WorldWideScience

Sample records for crystal structures revealed

  1. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed.

  2. Artemin Crystal Structure Reveals Insights into Heparan Sulfate Binding

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    Silvian,L.; Jin, P.; Carmillo, P.; Boriack-Sjodin, P.; Pelletier, C.; Rushe, M.; Gong, B.; Sah, D.; Pepinsky, B.; Rossomando, A.

    2006-01-01

    Artemin (ART) promotes the growth of developing peripheral neurons by signaling through a multicomponent receptor complex comprised of a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor (cRET) and a specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked co-receptor (GFR{alpha}3). Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signals through a similar ternary complex but requires heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for full activity. HSPG has not been demonstrated as a requirement for ART signaling. We crystallized ART in the presence of sulfate and solved its structure by isomorphous replacement. The structure reveals ordered sulfate anions bound to arginine residues in the pre-helix and amino-terminal regions that were organized in a triad arrangement characteristic of heparan sulfate. Three residues in the pre-helix were singly or triply substituted with glutamic acid, and the resulting proteins were shown to have reduced heparin-binding affinity that is partly reflected in their ability to activate cRET. This study suggests that ART binds HSPGs and identifies residues that may be involved in HSPG binding.

  3. Crystal structure of human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I.; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical to β-sheet rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide bond linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into an β-sheet rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates, and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such non-amyloid oligomers. PMID:23808589

  4. Crystal structure of a human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K

    2013-07-17

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical- to β-sheet-rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide-bond-linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into a β-sheet-rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such nonamyloid oligomers.

  5. High resolution crystal structure of human β-glucuronidase reveals structural basis of lysosome targeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Waheed, Abdul; Grubb, Jeffery H; Klei, Herbert E; Korolev, Sergey; Sly, William S

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  6. High Resolution Crystal Structure of Human [beta]-Glucuronidase Reveals Structural Basis of Lysosome Targeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md; Waheed, Abdul; Grubb, Jeffery; Klei, Herbert; Korolev, Sergey; Sly, William

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  7. High resolution crystal structure of human β-glucuronidase reveals structural basis of lysosome targeting.

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    Md Imtaiyaz Hassan

    Full Text Available Human β-glucuronidase (GUS cleaves β-D-glucuronic acid residues from the non-reducing termini of glycosaminoglycan and its deficiency leads to mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPSVII. Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases. The structure revealed several new details including a new glycan chain at Asn272, in addition to that previously observed at Asn173, and coordination of the glycan chain at Asn173 with Lys197 of the lysosomal targeting motif which is essential for phosphotransferase recognition. Analysis of the high resolution structure not only provided new insights into the structural basis for lysosomal targeting but showed significant differences between human GUS, which is medically important in its own right, and E. coli GUS, which can be selectively inhibited in the human gut to prevent prodrug activation and is also widely used as a reporter gene by plant biologists. Despite these differences, both human and E. coli GUS share a high structure homology in all three domains with most of the glycosyl hydrolases, suggesting that they all evolved from a common ancestral gene.

  8. Crystal Structures of Polymorphic Prion Protein β1 Peptides Reveal Variable Steric Zipper Conformations.

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    Yu, Lu; Lee, Seung-Joo; Yee, Vivien C

    2015-06-16

    The pathogenesis of prion diseases is associated with the conformational conversion of normal, predominantly α-helical prion protein (PrP(C)) into a pathogenic form that is enriched with β-sheets (PrP(Sc)). Several PrP(C) crystal structures have revealed β1-mediated intermolecular sheets, suggesting that the β1 strand may contribute to a possible initiation site for β-sheet-mediated PrP(Sc) propagation. This β1 strand contains the polymorphic residue 129 that influences disease susceptibility and phenotype. To investigate the effect of the residue 129 polymorphism on the conformation of amyloid-like continuous β-sheets formed by β1, crystal structures of β1 peptides containing each of the polymorphic residues were determined. To probe the conformational influence of the peptide construct design, four different lengths of β1 peptides were studied. From the 12 peptides studied, 11 yielded crystal structures ranging in resolution from 0.9 to 1.4 Å. This ensemble of β1 crystal structures reveals conformational differences that are influenced by both the nature of the polymorphic residue and the extent of the peptide construct, indicating that comprehensive studies in which peptide constructs vary are a more rigorous approach to surveying conformational possibilities.

  9. The crystal structure of phosphorylated MAPK13 reveals common structural features and differences in p38 MAPK family activation

    OpenAIRE

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Scheaffer, Suzanne M.; Romero, Arthur G.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinases are an important family of drug targets for a myriad of inflammatory, as well as other, diseases. Presented here is the crystal structure of the active form of MAPK13 (p38d) as well as a comprehensive analysis of all known apo inactive and active p38 MAPK structures, revealing a common mode of activation as well as some unique structural features.

  10. Crystal structure analysis reveals functional flexibility in the selenocysteine-specific tRNA from mouse.

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    Oleg M Ganichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNA(Sec exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNA(Sec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNA(Sec. tRNA(Sec lacking the single-stranded 3'-acceptor end ((ΔGCCARNA(Sec yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Å resolution. The global structure of (ΔGCCARNA(Sec resembles the structure of human tRNA(Sec determined at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNA(Sec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2'-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNA(Secin vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn(2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNA(Sec. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNA(Sec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNA(Sec support its interaction with proteins.

  11. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Anna T; Kirby, Karen A; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Tanner, John J; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2015-07-03

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Crystal structure of human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-2 reveals the mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction.

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    Teramoto, Takamasa; Fujikawa, Yukari; Kawaguchi, Yoshirou; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Soejima, Masayuki; Adachi, Rumi; Nakanishi, Yuichi; Mishiro-Sato, Emi; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification by tyrosine sulfation has an important role in extracellular protein-protein interactions. The protein tyrosine sulfation reaction is catalysed by the Golgi enzyme called the tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. To date, no crystal structure is available for tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. Detailed mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction has thus remained unclear. Here we present the first crystal structure of the human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase isoform 2 complexed with a substrate peptide (C4P5Y3) derived from complement C4 and 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate at 1.9 Å resolution. Structural and complementary mutational analyses revealed the molecular basis for catalysis being an SN2-like in-line displacement mechanism. Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase isoform 2 appeared to recognize the C4 peptide in a deep cleft by using a short parallel β-sheet type interaction, and the bound C4P5Y3 forms an L-shaped structure. Surprisingly, the mode of substrate peptide recognition observed in the tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase isoform 2 structure resembles that observed for the receptor type tyrosine kinases.

  13. Novel Features of Eukaryotic Photosystem II Revealed by Its Crystal Structure Analysis from a Red Alga.

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    Ago, Hideo; Adachi, Hideyuki; Umena, Yasufumi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo; Tian, Lirong; Han, Guangye; Kuang, Tingyun; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa; Enami, Isao; Miyano, Masashi; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-03-11

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes light-induced water splitting, leading to the evolution of molecular oxygen indispensible for life on the earth. The crystal structure of PSII from cyanobacteria has been solved at an atomic level, but the structure of eukaryotic PSII has not been analyzed. Because eukaryotic PSII possesses additional subunits not found in cyanobacterial PSII, it is important to solve the structure of eukaryotic PSII to elucidate their detailed functions, as well as evolutionary relationships. Here we report the structure of PSII from a red alga Cyanidium caldarium at 2.76 Å resolution, which revealed the structure and interaction sites of PsbQ', a unique, fourth extrinsic protein required for stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex in the lumenal surface of PSII. The PsbQ' subunit was found to be located underneath CP43 in the vicinity of PsbV, and its structure is characterized by a bundle of four up-down helices arranged in a similar way to those of cyanobacterial and higher plant PsbQ, although helices I and II of PsbQ' were kinked relative to its higher plant counterpart because of its interactions with CP43. Furthermore, two novel transmembrane helices were found in the red algal PSII that are not present in cyanobacterial PSII; one of these helices may correspond to PsbW found only in eukaryotic PSII. The present results represent the first crystal structure of PSII from eukaryotic oxygenic organisms, which were discussed in comparison with the structure of cyanobacterial PSII.

  14. Novel Features of Eukaryotic Photosystem II Revealed by Its Crystal Structure Analysis from a Red Alga*

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    Ago, Hideo; Adachi, Hideyuki; Umena, Yasufumi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo; Tian, Lirong; Han, Guangye; Kuang, Tingyun; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa; Enami, Isao; Miyano, Masashi; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes light-induced water splitting, leading to the evolution of molecular oxygen indispensible for life on the earth. The crystal structure of PSII from cyanobacteria has been solved at an atomic level, but the structure of eukaryotic PSII has not been analyzed. Because eukaryotic PSII possesses additional subunits not found in cyanobacterial PSII, it is important to solve the structure of eukaryotic PSII to elucidate their detailed functions, as well as evolutionary relationships. Here we report the structure of PSII from a red alga Cyanidium caldarium at 2.76 Å resolution, which revealed the structure and interaction sites of PsbQ′, a unique, fourth extrinsic protein required for stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex in the lumenal surface of PSII. The PsbQ′ subunit was found to be located underneath CP43 in the vicinity of PsbV, and its structure is characterized by a bundle of four up-down helices arranged in a similar way to those of cyanobacterial and higher plant PsbQ, although helices I and II of PsbQ′ were kinked relative to its higher plant counterpart because of its interactions with CP43. Furthermore, two novel transmembrane helices were found in the red algal PSII that are not present in cyanobacterial PSII; one of these helices may correspond to PsbW found only in eukaryotic PSII. The present results represent the first crystal structure of PSII from eukaryotic oxygenic organisms, which were discussed in comparison with the structure of cyanobacterial PSII. PMID:26757821

  15. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

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    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  16. Time-resolved soft X-ray diffraction reveals transient structural distortions of ternary liquid crystals.

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    Quevedo, Wilson; Peth, Christian; Busse, Gerhard; Scholz, Mirko; Mann, Klaus; Techert, Simone

    2009-11-04

    Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns) and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2-5.2 nm). The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C(16)E(7)/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 micros). Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 A resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  17. Crystal structure of pentapeptide-independent chemotaxis receptor methyltransferase (CheR) reveals idiosyncratic structural determinants for receptor recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Monu; Sharma, Rajesh; Malik, Anjali; Dhindwal, Sonali; Kumar, Pravindra; Tomar, Shailly

    2016-12-01

    Chemotactic methyltransferase, CheR catalyse methylation of specific glutamate residues in the cytoplasmic domain of methyl-accepting chemotactic protein receptors (MCPRs). The methylation of MCPRs is essential for the chemical sensing and chemotactic bacterial mobility towards favorable chemicals or away from unfavorable ones. In this study, crystal structure of B. subtilis CheR (BsCheR) in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH) has been determined to 1.8Å resolution. This is the first report of crystal structure belonging to the pentapeptide-independent CheR (PICheR) class. Till date, only one crystal structure of CheR from S. typhimurium (StCheR) belonging to pentapeptide-dependent CheR (PDCheR) class is available. Structural analysis of BsCheR reveals a helix-X-helix motif (HXH) with Asp53 as the linker residue in the N-terminal domain. The key structural features of the PDCheR β-subdomain involved in the formation of a tight complex with the pentapeptide binding motif in MCPRs were found to be absent in the structure of BsCheR. Additionally, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were performed to investigate S-adenosyl-(l)-methionine (SAM) binding affinity and KD was determined to be 0.32mM. The structure of BsCheR reveals that mostly residues of the large C-terminal domain contribute to SAH binding, with contributions of few residues from the linker region and the N-terminal domain. Structural investigations and sequence analysis carried out in this study provide critical insights into the distinct receptor recognition mechanism of the PDCheR and PICheR methyltransferase classes.

  18. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes

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    Kanai,R.; Kar, K.; Anthony, K.; Gould, L.; Ledizet, M.; Fikrig, E.; Marasco, W.; Koski, R.; Modis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  19. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

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    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang; (NU Sinapore); (Nankai); (Oxford); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (Tsinghua)

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans Apoptosome Reveals an Octameric Assembly of CED-4

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    Qi, S.; Li, H.; Pang, Y.; Hu, Q., Liu, Q., Li, H.; Zhou, Y.; He, T.; Liang, Q.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, X.; Luo, G.; Wang, J.; Yan, N.; Shi, Y.

    2010-04-30

    The CED-4 homo-oligomer or apoptosome is required for initiation of programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans by facilitating autocatalytic activation of the CED-3 caspase zymogen. How the CED-4 apoptosome assembles and activates CED-3 remains enigmatic. Here we report the crystal structure of the complete CED-4 apoptosome and show that it consists of eight CED-4 molecules, organized as a tetramer of an asymmetric dimer via a previously unreported interface among AAA{sup +} ATPases. These eight CED-4 molecules form a funnel-shaped structure. The mature CED-3 protease is monomeric in solution and forms an active holoenzyme with the CED-4 apoptosome, within which the protease activity of CED-3 is markedly stimulated. Unexpectedly, the octameric CED-4 apoptosome appears to bind only two, not eight, molecules of mature CED-3. The structure of the CED-4 apoptosome reveals shared principles for the NB-ARC family of AAA{sup +} ATPases and suggests a mechanism for the activation of CED-3.

  1. Crystal Structure of Homo Sapiens PTD012 Reveals a Zinc-Containing Hydrolase Fold

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    Manjasetty,B.; Bussow, K.; Fieber-ErdMan, M.; Roske, Y.; Gobam, J.; Scheich, C.; Gotz, F.; Niesen, F.; Heinemann, U.

    2006-01-01

    The human protein PTD012 is the longer product of an alternatively spliced gene and was described to be localized in the nucleus. The X-ray structure analysis at 1.7 Angstroms resolution of PTD012 through SAD phasing reveals a monomeric protein and a novel fold. The shorter splice form was also studied and appears to be unfolded and non-functional. The structure of PTD012 displays an {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} four-layer topology. A metal ion residing between the central {beta}-sheets is partially coordinated by three histidine residues. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis identifies the PTD012-bound ion as Zn{sup 2+}. Tetrahedral coordination of the ion is completed by the carboxylate oxygen atom of an acetate molecule taken up from the crystallization buffer. The binding of Zn{sup 2+} to PTD012 is reminiscent of zinc-containing enzymes such as carboxypeptidase, carbonic anhydrase, and {beta}-lactamase. Biochemical assays failed to demonstrate any of these enzyme activities in PTD012. However, PTD012 exhibits ester hydrolase activity on the substrate p-nitrophenyl acetate.

  2. Crystal structure of a c-di-AMP riboswitch reveals an internally pseudo-dimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-11-18

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a second messenger that is essential for growth and homeostasis in bacteria. A recently discovered c-di-AMP-responsive riboswitch controls the expression of genes in a variety of bacteria, including important pathogens. To elucidate the molecular basis for specific binding of c-di-AMP by a gene-regulatory mRNA domain, we have determined the co-crystal structure of this riboswitch. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals an internally pseudo-symmetric RNA in which two similar three-helix-junction elements associate head-to-tail, creating a trough that cradles two c-di-AMP molecules making quasi-equivalent contacts with the riboswitch. The riboswitch selectively binds c-di-AMP and discriminates exquisitely against other cyclic dinucleotides, such as c-di-GMP and cyclic-AMP-GMP, via interactions with both the backbone and bases of its cognate second messenger. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments indicate that global folding of the riboswitch is induced by the two bound cyclic dinucleotides, which bridge the two symmetric three-helix domains. This structural reorganization likely couples c-di-AMP binding to gene expression.

  3. The Crystal Structure of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Kinase Reveals an Unexpected Kinase Domain Fold*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Sascha; Hinniger, Alexandra; Fendrich, Gabriele; Drückes, Peter; Antz, Sylvie; Mattes, Henri; Möbitz, Henrik; Ofner, Silvio; Schmiedeberg, Niko; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Rieffel, Sebastien; Strauss, André; Troxler, Thomas; Glatthar, Ralf; Sparrer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are important cellular effectors in innate immune responses and play a major role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cancer Osaka thyroid (COT) kinase, also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (MAP3K8) and tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl-2), is a serine-threonine (ST) kinase and is a key regulator in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Due to its pivotal role in immune biology, COT kinase has been identified as an attractive target for pharmaceutical research that is directed at the discovery of orally available, selective, and potent inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and cancer. The production of monomeric, recombinant COT kinase has proven to be very difficult, and issues with solubility and stability of the enzyme have hampered the discovery and optimization of potent and selective inhibitors. We developed a protocol for the production of recombinant human COT kinase that yields pure and highly active enzyme in sufficient yields for biochemical and structural studies. The quality of the enzyme allowed us to establish a robust in vitro phosphorylation assay for the efficient biochemical characterization of COT kinase inhibitors and to determine the x-ray co-crystal structures of the COT kinase domain in complex with two ATP-binding site inhibitors. The structures presented in this study reveal two distinct ligand binding modes and a unique kinase domain architecture that has not been observed previously. The structurally versatile active site significantly impacts the design of potent, low molecular weight COT kinase inhibitors. PMID:25918157

  4. The crystal structure of phosphorylated MAPK13 reveals common structural features and differences in p38 MAPK family activation.

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    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Romero, Arthur G; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Tom J

    2015-04-01

    The p38 MAP kinases (p38 MAPKs) represent an important family centrally involved in mediating extracellular signaling. Recent studies indicate that family members such as MAPK13 (p38δ) display a selective cellular and tissue expression and are therefore involved in specific diseases. Detailed structural studies of all p38 MAPK family members are crucial for the design of specific inhibitors. In order to facilitate such ventures, the structure of MAPK13 was determined in both the inactive (unphosphorylated; MAPK13) and active (dual phosphorylated; MAPK13/pTpY) forms. Here, the first preparation, crystallization and structure determination of MAPK13/pTpY are presented and the structure is compared with the previously reported structure of MAPK13 in order to facilitate studies for structure-based drug design. A comprehensive analysis of inactive versus active structures for the p38 MAPK family is also presented. It is found that MAPK13 undergoes a larger interlobe configurational rearrangement upon activation compared with MAPK14. Surprisingly, the analysis of activated p38 MAPK structures (MAP12/pTpY, MAPK13/pTpY and MAPK14/pTpY) reveals that, despite a high degree of sequence similarity, different side chains are used to coordinate the phosphorylated residues. There are also differences in the rearrangement of the hinge region that occur in MAPK14 compared with MAPK13 which would affect inhibitor binding. A thorough examination of all of the active (phosphorylated) and inactive (unphosphorylated) p38 MAPK family member structures was performed to reveal a common structural basis of activation for the p38 MAP kinase family and to identify structural differences that may be exploited for developing family member-specific inhibitors.

