in surface delivery applications.

  1. Crystalline systems. [Book chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, L.D.

    The use of two double resonance methods, electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) in the study of free radicals in solids is reviewed. Included are descriptions of how crystalline-phase ENDOR is used to determine small hyperfine splittings, quadrupoly couplings, and reaction mechanisms or radical formation and how crystalline phase ELDOR is used to determine large hyperfine splittings, to identify radicals with large quadrupole moments and to study spin exchange processes. The complementary role played by the ENDOR and ELDOR spectroscopy in the separation of overlapping EPR spectra, in the study of proton-deuterium exchange, in the study of methyl groups undergoing tunneling rotation, and in the determination of the rates of intermolecular motion are dealt with. 13 figures, 1 table. (DP)

  2. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  3. Silver nanorod arrays for photocathode applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilayurganapathy, Subramanian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Joly, Alan G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); El-Khoury, Patrick Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Varga, Tamas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, Greg W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwenzer, Birgit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pandey, Archana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kayani, Asghar N. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Hess, Wayne P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-10-16

    In this study, we explore the possibility of using plasmonic Ag nanorod arrays featuring enhanced photoemission as high-brightness photocathode material. Silver nanorod arrays are synthesized by the DC electrodeposition method and their dimensionality, uniformity, crystallinity and oxide/impurity content are characterized. These Ag nanorod arrays exhibit greatly enhanced two-photon photoemission under 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser excitation. Plasmonic field enhancement in the array produces photoemission hot spots that are mapped using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). The relative photoemission enhancement of nanorod array hot spots relative to that of a flat Ag thin film is found to range between 102 and 3 x 103.

  4. Ultra-thin layer chromatography with integrated silver colloid-based SERS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ryan A; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Simplified lab-on-a-chip techniques are desirable for quick and efficient detection of analytes of interest in the field. The following work involves the use of deterministic pillar arrays on the micro-scale as a platform to separate compounds, and the use of Ag colloid within the arrays as a source of increased signal via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). One problem traditionally seen with SERS surfaces containing Ag colloid is oxidation; however, our platforms are superhydrophobic, reducing the amount of oxidation taking place on the surface of the Ag colloid. This work includes the successful separation and SERS detection of a fluorescent dye compounds (resorufin and sulforhodamine 640), fluorescent anti-tumor drugs (Adriamycin and Daunomycin), and purine and pyrimidine bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and thymine). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Opto-thermophoretic assembly of colloidal matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Linhan; Zhang, Jianli; Peng, Xiaolei; Wu, Zilong; Coughlan, Anna C H; Mao, Zhangming; Bevan, Michael A; Zheng, Yuebing

    2017-09-01

    Colloidal matter exhibits unique collective behaviors beyond what occurs at single-nanoparticle and atomic scales. Treating colloidal particles as building blocks, researchers are exploiting new strategies to rationally organize colloidal particles into complex structures for new functions and devices. Despite tremendous progress in directed assembly and self-assembly, a truly versatile assembly technique without specific functionalization of the colloidal particles remains elusive. We develop a new strategy to assemble colloidal matter under a light-controlled temperature field, which can solve challenges in the existing assembly techniques. By adding an anionic surfactant (that is, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride), which serves as a surface charge source, a macro ion, and a micellar depletant, we generate a light-controlled thermoelectric field to manipulate colloidal atoms and a depletion attraction force to assemble the colloidal atoms into two-dimensional (2D) colloidal matter. The general applicability of this opto-thermophoretic assembly (OTA) strategy allows us to build colloidal matter of diverse colloidal sizes (from subwavelength scale to micrometer scale) and materials (polymeric, dielectric, and metallic colloids) with versatile configurations and tunable bonding strengths and lengths. We further demonstrate that the incorporation of the thermoelectric field into the optical radiation force can achieve 3D reconfiguration of the colloidal matter. The OTA strategy releases the rigorous design rules required in the existing assembly techniques and enriches the structural complexity in colloidal matter, which will open a new window of opportunities for basic research on matter organization, advanced material design, and applications.

  6. Information storage and retrieval in a single levitating colloidal particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Christopher J.; Celebrano, Michele; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2015-10-01

    The binary switch is a basic component of digital information. From phase-change alloys to nanomechanical beams, molecules and atoms, new strategies for controlled bistability hold great interest for emerging technologies. We present a generic methodology for precise and parallel spatiotemporal control of nanometre-scale matter in a fluid, and demonstrate the ability to attain digital functionalities such as switching, gating and data storage in a single colloid, with further implications for signal amplification and logic operations. This fluid-phase bit can be arrayed at high densities, manipulated by either electrical or optical fields, supports low-energy, high-speed operation and marks a first step toward ‘colloidal information’. The principle generalizes to any system where spatial perturbation of a particle elicits a differential response amenable to readout.

  7. Fabrication of Ordered Macroporous CdS and ZnS by Colloidal Crystal Template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ordered macroporous semiconductors CdS and ZnS with regular arrays of spherical pores have been fabricated by poly (styrene-acrylic) (PSA) colloidal crystal template. It was found that the exact three-dimensional (3D) structure of the template had been imprinted in the final material.

  8. Seeded growth of titania colloids with refractive index tunability and fluorophore-free luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirörs, Ahmet Faik; Jannasch, Anita; van Oostrum, Peter D J; Schäffer, Erik; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2011-03-01

    Titania is an important material in modern materials science, chemistry, and physics because of its special catalytic, electric, and optical properties. Here, we describe a novel method to synthesize colloidal particles with a crystalline titania, anatase core and an amorphous titania-shell structure. We demonstrate seeded growth of titania onto titania particles with accurate particle size tunability. The monodispersity is improved to such an extent so that colloidal crystallization of the grown microspheres becomes feasible. Furthermore, seeded growth provides separate manipulation of the core and shell. We tuned the refractive index of the amorphous shell between 1.55 and 2.3. In addition, the particles show luminescence when trace amounts of aminopropyl-triethoxysilane are incorporated into the titania matrix and are calcined at 450 °C. Our novel colloids may be useful for optical materials and technologies such as photonic crystals and optical trapping.

  9. Freezing of charged colloids in slit pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandner, Stefan; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2008-12-28

    Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical and isobaric ensembles we investigate freezing phenomena in a charged colloidal suspension confined to narrow slit pores. Our model involves only the macroions which interact via a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential supplemented by a soft-sphere potential. We focus on DLVO parameters typical for moderately charged silica particles (with charges Z approximately 35) in solvents of low ionic strengths. The corresponding DLVO interactions are too weak to drive a (bulk) freezing transition. Nevertheless, for sufficiently small surface separations L(z) the confined systems display not only layering but also significant in-plane crystalline order at chemical potentials where the bulk system is a globally stable fluid (capillary freezing). At confinement conditions related to two-layer systems the observed in-plane structures are consistent with those detected in ground state calculations for perfect Yukawa bilayers [R. Messina and H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 146101 (2003)]. Here we additionally observe (at fixed L(z)) a compression-induced first-order phase transition from a two-layer to a three-layer system with different in-plane structure, in agreement with previous findings for pure hard spheres.

  10. Colloid Release from Soil Aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  11. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental concerns such as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in groundwater and the subsurface soil. Clay colloid release is resulted from physical alteration of subsurface sediments. Despite the potential importance of clay colloid activiti es, the detailed mechanisms of release and transport of clay colloidal particles with in natural sediments are poorly understood. Pore medium structure, properties and flow dynamics, etc. are factors that affect clay colloid generation, mobilization, and subse quent transport. Possible mechanisms of clay colloid generation in the sediments in clude precipitation, erosion and mobilization by changes in pore water chemistry and clay colloid release depends on a balance of applied hydrodynamic and resisting adhesive torques and forces. The coupled role of pore water chemistry and fluid hydrodynamics thus play key roles in controlling clay colloid release and transport in the sediment s. This paper investigated clay colloidal particle release and transport, especially th e colloidal particle release mechanisms as well as the process modeling in the sediments. In this research, colloidal particle release from intact sediment columns with variable length was examined and colloidal particle release curves were simulated using an im plicit, finite-difference scheme. Colloidal particle release rate coefficient was found to be an exponential function of the sediment depth. The simulated results demonstrated that transport parameters were

  12. 用AFM研究DL-缬氨酸晶体的结构及其表面分子的排列%Surface Recognition of the Space Group and Chiral Array on DL-valine Crystalline Structure Observed by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚(龙天); 王文清; 刘虹雯; 杜世萱; 郭海明; 王业亮; 高鸿钧

    2005-01-01

    利用原子力显微镜(AFM)成像技术来观察DL-缬氨酸晶体表面分子的规则排列,研究表明对映体分子在DL-缬氨酸晶体中相互配对排列,每个晶胞单元中包含两个对映体分子,属于具有中心对称结构P1群,整个晶体是消旋的.通过原子力显微镜对DL-缬氨酸晶体表面重复单元的测量结果与X衍射数据对比,发现用AFM观察到的DL-缬氨酸晶体中分子表面形貌的规整排列的距离,同X衍射得出的三斜晶系晶胞参数数据基本一致,由此判定该晶体属于三斜晶系而不是单斜晶系.探讨了利用纳米技术的研究手段在分子水平研究生命起源中的手性问题,在确定的晶面上通过分子周期性结构排列规律,对DL-缬氨酸晶体表面分子进行手性识别.%Atomic force microscopy(AFM) has been used to image arrays of molecules at the surface of DL-valine crystals. AFM images of DL-valine show that D- and L- molecular pairs formed from a DL-racemic mixture are exclusively homochiral. There are two different conclusions about the crystal structure of DL-valine with the data of X-ray crystallography. First, the structure of DL-valine was solved in the monoclinic space group P21/c. Second, the crystal structure of DL-valine has been refined in the centrosymmetric space group P1 and indicated a triclinic rather than a monoclinic space group. The present work emphasizes to solve the contradicting observations of space group and to provide direct evidence for chiral recognition at molecular level. DL-valine molecules {001 } are all in zwitterionic form with the isopropyl groups close to the surface and methyl groups on the top site, showing an ordered molecular morphology of triclinic unit cells, which are in fair agreement with the X-ray diffraction data. The application of AFM to the investigation of protein' s origins and a molecular-level illustration of chiral recognition at a periodic 2D surface structure ofracemic crystals is discussed.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Supramolecular Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Neus; De Feijter, Isja; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-04-22

    Control over colloidal assembly is of utmost importance for the development of functional colloidal materials with tailored structural and mechanical properties for applications in photonics, drug delivery and coating technology. Here we present a new family of colloidal building blocks, coined supramolecular colloids, whose self-assembly is controlled through surface-functionalization with a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derived supramolecular moiety. Such BTAs interact via directional, strong, yet reversible hydrogen-bonds with other identical BTAs. Herein, a protocol is presented that describes how to couple these BTAs to colloids and how to quantify the number of coupling sites, which determines the multivalency of the supramolecular colloids. Light scattering measurements show that the refractive index of the colloids is almost matched with that of the solvent, which strongly reduces the van der Waals forces between the colloids. Before photo-activation, the colloids remain well dispersed, as the BTAs are equipped with a photo-labile group that blocks the formation of hydrogen-bonds. Controlled deprotection with UV-light activates the short-range hydrogen-bonds between the BTAs, which triggers the colloidal self-assembly. The evolution from the dispersed state to the clustered state is monitored by confocal microscopy. These results are further quantified by image analysis with simple routines using ImageJ and Matlab. This merger of supramolecular chemistry and colloidal science offers a direct route towards light- and thermo-responsive colloidal assembly encoded in the surface-grafted monolayer.

  14. Colloidal gelation of oppositely charged particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russel, E.; Sprakel, J.H.B.; Kodger, T.E.; Weitz, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal gelation has been extensively studied for the case of purely attractive systems, but little is understood about how colloidal gelation is affected by the presence of repulsive interactions. Here we demonstrate the gelation of a binary system of oppositely charged colloids, in which repulsi

  15. Pu Sorption, Desorption and Intrinsic Colloid Stability under Granitic Chemical Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Pihong [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Zurong [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-04

    This progress report (M4FT-14LL0807031) describes research conducted at LLNL as part of the Crystalline Repository effort within the UFD program. Part I describes the dissolution kinetics of intrinsic Pu colloids synthesized in an alkaline solution. Part II describes the morphology and dissolution characteristics of various forms of Pu oxides prepared over a range of solution and temperature conditions. Proposed FY15 activities are identified.

  16. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought. PMID:28112152

  17. Crystalline mesoporous metal oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo Yue; Wuzong Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of many types of mesoporous silicas, such as SBA-15, KIT-6, FDU-12 and SBA-16, porous crystalline transition metal oxides, such as Cr2O3, Co3O4, In2O3, NiO, CeO2, WO3, Fe2O3 and MnO2, have been synthesized using the mesoporous silicas as hard templates. Several synthetic methods have been developed. These new porous materials have high potential applications in catalysis, Li-ion rechargeable batteries and gas sensors. This article gives a brief review of the research of porous crystals of metal oxides in the last four years.

  18. Bonding assembled colloids without loss of colloidal stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vutukuri, H.R.; Stiefelhagen, J.C.P.; Vissers, T; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the diversity of self-assembled colloidal structures has strongly increased, as it is fueled by a wide range of applications in materials science and also in soft condensed-matter physics.[1–4] Some potential applications include photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, materials for plasmon

  19. Colloids and Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  20. Dry Powder Precursors of Cubic Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles (cubosomes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Patrick T.; Small, William B.; Small, William B.; Lynch, Matthew L.; Burns, Janet L.

    2002-08-01

    Cubosomes are dispersed nanostructured particles of cubic phase liquid crystal that have stimulated significant research interest because of their potential for application in controlled-release and drug delivery. Despite the interest, cubosomes can be difficult to fabricate and stabilize with current methods. Most of the current work is limited to liquid phase processes involving high shear dispersion of bulk cubic liquid crystalline material into sub-micron particles, limiting application flexibility. In this work, two types of dry powder cubosome precursors are produced by spray-drying: (1) starch-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying a dispersion of cubic liquid crystalline particles in an aqueous starch solution and (2) dextran-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying an emulsion formed by the ethanol-dextran-monoolein-water system. The encapsulants are used to decrease powder cohesion during drying and to act as a soluble colloidal stabilizer upon hydration of the powders. Both powders are shown to form (on average) 0.6 μm colloidally-stable cubosomes upon addition to water. However, the starch powders have a broader particle size distribution than the dextran powders because of the relative ease of spraying emulsions versus dispersions. The developed processes enable the production of nanostructured cubosomes by end-users rather than just specialized researchers and allow tailoring of the surface state of the cubosomes for broader application.

  1. 3-D patterning of silicon by laser-initiated, liquid-assisted colloidal (LILAC) lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmeanu, M; Grubb, M P; Jipa, F; Quignon, B; Ashfold, M N R

    2015-06-01

    We report a comprehensive study of laser-initiated, liquid-assisted colloidal (LILAC) lithography, and illustrate its utility in patterning silicon substrates. The method combines single shot laser irradiation (frequency doubled Ti-sapphire laser, 50fs pulse duration, 400nm wavelength) and medium-tuned optical near-field effects around arrays of silica colloidal particles to achieve 3-D surface patterning of silicon. A monolayer (or multilayers) of hexagonal close packed silica colloidal particles act as a mask and offer a route to liquid-tuned optical near field enhancement effects. The resulting patterns are shown to depend on the difference in refractive index of the colloidal particles (ncolloid) and the liquid (nliquid) in which they are immersed. Two different topographies are demonstrated experimentally: (a) arrays of bumps, centred beneath the original colloidal particles, when using liquids with nliquidncolloid - and explained with the aid of complementary Mie scattering simulations. The LILAC lithography technique has potential for rapid, large area, organized 3-D patterning of silicon (and related) substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A short textbook of colloid chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Jirgensons, B

    1962-01-01

    A Short Textbook of Colloid Chemistry, Second Revised Edition details the factual aspect of colloid chemistry that includes the basic facts, established empirical and mathematical relationships, and practical applications. The chapters of the title are organized into two parts. In the first part, the text discusses the general concepts of colloid chemistry, such as the history and scope, basic terms, and basic methods in experiment with colloids. Part Two covers the technical aspect of colloid chemistry, such as the optical properties, electrical properties, and viscosity. The book will be of

  3. Supramolecular perspectives in colloid science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry puts emphasis on molecular assemblies held together by non-covalent bonds. As such, it is very close in spirit to colloid science which also focuses on objects which are small, but beyond the molecular scale, and for which other forces than covalent bonds are crucial. We dis

  4. Colloidal aspects of texture perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    The perception of complex textures in food is strongly related to the way food is processed during eating, and is modulated by other basic characteristics, such as taste and aroma. An understanding at the colloidal level of the basic processes in the mouth is essential in order to link the compositi

  5. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-03-01

    Solar cells based on solution-processed semiconductor nanoparticles -- colloidal quantum dots -- have seen rapid advances in recent years. By offering full-spectrum solar harvesting, these cells are poised to address the urgent need for low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  6. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  7. Proteolytic stability in colloidal systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maste, M.C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes in liquid detergents suffer from lack of stability in the sense that activity diminishes with time. Although the phenomenon could be attributed to several factors, the influence of colloidal surfaces on the enzymatic stability was investigated. Besides the types of surfaces that

  8. Multiple Colors Output on Voile through 3D Colloidal Crystals with Robust Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yao; Tang, Bingtao; Ju, Benzhi; Wu, Suli; Zhang, Shufen

    2017-01-25

    Distinguished from the chromatic mechanism of dyes and pigments, structural color is derived from physical interactions of visible light with structures that are periodic at the scale of the wavelength of light. Using colloidal crystals with coloring functions for fabrics has resulted in significant improvements compared with chemical colors because the structural color from colloidal crystals bears many unique and fascinating optical properties, such as vivid iridescence and nonphotobleaching. However, the poor mechanical performance of the structural color films cannot meet actual requirements because of the weak point contact of colloidal crystal particles. Herein, we demonstrate in this study the patterning on voile fabrics with high mechanical strength on account of the periodic array lock effect of polymers, and multiple structural color output was simultaneously achieved by a simple two-phase self-assembly method for printing voile fabrics with 3D colloidal crystals. The colored voile fabrics exhibit high color saturation, good mechanical stability, and multiple-color patterns printable. In addition, colloidal crystals are promising potential substitutes for organic dyes and pigments because colloidal crystals are environmentally friendly.

  9. Enhanced colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borum, La Rhonda Terese

    Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2 is the most thermodynamically stable calcium phosphate in physiological environments. Hence, it is the main inorganic mineral found in bone and teeth. Its colloidal stability, however, is poor because hydroxyapatite (HAp) particles exhibit sediment formation upon standing at short time periods, where agglomerates form and lead to non-homogeneous suspensions. Surface modification is a promising method to tailor the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite for biomaterial applications. Three techniques to modify the HAp surface and enhance the colloidal stability of HAp were investigated. Modified particles were characterized by methods sensitive to surface chemistry changes, such as sedimentation studies, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and electrophoresis. Sedimentation studies demonstrated how effective each technique was in improving the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite particles. Electrophoresis provided information on electrostatic interactions within each system. The first technique entailed an esterification reaction of the HAp surface with dodecyl alcohol at elevated temperatures. DRIFT results showed that dodecyl groups from the alcohol replaced acidic hydroxyl and phosphate sites on the HAp surface, giving rise to enhanced colloidal stability through steric interactions in ethanol suspensions. TGA curves gave insight to the degree of esterification for the esterified particles. Higher reaction temperatures give rise to a higher degree of esterification resulting in better colloidal stability. The second technique applied a silica coating on the HAp surface by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol. Silica was coated onto the HAp surface at 5--75 wt% loading amounts. A combination of acid dissolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), along with BET showed that the silica coating is complete at 50 wt% silica loading. The silica coating

  10. Life at ultralow interfacial tension: Wetting, waves and droplets in demixed colloid-polymer mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; de Villeneuve, V.W.A.; de Folter, J.W.J.; Schmidt, M.; Hennequin, Y.; Bonn, D.; Indekeu, J.O.; Aarts, D.G.A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Mixtures of colloids and polymers display a rich phase behavior, involving colloidal gas (rich in polymer, poor in colloid), colloidal liquid (poor in polymer, rich in colloid) and colloidal crystal phases (poor in polymer, highly ordered colloids). Recently, the colloidal gas-colloidal liquid inter

  11. Life at ultralow interfacial tension: wetting, waves and droplets in demixed colloid-polymer mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; de Villeneuve, V.W.A.; de Folter, J.W.J.; Schmidt, M.; Hennequin, Y.; Bonn, D.; Indekeu, J.O.; Aarts, D.G.A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Mixtures of colloids and polymers display a rich phase behavior, involving colloidal gas (rich in polymer, poor in colloid), colloidal liquid (poor in polymer, rich in colloid) and colloidal crystal phases (poor in polymer, highly ordered colloids). Recently, the colloidal gas-colloidal liquid inter

  12. Showing particles their place: deterministic colloid immobilization by gold nanomeshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelling, Christian; Mark, Andreas; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus

    2016-07-01

    highly site-selective trapping of the negatively charged polystyrene particles from the liquid phase. AFM force spectroscopy with a polystyrene colloidal probe was used to rationalize this electrostatic focusing effect. It provides quantitative access to the occurring interaction forces between the particle and substrate surface and clarifies the role of the pH during the immobilization process. Furthermore, the structure of the non-close packed colloidal monolayers can be finely tuned by varying the ionic strength and geometric parameters between colloidal particles and nanomesh. Therefore one is able to specifically and selectively adsorb one or several particles into one individual nanohole. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Photos and optical microscopy images, correlative optical and electron microscopy, low magnification SEM images, SEM images of adsorbed PMMA particles as well as 320 nm particles immobilized at pH 3 and pH 12, SEM images of particles assembled on hole arrays with variable center-to-center distances, radial distribution functions of 320 nm particles adsorbed at pH 3 and variable ionic strengths, video of particles assembled under the confocal laser scanning microscope at different pH values, zeta potential measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03113g

  13. Stabilized super-thermite colloids: A new generation of advanced highly energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif; Gaber Zaky, M.; Radwan, Mostafa; Mostafa, Sherif F.

    2017-10-01

    One of the great impetus of nanotechnology on energetic materials is the achievement of nanothermites (metal-oxide/metal) which are characterized by massive heat output. Yet, full exploitation of super-thermites in highly energetic systems has not been achieved. This manuscript reports on the sustainable fabrication of colloidal Fe2O3 and CuO nanoparticles for thermite applications. TEM micrographs demonstrated mono-dispersed Fe2O3 and CuO with an average particle size of 3 and 15 nm respectively. XRD diffractograms demonstrated highly crystalline materials. SEM micrographs demonstrated a great tendency of the developed oxides to aggregate over drying process. The effective integration and dispersion of mono-dispersed colloidal thermite particles into energetic systems are vital for enhanced performance. Aluminum is of interest as highly energetic metal fuel. In this paper, synthesized Fe2O3 and CuO nanoparticles were re-dispersed in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with aluminum nanoparticles using ultrasonic prope homogenizer. The colloidal thermite peraticles can be intgegrated into highly energetic system for subsequent nanocomposite development. Thanks to stabilization of colloidal CuO nanoparticles in IPA which could offer intimate mixing between oxidizer and metal fuel. The stabilization mechanism of CuO in IPA was correlated to steric stabilization with solvent molecules. This approach eliminated nanoparticle drying and the re-dispersion of dry aggregates into energetic materials. This manuscript shaded the light on the real development of colloidal thermite mixtures and their integration into highly energetic systems.

  14. Synthesis of transparent aqueous sols of colloidal layered niobate nanocrystals at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Shogo; Ohya, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    Transparent aqueous sols of colloidal tetramethylammonium niobate nanocrystals were synthesized by mixing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH), niobium ethoxide, and water at TMAOH/Nb≥0.7 at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the thin films prepared by evaporating the colloidal solutions on a glass substrate indicated that the colloidal niobate had a layered crystalline structure. Two types of layered structures are known as a layered niobate, i.e. M(4)Nb(6)O(17)·nH(2)O and MNb(3)O(8) (M=H, H(3)O, or alkaline metal). Raman spectra and electron diffraction suggested that the niobate nanocrystals were similar in crystal structure to M(4)Nb(6)O(17)·nH(2)O compounds. Moreover, when niobium oxide thin films were fabricated from the niobate colloidal solutions by the sol-gel method, oriented T-Nb(2)O(5) thin films, whose c-axis was parallel to the substrate surface, were obtained. The orientation of the thin films was probably attributed to the layered structure of the colloidal niobate nanocrystals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Liquid crystalline order in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Blumstein, Alexandre

    1978-01-01

    Liquid Crystalline Order in Polymers examines the topic of liquid crystalline order in systems containing rigid synthetic macromolecular chains. Each chapter of the book provides a review of one important area of the field. Chapter 1 discusses scattering in polymer systems with liquid crystalline order. It also introduces the field of liquid crystals. Chapter 2 treats the origin of liquid crystalline order in macromolecules by describing the in-depth study of conformation of such macromolecules in their unassociated state. The chapters that follow describe successively the liquid crystalli

  16. Transitions between imperfectly ordered crystalline structures: A phase switch Monte Carlo study

    OpenAIRE

    Wilms, Dorothea; Wilding, Nigel B.; Binder, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    A model for two-dimensional colloids confined laterally by "structured boundaries" (i.e., ones that impose a periodicity along the slit) is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. When the distance D between the confining walls is reduced at constant particle number from an initial value D_0, for which a crystalline structure commensurate with the imposed periodicity fits, to smaller values, a succession of phase transitions to imperfectly ordered structures occur. These structures have a reduced...

  17. Aerosol-Assisted Synthesis of Monodisperse Single-Crystalline α-Cristobalite Nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xingmao; Bao, Lihong; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Dunphy, Darren R.; Li, Xiaodong; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse single-crystalline α-cristobalite nanospheres have been synthesized by hydrocarbon-pyrolysis-induced carbon deposition on amorphous silica aerosol nanoparticles, devitrification of the coated silica at high temperature, and subsequent carbon removal by oxidation. The nanosphere size can be well controlled by tuning the size of the colloidal silica precursor. Uniform, high-purity nanocrystalline α-cristobalite is important for catalysis, nanocomposites, advanced polishing, and und...