  5. Crystal structures of β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 enzyme reveal conformational changes and substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Yuko; Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K

    2013-11-01

    The β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 (β4GalT7) enzyme is involved in proteoglycan synthesis. In the presence of a manganese ion, it transfers galactose from UDP-galactose to xylose on a proteoglycan acceptor substrate. We present here the crystal structures of human β4GalT7 in open and closed conformations. A comparison of these crystal structures shows that, upon manganese and UDP or UDP-Gal binding, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes involving a small and a long loop. We also present the crystal structures of Drosophila wild-type β4GalT7 and D211N β4GalT7 mutant enzymes in the closed conformation in the presence of the acceptor substrate xylobiose and the donor substrate UDP-Gal, respectively. To understand the catalytic mechanism, we have crystallized the ternary complex of D211N β4GalT7 mutant enzyme in the presence of manganese with the donor and the acceptor substrates together in the same crystal structure. The galactose moiety of the bound UDP-Gal molecule forms seven hydrogen bonds with the protein molecule. The nonreducing end of the xylose moiety of xylobiose binds to the hydrophobic acceptor sugar binding pocket created by the conformational changes, whereas its extended xylose moiety forms hydrophobic interactions with a Tyr residue. In the ternary complex crystal structure, the nucleophile O4 oxygen atom of the xylose molecule is found in close proximity to the C1 and O5 atoms of the galactose moiety. This is the first time that a Michaelis complex of a glycosyltransferase has been described, and it clearly suggests an SN2 type catalytic mechanism for the β4GalT7 enzyme.

  6. High Resolution Crystal Structure of Human [beta]-Glucuronidase Reveals Structural Basis of Lysosome Targeting: e79687

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Md Imtaiyaz Hassan; Abdul Waheed; Jeffery H Grubb; Herbert E Klei; Sergey Korolev; William S Sly

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  7. A proton wire and water channel revealed in the crystal structure of isatin hydrolase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Sommer, Theis; Jensen, Jan Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    The high resolution crystal structures of isatin hydrolase from Labrenzia aggregata in the apo and the product state, are described. These are the first structures of a functionally characterized metal-dependent hydrolase of this fold. Isatin hydrolase converts isatin to isatinate and belongs to ...... of orthologous genes encoding isatin hydrolases within the prokaryotic kingdom. The isatin hydrolase orthologues found in human gut bacteria raise the question as to whether the indole-3-acetic acid degradation pathway is present in human gut flora....

  8. Crystal structure of the carbapenemase OXA-24 reveals insights into the mechanism of carbapenem hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Elena; Beceiro, Alejandro; Bou, Germán; Romero, Antonio

    2007-03-27

    Combating bacterial resistance to beta-lactams, the most widely used antibiotics, is an emergent and clinically important challenge. OXA-24 is a class D beta-lactamase isolated from a multiresistant epidemic clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii. We have investigated how OXA-24 specifically hydrolyzes the last resort carbapenem antibiotic, and we have determined the crystal structure of OXA-24 at a resolution of 2.5 A. The structure shows that the carbapenem's substrate specificity is determined by a hydrophobic barrier that is established through the specific arrangement of the Tyr-112 and Met-223 side chains, which define a tunnel-like entrance to the active site. The importance of these residues was further confirmed by mutagenesis studies. Biochemical and microbiological analyses of specific point mutants selected on the basis of structural criteria significantly reduced the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) against carbapenems, whereas the specificity for oxacillin was noticeably increased. This is the previously unrecognized crystal structure that has been obtained for a class D carbapenemase enzyme. Accordingly, this information may help to improve the development of effective new drugs to combat beta-lactam resistance. More specifically, it may help to overcome carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii, probably one of the most worrying infectious threats in hospitals worldwide.

  9. Crystal structure of an invertebrate cytolysin pore reveals unique properties and mechanism of assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Savory, Peter; Rojko, Nejc; Kisovec, Matic; Wood, Neil; Hambley, Richard; Pugh, Jonathan; Wallace, E. Jayne; McNeill, Luke; Bruce, Mark; Liko, Idlir; Allison, Timothy M.; Mehmood, Shahid; Yilmaz, Neval; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Robinson, Carol V.; Jayasinghe, Lakmal; Anderluh, Gregor

    2016-05-01

    The invertebrate cytolysin lysenin is a member of the aerolysin family of pore-forming toxins that includes many representatives from pathogenic bacteria. Here we report the crystal structure of the lysenin pore and provide insights into its assembly mechanism. The lysenin pore is assembled from nine monomers via dramatic reorganization of almost half of the monomeric subunit structure leading to a β-barrel pore ~10 nm long and 1.6-2.5 nm wide. The lysenin pore is devoid of additional luminal compartments as commonly found in other toxin pores. Mutagenic analysis and atomic force microscopy imaging, together with these structural insights, suggest a mechanism for pore assembly for lysenin. These insights are relevant to the understanding of pore formation by other aerolysin-like pore-forming toxins, which often represent crucial virulence factors in bacteria.

  10. Crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations of thermophilic malate dehydrogenase reveal critical loop motion for co-substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Hung; Hwang, Tzann-Shun; Chang, Yu-Yung; Luo, Huei-Ru; Wu, Szu-Pei; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate and malate by using the NAD/NADH coenzyme system. The system is used as a conjugate for enzyme immunoassays of a wide variety of compounds, such as illegal drugs, drugs used in therapeutic applications and hormones. We elucidated the biochemical and structural features of MDH from Thermus thermophilus (TtMDH) for use in various biotechnological applications. The biochemical characterization of recombinant TtMDH revealed greatly increased activity above 60 °C and specific activity of about 2,600 U/mg with optimal temperature of 90 °C. Analysis of crystal structures of apo and NAD-bound forms of TtMDH revealed a slight movement of the binding loop and few structural elements around the co-substrate binding packet in the presence of NAD. The overall structures did not change much and retained all related positions, which agrees with the CD analyses. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at higher temperatures were used to reconstruct structures from the crystal structure of TtMDH. Interestingly, at the simulated structure of 353 K, a large change occurred around the active site such that with increasing temperature, a mobile loop was closed to co-substrate binding region. From biochemical characterization, structural comparison and MD simulations, the thermal-induced conformational change of the co-substrate binding loop of TtMDH may contribute to the essential movement of the enzyme for admitting NAD and may benefit the enzyme's activity.

  11. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  12. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1 Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas Fadel

    Full Text Available Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1 is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD. This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1 structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain.

  13. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Firas; Zhao, Yuguang; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X.; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD). This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family) and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase) comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL) at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1) structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain. PMID:27111557

  14. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  15. Crystal structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane subunit reveals another twist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Gourdon, Pontus; Horsefield, Rob; Brive, Lars; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Mori, Hirotada; Snijder, Arjan; Neutze, Richard

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial drug resistance is a serious concern for human health. Multidrug efflux pumps export a broad variety of substrates out of the cell and thereby convey resistance to the host. In Escherichia coli, the AcrB:AcrA:TolC efflux complex forms a principal transporter for which structures of the individual component proteins have been determined in isolation. Here, we present the X-ray structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane protein, assigned by mass spectrometry as YajC. A specific rotation of the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB is also revealed, consistent with the hypothesized "twist-to-open" mechanism for TolC activation. Growth experiments with yajc-deleted E. coli reveal a modest increase in the organism's susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics, but this effect could not conclusively be attributed to the loss of interactions between YajC and AcrB.

  16. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Pavia); (Lund); (Southern Research)

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  17. Crystal structure and biochemical analyses reveal Beclin 1 as a novel membrane binding protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijiao Huang; Feng-Liang Wang; Haiteng Deng; Lei Liu; Ning Gao; Li Yu; Yigong Shi; Wooyoung Choi; Wanqiu Hu; Na Mi; Qiang Guo; Meisheng Ma; Mei Liu; Yuan Tian; Peilong Lu

    2012-01-01

    The Beclin 1 gene is a haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor and plays an essential role in autophagy.However,the molecular mechanism by which Beclin 1 functions remains largely unknown.Here we report the crystal structure of the evolutionarily conserved domain(ECD)of Beclin 1 at 1.6(A)resolution.Beclin 1 ECD exhibits a previously unreported fold,with three structural repeats arranged symmetrically around a central axis.Beclin 1 ECD defines a novel class of membrane-binding domain,with a strong preference for lipid membrane enriched with cardiolipin.The tip of a surface loop in Beclin 1 ECD,comprising three aromatic amino acids,acts as a hydrophobic finger to associate with lipid membrane,consequently resulting in the deformation of membrane and liposomes.Mutation of these aromatic residues rendered Beclin 1 unable to stably associate with lipid membrane in vitro and unable to fully rescue autophagy in Beclin 1-knockdown cells in vivo.These observations form an important framework for deciphering the biological functions of Beclin 1.

  18. Crystal structure of P58(IPK) TPR fragment reveals the mechanism for its molecular chaperone activity in UPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiahui; Petrova, Kseniya; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2010-04-16

    P58(IPK) might function as an endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone to maintain protein folding homeostasis during unfolded protein responses. P58(IPK) contains nine tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum, we have determined the crystal structure of P58(IPK) TPR fragment to 2.5 A resolution by the SAD method. The crystal structure of P58(IPK) revealed three domains (I-III) with similar folds and each domain contains three TPR motifs. An ELISA assay indicated that P58(IPK) acts as a molecular chaperone by interacting with misfolded proteins such as luciferase and rhodanese. The P58(IPK) structure reveals a conserved hydrophobic patch located in domain I that might be involved in binding the misfolded polypeptides. Structure-based mutagenesis for the conserved hydrophobic residues located in domain I significantly reduced the molecular chaperone activity of P58(IPK).

  19. Crystal Structure of the FGFR4/LY2874455 Complex Reveals Insights into the Pan-FGFR Selectivity of LY2874455.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Daichao; Guo, Ming; Philips, Michael A; Qu, Lingzhi; Jiang, Longying; Li, Jun; Chen, Xiaojuan; Chen, Zhuchu; Chen, Lin; Chen, Yongheng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant FGFR4 signaling has been documented abundantly in various human cancers. The majority of FGFR inhibitors display significantly reduced potency toward FGFR4 compared to FGFR1-3. However, LY2874455 has similar inhibition potency for FGFR1-4 with IC50 less than 6.4 nM. To date, there is no published crystal structure of LY2874455 in complex with any kinase. To better understand the pan-FGFR selectivity of LY2874455, we have determined the crystal structure of the FGFR4 kinase domain bound to LY2874455 at a resolution of 2.35 Å. LY2874455, a type I inhibitor for FGFR4, binds to the ATP-binding pocket of FGFR4 in a DFG-in active conformation with three hydrogen bonds and a number of van der Waals contacts. After alignment of the kinase domain sequence of 4 FGFRs, and superposition of the ATP binding pocket of 4 FGFRs, our structural analyses reveal that the interactions of LY2874455 to FGFR4 are largely conserved in 4 FGFRs, explaining at least partly, the broad inhibitory activity of LY2874455 toward 4 FGFRs. Consequently, our studies reveal new insights into the pan-FGFR selectivity of LY2874455 and provide a structural basis for developing novel FGFR inhibitors that target FGFR1-4 broadly.

  20. Crystal Structure of Prp5p Reveals Interdomain Interactions that Impact Spliceosome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Min Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase Prp5p facilitates U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP binding to the intron branch site region during spliceosome assembly. We present crystal structures of S. cerevisiae Prp5p alone and in complex with ADP at 2.12 Å and 1.95 Å resolution. The three-dimensional packing of Prp5p subdomains differs strikingly from that so far observed in other DEAD-box proteins: two RecA-like subdomains adopt an “open state” conformation stabilized by extensive interactions involving sequences that flank the two subdomains. This conformation is distinct from that required for ATP hydrolysis. Consistent with this, Prp5p mutations that destabilize interdomain interactions exhibited increased ATPase activity in vitro and inhibited splicing of suboptimal branch site substrates in vivo, whereas restoration of interdomain interactions reversed these effects. We conclude that the Prp5p open state conformation is biologically relevant and that disruption of the interdomain interaction facilitates a large-scale conformational change of Prp5p during U2 snRNP-branch site recognition.

  1. Crystal Structures of Lys-63-linked tri- and di-ubiquitin Reveal a Highly Extended Chain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, S.; Grasty, K; Hernandez-Cuebas, L; Loll, P

    2009-01-01

    The covalent attachment of different types of poly-ubiquitin chains signal different outcomes for the proteins so targeted. For example, a protein modified with Lys-48-linked poly-ubiquitin chains is targeted for proteasomal degradation, whereas Lys-63-linked chains encode nondegradative signals. The structural features that enable these different types of chains to encode different signals have not yet been fully elucidated. We report here the X-ray crystal structures of Lys-63-linked tri- and di-ubiquitin at resolutions of 2.3 and 1.9 {angstrom}, respectively. The tri- and di-ubiquitin species adopt essentially identical structures. In both instances, the ubiquitin chain assumes a highly extended conformation with a left-handed helical twist; the helical chain contains four ubiquitin monomers per turn and has a repeat length of {approx}110 {angstrom}. Interestingly, Lys-48 ubiquitin chains also adopt a left-handed helical structure with a similar repeat length. However, the Lys-63 architecture is much more open than that of Lys-48 chains and exposes much more of the ubiquitin surface for potential recognition events. These new crystal structures are consistent with the results of solution studies of Lys-63 chain conformation, and reveal the structural basis for differential recognition of Lys-63 versus Lys-48 chains.

  2. Crystal structure of the predicted phospholipase LYPLAL1 reveals unexpected functional plasticity despite close relationship to acyl protein thioesterases

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Sequence homology indicates the existence of three human cytosolic acyl protein thioesterases, including APT1 that is known to depalmitoylate H- and N-Ras. One of them is the lysophospholipase-like 1 (LYPLAL1) protein that on the one hand is predicted to be closely related to APT1 but on the other hand might also function as a potential triacylglycerol lipase involved in obesity. However, its role remained unclear. The 1.7 Å crystal structure of LYPLAL1 reveals a fold very similar to APT1, as...

  3. The crystal structure of Mtr4 reveals a novel arch domain required for rRNA processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, R.N.; Robinson, H.; Klauer, A. A.; Hintze, B. J.; van Hoof, A.; Johnson, S. J.

    2010-07-01

    The essential RNA helicase, Mtr4, performs a critical role in RNA processing and degradation as an activator of the nuclear exosome. The molecular basis for this vital function is not understood and detailed analysis is significantly limited by the lack of structural data. In this study, we present the crystal structure of Mtr4. The structure reveals a new arch-like domain that is specific to Mtr4 and Ski2 (the cytosolic homologue of Mtr4). In vivo and in vitro analyses demonstrate that the Mtr4 arch domain is required for proper 5.8S rRNA processing, and suggest that the arch functions independently of canonical helicase activity. In addition, extensive conservation along the face of the putative RNA exit site highlights a potential interface with the exosome. These studies provide a molecular framework for understanding fundamental aspects of helicase function in exosome activation, and more broadly define the molecular architecture of Ski2-like helicases.

  4. Crystal structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase reveal complex domain movements and a sliding cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, I Ahmad; Yachnin, Brahm J; Wang, Shaozhao; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Imura, Akihiro; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C K; Berghuis, Albert M

    2009-07-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O(2) as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP(+) in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 A. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  5. Crystal structure of human importin-α1 (Rch1, revealing a potential autoinhibition mode involving homodimerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Miyatake

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the crystal structure of N-terminal importin-β-binding domain (IBB-truncated human importin-α1 (ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 at 2.63 Å resolution. The crystal structure of ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 reveals a novel closed homodimer. The homodimer exists in an autoinhibited state in which both the major and minor nuclear localization signal (NLS binding sites are completely buried in the homodimerization interface, an arrangement that restricts NLS binding. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies revealed that ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 is in equilibrium between monomers and dimers and that NLS peptides shifted the equilibrium toward the monomer side. This finding suggests that the NLS binding sites are also involved in the dimer interface in solution. These results show that when the IBB domain dissociates from the internal NLS binding sites, e.g., by binding to importin-β, homodimerization possibly occurs as an autoinhibition state.

  6. Crystal structure of a PCP/Sfp complex reveals the structural basis for carrier protein posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufar, Peter; Rahighi, Simin; Kraas, Femke I; Kirchner, Donata K; Löhr, Frank; Henrich, Erik; Köpke, Jürgen; Dikic, Ivan; Güntert, Peter; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-04-24

    Phosphopantetheine transferases represent a class of enzymes found throughout all forms of life. From a structural point of view, they are subdivided into three groups, with transferases from group II being the most widespread. They are required for the posttranslational modification of carrier proteins involved in diverse metabolic pathways. We determined the crystal structure of the group II phosphopantetheine transferase Sfp from Bacillus in complex with a substrate carrier protein in the presence of coenzyme A and magnesium, and observed two protein-protein interaction sites. Mutational analysis showed that only the hydrophobic contacts between the carrier protein's second helix and the C-terminal domain of Sfp are essential for their productive interaction. Comparison with a similar structure of a complex of human proteins suggests that the mode of interaction is highly conserved in all domains of life.

  7. Structural changes of phenylalanine 338 and histidine 447 revealed by the crystal structures of tabun-inhibited murine acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Fredrik; Akfur, Christine; Tunemalm, Anna-Karin; Lundberg, Susanne

    2006-01-10

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) interfere with the catalytic mechanism of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by rapidly phosphorylating the catalytic serine residue. The inhibited enzyme can at least partly be reactivated with nucleophilic reactivators such as oximes. The covalently attached OP conjugate may undergo further intramolecular dealkylation or deamidation reactions, a process termed "aging" that results in an enzyme considered completely resistant to reactivation. Of particular interest is the inhibition and aging reaction of the OP compound tabun since tabun conjugates display an extraordinary resistance toward most reactivators of today. To investigate the structural basis for this resistance, we determined the crystal structures of Mus musculus AChE (mAChE) inhibited by tabun prior to and after the aging reaction. The nonaged tabun conjugate induces a structural change of the side chain of His447 that uncouples the catalytic triad and positions the imidazole ring of His447 in a conformation where it may form a hydrogen bond to a water molecule. Moreover, an unexpected displacement of the side chain of Phe338 narrows the active site gorge. In the crystal structure of the aged tabun conjugate, the side chains of His447 and Phe338 are reversed to the conformation found in the apo structure of mAChE. A hydrogen bond between the imidazole ring of His447 and the ethoxy oxygen of the aged tabun conjugate stabilizes the side chain of His447. The displacement of the side chain of Phe338 into the active site gorge of the nonaged tabun conjugate may interfere with the accessibility of reactivators and thereby contribute to the high resistance of tabun conjugates toward reactivation.

  8. Crystal Structure of Inhibitor-Bound P450BM-3 Reveals Open Conformation of Substrate Access Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Donovan C.; Chen, Baozhi; Tomchick, Diana R.; Bondlela, Muralidhar; Hegde, Amita; Machius, Mischa; Peterson, Julian A. (Texas); (UTSMC)

    2008-08-19

    P450BM-3 is an extensively studied P450 cytochrome that is naturally fused to a cytochrome P450 reductase domain. Crystal structures of the heme domain of this enzyme have previously generated many insights into features of P450 structure, substrate binding specificity, and conformational changes that occur on substrate binding. Although many P450s are inhibited by imidazole, this compound does not effectively inhibit P450BM-3. {omega}-Imidazolyl fatty acids have previously been found to be weak inhibitors of the enzyme and show some unusual cooperativity with the substrate lauric acid. We set out to improve the properties of these inhibitors by attaching the {omega}-imidazolyl fatty acid to the nitrogen of an amino acid group, a tactic that we used previously to increase the potency of substrates. The resulting inhibitors were significantly more potent than their parent compounds lacking the amino acid group. A crystal structure of one of the new inhibitors bound to the heme domain of P450BM-3 reveals that the mode of interaction of the amino acid group with the enzyme is different from that previously observed for acyl amino acid substrates. Further, required movements of residues in the active site to accommodate the imidazole group provide an explanation for the low affinity of imidazole itself. Finally, the previously observed cooperativity with lauric acid is explained by a surprisingly open substrate-access channel lined with hydrophobic residues that could potentially accommodate lauric acid in addition to the inhibitor itself.

  9. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q; Cornea, Razvan L; Fessenden, James D; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-08-06

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca(2+)-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2-1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding.

  10. Molecular basis for TANK recognition by TRAF1 revealed by the crystal structure of TRAF1/TANK complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Min; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Son, Young-Jin; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Hyun Ho

    2017-02-02

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1) is a multifunctional adaptor protein involved in important processes of cellular signaling, including innate immunity and apoptosis. TRAF family member-associated NF-kappaB activator (TANK) has been identified as a competitive intracellular inhibitor of TRAF2 function. Although TRAF recognition by various receptors has been studied extensively in the field of TRAF-mediated biology, molecular and functional details of TANK recognition and interaction with TRAF1 have not been studied. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the TRAF1/TANK peptide complex. Quantitative interaction experiments showed that TANK peptide interacts with both TRAF1 and TRAF2 with similar affinity in a micromolar range. Our structural study also reveals that TANK binds TRAF1 using a minor minimal consensus motif for TRAF binding, Px(Q/E)xT.

  11. Novel structural features in the GMC family of oxidoreductases revealed by the crystal structure of fungal aryl-alcohol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Israel S; Ruíz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Santillana, Elena; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T; Romero, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    Lignin biodegradation, a key step in carbon recycling in land ecosystems, is carried out by white-rot fungi through an H(2)O(2)-dependent process defined as enzymatic combustion. Pleurotus eryngii is a selective lignin-degrading fungus that produces H(2)O(2) during redox cycling of p-anisylic compounds involving the secreted flavoenzyme aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO). Here, the 2.4 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of this oxidoreductase, which catalyzes dehydrogenation reactions on various primary polyunsaturated alcohols, yielding the corresponding aldehydes, is reported. The AAO crystal structure was solved by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction of a selenomethionine derivative obtained by Escherichia coli expression and in vitro folding. This monomeric enzyme is composed of two domains, the overall folding of which places it into the GMC (glucose-methanol-choline oxidase) oxidoreductase family, and a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor. However, two additional structural elements exist in the surroundings of its active site that modulate the access of substrates; these are absent in the structure of the model GMC oxidoreductase glucose oxidase. The folding of these novel elements gives rise to a funnel-like hydrophobic channel that connects the solvent region to the buried active-site cavity of AAO. This putative active-site cavity is located in front of the re side of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and near two histidines (His502 and His546) that could contribute to alcohol activation as catalytic bases. Moreover, three aromatic side chains from two phenylalanines (Phe397 and Phe502) and one tyrosine (Tyr92) at the inner region of the channel form an aromatic gate that may regulate the access of the enzyme substrates to the active site as well as contribute to the recognition of the alcohols that can effectively be oxidized by AAO.

  12. Structural similarities and differences in Staphylococcus aureus exfoliative toxins A and B as revealed by their crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, A C; Plano, L R; Collins, C M; Acharya, K R

    2000-03-01

    Staphylococcal aureus epidermolytic toxins (ETs) A and B are responsible for the induction of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, a disease of neonates and young children. The clinical features of this syndrome vary from localized blisters to severe exfoliation affecting most of the body surface. Comparison of the crystal structures of two subtypes of ETs-rETA (at 2.0 A resolution), rETB (at 2.8 A resolution), and an active site variant of rETA, Ser195Ala at 2.0 A resolution has demonstrated that their overall topology resembles that of a "trypsin-like" serine protease, but with significant differences at the N- and C-termini and loop regions. The details of the catalytic site in both ET structures are very similar to those in glutamate-specific serine proteases, suggesting a common catalytic mechanism. However, the "oxyanion hole," which is part of the catalytic sites of glutamate specific serine proteases, is in the closed or inactive conformation for rETA, yet in the open or active conformation for rETB. The ETs contain a unique amphipathic helix at the N-terminus, and it appears to be involved in optimizing the conformation of the catalytic site residues. Determination of the structure of the rETA catalytic site variant, Ser195Ala, showed no significant perturbation at the active site, establishing that the loss of biological and esterolytic activity can be attributed solely to disruption of the catalytic serine residue. Finally, the crystal structure of ETs, together with biochemical data and mutagenesis studies, strongly confirms the classification of these molecules as "serine proteases" rather than "superantigens."

  13. Three-Dimensional Structure and Defects in Colloidal Photonic Crystals Revealed by Tomographic Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, Jan; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Wang, Jian; de Smit, Emiel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Raabe, Joerg; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Obst, Martin; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Petukhov, Andrei V.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembled colloidal crystals have attracted major attention because of their potential as low-cost three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals. Although a high degree of perfection is crucial for the properties of these materials, little is known about their exact structure and internal defects. I

  14. Crystal Structure of Protein Reveals Target for Drugs Against Lethal MERS Virus | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    A research team of scientists from the National Cancer Institute and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research recently identified the structure of a key protein of the virus that causes the highly lethal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

  15. Crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus polynucleotide phosphorylase reveals a mechanism of RNA substrate channelling and RNA degradosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Steven W; Gubbey, Tobias; Hug, Isabelle; Jenal, Urs; Luisi, Ben F

    2012-04-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is an exoribonuclease that cleaves single-stranded RNA substrates with 3'-5' directionality and processive behaviour. Its ring-like, trimeric architecture creates a central channel where phosphorolytic active sites reside. One face of the ring is decorated with RNA-binding K-homology (KH) and S1 domains, but exactly how these domains help to direct the 3' end of single-stranded RNA substrates towards the active sites is an unsolved puzzle. Insight into this process is provided by our crystal structures of RNA-bound and apo Caulobacter crescentus PNPase. In the RNA-free form, the S1 domains adopt a 'splayed' conformation that may facilitate capture of RNA substrates. In the RNA-bound structure, the three KH domains collectively close upon the RNA and direct the 3' end towards a constricted aperture at the entrance of the central channel. The KH domains make non-equivalent interactions with the RNA, and there is a marked asymmetry within the catalytic core of the enzyme. On the basis of these data, we propose that structural non-equivalence, induced upon RNA binding, helps to channel substrate to the active sites through mechanical ratcheting. Structural and biochemical analyses also reveal the basis for PNPase association with RNase E in the multi-enzyme RNA degradosome assembly of the α-proteobacteria.

  16. Crystal Structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase Bound to Inhibitory Analogs Reveal New Insight into Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Skaff, D. Andrew; McWhorter, William J.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2011-10-28

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 {angstrom} resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 {angstrom} resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 {angstrom} resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K{sub i} values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser{sup 192} as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser {yields} Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k{sub cat} by {approx}10{sup 3}-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 {angstrom} cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  17. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  18. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis cyclophilin38 reveals a previously uncharacterized immunophilin fold and a possible autoinhibitory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Dileep; Fu, Aigen; Luan, Sheng; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2012-06-01

    Cyclophilin38 (CYP38) is one of the highly divergent cyclophilins from Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report the crystal structure of the At-CYP38 protein (residues 83 to 437 of 437 amino acids) at 2.39-Å resolution. The structure reveals two distinct domains: an N-terminal helical bundle and a C-terminal cyclophilin β-barrel, connected by an acidic loop. Two N-terminal β-strands become part of the C-terminal cyclophilin β-barrel, thereby making a previously undiscovered domain organization. This study shows that CYP38 does not possess peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity and identifies a possible interaction of CYP38 with the E-loop of chlorophyll protein47 (CP47), a component of photosystem II. The interaction of CYP38 with the E-loop of CP47 is mediated through its cyclophilin domain. The N-terminal helical domain is closely packed together with the putative C-terminal cyclophilin domain and establishes a strong intramolecular interaction, thereby preventing the access of the cyclophilin domain to other proteins. This was further verified by protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast two-hybrid system. Furthermore, the non-Leucine zipper N-terminal helical bundle contains several new elements for protein-protein interaction that may be of functional significance. Together, this study provides the structure of a plant cyclophilin and explains a possible mechanism for autoinhibition of its function through an intramolecular interaction.

  19. Crystal structure of the HSV-1 Fc receptor bound to Fc reveals a mechanism for antibody bipolar bridging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sprague

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type-1 expresses a heterodimeric Fc receptor, gE-gI, on the surfaces of virions and infected cells that binds the Fc region of host immunoglobulin G and is implicated in the cell-to-cell spread of virus. gE-gI binds immunoglobulin G at the basic pH of the cell surface and releases it at the acidic pH of lysosomes, consistent with a role in facilitating the degradation of antiviral antibodies. Here we identify the C-terminal domain of the gE ectodomain (CgE as the minimal Fc-binding domain and present a 1.78-angstroms CgE structure. A 5-angstroms gE-gI/Fc crystal structure, which was independently verified by a theoretical prediction method, reveals that CgE binds Fc at the C(H2-C(H3 interface, the binding site for several mammalian and bacterial Fc-binding proteins. The structure identifies interface histidines that may confer pH-dependent binding and regions of CgE implicated in cell-to-cell spread of virus. The ternary organization of the gE-gI/Fc complex is compatible with antibody bipolar bridging, which can interfere with the antiviral immune response.

  20. Crystal structures of human Ero1α reveal the mechanisms of regulated and targeted oxidation of PDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kenji; Masui, Shoji; Iida, Hiroka; Vavassori, Stefano; Sitia, Roberto; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2010-10-06

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells, Ero1 flavoenzymes promote oxidative protein folding through protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), generating reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) as byproducts. Therefore, Ero1 activity must be strictly regulated to avoid futile oxidation cycles in the ER. Although regulatory mechanisms restraining Ero1α activity ensure that not all PDIs are oxidized, its specificity towards PDI could allow other resident oxidoreductases to remain reduced and competent to carry out isomerization and reduction of protein substrates. In this study, crystal structures of human Ero1α were solved in its hyperactive and inactive forms. Our findings reveal that human Ero1α modulates its oxidative activity by properly positioning regulatory cysteines within an intrinsically flexible loop, and by fine-tuning the electron shuttle ability of the loop through disulphide rearrangements. Specific PDI targeting is guaranteed by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of Ero1α with the PDI b'-domain through its substrate-binding pocket. These results reveal the molecular basis of the regulation and specificity of protein disulphide formation in human cells.

  1. Crystal structure of Zebrafish interferons I and II reveals conservation of type I interferon structure in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamming, Ole Jensen; Lutfalla, Georges; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Hartmann, Rune

    2011-08-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play a major role in orchestrating the innate immune response toward viruses in vertebrates, and their defining characteristic is their ability to induce an antiviral state in responsive cells. Interferons have been reported in a multitude of species, from bony fish to mammals. However, our current knowledge about the molecular function of fish IFNs as well as their evolutionary relationship to tetrapod IFNs is limited. Here we establish the three-dimensional (3D) structure of zebrafish IFNϕ1 and IFNϕ2 by crystallography. These high-resolution structures offer the first structural insight into fish cytokines. Tetrapods possess two types of IFNs that play an immediate antiviral role: type I IFNs (e.g., alpha interferon [IFN-α] and beta interferon [IFN-β]) and type III IFNs (lambda interferon [IFN-λ]), and each type is characterized by its specific receptor usage. Similarly, two groups of antiviral IFNs with distinct receptors exist in fish, including zebrafish. IFNϕ1 and IFNϕ2 represent group I and group II IFNs, respectively. Nevertheless, both structures reported here reveal a characteristic type I IFN architecture with a straight F helix, as opposed to the remaining class II cytokines, including IFN-λ, where helix F contains a characteristic bend. Phylogenetic trees derived from structure-guided multiple alignments confirmed that both groups of fish IFNs are evolutionarily closer to type I than to type III tetrapod IFNs. Thus, these fish IFNs belong to the type I IFN family. Our results also imply that a dual antiviral IFN system has arisen twice during vertebrate evolution.

  2. Crystal structure and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-04-01

    The notion of structure is central to the subject of chemistry. This review traces the development of the idea of crystal structure since the time when a crystal structure could be determined from a three-dimensional diffraction pattern and assesses the feasibility of computationally predicting an unknown crystal structure of a given molecule. Crystal structure prediction is of considerable fundamental and applied importance, and its successful execution is by no means a solved problem. The ease of crystal structure determination today has resulted in the availability of large numbers of crystal structures of higher-energy polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs. These structural libraries lead to the concept of a crystal structure landscape. A crystal structure of a compound may accordingly be taken as a data point in such a landscape.

  3. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1 × 1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D. (Scripps)

    2012-03-27

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[{und UU}GGGC(C{und U}G){sub 3}GUCC]{sub 2}, refined to 2.20 and 1.52 {angstrom} resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 {angstrom} structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 {angstrom} structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands.

  4. Crystal structure of the primary piRNA biogenesis factor Zucchini reveals similarity to the bacterial PLD endonuclease Nuc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Franka; Reuter, Michael; Kasaruho, Anisa; Schulz, Eike C; Pillai, Ramesh S; Barabas, Orsolya

    2012-12-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a gonad-specific class of small RNAs that associate with the Piwi clade of Argonaute proteins and play a key role in transposon silencing in animals. Since biogenesis of piRNAs is independent of the double-stranded RNA-processing enzyme Dicer, an alternative nuclease that can process single-stranded RNA transcripts has been long sought. A Phospholipase D-like protein, Zucchini, that is essential for piRNA processing has been proposed to be a nuclease acting in piRNA biogenesis. Here we describe the crystal structure of Zucchini from Drosophila melanogaster and show that it is very similar to the bacterial endonuclease, Nuc. The structure also reveals that homodimerization induces major conformational changes assembling the active site. The active site is situated on the dimer interface at the bottom of a narrow groove that can likely accommodate single-stranded nucleic acid substrates. Furthermore, biophysical analysis identifies protein segments essential for dimerization and provides insights into regulation of Zucchini's activity.

  5. Crystal structure of TAZ-TEAD complex reveals a distinct interaction mode from that of YAP-TEAD complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaan, Hung Yi Kristal; Chan, Siew Wee; Tan, Siew Kim Joyce; Guo, Fusheng; Lim, Chun Jye; Hong, Wanjin; Song, Haiwei

    2017-05-17

    The Hippo pathway is a tumor suppressor pathway that is implicated in the regulation of organ size. The pathway has three components: the upstream regulatory factors, the kinase core, and the downstream transcriptional machinery, which consists of YAP, TAZ (transcription co-activators) and TEAD (transcription factor). Formation of YAP/TAZ-TEAD complexes leads to the transcription of growth-promoting genes. Herein, we report the crystal structure of TAZ-TEAD4 complex, which reveals two binding modes. The first is similar to the published YAP-TEAD structure. The second is a unique binding mode, whereby two molecules of TAZ bind to and bridge two molecules of TEAD4. We validated the latter using cross-linking and multi-angle light scattering. Using siRNA, we showed that TAZ knockdown leads to a decrease in TEAD4 dimerization. Lastly, results from luciferase assays, using YAP/TAZ transfected or knockdown cells, give support to the non-redundancy of YAP/TAZ co-activators in regulating gene expression in the Hippo pathway.

  6. Salts of hexamethylenetetramine with organic acids: Enhanced anomeric interactions with a lowering of molecular symmetry revealed by crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2015-02-01

    The hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) framework displays interesting stereoelectronic interactions of the anomeric type. In the highly symmetrical parent system, the nitrogen centres act as both donors and acceptors. Protonation lowers symmetry and also leads to an enhancement of the anomeric interaction around the protonated centre. X-ray diffraction crystal structures of four derivatives of HMT - with succinic, (DL)-malic, phthalic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids - reveal significant trends. (The first three form well-defined salts, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid forming a co-crystalline compound.) Each molecular structure is essentially characterised by a major anomeric interaction involving the protonated centre as acceptor. In two cases (succinic and 4-hydroxybenzoic), secondary protonation leads to a weaker anomeric interaction site that apparently competes with the dominant one. Bond length changes indicate that the anomeric interaction decreases as malic > phthalic > succinic > 4-hydroxybenzoic, which correlates with the degree of proton transfer to the nitrogen centre. Along with other bond length and angle changes, the results offer insight into the applicability of the antiperiplanar lone pair hypothesis (ALPH) in a rigid system.

  7. The Crystal Structure of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein Reveals the Location of a Frequent Mutation that Impairs Innate Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckert, J.K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, J.I.; Gurtler, K.; Oh, D.Y.; Sur, S.; Lundvall, L.; Hamann, L.; Ploeg, A. van der; Pickkers, P.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E.; Kubarenko, A.V.; Weber, A.N.; Kabesch, M.; Kumpf, O.; An, H.J.; Lee, J.O.; Schumann, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein that initiates an immune response after recognition of bacterial LPS. Here, we report the crystal structure of murine LBP at 2.9 A resolution. Several structural differences were observed between LBP and the related

  8. Crystal Structure of the Leucine Aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida Reveals the Molecular Basis for its Enantioselectivity and Broad Substrate Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kale, Avinash; Pijning, Tjaard; Sonke, Theo; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Guss, M.

    2010-01-01

    The zinc-dependent leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida (ppLAP) is an important enzyme for the industrial production of enantiomerically pure amino acids. To provide a better understanding of its structure function relationships, the enzyme was studied by X-ray crystallography. Crystal str

  9. Functional characterization and crystal structure of thermostable amylase from Thermotoga petrophila, reveals high thermostability and an unusual form of dimerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hameed, Uzma; Price, Ian; Ikram-Ul-Haq

    2017-01-01

    Thermostable α-amylases have many industrial applications and are therefore continuously explored from novel sources. We present the characterization of a novel putative α-amylase gene product (Tp-AmyS) cloned from Thermotoga petrophila. The purified recombinant enzyme is highly thermostable and ...... of salivary amylase from a previous crystal structure, and thus could be a functional feature of some amylases....