  18. Chemical Routes to Colloidal Chalcogenide Nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaak, Raymond

    2015-02-19

    This project sought to develop new low-temperature synthetic pathways to intermetallic and chalcogenide nanostructures and powders, with an emphasis on systems that are relevant to advancing the synthesis, processing, and discovery of superconducting materials. The primary synthetic routes involved solution chemistry methods, and several fundamental synthetic challenges that underpinned the formation of these materials were identified and investigated. Methods for incorporating early transition metals and post transition metals into nanoscale and bulk crystals using low-temperature solution chemistry methods were developed and studied, leading to colloidal nanocrystals of elemental indium, manganese, and germanium, as well as nanocrystalline and bulk intermetallic compounds containing germanium, gallium, tin, indium, zinc, bismuth, and lithium. New chemical tools were developed to help target desired phases in complex binary intermetallic and metal chalcogenide systems that contain multiple stable phases, including direct synthesis methods and chemical routes that permit post-synthetic modification. Several phases that are metastable in bulk systems were targeted, synthesized, and characterized as nanocrystalline solids and bulk powders, including the L12-type intermetallic compounds Au3Fe, Au3Ni, and Au3Co, as well as wurtzite-type MnSe. Methods for accessing crystalline metal borides and carbides using direct solution chemistry methods were also developed, with an emphasis on Ni3B and Ni3C, which revealed useful correlations of composition and magnetic properties. Methods for scale-up and nanoparticle purification were explored, providing access to centimeter-scale pressed pellets of polyol-synthesized nanopowders and a bacteriophage-mediated method for separating impure nanoparticle mixtures into their components. Several advances were made in the synthesis of iron selenide and related superconducting materials, including the production of colloidal Fe

  19. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  20. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  1. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute-solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute-solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  2. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-01

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  3. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  4. COLD DRAWING IN CRYSTALLINE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    alcohols, phenol) in Nylon 6 produced changes in the crystalline structure as well as plasticizer action; these two effects must therefore be carefully...distinguished. Changes in the crystalline structure were followed by changes in the infrared spectrum. Dynamic mechanical and thermogravimetric analysis

  5. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  6. Crystalline Bioceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A strong interest in the use of ceramics for biomedical engineering applications developed in the late 1960´s. Used initially as alternatives to metallic materials in order to increase the biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics; bioactive or surface reactive bioceramics and bioresorbable ceramics. This review will only refer to bioceramics “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials constituted for nonmetallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidated by thermal treatments of powders to high temperatures. Leaving bioglasses, glass-ceramics and biocements apart, since, although all of them are obtained by thermal treatments to high temperatures, the first are amorphous, the second are obtained by desvitrification of a glass and in them vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases and the third are consolidated by means of a hydraulic or chemical reaction to room temperature. A review of the composition, physiochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of crystalline bioceramics is given, based on the literature data and on the own experience of the authors.

    A finales de los años sesenta se despertó un gran interés por el uso de los materiales cerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. Inicialmente utilizados como una alternativa a los materiales metálicos, con el propósito de incrementar la biocompatibilidad de los implantes, las biocerámicas se han convertido en una clase diversa de biomateriales, incluyendo actualmente tres tipos: cerámicas cuasi inertes; cerámicas bioactivas o reactivas superficialmente y cerámicas reabsorbibles o biodegradables. En la presente revisión se hace referencia a las biocerámicas en sentido estricto, es decir, a aquellos materiales constitutitos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados

  7. Colloidal quantum dot materials for infrared optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Ebuka S.; Nyirjesy, Gabrielle; Cheng, Yan; Palmquist, Nathan; Thon, Susanna M.

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are an attractive material for optoelectronic applications because they combine flexible, low-cost solution-phase synthesis and processing with the potential for novel functionality arising from their nanostructure. Specifically, the bandgap of films composed of arrays of CQDs can be tuned via the quantum confinement effect for tailored spectral utilization. PbS-based CQDs can be tuned throughout the near and mid-infrared wavelengths and are a promising materials system for photovoltaic devices that harvest non-visible solar radiation. The performance of CQD solar cells is currently limited by an absorption-extraction compromise, whereby photon absorption lengths in the near infrared spectral regime exceed minority carrier diffusion lengths in the bulk films. Several light trapping strategies for overcoming this compromise and increasing the efficiency of infrared energy harvesting will be reviewed. A thin-film interference technique for creating multi-colored and transparent solar cells will be presented, and a discussion of designing plasmonic nanomaterials based on earth-abundant materials for integration into CQD solar cells is developed. The results indicate that it should be possible to achieve high absorption and color-tunability in a scalable nanomaterials system.

  8. Perspective: The Asakura Oosawa model: A colloid prototype for bulk and interfacial phase behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Statt, Antonia [Graduate School of Excellence Material Science in Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-10-14

    In many colloidal suspensions, the micrometer-sized particles behave like hard spheres, but when non-adsorbing polymers are added to the solution a depletion attraction (of entropic origin) is created. Since 60 years the Asakura-Oosawa model, which simply describes the polymers as ideal soft spheres, is an archetypical description for the statistical thermodynamics of such systems, accounting for many features of real colloid-polymer mixtures very well. While the fugacity of the polymers (which controls their concentration in the solution) plays a role like inverse temperature, the size ratio of polymer versus colloid radii acts as a control parameter to modify the phase diagram: when this ratio is large enough, a vapor-liquid like phase separation occurs at low enough colloid packing fractions, up to a triple point where a liquid-solid two-phase coexistence region takes over. For smaller size ratios, the critical point of the phase separation and the triple point merge, resulting in a single two-phase coexistence region between fluid and crystalline phases (of “inverted swan neck”-topology, with possibly a hidden metastable phase separation). Furthermore, liquid-crystalline ordering may be found if colloidal particles of non-spherical shape (e.g., rod like) are considered. Also interactions of the particles with solid surfaces should be tunable (e.g., walls coated by polymer brushes), and interfacial phenomena are particularly interesting experimentally, since fluctuations can be studied in the microscope on all length scales, down to the particle level. Due to its simplicity this model has become a workhorse for both analytical theory and computer simulation. Recently, generalizations addressing dynamic phenomena (phase separation, crystal nucleation, etc.) have become the focus of studies.

  9. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Cihan Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2014-01-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming whe...

  10. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  11. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  12. Implant materials modified by colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zboromirska-Wnukiewicz Beata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in general medicine led to the development of biomaterials. Implant material should be characterized by a high biocompatibility to the tissue and appropriate functionality, i.e. to have high mechanical and electrical strength and be stable in an electrolyte environment – these are the most important properties of bioceramic materials. Considerations of biomaterials design embrace also electrical properties occurring on the implant-body fluid interface and consequently the electrokinetic potential, which can be altered by modifying the surface of the implant. In this work, the surface of the implants was modified to decrease the risk of infection by using metal colloids. Nanocolloids were obtained using different chemical and electrical methods. It was found that the colloids obtained by physical and electrical methods are more stable than colloids obtained by chemical route. In this work the surface of modified corundum implants was investigated. The implant modified by nanosilver, obtained by electrical method was selected. The in vivo research on animals was carried out. Clinical observations showed that the implants with modified surface could be applied to wounds caused by atherosclerotic skeleton, for curing the chronic and bacterial inflammations as well as for skeletal reconstruction surgery.

  13. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-24

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle-light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd's mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  14. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A.; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle–light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd’s mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  15. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J

    2015-06-16

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids.

  16. Janus Nematic Colloids with Designable Valence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Čopar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Janus nematic colloids based on various morphologies of particle surface patches imposing homeotropic and planar surface anchoring are demonstrated. By using mesoscopic numerical modeling, multiple types of Janus particles are explored, demonstrating a variety of novel complex colloidal structures. We also show binding of Janus particles to a fixed Janus post in the nematic cell, which acts as a seed and a micro-anchor for the colloidal structure. Janus colloidal structures reveal diverse topological defect configurations, which are effectively combinations of surface boojum and bulk defects. Topological analysis is applied to defects, importantly showing that topological charge is not a well determined topological invariant in such patchy nematic Janus colloids. Finally, this work demonstrates colloidal structures with designable valence, which could allow for targeted and valence-conditioned self-assembly at micro- and nano-scale.

  17. Orientational defects near colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, James J; Zhou, Chixing

    2004-01-01

    We study the interaction between a surface-anchoring colloidal particle and a liquid-crystalline host, and in particular the formation of orientational defects near the particle. A mean-field theory based on the nonlocal Marrucci-Greco nematic potential is used to represent molecular interactions in an inhomogeneous orientational field. An evolution equation for the molecular configuration tensor is solved numerically whose steady state minimizes the total free energy of the system. With strong homeotropic anchoring on the particle surface, three types of solutions may appear depending on initial conditions and particle size: Saturn rings, satellite point defects, and polar rings. The Saturn ring remains stable on micrometer-sized particles, contrary to previous calculations but consistent with experiments. A phase diagram is constructed for the three regimes. Based on the free energy, the most stable state is the Saturn ring for smaller particles and the satellite defect for larger ones.

  18. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Chen; Yue Niu; Boya Wang; Kamal Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental conce...

  19. Thermophoresis of colloids by mesoscale simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüsebrink, Daniel; Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol

    2012-07-18

    The motion of a colloid induced by a temperature gradient is simulated by means of multiparticle collision dynamics, a mesoscale simulation technique. Two algorithms to quantify the thermophoretic behavior are employed and contrasted. The validity of the methods is verified as a function of the temperature gradient, system size, and algorithm parameters. The variation of the solvent-colloid interaction from attractive to purely repulsive interestingly results in the change of the colloid behavior from thermophobic to thermophilic.

  20. Colloidal quantum dots: synthesis, properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichkin, S. B.; Razumov, V. F.

    2016-12-01

    Key recent results obtained in studies of a new class of luminophores, colloidal quantum dots, are analyzed. Modern methods for the synthesis and post-synthetic treatment of colloidal quantum dots that make it possible to achieve record high quantum yield of luminescence and to modify their characteristics for specific applications are considered. Currently important avenues of research on colloidal quantum dots and the problems in and prospects for their practical applications in various fields are discussed. The bibliography includes 272 references.

  1. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  2. Achieving micelle control through core crystallinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavas, Lidija; Olsén, Peter; Odelius, Karin; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2013-11-11

    We have designed a pathway for controlling the critical micelle concentration and micelle size of polyester-based systems. This was achieved by creating an array of different copolymers with semicrystalline or amorphous hydrophobic blocks. The hydrophobic block was constructed through ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone, L-lactide, and ε-decalactone, either as homopolymers or random copolymers, using PEG as both the initiator and the hydrophilic block. Micelles formed with amorphous cores exhibited considerably higher critical micelle concentrations than those with semicrystalline cores. Micelles with amorphous cores also became larger in size with an increased molecular weight of the hydrophobic bock, in contrast to micelles with semicrystalline cores, which displayed the opposite behavior. Hence, core crystallinity was found to be a potent tool for tailoring micelle properties and thereby facilitating the optimization of drug delivery systems. The introduction of PEG-PεDL also proved to be a valuable asset in the tuning of micelle properties.

  3. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  4. Collective motion in populations of colloidal bots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Denis

    One of the origins of active matter physics was the idea that flocks, herds, swarms and shoals could be quantitatively described as emergent ordered phases in self-driven materials. From a somehow dual perspective, I will show how to engineer active materials our of colloidal flocks. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal bots display a non-equilibrium transition toward collective motion. A special attention will be paid to the robustness of the resulting colloidal flocks with respect to geometrical frustration and to quenched disorder.

  5. Depinning transition and 2D superlubricity in incommensurate colloidal monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Davide; Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-03-01

    Colloidal monolayers sliding over periodic corrugated potential are highly tunable systems allowing to visualize the dynamics between crystalline surfaces. Based on molecular dynamics, Vanossi and coworkers reproduced the main experimental results and explored the potential impact of colloid sliding in nanotribology. The degree of interface commensurability was found to play a major role in determining the frictional properties, the static friction force Fs becoming vanishingly small in incommensurate geometries for weak corrugation U0.Lead by this result,here we systematically investigate the possibility to observe a 2D Aubry-like transition from a superlubric state to a pinned state for increasing U0. By using a reliable protocol, we generate annealed configurations at different values of U0 for an underdense monolayer. We find Fs to be vanishingly small up to a critical corrugation Uc coinciding with an abrupt structural transition in the ground state configuration. Similarly to what is observed in the Frenkel Kontorova model,this transition is characterized by a significant decrease in the number of particles sampling regions near the maxima of the substrate potential. Research partly sponsored by Sinergia Project CRSII2 136287-1 and ERC 2012ADG320796 MODPHYSFRICT.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Bietti crystalline dystrophy Bietti crystalline dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a disorder in which numerous ...

  7. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Crystalline and Non-Crystalline Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parrott, Edward P. J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy of crystalline and non-crystalline solids is probably one of the most active research fields within the terahertz community. Many potential applications, amongst which spectral recognition is probably one of the most prominent, have significantly stimulated the development...... selected examples, the potential the technique holds for various different applications. A particular focus will be given to data analysis and, in particular, how we may account for effects resulting from non-ideal sample preparation....

  8. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material\\'s luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon. This journal is

  9. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  10. Improved efficiency for nanopillar array of c-Si photovoltaic by down-conversion and anti-reflection of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-chung; Chen, Hsin-Chu; Han, Hau-Vei; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Chang, Chia-Hua; Tsai, Min-An; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Yu, Peichen

    2012-02-01

    Improvement of efficiency for crystalline silicon (c-Si) with nanopillar arrays (NPAs) solar cell was demonstrated by deployment of CdS quantum dots (QDs). The NPAs was fabricated by colloidal lithography of self-assembled polystyrene (PS) nanospheres with a 600 nm in size and reactive-ion etching techniques, and then a colloidal CdS QDs with a concentration of 5 mg/mL was spun on the surface of c-Si with NPAs solar cell. Under a simulated one-sun condition, the device with CdS QDs shows a 33% improvement of power conversion efficiency, compared with the one without QDs. Additionally, we also found that the device with CdS QDs shows a 32% reduction in electrical resistance, compared with the one without QDs solar cell, under an ultraviolet (UV) light of 355nm illumination. This reduced electrical resistance can directly contribute to our fill-factor (FF) enhancement. For further investigation, the excitation spectrum of photoluminescence (PL), absorbance spectrum, current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, reflectance and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the device were measured and analyzed. Based on the spectral response and optical measurement, we believe that CdS QDs not only have the capability for photon down-conversion in ultraviolet region, but also provide extra antireflection capability.

  11. Synthesis and Analytical Centrifugation of Magnetic Model Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Luigjes, B.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the preparation and thermodynamic properties of magnetic colloids. First, two types of magnetic model colloids are investigated: composite colloids and single-domain nanoparticles. Thermodynamics of magnetic colloids is studied using analytical centrifugation, including a specially adapted centrifuge for measuring heavy and strongly light absorbing colloids. Magnetic composite colloids can be prepared from thermodynamically stable Pickering emulsions of 3-methacrylox...

  12. Luminescence properties of II/VI semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals at collective and single scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vion, Celine; Barthou, Carlos; Coolen, Laurent; Bennaloul, Paul; MaItre, Agnes [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Unite Mixte de Recherche-CNRS 7588, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Vu Duc Chinh; Pham Thuy Linh; Vu Thi Bich; Pham Thu Nga [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)], E-mail: celine.vion@insp.jussieu.fr

    2009-09-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals are crystalline spheres of semiconductors of a few nanometers, obtained by chemical synthesis. At this size scale, lower than Bohr radius of the exciton, emission properties are dominated by quantum confinement effects and depend crucially on the nanocrystal radius, which can be controlled by adjusting the synthesis parameters. Nanocrystals present high photostability and good quantum efficiency, even at room temperature. Their emission wavelength can be tuned over the whole visible range, making them very attractive solid state light sources which are already used in optoelectronic devices or for biological labeling. The luminescence properties of CdSe colloidal nanocrystals synthesized at the Institute of Materials Science in Hanoi are presented. At collective scale, the emission properties reveal the synthesis quality. Temperature effects from ambient to 4 K on spectra and decay rates will be presented and analyzed in terms of emitting level fine structure. The study of CdSe colloidal quantum dots at the single emitter scale is of great interest as it reveals properties which are hidden by collective studies, such as luminescence 'blinking', a random switching from a fluorescent to a non fluorescent state, which is closely related to the crystalline defects of a nanocrystal and its interaction with its environment. We will present the blinking properties of the prepared nanocrystals, and relate them to the nanocrystals synthesis quality and shell quality.

  13. Amorphization of Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline ice by irradiation in the 10-50 K temperature range with 5 keV electrons at a dose of ~140 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. Our experiments showed that some of the 1.65-micrometer band survived the irradiation, to a degree that depends on the temperature, demonstrating that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. At 50 K, recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most known objects in the solar system, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites, and Kuiper belt objects, are equal to or above 50 K, this might explain why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

  14. Liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the recent developments in the field of liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes. The role of trivalent lanthanide ions as the central metal ion in metallomesogens is considered. An outlook for the future is given.

  15. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.

    2012-01-01

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso-

  16. Fabricating colloidal crystals and construction of ordered nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColloidal crystals of polymeric or inorganic microspheres are of extensive interest due to their potential applications in such as sensing, optics, photonic bandgap and surface patterning. The article highlights a set of approaches developed in our group, which are efficient to prepare colloidal crystals with ordered voids, patterned colloidal crystals on non-planar surfaces, heterogeneous colloidal crystals of different building blocks, colloidal crystals composed of non-spherical polyhedrons, and colloidal crystals of non-close-packed colloidal microspheres in particular. The use of these colloidal crystals as templates for different microstructures range from nanoscale to micron-scale is also summarized.

  17. Characterisation and Treatment of Nano-sized Particles, Colloids and Associated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Stormwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine

    Stormwater from urban areas contains a vast array of different pollutants, including particulate matter and organic and inorganic compounds as well as microbial pollution. These compounds can be found associated with particulate matter, colloids and nano-sized particles in stormwater. The associa......Stormwater from urban areas contains a vast array of different pollutants, including particulate matter and organic and inorganic compounds as well as microbial pollution. These compounds can be found associated with particulate matter, colloids and nano-sized particles in stormwater....... The associated pollutants will, if not removed in stormwater treatment facilities, be discharged into receiving surface waters, due to enhanced transportation exerted by the colloids and nano-sized particles. More stormwater than previously is separated from wastewater and drained to stormwater treatment.......Since little is known about the colloids and nano-sized particle-enhanced transportation of pollutants in stormwater, it has been difficult to determine their quantitative role in the total release of pollutants into receiving waters.Therefore the main purpose of this thesis has been to document the presence...

  18. Table-top deterministic and collective colloidal assembly using videoprojector lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, J. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Zelsmann, M., E-mail: marc.zelsmann@cea.fr [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Honegger, T. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Picard, E.; Hadji, E. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Peyrade, D. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Micrometric resolution substrates are made at low cost using a videoprojector. • Fabricated patterns could be used as substrates for capillary force assembly. • Arrays of organized particles are made using a table-top capillary assembly tool. • This process offers a new bridge between the colloidal domain and the chip world. - Abstract: In the field of micro- and nanotechnology, most lithography and fabrication tools coming from the microelectronic industry are expensive, time-consuming and may need some masks that have to be subcontracted. Such approach is not suitable for other fields that require rapid prototyping such as chemistry, life science or energy and may hinder research creativity. In this work, we present two table-top equipments dedicated to the fabrication of deterministic colloidal particles assemblies onto micro-structured substrates. We show that, with a limited modification of the optics of a standard videoprojector, it is possible to quickly obtain substrates with thousands of micrometric features. Then, we combine these substrates with thermodynamic colloidal assembly and generate arrays of particles without defects. This work opens the way to a simple and table-top fabrication of devices based on colloidal particles.

  19. Yolk/Shell Colloidal Crystals Incorporating Movable Cores with Their Motion Controlled by an External Electric Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K., Watanabe,; H., Ishii,; Konno, M.; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.; Nagao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Yolk/shell particles composed of a submicrometer-sized movable core and a silica shell are promising building blocks for novel optical colloidal crystals, because the locations of cores in the shell compartment can be reversibly changed by using external stimuli. Two dimensional arrays of yolk/shell

  20. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Field Emission Performance of Single Crystalline TiO2 Nanowires Bundle Arrays%单晶TiO2纳米线束阵列的水热合成及场发射性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛增娴; 刘俊; 魏爱香; 赵旺

    2011-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-crystalline TiO2 nanowire bundles array were synthesized on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by hydrothermal method using tetrabutyl titanate and hydrochloric acid as precursors. The nanowire bundles have flat tetragonal crystallographic planes with the section of 100-200 nm and the length of 3 μm. HRTEM indicate that each nanowire bundle is composed of 20-40 tiny nanowires. The tiny nanowires have the diameter of 4-6 nm. Field emission results of the TiO2 nanowire bundles show a turn-on field of 5.7 V/μm at a current density of 10 μA/cm2. The threshold field is 9.5 V/μm. The emission current is relatively stable. The low synthesis temperature and good field emission performance show that the TiO2 nanowire bundles have good potential apphcation in field emission cold cathode device.%采用水热合成技术,以钛酸丁酯、盐酸和去离子水作为前驱物,在透明导电玻璃(FTO)衬底上合成了垂直于衬底牛长的二氧化钛(TiO2)纳米线束阵列.纳米线束呈四方柱状结构,宽度100~200nm,长度约3μm.HRTEM表明每根纳米线束实际上是由20~40根直径约为4~6 nm的细小纳米线聚集在一起而形成的.系统研究了盐酸浓度对纳米线生长的影响,分析了盐酸在晶体生长中的作用.研究了TiO2纳米线束阵列的场致电子发射特性,其场发射开启电场为5.7 V/ μm(对应电流密度10μA/ cm2),阈值电场为9.5 V/ μm,同时表现出较好的场发射稳定性.低的合成温度和好的场发射性能表明TiO2纳米线束阵列在场发射冷阴极器件上具有良好的应用前景.

  1. Thin, Flexible IMM Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    NASA needs solar arrays that are thin, flexible, and highly efficient; package compactly for launch; and deploy into large, structurally stable high-power generators. Inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cells can enable these arrays, but integration of this thin crystalline cell technology presents certain challenges. The Thin Hybrid Interconnected Solar Array (THINS) technology allows robust and reliable integration of IMM cells into a flexible blanket comprising standardized modules engineered for easy production. The modules support the IMM cell by using multifunctional materials for structural stability, shielding, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) stress relief, and integrated thermal and electrical functions. The design approach includes total encapsulation, which benefits high voltage as well as electrostatic performance.

  2. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  3. The hydrodynamics of colloidal gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsigmond; Wang, Gang; Swan, James

    2015-12-14

    Colloidal gels are formed during arrested phase separation. Sub-micron, mutually attractive particles aggregate to form a system spanning network with high interfacial area, far from equilibrium. Models for microstructural evolution during colloidal gelation have often struggled to match experimental results with long standing questions regarding the role of hydrodynamic interactions. In nearly all models, these interactions are neglected entirely. In the present work, we report simulations of gelation with and without hydrodynamic interactions between the suspended particles executed in HOOMD-blue. The disparities between these simulations are striking and mirror the experimental-theoretical mismatch in the literature. The hydrodynamic simulations agree with experimental observations, however. We explore a simple model of the competing transport processes in gelation that anticipates these disparities, and conclude that hydrodynamic forces are essential. Near the gel boundary, there exists a competition between compaction of individual aggregates which suppresses gelation and coagulation of aggregates which enhances it. The time scale for compaction is mildly slowed by hydrodynamic interactions, while the time scale for coagulation is greatly accelerated. This enhancement to coagulation leads to a shift in the gel boundary to lower strengths of attraction and lower particle concentrations when compared to models that neglect hydrodynamic interactions. Away from the gel boundary, differences in the nearest neighbor distribution and fractal dimension persist within gels produced by both simulation methods. This result necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how dynamic, discrete element models for gelation kinetics are developed as well as how collective hydrodynamic interactions influence the arrest of attractive colloidal dispersions.

  4. Structured fluids polymers, colloids, surfactants

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, the study of liquids containing polymers, surfactants, or colloidal particles has developed from a loose assembly of facts into a coherent discipline with substantial predictive power. These liquids expand our conception of what condensed matter can do. Such structured-fluid phenomena dominate the physical environment within living cells. This book teaches how to think of these fluids from a unified point of view showing the far-reaching effects ofthermal fluctuations in producing forces and motions. Keeping mathematics to a minimum, the book seeks the simplest expl

  5. Frost Heave in Colloidal Soils

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of frost heave in colloidal soils. The theory accountsfor heave and consolidation while not requiring a frozen fringe assumption. Two solidificationregimes occur: a compaction regime in which the soil consolidates to accommodate the ice lenses, and a heave regime during which liquid is sucked into the consolidated soil from an external reservoir, and the added volume causes the soil to heave. The ice fraction is found to vary inversely with thefreezing velocity V , while the rate of heave is independent of V , consistent with field and laboratoryobservations. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  6. Thermodynamic perturbation theory for self assembling mixtures of multi - patch colloids and colloids with spherically symmetric attractions

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, B. D.; Chapman, W. G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we extend our previous theory [B. D. Marshall and W.G. Chapman, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104904 (2013)] for mixtures of single patch colloids (p colloids) and colloids with spherically symmetric attractions (s colloids) to the case that the p colloids can have multiple patches. The theory is then applied to the case of a binary mixture of bi-functional p colloids which have an A and B type patch and s colloids which are not attracted to other s colloids and are attracted to only patc...

  7. Thermodynamic perturbation theory for self assembling mixtures of multi - patch colloids and colloids with spherically symmetric attractions

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, B. D.; Chapman, W G

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we extend our previous theory [B. D. Marshall and W.G. Chapman, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104904 (2013)] for mixtures of single patch colloids (p colloids) and colloids with spherically symmetric attractions (s colloids) to the case that the p colloids can have multiple patches. The theory is then applied to the case of a binary mixture of bi-functional p colloids which have an A and B type patch and s colloids which are not attracted to other s colloids and are attracted to only patc...

  8. Sub-10 nm colloidal lithography for circuit-integrated spin-photo-electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovan, Adrian; Fischer, Marco; Lo Conte, Roberto; Korenivski, Vladislav

    2012-01-01

    Patterning of materials at sub-10 nm dimensions is at the forefront of nanotechnology and employs techniques of various complexity, efficiency, areal scale, and cost. Colloid-based patterning is known to be capable of producing individual sub-10 nm objects. However, ordered, large-area nano-arrays, fully integrated into photonic or electronic devices have remained a challenging task. In this work, we extend the practice of colloidal lithography to producing large-area sub-10 nm point-contact arrays and demonstrate their circuit integration into spin-photo-electronic devices. The reported nanofabrication method should have broad application areas in nanotechnology as it allows ballistic-injection devices, even for metallic materials with relatively short characteristic relaxation lengths.

  9. Sub-10 nm colloidal lithography for circuit-integrated spin-photo-electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Iovan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patterning of materials at sub-10 nm dimensions is at the forefront of nanotechnology and employs techniques of various complexity, efficiency, areal scale, and cost. Colloid-based patterning is known to be capable of producing individual sub-10 nm objects. However, ordered, large-area nano-arrays, fully integrated into photonic or electronic devices have remained a challenging task. In this work, we extend the practice of colloidal lithography to producing large-area sub-10 nm point-contact arrays and demonstrate their circuit integration into spin-photo-electronic devices. The reported nanofabrication method should have broad application areas in nanotechnology as it allows ballistic-injection devices, even for metallic materials with relatively short characteristic relaxation lengths.