  10. The crystal structure of Arabidopsis VSP1 reveals the plant class C-like phosphatase structure of the DDDD superfamily of phosphohydrolases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Chen

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana vegetative storage proteins, VSP1 and VSP2, are acid phosphatases and belong to the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD superfamily. In addition to their potential nutrient storage function, they were thought to be involved in plant defense and flower development. To gain insights into the architecture of the protein and obtain clues about its function, we have tested their substrate specificity and solved the structure of VSP1. The acid phosphatase activities of these two enzymes require divalent metal such as magnesium ion. Conversely, the activity of these two enzymes is inhibited by vanadate and molybdate, but is resistant to inorganic phosphate. Both VSP1 and VSP2 did not exhibit remarkable activities to any physiological substrates tested. In the current study, we presented the crystal structure of recombinant VSP1 at 1.8 Å resolution via the selenomethionine single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD. Specifically, an α-helical cap domain on the top of the α/β core domain is found to be involved in dimerization. In addition, despite of the low sequence similarity between VSP1 and other HAD enzymes, the core domain of VSP1 containing conserved active site and catalytic machinery displays a classic haloacid dehalogenase fold. Furthermore, we found that VSP1 is distinguished from bacterial class C acid phosphatase P4 by several structural features. To our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal the crystal structure of plant vegetative storage proteins.

  11. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Miyagi, Masaru, E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lodowski, David T., E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  12. Mechanisms for Improved Hygroscopicity of L-Arginine Valproate Revealed by X-Ray Single Crystal Structure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masataka; Nambu, Kaori; Sakon, Aya; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Noguchi, Shuji; Terada, Katsuhide

    2017-03-01

    Valproic acid is widely used as an antiepileptic agent. Valproic acid is in liquid phase while sodium valproate is in solid phase at room temperature. Sodium valproate is hard to manufacture because of its hygroscopic and deliquescent properties. To improve these, cocrystal and salt screening for valproic acid was employed in this study. Two solid salt forms, l-arginine valproate and l-lysine valproate, were obtained and characterized. By using dynamic vapor sorption method, the critical relative humidity of sodium valproate, l-arginine valproate, and l-lysine valproate were measured. Critical relative humidity of sodium valproate was 40%, of l-lysine valproate was 60%, and of l-arginine valproate was 70%. Single-crystal X-ray structure determination of l-arginine valproate was employed. l-Lysine valproate was of low diffraction quality, and l-arginine valproate formed a 1:1 salt. Crystal l-arginine valproate has a disorder in the methylene carbon chain that creates 2 conformations. The carboxylate group of valproic acid is connected to the amino group of l-arginine. Crystalline morphologies were calculated from its crystal structure. Adsorption of water molecules to crystal facets was simulated by Material Studio. When comparing adsorption energy per site of these salts, sodium valproate is more capable of adsorption of water molecule than l-arginine valproate.

  13. Crystal structure of the adenosine A 2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon; Wood, Martyn; Ceska, Tom; Sands, Zara A.; Mercier, Joel; Lebon, Florence; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (ConfometRx); (UCB Pharma)

    2017-02-06

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has long been implicated in cardiovascular disorders. As more selective A2AR ligands are being identified, its roles in other disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, are starting to emerge, and A2AR antagonists are important drug candidates for nondopaminergic anti-Parkinson treatment. Here we report the crystal structure of A2A receptor bound to compound 1 (Cmpd-1), a novel A2AR/N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B) dual antagonist and potential anti-Parkinson candidate compound, at 3.5 Å resolution. The A2A receptor with a cytochrome b562-RIL (BRIL) fusion (A2AR–BRIL) in the intracellular loop 3 (ICL3) was crystallized in detergent micelles using vapor-phase diffusion. Whereas A2AR–BRIL bound to the antagonist ZM241385 has previously been crystallized in lipidic cubic phase (LCP), structural differences in the Cmpd-1–bound A2AR–BRIL prevented formation of the lattice observed with the ZM241385–bound receptor. The crystals grew with a type II crystal lattice in contrast to the typical type I packing seen from membrane protein structures crystallized in LCP. Cmpd-1 binds in a position that overlaps with the native ligand adenosine, but its methoxyphenyl group extends to an exosite not previously observed in other A2AR structures. Structural analysis revealed that Cmpd-1 binding results in the unique conformations of two tyrosine residues, Tyr91.35 and Tyr2717.36, which are critical for the formation of the exosite. The structure reveals insights into antagonist binding that are not observed in other A2AR structures, highlighting flexibility in the binding pocket that may facilitate the development of A2AR-selective compounds for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

  14. Crystal Structure of a Complex of Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and Haemophilus influenzae Lipopolysaccharide Reveals Shielding of Core Structures in SP-D-Resistant Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Howard W; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Deadman, Mary E; Hood, Derek W; Madsen, Jens; Moxon, E Richard; Townsend, J Paul; Reid, Kenneth B M; Ahmed, Abdul; Shaw, Amy J; Greenhough, Trevor J; Shrive, Annette K

    2016-05-01

    The carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of lung collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognize sugar patterns on the surface of lung pathogens and promote phagocytosis. Using Haemophilus influenzae Eagan strains expressing well-characterized lipopolysaccharide (LPS) surface structures of various levels of complexity, we show that bacterial recognition and binding by SP-D is inversely related to LPS chain extent and complexity. The crystal structure of a biologically active recombinant trimeric SP-D CRD complexed with a delipidated Eagan 4A LPS suggests that efficient LPS recognition by SP-D requires multiple binding interactions utilizing the three major ligand-binding determinants in the SP-D binding pocket, with Ca-dependent binding of inner-core heptose accompanied by interaction of anhydro-Kdo (4,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) with Arg343 and Asp325. Combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) binding analyses, our results show that extended LPS structures previously thought to be targets for collectins are important in shielding the more vulnerable sites in the LPS core, revealing a mechanism by which pathogens with complex LPS extensions efficiently evade a first-line mucosal innate immune defense. The structure also reveals for the first time the dominant form of anhydro-Kdo.

  15. The crystal structure of a sodium galactose transporter reveals mechanistic insights into Na[superscript +]/sugar symport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faham, S.; Watanabe, A.; Besserer, G.M.; Cascio, D.; Specht, A.; Hirayama, B.A.; Wright, E.M.; Abramson, J. (CNRS-UMR); (UCLA)

    2009-08-27

    Membrane transporters that use energy stored in sodium gradients to drive nutrients into cells constitute a major class of proteins. We report the crystal structure of a member of the solute sodium symporters (SSS), the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT). The -3.0 angstrom structure contains 14 transmembrane (TM) helices in an inward-facing conformation with a core structure of inverted repeats of 5 TM helices (TM2 to TM6 and TM7 to TM11). Galactose is bound in the center of the core, occluded from the outside solutions by hydrophobic residues. Surprisingly, the architecture of the core is similar to that of the leucine transporter (LeuT) from a different gene family. Modeling the outward-facing conformation based on the LeuT structure, in conjunction with biophysical data, provides insight into structural rearrangements for active transport.

  16. Crystal Structure of Deinococcus Phytochrome in the Photoactivated State Reveals a Cascade of Structural Rearrangements during Photoconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgie, E Sethe; Zhang, Junrui; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Phytochromes are photochromic photoreceptors responsible for a myriad of red/far-red light-dependent processes in plants and microorganisms. Interconversion is initially driven by photoreversible isomerization of bilin, but how this alteration directs the photostate-dependent changes within the protein to actuate signaling is poorly understood. Here, we describe the structure of the Deinococcus phytochrome photosensory module in its near complete far-red light-absorbing Pfr state. In addition to confirming the 180° rotation of the D-pyrrole ring, the dimeric structure clearly identifies downstream rearrangements that trigger large-scale conformational differences between the dark-adapted and photoactivated states. Mutational analyses verified the importance of residues surrounding the bilin in Pfr stabilization, and protease sensitivity assays corroborated photostate alterations that propagate along the dimeric interface. Collectively, these data support a cooperative "toggle" model for phytochrome photoconversion and advance our understanding of the allosteric connection between the photosensory and output modules.

  17. Crystal Structure of Homoserine Transacetylase from Haemophilus Influenzae Reveals a New Family of alpha/beta-Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirza,I.; Nazi, I.; Korczynska, M.; Wright, G.; Berghuis, A.

    2005-01-01

    Homoserine transacetylase catalyzes one of the required steps in the biosynthesis of methionine in fungi and several bacteria. We have determined the crystal structure of homoserine transacetylase from Haemophilus influenzae to a resolution of 1.65 A. The structure identifies this enzyme to be a member of the alpha/beta-hydrolase structural superfamily. The active site of the enzyme is located near the end of a deep tunnel formed by the juxtaposition of two domains and incorporates a catalytic triad involving Ser143, His337, and Asp304. A structural basis is given for the observed double displacement kinetic mechanism of homoserine transacetylase. Furthermore, the properties of the tunnel provide a rationale for how homoserine transacetylase catalyzes a transferase reaction vs. hydrolysis, despite extensive similarity in active site architecture to hydrolytic enzymes.

  18. Crystal Structures of the GCaMP Calcium Sensor Reveal the Mechanism of Fluorescence Signal Change and Aid Rational Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerboom, Jasper; Velez Rivera, Jonathan D.; Rodriguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Tian, Lin; Hires, S. Andrew; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.; (MIT); (Puerto Rico); (HHMI)

    2009-03-16

    The genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP2 shows promise for neural network activity imaging, but is currently limited by low signal-to-noise ratio. We describe x-ray crystal structures as well as solution biophysical and spectroscopic characterization of GCaMP2 in the calcium-free dark state, and in two calcium-bound bright states: a monomeric form that dominates at intracellular concentrations observed during imaging experiments and an unexpected domain-swapped dimer with decreased fluorescence. This series of structures provides insight into the mechanism of Ca{sup 2+}-induced fluorescence change. Upon calcium binding, the calmodulin (CaM) domain wraps around the M13 peptide, creating a new domain interface between CaM and the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein domain. Residues from CaM alter the chemical environment of the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein chromophore and, together with flexible inter-domain linkers, block solvent access to the chromophore. Guided by the crystal structures, we engineered a series of GCaMP2 point mutants to probe the mechanism of GCaMP2 function and characterized one mutant with significantly improved signal-to-noise. The mutation is located at a domain interface and its effect on sensor function could not have been predicted in the absence of structural data.

  19. A Novel N-Acetylglutamate Synthase Architecture Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Bifunctional Enzyme from Maricaulis maris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Dashuang; Li, Yongdong; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel (Maryland); (GWU); (Georgia)

    2012-05-24

    Novel bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinases (NAGS/K) that catalyze the first two steps of arginine biosynthesis and are homologous to vertebrate N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), an essential cofactor-producing enzyme in the urea cycle, were identified in Maricaulis maris and several other bacteria. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of NAGS but not NAGK activity. The crystal structure of M. maris NAGS/K (mmNAGS/K) at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution indicates that it is a tetramer, in contrast to the hexameric structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS. The quaternary structure of crystalline NAGS/K from Xanthomonas campestris (xcNAGS/K) is similar, and cross-linking experiments indicate that both mmNAGS/K and xcNAGS are tetramers in solution. Each subunit has an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, which is likely responsible for N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) activity and has a putative arginine binding site, and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain that contains the putative NAGS active site. These structures and sequence comparisons suggest that the linker residue 291 may determine whether arginine acts as an allosteric inhibitor or activator in homologous enzymes in microorganisms and vertebrates. In addition, the angle of rotation between AAK and NAT domains varies among crystal forms and subunits within the tetramer. A rotation of 26{sup o} is sufficient to close the predicted AcCoA binding site, thus reducing enzymatic activity. Since mmNAGS/K has the highest degree of sequence homology to vertebrate NAGS of NAGS and NAGK enzymes whose structures have been determined, the mmNAGS/K structure was used to develop a structural model of human NAGS that is fully consistent with the functional effects of the 14 missense mutations that were identified in NAGS-deficient patients.

  20. Crystal Structure of PKG I:cGMP Complex Reveals a cGMP-Mediated Dimeric Interface that Facilitates cGMP-Induced Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Jeong Joo

    2016-04-09

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is a key regulator of smooth muscle and vascular tone and represents an important drug target for treating hypertensive diseases and erectile dysfunction. Despite its importance, its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To understand the activation mechanism, we determined a 2.5 Å crystal structure of the PKG I regulatory (R) domain bound with cGMP, which represents the activated state. Although we used a monomeric domain for crystallization, the structure reveals that two R domains form a symmetric dimer where the cGMP bound at high-affinity pockets provide critical dimeric contacts. Small-angle X-ray scattering and mutagenesis support this dimer model, suggesting that the dimer interface modulates kinase activation. Finally, structural comparison with the homologous cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase reveals that PKG is drastically different from protein kinase A in its active conformation, suggesting a novel activation mechanism for PKG. Kim et al. obtain the first crystal structure of the PKG I R domain bound with cGMP representing its activated state. It reveals a symmetric R dimer where cGMP molecules provide dimeric contacts. This R-R interaction prevents the high-affinity inhibitory interaction between R-C domain and sustains activation. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. A High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Psychrohalophilic α–Carbonic Anhydrase from Photobacterium profundum Reveals a Unique Dimer Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somalinga, Vijayakumar; Buhrman, Greg; Arun, Ashikha; Rose, Robert B.; Grunden, Amy M. (NCSU)

    2016-12-09

    Bacterial α–carbonic anhydrases (α-CA) are zinc containing metalloenzymes that catalyze the rapid interconversion of CO2 to bicarbonate and a proton. We report the first crystal structure of a pyschrohalophilic α–CA from a deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. Size exclusion chromatography of the purified P. profundum α–CA (PprCA) reveals that the protein is a heterogeneous mix of monomers and dimers. Furthermore, an “in-gel” carbonic anhydrase activity assay, also known as protonography, revealed two distinct bands corresponding to monomeric and dimeric forms of PprCA that are catalytically active. The crystal structure of PprCA was determined in its native form and reveals a highly conserved “knot-topology” that is characteristic of α–CA’s. Similar to other bacterial α–CA’s, PprCA also crystallized as a dimer. Furthermore, dimer interface analysis revealed the presence of a chloride ion (Cl-) in the interface which is unique to PprCA and has not been observed in any other α–CA’s characterized so far. Molecular dynamics simulation and chloride ion occupancy analysis shows 100% occupancy for the Cl- ion in the dimer interface. Zinc coordinating triple histidine residues, substrate binding hydrophobic patch residues, and the hydrophilic proton wire residues are highly conserved in PprCA and are identical to other well-studied α–CA’s.

  2. The Crystal Structure of the Ivy delta4-16:0-ACP Desaturase Reveals Structural Details of the Oxidized Active Site and Potential Determinants of Regioselectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy,J.; Whittle, E.; Kumaran, D.; Lindqvist, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase from Hedera helix (English ivy) catalyzes the {Delta}{sup 4} desaturation of 16:0-ACP and the{Delta}{sup 9} desaturation of 18:0-ACP and further desaturates{Delta}{sup 9}-16:1 or {Delta}{sup 9}-18:1 to the corresponding {Delta}{sup 4,9} dienes. The crystal structure of the enzyme has been solved to 1.95{angstrom} resolution, and both the iron-iron distance of 3.2{angstrom} and the presence of a {mu}-oxo bridge reveal this to be the only reported structure of a desaturase in the oxidized FeIII-FeIII form. Significant differences are seen between the oxidized active site and the reduced active site of the Ricinus communis (castor) desaturase; His{sup 227} coordination to Fe2 is lost, and the side chain of Glu{sup 224}, which bridges the two iron ions in the reduced structure, does not interact with either iron. Although carboxylate shifts have been observed on oxidation of other diiron proteins, this is the first example of the residue moving beyond the coordination range of both iron ions. Comparison of the ivy and castor structures reveal surface amino acids close to the annulus of the substrate-binding cavity and others lining the lower portion of the cavity that are potential determinants of their distinct substrate specificities. We propose a hypothesis that differences in side chain packing explains the apparent paradox that several residues lining the lower portion of the cavity in the ivy desaturase are bulkier than their equivalents in the castor enzyme despite the necessity for the ivy enzyme to accommodate three more carbons beyond the diiron site.

  3. Crystal structures of PRK1 in complex with the clinical compounds lestaurtinib and tofacitinib reveal ligand induced conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Philip; Delker, Silvia; Pagarigan, Barbra; Mahmoudi, Afshin; Jackson, Pilgrim; Abbasian, Mahan; Muir, Jeff; Raheja, Neil; Cathers, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase C related kinase 1 (PRK1) is a component of Rho-GTPase, androgen receptor, histone demethylase and histone deacetylase signaling pathways implicated in prostate and ovarian cancer. Herein we describe the crystal structure of PRK1 in apo form, and also in complex with a panel of literature inhibitors including the clinical candidates lestaurtinib and tofacitinib, as well as the staurosporine analog Ro-31-8220. PRK1 is a member of the AGC-kinase class, and as such exhibits the characteristic regulatory sequence at the C-terminus of the catalytic domain--the 'C-tail'. The C-tail fully encircles the catalytic domain placing a phenylalanine in the ATP-binding site. Our inhibitor structures include examples of molecules which both interact with, and displace the C-tail from the active site. This information may assist in the design of inhibitors targeting both PRK and other members of the AGC kinase family.

  4. The quaternary structure of the amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8 is revealed by its crystal packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarkar, Vinod B. [Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Kimani, Serah W. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Cowan, Donald A.; Sayed, Muhammed F.-R. [Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Sewell, B. Trevor, E-mail: sewell@uctvms.uct.ac.za [Electron Microscope Unit, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2006-12-01

    The amidase from G. pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned, expressed and purified, and then crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, is a member of the nitrilase enzyme superfamily. It converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and has been purified by heat treatment and a number of chromatographic steps. The enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals produced in the presence of 1.2 M sodium citrate, 400 mM NaCl, 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.6 were selected for X-ray diffraction studies. A data set having acceptable statistics to 1.96 Å resolution was collected under cryoconditions using an in-house X-ray source. The space group was determined to be primitive cubic P4{sub 2}32, with unit-cell parameter a = 130.49 (±0.05) Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the backbone of the hypothetical protein PH0642 from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PDB code 1j31) with all non-identical side chains substituted with alanine as a probe. There is one subunit per asymmetric unit. The subunits are packed as trimers of dimers with D3 point-group symmetry around the threefold axis in such a way that the dimer interface seen in the homologues is preserved.

  5. Crystal Structure of the VP4 Protease from Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Reveals the acyl-enzyme Complex for an Intermolecular Self-Cleavage Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee,J.; Feldman, A.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), an aquatic birnavirus that infects salmonid fish, encodes a large polyprotein (NH{sub 2}-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease, VP4, to release the proteins pVP2 and VP3. pVP2 is further processed to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and three peptides that are incorporated into the virion. Reported here are two crystal structures of the IPNV VP4 protease solved from two different crystal symmetries. The electron density at the active site in the triclinic crystal form, refined to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution, reveals the acyl-enzyme complex formed with an internal VP4 cleavage site. The complex was generated using a truncated enzyme in which the general base lysine was substituted. Inside the complex, the nucleophilic Ser{sup 633}O{gamma} forms an ester bond with the main-chain carbonyl of the C-terminal residue, Ala{sup 716}, of a neighboring VP4. The structure of this substrate-VP4 complex allows us to identify the S1, S3, S5, and S6 substrate binding pockets as well as other substrate-VP4 interactions and therefore provides structural insights into the substrate specificity of this enzyme. The structure from the hexagonal crystal form, refined to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, reveals the free-binding site of the protease. Three-dimensional alignment with the VP4 of blotched snakehead virus, another birnavirus, shows that the overall structure of VP4 is conserved despite a low level of sequence identity ({approx}19%). The structure determinations of IPNV VP4, the first of an acyl-enzyme complex for a Ser/Lys dyad protease, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and substrate recognition of this type of protease.

  6. Crystal Structure of Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase from Taenia Solium Reveals Metal-mediated Self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Hernandez-Santoyo; A Landa; E Gonzalez-Mondragon; M Pedraza-Escalona; R Parra-Unda; A Rodriguez-Romero

    2011-12-31

    Taenia solium is the cestode responsible for porcine and human cysticercosis. The ability of this parasite to establish itself in the host is related to its evasion of the immune response and its antioxidant defence system. The latter includes enzymes such as cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. In this article, we describe the crystal structure of a recombinant T. solium Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, representing the first structure of a protein from this organism. This enzyme shows a different charge distribution at the entrance of the active channel when compared with human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, giving it interesting properties that may allow the design of specific inhibitors against this cestode. The overall topology is similar to other superoxide dismutase structures; however, there are several His and Glu residues on the surface of the protein that coordinate metal ions both intra- and intermolecularly. Interestingly, one of these ions, located on the {beta}2 strand, establishes a metal-mediated intermolecular {beta}-{beta} interaction, including a symmetry-related molecule. The factors responsible for the abnormal protein-protein interactions that lead to oligomerization are still unknown; however, high metal levels have been implicated in these phenomena, but exactly how they are involved remains unclear. The present results suggest that this structure could be useful as a model to explain an alternative mechanism of protein aggregation commonly observed in insoluble fibrillar deposits.

  7. Mechanism of Inhibition of Novel Tryptophan Hydroxylase Inhibitors Revealed by Co-crystal Structures and Kinetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetta, Giovanni; Stouch, Terry; Yu, Wangsheng; Shi, Zhi-Cai; Tari, Leslie W; Swanson, Ronald V; Hunter, Michael J; Hoffman, Isaac D; Liu, Qingyun

    2010-04-14

    Trytophan Hydroxylase Type I (TPH1), most abundantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, initiates the synthesis of serotonin by catalyzing hydroxylation of tryptophan in the presence of biopterin and oxygen. We have previously described three series of novel, periphery-specific TPH1 inhibitors that selectively deplete serotonin in the gastrointestinal tract. We have now determined co-crystal structures of TPH1 with three of these inhibitors at high resolution. Analysis of the structural data showed that each of the three inhibitors fills the tryptophan binding pocket of TPH1 without reaching into the binding site of the cofactor pterin, and induces major conformational changes of the enzyme. The enzyme-inhibitor complexes assume a compact conformation that is similar to the one in tryptophan complex. Kinetic analysis showed that all three inhibitors are competitive versus the substrate tryptophan, consistent with the structural data that the compounds occupy the tryptophan binding site. On the other hand, all three inhibitors appear to be uncompetitive versus the cofactor 6-methyltetrahydropterin, which is not only consistent with the structural data but also indicate that the hydroxylation reaction follows an ordered binding mechanism in which a productive complex is formed only if tryptophan binds only after pterin, similar to the kinetic mechanisms of tyrosine and phenylalanine hydroxylase.

  8. Crystal structure of Bombyx mori arylphorins reveals a 3:3 heterohexamer with multiple papain cleavage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Li, Jianwei; Li, Yi; Dong, Zhaoming; Xia, Qingyou; Yuan, Y Adam

    2014-06-01

    In holometabolous insects, the accumulation and utilization of storage proteins (SPs), including arylphorins and methionine-rich proteins, are critical for the insect metamorphosis. SPs function as amino acids reserves, which are synthesized in fat body, secreted into the larval hemolymph and taken up by fat body shortly before pupation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of digestion and utilization of SPs during development are largely unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of Bombyx mori arylphorins at 2.8 Å, which displays a heterohexameric structural arrangement formed by trimerization of dimers comprising two structural similar arylphorins. Our limited proteolysis assay and microarray data strongly suggest that papain-like proteases are the major players for B. mori arylphorins digestion in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with the biochemical data, dozens of papain cleavage sites are mapped on the surface of the heterohexameric structure of B. mori arylphorins. Hence, our results provide the insightful information to understand the metamorphosis of holometabolous insects at molecular level.

  9. Crystal structure of the papain-like protease of MERS coronavirus reveals unusual, potentially druggable active-site features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jian; Mesters, Jeroen R; Drosten, Christian; Anemüller, Stefan; Ma, Qingjun; Hilgenfeld, Rolf

    2014-09-01

    The Middle-East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe acute pneumonia and renal failure. The MERS-CoV papain-like protease (PL(pro)) is a potential target for the development of antiviral drugs. To facilitate these efforts, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme by X-ray crystallography. The molecule consists of a ubiquitin-like domain and a catalytic core domain. The catalytic domain displays an extended right-hand fold with a zinc ribbon and embraces a solvent-exposed substrate-binding region. The overall structure of the MERS-CoV PL(pro) is similar to that of the corresponding SARS-CoV enzyme, but the architecture of the oxyanion hole and of the S3 as well as the S5 specificity sites differ from the latter. These differences are the likely reason for reduced in vitro peptide hydrolysis and deubiquitinating activities of the MERS-CoV PL(pro), compared to the homologous enzyme from the SARS coronavirus. Introduction of a side-chain capable of oxyanion stabilization through the Leu106Trp mutation greatly enhances the in vitro catalytic activity of the MERS-CoV PL(pro). The unique features observed in the crystal structure of the MERS-CoV PL(pro) should allow the design of antivirals that would not interfere with host ubiquitin-specific proteases.

  10. Novel disulfide bond-mediated dimerization of the CARD domain was revealed by the crystal structure of CARMA1 CARD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-ho Jang

    Full Text Available CARMA1, BCL10 and MALT1 form a large molecular complex known as the CARMA1 signalosome during lymphocyte activation. Lymphocyte activation via the CARMA1 signalosome is critical to immune response and linked to many immune diseases. Despite the important role of the CARMA1 signalosome during lymphocyte activation and proliferation, limited structural information is available. Here, we report the dimeric structure of CARMA1 CARD at a resolution of 3.2 Å. Interestingly, although CARMA1 CARD has a canonical six helical-bundles structural fold similar to other CARDs, CARMA1 CARD shows the first homo-dimeric structure of CARD formed by a disulfide bond and reveals a possible biologically important homo-dimerization mechanism.

  11. Crystal Structure of Mouse Thymidylate Synthase in Tertiary Complex with dUMP and Raltitrexed Reveals N-Terminus Architecture and Two Different Active Site Conformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dowierciał

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of mouse thymidylate synthase (mTS in complex with substrate dUMP and antifolate inhibitor Raltitrexed is reported. The structure reveals, for the first time in the group of mammalian TS structures, a well-ordered segment of 13 N-terminal amino acids, whose ordered conformation is stabilized due to specific crystal packing. The structure consists of two homodimers, differing in conformation, one being more closed (dimer AB and thus supporting tighter binding of ligands, and the other being more open (dimer CD and thus allowing weaker binding of ligands. This difference indicates an asymmetrical effect of the binding of Raltitrexed to two independent mTS molecules. Conformational changes leading to a ligand-induced closing of the active site cleft are observed by comparing the crystal structures of mTS in three different states along the catalytic pathway: ligand-free, dUMP-bound, and dUMP- and Raltitrexed-bound. Possible interaction routes between hydrophobic residues of the mTS protein N-terminal segment and the active site are also discussed.

  12. Crystal structure of mouse thymidylate synthase in tertiary complex with dUMP and raltitrexed reveals N-terminus architecture and two different active site conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowierciał, Anna; Wilk, Piotr; Rypniewski, Wojciech; Rode, Wojciech; Jarmuła, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of mouse thymidylate synthase (mTS) in complex with substrate dUMP and antifolate inhibitor Raltitrexed is reported. The structure reveals, for the first time in the group of mammalian TS structures, a well-ordered segment of 13 N-terminal amino acids, whose ordered conformation is stabilized due to specific crystal packing. The structure consists of two homodimers, differing in conformation, one being more closed (dimer AB) and thus supporting tighter binding of ligands, and the other being more open (dimer CD) and thus allowing weaker binding of ligands. This difference indicates an asymmetrical effect of the binding of Raltitrexed to two independent mTS molecules. Conformational changes leading to a ligand-induced closing of the active site cleft are observed by comparing the crystal structures of mTS in three different states along the catalytic pathway: ligand-free, dUMP-bound, and dUMP- and Raltitrexed-bound. Possible interaction routes between hydrophobic residues of the mTS protein N-terminal segment and the active site are also discussed.

  13. Crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region reveals an autoinhibited conformation through active site sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Huawei; Yang, Taehong; Terman, Jonathan R.; Zhang, Xuewu; (UTSMC)

    2010-01-20

    Plexin cell surface receptors bind to semaphorin ligands and transduce signals for regulating neuronal axon guidance. The intracellular region of plexins is essential for signaling and contains a R-Ras/M-Ras GTPase activating protein (GAP) domain that is divided into two segments by a Rho GTPase-binding domain (RBD). The regulation mechanisms for plexin remain elusive, although it is known that activation requires both binding of semaphorin to the extracellular region and a Rho-family GTPase (Rac1 or Rnd1) to the RBD. Here we report the crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region. The structure shows that the N- and C-terminal portions of the GAP homologous regions together form a GAP domain with an overall fold similar to other Ras GAPs. However, the plexin GAP domain adopts a closed conformation and cannot accommodate R-Ras/M-Ras in its substrate-binding site, providing a structural basis for the autoinhibited state of plexins. A comparison with the plexin B1 RBD/Rnd1 complex structure suggests that Rnd1 binding alone does not induce a conformational change in plexin, explaining the requirement of both semaphorin and a Rho GTPase for activation. The structure also identifies an N-terminal segment that is important for regulation. Both the N-terminal segment and the RBD make extensive interactions with the GAP domain, suggesting the presence of an allosteric network connecting these three domains that integrates semaphorin and Rho GTPase signals to activate the GAP. The importance of these interactions in plexin signaling is shown by both cell-based and in vivo axon guidance assays.

  14. Crystal structure of enhanced green fluorescent protein to 1.35 A resolution reveals alternative conformations for Glu222.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A J Arpino

    Full Text Available Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP is one of the most widely used engineered variants of the original wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein. Here, we report the high resolution (1.35 Å structure of EGFP crystallised in its untagged sequence form that reveals the combined impact of the F64L and S65T, that give rise to improved folding and spectral characteristics. The overall structure of EGFP is very similar to wt GFP, forming the classical β-barrel fold with the chromophore containing helix running through the core of the structure. Replacement of Phe64 with Leu in EGFP results in subtle rearrangement of hydrophobic core packing close to the chromophore including the reduction in surface exposure of two hydrophobic residues. Replacement of Ser65 with Thr has a significant impact on the local hydrogen bond network in the vicinity of the chromophore. Detailed analysis of electron density reveals that several residues close to the chromophore occupy at least two distinct conformations. This includes Glu222 that defines the charged state on the chromophore, with the two conformations having slightly different effects on the hydrogen bond network surrounding the chromophore. Hence, the reported high-resolution structure of EGFP has provided a long overdue molecular description of one of the most important fluorescent protein variants currently in general use.

  15. Crystal Structure of DNA-PKcs Reveals a Large Open-Ring Cradle Comprised of HEAT Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Bancinyane L.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2009-01-01

    Broken chromosomes arising from DNA double strand breaks result from endogenous events such as the production of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism, as well as from exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation1, 2, 3. Left unrepaired or incorrectly repaired they can lead to genomic changes that may result in cell death or cancer. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a holo-enzyme that comprises DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)4, 5 and the heterodimer Ku70/Ku80, plays a major role in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the main pathway in mammals used to repair double strand breaks6, 7, 8. DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine protein kinase comprising a single polypeptide chain of 4128 amino acids and belonging to the phosphotidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)- related protein family9. DNA-PKcs is involved in the sensing and transmission of DNA damage signals to proteins such as p53, setting off events that lead to cell cycle arrest10, 11. It phosphorylates a wide range of substrates in vitro, including Ku70/Ku80, which is translocated along DNA12. Here we present the crystal structure of human DNA-PKcs at 6.6Å resolution, in which the overall fold is for the first time clearly visible. The many α-helical HEAT repeats (helix-turn-helix motifs) facilitate bending and allow the polypeptide chain to fold into a hollow circular structure. The C-terminal kinase domain is located on top of this structure and a small HEAT repeat domain that likely binds DNA is inside. The structure provides a flexible cradle to promote DNA double-strand-break repair. PMID:20023628

  16. Mechanistic insights revealed by the crystal structure of a histidine kinase with signal transducer and sensor domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    Full Text Available Two-component systems (TCSs are important for the adaptation and survival of bacteria and fungi under stress conditions. A TCS is often composed of a membrane-bound sensor histidine kinase (SK and a response regulator (RR, which are relayed through sequential phosphorylation steps. However, the mechanism for how an SK is switched on in response to environmental stimuli remains obscure. Here, we report the crystal structure of a complete cytoplasmic portion of an SK, VicK from Streptococcus mutans. The overall structure of VicK is a long-rod dimer that anchors four connected domains: HAMP, Per-ARNT-SIM (PAS, DHp, and catalytic and ATP binding domain (CA. The HAMP, a signal transducer, and the PAS domain, major sensor, adopt canonical folds with dyad symmetry. In contrast, the dimer of the DHp and CA domains is asymmetric because of different helical bends in the DHp domain and spatial positions of the CA domains. Moreover, a conserved proline, which is adjacent to the phosphoryl acceptor histidine, contributes to helical bending, which is essential for the autokinase and phosphatase activities. Together, the elegant architecture of VicK with a signal transducer and sensor domain suggests a model where DHp helical bending and a CA swing movement are likely coordinated for autokinase activation.

  17. Crystal Structure of E. coli RecE Protein Reveals a Toroidal Tetramer for Processing Double-Stranded DNA Breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinjin; Xing, Xu; Herr, Andrew B.; Bell, Charles E.; (OSU); (UCIN)

    2009-07-21

    Escherichia coli RecE protein is part of the classical RecET recombination system that has recently been used in powerful new methods for genetic engineering. RecE binds to free double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ends and processively digests the 5{prime}-ended strand to form 5{prime}-mononucleotides and a 3{prime}-overhang that is a substrate for single strand annealing promoted by RecT. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal nuclease domain of RecE at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. RecE forms a toroidal tetramer with a central tapered channel that is wide enough to bind dsDNA at one end, but is partially plugged at the other end by the C-terminal segment of the protein. Four narrow tunnels, one within each subunit of the tetramer, lead from the central channel to the four active sites, which lie about 15 {angstrom} from the channel. The structure, combined with mutational studies, suggests a mechanism in which dsDNA enters through the open end of the central channel, the 5{prime}-ended strand passes through a tunnel to access one of the four active sites, and the 3{prime}-ended strand passes through the plugged end of the channel at the back of the tetramer.

  18. Crystal structures of the SAM-III/S[subscript MK] riboswitch reveal the SAM-dependent translation inhibition mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, C.; Smith, A.M.; Fuchs, R.T.; Ding, F.; Rajashankar, K.; Henkin, T.M.; Ke, A. (Cornell); (OSU)

    2010-01-07

    Three distinct classes of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-responsive riboswitches have been identified that regulate bacterial gene expression at the levels of transcription attenuation or translation inhibition. The SMK box (SAM-III) translational riboswitch has been identified in the SAM synthetase gene in members of the Lactobacillales. Here we report the 2.2-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Enterococcus faecalis SMK box riboswitch. The Y-shaped riboswitch organizes its conserved nucleotides around a three-way junction for SAM recognition. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence, which is sequestered by base-pairing with the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence in response to SAM binding, also directly participates in SAM recognition. The riboswitch makes extensive interactions with the adenosine and sulfonium moieties of SAM but does not appear to recognize the tail of the methionine moiety. We captured a structural snapshot of the SMK box riboswitch sampling the near-cognate ligand S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) in which SAH was found to adopt an alternative conformation and fails to make several key interactions.

  19. Crystal Structures Reveal that the Reaction Mechanism of Imidazoleglycerol-Phosphate Dehydratase Is Controlled by Switching Mn(II) Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Claudine; Britton, K. Linda; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rodgers, H. Fiona; Eadsforth, Thomas C.; Viner, Russell C.; Hawkes, Tim R.; Baker, Patrick J.; Rice, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (IGPD) catalyzes the Mn(II)-dependent dehydration of imidazoleglycerol phosphate (IGP) to 3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-2-oxopropyl dihydrogen phosphate during biosynthesis of histidine. As part of a program of herbicide design, we have determined a series of high-resolution crystal structures of an inactive mutant of IGPD2 from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with IGP. The structures represent snapshots of the enzyme trapped at different stages of the catalytic cycle and show how substrate binding triggers a switch in the coordination state of an active site Mn(II) between six- and five-coordinate species. This switch is critical to prime the active site for catalysis, by facilitating the formation of a high-energy imidazolate intermediate. This work not only provides evidence for the molecular processes that dominate catalysis in IGPD, but also describes how the manipulation of metal coordination can be linked to discrete steps in catalysis, demonstrating one way that metalloenzymes exploit the unique properties of metal ions to diversify their chemistry. PMID:26095028

  20. Crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus metallopeptidase (Sapep) reveals large domain motions between the manganese-bound and apo-states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Tavarekere S; Gopal, Balasubramanian

    2010-09-17

    Proteases belonging to the M20 family are characterized by diverse substrate specificity and participate in several metabolic pathways. The Staphylococcus aureus metallopeptidase, Sapep, is a member of the aminoacylase-I/M20 protein family. This protein is a Mn(2+)-dependent dipeptidase. The crystal structure of this protein in the Mn(2+)-bound form and in the open, metal-free state suggests that large interdomain movements could potentially regulate the activity of this enzyme. We note that the extended inactive conformation is stabilized by a disulfide bond in the vicinity of the active site. Although these cysteines, Cys(155) and Cys(178), are not active site residues, the reduced form of this enzyme is substantially more active as a dipeptidase. These findings acquire further relevance given a recent observation that this enzyme is only active in methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The structural and biochemical features of this enzyme provide a template for the design of novel methicillin-resistant S. aureus-specific therapeutics.