  10. Sub-10 nm colloidal lithography for circuit-integrated spin-photo-electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovan, Adrian; Fischer, Marco; Lo Conte, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary Patterning of materials at sub-10 nm dimensions is at the forefront of nanotechnology and employs techniques of various complexity, efficiency, areal scale, and cost. Colloid-based patterning is known to be capable of producing individual sub-10 nm objects. However, ordered, large-area nano-arrays, fully integrated into photonic or electronic devices have remained a challenging task. In this work, we extend the practice of colloidal lithography to producing large-area sub-10 nm point-contact arrays and demonstrate their circuit integration into spin-photo-electronic devices. The reported nanofabrication method should have broad application areas in nanotechnology as it allows ballistic-injection devices, even for metallic materials with relatively short characteristic relaxation lengths. PMID:23365801

  11. The Impact of Colloidal Surface-Anchoring on the Smectic A Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püschel-Schlotthauer, Sergej; Meiwes Turrión, Victor; Hall, Carol K; Mazza, Marco G; Schoen, Martin

    2017-03-07

    Liquid-crystalline phases are known for their unique properties, i.e., the combination of fluidity and long-range orientational and/or positional order. The presence of a colloidal particle gives rise to perturbations of this order locally. These perturbations are the origin of intercolloidal forces driving the colloidal self-assembly in a directed manner. Hence, the understanding of these perturbations is the first step in understanding and controlling the self-assembly process. Here, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the perturbations of orientational and positional order in a smectic A phase caused by a spherical colloid. We model the host phase via an interaction potential that reproduces characteristic features of phase behavior, structure, dynamics, and elasticity [S. Püschel-Schlotthauer et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 145, 164903]. For strong homeotropic anchoring conditions, we find a Saturn ring defect and an onion structure in the smectic A phase; the latter has never been reported for colloids so far. For strong planar anchoring conditions, we find Boojum defects that become elongated at low temperature, similar to what is observed in experiments. However, for weak planar anchoring conditions, a double surface ring defect is exhibited in the smectic A phase.

  12. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the incre...

  13. Colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.; Velikov, K. P.; Philipse, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate is a widely used material in the area of mineral fortification but its synthesis and properties in colloidal form are largely unknown. In this article, we report on the synthesis and characterisation of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate particles with potential for application a

  14. Hemocompatibility of titania nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara S; Yoriya, Sorachon; Grissom, Laura; Grimes, Craig A; Popat, Ketul C

    2010-11-01

    Hemocompatibility is a key consideration for the long-term success of blood contacting biomaterials; hence, there is a critical need to understand the physiological response elicited from blood/nano-biomaterial interactions. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets, and clotting kinetics of whole blood on titania nanotube arrays. Previous studies have demonstrated improved mesenchymal stem cell functionality, osteoblast phenotypic behavior, localized drug delivery, and the production of endothelial cell ECM on titania nanotube arrays. Furthermore, these titania nanotube arrays have elicited minimal levels of monocyte activation and cytokine secretion, thus exhibiting a very low degree of immunogenicity. Titania nanotube arrays were fabricated using anodization technique and the surface morphology was examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phases were identified using glancing angled X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Nanoindentation and scratch tests were used to characterize the mechanical properties of titania nanotube arrays. The adsorption of key blood proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin-g) was evaluated using a micro-BCA assay and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesion and activation of platelets was investigated using live-cell staining, MTT assay, and SEM. Whole blood clotting kinetics was evaluated by measuring the free hemoglobin concentration, and SEM was used to visualize the clot formation. Our results indicate increased blood serum protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and activation, and whole blood clotting kinetics on titania nanotube arrays.

  15. Structural transitions in condensed colloidal virus phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Barr, Steve; Udit, Andrew; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Nguyen, Thanh; Finn, M. G.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Analogous to monatomic systems colloidal phase behavior is entirely determined by the interaction potential between particles. This potential can be tuned using solutes such as multivalent salts and polymers with varying affinity for the colloids to create a hierarchy of attractions. Bacteriophage viruses are a naturally occurring type of colloidal particle with characteristics difficult to achieve by laboratory synthesis. They are monodisperse, nanometers in size, and have heterogeneous surface charge distributions. We use the MS2 and Qbeta bacteriophages (diameters 27-28nm) to understand the interplay between different attraction mechanisms on nanometer-sized colloids. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is used to characterize the inter-particle interaction between colloidal viruses using several polymer species and different salt types.

  16. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dimitri V.

    2017-02-16

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes1, 2, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other2. Electrostatic stabilization3, 4 of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains2, 5. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  17. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Mertz

    2000-12-21

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types.

  18. Anisometric C60 Fullerene Colloids Assisted by Structure-Directing Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penterman, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Liddell Watson, Chekesha M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Escobedo, Fernando A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Cohen, Itai [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-08-05

    Colloidal synthesis and assembly provide low cost, large area routes to mesoscale structures. In particular, shape-anisotropic particles may form crystalline, plastic crystalline, complex liquid crystalline and glassy phases. Arrangements in each order class have been used to generate photonic materials. For example, large photonic band gaps have been found for photonic crystals, hyperuniform photonic glasses, and also for plastic crystals at sufficient refractive index contrast. The latter structures support highly isotropic bandgaps that are desirable for free-form waveguides and LED out-coupling. Photonic glasses with optical gain lead to self-tuned lasing by the superposition of multiply scattered light. Typically, extrinsic media such as organic dyes, rare earths, lanthanides and quantum dots are used to impart optical gain in photonic solids. The present work advances fullerene microcrystals as a new materials platform for ‘active’ light emitting in colloid-based photonic crystals. Fullerenes support singlet excited states that recombine to produce a characteristic red photoluminescence. C60 also has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.2) and transparency (> 560 nm)9 so that inverse structures are not required.

  19. Diffusion in active magnetic colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taukulis, R.; Cebers, A., E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv

    2014-11-15

    Properties of active colloids of circle swimmers are reviewed. As a particular example of active magnetic colloids the magnetotactic bacteria under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. The relation for a diffusion coefficient due to the random switching of the direction of rotation of their rotary motors is derived on the basis of the master equation. The obtained relation is confirmed by the direct numerical simulation of random trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium under the action of the Poisson type internal noise due to the random switching of rotary motors. The results obtained are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the available experimental results and allow one to determine the characteristic time between the switching events of a rotary motor of the bacterium. - Highlights: • Magnetotactic bacteria in a rotating field behaves as circle swimmers. • Diffusion coefficient of these swimmers due to the random switching of rotary motors is calculated. • Results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with available experimental results.

  20. Dynamics of the colloidal suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-yan; MA Hong-ru

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a survey on our current knowledge of the dynamics of the colloidal suspension,where each particle experiences the friction force with solvent,hydrodynamic interaction,and potential force from surrounding particles and thermodynamic force.It further contains a summary of the basic concepts about microstructures and equilibrium properties,and of analytical and numerical methods,which are relevant for the theoretical description of the suspensions.The description of the dynamics of colloidal particles,based on the generalized Smoluchowski equation,is justified for the time scale accessible in DLS experiments.The combined influence of hard sphere or electrostatic potential and solvent-mediated hydrodynamic interaction on the short-time dynamics of monodisperse suspensions is investigated in detail.A thorough study of tracer-diffusion in hard sphere and charge-stabilized suspensions is presented.Mean-square displacements and long-time tracer-diffusion coefficients are calculated with two alternative approximations,i.e.,a mode-coupling scheme and a single relaxation time ansatz.

  1. Gel trapping of dense colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxton, Peter B; Berg, John C

    2005-05-01

    Phase density differences in sols, foams, or emulsions often lead to sedimentation or creaming, causing problems for materials where spatial uniformity over extended periods of time is essential. The problem may be addressed through the use of rheology modifiers in the continuous phase. Weak polymer gels have found use for this purpose in the food industry where they appear to be capable of trapping dispersoid particles in a three-dimensional matrix while displaying water-like viscosities at low shear. Attempts to predict sedimentation stability in terms of particle properties (size, shape, density difference) and gel yield stress have led to qualitative success for suspensions of large particles. The effect of particle size, however, in particular the case in which colloidal dimensions are approached, has not been investigated. The present work seeks to determine useful stability criteria for colloidal dispersions in terms of readily accessible viscoelastic descriptors. Results are reported for systems consisting of 12 microm poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres dispersed in aqueous gellan gum. Monovalent salt concentration is varied to control rheological properties, and sedimentation/centrifugation experiments are performed to determine dispersion stability. Necessary conditions for stability consist of a minimum yield stress together with a value of tan delta less than unity.

  2. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  3. Simultaneous synthesis of anatase colloidal and multiple-branched rutile TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trong Tung; Duong, Ngoc Huyen [School of Engineering Physics, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Mai, Xuan Dung [Dept. of Chemistry, Hanoi Pedagogical University No2, Vinh Phuc (Viet Nam)

    2017-03-15

    Facile synthesis of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2} ) nanostructures with controllability over their cystallinity, dimensions, and shape is in demand for diverse optoelectronic applications. Anatase colloidal particles and precipitates of rutile bundles were synthesized simultaneously using HCl catalyzed sol–gel process with titanium tetrachloride as Ti precursor. The crystallinity and the morphology of these two separable TiO{sub 2} phases were studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that by varying HCl concentration during synthesis, dimensions of colloidal anatase can be tuned from spherical particles with a diameter of 2–5 nm to nanorods of dimension of 4 nm (width) × 14 nm (length). The rutile bundles whose size increased with aging time consisted of multiple branches with elongation along c-axis. Both anatase nanorods and rutile bundles can be applied as highly efficient photocatalysts or electron conduits.

  4. Self-assembly with colloidal clusters: facile crystal design using connectivity landscape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani, Mehdi B; Crocker, John C; Sinno, Talid

    2017-08-29

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies demonstrate that prefabricated micron-scale colloidal clusters functionalized with DNA oligomers offer a practical way for introducing anisotropic interactions, significantly extending the scope of DNA-mediated colloidal assembly, and enabling the formation of interesting crystalline superstructures that are otherwise inaccessible with short-ranged, spherically symmetric interactions. However, it is apparent that the high-dimensional parameter space that defines the geometric and interaction properties of such systems poses an obstacle to assembly design and optimization. Here, we present a geometrical analysis that generates connectivity landscapes for target superstructures, greatly reducing the space over which subsequent experimental trials must search. We focus on several superstructures that are assembled from binary systems comprised of 'merged' or 'sintered' tetrahedral clusters and single spheres. We also validate and extend the analytical constraint approach with direct MD simulations of superstructure nucleation and growth.

  5. Comparative evaluation of bioactivity of crystalline trypsin for drying by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Fukui, Yuya; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic stability of colloidal trypsin powder during heating in a solid-state by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra with chemoinformatics and generalized two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy. Colloidal crystalline trypsin powders were heated using differential scanning calorimetry. The enzymatic activity of trypsin was assayed by the kinetic degradation method. Spectra of 10 calibration sample sets were recorded three times with a FT-IR spectrometer. The maximum intensity at 1634cm(-1) of FT-IR spectra and enzymatic activity of trypsin decreased as the temperature increased. The FT-IR spectra of trypsin samples were analyzed by a principal component regression analysis (PCR). A plot of the calibration data obtained was made between the actual and predicted trypsin activity based on a two-component model with gamma(2)=0.962. On the other hand, a 2D method was applied to FT-IR spectra of heat-treated trypsin. The result was consistent with that of the chemoinformetrical method. The results for deactivation of colloidal trypsin powder by heat-treatment indicated that nano-structure of crystalline trypsin changed by heating reflecting that the beta-sheet was mainly transformed, since the peak at 1634cm(-1) decreased with dehydration. The FT-IR chemoinformetrical method allows for a solid-state quantitative analysis of the bioactivity of the bulk powder of trypsin during drying.

  6. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  7. Recent advances in fabrication of monolayer colloidal crystals and their inverse replicas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE XiaoZhou; QI LiMin

    2014-01-01

    Monolayer colloidal crystals(MCCs)are two-dimensional(2D)colloidal crystals consisting of a monolayer of monodisperse colloidal particles arrayed with a 2D periodic order.In recent years,MCCs have attracted intensive interest because they can act as 2D photonic crystals and be used as versatile templates for fabrication of various 2D nanostructure arrays.In this review,we provide an overview of the recent progress in the controllable fabrication of MCCs and their inverse replicas.First,some newly-developed methods for the self-assembly of MCCs based on different strategies including interfacial assembly and convective assembly are introduced.Second,some representative novel methods regarding the fabrication of various functional2D inverse replicas of MCCs,such as 2D arrays of nanobowls,nanocaps,and hollow spheres,as well as 2D monolayer inverse opals(MIOs),are described.In addition,the potential applications of MCCs and their inverse replicas are discussed.

  8. Fluid-fluid demixing curves for colloid-polymer mixtures in a random colloidal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Mario Alberto; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    We study fluid-fluid phase separation in a colloid-polymer mixture adsorbed in a colloidal porous matrix close to the θ point. For this purpose we consider the Asakura-Oosawa model in the presence of a quenched matrix of colloidal hard spheres. We study the dependence of the demixing curve on the parameters that characterize the quenched matrix, fixing the polymer-to-colloid size ratio to 0.8. We find that, to a large extent, demixing curves depend only on a single parameter f, which represents the volume fraction which is unavailable to the colloids. We perform Monte Carlo simulations for volume fractions f equal to 40% and 70%, finding that the binodal curves in the polymer and colloid packing-fraction plane have a small dependence on disorder. The critical point instead changes significantly: for instance, the colloid packing fraction at criticality increases with increasing f. Finally, we observe for some values of the parameters capillary condensation of the colloids: a bulk colloid-poor phase is in chemical equilibrium with a colloid-rich phase in the matrix.

  9. Self-assembled biomimetic superhydrophobic hierarchical arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongta; Dou, Xuan; Fang, Yin; Jiang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Here, we report a simple and inexpensive bottom-up technology for fabricating superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical micro-/nano-structures, which are inspired by the binary periodic structure found on the superhydrophobic compound eyes of some insects (e.g., mosquitoes and moths). Binary colloidal arrays consisting of exemplary large (4 and 30 μm) and small (300 nm) silica spheres are first assembled by a scalable Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technology in a layer-by-layer manner. After surface modification with fluorosilanes, the self-assembled hierarchical particle arrays become superhydrophobic with an apparent water contact angle (CA) larger than 150°. The throughput of the resulting superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical structures can be significantly improved by templating the binary periodic structures of the LB-assembled colloidal arrays into UV-curable fluoropolymers by a soft lithography approach. Superhydrophobic perfluoroether acrylate hierarchical arrays with large CAs and small CA hysteresis can be faithfully replicated onto various substrates. Both experiments and theoretical calculations based on the Cassie's dewetting model demonstrate the importance of the hierarchical structure in achieving the final superhydrophobic surface states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Photochemical manipulation of colloidal structures in liquid-crystal colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T.; Tabe, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    2007-05-01

    We investigated photochemical manipulation of physical properties and colloidal structures in liquid-crystal (LC) colloids containing azobenzene compounds. In a LC suspension where polymeric particles were dispersed in a host LC, we achieved photochemical control of light-scattering properties of the suspension. In a nematic phase, when the suspension was sandwiched with two glass plates, the film became opaque. This would be attributable to an appearance of both multidomain structures of LC alignment and mismatches of refractive indices between the materials. The opaque state turned into a transparent one when a nematic-to-isotropic phase transition was induced by the trans-to-cis photoisomerization of the azo-dye. This will result from a disappearance of both the multidomain structures and the refractive-index mismatches in the isotropic phase. The transparent film went back into the initial opaque film when the nematic phase was obtained by the cis-to-trans photoisomerization. In a LC emulsion in which glycerol or water droplets were dispersed in liquid crystals, we examined photochemical change of defect structures and inter-droplet distances by the photochemical manner. At the initial state, Saturn ring and hedgehog defects were formed around the droplets. For the glycerol droplets, we observed structural transformations between Saturn ring and boojums on irradiation with ultra-violet and visible light. For the water droplets, the inter-droplet distances varied by changing defect size on the irradiation. These phenomena would result from modulation of anchoring conditions of the droplets by the photoisomerization of the azo-dyes.

  11. Fabrication of size-controllable hexagonal non-close-packed colloidal crystals and binary colloidal crystals by pyrolysis combined with plasma-electron coirradiation of polystyrene colloidal monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Joon; Li, Yue; Lee, Eun Je; Cho, Sung Oh

    2011-03-15

    We present an unprecedented and systematic route to controllably fabricate hexagonal non-close-packed (hncp) monolayer colloidal crystals and binary colloidal crystals (BCCs) based on plasma-electron coirradiation of polystyrene colloidal monolayers followed by thermal decomposition. Hncp colloidal crystals with tunable particle sizes and periods could be fabricated by changing the pristine colloidal particle size and the thermal decomposition time. In addition, BCCs and trimodal colloidal crystals that are composed of different-sized colloidal particles can also be fabricated by adding small particles on the prepared hncp colloidal crystals. Both the particle size ratio and the volume fraction of the BCCs can be widely tuned. These hncp colloidal crystals and BCCs have various potential applications as optical and photonic materials as well as in catalysis and sensors.

  12. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, S.; Moens, C.; Griffioen, J.J.; Smolders, E.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the

  13. Synthesis and Analytical Centrifugation of Magnetic Model Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luigjes, B.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the preparation and thermodynamic properties of magnetic colloids. First, two types of magnetic model colloids are investigated: composite colloids and single-domain nanoparticles. Thermodynamics of magnetic colloids is studied using analytical centrifugation, including a

  14. Synthesis and Analytical Centrifugation of Magnetic Model Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luigjes, B.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the preparation and thermodynamic properties of magnetic colloids. First, two types of magnetic model colloids are investigated: composite colloids and single-domain nanoparticles. Thermodynamics of magnetic colloids is studied using analytical centrifugation, including a s

  15. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, S.; Moens, C.; Griffioen, J.J.; Smolders, E.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the che

  16. Crystalline 'Genes' in Metallic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yang; Ye, Zhuo; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Ott, Ryan T; Kramer, M J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The underlying structural order that transcends the liquid, glass and crystalline states is identified using an efficient genetic algorithm (GA). GA identifies the most common energetically favorable packing motif in crystalline structures close to the alloy's Al-10 at.% Sm composition. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid structures using a cluster-alignment method which reveals the average topology. Conventional descriptions of the short-range order, such as Voronoi tessellation, are too rigid in their analysis of the configurational poly-types when describing the chemical and topological ordering during transition from undercooled metallic liquids to crystalline phases or glass. Our approach here brings new insight into describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter physics.

  17. Direct visualization of colloidal liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Richard Vernon

    We have investigated various colloidal systems consisting of aqueous suspensions of micron sized polystyrene particles. These systems are appealing because they provide a fertile testing ground for theories of both the liquid and solid states, as well as for theories describing hydrodynamic interactions. Our first study of colloidal systems was motivated by some interesting observations we made while looking at a suspension under a light microscope. We, as well as other workers, noticed that particles undergoing Brownian motion can appear to linger around each other for long periods of time. The question arose as to whether this lingering was a product of interparticle interactions, or was an artifact due to random thermal motion and projection onto a two dimensional image plane. We found that the latter was true, which drove home the idea that we must be wary of our own biases when making scientific observations. During the course of the research on this lingering behavior, we developed a mathematical technique for generating successively more accurate approximate analytical solutions to initial value linear partial differential equations which are first order in time and have no mixing of spatial and time derivatives. This formalism is especially useful for diffusion problems, since the analytical approximation conserves probability at each order of approximation. Our next experimental effort involved colloidal systems in which the suspending medium was carefully prepared to promote long ranged electrostatic interactions between the particles. The interaction potential in such a suspension has been the topic of much research recently. Using digital video microscopy, as well as techniques we developed allowing the proper analysis of two dimensional data, we found that the interaction length in our samples was surprisingly short ranged compared to what we expected based on our water purification experiments. The problems with projection effects associated with two

  18. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H.; Tang, Degui

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority (>50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase (≥0.45 μm), except for 65Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe (˜60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of 59Fe and 110Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of 54Mn, 133Ba, 65Zn, 109Cd, 113Sn, and 60CO increased while the LMW (≤ 1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The values of the particle-water ( Kd) and colloid-water partitioning ( Kc) coefficients for most trace metals were similar to those observed in Galveston Bay waters, suggesting complementary results to field studies. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying

  19. Investigation of gamma-ray irradiation on molecular structure, optical properties and mass attenuation coefficients of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Z.; Vejdani Noghreiyan, A.; Nadafan, M.; Majles Ara, M. H.

    2017-08-01

    In this research, colloidal gold NPs were synthesized by turkevich method. XRD spectrum after irradiation showed the different peaks but the most important distinctive was related to (111) peaks at (2θ = 38.41°) which give an indication that the structure is cubic. The Raman spectroscopy results indicated that the intensity of peaks with the wave number of 3450 cm-1was increased in the colloidal gold NPs irradiated due to improvement of the crystalline properties of colloidal gold NPs. SEM images showed significant changes in the morphology and size of gamma irradiated colloidal gold NPs. For 10 kGy dose, gamma-ray irradiated crystals, the optical absorption increases compared to that of before irradiation which may be the consequence of the formation of point defects due to gamma-rays. Comparing nonlinear studies, the magnitude of nonlinear refraction index, n2 and nonlinear absorption coefficient, β increase after gamma-ray irradiation. The measurement of mass attenuation coefficients result shows that the gamma-ray irradiation has an influence on radiation absorption coefficients of colloidal gold NPs. It is an evidence which shows that in addition to the atomic mass number of elements, the molecular structure may affect on the attenuation coefficients and nonlinear optical properties.

  20. Positronium diffusion in crystalline polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, J. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-12-16

    The analysis in four components of the positron lifetime spectra of nine different and structurally well characterised lamellar polyethylene samples has allowed to associate the two longest-lived components to positronium annihilation in the crystalline and amorphous phases. Further assumption on positronium tunneling through the interface between both phases, and a simple geometrical model, led to a value for the positronium diffusion coefficient in the crystalline phase of the order of 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2}/s. Interfaces have thicknesses around 1.5 nm and are shallow traps for positronium. (orig.).

  1. Simple method for the synthesis of inverse patchy colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostrum, P D J; Hejazifar, M; Niedermayer, C; Reimhult, E

    2015-06-17

    Inverse patchy colloids (IPC's) have recently been introduced as a conceptually simple model to study the phase-behavior of heterogeneously charged units. This class of patchy particles is referred to as inverse to highlight that the patches repel each other in contrast to the attractive interactions of conventional patches. IPCs demonstrate a complex interplay between attractions and repulsions that depend on their patch size and charge, their relative orientations as well as on charge of the substrate below; the resulting wide array of different types of aggregates that can be formed motivates their fabrication and use as model system. We present a novel method that does not rely on clean-room facilities and that is easily scalable to modify the surface of colloidal particles to create two polar regions with the opposite charge with respect to that of the equatorial region. The patch size is characterized by electron microscopy and fluorescently labeled to facilitate using confocal microscopy to study their phase behavior. We show that the pH can be used to tune the charges of the IPCs thus offering a tool to steer the self assembly.

  2. Site-specific functionalization of anisotropic nanoparticles: from colloidal atoms to colloidal molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Yoo, Won Cheol; Beernink, Molly B

    2009-01-01

    Multipodal nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled tethers are promising principal building blocks, useful for constructing more complex materials, much like atoms are connected into more complex molecules. Here we report colloidal sphere templating as a viable means to create tetrapodal NPs with site......-specific tethers. Amorphous sol-gel materials were molded by the template into shaped NPs that mimic tetravalent atoms but on the length scale of colloids. Synthetic methods were developed to modify only the tips of the tetrapods with a range of possible functional groups to generate anisotropic NPs capable...... of directional bonding to other NPs. We also illustrate that sets of tethered "colloidal atoms" can assemble themselves into "colloidal molecules" with precise placement of the modifying colloids. The templating and tethering approaches to these anisotropic colloidal building blocks and the assembly methods...

  3. Oxyhydroxy Silicate Colloids: A New Type of Waterborne Actinide(IV) Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Brendler, Vinzenz; Ikeda‐Ohno, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At the near‐neutral and reducing aquatic conditions expected in undisturbed ore deposits or in closed nuclear waste repositories, the actinides Th, U, Np, and Pu are primarily tetravalent. These tetravalent actinides (AnIV) are sparingly soluble in aquatic systems and, hence, are often assumed to be immobile. However, AnIV could become mobile if they occur as colloids. This review focuses on a new type of AnIV colloids, oxyhydroxy silicate colloids. We herein discuss the chemical characteristics of these colloids and the potential implication for their environmental behavior. The binary oxyhydroxy silicate colloids of AnIV could be potentially more mobile as a waterborne species than the well‐known mono‐component oxyhydroxide colloids. PMID:27957406

  4. The Ongoing Controversy: Crystalloids Versus Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Janet D; Shen, Qiuhua; Thimmesch, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    There is still much debate over the optimal fluid to use for resuscitation. Different studies have indicated either crystalloid or colloid is the ideal intravenous solution to administer, based on mortality or various physiological parameters. Older studies found differences between crystalloids and colloids. However, with the evolving science of fluid administration, more recent studies have shown no differences in patient outcomes. This review article will provide an overview of these substances and discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and implications for giving crystalloids and colloids in clinical practice.

  5. Colloid and interface chemistry for nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Kralchevsky, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Colloid and interface science dealt with nanoscale objects for nearly a century before the term nanotechnology was coined. An interdisciplinary field, it bridges the macroscopic world and the small world of atoms and molecules. Colloid and Interface Chemistry for Nanotechnology is a collection of manuscripts reflecting the activities of research teams that have been involved in the networking project Colloid and Interface Chemistry for Nanotechnology (2006-2011), Action D43, the European Science Foundation. The project was a part of the intergovernmental framework for Cooperation in Science an

  6. Oblique Colloidal Lithography for the Fabrication of Nonconcentric Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi; Cao, Yang; Cai, Yangjun; Yang, Jian; He, Ximin; Nordlander, Peter; Cremer, Paul S

    2017-07-25

    Herein, we describe the development of oblique colloidal lithography (OCL) and establish a systematic patterning strategy for creating libraries of nanosized nonconcentric plasmonic structures. This strategy combines OCL, capillary force lithography, and several wet and ion etching steps. Hexagonal arrays of nonconcentric gold features were created on glass substrates with highly controllable geometric parameters. The size, geometry, and eccentricity of the gold features could be independently tuned by controlling the experimental conditions. Gaps within surface elements could be shrunk to as small as 30 nm, while the total patterned area was about l cm(2). The goal was to devise a method that offers a high degree of control over the resolution and morphology of asymmetric structures without the need to resort to electron beam lithography. This technique also enabled the development of numerous surface patterns through the stepwise fabrication of separate elements. Complex features, including dots-surrounded nonconcentric targets, nonconcentric hexagram-disks, and nonconcentric annular aperture arrays, were demonstrated, and their optical properties were characterized. Indeed, spectroscopic studies and FDTD simulations demonstrated that Fano resonances could readily be generated by the nonconcentric gold features. Consequently, our patterning strategy should enable the high-throughput investigation of plasmonic coupling and Fano resonances as a function of the physical parameters of the elements within the nanopattern array.

  7. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  8. Colloidal QDs-polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, H.; Suárez, I.; Rodríguez-Cantó, P.; Abargues, R.; García-Calzada, R.; Chyrvony, V.; Albert, S.; Martínez-Pastor, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nanometer-size colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or Quantum Dots (NQD), are very prospective active centers because their light emission is highly efficient and temperature-independent. Nanocomposites based on the incorporation of QDs inside a polymer matrix are very promising materials for application in future photonic devices because they combine the properties of QDs with the technological feasibility of polymers. In the present work some basic applications of these new materials have been studied. Firstly, the fabrication of planar and linear waveguides based on the incorporation of CdS, CdSe and CdTe in PMMA and SU-8 are demonstrated. As a result, photoluminescence (PL) of the QDs are coupled to a waveguide mode, being it able to obtain multicolor waveguiding. Secondly, nanocomposite films have been evaluated as photon energy down-shifting converters to improve the efficiency of solar cells.

  9. Filter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  10. Hard sphere-like glass transition in eye lens α-crystallin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, Giuseppe; Savin, Gabriela; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Thurston, George M; Stradner, Anna; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2014-11-25

    We study the equilibrium liquid structure and dynamics of dilute and concentrated bovine eye lens α-crystallin solutions, using small-angle X-ray scattering, static and dynamic light scattering, viscometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and mode-coupling theory. We find that a polydisperse Percus-Yevick hard-sphere liquid-structure model accurately reproduces both static light scattering data and small-angle X-ray scattering liquid structure data from α-crystallin solutions over an extended range of protein concentrations up to 290 mg/mL or 49% vol fraction and up to ca. 330 mg/mL for static light scattering. The measured dynamic light scattering and viscosity properties are also consistent with those of hard-sphere colloids and show power laws characteristic of an approach toward a glass transition at α-crystallin volume fractions near 58%. Dynamic light scattering at a volume fraction beyond the glass transition indicates formation of an arrested state. We further perform event-driven molecular dynamics simulations of polydisperse hard-sphere systems and use mode-coupling theory to compare the measured dynamic power laws with those of hard-sphere models. The static and dynamic data, simulations, and analysis show that aqueous eye lens α-crystallin solutions exhibit a glass transition at high concentrations that is similar to those found in hard-sphere colloidal systems. The α-crystallin glass transition could have implications for the molecular basis of presbyopia and the kinetics of molecular change during cataractogenesis.

  11. An on-chip colloidal magneto-optical grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikockis, M.; Wijesinghe, H.; Chen, A.; VanCourt, J.; Roderick, D.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2016-04-01

    Interacting nano- and micro-particles provide opportunities to create a wide range of useful colloidal and soft matter constructs. In this letter, we examine interacting superparamagnetic polymeric particles residing on designed permalloy (Ni0.8 Fe0.2) shapes that are subject to weak time-orbiting magnetic fields. The precessing field and magnetic barriers that ensue along the outer perimeter of the shapes allow for containment concurrent with independent field-tunable ordering of the dipole-coupled particles. These remotely activated arrays with inter-particle spacing comparable to the wavelength of light yield microscopic on-chip surface gratings for beam steering and magnetically regulated light diffraction applications.

  12. Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized “Giant” Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ghosh, Yagnaseni [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dennis, Allison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mangum, Benjamin D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Young-Shin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kundu, Janardan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Due to their characteristic bright and stable photoluminescence, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) have attracted much interest as efficient light emitters for applications from single-particle tracking to solid-state lighting. Despite their numerous enabling traits, however, NQD optical properties are frustratingly sensitive to their chemical environment, exhibit fluorescence intermittency ('blinking'), and are susceptible to Auger recombination, an efficient nonradiative decay process. Previously, we showed for the first time that colloidal CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) comprising ultrathick shells (number of shell monolayers, n, > 10) grown by protracted successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) leads to remarkable photostability and significantly suppressed blinking behavior as a function of increasing shell thickness. We have also shown that these so-called 'giant' NQDs (g-NQDs) afford nearly complete suppression of non-radiative Auger recombination, revealed in our studies as long biexciton lifetimes and efficient multiexciton emission. The unique behavior of this core/shell system prompted us to assess correlations between specific physicochemical properties - beyond shell thickness - and functionality. Here, we demonstrate the ability of particle shape/faceting, crystalline phase, and core size to determine ensemble and single-particle optical properties (quantum yield/brightness, blinking, radiative lifetimes). Significantly, we show how reaction process parameters (surface-stabilizing ligands, ligand:NQD ratio, choice of 'inert' solvent, and modifications to the SILAR method itself) can be tuned to modify these function-dictating NQD physical properties, ultimately leading to an optimized synthetic approach that results in the complete suppression of blinking. We find that the resulting 'guiding principles' can be applied to other NQD compositions, allowing us to

  13. The Effect of Attractive Interactions and Macromolecular Crowding on Crystallins Association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Wei

    Full Text Available In living systems proteins are typically found in crowded environments where their effective interactions strongly depend on the surrounding medium. Yet, their association and dissociation needs to be robustly controlled in order to enable biological function. Uncontrolled protein aggregation often causes disease. For instance, cataract is caused by the clustering of lens proteins, i.e., crystallins, resulting in enhanced light scattering and impaired vision or blindness. To investigate the molecular origins of cataract formation and to design efficient treatments, a better understanding of crystallin association in macromolecular crowded environment is needed. Here we present a theoretical study of simple coarse grained colloidal models to characterize the general features of how the association equilibrium of proteins depends on the magnitude of intermolecular attraction. By comparing the analytic results to the available experimental data on the osmotic pressure in crystallin solutions, we identify the effective parameters regimes applicable to crystallins. Moreover, the combination of two models allows us to predict that the number of binding sites on crystallin is small, i.e. one to three per protein, which is different from previous estimates. We further observe that the crowding factor is sensitive to the size asymmetry between the reactants and crowding agents, the shape of the protein clusters, and to small variations of intermolecular attraction. Our work may provide general guidelines on how to steer the protein interactions in order to control their association.

  14. Crystalline instability of Bi-2212 superconducting whiskers near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliero, Stefano; Agostino, Angelo; Khan, Mohammad Mizanur Rahman; Truccato, Marco; Orsini, Francesco; Marinone, Massimo; Poletti, Giulio; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    We report new evidences for the thermodynamic instability of whisker crystals in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) system. Annealing treatments at 90°C have been performed on two sets of samples, which were monitored by means of X-Rays Diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements, respectively. Two main crystalline domains of Bi2Sr2CuCa2O8+ x (Bi-2212) were identified in the samples by the XRD data, which underwent an evident crystalline segregation after about 60 hours. Very fast dynamics of the surface modifications was also described by the AFM monitoring. Two typologies of surface structures formed after about 3 annealing hours: continuous arrays of dome shaped bodies were observed along the edges of the whiskers, while in the central regions a dense texture of flat bodies was found. These modifications are described in terms of the formation of simple oxide clusters involving a degradation of the internal layers.

  15. Hemorrhagic Colloid Cyst Presenting with Acute Hydrocephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Reza; Zandi, Behrouz; Pezeshki-Rad, Masoud; Farrokh, Donya

    2017-01-01

    Colloid cysts are benign slow-growing cystic lesions located on the roof of the third ventricle that usually present with symptoms related to gradual rise of intracranial pressure. They mostly remain asymptomatic and sometimes grow progressively and cause diverse symptoms associated with increased intracranial pressure such as headache, diplopia, and sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a 47-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with acute severe headache and nausea/vomiting. On MRI examination acute hydrocephaly due to hemorrhagic colloid cyst was detected. Acute hemorrhage in colloid cysts is extremely rare and may present with symptoms of acute increase in the intracranial pressure. Intracystic hemorrhage is very rarely reported as a complication of colloid cyst presenting with paroxysmal symptoms of acute hydrocephaly. PMID:28210514

  16. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes.

  17. Suspensions of colloidal particles and aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Babick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This book addresses the properties of particles in colloidal suspensions. It has a focus on particle aggregates and the dependency of their physical behaviour on morphological parameters. For this purpose, relevant theories and methodological tools are reviewed and applied to selected examples. The book is divided into four main chapters. The first of them introduces important measurement techniques for the determination of particle size and interfacial properties in colloidal suspensions. A further chapter is devoted to the physico-chemical properties of colloidal particles—highlighting the interfacial phenomena and the corresponding interactions between particles. The book’s central chapter examines the structure-property relations of colloidal aggregates. This comprises concepts to quantify size and structure of aggregates, models and numerical tools for calculating the (light) scattering and hydrodynamic properties of aggregates, and a discussion on van-der-Waals and double layer interactions between ...

  18. Size determinations of colloidal fat emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Klaus, Katrin; Steiniger, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Size and size distributions of colloidal dispersions are of crucial importance for their performance and safety. In the present study, commercially available fat emulsions (Lipofundin N, Lipofundin MCT and Lipidem) were analyzed by photon correlation spectroscopy, laser diffraction with adequate...

  19. Linear Optical Properties of Gold Colloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin XIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold colloid was prepared by reducing HAuCl4·4H2O with Na3C6H5O7·2H2O. The morphology, size of gold nanoparticles and the optical property of colloid were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-Vis spectrophotometer, respectively. It shows that the gold nanoparticles are in the shape of spheres with diameters less than 8 nm, and the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak is located at about 438 nm. As the volume fraction of gold particles increases, the intensity of absorption peak strengthens. The optical property of gold colloid was analyzed by Maxwell-Garnett (MG effective medium theory in the company of Drude dispersion model. The results show that the matrix dielectric constant is a main factor, which influences the optical property of gold colloid.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9558

  20. Accelerated purification of colloidal silica sols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnsen, E. B.; Garofalini, S.; Pechman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Accelerated purification process for colloidal sols using heat/deionization scheme, sharply reduces waiting time between deionization cycles from several months to a few days. Process produces same high purity silica sols as conventional methods.

  1. Entropically Driven Colloidal Assembly in Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keng-Hui; Lai, Liang-Jie; Chen, Hui

    2007-03-01

    Using the techniques developed by Manoharan [1], we encapsulate small numbers of colloidal microspheres and polymers in oil-in-water emulsion droplets, remove the oil and generate colloidal clusters covered with polymers. We observe two types of arrangement in the clusters. The first kind is the same as the type reported in [1] of which the clusters are formed without polymer. The second kind is the same as the structure reported in [2] of which the clusters are formed by binary colloidal microspheres. The polymers we put in the emulsions induce depletion interactions between colloidal particles. We will show that two types of structures are from the interplay between the depletion interactions and surface tension. [1] Manoharan, Elsesser, Pine, Science 301, 483(2003). [2] Cho et al. JACS 127, 15968 (2005).

  2. A Course in Colloid and Surface Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamehorn, John F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course for chemical engineers, chemists, and petroleum engineers that focuses on colloid and surface science. Major topic areas in the course include capillarity, surface thermodynamics, adsorption contact angle, micelle formation, solubilization in micelles, emulsions, foams, and applications. (JN)

  3. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  4. Measuring nonlinear stresses generated by defects in 3D colloidal crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Neil Y C; Schall, Peter; Sethna, James P; Cohen, Itai

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical, structural and functional properties of crystals are determined by their defects and the distribution of stresses surrounding these defects has broad implications for the understanding of transport phenomena. When the defect density rises to levels routinely found in real-world materials, transport is governed by local stresses that are predominantly nonlinear. Such stress fields however, cannot be measured using conventional bulk and local measurement techniques. Here, we report direct and spatially resolved experimental measurements of the nonlinear stresses surrounding colloidal crystalline defect cores, and show that the stresses at vacancy cores generate attractive interactions between them. We also directly visualize the softening of crystalline regions surrounding dislocation cores, and find that stress fluctuations in quiescent polycrystals are uniformly distributed rather than localized at grain boundaries, as is the case in strained atomic polycrystals. Nonlinear stress measurements ...

  5. Colloidal Silver Not Approved for Treating Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Bagley, Clell

    1997-01-01

    FDA has received reports that products containing colloidal silver are being promoted for use in the treatment of mastitis and other serious disease conditions of dairy cattle, as well as for various conditions of companion animals. For example, FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine has received reports from the Agency's regional milk specialists and State inspectors that colloidal silver products have been found on some dairy farms. Also, recent articles in some farm newspapers and journals p...

  6. Colloid Thrusters, Physics, Fabrication and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-17

    response, including the time for reviewing in. tata needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this...a discussion with colleagues during the 2nd Colloid Thruster/ Nano Electrojet Workshop (MIT, April 14- 15, 2005, Ref. [11]) an agreement was reached...23 Jul 2003. 11. Second Colloid Thruster/ Nano Electrojet Workshop, CD with a collection of presentations by attendees to this Workshop. MIT, April 14

  7. Colloids with high-definition surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-01-01

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of ≈107 to 108 particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors. PMID:17592149

  8. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, Joshua M; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  9. Complex coacervation between colloidal silica and polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawase, Kaoru; Sakami, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi

    1989-03-01

    Complex coacervation introduced by gamma-ray induced polymerization of acrylamide in colloidal silica was studied. The complex coaservate was formed by polymerization of acrylamide dissolved in a colloidal silica and methanol mixture. Complex coacervation (two-phase separation of the mixture) was observed only when the concentration of methanol was between 33 and 41 percent by volume, and the concentration of colloidal silica did not affect it. Although two phase separation was not influenced by pH change, the content of polyacrylamide was bigger in the equilibrated solution in acidic regions. It was, however, bigger in the complex coacervate at neutral and in alkaline regions. The content of polyacrylamide was also calculated from the particle diameter of complex coacervate measured by small angle X-ray scattering, and the result was well coincided with the analytical result. The stability of the complex coacervate against the addition of salts was better than that of the untreated colloidal silica. The rate of electrophoretic transport of the complex coacervate was also lower than that of the colloidal silica. From these observation it was concluded that the hydrophobic colloidal silica particles were protected by the surrounding hydrophilic polyacrylamide. (author).

  10. Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-07-20

    The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

  11. Colloids with high-definition surface structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-07-03

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of approximately 10(7) to 10(8) particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors.

  12. Colloidal oatmeal: history, chemistry and clinical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Ellen S; Wallo, Warren

    2007-02-01

    Oatmeal has been used for centuries as a soothing agent to relieve itch and irritation associated with various xerotic dermatoses. In 1945, a ready to use colloidal oatmeal, produced by finely grinding the oat and boiling it to extract the colloidal material, became available. Today, colloidal oatmeal is available in various dosage forms from powders for the bath to shampoos, shaving gels, and moisturizing creams. Currently, the use of colloidal oatmeal as a skin protectant is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) according to the Over-The-Counter Final Monograph for Skin Protectant Drug Products issued in June 2003. Its preparation is also standardized by the United States Pharmacopeia. The many clinical properties of colloidal oatmeal derive from its chemical polymorphism. The high concentration in starches and beta-glucan is responsible for the protective and water-holding functions of oat. The presence of different types of phenols confers antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Some of the oat phenols are also strong ultraviolet absorbers. The cleansing activity of oat is mostly due to saponins. Its many functional properties make colloidal oatmeal a cleanser, moisturizer, buffer, as well as a soothing and protective anti-inflammatory agent.

  13. Phase diagrams of binary crystalline-crystalline polymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkar, Rushikesh A; Kyu, Thein

    2006-08-17

    A thermodynamically self-consistent theory has been developed to establish binary phase diagrams for two-crystalline polymer blends by taking into consideration all interactions including amorphous-amorphous, crystal-amorphous, amorphous-crystal, and crystal-crystal interactions. The present theory basically involves combination of the Flory-Huggins free energy for amorphous-amorphous isotropic mixing and the Landau free energy of polymer solidification (e.g., crystallization) of the crystalline constituents. The self-consistent solution via minimization of the free energy of the mixture affords determination of eutectic, peritectic, and azeotrope phase diagrams involving various coexistence regions such as liquid-liquid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid coexistence regions bound by liquidus and solidus lines. To validate the present theory, the predicted eutectic phase diagrams have been compared with the reported experimental binary phase diagrams of blends such as polyethylene fractions as well as polycaprolactone/trioxane mixtures.

  14. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, L.S.; Santschi, P.H.; Tang, D. [Texas A & M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority ( >50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase ({ge} 0.45{mu}m), except for {sup 65}Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe ({approximately}60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of {sup 59}Fe and {sup 110}Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of {sup 54}Mn, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 113}Sn, and {sup 60}Co increased while the LMW({le}1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying affinities for different trace metals. 39 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Exploiting imperfections in the bulk to direct assembly of surface colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Marcello; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2013-01-01

    We exploit the long-ranged elastic fields inherent to confined nematic liquid crystals (LCs) to assemble colloidal particles trapped at the LC interface into reconfigurable structures with complex symmetries and packings. Spherical colloids with homeotropic anchoring trapped at the interface between air and the nematic LC 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl create quadrupolar distortions in the director field causing particles to repel and consequently form close-packed assemblies with a triangular habit. Here, we report on complex open structures organized via interactions with defects in the bulk. Specifically, by confining the nematic LC in an array of microposts with homeotropic anchoring conditions, we cause defect rings to form at well-defined locations in the bulk of the sample. These defects source elastic deformations that direct the assembly of the interfacially trapped colloids into ring-like assemblies, which recapitulate the defect geometry even when the microposts are completely immersed in the nematic. When the surface density of the colloids is high, they form a ring near the defect and a hexagonal lattice far from it. Because topographically complex substrates are easily fabricated and LC defects are readily reconfigured, this work lays the foundation for a versatile, robust mechanism to direct assembly dynamically over large areas by controlling surface anchoring and associated bulk defect structure. PMID:24191037

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of the solid-liquid transition in hard spheres and colloid-polymer mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykova-Timan, T; Horbach, J; Binder, K

    2010-07-07

    Monte Carlo simulations at constant pressure are performed to study coexistence and interfacial properties of the liquid-solid transition in hard spheres and in colloid-polymer mixtures. The latter system is described as a one-component Asakura-Oosawa (AO) model where the polymer's degrees of freedom are incorporated via an attractive part in the effective potential for the colloid-colloid interactions. For the considered AO model, the polymer reservoir packing fraction is eta(p) (r)=0.1 and the colloid-polymer size ratio is q[triple bond]sigma(p)/sigma=0.15 (with sigma(p) and sigma as the diameter of polymers and colloids, respectively). Inhomogeneous solid-liquid systems are prepared by placing the solid fcc phase in the middle of a rectangular simulation box, creating two interfaces with the adjoined bulk liquid. By analyzing the growth of the crystalline region at various pressures and for different system sizes, the coexistence pressure p(co) is obtained, yielding p(co)=11.576 k(B)T/sigma(3) for the hard-sphere system and p(co)=8.00 k(B)T/sigma(3) for the AO model (with k(B) as the Boltzmann constant and T as the temperature). Several order parameters are introduced to distinguish between solid and liquid phases and to describe the interfacial properties. From the capillary-wave broadening of the solid-liquid interface, the interfacial stiffness is obtained for the (100) crystalline plane, giving the values gamma approximately 0.49 k(B)T/sigma(2) for the hard-sphere system and gamma approximately 0.95 k(B)T/sigma(2) for the AO model.

  17. Colloid's influences on microalgae growth as a potential environmental factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵新淮; 张正斌; 刘莲生

    2003-01-01

    The role of colloid as "colloid pump" in the ocean is well known. The important influence of colloid in seawater on the growth of microalga was found in our 1999-2000 study. Colloid concentrates were obtained by employing a cross-flow filtration systen to ultrafilter seawater (which had been pre-filtrated by 0.45 μm acetate cellulose membrane) successively with different membranes. Ultrafiltration retentions (we called them colloid concentrates ) together with control sample ( seawater without colloid) were then inoculated with two species of microalgae and cultivated in selected conditions. Monitoring of microalgae growth during cultivation showed that all colloid concentrates had obvious influence on the growth of the microalgae studied. Addition of Fe(OH)3 colloid or organic colloid (protein or carbohydrate) to the control sample enhanced the microalgae's growth.

  18. Equilibrium sedimentation profile of dilute, salt-free charged colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yu; Li, Hsien-Tsung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2008-11-28

    The sedimentation profile of a dilute colloidal solution follows the barometric distribution owing to the balance between gravitational force and thermal fluctuation. However, the electrostatic interactions may lead to significant deviation even in the low volume fraction limit (e.g., 10(-5)). On the basis of Monte Carlo simulations for a dilute, salt-free colloidal dispersion, five regimes can be identified through the resulting colloidal sedimentation profile and the counterion distribution. The electrostatic interactions depends on the Coulomb strength E(c) defined as the ratio of the Bjerrum length to the colloid size. At weak colloid-ion attractions (small E(c)), counterions tend to distribute uniformly in the container. However, both barometric and inflated profiles of colloids can be observed. On the contrary, at strong colloid-ion attraction (large E(c)), counterions accumulate in the vicinity of the colloids. Significant counterion condensation effectively decreases the strength of colloid-colloid repulsion and barometric profile of colloids can be obtained as well. As a result, the sedimentation profile and counterion distribution are indicative of the strength of effective colloid-colloid and colloid-ion interactions. It is also found that local electroneutrality condition is generally not satisfied and charge separation (or internal electric field) is neither a sufficient nor necessary condition for nonbarometric distributions.

  19. Colloidal Gelation-2 and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 Investigations Conducted on STS-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Monica T.

    2000-01-01

    The Colloidal Gelation-2 (CGEL 2) and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 (CDOT 2) investigations flew on Space Shuttle Discovery mission STS-95 (also known as the John Glenn Mission). These investigations were part of a series of colloid experiments designed to help scientists answer fundamental science questions and reduce the trial and error involved in developing new and better materials. Industries dealing with semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. The goal of the CGEL 2 investigation was to study the fundamental properties of colloids to help scientists better understand their nature and make them more useful for technology. Colloids consist of very small (submicron) particles suspended in a fluid. They play a critical role in the technology of this country, finding uses in materials ranging from paints and coatings to drugs, cosmetics, food, and drink. Although these products are routinely produced and used, there are still many aspects of their behavior about which scientists know little. Understanding their structures may allow scientists to manipulate the physical properties of colloids (a process called "colloidal engineering") to produce new materials and products. Colloid research may even improve the processing of known products to enhance their desirable properties.

  20. Colloids and polymers in random colloidal matrices: Demixing under good-solvent conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Mario Alberto; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    We consider a simplified coarse-grained model for colloid-polymer mixtures, in which polymers are represented as monoatomic molecules interacting by means of pair potentials. We use it to study polymer-colloid segregation in the presence of a quenched matrix of colloidal hard spheres. We fix the polymer-to-colloid size ratio to 0.8 and consider matrices such that the fraction f of the volume that is not accessible to the colloids due to the matrix is equal to 40%. As in the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij (AOV) case, we find that binodal curves in the polymer and colloid volume-fraction plane have a small dependence on disorder. As for the position of the critical point, the behavior differs from that observed in the AOV case: While the critical colloid volume fraction is essentially the same in the bulk and in the presence of the matrix, the polymer volume fraction at criticality increases as f increases. At variance with the AOV case, no capillary colloid condensation or evaporation is generically observed.

  1. Gravitational Effects of a Crystalline Quantum Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, David

    2017-01-01

    In this work, concepts in quantum mechanics and general relativity are used to derive the quantums of space and time. After showing that space and time, at the Planck scale, must be discrete and not continuous, various anomalous gravitational effects are described. It is discussed how discrete space necessarily imposes order upon Wheeler's quantum foam, changing the foam into a crystal. The forces in this crystal are gravitational forces due to the ordered array of electrically neutral Planck masses, and with a lattice constant on the order of the Planck length. Thus the crystal is a gravity crystal rather than the more common crystals (e.g., silicon) that rely on electromagnetic forces. It is shown that similar solid-state physics techniques can be applied to this universe-wide gravity crystal to calculate particles' dispersion curves. It is shown that the crystal produces typical crystalline effects, namely bandgaps, Brillouin zones, and effective inertial masses that may differ from the gravitational masses with possible values even being near zero or negative. It is shown that the gravity crystal can affect the motion of black holes in dramatic ways, imbuing them with a negative inertial mass such that they are pushed by the pull of gravity.

  2. Photocontrollable liquid-crystalline actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haifeng [Top Runner Incubation Center for Academia-Industry Fusion and Department of Materials and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Ikeda, Tomiki [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R1-11, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2011-05-17

    Coupling photochromic molecules with liquid crystalline (LC) materials enables one to reversibly photocontrol unique LC features such as phase transition, photoalignment, and molecular cooperative motion. LC elastomers show photomechanical and photomobile properties, directly converting light energy into mechanical energy. In well-defined LC block copolymers, regular patternings of nanostructures in macroscopic scales are fabricated by photo-manipulation of LC actuators. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Liquid Crystalline Esters of Dibenzophenazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin John Anthony Bozek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of esters of 2,3,6,7-tetrakis(hexyloxydibenzo[a,c]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid was prepared in order to probe the effects of the ester groups on the liquid crystalline behavior. These compounds exhibit columnar hexagonal phases over broad temperature ranges. Variations in chain length, branching, terminal groups, and the presence of cyclic groups were found to modify transition temperatures without substantially destabilizing the mesophase range.

  4. EXAFS studies of crystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, G.S.; Georgopoulos, P.

    1982-01-01

    The application of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique to the study of crystalline materials is discussed, and previously published work on the subject is reviewed with 46 references being cited. The theory of EXAFS, methods of data analysis, and the experimental techniques, including those based on synchrotron and laboratory facilities are all discussed. Absorption and fluorescence methods of detecting EXAFS also receive attention. (BLM)

  5. Drying of thin colloidal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Alexander F.

    2013-04-01

    When thin films of colloidal fluids are dried, a range of transitions are observed and the final film profile is found to depend on the processes that occur during the drying step. This article describes the drying process, initially concentrating on the various transitions. Particles are seen to initially consolidate at the edge of a drying droplet, the so-called coffee-ring effect. Flow is seen to be from the centre of the drop towards the edge and a front of close-packed particles passes horizontally across the film. Just behind the particle front the now solid film often displays cracks and finally the film is observed to de-wet. These various transitions are explained, with particular reference to the capillary pressure which forms in the solidified region of the film. The reasons for cracking in thin films is explored as well as various methods to minimize its effect. Methods to obtain stratified coatings through a single application are considered for a one-dimensional drying problem and this is then extended to two-dimensional films. Different evaporative models are described, including the physical reason for enhanced evaporation at the edge of droplets. The various scenarios when evaporation is found to be uniform across a drying film are then explained. Finally different experimental techniques for examining the drying step are mentioned and the article ends with suggested areas that warrant further study.