  1. Crystal structures of PRK1 in complex with the clinical compounds lestaurtinib and tofacitinib reveal ligand induced conformational changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Chamberlain

    Full Text Available Protein kinase C related kinase 1 (PRK1 is a component of Rho-GTPase, androgen receptor, histone demethylase and histone deacetylase signaling pathways implicated in prostate and ovarian cancer. Herein we describe the crystal structure of PRK1 in apo form, and also in complex with a panel of literature inhibitors including the clinical candidates lestaurtinib and tofacitinib, as well as the staurosporine analog Ro-31-8220. PRK1 is a member of the AGC-kinase class, and as such exhibits the characteristic regulatory sequence at the C-terminus of the catalytic domain--the 'C-tail'. The C-tail fully encircles the catalytic domain placing a phenylalanine in the ATP-binding site. Our inhibitor structures include examples of molecules which both interact with, and displace the C-tail from the active site. This information may assist in the design of inhibitors targeting both PRK and other members of the AGC kinase family.

  2. Crystal structure of human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing antibody reveals insights into receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Lammens

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a multifunctional cytokine playing a key role in tissue regeneration and remodeling. Dysregulation of TWEAK signaling is involved in various pathological processes like autoimmune diseases and cancer. The unique interaction with its cognate receptor Fn14 makes both ligand and receptor promising targets for novel therapeutics. To gain insights into this important signaling pathway, we determined the structure of soluble human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of an antibody selected for inhibition of receptor binding. In the crystallized complex TWEAK is bound by three Fab fragments of the neutralizing antibody. Homology modeling shows that Fab binding overlaps with the putative Fn14 binding site of TWEAK. Docking of the Fn14 cysteine rich domain (CRD to that site generates a highly complementary interface with perfectly opposing charged and hydrophobic residues. Taken together the presented structure provides new insights into the biology of TWEAK and the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway, which will help to optimize the therapeutic strategy for treatment of related cancer types and autoimmune diseases.

  3. Crystal Structure of the CTP1L Endolysin Reveals How Its Activity Is Regulated by a Secondary Translation Product*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Leicht, Stefan; Krichel, Boris; Thompson, Andrew; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Garde, Sonia; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages produce endolysins, which lyse the bacterial host cell to release newly produced virions. The timing of lysis is regulated and is thought to involve the activation of a molecular switch. We present a crystal structure of the activated endolysin CTP1L that targets Clostridium tyrobutyricum, consisting of a complex between the full-length protein and an N-terminally truncated C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). The truncated CBD is produced through an internal translation start site within the endolysin gene. Mutants affecting the internal translation site change the oligomeric state of the endolysin and reduce lytic activity. The activity can be modulated by reconstitution of the full-length endolysin-CBD complex with free CBD. The same oligomerization mechanism applies to the CD27L endolysin that targets Clostridium difficile and the CS74L endolysin that targets Clostridium sporogenes. When the CTP1L endolysin gene is introduced into the commensal bacterium Lactococcus lactis, the truncated CBD is also produced, showing that the alternative start codon can be used in other bacterial species. The identification of a translational switch affecting oligomerization presented here has implications for the design of effective endolysins for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:26683375

  4. Crystal Structures of Glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 Reveal the Molecular Basis for Glycosylation and Deglycosylation of (Iso)flavonoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modolo, Luzia V.; Li, Lenong; Pan, Haiyun; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.; Wang, Xiaoqiang; (SRNF)

    2010-09-21

    The glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 from Medicago truncatula catalyzes the glycosylation of various (iso)flavonoids such as the flavonols kaempferol and myricetin, the isoflavone formononetin, and the anthocyanidins pelargonidin and cyanidin. It also catalyzes a reverse reaction to remove the sugar moiety from glycosides. The structures of UGT78G1 bound with uridine diphosphate or with both uridine diphosphate and myricetin were determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, revealing detailed interactions between the enzyme and substrates/products and suggesting a distinct binding mode for the acceptor/product. Comparative structural analysis and mutagenesis identify glutamate 192 as a key amino acid for the reverse reaction. This information provides a basis for enzyme engineering to manipulate substrate specificity and to design effective biocatalysts with glycosylation and/or deglycosylation activity.

  5. Crystal Structure of the ERp44-Peroxiredoxin 4 Complex Reveals the Molecular Mechanisms of Thiol-Mediated Protein Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Li, De-Feng; Wang, Xi'e; Liang, Jinzhao; Sitia, Roberto; Wang, Chih-Chen; Wang, Xi

    2016-10-04

    ERp44 controls the localization and transport of diverse proteins in the early secretory pathway. The mechanisms that allow client recognition and the source of the oxidative power for forming intermolecular disulfides are as yet unknown. Here we present the structure of ERp44 bound to a client, peroxiredoxin 4. Our data reveal that ERp44 binds the oxidized form of peroxiredoxin 4 via thiol-disulfide interchange reactions. The structure explains the redox-dependent recognition and characterizes the essential non-covalent interactions at the interface. The ERp44-Prx4 covalent complexes can be reduced by glutathione and protein disulfide isomerase family members in the ER, allowing the two components to recycle. This work provides insights into the mechanisms of thiol-mediated protein retention and indicates the key roles of ERp44 in this biochemical cycle to optimize oxidative folding and redox homeostasis.

  6. Crystal Structures and Inhibition Kinetics Reveal a Two-Stage Catalytic Mechanism with Drug Design Implications for Rhomboid Proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sangwoo; Dickey, Seth W; Urban, Siniša

    2016-02-04

    Intramembrane proteases signal by releasing proteins from the membrane, but despite their importance, their enzymatic mechanisms remain obscure. We probed rhomboid proteases with reversible, mechanism-based inhibitors that allow precise kinetic analysis and faithfully mimic the transition state structurally. Unexpectedly, inhibition by peptide aldehydes is non-competitive, revealing that in the Michaelis complex, substrate does not contact the catalytic center. Structural analysis in a membrane revealed that all extracellular loops of rhomboid make stabilizing interactions with substrate, but mainly through backbone interactions, explaining rhomboid's broad sequence selectivity. At the catalytic site, the tetrahedral intermediate lies covalently attached to the catalytic serine alone, with the oxyanion stabilized by unusual tripartite interactions with the side chains of H150, N154, and the backbone of S201. We also visualized unexpected substrate-enzyme interactions at the non-essential P2/P3 residues. These "extra" interactions foster potent rhomboid inhibition in living cells, thereby opening avenues for rational design of selective rhomboid inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal Structures of Mite Allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1 Reveal Differences in Surface-Exposed Residues that May Influence Antibody Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Chapman, Martin D.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Stura, Enrico A.; Saint-Remy, Jean-Marie; Minor, Wladek; Pomés, Anna; (INDOOR Bio.); (CEAS); (Leuven); (UV)

    2009-12-01

    The Group 1 mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, are potent allergens excreted by Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, respectively. The human IgE antibody responses to the Group 1 allergens show more cross-reactivity than the murine IgG antibody responses which are largely species-specific. Here, we report the crystal structure of the mature form of Der f 1, which was isolated from its natural source, and a new, high-resolution structure of mature recombinant Der p 1. Unlike Der p 1, Der f 1 is monomeric both in the crystalline state and in solution. Moreover, no metal binding is observed in the structure of Der f 1, despite the fact that all amino acids involved in Ca{sup 2+} binding in Der p 1 are completely conserved in Der f 1. Although Der p 1 and Der f 1 share extensive sequence identity, comparison of the crystal structures of both allergens revealed structural features which could explain the differences in murine and human IgE antibody responses to these allergens. There are structural differences between Der f 1 and Der p 1 which are unevenly distributed on the allergens' surfaces. This uneven spatial arrangement of conserved versus altered residues could explain both the specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies against Der f 1 and Der p 1.

  8. Crystal Structures of Furazanes

    OpenAIRE

    Klapötke, Thomas; Schmid, Philipp; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Several nitrogen-rich salts of 3-nitramino-4-nitrofurazane and dinitraminoazoxyfurazane were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The crystal structures were determined by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Moreover the sensitivities toward thermal and mechanical stimuli were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and BAM (Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung) methods. The standard enthalpies of formation were calculated for all...

  9. High-resolution crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase in complex with its endogenous inhibitor IFS reveals a highly water-rich interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye-Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jae [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ha Na; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure of the complex between the C-terminal domain of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase and an endogenous inhibitor for SPN was determined at 1.70 Å. It reveals that the interface between the two proteins is highly rich in water molecules. One of the virulence factors produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase (SPN). S. pyogenes injects SPN into the cytosol of an infected host cell using the cytolysin-mediated translocation pathway. As SPN is toxic to bacterial cells themselves, S. pyogenes possesses the ifs gene that encodes an endogenous inhibitor for SPN (IFS). IFS is localized intracellularly and forms a complex with SPN. This intracellular complex must be dissociated during export through the cell envelope. To provide a structural basis for understanding the interactions between SPN and IFS, the complex was overexpressed between the mature SPN (residues 38–451) and the full-length IFS (residues 1–161), but it could not be crystallized. Therefore, limited proteolysis was used to isolate a crystallizable SPN{sub ct}–IFS complex, which consists of the SPN C-terminal domain (SPN{sub ct}; residues 193–451) and the full-length IFS. Its crystal structure has been determined by single anomalous diffraction and the model refined at 1.70 Å resolution. Interestingly, our high-resolution structure of the complex reveals that the interface between SPN{sub ct} and IFS is highly rich in water molecules and many of the interactions are water-mediated. The wet interface may facilitate the dissociation of the complex for translocation across the cell envelope.

  10. Crystal Structure of PKG I:cGMP Complex Reveals a cGMP-Mediated Dimeric Interface that Facilitates cGMP-Induced Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Joo; Lorenz, Robin; Arold, Stefan T; Reger, Albert S; Sankaran, Banumathi; Casteel, Darren E; Herberg, Friedrich W; Kim, Choel

    2016-05-03

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is a key regulator of smooth muscle and vascular tone and represents an important drug target for treating hypertensive diseases and erectile dysfunction. Despite its importance, its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To understand the activation mechanism, we determined a 2.5 Å crystal structure of the PKG I regulatory (R) domain bound with cGMP, which represents the activated state. Although we used a monomeric domain for crystallization, the structure reveals that two R domains form a symmetric dimer where the cGMP bound at high-affinity pockets provide critical dimeric contacts. Small-angle X-ray scattering and mutagenesis support this dimer model, suggesting that the dimer interface modulates kinase activation. Finally, structural comparison with the homologous cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase reveals that PKG is drastically different from protein kinase A in its active conformation, suggesting a novel activation mechanism for PKG.

  11. Crystal structure and characterization of esterase Est25 mutants reveal improved enantioselectivity toward (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyeong; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Hong, Eunsoo; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Ryu, Yeonwoo

    2017-03-01

    Esterases comprise a group of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage and synthesis of ester bonds. They are important in biotechnological applications owing to their enantioselectivity, regioselectivity, broad substrate specificity, and the fact that they do not require cofactors. In a previous study, we isolated the esterase Est25 from a metagenomic library. Est25 showed catalytic activity toward the (R,S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester but had low enantioselectivity toward the (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester. Because (S)-ketoprofen has stronger anti-inflammatory effects and fewer side effects than (R)-ketoprofen, enantioselectivity of this esterase is important. In this study, we generated Est25 mutants with improved enantioselectivity toward the (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester; improved enantioselectivity of mutants was established by analysis of their crystal structures. The enantioselectivity of mutants was influenced by substitution of Phe72 and Leu255. Substituting these residues changed the size of the binding pocket and the entrance hole that leads to the active site. The enantioselectivity of Est25 (E = 1.1 ± 0.0) was improved in the mutants F72G (E = 1.9 ± 0.2), L255W (E = 16.1 ± 1.1), and F72G/L255W (E = 60.1 ± 0.5). Finally, characterization of Est25 mutants was performed by determining the optimum reaction conditions, thermostability, effect of additives, and substrate specificity after substituting Phe72 and Leu255.

  12. Germinal-center kinase-like kinase co-crystal structure reveals a swapped activation loop and C-terminal extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Douglas; Rushe, Mia; M Arduini, Robert; Lukacs, Christine; Atkins, Kateri; Sun, Xin; Little, Kevin; Cullivan, Michael; Paramasivam, Murugan; Patterson, Thomas A; Hesson, Thomas; D McKee, Timothy; May-Dracka, Tricia L; Xin, Zhili; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea; Bhisetti, Govinda R; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Silvian, Laura F

    2017-02-01

    Germinal-center kinase-like kinase (GLK, Map4k3), a GCK-I family kinase, plays multiple roles in regulating apoptosis, amino acid sensing, and immune signaling. We describe here the crystal structure of an activation loop mutant of GLK kinase domain bound to an inhibitor. The structure reveals a weakly associated, activation-loop swapped dimer with more than 20 amino acids of ordered density at the carboxy-terminus. This C-terminal PEST region binds intermolecularly to the hydrophobic groove of the N-terminal domain of a neighboring molecule. Although the GLK activation loop mutant crystallized demonstrates reduced kinase activity, its structure demonstrates all the hallmarks of an "active" kinase, including the salt bridge between the C-helix glutamate and the catalytic lysine. Our compound displacement data suggests that the effect of the Ser170Ala mutation in reducing kinase activity is likely due to its effect in reducing substrate peptide binding affinity rather than reducing ATP binding or ATP turnover. This report details the first structure of GLK; comparison of its activation loop sequence and P-loop structure to that of Map4k4 suggests ideas for designing inhibitors that can distinguish between these family members to achieve selective pharmacological inhibitors.

  13. Crystal Structure of Reduced and of Oxidized Peroxiredoxin IV Enzyme Reveals a Stable Oxidized Decamer and a Non-disulfide-bonded Intermediate in the Catalytic Cycle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenbo; Tavender, Timothy J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin IV (PrxIV) is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme that metabolizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (Ero1). It has been shown to play a role in de novo disulfide formation, oxidizing members of the protein disulfide isomerase family of enzymes, and is a member of the typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. We have determined the crystal structure of both reduced and disulfide-bonded, as well as a resolving cysteine mutant of human PrxIV. We show that PrxIV has a similar structure to other typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and undergoes a conformational change from a fully folded to a locally unfolded form following the formation of a disulfide between the peroxidatic and resolving cysteine residues. Unlike other mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, we show that human PrxIV forms a stable decameric structure even in its disulfide-bonded state. In addition, the structure of a resolving cysteine mutant reveals an intermediate in the reaction cycle that adopts the locally unfolded conformation. Interestingly the peroxidatic cysteine in the crystal structure is sulfenylated rather than sulfinylated or sulfonylated. In addition, the peroxidatic cysteine in the resolving cysteine mutant is resistant to hyper-oxidation following incubation with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. These results highlight some unique properties of PrxIV and suggest that the equilibrium between the fully folded and locally unfolded forms favors the locally unfolded conformation upon sulfenylation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue. PMID:21994946

  14. An Evaluation of the Crystal Structure of C-terminal Truncated Apolipoprotein A-I in Solution Reveals Structural Dynamics Related to Lipid Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, John T; Walker, Ryan G; Morris, Jamie; Jones, Martin K; Segrest, Jere P; Lima, Diogo B; Carvalho, Paulo C; Gozzo, Fábio C; Castleberry, Mark; Thompson, Thomas B; Davidson, W Sean

    2016-03-04

    Apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mediates many of the anti-atherogenic functions attributed to high density lipoprotein. Unfortunately, efforts toward a high resolution structure of full-length apoA-I have not been fruitful, although there have been successes with deletion mutants. Recently, a C-terminal truncation (apoA-I(Δ185-243)) was crystallized as a dimer. The structure showed two helical bundles connected by a long, curved pair of swapped helical domains. To compare this structure to that existing under solution conditions, we applied small angle x-ray scattering and isotope-assisted chemical cross-linking to apoA-I(Δ185-243) in its dimeric and monomeric forms. For the dimer, we found evidence for the shared domains and aspects of the N-terminal bundles, but not the molecular curvature seen in the crystal. We also found that the N-terminal bundles equilibrate between open and closed states. Interestingly, this movement is one of the transitions proposed during lipid binding. The monomer was consistent with a model in which the long shared helix doubles back onto the helical bundle. Combined with the crystal structure, these data offer an important starting point to understand the molecular details of high density lipoprotein biogenesis.

  15. Crystal structure of TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori in active form reveals the intrinsic molecular flexibility for unique DNA-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Gao

    Full Text Available Tipα (TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori is a carcinogenic effector. Studies on this protein revealed that a homodimer linked by a pair of intermolecular disulfide bridges (Cys25-Cys25 and Cys27-Cys27 was absolutely necessary for its biological functions. The activities of Tipα would be abolished when both disulfide bridges were disrupted. The crystal structures of Tipα reported to date, however, were based on inactive, monomeric mutants with their N-terminal, including residues Cys25 and Cys27, truncated. Here we report the crystal structure of H. pylori Tipα protein, TipαN(25, at 2.2Å resolution, in which Cys25 and Cys27 form a pair of inter-chain disulfide bridges linking an active dimer. The disulfide bridges exhibit structural flexibility in the present structure. A series of structure-based mutagenesis, biochemical assays and molecular dynamic simulations on DNA-Tipα interactions reveal that Tipα utilizes the dimeric interface as the DNA-binding site and that residues His60, Arg77 and Arg81 located at the interface are crucial for DNA binding. Tipα could bind to one ssDNA, two ssDNA or one dsDNA in experiments, respectively, in the native or mutant states. The unique DNA-binding activities of Tipα indicate that the intrinsic flexible nature of disulfide bridges could endow certain elasticity to the Tipα dimer for its unique bioactivities. The results shed light on the possible structural mechanism for the functional performances of Tipα.

  16. The crystal structure of an HSL-homolog EstE5 complex with PMSF reveals a unique configuration that inhibits the nucleophile Ser144 in catalytic triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kim, Soo-Jin; Priyadarshi, Amit; Kim, Hyun Sook; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2009-11-13

    The esterase/lipase family (EC 3.1.1.3/EC 3.1.1.1) represents a diverse group of hydrolases that catalyze the cleavage of ester bonds and are widely distributed in animals, plants and microorganisms. Among these enzymes, hormone-sensitive lipases, play a critical role in the regulation of rodent fat cell lipolysis and are regarded as adipose tissue-specific enzymes. Recently, we reported the structural and biological characterization of EstE5 from the metagenome library [K.H. Nam, M.Y. Kim, S.J. Kim, A. Priyadarshi, W.H. Lee, K.Y. Hwang, Structural and functional analysis of a novel EstE5 belonging to the subfamily of hormone-sensitive lipase, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 379 (2009) 553-556]. The structure of this protein revealed that it belongs to the HSL-family. Here, we report the inhibition of the activity of the HSL-homolog EstE5 protein as determined by the use of esterase/lipase inhibitors. Our results revealed that the EstE5 protein is significantly inhibited by PMSF. In addition, this is the first study to identify the crystal structures of EstE5-PMSF at 2.4 and 2.5A among the HSL-homolog structures. This structural configuration is similar to that adopted when serine proteases are inhibited by PMSF. The results presented here provide valuable information regarding the properties of the HSL-family.