  6. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  7. ADVANCES IN LIQUID CRYSTALLINE POLYESTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. J. Jackson

    1992-01-01

    Advances have been made in understanding the interactions of composition, molecular weight,liquid crystallinity, orientation, and three-dimensional crystallinity on the properties of injection-molded and melt-spun liquid crystalline polyesters (LCP's). Two classes of potentially low-cost LCP's were compared : (1) semiflexible LCP's prepared from 1,6-hexanediol and the dimethyl ester of either trans-4, 4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid or 4.4 ′-biphenyldicarboxylic acid and (2) all-aromatic LCP's prepared from terephthalic acid, 2, 6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid, the diacetate of hydroquinone,and the acetate of p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The effects of composition on the plastic properties of the 4-component all-aromatic LCP's were determined with the aid of a 3 × 3 factorial statistically designed experiment, the generation of equations with a computer program, and the plotting of three-dimensional figures and contour diagrams. The effects of absolute molecular weight (Mw) on the tensile strengths of the semiflexible LCP's and one of the all-aromatic LCP's having an excellent balance of plastic properties were also compared, and it was observed that the semiflexible LCP's required Mw's about 4 times higher than the all-aromatic LCP to attain a given strength. Persistence lengths and molecular modeling were used to explain these differences.

  8. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  9. Colloids in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruer, Rachel M; Ensor, Christopher R

    2012-10-01

    The most recent published evidence on the use of colloids versus crystalloids in critical care is reviewed, with a focus on population-dependent differences in safety and efficacy. Colloids offer a number of theoretical advantages over crystalloids for fluid resuscitation, but some colloids (e.g., hydroxyethyl starch solutions, dextrans) can have serious adverse effects, and albumin products entail higher costs. The results of the influential Saline Versus Albumin Fluid Evaluation (SAFE) trial and a subsequent SAFE subgroup analysis indicated that colloid therapy should not be used in patients with traumatic brain injury and other forms of trauma due to an increased mortality risk relative to crystalloid therapy. With regard to patients with severe sepsis, two meta-analyses published in 2011, which collectively evaluated 82 trials involving nearly 10,000 patients, indicated comparable outcomes with the use of either crystalloids or albumins. For patients requiring extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during heart surgery, the available evidence supports the use of a colloid, particularly albumin, for CPB circuit priming and postoperative volume expansion. In select patients with burn injury, the published evidence supports the use of supplemental colloids if adequate urine output cannot be maintained with a crystalloid-only rescue strategy. The results of the SAFE trial and a subgroup analysis of SAFE data suggest that colloids should be avoided in patients with trauma and traumatic brain injury. There are minimal differences in outcome between crystalloids and hypo-oncotic or iso-oncotic albumin for fluid resuscitation in severe sepsis; in select populations, such as patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the use of iso-oncotic albumin may confer a survival advantage and should be considered a first-line alternative.

  10. From colloidal nanoparticles to a single crystal: new insights into the formation of nacre's aragonite tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gangsheng; Xu, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Nacre has long served as a model for understanding the biomineralization mechanism and designing bio-inspired materials. However, its basic building blocks, the aragonite tablets, are still under debate in terms of their fine structure at the nanoscale and corresponding formation mechanism. Here, using a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and X-ray diffractometer, we comparatively investigate the immature and mature tablet from the green mussel's nacre. We find that: (1) the early immature tablet consists of closely-packed colloidal nanoparticles, which contain nanocrystals surrounded by the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase. Moreover, these nanocrystals are generally different in shape, size, and orientation; (2) the immature tablet can grow via oriented attachment besides via transformation of the ACC phase; and (3) with growth, the colloidal nanoparticles gradually increase in crystallinity and size until fully crystallized and fused together, leading to a mature tablet that is a monolithic single crystal of aragonite. Based on these findings, we propose a new model showing how the mature tablet evolves from the primary colloidal ACC nanoparticles. We expect this work will provide new insights into the formation of single crystal biominerals via the amorphous precursor route.

  11. Hybrid halide perovskite solar cell precursors: colloidal chemistry and coordination engineering behind device processing for high efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Keyou; Long, Mingzhu; Zhang, Tiankai; Wei, Zhanhua; Chen, Haining; Yang, Shihe; Xu, Jianbin

    2015-04-01

    The precursor of solution-processed perovskite thin films is one of the most central components for high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. We first present the crucial colloidal chemistry visualization of the perovskite precursor solution based on analytical spectra and reveal that perovskite precursor solutions for solar cells are generally colloidal dispersions in a mother solution, with a colloidal size up to the mesoscale, rather than real solutions. The colloid is made of a soft coordination complex in the form of a lead polyhalide framework between organic and inorganic components and can be structurally tuned by the coordination degree, thereby primarily determining the basic film coverage and morphology of deposited thin films. By utilizing coordination engineering, particularly through employing additional methylammonium halide over the stoichiometric ratio for tuning the coordination degree and mode in the initial colloidal solution, along with a thermal leaching for the selective release of excess methylammonium halides, we achieved full and even coverage, the preferential orientation, and high purity of planar perovskite thin films. We have also identified that excess organic component can reduce the colloidal size of and tune the morphology of the coordination framework in relation to final perovskite grains and partial chlorine substitution can accelerate the crystalline nucleation process of perovskite. This work demonstrates the important fundamental chemistry of perovskite precursors and provides genuine guidelines for accurately controlling the high quality of hybrid perovskite thin films without any impurity, thereby delivering efficient planar perovskite solar cells with a power conversion efficiency as high as 17% without distinct hysteresis owing to the high quality of perovskite thin films.

  12. Large-area, near-infrared (IR) photonic crystals with colloidal gold nanoparticles embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shobha; Baev, Alexander; Jee, Hongsub; Hu, Rui; Burzynski, Ryszard; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-04-01

    A polymeric composite material composed of colloidal gold nanoparticles (slabs from composite materials using a combination of multiple beam interference lithography and reactive ion etching processes. Doping of colloidal gold nanoparticles into the SU8 photopolymer results in a better definition of structural features and hence in the enhancement of the optical properties of the fabricated photonic crystals. A 2D air hole array of triangular symmetry with a hole-to-hole pitch of approximately 500 nm has been successfully fabricated in a large circular area of 1 cm diameter. Resonant features observed in reflectance spectra of our slabs are found to depend on the exposure time, and can be tuned over a range of near-infrared frequencies.

  13. Clogging by sieving in microchannels: Application to the detection of contaminants in colloidal suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Sauret, Alban; Perro, Adeline; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Stone, Howard A; Dressaire, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic method that allows measurement of a small concentration of large contaminants in suspensions of solid micrometer-scale particles. To perform the measurement, we flow the colloidal suspension through a series of constrictions, i.e. a microchannel of varying cross-section. We show and quantify the role of large contaminants in the formation of clogs at a constriction and the growth of the resulting filter cake. By measuring the time interval between two clogging events in an array of parallel microchannels, we are able to estimate the concentration of contaminants whose size is selected by the geometry of the microfluidic device. This technique for characterizing colloidal suspensions offers a versatile and rapid tool to explore the role of contaminants on the properties of the suspensions.

  14. Self-assembling three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystal multilayers from aqueous ethanol mixture solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Yuan Chun-Wei; Tang Fang-Qiong

    2005-01-01

    Vertical deposition technique to fabricate thin film solid artificial opals is becoming widely used. In the present work, we report our research on solvent modification and its effect on the quality of colloidal crystals. We used aqueous ethanol mixture solution to replace the ethanol solution, and used the vertical deposition technique to pack the spherical colloids into close-packed arrays. High quality samples can be prepared with thickness up to 20μm in one step. Furthermore, large spheres (diameters greater than 500nm) were successfully crystallized. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical methods were used to measure sample thickness and uniformity. The number of layers was calculated from the spectral separation of the Fabry-Perot fringes.

  15. Integrated lithography to prepare arrays of rounded nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Csete, Mária

    2012-03-01

    An integrated lithography method is presented to prepare rounded nano-objects with variable shape, in arrays with arbitrary symmetry and wavelength-scaled periodicity. Finite element method was applied to determine the near-field confinement under monolayers of silver and gold colloid spheres illuminated by circularly polarized beams possessing periodic intensity distribution, and to predict the shape of nano-objects, which can be fabricated on thin noble metal layers on glass substrates. It was shown that illumination by perpendicularly incident homogeneous beam results in hexagonal array of uniform nano-rings, while uniform nano-crescents appear due to single obliquely incident beam. Illumination of colloid sphere monolayers by interfering beams causes development of co-existent nano-rings and nanocrescents. It was demonstrated that the periodicity of complex patterns is determined by the wavelength and angle of incidence; the inter-object distance is controlled by the relative orientation of interference patterns with respect to colloid sphere monolayers; the nano-object size is determined by the wavelength, sphere diameter and material; while the nearfield distribution sensitively depends on the direction of illumination by circularly polarized light. We present complex patterns of various rounded nano-objects that can be uniquely fabricated via Circular Integrated Interference and Colloid sphere Lithography (CIICL), and applied as plasmonic and meta-materials.

  16. Colloidal spirals in nematic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Pandey, Manoj B; Liu, Qingkun; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-12-07

    One of the central experimental efforts in nematic colloids research aims to explore how the interplay between the geometry of particles along with the accompanying nematic director deformations and defects around them can provide a means of guiding particle self-assembly and controlling the structure of particle-induced defects. In this work, we design, fabricate, and disperse low-symmetry colloidal particles with shapes of spirals, double spirals, and triple spirals in a nematic fluid. These spiral-shaped particles, which are controlled by varying their surface functionalization to provide tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions of the nematic molecular alignment, are found inducing director distortions and defect configurations with non-chiral or chiral symmetry. Colloidal particles also exhibit both stable and metastable multiple orientational states in the nematic host, with a large number of director configurations featuring both singular and solitonic nonsingular topological defects accompanying them, which can result in unusual forms of colloidal self-assembly. Our findings directly demonstrate how the symmetry of particle-generated director configurations can be further lowered, or not, as compared to the low point group symmetry of solid micro-inclusions, depending on the nature of induced defects while satisfying topological constraints. We show that achiral colloidal particles can cause chiral symmetry breaking of elastic distortions, which is driven by complex three-dimensional winding of induced topological line defects and solitons.

  17. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-09

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters.

  18. Physics of liquid and crystalline plasmas: Future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfill, G. E.

    It has been shown that under certain conditions "complex plasmas" (plasma containing ions, electrons and charged microspheres) may undergo spontaneous phase changes to become liquid and crystalline, without recombination of the charge components. Hence these systems may be regarded as new plasma states "condensed plasmas". The ordering forces are mainly electrostatic, but dipolar effects, anisotropic pressure due shielding, ion flow focussing etc. may all play a role, too. Complex plasmas are of great interest from a fundamental research point of view because the individual particles of one plasma component (the charged microspheres) can be visualised and hence the plasma can be studied at the kinetic level. Also, the relevant time scales (e.g. 1/plasma frequency) are of order 0.1 sec, the plasma processes occur practically in "slow motion". We will discuss some physical processes (e.g. wave propagation, shocks, phase transitions) of these systems and outline the potential of the research for the understanding of strongly coupled systems. Technologically, it is expected that colloidal plasmas will also become very important, because both plasma technology and colloid technology are widely developed already. In this overview first the basic forces between the particles are discussed, then the phase transitions, the lattice structures and results from active experiments will be presented. Finally the future perspectives will be discussed, from the scientific potential point of view and the experimental approaches in the laboratory and in space. Experiments under microgravity conditions are of great importance, because the microspheres are 10's of billions times heavier than the ions.

  19. Colloidal Magnetic Heterostructured Nanocrystals with Asymmetric Topologies: Seeded-Growth Synthetic Routes and Formation Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Scarfiello

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals, free-standing crystalline nanostructures generated and processed in solution phase, represent an important class of advanced nanoscale materials owing to the flexibility with which their physical–chemical properties can be controlled through synthetic tailoring of their compositional, structural and geometric features and the versatility with which they can be integrated in technological fields as diverse as optoelectronics, energy storage/ conversion/production, catalysis and biomedicine. In recent years, building upon mechanistic knowledge acquired on the thermodynamic and kinetic processes that underlie nanocrystal evolution in liquid media, synthetic nanochemistry research has made impressive advances, opening new possibilities for the design, creation and mastering of increasingly complex colloidal molecules, in which nanocrystal modules of different materials are clustered together via solid-state bonding interfaces into free-standing, easily processable multifunctional nanocomposite systems. This Review will provide a glimpse into this fast-growing research field by illustrating progress achieved in the wet-chemical development of last-generation breeds of all-inorganic heterostructured nanocrystals (HNCs in asymmetric non-onionlike geometries, inorganic analogues of polyfunctional organic molecules, in which distinct nanoscale crystalline modules are interconnected in hetero-dimer, hetero-oligomer and anisotropic multidomain architectures via epitaxial heterointerfaces of limited extension. The focus will be on modular HNCs entailing at least one magnetic material component combined with semiconductors and/or metals, which hold potential for generating enhanced or unconventional magnetic properties, while offering diversified or even new chemical-physical properties and functional capabilities. The available toolkit of synthetic strategies, all based on the manipulation of seeded-growth techniques

  20. Global Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2015-11-01

    Global Arrays (GA) is a distributed-memory programming model that allows for shared-memory-style programming combined with one-sided communication, to create a set of tools that combine high performance with ease-of-use. GA exposes a relatively straightforward programming abstraction, while supporting fully-distributed data structures, locality of reference, and high-performance communication. GA was originally formulated in the early 1990’s to provide a communication layer for the Northwest Chemistry (NWChem) suite of chemistry modeling codes that was being developed concurrently.

  1. Fabrication and optical properties of Alq 3 doped PMMA microsphere arrays templated by ZnO inverse opal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ming; Deng, Lier; Zhao, Ailun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Dawei

    2010-07-01

    PMMA microsphere arrays are fabricated by a double replicating method with common used polystyrene colloidal crystal template. High quality ZnO inverse opals formed by electrodeposition play the key role between the PMMA microsphere arrays and polystyrene colloidal crystals. The electrodeposition method has advantage on fabricating IO structures with high solid fraction. After the subsequently in-situ polymerization of MMA in the voids of ZnO inverse opals, the ZnO is removed by hydrochloric acid solution. Microsphere arrays fabricated by PMMA or PMMA doped with Alq 3 are prepared. Reflection stop bands are detected from the formed PMMA microsphere arrays. Solid fraction from 37% to 50% of the PMMA arrays can be formed by different in-situ polymerization modes of MMA. The photoluminescence of Alq 3 in the PMMA spheres is partly suppressed at the wavelength of the photonic stop band induced by PMMA arrays.

  2. Quil A-lipid powder formulations releasing ISCOMs and related colloidal structures upon hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Patrick H; Davies, Nigel M; Hook, Sarah; Rades, Thomas

    2005-03-02

    The aim of the present study was to prepare solid Quil A-cholesterol-phospholipid formulations (as powder mixtures or compressed to pellets) by physical mixing or by freeze-drying of aqueous dispersions of these components in ratios that allow spontaneous formation of ISCOMs and other colloidal structures upon hydration. The effect of addition of excess cholesterol to the lipid mixtures on the release of a model antigen (PE-FITC-OVA) from the pellets was also investigated. Physical properties were evaluated by X-ray powder diffractometry (XPRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Characterization of aqueous colloidal dispersions was performed by negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physically mixed powders (with or without PE-FITC-OVA) and pellets prepared from the same powders did not spontaneously form ISCOM matrices and related colloidal structures such as worm-like micelles, ring-like micelles, lipidic/layered structures and lamellae (hexagonal array of ring-like micelles) upon hydration as expected from the pseudo-ternary diagram for aqueous mixtures of Quil A, cholesterol and phospholipid. In contrast, spontaneous formation of the expected colloids was demonstrated for the freeze-dried lipid mixtures. Pellets prepared by compression of freeze-dried powders released PE-FITC-OVA slower than those prepared from physically mixed powders. TEM investigations revealed that the antigen was released in the form of colloidal particles (ISCOMs) from pellets prepared by compression of freeze-dried powders. The addition of excess cholesterol slowed down the release of antigen. The findings obtained in this study are important for the formulation of solid Quil A-containing lipid articles as controlled particulate adjuvant containing antigen delivery systems.

  3. Neptunium Colloidal Behaviors in Present of Humic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The colloidal-borne facilitated transport of actinides is an important part of radionuclide migration investigation in HLW geological disposal. In the present studies, Np colloidal behaviors in present of

  4. Colloidal joints with designed motion range and tunable joint flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Indrani; Meester, Vera; van der Wel, Casper; Kraft, Daniela J

    2017-06-14

    The miniaturization of machines towards the micron and nanoscale requires the development of joint-like elements that enable and constrain motion. We present a facile method to create colloidal joints, that is, anisotropic colloidal particles functionalized with surface mobile DNA linkers that control the motion range of bonded particles. We demonstrate quantitatively that we can control the flexibility of these colloidal joints by tuning the DNA linker concentration in the bond area. We show that the shape of the colloidal joint controls the range of motion of bonded particles through a maximisation of the bond area. Using spheres, cubes, and dumbbells, we experimentally realize spherical joints, planar sliders, and hinges, respectively. Finally we demonstrate the potential of the colloidal joints for programmable bottom-up self-assembly by creating flexible colloidal molecules and colloidal polymers. The reconfigurability and motion constraint offered by our colloidal joints make them promising building blocks for the development of switchable materials and nanorobots.

  5. Inorganic passivation and doping control in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Hoogland, Sjoerd H.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss strategies to reduce midgap trap state densities in colloidal quantum dot films and requirements to control doping type and magnitude. We demonstrate that these improvements result in colloidal quantum dot solar cells with certified 7.0% efficiency.

  6. Continuum theory for cluster morphologies of soft colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmrlj, A; Pauschenwein, G J; Kahl, G; Ziherl, P

    2011-06-01

    We introduce a continuum description of the thermodynamics of colloids with a core-corona architecture. In the case of thick coronas, their overlap can be treated approximately by replacing the exact one-particle density distribution by a suitably shaped step profile, which provides a convenient way of modeling the spherical, columnar, lamellar, and inverted cluster morphologies predicted by numerical simulations and the more involved theories. We use the model to study monodisperse particles with the hard-core/square-shoulder pair interaction as the simplest representatives of the core-corona class. We derive approximate analytical expressions for the enthalpies of the cluster morphologies which offer a clear insight into the mechanisms at work, and we calculate the lattice spacing and the cluster size for all morphologies of the phase sequence as well as the phase-transition pressures. By comparing the results with the exact crystalline minimum-enthalpy configurations, we show that the accuracy of the theory increases with shoulder width. We discuss possible extensions of the theory that could account for the finite-temperature effects.

  7. Doped Colloidal ZnO Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal ZnO nanocrystals are promising for a wide range of applications due to the combination of unique multifunctional nature and remarkable solution processability. Doping is an effective approach of enhancing the properties of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals in well-controlled manners. In this paper, we analyzed two synthetic strategies for the doped colloidal ZnO nanocrystals, emphasizing our understanding on the critical factors associated with the high temperature and nonaqueous approach. Latest advances of three topics, bandgap engineering, n-type doping, and dilute magnetic semiconductors related to doped ZnO nanocrystals were discussed to reveal the effects of dopants on the properties of the nanocrystalline materials.

  8. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

  9. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems. PMID:24100868

  10. Charge-transfer processes in semiconductor colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Prashant V.; Gopidas, K. R.

    1990-04-01

    A picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy technique has been employed to probe the charge transfer processes in Ti02 semiconductor colloids. The trapping of electrons at the TiO surface (Ti4+ sitesY was characterized from the appearance of a broad absorption in the region of 550-750 nm following the 355-nm laser pulse excitation of Ti02 colloids. The lifetime of these trapped charge carriers increased upon incorporation of a hole scavenger in the colloidal semiconductor system. The mechanistic and kinetic details of the charge injection from excited CdS into a large bandgap semiconductor such as AgI and Ti02 have also been inves-' t i ga ted.

  11. Dynamic Assembly of Magnetic Colloidal Vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Kokot, Gašper; Osterman, Natan; Snezhko, Alexey; Vilfan, Andrej; Babič, Dušan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-04-29

    Magnetic colloids in external time-dependent fields are subject to complex induced many-body interactions governing their self-assembly into a variety of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium structures such as chains, networks, suspended membranes, and colloidal foams. Here, we report experiments, simulations, and theory probing the dynamic assembly of superparamagnetic colloids in precessing external magnetic fields. Within a range of field frequencies, we observe dynamic large-scale structures such as ordered phases composed of precessing chains, ribbons, and rotating fluidic vortices. We show that the structure formation is inherently coupled to the buildup of torque, which originates from internal relaxation of induced dipoles and from transient correlations among the particles as a result of short-lived chain formation. We discuss in detail the physical properties of the vortex phase and demonstrate its potential in particle-coating applications.

  12. Vector assembly of colloids on monolayer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yang, Shenyu; Tsang, Boyce; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve

    2017-06-01

    The key to spontaneous and directed assembly is to encode the desired assembly information to building blocks in a programmable and efficient way. In computer graphics, raster graphics encodes images on a single-pixel level, conferring fine details at the expense of large file sizes, whereas vector graphics encrypts shape information into vectors that allow small file sizes and operational transformations. Here, we adapt this raster/vector concept to a 2D colloidal system and realize `vector assembly' by manipulating particles on a colloidal monolayer substrate with optical tweezers. In contrast to raster assembly that assigns optical tweezers to each particle, vector assembly requires a minimal number of optical tweezers that allow operations like chain elongation and shortening. This vector approach enables simple uniform particles to form a vast collection of colloidal arenes and colloidenes, the spontaneous dissociation of which is achieved with precision and stage-by-stage complexity by simply removing the optical tweezers.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological applications of colloidal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Wolfgang J.; Gerion, Daniele; Pellegrino, Teresa; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine; Williams, Shara C.; Boudreau, Rosanne; LeGros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2003-07-01

    Due to their interesting properties, research on colloidal nanocrystals has moved in the last few years from fundamental research to first applications in materials science and life sciences. In this review some recent biological applications of colloidal nanocrystals are discussed, without going into biological or chemical details. First, the properties of colloidal nanocrystals and how they can be synthesized are described. Second, the conjugation of nanocrystals with biological molecules is discussed. And third, three different biological applications are introduced: (i) the arrangement of nanocrystal-oligonucleotide conjugates using molecular scaffolds such as single-stranded DNA, (ii) the use of nanocrystal-protein conjugates as fluorescent probes for cellular imaging, and (iii) a motility assay based on the uptake of nanocrystals by living cells.

  14. Enhanced photoredox chemistry in quantized semiconductor colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Nenadovic, M.T.; Micic, O.I.; Nozik, A.J.

    1986-01-02

    Optical effects due to size quantization have been observed for HgSe, PbSe, and CdSe colloids in water and acetonitrile with particle diameters of 20-100 A. For diameters less than 50 A, the optical absorption edge of HgSe and PbSe is blue shifted by several volts. The results are consistent with perturbation of the semiconductor band structure due to carrier confinement in very small particles resulting in an increase in the effective band gap. The redox potential of photogenerated carriers is greatly enhanced in such quantized semiconductor particles; reduction reactions that cannot occur in bulk materials can occur in sufficiently small particles. This has been demonstrated with H/sub 2/ evolution in 50-A PbSe and HgSe colloids and CO/sub 2/ reduction in 50-A CdSe colloids. 13 references, 3 figures.

  15. Manipulating semiconductor colloidal stability through doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2014-10-10

    The interface between a doped semiconductor material and electrolyte solution is of considerable fundamental interest, and is relevant to systems of practical importance. Both adjacent domains contain mobile charges, which respond to potential variations. This is exploited to design electronic and optoelectronic sensors, and other enabling semiconductor colloidal materials. We show that the charge mobility in both phases leads to a new type of interaction between semiconductor colloids suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions. This interaction is due to the electrostatic response of the semiconductor interior to disturbances in the external field upon the approach of two particles. The electrostatic repulsion between two charged colloids is reduced from the one governed by the charged groups present at the particles surfaces. This type of interaction is unique to semiconductor particles and may have a substantial effect on the suspension dynamics and stability.

  16. Novel Photovoltaic Devices Using Ferroelectric Material and Colloidal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Young Hun

    As the global concern for the financial and environmental costs of traditional energy resources increases, research on renewable energy, most notably solar energy, has taken center stage. Many alternative photovoltaic (PV) technologies for 'the next generation solar cell' have been extensively studied to overcome the Shockley-Queisser 31% efficiency limit as well as tackle the efficiency vs. cost issues. This dissertation focuses on the novel photovoltaic mechanism for the next generation solar cells using two inorganic nanomaterials, nanocrystal quantum dots and ferroelectric nanoparticles. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) materials are widely studied and easy to synthesize using solution based chemistry. One of the fascinating properties of the PZT material is a Bulk Photovoltaic effect (BPVE). This property has been spotlighted because it can produce very high open circuit voltage regardless of the electrical bandgap of the materials. However, the poor optical absorption of the PZT materials and the required high temperature to form the ferroelectric crystalline structure have been obstacles to fabricate efficient photovoltaic devices. Colloidal quantum dots also have fascinating optical and electrical properties such as tailored absorption spectrum, capability of the bandgap engineering due to the wide range of material selection and quantum confinement, and very efficient carrier dynamics called multiple exciton generations. In order to utilize these properties, many researchers have put numerous efforts in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic research and there has been remarkable progress in the past decade. However, several drawbacks are still remaining to achieve highly efficient photovoltaic device. Traps created on the large surface area, low carrier mobility, and lower open circuit voltage while increasing the absorption of the solar spectrum is main issues of the nanocrystal based photovoltaic effect. To address these issues and to take the advantages of

  17. Highly Elastic and Self-Healing Composite Colloidal Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diba, Mani; Wang, Huanan; Kodger, Thomas E; Parsa, Shima; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2017-03-01

    Composite colloidal gels are formed by the pH-induced electrostatic assembly of silica and gelatin nanoparticles. These injectable and moldable colloidal gels are able to withstand substantial compressive and tensile loads, and exhibit a remarkable self-healing efficiency. This study provides new, critical insight into the structural and mechanical properties of composite colloidal gels and opens up new avenues for practical application of colloidal gels.

  18. Colloidal interactions in two-dimensional nematic emulsions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N M Silvestre; P Patrício; M M Telo Da Gama

    2005-06-01

    We review theoretical and experimental work on colloidal interactions in two-dimensional (2D) nematic emulsions. We pay particular attention to the effects of (i) the nematic elastic constants, (ii) the size of the colloids, and (iii) the boundary conditions at the particles and the container. We consider the interactions between colloids and fluid (deformable) interfaces and the shape of fluid colloids in smectic-C films.

  19. Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport: Current State of Knowledge from a Nuclear Waste Repository Risk Assessment Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    This report provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository risk assessment perspective. It draws on work that has been conducted over the past 3 decades, although there is considerable emphasis given to work that has been performed over the past 3-5 years as part of the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign. The timing of this report coincides with the completion of a 3-year DOE membership in the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) partnership, an international collaboration of scientists studying colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides at both the laboratory and field-scales in a fractured crystalline granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. This Underground Research Laboratory has hosted the most extensive and carefully-controlled set of colloid-facilitated solute transport experiments that have ever been conducted in an in-situ setting, and a summary of the results to date from these efforts, as they relate to transport over long time and distance scales, is provided in Chapter 3 of this report.