  17. Double hexagonal close-packed structure revealed in a single colloidal crystal grain by Bragg rod analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J. M.; Shabalin, A.; Dronyak, R.; Yefanov, O. M.; Singer, A.; Kurta, R. P.; Lorenz, U.; Gorobstov, O.; Dzhigaev, D.; Gulden, J.; Byelov, D. V.; Zozulya, A. V.; Sprung, M.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    A coherent X-ray diffraction study of a single colloidal crystal grain composed of silica spheres is reported. The diffraction data contain Bragg peaks and additional features in the form of Bragg rods, which are related to the stacking of the hexagonally close-packed layers. The profile of the Brag

  18. Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwang Su; Zhang, Zaoli; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-01

    This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ~≤ 5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4).

  19. Revealing mechanism responsible for structural reversibility of single-crystal VO2 nanorods upon lithiation/delithiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Tan, Guoqiang; Wang, Peng; Abeyweera, Sasitha C.; Zhang, Dongtang; Rong, Yangchun; Wu, Yimin; Lu, Jun; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Ren, Yang; Liu, Yuzi; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Guzowski, Leah B.; Li, Jie; Xiao, Xianghui; Sun, Yugang

    2017-04-17

    A pure phase of VO2(B) nanorods have been synthesized through an energy-efficient microwave hydrothermal reaction and used as cathode materials of lithium ion batteries, which exhibit promising specific capacity (e.g., 130 mA h g-1 even after 100 charge/discharge cycles) and rate capacity (e.g., ~130 mA h g-1 at a high current of 400 mA g-1). The excellent cyclability originates from the structural reversibility of VO2(B) upon lithiation/delithiation that is confirmed by the in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) and in situ x-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of the VO2 nanorods in operating battery cells. As a result, the real-time results reveal that discharge forces lithium ions to insert firstly into the tunnels with the largest size along b direction followed by the second largest tunnels along c direction, which is completely reversible in the charge process.

  20. Molecular basis for homo-dimerization of the CIDE domain revealed by the crystal structure of the CIDE-N domain of FSP27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Mi; Jang, Tae-ho; Park, Hyun Ho

    2013-10-04

    FSP27 (CIDE-3 in humans) plays critical roles in lipid metabolism and apoptosis and is known to be involved in regulation of lipid droplet (LD) size and lipid storage and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Given that CIDE-containing proteins including FSP27 are associated with many human diseases including cancer, aging, diabetes, and obesity, studies of FSP27 and other CIDE-containing proteins are of great biological importance. As a first step toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms of FSP27-mediated lipid droplet growth and apoptosis, we report the crystal structure of the CIDE-N domain of FSP27 at a resolution of 2.0 Å. The structure revealed a possible biologically important homo-dimeric interface similar to that formed by the hetero-dimeric complex, CAD/ICAD. Comparison with other structural homologues revealed that the PB1 domain of BEM1P, ubiquitin-like domain of BAG6 and ubiquitin are structurally similar proteins. Our homo-dimeric structure of the CIDE-N domain of FSP27 will provide important information that will enable better understanding of the function of FSP27.

  1. Crystal structure of a dimeric Ser49- PLA₂-like myotoxic component of the Vipera ammodytes meridionalis venomics reveals determinants of myotoxicity and membrane damaging activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Dessislava; Coronado, Monika; Oberthür, Dominik; Buck, Friedrich; Duhalov, Deyan; Arni, Raghuvir K; Betzel, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Myotoxicity and membrane damage play a central role in the life-threatening effects of the viper envenomation. Myotoxins are an important part of the viper venomics. A Ser49 PLA₂-like myotoxin from the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis, the most venomous snake in Europe, was crystallized and its three-dimensional structure determined. The toxin is devoid of phospholipolytic activity. The structure demonstrates a formation of dimers. In the dimers functionally important peptide segments, located on the protein surface, point in the same direction which can strengthen the pharmacological effect. This supports the hypothesis about the physiological importance of the toxin oligomerization for the myotoxicity and membrane damage. The crystallographic model revealed that the structural determinants of myotoxicity (a positively charged C-terminal region and a hydrophobic knuckle) are fully exposed on the protein surface and accessible for interactions with target membranes. Distortion of the catalytic site region explains the absence of enzymatic activity. The structure reveals anion-binding sites which can be considered as possible sites of interactions of the toxin with a negatively charged membrane surface. The high structural similarity of the Ser49 myotoxin and Asp49 PLA₂ from the same venom suggests an evolutionary relationship: probably, the Ser49 myotoxin is a product of evolution of the catalytically active phospholipase A₂. The first toxin lost the enzymatic activity which is not necessary for the myotoxicity but preserved the cytotoxicity and membrane damaging activity as important components of the venom toxicity.

  2. Crystal Structure of the VapBC Toxin–Antitoxin Complex from Shigella flexneri Reveals a Hetero-Octameric DNA-Binding Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienemann, Christian; Bøggild, Andreas; Winther, Kristoffer S.

    2011-01-01

    the crystal structure of the intact Shigella flexneri VapBC TA complex, determined to 2.7 Å resolution. Both in solution and in the crystal structure, four molecules of each protein combine to form a large and globular hetero-octameric assembly with SpoVT/AbrB-type DNA-binding domains at each end and a total...

  3. Crystal Structures of Furazanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Klapötke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several nitrogen-rich salts of 3-nitramino-4-nitrofurazane and dinitraminoazoxyfurazane were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The crystal structures were determined by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Moreover the sensitivities toward thermal and mechanical stimuli were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA and BAM (Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung methods. The standard enthalpies of formation were calculated for all compounds at the CBS-4M level of theory, and the energetic performance was predicted with the EXPLO5 V6.02 computer code.

  4. Co-crystal structures of PKG Iβ (92-227 with cGMP and cAMP reveal the molecular details of cyclic-nucleotide binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Joo Kim

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases (PKGs are central mediators of the NO-cGMP signaling pathway and phosphorylate downstream substrates that are crucial for regulating smooth muscle tone, platelet activation, nociception and memory formation. As one of the main receptors for cGMP, PKGs mediate most of the effects of cGMP elevating drugs, such as nitric oxide-releasing agents and phosphodiesterase inhibitors which are used for the treatment of angina pectoris and erectile dysfunction, respectively.We have investigated the mechanism of cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG by determining crystal structures of the amino-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD-A of human PKG I bound to either cGMP or cAMP. We also determined the structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound nucleotide. The crystal structures of CNBD-A with bound cAMP or cGMP reveal that cAMP binds in either syn or anti configurations whereas cGMP binds only in a syn configuration, with a conserved threonine residue anchoring both cyclic phosphate and guanine moieties. The structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound cyclic nucleotide was similar to that of the cyclic nucleotide bound structures. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that CNBD-A binds both cGMP and cAMP with a relatively high affinity, showing an approximately two-fold preference for cGMP.Our findings suggest that CNBD-A binds cGMP in the syn conformation through its interaction with Thr193 and an unusual cis-peptide forming residues Leu172 and Cys173. Although these studies provide the first structural insights into cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG, our ITC results show only a two-fold preference for cGMP, indicating that other domains are required for the previously reported cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

  5. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Liu, J; Lombardo, M; Bolstad, D; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH-binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance.

  6. Crystal structure of the PEG-bound SH3 domain of myosin IB from Entamoeba histolytica reveals its mode of ligand recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Gunjan; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Pandey, Preeti; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2017-08-01

    The versatility in the recognition of various interacting proteins by the SH3 domain drives a variety of cellular functions. Here, the crystal structure of the C-terminal SH3 domain of myosin IB from Entamoeba histolytica (EhMySH3) is reported at a resolution of 1.7 Å in native and PEG-bound states. Comparisons with other structures indicated that the PEG molecules occupy protein-protein interaction pockets similar to those occupied by the peptides in other peptide-bound SH3-domain structures. Also, analysis of the PEG-bound EhMySH3 structure led to the recognition of two additional pockets, apart from the conventional polyproline and specificity pockets, that are important for ligand interaction. Molecular-docking studies combined with various comparisons revealed structural similarity between EhMySH3 and the SH3 domain of β-Pix, and this similarity led to the prediction that EhMySH3 preferentially binds targets containing type II-like PXXP motifs. These studies expand the understanding of the EhMySH3 domain and provide extensive structural knowledge, which is expected to help in predicting the interacting partners which function together with myosin IB during phagocytosis in E. histolytica infections.

  7. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhou, Jianhua [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Shao, Yiming [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, and National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Qiao, Wentao, E-mail: wentaoqiao@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Xinqi, E-mail: liu2008@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2013-11-15

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process.

  8. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH); (NIID-Japan)

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  9. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan (Purdue)

    2012-10-25

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we were able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant [catalytic Cys to Ala; Nishio K et al. (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun390, 855-860], which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form.

  10. Crystal structure of the Bacillus anthracis nucleoside diphosphate kinase and its characterization reveals an enzyme adapted to perform under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Gauri; Aggarwal, Anita; Dube, Divya; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Singh, Yogendra; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2009-08-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (Ndks) play an important role in a plethora of regulatory and metabolic functions. Inhibition of the B. anthracis Ndk mRNA results in the formation of nonviable aberrant spores. We report the characterization and crystal structure of the enzyme from B. anthracis nucleoside diphosphate kinase (BaNdk), the first from sporulating bacteria. The enzyme, although from a mesophilic source, is active at extremes of pH (3.5-10.5), temperature (10-95 degrees C) and ionic strength (0.25-4.0M NaCl). It exists as a hexamer that is composed of two SDS-stable trimers interacting in a back-to-back association; mutational analysis confirms that the enzyme is a histidine kinase. The high-resolution crystal structure reported here reveals an unanticipated change in the conformation of residues between 43 and 63 that also regulates substrate entry in other Ndks. A comparative structural analysis involving Ndks from seven mesophiles and three thermophiles has resulted in the delineation of the structure into relatively rigid and flexible regions. The analysis suggests that the larger number of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and to a lesser extent ionic interactions in BaNdk contributes to its high thermostability. Mutational analysis and Molecular Dynamics simulations were used to probe the role of a highly conserved Gly19 (present at the oligomeric interface in most of the Ndks). The results suggest that the mutation leads to a rigidification of those residues that facilitate substrate entry and consequently leads to a large reduction in the kinase activity. Overall, the enzyme characterization helps to understand its apparent adaptation to perform under stress conditions.

  11. In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2015-08-01

    Supercapacitors store charge through the electrosorption of ions on microporous electrodes. Despite major efforts to understand this phenomenon, a molecular-level picture of the electrical double layer in working devices is still lacking as few techniques can selectively observe the ionic species at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here, we use in situ NMR to directly quantify the populations of anionic and cationic species within a working microporous carbon supercapacitor electrode. Our results show that charge storage mechanisms are different for positively and negatively polarized electrodes for the electrolyte tetraethylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile; for positive polarization charging proceeds by exchange of the cations for anions, whereas for negative polarization, cation adsorption dominates. In situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the NMR results and indicate that adsorbed ions are only partially solvated. These results provide new molecular-level insight, with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the study of pore/ion size, desolvation and other effects on charge storage in supercapacitors.

  12. Co-evolution of quaternary organization and novel RNA tertiary interactions revealed in the crystal structure of a bacterial protein–RNA toxin–antitoxin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Short, Francesca L.; Voss, Jarrod E.; Blower, Tim R.; Orme, Anastasia L.; Whittaker, Tom E.; Luisi, Ben F.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Genes encoding toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are near ubiquitous in bacterial genomes and they play key roles in important aspects of bacterial physiology, including genomic stability, formation of persister cells under antibiotic stress, and resistance to phage infection. The CptIN locus from Eubacterium rectale is a member of the recently-discovered Type III class of TA systems, defined by a protein toxin suppressed by direct interaction with a structured RNA antitoxin. Here, we present the crystal structure of the CptIN protein–RNA complex to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a new heterotetrameric quaternary organization for the Type III TA class, and the RNA antitoxin bears a novel structural feature of an extended A-twist motif within the pseudoknot fold. The retention of a conserved ribonuclease active site as well as traits normally associated with TA systems, such as plasmid maintenance, implicates a wider functional role for Type III TA systems. We present evidence for the co-variation of the Type III component pair, highlighting a distinctive evolutionary process in which an enzyme and its substrate co-evolve. PMID:26350213

  13. Co-evolution of quaternary organization and novel RNA tertiary interactions revealed in the crystal structure of a bacterial protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Short, Francesca L; Voss, Jarrod E; Blower, Tim R; Orme, Anastasia L; Whittaker, Tom E; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2015-10-30

    Genes encoding toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are near ubiquitous in bacterial genomes and they play key roles in important aspects of bacterial physiology, including genomic stability, formation of persister cells under antibiotic stress, and resistance to phage infection. The CptIN locus from Eubacterium rectale is a member of the recently-discovered Type III class of TA systems, defined by a protein toxin suppressed by direct interaction with a structured RNA antitoxin. Here, we present the crystal structure of the CptIN protein-RNA complex to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a new heterotetrameric quaternary organization for the Type III TA class, and the RNA antitoxin bears a novel structural feature of an extended A-twist motif within the pseudoknot fold. The retention of a conserved ribonuclease active site as well as traits normally associated with TA systems, such as plasmid maintenance, implicates a wider functional role for Type III TA systems. We present evidence for the co-variation of the Type III component pair, highlighting a distinctive evolutionary process in which an enzyme and its substrate co-evolve.

  14. Crystal structure of histidine-rich glycoprotein N2 domain reveals redox activity at an interdomain disulfide bridge: implications for angiogenic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaar, Omar; McMahon, Stephen A.; Thompson, Rory; Botting, Catherine H.; Naismith, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is a plasma protein consisting of 6 distinct functional domains and is an important regulator of key cardiovascular processes, including angiogenesis and coagulation. The protein is composed of 2 N-terminal domains (N1 and N2), 2 proline-rich regions (PRR1 and PRR2) that flank a histidine-rich region (HRR), and a C-terminal domain. To date, structural information of HRG has largely come from sequence analysis and spectroscopic studies. It is thought that an HRG fragment containing the HRR, released via plasmin-mediated cleavage, acts as a negative regulator of angiogenesis in vivo. However, its release also requires cleavage of a disulphide bond suggesting that its activity is mediated by a redox process. Here, we present a 1.93 Å resolution crystal structure of the N2 domain of serum-purified rabbit HRG. The structure confirms that the N2 domain, which along with the N1 domain, forms an important molecular interaction site on HRG, possesses a cystatin-like fold composed of a 5-stranded antiparallel β-sheet wrapped around a 5-turn α-helix. A native N-linked glycosylation site was identified at Asn184. Moreover, the structure reveals the presence of an S-glutathionyl adduct at Cys185, which has implications for the redox-mediated release of the antiangiogenic cleavage product from HRG. PMID:24501222

  15. Crystal structure and biochemical investigations reveal novel mode of substrate selectivity and illuminate substrate inhibition and allostericity in a subfamily of Xaa-Pro dipeptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are, Venkat N; Kumar, Ashwani; Kumar, Saurabh; Goyal, Venuka Durani; Ghosh, Biplab; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Jamdar, Sahayog N; Makde, Ravindra D

    2017-02-01

    Xaa-Pro dipeptidase (XPD) catalyzes hydrolysis of iminopeptide bond in dipeptides containing trans-proline as a second residue. XPDs are found in all living organisms and are believed to play an essential role in proline metabolism. Here, we report crystal structures and extensive enzymatic studies of XPD from Xanthomonas campestris (XPDxc), the first such comprehensive study of a bacterial XPD. We also report enzymatic activities of its ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XPDmt). These enzymes are strictly dipeptidases with broad substrate specificities. They exhibit substrate inhibition and allostericity, as described earlier for XPD from Lactococcus lactis (XPDll). The structural, mutational and comparative data have revealed a novel mechanism of dipeptide selectivity and substrate binding in these enzymes. Moreover, we have identified conserved sequence motifs that distinguish these enzymes from other prolidases, thus defining a new subfamily. This study provides a suitable structural template for explaining unique properties of this XPDxc subfamily. In addition, we report unique structural features of XPDxc protein like an extended N-terminal tail region and absence of a conserved Tyr residue near the active site.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Nephila clavipes Major Ampullate Spidroin 1A N-terminal Domain Reveals Plasticity at the Dimer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkison, James H; Parnham, Stuart; Marcotte, William R; Olsen, Shaun K

    2016-09-02

    Spider dragline silk is a natural polymer harboring unique physical and biochemical properties that make it an ideal biomaterial. Artificial silk production requires an understanding of the in vivo mechanisms spiders use to convert soluble proteins, called spidroins, into insoluble fibers. Controlled dimerization of the spidroin N-terminal domain (NTD) is crucial to this process. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Nephila clavipes major ampullate spidroin NTD dimer. Comparison of our N. clavipes NTD structure with previously determined Euprosthenops australis NTD structures reveals subtle conformational alterations that lead to differences in how the subunits are arranged at the dimer interface. We observe a subset of contacts that are specific to each ortholog, as well as a substantial increase in asymmetry in the interactions observed at the N. clavipes NTD dimer interface. These asymmetric interactions include novel intermolecular salt bridges that provide new insights into the mechanism of NTD dimerization. We also observe a unique intramolecular "handshake" interaction between two conserved acidic residues that our data suggest adds an additional layer of complexity to the pH-sensitive relay mechanism for NTD dimerization. The results of a panel of tryptophan fluorescence dimerization assays probing the importance of these interactions support our structural observations. Based on our findings, we propose that conformational selectivity and plasticity at the NTD dimer interface play a role in the pH-dependent transition of the NTD from monomer to stably associated dimer as the spidroin progresses through the silk extrusion duct.

  17. Crystal structure of the S. solfataricus archaeal exosome reveals conformational flexibility in the RNA-binding ring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrui Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exosome complex is an essential RNA 3'-end processing and degradation machinery. In archaeal organisms, the exosome consists of a catalytic ring and an RNA-binding ring, both of which were previously reported to assume three-fold symmetry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an asymmetric 2.9 A Sulfolobus solfataricus archaeal exosome structure in which the three-fold symmetry is broken due to combined rigid body and thermal motions mainly within the RNA-binding ring. Since increased conformational flexibility was also observed in the RNA-binding ring of the related bacterial PNPase, we speculate that this may reflect an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to accommodate diverse RNA substrates for degradation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study clearly shows the dynamic structures within the RNA-binding domains, which provides additional insights on mechanism of asymmetric RNA binding and processing.