  20. Bulk nano-crystalline alloys

    OpenAIRE

    T.-S. Chin; Lin, C. Y.; Lee, M.C.; R.T. Huang; S. M. Huang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Fe–B–Y–Nb–Cu, 2 mm in diameter, were successfully annealed to become bulk nano-crystalline alloys (BNCAs) with α-Fe crystallite 11–13 nm in size. A ‘crystallization-and-stop’ model was proposed to explain this behavior. Following this model, alloy-design criteria were elucidated and confirmed successful on another Fe-based BMG Fe–B–Si–Nb–Cu, 1 mm in diameter, with crystallite sizes 10–40 nm. It was concluded that BNCAs can be designed in general by the proposed cr...

  1. Porous titania/carbon hybrid microspheres templated by in situ formed polystyrene colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ting; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xia, Yonggao; Sun, Zaicheng; Yang, Zhaohui; Liu, Rui; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Meimei; Ban, Jianzhen; Yang, Liangtao; Ji, Qing; Qiu, Bao; Chen, Guoxin; Chen, Huifeng; Lin, Yichao; Pei, Xiaoying; Wu, Qiang; Meng, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Zhaoping; Chen, Liang; Xiao, Tonghu; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Butt, Hans Jürgen; Cheng, Ya-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A new strategy to synthesize hierarchical, porous titania/carbon (TiO2/C) hybrid microspheres via solvothermal reaction in N,N'-dimethyl formamide (DMF) has been developed. In situ formed polystyrene (PS) colloids have been used as templating agent and carbon source, through which TiO2/PS microspheres with a diameter of ca. 1 μm are built by packed TiO2 nanoparticles of tens of nanometers. The TiO2/PS microspheres are converted to TiO2/C microspheres with different amounts of carbon under controlled calcination condition. The mechanism investigation unveils that the introduction of concentrated HCl creates surface tension between PS and DMF, leading to the formation of PS colloids in solution. The solvothermal treatment further promotes the formation of PS colloids and integration of the titania nanoparticles within the PS colloids. The morphology, crystallinity, nature and content of carbon, UV-Vis absorption, carbon doping, pore size distribution, pore volume, and BET surface area of the TiO2 microspheres with different amounts of carbon have been measured. The applications of the TiO2/C hybrid microspheres as photo catalyst for water splitting and lithium-ion battery anode have been demonstrated. Superior photo catalytic activity for hydrogen conversion under both full spectrum and visible light illumination compared to commercial P25 has been observed for the TiO2/C microspheres with 2 wt% of carbon. Besides, the TiO2/C microspheres with 8 wt% of carbon as lithium-ion battery anode showed a much higher capacity than the bare TiO2 microsphere anode. The origin for the enhanced performance as photo catalyst and lithium-ion battery anode is discussed.

  2. Oxyhydroxy Silicate Colloids: A New Type of Waterborne Actinide(IV) Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Z?nker, Harald; Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Brendler, Vinzenz; Ikeda?Ohno, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At the near?neutral and reducing aquatic conditions expected in undisturbed ore deposits or in closed nuclear waste repositories, the actinides Th, U, Np, and Pu are primarily tetravalent. These tetravalent actinides (AnIV) are sparingly soluble in aquatic systems and, hence, are often assumed to be immobile. However, AnIV could become mobile if they occur as colloids. This review focuses on a new type of AnIV colloids, oxyhydroxy silicate colloids. We herein discuss the chemical cha...

  3. Oxyhydroxy Silicate Colloids: A New Type of Waterborne Actinide(IV) Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Zänker, Harald; Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Brendler, Vinzenz; Ikeda‐Ohno, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At the near‐neutral and reducing aquatic conditions expected in undisturbed ore deposits or in closed nuclear waste repositories, the actinides Th, U, Np, and Pu are primarily tetravalent. These tetravalent actinides (AnIV) are sparingly soluble in aquatic systems and, hence, are often assumed to be immobile. However, AnIV could become mobile if they occur as colloids. This review focuses on a new type of AnIV colloids, oxyhydroxy silicate colloids. We herein discuss the chemical cha...

  4. Vortexlike topological defects in nematic colloids: chiral colloidal dimers and 2D crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalec, U; Ravnik, M; Zumer, S; Musevic, I

    2009-09-18

    We show that chiral ordering of the underlying complex fluid strongly influences defect formation and colloidal interactions. Nonsingular defect loops with a topological charge -2 are observed, with a cross section identical to hyperbolic vortices in magnetic systems. These loops are binding spontaneously formed pairs of colloidal particles and dimers, which are chiral objects. Chiral dimer-dimer interaction weakly depends on the chirality of dimers and leads to the assembly of 2D nematic colloidal crystals of pure or "mixed" chirality, intercalated with a lattice of nonsingular vortexlike defects.

  5. Clustering and self-assembly in colloidal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallenburg, F.

    2012-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion consists of small particles called colloids, typically tens of nanometers to a few micrometers in size, suspended in a solvent. Due to collisions with the much smaller particles in the solvent, colloids perform Brownian motion: randomly directed movements that cause the

  6. Interplay between Colloids and Interfaces : Emulsions, Foams and Microtubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Folter, J.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of this thesis is the interplay between colloids and interfaces. The adsorption of colloids at fluid-fluid interfaces is the main topic and covers Chapters 2-6. Pickering emulsions where colloidal particles act as emulsion stabilizers in the absence of surfactants are studied in a

  7. A general method to coat colloidal particles with titiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a general one-pot method for coating colloidal particles with amorphous titania. Various colloidal particles such as silica particles, large silver colloids, gibbsite platelets, and polystyrene spheres were successfully coated with a titania shell. Although there are several ways of coat

  8. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovicka, J.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called "colloid antibodies", were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating

  9. Introduction to Applied Colloid and Surface Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    Colloid and Surface Chemistry is a subject of immense importance and implications both to our everyday life and numerous industrial sectors, ranging from coatings and materials to medicine and biotechnology. How do detergents really clean? (Why can’t we just use water ?) Why is milk “milky” Why do......, to the benefit of both the environment and our pocket. Cosmetics is also big business! Creams, lotions and other personal care products are really just complex emulsions. All of the above can be explained by the principles and methods of colloid and surface chemistry. A course on this topic is truly valuable...

  10. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  11. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  12. Collective sliding states for colloidal molecular crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study the driving of colloidal molecular crystals over periodic substrates such as those created with optical traps. The n-merization that occurs in the colloidal molecular crystal states produces a remarkably rich variety of distinct dynamical behaviors, including polarization effects within the pinned phase and the formation of both ordered and disordered sliding phases. Using computer simulations, we map the dynamic phase diagrams as a function of substrate strength for dimers and trimers on a triangular substrate, and correlate features on the phase diagram with transport signatures.

  13. Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    We use x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) to probe the dynamics of colloidal particles in polycrystalline ice. During freezing, the dendritic ice morphology and rejection of particles from the ice created regions of high particle density, where some of the colloids were forced into contact and formed disordered aggregates. The particles in these high density regions underwent ballistic motion, with a characteristic velocity that increased with temperature. This ballistic motion is coupled with both stretched and compressed exponential decays of the intensity autocorrelation function. We suggest that this behavior could result from ice grain boundary migration. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Fabrication of anisotropic multifunctional colloidal carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerri, Huda A.

    The field of colloidal assembly has grown tremendously in recent years, although the direct or template-assisted methods used to fabricate complex colloidal constructions from monodisperse micro- and nanoparticles have been generally demonstrated on model materials. In this work, novel core particle syntheses, particle functionalizations and bottom-up assembly techniques are presented to create functional colloidal devices. Using particle lithography, high-information colloidal vectors have been developed and modified with imaging and targeting agents. Localized nanoscale patches have been reliably positioned on microparticles to serve as foundations for further chemical or physical modifications. Site-specific placement of RGD targeting ligands has been achieved in these lithographed patches. Preferential uptake of these targeted vectors by RGD-specific 3T3 fibroblasts was verified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. A transition was made from the functionalization of model imaging core particles to the lithography of colloidal cartridges, in an effort to construct colloidal syringes with specialized, programmable release profiles. A variety of functional, pH-sensitive fluorescent cores were engineered to respond to solution conditions. When triggered, the diverse composite core microparticles and reservoir microcapsules released embedded fluorescent moieties such as dye molecules, and fluorophore-conjugated nanoparticles. The microcapsules, created using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition on sacrificial templates, were selectively modified with a robust coating. The pH-responsive anisotropic reservoir microcapsules were extremely stable in solution, and exhibited a "Lazarus" functionality of rehydrating to their original state following desiccation. A snapshot of focused-release of core constituents through the lone opening in colloidal monotremes has been obtained by anisotropically-functionalizing degradable cores with barrier shells. Additionally

  15. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy.

  16. Optical and structural properties of ensembles of colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots in gelatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, O. V., E-mail: Ovchinnikov-O-V@rambler.ru; Smirnov, M. S. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Shapiro, B. I. [Moscow State University of Fine Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Shatskikh, T. S.; Perepelitsa, A. S.; Korolev, N. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The size dependences of the absorption and luminescence spectra of ensembles of hydrophilic colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots produced by the sol-gel method and dispersed in gelatin are analyzed. By X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, the formation of core/shell nanoparticles is detected. The characteristic feature of the nanoparticles is the formation of crystalline cores, 1.5–2.0 nm in dimensions, and shells of gelatin and its complexes with the components of synthesis. The observed slight size dependence of the position of infrared photoluminescence bands (in the range 1000–1400 nm) in the ensembles of hydrophilic colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots is explained within the context of the model of the radiative recombination of electrons localized at structural and impurity defects with free holes.

  17. Organometallics meet colloid chemistry: a case study in three phases based on molecular carbonyl precursors containing zinc and manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, A; Roy, A; Lehmann, M; Driess, M; Polarz, S

    2007-01-17

    Two organometallic compounds containing zinc and manganese in different ratios are used as single-source precursors for the preparation of various new, bimetallic oxide materials with nanoscaled dimensions. It is shown that the materials synthesis can be performed in the solid-state, the liquid-phase, and even in the gas-phase. The molecular composition of the precursors determines the composition of the resulting materials. In addition, two novel methods for the preparation of highly crystalline metal oxide colloids are presented: The coupling between a gas-phase process and a colloidal approach, and the application of ozone as an oxidant for the transformation of metal carbonyls into oxides in the liquid phase.

  18. Influence of biofilms on colloid transport: investigations with laponite as a model colloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon-Morales, C.F.; Flemming, H.C.; Leis, A. [Duisburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Interface Biotechnology

    2003-07-01

    The synthetic clay mineral laponite RD was used as a model compound to investigate colloid transport in the presence of bacterial biofilms. A complex but pronounced delay in the transport of laponite was observed in colonised porous media, clearly demonstrating the influence of attached bacterial biomass on colloid transport. The transport of laponite under conditions which promoted laponite aggregation was associated with release of attached bacteria; this effect was shown to be independent of ionic strength, indicating that the colloids caused detachment of bacteria. Two major mechanisms are proposed to account for the different colloid transport patterns obtained in the presence or absence of biomass: (1) hydrodynamic effects due to aggregation of laponite and subsequent blockage of a proportion of the flow channels, and (2) sorption of laponite by bacterial biomass. (orig.)

  19. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  20. Dynamics of Colloids Confined in Microcylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Wijnperle, Daniël; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2016-01-01

    We studied both global and local effects of cylindrical confinement on the diffusive behavior of hard sphere (HS) colloids. Using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and particle tracking, we measured the mean squared displacement (MSD) of 1 micron sized silica particles in water–glycerol.

  1. Colloidal models. A bit of history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyklema, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers an anthology on developments in colloid and interface science emphasizing themes that may be of direct or indirect interest to Interfaces Against Pollution. Topics include the determination of Avogadro’s number, development in the insight into driving forces for double layer format

  2. Aggregation kinetics of coalescing polymer colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Cornelius; Jia, Zichen; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    The aggregation behavior of a soft, rubbery colloidal system with a relatively low glass transition temperature, T(g) approximately -20 degrees C, has been investigated. It is found that the average gyration and hydrodynamic radii, R(g) and R(h), measured by light scattering techniques, evolve in time in parallel, without exhibiting the crossover typical of rigid particle aggregation. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) images reveal sphere-like clusters, indicating that complete coalescence between particles occurs during aggregation. Since coalescence leads to a reduction in the total colloidal surface area, the surfactant adsorption equilibrium, and thus the colloidal stability, change in the course of aggregation. It is found that to simulate the observed kinetic behavior based on the population balance equations, it is necessary to assume that all the clusters are spherical and to account for variations in the colloidal stability of each aggregating particle pair with time. This indicates that, for the given system, the coalescence is very fast, i.e., its time scale is much smaller than that of the aggregation.

  3. Cubic colloids : Synthesis, functionalization and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo, S.I.R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is a study on cubic colloids: micron-sized cubic particles with rounded corners (cubic superballs). Owing to their shape, particle packing for cubes is more efficient than for spheres and results in fascinating phase and packing behavior. For our cubes, the particle volume fraction when

  4. Colloidal Toolbox Synthesis of Pt Nanoalloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Ioannis

    enhancement of the activity is observeddue to the introduction of an electronic or ligand effect. The above method is however difficult to control and its reproducibility is poor. For thatreason, a colloidal method is used as a toolbox to conduct systematic studies on PtxCo1-xnanoalloys. This method provides...

  5. Designing Zirconium Coated Polystyrene Colloids and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Chira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple technique has been developed to prepare core colloids that are modified using zirconium oxychloride, based on heating a solution of core colloid composites, consisting of poly (ethylenimine (PEI and zirconium oxychloride. The interaction of zirconium oxychloride with the polystyrene (PS core colloids has been investigated using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM data. FT-IR studies confirm the occurrence of amine groups present in PEI which are oxidized to carboxyl groups after the reaction. The EDX data and the SEM images confirm the presence of zirconium particles immobilized on the polystyrene surfaces. Demeton, a highly toxic nerve agent, was used due to its ability to easily bind through its organophosphate group illustrating a practical application of the PS-PEI-Zr particles. Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR Spectroscopy was used to assess the interactions between the toxic nerve agent demeton-S and the PS-PEI-Zr particles. The results show that the presented technique for coating polystyrene core colloids with zirconium was successfully accomplished, and the newly formed particles easily bond with demeton agents through the P=O functional group.

  6. Dipolar structures in colloidal magnetite dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klokkenburg, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Dipolar structures in liquid colloidal dispersions comprising well-defined magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment are analyzed on a single-particle level by in situ cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (2D). Compared to conventional ferrofluids, these dispersio

  7. Natural and Synthetic Colloids in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Aimee; Thomovsky, Elizabeth; Johnson, Paula

    2016-06-01

    This review article covers basic physiology underlying the clinical use of natural and artificial colloids as well as provide practice recommendations. It also touches on the recent scrutiny of these products in human medicine and how this may have an effect on their use in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dipolar structures in colloidal magnetite dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klokkenburg, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Dipolar structures in liquid colloidal dispersions comprising well-defined magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment are analyzed on a single-particle level by in situ cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (2D). Compared to conventional ferrofluids, these dispersio

  9. Colloidal crystals by electrospraying polystyrene nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces the electrospray technique as a suitable option to fabricate large-scale colloidal nanostructures, including colloidal crystals, in just a few minutes. It is shown that by changing the deposition conditions, different metamaterials can be fabricated: from scattered monolayers of polystyrene nanospheres to self-assembled three-dimensional ordered nanolayers having colloidal crystal properties. The electrospray technique overcomes the main problems encountered by top-down fabrication approaches, largely simplifying the experimental setup. Polystyrene nanospheres, with 360-nm diameter, were typically electrosprayed using off-the-shelf nanofluids. Several parameters of the setup and deposition conditions were explored, namely the distance between electrodes, nanofluid conductivity, applied voltage, and deposition rate. Layers thicker than 20 μm and area of 1 cm2 were typically produced, showing several domains of tens of microns wide with dislocations in between, but no cracks. The applied voltage was in the range of 10 kV, and the conductivity of the colloidal solution was in the range of 3 to 4 mS. Besides the morphology of the layers, the quality was also assessed by means of optical reflectance measurements showing an 80% reflectivity peak in the vicinity of 950-nm wavelength. PMID:23311494

  10. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into accou

  11. Transformative Colloidal Nanomaterials for Mid- Infrared Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-11

    446 (2005) [2] Hillhouse, H.W., Beard, M.C., “Solar cells from colloidal nanocrystals: Fundamentals, materials, devices, and economics ,” Curr. Op...I., Fischer , A., Hoogland, S., Clifford, J., Klem, E., Levina, L., Sargent, EH., “Ultrasensitive solution-cast quantum dot photodetectors

  12. Repeptization and the theory of electrocratic colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frens, G.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1972-01-01

    The coagulation and the repeptization of electrocratic colloids can be treated in one theory provided that the appropriate boundary conditions are chosen. From this version of the DLVO theory it follows that for each sol there exists a critical value Z∞c of the double layer parameter Z∞, Z∞ = zeδ/kT

  13. Colloidal quantum dots as optoelectronic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Milana; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Sun, Ke; Li, Yang; Yang, Jianyong; Ramadurai, Dinakar; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2007-02-01

    Novel optoelectronic systems based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals are addressed in this paper. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and related quantum-wire structures have been characterized optically; these optical measurements include those made on self-assembled monolayers of DNA molecules terminated on one end with a common substrate and on the other end with TiO II quantum dots. The electronic properties of these structures are modeled and compared with experiment. The characterization and application of ensembles of colloidal quantum dots with molecular interconnects are considered. The chemically-directed assembly of ensembles of colloidal quantum dots with biomolecular interconnects is demonstrated with quantum dot densities in excess of 10 +17 cm -3. A number of novel photodetectors have been designed based on the combined use of double-barrier quantum-well injectors, colloidal quantum dots, and conductive polymers. Optoelectronic devices including photodetectors and solar cells based on threedimensional ensembles of quantum dots are considered along with underlying phenomena such as miniband formation and the robustness of minibands to displacements of quantum dots in the ensemble.

  14. Geochemistry of colloid systems. For earth scientists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickel, E.

    1979-01-01

    The second part of the title of this book gives an indication for whom it has been written. It is a real 'synthesizer'. Throughout ten chapters the reader is introduced into the highly complex matter of colloid chemistry and its role in geochemistry, pedology, oceanography, and geology.

  15. Non-Fickian diffusion in colloidal glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen, M.H.J.; Frenkel, D.; Lowe, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    We have studied numerically the decay of the self-dynamic structure factor (SDSF) for a small particle diffusing in a colloidal glass. We show that, in line with theoretical predictions, the super-Burnett coefficient (characterizing the deviation of the fourth moment of the single particle distribut

  16. Phase behavior of colloidal silica rods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a novel colloidal hard-rod-like model system was developed which consists of silica rods [Kuijk et al., JACS, 2011, 133, 2346]. Here, we present a study of the phase behavior of these rods, for aspect ratios ranging from 3.7 to 8.0. By combining real-space confocal laser scanning microscop

  17. Random packing of colloids and granular matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with the random packing of colloids and granular matter. A random packing is a stable disordered collection of touching particles, without long-range positional and orientational order. Experimental random packings of particles with the same shape but made of different materials sh

  18. Cubic colloids : Synthesis, functionalization and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo, S.I.R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is a study on cubic colloids: micron-sized cubic particles with rounded corners (cubic superballs). Owing to their shape, particle packing for cubes is more efficient than for spheres and results in fascinating phase and packing behavior. For our cubes, the particle volume fraction when

  19. Patchy particles made by colloidal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhe; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2017-09-18

    Patches on the surfaces of colloidal particles provide directional information that enables the self-assembly of the particles into higher-order structures. Although computational tools can make quantitative predictions and can generate design rules that link the patch motif of a particle to its internal microstructure and to the emergent properties of the self-assembled materials, the experimental realization of model systems of particles with surface patches (or 'patchy' particles) remains a challenge. Synthetic patchy colloidal particles are often poor geometric approximations of the digital building blocks used in simulations and can only rarely be manufactured in sufficiently high yields to be routinely used as experimental model systems. Here we introduce a method, which we refer to as colloidal fusion, for fabricating functional patchy particles in a tunable and scalable manner. Using coordination dynamics and wetting forces, we engineer hybrid liquid-solid clusters that evolve into particles with a range of patchy surface morphologies on addition of a plasticizer. We are able to predict and control the evolutionary pathway by considering surface-energy minimization, leading to two main branches of product: first, spherical particles with liquid surface patches, capable of forming curable bonds with neighbouring particles to assemble robust supracolloidal structures; and second, particles with a faceted liquid compartment, which can be cured and purified to yield colloidal polyhedra. These findings outline a scalable strategy for the synthesis of patchy particles, first by designing their surface patterns by computer simulation, and then by recreating them in the laboratory with high fidelity.

  20. Colloidal dynamics in flow and confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Somnath

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand how the diffusive dynamics and flow behaviors of colloidal hard spheres are influenced by the confinement of nearby walls. The Brownian motion of hard spheres in quiescent bulk fluids is well known, but the presence of confining walls generate new physical phe

  1. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  2. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  3. Morphology of colloidal metal pyrophosphate salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Y.M.; Velikov, K.; Kegel, W.K.

    2012-01-01

    We report the preparation and characterization of colloidal particles of several pyrophosphate metal salts, including, for the first time, salts containing multiple metals. These materials are compared in order to determine the influence of the composition and experimental conditions on particle

  4. Gold nanoparticle wire and integrated wire array for electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Diao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle wire and integrated nanoparticle wire array have been prepared through a green technique: discontinuous vertical evaporation-driven colloidal deposition. The conducting gold nanoparticle wire made by this technique shows ability for the sensitive electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules due to its high surface to volume ratio. Furthermore, we also demonstrate a potential usage of integrated gold nanoparticle wire array for the localized detection.

  5. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  6. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  7. Birefringence Measurements on Crystalline Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Christoph; Khalaidovski, Alexander; Steinlechner, Jessica; Nawrodt, Ronny; Schnabel, Roman; Lück, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline silicon has been proposed as a new test mass material in third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET). Birefringence can reduce the interferometric contrast and can produce dynamical disturbances in interferometers. In this work we use the method of polarisation-dependent resonance frequency analysis of Fabry-Perot-cavities containing silicon as a birefringent medium. Our measurements show a birefringence of silicon along the (111) axis of the order of $\\Delta\\, n \\approx 10^{-7}$ at a laser wavelength of 1550nm and room temperature. A model is presented that explains the results of different settings of our measurements as a superposition of elastic strains caused by external stresses in the sample and plastic strains possibly generated during the production process. An application of our theory on the proposed ET test mass geometry suggests no critical effect on birefringence due to elastic strains.

  8. Exploring plasmonic coupling in hole-cap arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasmonic coupling between gold caps and holes in thin films was investigated experimentally and through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD calculations. Sparse colloidal lithography combined with a novel thermal treatment was used to control the vertical spacing between caps and hole arrays and compared to separated arrays of holes or caps. Optical spectroscopy and FDTD simulations reveal strong coupling between the gold caps and both Bloch Wave-surface plasmon polariton (BW-SPP modes and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR-type resonances in hole arrays when they are in close proximity. The interesting and complex coupling between caps and hole arrays reveals the details of the field distribution for these simple to fabricate structures.

  9. Cross-interaction drives stratification in drying film of binary colloidal mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jiajia; Jiang, Ying; Doi, Masao

    2017-01-01

    When a liquid film of colloidal solution consisting of particles of different sizes is dried on a substrate, the colloids often stratify, where smaller colloids are laid upon larger colloids. This phenomenon is counter intuitive because larger colloids which have smaller diffusion constant are expected to remain near the surface during the drying process, leaving the layer of larger colloids on top of smaller colloids. Here we show that the phenomenon is caused by the interaction between the ...

  10. Investigation on the Stability of Aluminosilicate Colloids by Various Analytical Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Kirana Y.; Lee, D. H.; Yun, J. I. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Colloids are ubiquitous in natural aquatic systems. Aquatic colloids may play a significant carrier role for radionuclide migration in aquifer systems. Being omnipresent in natural aquatic systems, aluminosilicate colloids are considered as a kernel for various aquatic colloids. Characterization of aluminosilicate colloids formed under various geochemical conditions is of importance to understand their chemical behavior in natural aquatic systems. In this work, a preliminary study on the formation of aluminosilicate colloids with a help of colorimetry and other colloid detection techniques is presented

  11. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  12. Sensorless PV Array Diagnostic Method for Residential PV Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso; Spataru, Sergiu; Mathe, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    This work proposes a temperature and irradiance sensorless diagnostic method suitable for small residential PV installations, focusing on detection of partial shadows. The method works by detection of failures in crystalline silicone PV arrays by concomitant monitoring of some of their key parame...

  13. Formation mechanisms of metal colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaciuga, Ionel

    aggregation process. Furthermore, the two-stage particle growth model was used to account for the effects of solvent viscosity and temperature on the particle properties, particularly their size. As an application of the above mentioned study, the aggregation process that led to the formation of large silver spheres was used to deposit in a controlled manner layers of silver and other metals (Ni, Au) onto various metallic and non-metallic substrates. In the final section of this thesis methods to form nanosized primary particle strictly through diffusional growth are described. The highly crystalline metallic particles of various sizes and composition prepared provide performance characteristics that are complementary to the polycrystalline metallic particles described in the preceding sections.

  14. Synthesis of 3D ordered macroporous indium tin oxide using polymer colloidal crystal template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xue'ao; MAN; Yahui; WANG; Jianfang; LIU; Changli; WU; Wenjian

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ordered macroporous indium tin oxide (ITO) is prepared using a polymer colloidal crystal template that is formed by self-assembly of the monodisperse poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microspheres. The morphologies and BET surface area of the macroporous material is examined by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption/desorption. Results indicate that the macroporous material has highly ordered arrays of the uniform pores replicated from the PMMA colloidal crystal template when the polymer colloidal crystal template is removed by calcinations at 500℃. The pore diameter (about 450 nm) of macroporous ITO slightly shrank to the PMMA microspheres. The BET surface area and pore volume of the macroporous material are 389 m2·g-1 and 0.36 cm3·g-1, respectively. Moreover, the macroporous ITO, containing 5 mol% Sn and after annealing under vacuum, shows the minimum resistivity of ρ= 8.2×10-3 Ω· cm. The conductive mechanism of macroporous ITO is discussed, and it is believed that the oxygen vacancies are the major factor for excellent electrical properties.

  15. Reproducible, high-throughput synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals for optimization in multidimensional parameter space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Emory M; Xu, Chenxu; Mao, Alvin W; Han, Gang; Owen, Jonathan S; Cohen, Bruce E; Milliron, Delia J

    2010-05-12

    While colloidal nanocrystals hold tremendous potential for both enhancing fundamental understanding of materials scaling and enabling advanced technologies, progress in both realms can be inhibited by the limited reproducibility of traditional synthetic methods and by the difficulty of optimizing syntheses over a large number of synthetic parameters. Here, we describe an automated platform for the reproducible synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals and for the high-throughput optimization of physical properties relevant to emerging applications of nanomaterials. This robotic platform enables precise control over reaction conditions while performing workflows analogous to those of traditional flask syntheses. We demonstrate control over the size, size distribution, kinetics, and concentration of reactions by synthesizing CdSe nanocrystals with 0.2% coefficient of variation in the mean diameters across an array of batch reactors and over multiple runs. Leveraging this precise control along with high-throughput optical and diffraction characterization, we effectively map multidimensional parameter space to tune the size and polydispersity of CdSe nanocrystals, to maximize the photoluminescence efficiency of CdTe nanocrystals, and to control the crystal phase and maximize the upconverted luminescence of lanthanide-doped NaYF(4) nanocrystals. On the basis of these demonstrative examples, we conclude that this automated synthesis approach will be of great utility for the development of diverse colloidal nanomaterials for electronic assemblies, luminescent biological labels, electroluminescent devices, and other emerging applications.

  16. On the mechanisms of colloidal self-assembly during spin-coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Fujii, Syuji; Ebbens, Stephen J; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Howse, Jonathan R

    2014-11-28

    Spin-coating offers a facile fabrication route for the production of high quality colloidal crystals, which have potential as photonic band-gap materials. This paper presents the results of direct observations of the self-assembly of latex colloids during spin-coating through the use of stroboscopic microscopy. We have been able to identify several mechanisms by which self-assembly occurs, depending upon the dispersion properties, such as particle weight fraction, solvent volatility and viscosity. Through the use of stroboscopic microscopy we have directly observed ordering occurring due to high concentrations of colloid particles (where volatility is relatively low), resulting in the formation of regular close packed ordered particle arrays. Conversely when the system in spun-cast from a much more volatile solvent, highly disordered non-equilibrium arrangements of particles form. When spin-coating a low concentration, low volatility dispersion, ordering is dominated by the occurrence of capillary drying fronts, which drag the particles into ordered arrangements. At a volatility intermediate to that of water and ethanol, ordering occurring predominantly via shear forces. Finally when the volatility is increased beyond the shear ordering regime, excessive shear leads to the occurrence of drying fronts within the system and so again, capillary forces induce a large degree of order within the final film.

  17. Quantitative characterization of the colloidal stability of metallic nanoparticles using UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tyler R; Lettiere, Bethany; de Rutte, Joseph; Pennathur, Sumita

    2015-03-31

    Plasmonic nanoparticles are used in a wide variety of applications over a broad array of fields including medicine, energy, and environmental chemistry. The continued successful development of this material class requires the accurate characterization of nanoparticle stability for a variety of solution-based conditions. Although many characterization methods exists, there is an absence of a unified, quantitative means for assessing the colloidal stability of plasmonic nanoparticles. We present the particle instability parameter (PIP) as a robust, quantitative, and generalizable characterization technique based on UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy to characterize colloidal instability. We validate PIP performance with both traditional and alternative characterization methods by measuring gold nanorod instability in response to different salt (NaCl) concentrations. We further measure gold nanorod stability as a function of solution pH, salt, and buffer (type and concentration), nanoparticle concentration, and concentration of free surfactant. Finally, these results are contextualized within the literature on gold nanorod stability to establish a standardized methodology for colloidal instability assessment.

  18. Microbes make average 2 nanometer diameter crystalline UO2 particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    It is well known that phylogenetically diverse groups of microorganisms are capable of catalyzing the reduction of highly soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV), which rapidly precipitates as uraninite (UO2). Because biological uraninite is highly insoluble, microbial uranyl reduction is being intensively studied as the basis for a cost-effective in-situ bioremediation strategy. Previous studies have described UO2 biomineralization products as amorphous or poorly crystalline. The objective of this study is to characterize the nanocrystalline uraninite in detail in order to determine the particle size, crystallinity, and size-related structural characteristics, and to examine the implications of these for reoxidation and transport. In this study, we obtained U-contaminated sediment and water from an inactive U mine and incubated them anaerobically with nutrients to stimulate reductive precipitation of UO2 by indigenous anaerobic bacteria, mainly Gram-positive spore-forming Desulfosporosinus and Clostridium spp. as revealed by RNA-based phylogenetic analysis. Desulfosporosinus sp. was isolated from the sediment and UO2 was precipitated by this isolate from a simple solution that contains only U and electron donors. We characterized UO2 formed in both of the experiments by high resolution-TEM (HRTEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (XAFS). The results from HRTEM showed that both the pure and the mixed cultures of microorganisms precipitated around 1.5 - 3 nm crystalline UO2 particles. Some particles as small as around 1 nm could be imaged. Rare particles around 10 nm in diameter were also present. Particles adhere to cells and form colloidal aggregates with low fractal dimension. In some cases, coarsening by oriented attachment on \\{111\\} is evident. Our preliminary results from XAFS for the incubated U-contaminated sample also indicated an average diameter of UO2 of 2 nm. In nanoparticles, the U-U distance obtained by XAFS was 0.373 nm, 0.012 nm

  19. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorkin, Jonathan A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Hughes, Stephen [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Soares, Paulo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic School, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR 80215-901 (Brazil); Popat, Ketul C., E-mail: ketul.popat@colostate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. - Highlights: • Titania nanotube arrays can be fabricated with to have loosely or densely packed morphologies. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell differentiation towards neuronal lineage.

  20. Fracture detection in crystalline rock using ultrasonic shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, K.H.; Palmer, S.P.; Farrell, W.E.

    1978-12-01

    An ultrasonic shear wave reflection profiling system for use in the detection of water-filled cracks occurring within a crystalline rock mass is being tested in a laboratory environment. Experiments were performed on an irregular tensile crack induced approximately 0.5 m below one circular face of a 1.0-m-dia, 1.8-m-long granite cylinder. Good reflection data were obtained from this irregular crack with the crack either air filled or water filled. Data were collected that suggest a frequency-dependent S/sub H/ wave reflection coefficient for a granite-water interface. Waves that propagate along the free surface of a rock mass (surface waves) can severely hinder the detection of reflected events. Two methods of reducing this surface wave noise were investigated. The first technique uses physical obstructions (such as a slit trench) to scatter the surface waves. The second technique uses a linear array of receivers located on the free surface to cancel waves that are propagating parallel to the array (e.g., surface waves), thus enhancing waves with propagation vectors orthogonal to the linear array (e.g., reflected events). Deconvolution processing was found to be another method useful in surface wave cancellation.

  1. Comparision of {sup 188}Rhenuim-tin colloid and {sup 188}Rhenium-sulfur colloid as a radiation synovectomy agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Jung, J. M.; Kim, Y. J.; Jang, Y. S.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, J. K.; Song, Y. W.; Lee, M. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    Beta-emitting radiocolloids have been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. As a generator produced beta-emitting radionuclide, the importance of Re-188 for radionuclide therapy is increasing rapidly. We compared the radiochemistry of two {sup 188}Re labeled radiocolloids: {sup 188}Re-tin colloid and {sup 188}Re-sulfur colloid. {sup 188}Re-tin colloid was obtained by reacting 10 mg SnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O and {sup 188}Re perrhenate. {sup 188}Re-sulfur colloid was labeled by boiling 40 mg sodium thiosulfate, 0.8 mg Na{sub 2}{center_dot}EDTA, and 0.8 mg potassium perrhenate with {sup 188}Re perrhenate. Radiochemical purity was checked by ITLC-SG/ saline. Labeling efficiencies reached >98% for tin colloid at 2 hr and 89{approx}94% for sulfur colloid at 3 hr. All the preparations were stable for 72 hr in water, serum, and synovial fluid. If labeled at higher temperature, particle size of tin colloid increased. Remained radioactivity of {sup 188}Re-sulfur colloid in disposable polypropylene syringe after injecting to mice was high (62.0{+-}7.0%) due to its hydrophobic nature, although, tin colloid did not show high remained radioactivity (2.9{+-}1.6%). Biodistribution in Antigen induced arthratitis model rabbit after synovial space injection showed that {sup 188}Re-tin colloid was well retained in synovial space for 48 hr. Although, both {sup 188}Re-tin colloid and {sup 188}Re-sulfur colloid might be useful for radionuclide therapy, we concluded that {sup 188}Re-tin colloid is more adventageous over {sup 188}Re-sulfur colloid, due to higher labeling efficency, size-controllable property, and lower residual activity in syringe.

  2. Bietti crystalline dystrophy and choroidal neovascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; Parvizi, S; Mohamed, M D

    2011-02-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by the presence of crystals in the retina and is followed by retinal and choroidal degeneration. We present a novel finding of juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularisation in Bietti crystalline dystrophy and demonstrate a spectral domain optical coherence tomography image of this disorder.

  3. Highly Crystalline Nanoparticle Suspensions for Low-Temperature Processing of TiO2 Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watté, Jonathan; Lommens, Petra; Pollefeyt, Glenn; Meire, Mieke; De Buysser, Klaartje; Van Driessche, Isabel

    2016-05-25

    In this work, we present preparation and stabilization methods for highly crystalline TiO2 nanoparticle suspensions for the successful deposition of transparent, photocatalytically active TiO2 thin films toward the degradation of organic pollutants by a low temperature deposition method. A proof-of-concept is provided wherein stable, aqueous TiO2 suspensions are deposited on glass substrates. Even if the processing temperature is lowered to 150-200 °C, the subsequent heat treatment provides transparent and photocatalytically active titania thin layers. Because all precursor solutions are water-based, this method provides an energy-efficient, sustainable, and environmentally friendly synthesis route. The high load in crystalline titania particles obtained after microwave heating opens up the possibility to produce thin coatings by low temperature processing, as a conventional crystallization procedure is in this case superfluous. The impact of the precursor chemistry in Ti(4+)-peroxo solutions, containing imino-diacetic acid as a complexing ligand and different bases to promote complexation was studied as a function of pH, reaction time and temperature. The nanocrystal formation was followed in terms of colloidal stability, crystallinity and particle size. Combined data from Raman and infrared spectroscopy, confirmed that stable titanium precursors could be obtained at pH levels ranging from 2 to 11. A maximum amount of 50.7% crystallinity was achieved, which is one of the highest reported amounts of anatase nanoparticles that are suspendable in stable aqueous titania suspensions. Decoloring of methylene blue solutions by precipitated nanosized powders from the TiO2 suspensions proves their photocatalytic properties toward degradation of organic materials, a key requisite for further processing. This synthesis method proves that the deposition of highly crystalline anatase suspensions is a valid route for the production of photocatalytically active, transparent

  4. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  5. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  6. Al纳米颗粒增强微晶硅薄膜太阳电池光吸收的模拟研究∗%Numerical simulation of light absorption enhancement in micro crystalline silicon solar cells with Al nanoparticle arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁东; 杨仕娥; 陈永生; 郜小勇; 谷锦华; 卢景霄

    2015-01-01

    利用价格低廉、性能优良的金属纳米颗粒增强太阳电池的光吸收具有广阔的应用前景。通过建立三维数值模型,模拟了微晶硅薄膜电池前表面周期性分布的Al纳米颗粒阵列对电池光吸收的影响,并对其结构参数进行了优化。模拟结果表明:对于球状Al纳米颗粒阵列,影响电池光吸收的关键参数是周期P与半径R的比值,或者说是颗粒的表面覆盖度;当P/R=4—5时,总的光吸收较参考电池提高可达20%。与球状颗粒相比,优化后的半球状Al纳米颗粒阵列可获得更好的陷光效果,但后者对颗粒半径R的变化较敏感。另外,结合电场分布,对电池光吸收增强的物理机理进行了分析。%Metal nanoparticles with low cost and high performance have good potential applications in light-trapping of solar cells. In this paper, a three-dimensional model is proposed to simulate the light absorption of microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si:H) thin film solar cells. The effects of spherical and hemispherical Al nanoparticle arrays located on the front surfaces of solar cells are investigated, and the particle radius and array period are optimized by the finite element method. The results show that the optimal Al nanoparticle arrays can enhance broadband absorption in thin film solar cells. For spherical particle arrays, the key parameter that influences light absorption in solar cells is period/radius ratio (P/R) or particle surface coverage. When P/R = 4–5, the optimum integrated absorption enhancement (Eabs) is over 20%under AM1.5 illumination compared with the solar cell without nanoparticles. The value of Eabs is small and decreases with the increase of P/R when P/R>5, and Eabs is less than zero when P/R<3 because of the parasitic absorption and backward scattering from the mental nanoparticles. When P =500 nm and R=120 nm, the spectral absorption rate as a function of wavelength shows broadband absorption including

  7. Green and scalable production of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals and transparent sols by a controlled self-collection process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin; Li, Wanlu; Liu, Xiaohua; Jing, Shui; Li, Jackie; O'Brien, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Colloidal perovskite oxide nanocrystals have attracted a great deal of interest owing to the ability to tune physical properties by virtue of the nanoscale, and generate thin film structures under mild chemical conditions, relying on self-assembly or heterogeneous mixing. This is particularly true for ferroelectric/dielectric perovskite oxide materials, for which device applications cover piezoelectrics, MEMs, memory, gate dielectrics and energy storage. The synthesis of complex oxide nanocrystals, however, continues to present issues pertaining to quality, yield, % crystallinity, purity and may also suffer from tedious separation and purification processes, which are disadvantageous to scaling production. We report a simple, green and scalable ``self-collection'' growth method that produces uniform and aggregate-free colloidal perovskite oxide nanocrystals including BaTiO3 (BT), BaxSr1-xTiO3 (BST) and quaternary oxide BaSrTiHfO3 (BSTH) in high crystallinity and high purity. The synthesis approach is solution processed, based on the sol-gel transformation of metal alkoxides in alcohol solvents with controlled or stoichiometric amounts of water and in the stark absence of surfactants and stabilizers, providing pure colloidal nanocrystals in a remarkably low temperature range (15 °C-55 °C). Under a static condition, the nanoscale hydrolysis of the metal alkoxides accomplishes a complete transformation to fully crystallized single domain perovskite nanocrystals with a passivated surface layer of hydroxyl/alkyl groups, such that the as-synthesized nanocrystals can exist in the form of super-stable and transparent sol, or self-accumulate to form a highly crystalline solid gel monolith of nearly 100% yield for easy separation/purification. The process produces high purity ligand-free nanocrystals excellent dispersibility in polar solvents, with no impurity remaining in the mother solution other than trace alcohol byproducts (such as isopropanol). The afforded stable

  8. Mobile linkers on DNA-coated colloids: valency without patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Varilly, Patrick; Mognetti, Bortolo M; Frenkel, Daan

    2014-09-19

    Colloids coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) can bind selectively to other colloids coated with complementary ssDNA. The fact that DNA-coated colloids (DNACCs) can bind to specific partners opens the prospect of making colloidal "molecules." However, in order to design DNACC-based molecules, we must be able to control the valency of the colloids, i.e., the number of partners to which a given DNACC can bind. One obvious, but not very simple approach is to decorate the colloidal surface with patches of single-stranded DNA that selectively bind those on other colloids. Here we propose a design principle that exploits many-body effects to control the valency of otherwise isotropic colloids. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that we can tune the valency of colloids coated with mobile ssDNA, simply by tuning the nonspecific repulsion between the particles. Our simulations show that the resulting effective interactions lead to low-valency colloids self-assembling in peculiar open structures, very different from those observed in DNACCs with immobile DNA linkers.

  9. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-01-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N'-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  11. Purity assessment of crystalline zearalenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krska, Rudolf; Welzig, Elvira; Josephs, Ralf D; Kandler, Wolfgang; Pettersson, Hans; MacDonald, Susan; Charlton, Adrian; Brereton, Paul; Hametner, Christian; Berner, Diana; Zöllner, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available solid zearalenone (ZON) to be used as a certified liquid calibrant (BCR-699) in a project funded by the European Commission within the Standard Measurement and Testing program was characterized and its purity determined. The degree of purity of the ZON was examined by UV spectrophotometer, liquid chromatography (LC) with diode array and fluorescence detection, 1H and 13C-NMR spectrometry, LC-mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), ion chromatography (IC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The diagrams obtained from DSC analysis and the UV spectrum showed no detectable impurities. Likewise, no impurities were observed by LC analysis with both diode array and fluorescence detection. IC determination revealed negligible contamination of ZON with chloride of 0.020 +/- 0.005% and nitrate of 0.016 +/- 0.006%. Zearalanone (ZAN) was identified as one of 2 minor (0.2%) impurities by LC/MS/MS. The 1H-NMR measurements revealed an additional peak, which has not been previously reported in the literature. It could be identified as part of the ZON spectrum as the signal arising from the phenolic proton attached to C4'. The manufacturer states an additional contamination with 0.2% methylene chloride, which could be confirmed to an extent of 0.1% by 1H-NMR. Minor impurities, whose structures remain unknown, were discovered at 3.5 and project.

  12. Integrated lithography to prepare periodic arrays of nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Csete, Mária

    2013-08-01

    We present an integrated lithography method to prepare versatile nano-objects with variable shape and nano-scaled substructure, in wavelength-scaled periodic arrays with arbitrary symmetry. The idea is to illuminate colloid sphere monolayers by polarized beams possessing periodic lateral intensity modulations. Finite element method was applied to determine the effects of the wavelength, polarization and angle of incidence of the incoming beam, and to predict the characteristics of nano-objects, which can be fabricated on thin metal layer covered substrates due to the near-field enhancement under silica colloid spheres. The inter-object distance is controlled by varying the relative orientation of the periodic intensity modulation with respect to the silica colloid sphere monolayer. It is shown that illuminating silica colloid sphere monolayers by two interfering beams, linear patterns made of elliptical holes appear in case of linear polarization, while circularly polarized beams result in co-existent rounded objects, as more circular nano-holes and nano-crescents. The size of the nano-objects and their sub-structure is determined by the spheres diameter and by the wavelength. We present various complex plasmonic patterns made of versatile nano-objects that can be uniquely fabricated applying the inherent symmetry breaking possibilities in the integrated lithography method.

  13. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2012-04-21

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-porous structures. In meso-porous materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.

  14. Colloid Release From Differently Managed Loess Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    of the total clay not associated with organic matter. No significant difference in release rate was found for air-dry aggregates. The low-carbon soils initially had a higher content of WSA but were more susceptible to disaggregation than the high-carbon soils. Furthermore, the application of NPK fertilizer had......The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) in a soil can have a major impact on soil functions, such as permeability to water and air, and on soil strength, which can impair soil fertility and workability. In addition, the content of WDC in the soil may increase the risk of nutrient loss...... and of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. In the present study, soils from the Bad Lauchsta¨dt longterm static fertilizer experiment with different management histories were investigated to relate basic soil properties to the content of WDC, the content of water-stable aggregates (WSA...

  15. Ultrasonic wave interactions with magnetic colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J R

    2001-01-01

    fluids have been performed in an effort to determine the relative stability of the fluids. The experimental results have been compared with a combined scattering and hydrodynamic model (Allegra and Hawley 1972) and the ultrasonic anisotropy theory of Skumiel (1997). An on-line quality assurance process is proposed. Originally invented as a method for moving spacecraft fuel in weightless conditions, magnetic colloids or ferrofluids are now used in applications as diverse as the dissipation of heat in the voice coils of a loudspeaker, and for the separation of scrap metal. It has been found that aqueous ferrofluids become unstable after a period of time and with dilution. Therefore, there is a need to characterize the colloidal fluid to study the effects of degradation. Additionally, due to the high cost of ferrofluids and the large volumes required for some applications, the fluid is recycled. It is therefore necessary to develop a system for quality assurance for the fluid reclamation process. Ultrasonic meth...

  16. Laser diffraction analysis of colloidal crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogami, Ikuo S.; Shinohara, Tadatomi; Yoshiyama, Tsuyoshi [Kyoto Sangyo Univ., Department of Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Laser diffraction analysis is made on crystallization in salt-free aqueous suspensions of highly-charged colloidal particles for semi-dilute specimens of concentration 0.1-10.0 vol%. Kossel diffraction patterns which represent faithfully accurate information on lattice symmetries in the suspensions enable us to investigate the time evolution of colloidal crystals. The results show that the crystallization proceeds by way of the following intermediate phase transitions: two-dimensional hcp structure {yields} random layer structure {yields} layer structure with one sliding degree of freedom {yields} stacking disorder structure {yields} stacking structure with multivariant periodicity {yields} fcc twin structure with twin plane (111) {yields} normal fcc structure {yields} bcc twin structure with twin plane (11-bar2) or (1-bar12) {yields} normal bcc structure. For concentrated suspensions (>2 vol %), the phase transition ceases to proceed at the normal fcc structure. (author)

  17. Theory of Electrorotation of Clustered Colloidal Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ren-Ming; HUANG Ji-Ping

    2005-01-01

    When a colloidal suspension is exposed to a strong rotating electric field, an aggregation of the suspended particles is induced to appear. In such clusters, the separation between the suspended particles is so close that one could not neglect the multiple image effect on the electrorotation (ER) spectrum. Since so far the exact multiple image method exists in two dimensions only, rather than in three dimensions, we investigate the ER spectrum of the clustered colloidal particles in two dimensions, in which many cylindrical particles are randomly distributed in a sheet cluster. We report the dependence of the ER spectrum on the materialparameters. It is shown that the multiple image method predicts two characteristic frequencies, at which the rotation speed reaches maximum. To this end, the multiple image method is numerically demonstrated to be in good agreement with the known Maxwell-Garnett approximation.

  18. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  19. Ultrasmall colloidal PbS quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Nick; Wehrung, Michael; O' Dell, Ryan Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 (United States); Sun, Liangfeng, E-mail: lsun@bgsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 (United States); Center for Photochemical Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasmall colloidal lead sulfide quantum dots can increase the open circuit voltages of quantum-dot-based solar cells because of their large energy gap. Their small size and visible or near infrared light-emitting property make them attractive to the applications of biological fluorescence labeling. Through a modified organometallic route, we can synthesize lead sulfide quantum dots as small as 1.6 nm in diameter. The low reaction temperature and the addition of a chloroalkane cosolvent decrease the reaction rate, making it possible to obtain the ultrasmall quantum dots. - Highlights: • Ultrasmall colloidal PbS quantum dots as small as 1.6 nm in diameter are synthesized. • The quantum dots emit red light with photoluminescence peak at 760 nm. • The growth temperature is as low as 50 °C. • Addition of cosolvent 1,2-dichloroethane in the reaction decreases the reaction rate.

  20. Optoelectronic Applications of Colloidal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Nanzhu; Brenneman, Kimber; Wu, Tsai Chin; Jung, Hyeson; Biswas, Sushmita; Sen, Banani; Reinhardt, Kitt; Liao, Sicheng; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    This chapter highlights recent optoelectronic applications of colloidal quantum dots (QDs). In recent years, many colloidal QD-based optoelectronic devices, and device concepts have been proposed and studied. Many of these device concepts build on traditional optoelectronic device concepts. Increasingly, many new optoelectronic device concepts have been based on the use of biomolecule QD complexes. In this chapter, both types of structures are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on new optoelectronic device concepts that incorporate DNA-based aptamers in biomolecule QD complexes. Not only are the extensions of traditional devices and concepts realizable, such as QD-based photo detectors, displays, photoluminescent and photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photovoltaic devices, and solar cells, but new devices concepts such a biomolecule-based molecular sensors possible. This chapter highlights a number of such novel QD-based devices and device concepts.

  1. Collective motion in populations of colloidal robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Dauchot, Olivier; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Could the behavior of bacteria swarms, fish schools, and bird flocks be understood within a unified framework? Can one ignore the very details of the interaction mechanisms at the individual level to elucidate how strikingly similar collective motion emerges at the group level in this broad range of motile systems? These seemingly provocative questions have triggered significant advance in the physics and the biology, communities over the last decade. In the physics language these systems, made of motile individuals, can all be though as different realizations of ``active matter.'' In this talk, I will show how to gain more insight into this vivid field using self-propelled colloids as a proxy for motile organism. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors. Then, I will demonstrate that these archetypal populations display spontaneous transitions to swarming motion, and to global directed motion with very few density and orientation fluctuations.

  2. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Style, R. W.

    2010-06-30

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy\\'s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the concentration and stress profiles during drying. A solution is found for the steady-state growth of a nedimensional crust during constant evaporation rate from the surface. The solution is used to demonstrate the importance of the system boundary conditions on stress profiles and diffusivity in a drying crust. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  3. Colloidal attraction induced by a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R; Ianni, F; Ruocco, G

    2009-04-21

    Colloidal crystals are of extreme importance for applied research and for fundamental studies in statistical mechanics. Long-range attractive interactions, such as capillary forces, can drive the spontaneous assembly of such mesoscopic ordered structures. However, long-range attractive forces are very rare in the colloidal realm. Here we report a novel strong, long-ranged attraction induced by a thermal gradient in the presence of a wall. By switching the thermal gradient on and off, we can rapidly and reversibly form stable hexagonal 2D crystals. We show that the observed attraction is hydrodynamic in nature and arises from thermally induced slip flow on particle surfaces. We used optical tweezers to measure the force law directly and compare it to an analytical prediction based on Stokes flow driven by Marangoni-like forces.

  4. Interaction between colloidal particles. Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longcheng Liu; Neretnieks, Ivars (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology)

    2010-02-15

    This report summarises the commonly accepted theoretical basis describing interaction between colloidal particles in an electrolyte solution. The two main forces involved are the van der Waals attractive force and the electrical repulsive force. The report describes in some depth the origin of these two forces, how they are formulated mathematically as well as how they interact to sometimes result in attraction and sometimes in repulsion between particles. The report also addresses how the mathematical models can be used to quantify the forces and under which conditions the models can be expected to give fair description of the colloidal system and when the models are not useful. This report does not address more recent theories that still are discussed as to their applicability, such as ion-ion correlation effects and the Coulombic attraction theory (CAT). These and other models will be discussed in future reports

  5. Production of TiO{sub 2} crystalline nanoparticles by laser ablation in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutinguiza, M., E-mail: mohamed@uvigo.es [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETSII Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Rodriguez-Gonzalez, B. [Microscopia Electronica de Alta Resolucion y Caracterizacion de Materiales, C.A.C.T.I., Universidad de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Val, J. del; Comesana, R.; Lusquinos, F.; Pou, J. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETSII Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} have been obtained by laser ablation of Ti submerged in ethanol using CW laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CW laser contributes to control the size distribution and to complete oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particles formation mechanism is the melting and rapid solidification. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have received a special attention due to their applications in many different fields, such as catalysis, biomedical engineering, and energy conversion in solar cells. In this paper we report on the production of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles by means of a pulsed laser to ablate titanium metallic target submerged in ethanol. The results show that titanium crystalline dioxide nanoparticles can be obtained in a narrow size distribution. Crystalline phases, morphology and optical properties of the obtained colloidal nanoparticles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy. The produced particles consisted mainly of titanium oxide crystalline nanoparticles showing spherical shape with most diameters ranging from 5 to 50 nm. Nanoparticles are polycrystalline exhibiting the coexistence of the three main phases with the predominance of brookite.

  6. Stabilization of Colloidal Silica Using Small Polyols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GULLEY, GERALD L.; MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-09-07

    We have discovered that small polyols are reasonably effective at stabilizing colloidal silica against aggregation, even under the conditions of high pH and salt concentration. Both quasielastic and elastic light scattering were used to show that these polyols dramatically decrease the aggregation rate of the suspension, changing the growth kinetics from diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation to reaction-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. These polyols maybe useful in the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site.

  7. Thermal Jamming of a Colloidal Glass

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Praveen

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature on structure and dynamics of a colloidal glass created by tethering polymers to the surface of inorganic nanoparticles. Contrary to the conventional assumption, an increase in temperature slows down glassy dynamics of the material, yet causes no change in its static structure factor. We show that these findings can be explained within the soft glassy rheology framework if the noise temperature X of the glass phase is correlated with thermodynamic temperature. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  8. Depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhouse, D.A.R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY, 10598 (United States); Debnath, Ratan; Kramer, Illan J.; Zhitomirsky, David; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Quantum Solar Power Corporation, 1055 W. Hastings, Ste. 300, Vancouver, BC, V6E 2E9 (Canada); Etgar, Lioz; Graetzel, Michael [Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Structure of crystals of hard colloidal spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, P.N.; van Megen, W.; Bartlett, P.; Ackerson, B.J.; Rarity, J.G.; Underwood, S.M. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern, WR14 3PS, United Kingsom (GB) Department of Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia School of Chemistry, Bristol University, Bristol, BS8 1TS, United Kingdom Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078)

    1989-12-18

    We report light-scattering measurements of powder diffraction patterns of crystals of essentially hard colloidal spheres. These are consistent with structures formed by stacking close-packed planes of particles in a sequence of permitted lateral positions, {ital A},{ital B},{ital C}, which shows a high degree of randomness. Crystals grown slowly, while still containing many stacking faults, show a tendency towards face-centered-cubic packing: possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  11. Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, N.; Cinacchi, G.; van Duijneveldt, J. S.; Cosgrove, T.; Prescott, S. W.; Grillo, I.; Phipps, J.; Gittins, D. I.

    2011-05-01

    In addition to containing spherical pigment particles, coatings usually contain plate-like clay particles. It is thought that these improve the opacity of the paint film by providing an efficient spacing of the pigment particles. This observation is counterintuitive, as suspensions of particles of different shapes and sizes tend to phase separate on increase of concentration. In order to clarify this matter a model colloidal system is studied here, with a sphere-plate diameter ratio similar to that found in paints. For dilute suspensions, small angle neutron scattering revealed that the addition of plates leads to enhanced density fluctuations of the spheres, in agreement with new theoretical predictions. On increasing the total colloid concentration the plates and spheres phase separate due to the disparity in their shape. This is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work on colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, where one particle acts as a depleting agent. The fact that no large scale phase separation is observed in coatings is ascribed to dynamic arrest in intimately mixed, or possibly micro-phase separated structures, at elevated concentration.

  12. C-cells in colloid goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Marcus A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this investigation was to quantitatively evaluate C-cells in colloid goiters, analyzing 36 thyroids that were obtained through thyroidectomy from 24 patients with goiter and 12 normal glands from adult patients without thyroid disease, which were used as the control group. MATERIAL AND METHODS: On average, 6 different thyroid areas were sampled and labeled by immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal anticalcitonin antibody, utilizing the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex. C-cells were counted in fields measuring 1 square centimeter, and the mean number of cells per field was then calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: In the colloid goiter group, the number of C-cells ranged from 0 to 23 per field, while in normal controls they ranged from 20 to 148 per field. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate a significant decrease of C-cell number in the colloid goiter group compared with control group, indicating that the hyperplastic process is restricted to follicular cells, to the detriment of C-cells, which probably cease to receive trophic stimuli.

  13. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  14. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  15. Equilibrium crystal phases of triblock Janus colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Wesley F.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-09-01

    Triblock Janus colloids, which are colloidal spheres decorated with attractive patches at each pole, have recently generated significant interest as potential building blocks for functional materials. Their inherent anisotropy is known to induce self-assembly into open structures at moderate temperatures and pressures, where they are stabilized over close-packed crystals by entropic effects. We present a numerical investigation of the equilibrium phases of triblock Janus particles with many different patch geometries in three dimensions, using Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations. In all cases, we find that the free energy difference between crystal polymorphs is less than 0.2 kBT per particle. By varying the patch fraction and interaction range, we show that large patches stabilize the formation of structures with four bonds per patch over those with three. This transition occurs abruptly above a patch fraction of 0.30 and has a strong dependence on the interaction range. Furthermore, we find that a short interaction range favors four bonds per patch, with longer range increasingly stabilizing structures with only three bonds per patch. By quantifying the effect of patch geometry on the stability of the equilibrium crystal structures, we provide insights into the fundamental design rules for constructing complex colloidal crystals.

  16. Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doshi, N; Cinacchi, G; Van Duijneveldt, J S; Cosgrove, T; Prescott, S W [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Grillo, I [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Phipps, J [Imerys Minerals Ltd, Par Moor Centre, Par Moor Road, Par, Cornwall PL24 2SQ (United Kingdom); Gittins, D I, E-mail: Giorgio.Cinacchi@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: J.S.van-Duijneveldt@bristol.ac.uk [Imerys Performance and Filtration Minerals Ltd, 130 Castilian Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)

    2011-05-18

    In addition to containing spherical pigment particles, coatings usually contain plate-like clay particles. It is thought that these improve the opacity of the paint film by providing an efficient spacing of the pigment particles. This observation is counterintuitive, as suspensions of particles of different shapes and sizes tend to phase separate on increase of concentration. In order to clarify this matter a model colloidal system is studied here, with a sphere-plate diameter ratio similar to that found in paints. For dilute suspensions, small angle neutron scattering revealed that the addition of plates leads to enhanced density fluctuations of the spheres, in agreement with new theoretical predictions. On increasing the total colloid concentration the plates and spheres phase separate due to the disparity in their shape. This is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work on colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, where one particle acts as a depleting agent. The fact that no large scale phase separation is observed in coatings is ascribed to dynamic arrest in intimately mixed, or possibly micro-phase separated structures, at elevated concentration.

  17. Colloidal solitary waves with temperature dependent compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, A.; Marchant, T. R.

    2014-05-01

    Spatial solitary waves which form in colloidal suspensions of dielectric nanoparticles are considered. The interactions, or compressibility, of the colloidal particles, is modelled using a series in the particle density, or packing fraction, where the virial, or series, coefficients depend on the type of particle interaction model. Both the theoretical hard disk and sphere repulsive models, and a model with temperature dependent compressibility, are considered. Experimental results show that particle interactions can be temperature dependent and either repulsive or attractive in nature, so we model the second virial coefficient using a physically realistic temperature power law. One- and two-dimensional semi-analytical colloidal solitary wave solutions are found. Trial functions, based on the form of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation soliton, are used, together with averaging, to develop the semi-analytical solutions. When the background packing fraction is low, the one-dimensional solitary waves have three solutions branches (with a bistable regime) while the two-dimensional solitary waves have two solution branches, with a single stable branch. The temperature dependent second virial coefficient results in changes to the solitary wave properties and the parameter space, in which multiple solutions branches occur. An excellent comparison is found between the semi-analytical and numerical solutions.

  18. Colloidal silver solutions with antimicrobial properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petica, A. [INCDIE ICPE-Advanced Research, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: petica@icpe-ca.ro; Gavriliu, S.; Lungu, M.; Buruntea, N. [INCDIE ICPE-Advanced Research, Bucharest (Romania); Panzaru, C. [Institute of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iassy (Romania)

    2008-08-25

    Some colloidal silver solutions involving the electrochemical technique with 'sacrificial anode method and different stabilizers and co-stabilizers' have been prepared. A constant current pulse generator with stirrer at different working times has been used. To achieve stable colloidal silver solutions, a mix of different tensioactive agents namely [poly (N-vinylpyrrolidone)], Na-naphthalene sulphonate, Na-lauryl sulfate and Na-dodecyl sulphonate were tested. The effects of these various mixes of polymer and ionic surfactants upon the Ag concentration and UV-vis spectra of silver nanoparticles were determined by spectrophotometer techniques. The nanoparticles sizes have been analyzed through dynamic light scattering technique and the silver nanoparticle morphology has been evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Micobiological analysis has been made by determining minimal inhibitorial concentration upon the following germs: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC) (Gram-positive cocci), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATTC), Escherichia coli (ATCC) and Acinetobacter spp. (Gram-negative coccobacillus). To evaluate the antifungal effect, the antibiogram method involving various tests using a fungi mix of Aspergillus, Penicillium and Trichoderma species has been used. The presented method allows obtaining of some stable colloidal solutions containing up to 35 ppm of Ag with very good antimicrobial and antifungal properties.

  19. Patchy polymer colloids with tunable anisotropy dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; Hilhorst, Jan; Heinen, Maria A P; Hoogenraad, Mathijs J; Luigjes, Bob; Kegel, Willem K

    2011-06-09

    We present the synthesis of polymer colloids with continuously tunable anisotropy dimensions: patchiness, roughness, and branching. Our method makes use of controlled fusion of multiple protrusions on highly cross-linked polymer particles produced by seeded emulsion polymerization. Carefully changing the synthesis conditions, we can tune the number of protrusions, or branching, of the obtained particles from spheres with one to three patches to raspberry-like particles with multiple protrusions. In addition to that, roughness is generated on the seed particles by adsorption of secondary nucleated particles during synthesis. The size of the roughness relative to the smooth patches can be continuously tuned by the initiator, surfactant, and styrene concentrations. Seed colloids chemically different from the protrusions induce patches of different chemical nature. The underlying generality of the synthesis procedure allows for application to a variety of seed particle sizes and materials. We demonstrate the use of differently sized polyNIPAM (poly-N-isopropylacrylamide), as well as polystyrene and magnetite filled polyNIPAM seed particles, the latter giving rise to magnetically anisotropic colloids. The high yield together with the uniform, anisotropic shape make them interesting candidates for use as smart building blocks in self-assembling systems.

  20. Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2014-03-01

    DPD as a mesoscale method was firstly proposed to study dynamics of suspensions under flow condition. However the proposed method failed to capture shear properties of suspensions because it lacked: first a potential to reproduce lubrication forces and second a clear definition for the colloid surface. Recently we reported a modified DPD method which defines colloidal particles as particles with hard core and a dissipative coat. An additional lubrication force was introduced to include the short-range hydrodynamics that are not captured in original DPD. The model was found to be able to reproduce shear properties of suspensions for a wide range of different systems, from monodisperse to bimodal with different volume fractions, compositions and size ratios. In present work our modified DPD method is employed to study both equilibrium and flow properties of colloidal suspension. Zero shear viscosity of suspension is measured using Green-Kubo expressions and the results are compared to theoretical predictions. Furthermore, structure formation in suspensions is studied in respect to energy landscape of the fluid both at rest and under flow.

  1. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R; Medina-Noyola, M

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the ("bifurcation" or fixed-point") equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  2. Colloidal nanorod heterostructures for photovoltaics and optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moonsub

    2017-05-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) synthesized in versatile, easy-to-process solutions are opening up exciting prospects in multiple areas, especially in biomedical imaging, photovoltaics, solid-state lighting and displays. The success of most of these prospects relies on high-quality heterostructures that improve optical properties. In particular, the core/shell heterostructure with a type I straddling band offset has been indispensable but the applicability is often limited to those exploiting only photoluminescence. QDs and their heterostructures can also be made with anisotropic shapes that allow access to essentially an unlimited number of combinations of size, shape and composition. Structures that allow enhancement of optical properties and physical accessibility for carrier injection/extraction simultaneously can open up new and exciting prospects in photovoltaics and optoelectronics. This topical review focuses on nanorod-based colloidal semiconductor heterostructures. Two-component, type II staggered band offset nanorod heterostructures capable of efficiently separating photoinduced charges are first discussed. Double heterojunction nanorods that contain three different phases are then considered with respect to their novelty and potential as emissive materials in light-emitting diodes. We conclude with an outlook on the possibility of developing colloidal nanorods that contain epitaxial interfaces beyond the conventional semiconductor heterojunctions.

  3. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic...

  4. Amphiphilic Graft Copolymer Nanospheres: From Colloidal Self-Assembly to CO2 Capture Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Harim; Kim, Dong Jun; Park, Min Su; Ryu, Du Yeol; Kim, Jong Hak

    2016-04-13

    Colloidal nanosphere self-assembly effectively generates ordered nanostructures, prompting tremendous interest in many applications such as photonic crystals and templates for inverse opal fabrication. Here we report the self-assembly of low-cost, graft copolymer nanospheres for CO2 capture membranes. Specifically, poly(dimethylsiloxane)-graft-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PDMS-g-P4VP) is synthesized via one-pot, free radical dispersion polymerization to give discrete monodisperse nanospheres. These nanospheres comprise a surface-anchored highly permeable PDMS layer and internal CO2-philic P4VP spherical core. Their diameter is controllable below the submicrometer range by varying grafting ratios. The colloidal dispersion forms a long-range, close-packed hexagonal array on a substrate by inclined deposition and convective assembly. The array shows dispersion medium-dependent packing characteristics. A thermodynamic correlation is determined using different solvents to obtain stable PDMS-g-P4VP dispersions and interpreted in terms of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. As a proof-of-concept, the implementation of these nanospheres into membranes simultaneously enhances the CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 selectivity of PDMS-based transport matrixes. Upon physical aging of the solution, the CO2/N2 selectivity is improved up to 26, one of the highest values for highly permeable PDMS-based polymeric membranes.

  5. [Indications and limitations for colloids in interventions and surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artmann, Thorsten; Gan, Tong Joo; Kranke, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Over the last few decades colloids have played an important part in the stabilisation of patients with acute need of intravascular volume replacement. After the 6S and the CHEST trials were published in 2012 and the subsequent recommendations of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) there has been some uncertainty about the current clinical relevance and routine use of colloids. This article summarizes the current evidence and relevance of colloids in the perioperative environment and in the interventional setting on the basis of the recently published German S3-guidelines for volume therapy in adults. In situations of acute volume resuscitation colloids are still appropriate. Only colloids in balanced solutions should be used. Possible side effects, contraindications and the maximum daily dose have to be taken into consideration when administering colloids.

  6. Inertial and viscoelastic forces on rigid colloids in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michael P; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Nikoubashman, Arash

    2015-06-14

    We perform hybrid molecular dynamics simulations to study the flow behavior of rigid colloids dispersed in a dilute polymer solution. The underlying Newtonian solvent and the ensuing hydrodynamic interactions are incorporated through multiparticle collision dynamics, while the constituent polymers are modeled as bead-spring chains, maintaining a description consistent with the colloidal nature of our system. We study the cross-stream migration of the solute particles in slit-like channels for various polymer lengths and colloid sizes and find a distinct focusing onto the channel center under specific solvent and flow conditions. To better understand this phenomenon, we systematically measure the effective forces exerted on the colloids. We find that the migration originates from a competition between viscoelastic forces from the polymer solution and hydrodynamically induced inertial forces. Our simulations reveal a significantly stronger fluctuation of the lateral colloid position than expected from thermal motion alone, which originates from the complex interplay between the colloid and polymer chains.

  7. Two-substrate vertical deposition for stable colloidal crystal chips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin; SUN Zhiqiang; CHEN Zhimin; ZHANG Kai; YANG Bai

    2005-01-01

    By combining vertical deposition with micromolding in capillaries method, we have demonstrated the two-substrate vertical deposition, an alternative and versatile procedure for fabricating high-quality stable colloidal crystal chips. Apparent bright colors, special UV-vis spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images all prove that high-quality colloidal crystal structures are formed in between the two substrates. During the two-substrate vertical deposition for colloidal crystal chips, capillary force and evaporation of the medium are critical to the formation of the colloidal crystals; while the confinement in between two close substrates makes the resulting colloidal crystal chips more stable. Due to the excellent stability, these colloidal crystal chips can be used to construct some composite optical devices via a simpler and more flexible process. Meanwhile, they can also be further used as the templates for ordered multiporous materials.

  8. Self-pinning by colloids confined at a contact line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weon, Byung; Je, Jung

    2013-03-01

    Colloidal particles suspended in a fluid usually inhibit complete wetting of the fluid on a solid surface and cause pinning of the contact line, known as self-pinning. We show differences in spreading and drying behaviors of pure and colloidal droplets using optical and confocal imaging methods. These differences come from spreading inhibition by colloids confined at a contact line. We propose a self-pinning mechanism based on spreading inhibition by colloids. We find a good agreement between the mechanism and the experimental result taken by directly tracking individual colloids near the contact lines of evaporating colloidal droplets. This research was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (Functional X-ray Imaging) of MEST/NRF.

  9. Design and elaboration of colloidal molecules: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Etienne; Désert, Anthony; Perro, Adeline; Ravaine, Serge

    2011-02-01

    The concept of colloidal molecules was first evoked by van Blaaderen in 2003 for describing small non-spherical colloids made of the aggregation of a small number of particles. He predicted original properties to the complex assemblies of such colloids, in particular in optics. This critical review deals with the different strategies reported for creating robust clusters of spherical particles which could mimic the space-filling models of simple conventional molecules. These routes concern either the controlled clustering of preformed colloids directed by coalescence, physical routes, chemical routes, or 2-D/3-D geometrical confinement, or strategies starting from a single colloid which is decorated by satellite colloids by taking advantage of controlled phase separation or nucleation and growth phenomena. These routes are compared from the viewpoint of the accessible shapes, their tunability and scalability (146 references).

  10. Synthesis and characterization of single-crystalline alumina nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing; XU Xiang-yu; ZHANG Hong-zhou; CHEN Yao-feng; XU Jun; YU Da-peng

    2005-01-01

    Alumina nanowires were synthesized on large-area silicon substrate via simple thermal evaporation method of heating a mixture of aluminum and alumina powders without using any catalyst or template. The phase structure and the surface morphology of the as-grown sample were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The chemical composition and the microstructure of the as-grown alumina nanowires were characterized using transmission electron microscope(TEM). The nanowires are usually straight and the single crystalline has average diameter of 40 nm and length of 3 - 5 μm. The growth direction is along the [002] direction. Well aligned alumina nanowire arrays were observed on the surface of many large particles. The catalyst-free growth of the alumina nanowires was explained under the framework of a vapor-solid(VS)growth mechanism. This as-synthesized alumina nanowires could find potential applications in the fabrication of nanodevices.

  11. Crystalline metamaterials for topological properties at subwavelength scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yves, Simon; Fleury, Romain; Berthelot, Thomas; Fink, Mathias; Lemoult, Fabrice; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2017-07-18

    The exciting discovery of topological condensed matter systems has lately triggered a search for their photonic analogues, motivated by the possibility of robust backscattering-immune light transport. However, topological photonic phases have so far only been observed in photonic crystals and waveguide arrays, which are inherently physically wavelength scaled, hindering their application in compact subwavelength systems. In this letter, we tackle this problem by patterning the deep subwavelength resonant elements of metamaterials onto specific lattices, and create crystalline metamaterials that can develop complex nonlocal properties due to multiple scattering, despite their very subwavelength spatial scale that usually implies to disregard their structure. These spatially dispersive systems can support subwavelength topological phases, as we demonstrate at microwaves by direct field mapping. Our approach gives a straightforward tabletop platform for the study of photonic topological phases, and allows to envision applications benefiting the compactness of metamaterials and the amazing potential of topological insulators.

  12. Crystalline metamaterials for topological properties at subwavelength scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yves, Simon; Fleury, Romain; Berthelot, Thomas; Fink, Mathias; Lemoult, Fabrice; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2017-07-01

    The exciting discovery of topological condensed matter systems has lately triggered a search for their photonic analogues, motivated by the possibility of robust backscattering-immune light transport. However, topological photonic phases have so far only been observed in photonic crystals and waveguide arrays, which are inherently physically wavelength scaled, hindering their application in compact subwavelength systems. In this letter, we tackle this problem by patterning the deep subwavelength resonant elements of metamaterials onto specific lattices, and create crystalline metamaterials that can develop complex nonlocal properties due to multiple scattering, despite their very subwavelength spatial scale that usually implies to disregard their structure. These spatially dispersive systems can support subwavelength topological phases, as we demonstrate at microwaves by direct field mapping. Our approach gives a straightforward tabletop platform for the study of photonic topological phases, and allows to envision applications benefiting the compactness of metamaterials and the amazing potential of topological insulators.

  13. A colloidal singularity reveals the crucial role of colloidal stability for nanomaterials in-vitro toxicity testing: nZVI-microalgae colloidal system as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Gonzalo

    Full Text Available Aggregation raises attention in Nanotoxicology due to its methodological implications. Aggregation is a physical symptom of a more general physicochemical condition of colloidal particles, namely, colloidal stability. Colloidal stability is a global indicator of the tendency of a system to reduce its net surface energy, which may be achieved by homo-aggregation or hetero-aggregation, including location at bio-interfaces. However, the role of colloidal stability as a driver of ENM bioactivity has received little consideration thus far. In the present work, which focuses on the toxicity of nanoscaled Fe° nanoparticles (nZVI towards a model microalga, we demonstrate that colloidal stability is a fundamental driver of ENM bioactivity, comprehensively accounting for otherwise inexplicable differential biological effects. The present work throws light on basic aspects of Nanotoxicology, and reveals a key factor which may reconcile contradictory results on the influence of aggregation in bioactivity of ENMs.

  14. Selection of Arginine-Rich Anti-Gold Antibodies Engineered for Plasmonic Colloid Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Purvi; Narayanan, S Shankara; Sharma, Jadab; Girard, Christian; Dujardin, Erik; Nizak, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are affinity proteins with a wide spectrum of applications in analytical and therapeutic biology. Proteins showing specific recognition for a chosen molecular target can be isolated and their encoding sequence identified in vitro from a large and diverse library by phage display selection. In this work, we show that this standard biochemical technique rapidly yields a collection of antibody protein binders for an inorganic target of major technological importance: crystalline metallic gold surfaces. 21 distinct anti-gold antibody proteins emerged from a large random library of antibodies and were sequenced. The systematic statistical analysis of all the protein sequences reveals a strong occurrence of arginine in anti-gold antibodies, which corroborates recent molecular dynamics predictions on the crucial role of arginine in protein/gold interactions. Once tethered to small gold nanoparticles using histidine tag chemistry, the selected antibodies could drive the self-assembly of the colloids onto t...

  15. Directed Self-assembly of Colloidal Particles on a Blue Phase I Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose; Zhou, Ye; Sadati, Monirosadat; Abbott, Nicholas; de Pablo, Juan

    Blue phases are liquid states of matter with a highly ordered defect structure which confers unique properties among complex fluids. In this work, a free energy model of chiral liquid crystals is used to consider the self-assembly of colloids and nanoparticles on the interface of a Blue Phase I. It is shown that the crystalline defect structure of the blue phase produces intricate, two-dimensional hexagonal and Kagome structures among the nanoparticle arrangements, with lattice parameters that depend on the type of anchoring of the liquid crystal at the particle's surface. These parameters can be tuned via the chirality of the material, thereby offering intriguing possibilities for the creation of hierarchical materials based on the directed assembly of particles in chiral liquid crystals. This work is supported by the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division, Biomaterials Program, through DE-SC004025.

  16. Largescale Preparation of Organic-Dispersible Lanthanide Fluorides Nanocrystals via Colloid-Extraction Route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Weiwan; Zhang Shengmao; He Benfang; Wu Zhishen; Zhang Zhijun

    2007-01-01

    Organic-dispersible lanthanide fluorides nanocrystals were synthesized at a large Scale using colloid-extraction method, in the presence of dialkyl-dithiophosphinic acid (DDPA) as the extraction agent. The products were characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that the synthesized lanthanide fluorides nanoparticles had high purity and crystallinity, and could be well dispersed in organic solvents such as chloroform, toluene etc., which could be closely related to the surface-capping of the nanocrystals by the DDPA molecules. Moreover, the nanocrystals before and after extraction by DDPA showed few differences in the microscopic morphologies. It was implied that DDPA as the extraction agent had good protection to the nanocrystals as well, which could be essential to the commercial application of the titled rare earth nanocrystals as novel multifunctional additives in the fields of lubrication.

  17. Colloidal Surfaces with Boundaries, Apex Boojums, and Nested Elastic Self-Assembly of Nematic Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungoh; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-12-01

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles is poised to become a powerful composite material fabrication technique, but remains challenged by a limited control over the ensuing structures. We develop a new breed of nematic colloids that are physical analogs of a mathematical surface with boundary, interacting with the molecular alignment field without inducing defects when flat. However, made from a thin nanofoil, they can be shaped to prompt formation of self-compensating defects that drive preprogramed elastic interactions mediated by the nematic host. To show this, we wrap the nanofoil on all triangular side faces of a pyramid, except its square base. The ensuing pyramidal cones induce point defects with fractional hedgehog charges of opposite signs, spontaneously align with respect to the far-field director to form elastic dipoles and nested assemblies with tunable spacing. Nanofoils shaped into octahedrons interact as elastic quadrupoles. Our findings may drive realization of low-symmetry colloidal phases.

  18. Non-lamellar lipid liquid crystalline structures at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P; Barauskas, Justas; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Wadsäter, Maria; Tiberg, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The self-assembly of lipids leads to the formation of a rich variety of nano-structures, not only restricted to lipid bilayers, but also encompassing non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures, such as cubic, hexagonal, and sponge phases. These non-lamellar phases have been increasingly recognized as important for living systems, both in terms of providing compartmentalization and as regulators of biological activity. Consequently, they are of great interest for their potential as delivery systems in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. The compartmentalizing nature of these phases features mono- or bicontinuous networks of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. To utilize these non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures in biomedical devices for analyses and drug delivery, it is crucial to understand how they interact with and respond to different types of interfaces. Such non-lamellar interfacial layers can be used to entrap functional biomolecules that respond to lipid curvature as well as the confinement. It is also important to understand the structural changes of deposited lipid in relation to the corresponding bulk dispersions. They can be controlled by changing the lipid composition or by introducing components that can alter the curvature or by deposition on nano-structured surface, e.g. vertical nano-wire arrays. Progress in the area of liquid crystalline lipid based nanoparticles opens up new possibilities for the preparation of well-defined surface films with well-defined nano-structures. This review will focus on recent progress in the formation of non-lamellar dispersions and their interfacial properties at the solid/liquid and biologically relevant interfaces.

  19. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  20. [Bactericidal activity of colloidal silver against grampositive and gramnegative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonina, I A; Kraeva, L A; Tseneva, G Ia

    2010-01-01

    It was shown that colloidal silver solution prepared in cooperation with the A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, had significant bactericidal activity. Stable bactericidal effect on gramnegative microorganisms was observed after their 2-hour exposition in the solution of colloidal silver at a concentration of 10 ppm. Grampositive capsule-forming microorganisms were less susceptible to the colloidal silver solution: their death was observed after the 4-hour exposition in the solution.