  18. Crystal structures of histone and p53 methyltransferase SmyD2 reveal a conformational flexibility of the autoinhibitory C-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Jiang

    Full Text Available SmyD2 belongs to a new class of chromatin regulators that control gene expression in heart development and tumorigenesis. Besides methylation of histone H3 K4, SmyD2 can methylate non-histone targets including p53 and the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. The methyltransferase activity of SmyD proteins has been proposed to be regulated by autoinhibition via the intra- and interdomain bending of the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD. However, there has been no direct evidence of a conformational change in the CTD. Here, we report two crystal structures of SmyD2 bound either to the cofactor product S-adenosylhomocysteine or to the inhibitor sinefungin. SmyD2 has a two-lobed structure with the active site located at the bottom of a deep crevice formed between the CTD and the catalytic domain. By extensive engagement with the methyltransferase domain, the CTD stabilizes the autoinhibited conformation of SmyD2 and restricts access to the catalytic site. Unexpectedly, despite that the two SmyD2 structures are highly superimposable, significant differences are observed in the first two helices of the CTDs: the two helices bend outwards and move away from the catalytic domain to generate a less closed conformation in the sinefungin-bound structure. Although the overall fold of the individual domains is structurally conserved among SmyD proteins, SmyD2 appear to be a conformational "intermediate" between a close form of SmyD3 and an open form of SmyD1. In addition, the structures reveal that the CTD is structurally similar to tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR, a motif through which many cochaperones bind to the heat shock protein Hsp90. Our results thus provide the first evidence for the intradomain flexibility of the TPR-like CTD, which may be important for the activation of SmyD proteins by Hsp90.

  19. A crystal structure of the Dengue virus NS5 protein reveals a novel inter-domain interface essential for protein flexibility and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqian Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3 at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5.

  20. Crystal structure and site-directed mutational analysis reveals key residues involved in Escherichia coli ZapA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Elyse J; Kimber, Matthew S; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2014-08-22

    FtsZ is an essential cell division protein in Escherichia coli, and its localization, filamentation, and bundling at the mid-cell are required for Z-ring stability. Once assembled, the Z-ring recruits a series of proteins that comprise the bacterial divisome. Zaps (FtsZ-associated proteins) stabilize the Z-ring by increasing lateral interactions between individual filaments, bundling FtsZ to provide a scaffold for divisome assembly. The x-ray crystallographic structure of E. coli ZapA was determined, identifying key structural differences from the existing ZapA structure from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including a charged α-helix on the globular domains of the ZapA tetramer. Key helix residues in E. coli ZapA were modified using site-directed mutagenesis. These ZapA variants significantly decreased FtsZ bundling in protein sedimentation assays when compared with WT ZapA proteins. Electron micrographs of ZapA-bundled FtsZ filaments showed the modified ZapA variants altered the number of FtsZ filaments per bundle. These in vitro results were corroborated in vivo by expressing the ZapA variants in an E. coli ΔzapA strain. In vivo, ZapA variants that altered FtsZ bundling showed an elongated phenotype, indicating improper cell division. Our findings highlight the importance of key ZapA residues that influence the extent of FtsZ bundling and that ultimately affect Z-ring formation in dividing cells.

  1. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5′ splice site recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5′ exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein–protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5′ splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5′-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5′-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5′-splice sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04986.001 PMID:25555158

  2. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  3. The crystal structure of Haloferax volcanii proliferating cell nuclear antigen reveals unique surface charge characteristics due to halophilic adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morroll Shaun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high intracellular salt concentration required to maintain a halophilic lifestyle poses challenges to haloarchaeal proteins that must stay soluble, stable and functional in this extreme environment. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a fundamental protein involved in maintaining genome integrity, with roles in both DNA replication and repair. To investigate the halophilic adaptation of such a key protein we have crystallised and solved the structure of Haloferax volcanii PCNA (HvPCNA to a resolution of 2.0 Å. Results The overall architecture of HvPCNA is very similar to other known PCNAs, which are highly structurally conserved. Three commonly observed adaptations in halophilic proteins are higher surface acidity, bound ions and increased numbers of intermolecular ion pairs (in oligomeric proteins. HvPCNA possesses the former two adaptations but not the latter, despite functioning as a homotrimer. Strikingly, the positive surface charge considered key to PCNA's role as a sliding clamp is dramatically reduced in the halophilic protein. Instead, bound cations within the solvation shell of HvPCNA may permit sliding along negatively charged DNA by reducing electrostatic repulsion effects. Conclusion The extent to which individual proteins adapt to halophilic conditions varies, presumably due to their diverse characteristics and roles within the cell. The number of ion pairs observed in the HvPCNA monomer-monomer interface was unexpectedly low. This may reflect the fact that the trimer is intrinsically stable over a wide range of salt concentrations and therefore additional modifications for trimer maintenance in high salt conditions are not required. Halophilic proteins frequently bind anions and cations and in HvPCNA cation binding may compensate for the remarkable reduction in positive charge in the pore region, to facilitate functional interactions with DNA. In this way, HvPCNA may harness its environment as

  4. The DDB1–DCAF1–Vpr–UNG2 crystal structure reveals how HIV-1 Vpr steers human UNG2 toward destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Zhou, Xiaohong; Barnes, Christopher O.; DeLucia, Maria; Cohen, Aina E.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Calero, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr is required for efficient viral infection of macrophages and promotion of viral replication in T cells. Vpr’s biological activities are closely linked to the interaction with human DCAF1, a cellular substrate receptor of the Cullin4–RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) of the host ubiquitin–proteasome-mediated protein degradation pathway. The molecular details of how Vpr usurps the protein degradation pathway have not been delineated. Here we present the crystal structure of the DDB1–DCAF1–HIV-1–Vpr–uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG2) complex. The structure reveals how Vpr engages with DCAF1, creating a binding interface for UNG2 recruitment, in a manner distinct from the recruitment of SAMHD1 by Vpx protein for degradation by Vpx proteins. Vpr and Vpx use similar N-terminal and helical regions to bind the substrate receptor, whereas different regions target the specific cellular substrates. Furthermore, Vpr uses molecular mimicry of DNA by a variable loop for specific recruitment of the UNG2 substrate. PMID:27571178

  5. Crystal Structures of the Scaffolding Protein LGN Reveal the General Mechanism by Which GoLoco Binding Motifs Inhibit the Release of GDP from Gαi *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Min; Li, Jianchao; Zhu, Jinwei; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie; Wang, Wenning

    2012-01-01

    GoLoco (GL) motif-containing proteins regulate G protein signaling by binding to Gα subunit and acting as guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. GLs of LGN are also known to bind the GDP form of Gαi/o during asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the C-terminal GL domain of LGN binds four molecules of Gαi·GDP. The crystal structures of Gαi·GDP in complex with LGN GL3 and GL4, respectively, reveal distinct GL/Gαi interaction features when compared with the only high resolution structure known with GL/Gαi interaction between RGS14 and Gαi1. Only a few residues C-terminal to the conserved GL sequence are required for LGN GLs to bind to Gαi·GDP. A highly conserved “double Arg finger” sequence (RΨ(D/E)(D/E)QR) is responsible for LGN GL to bind to GDP bound to Gαi. Together with the sequence alignment, we suggest that the LGN GL/Gαi interaction represents a general binding mode between GL motifs and Gαi. We also show that LGN GLs are potent guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. PMID:22952234

  6. Crystal structure of Δ-[Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ bound to mismatched DNA reveals side-by-side metalloinsertion and intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hang; Kaiser, Jens T.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-08-01

    DNA mismatches represent a novel target in the development of diagnostics and therapeutics for cancer, because deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair are implicated in cancers, and cells that are repair-deficient show a high frequency of mismatches. Metal complexes with bulky intercalating ligands serve as probes for DNA mismatches. Here, we report the high-resolution (0.92 Å) crystal structure of the ruthenium ‘light switch’ complex Δ-[Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ (bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine and dppz = dipyridophenazine), which is known to show luminescence on binding to duplex DNA, bound to both mismatched and well-matched sites in the oligonucleotide 5‧-(dCGGAAATTACCG)2-3‧ (underline denotes AA mismatches). Two crystallographically independent views reveal that the complex binds mismatches through metalloinsertion, ejecting both mispaired adenosines. Additional ruthenium complexes are intercalated at well-matched sites, creating an array of complexes in the minor groove stabilized by stacking interactions between bpy ligands and extruded adenosines. This structure attests to the generality of metalloinsertion and metallointercalation as DNA binding modes.

  7. Frustrated polymer crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, B.; Strasbourg, 67083

    1997-03-01

    Several crystal structures or polymorphs of chiral or achiral polymers and biopolymers with three fold conformation of the helix have been found to conform to a common and -with one exception(Puterman, M. et al, J. Pol. Sci., Pol. Phys. Ed., 15, 805 (1977))- hitherto unsuspected packing scheme. The trigonal unit-cell contains three isochiral helices; the azimuthal setting of one helix differs significantly from that of the other two, leading to a so-called frustrated packing scheme, in which the environment of conformationally identical helices differs. Two variants of the frustrated scheme are analyzed. Similarities with frustrated two dimensional magnetic systems are underlined. Various examples of frustration in polymer crystallography are illustrated via the elucidation or reinterpretation of crystal phases or polymorphs of polyolefins, polyesters, cellulose derivatives and polypeptides. Structural manifestations (including AFM evidence) and morphological consequences of frustration are presented, which help diagnose the existence of this original packing of polymers.(Work done with L. Cartier, D. Dorset, S. Kopp, T. Okihara, M. Schumacher, W. Stocker.)

  8. The crystal structure of the AhRR/ARNT heterodimer reveals the structural basis of the repression of AhR-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Shunya; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Ohto, Umeharu

    2017-09-13

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and related compounds (TCDDs) are extraordinarily potent environmental toxic pollutants. Most of the TCDD toxicities are mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix-Per-ARNT-Sim (bHLH-PAS) family. Upon ligand binding, AhR forms a heterodimer with AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and induces the expression of genes involved in various biological responses. One of the genes induced by AhR encodes AhR repressor (AhRR), which also forms a heterodimer with ARNT and represses the activation of AhR-dependent transcription. The control of AhR activation is critical for managing AhR-mediated diseases, but the mechanisms by which AhRR represses AhR activation remain poorly understood, due to the lack of structural information. Here, we determined the structure of the AhRR/ARNT heterodimer by X-ray crystallography, which revealed an asymmetric intertwined domain organization presenting structural features that are both conserved and distinct among bHLH-PAS family members. The structures of AhRR/ARNT and AhR/ARNT were similar in the bHLH-PAS-A region, while the PAS-B of ARNT in the AhRR/ARNT complex exhibited a different domain arrangement in this family reported so far. The structure clearly disclosed that AhRR competitively represses AhR binding to ARNT and target DNA, and further suggested the existence of an AhRR/ARNT-specific repression mechanism. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the mechanism by which AhRR represses AhR-mediated gene transcription. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  10. Crystal structure of ruthenocenecarbonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Strehler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The molecular structure of ruthenocenecarbonitrile, [Ru(η5-C5H4C[triple-bond]N(η5-C5H5], exhibits point group symmetry m, with the mirror plane bisecting the molecule through the C[triple-bond]N substituent. The RuII atom is slightly shifted from the η5-C5H4 centroid towards the C[triple-bond]N substituent. In the crystal, molecules are arranged in columns parallel to [100]. One-dimensional intermolecular π–π interactions [3.363 (3 Å] between the C[triple-bond]N carbon atom and one carbon of the cyclopentadienyl ring of the overlaying molecule are present.

  11. Crystal structure of propaquizafop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngeun Jeon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C22H22ClN3O5 {systematic name: 2-(propan-2-ylideneaminooxyethyl (R-2-[4-(6-chloroquinoxalin-2-yloxyphenoxy]propionate}, is a herbicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules in which the dihedral angles between the phenyl ring and the quinoxaline ring plane are 75.93 (7 and 82.77 (8°. The crystal structure features C—H...O, C—H...N, and C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, as well as weak π–π interactions [ring-centroid separation = 3.782 (2 and 3.5952 (19 Å], resulting in a three-dimensional architecture.

  12. Crystal Structure of a Thermostable Alanine Racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 Reveals the Role of Gln360 in Substrate Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoliang; He, Guangzheng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Shujing; Ju, Jiansong; Xu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent alanine racemase catalyzes racemization of L-Ala to D-Ala, a key component of the peptidoglycan network in bacterial cell wall. It has been extensively studied as an important antimicrobial drug target due to its restriction in eukaryotes. However, many marketed alanine racemase inhibitors also act on eukaryotic PLP-dependent enzymes and cause side effects. A thermostable alanine racemase (AlrTt) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 contains an evolutionarily non-conserved residue Gln360 in inner layer of the substrate entryway, which is supposed to be a key determinant in substrate specificity. Here we determined the crystal structure of AlrTt in complex with L-Ala at 2.7 Å resolution, and investigated the role of Gln360 by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Compared to typical bacterial alanine racemase, presence of Gln360 and conformational changes of active site residues disrupted the hydrogen bonding interactions necessary for proper PLP immobilization, and decreased both the substrate affinity and turnover number of AlrTt. However, it could be complemented by introduction of hydrophobic amino acids at Gln360, through steric blocking and interactions with a hydrophobic patch near active site pocket. These observations explained the low racemase activity of AlrTt, revealed the essential role of Gln360 in substrate selection, and its preference for hydrophobic amino acids especially Tyr in bacterial alanine racemization. Our work will contribute new insights into the alanine racemization mechanism for antimicrobial drug development.

  13. Crystal Structure of a Thermostable Alanine Racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 Reveals the Role of Gln360 in Substrate Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Sun

    Full Text Available Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP dependent alanine racemase catalyzes racemization of L-Ala to D-Ala, a key component of the peptidoglycan network in bacterial cell wall. It has been extensively studied as an important antimicrobial drug target due to its restriction in eukaryotes. However, many marketed alanine racemase inhibitors also act on eukaryotic PLP-dependent enzymes and cause side effects. A thermostable alanine racemase (AlrTt from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 contains an evolutionarily non-conserved residue Gln360 in inner layer of the substrate entryway, which is supposed to be a key determinant in substrate specificity. Here we determined the crystal structure of AlrTt in complex with L-Ala at 2.7 Å resolution, and investigated the role of Gln360 by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Compared to typical bacterial alanine racemase, presence of Gln360 and conformational changes of active site residues disrupted the hydrogen bonding interactions necessary for proper PLP immobilization, and decreased both the substrate affinity and turnover number of AlrTt. However, it could be complemented by introduction of hydrophobic amino acids at Gln360, through steric blocking and interactions with a hydrophobic patch near active site pocket. These observations explained the low racemase activity of AlrTt, revealed the essential role of Gln360 in substrate selection, and its preference for hydrophobic amino acids especially Tyr in bacterial alanine racemization. Our work will contribute new insights into the alanine racemization mechanism for antimicrobial drug development.

  14. Crystal structures of yeast beta-alanine synthase complexes reveal the mode of substrate binding and large scale domain closure movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piskur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-12-07

    Beta-alanine synthase is the final enzyme of the reductive pyrimidine catabolic pathway, which is responsible for the breakdown of uracil and thymine in higher organisms. The fold of the homodimeric enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri identifies it as a member of the AcyI/M20 family of metallopeptidases. Its subunit consists of a catalytic domain harboring a di-zinc center and a smaller dimerization domain. The present site-directed mutagenesis studies identify Glu(159) and Arg(322) as crucial for catalysis and His(262) and His(397) as functionally important but not essential. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type beta-alanine synthase in complex with the reaction product beta-alanine, and of the mutant E159A with the substrate N-carbamyl-beta-alanine, revealing the closed state of a dimeric AcyI/M20 metallopeptidase-like enzyme. Subunit closure is achieved by a approximately 30 degrees rigid body domain rotation, which completes the active site by integration of substrate binding residues that belong to the dimerization domain of the same or the partner subunit. Substrate binding is achieved via a salt bridge, a number of hydrogen bonds, and coordination to one of the zinc ions of the di-metal center.

  15. Crystal structure of Yersinia pestis virulence factor YfeA reveals two polyspecific metal-binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radka, Christopher D.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, Landon S.; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Perry, Robert D.; Aller, Stephen G.

    2017-06-30

    Gram-negative bacteria use siderophores, outer membrane receptors, inner membrane transporters and substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) to transport transition metals through the periplasm. The SBPs share a similar protein fold that has undergone significant structural evolution to communicate with a variety of differentially regulated transporters in the cell. InYersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, YfeA (YPO2439, y1897), an SBP, is important for full virulence during mammalian infection. To better understand the role of YfeA in infection, crystal structures were determined under several environmental conditions with respect to transition-metal levels. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and anomalous X-ray scattering data show that YfeA is polyspecific and can alter its substrate specificity. In minimal-media experiments, YfeA crystals grown after iron supplementation showed a threefold increase in iron fluorescence emission over the iron fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions, and YfeA crystals grown after manganese supplementation during overexpression showed a fivefold increase in manganese fluorescence emission over the manganese fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions. In all experiments, the YfeA crystals produced the strongest fluorescence emission from zinc and could not be manipulated otherwise. Additionally, this report documents the discovery of a novel surface metal-binding site that prefers to chelate zinc but can also bind manganese. Flexibility across YfeA crystal forms in three loops and a helix near the buried metal-binding site suggest that a structural rearrangement is required for metal loading and unloading.

  16. Crystal structure of an affinity-matured prolactin complexed to its dimerized receptor reveals the topology of hormone binding site 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broutin, Isabelle; Jomain, Jean-Baptiste; Tallet, Estelle;

    2010-01-01

    We report the first crystal structure of a 1:2 hormone.receptor complex that involves prolactin (PRL) as the ligand, at 3.8-A resolution. Stable ternary complexes were obtained by generating affinity-matured PRL variants harboring an N-terminal tail from ovine placental lactogen, a closely relate...

  17. Modes of Heme-Binding and Substrate Access for Cytochrome P450 CYP74A Revealed by Crystal Structures of Allene Oxide Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytochrome P450s exist ubiquitously in all organisms and are involved in many biological processes. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a P450 enzyme that plays a key role in the biosynthesis of oxylipin jasmonates which are involved in signal and defense reactions in higher plants. The crystal structure...

  18. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  19. High resolution crystal structures of unliganded and liganded human liver ACBP reveal a new mode of binding for the acyl-CoA ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskinen, Jukka P; van Aalten, Daan M; Knudsen, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is essential for the fatty acid metabolism, membrane structure, membrane fusion, and ceramide synthesis. Here high resolution crystal structures of human cytosolic liver ACBP, unliganded and liganded with a physiological ligand, myristoyl-CoA are described....... The binding of the acyl-CoA molecule induces only few structural differences near the binding pocket. The crystal form of the liganded ACBP, which has two ACBP molecules in the asymmetric unit, shows that in human ACBP the same acyl-CoA binding pocket is present as previously described for the bovine...... and Plasmodium falciparum ACBP and the mode of binding of the 3'-phosphate-AMP moiety is conserved. Unexpectedly, in one of the acyl-CoA binding pockets the acyl moiety is bound in a reversed mode as compared with the bovine and P. falciparum structures. In this binding mode, the myristoyl-CoA molecule is fully...

  20. Crystal structure of fipronil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjin Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C12H4Cl2F6N4OS {systematic name: 5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethylphenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethanesulfinyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile}, is a member of the phenylpyrazole group of acaricides, and one of the phenylpyrazole group of insecticides. The dihedral angle between the planes of the pyrazole and benzene rings is 89.03 (9°. The fluorine atoms of the trifluoromethyl substituent on the benzene ring are disordered over two sets of sites, with occupancy ratios 0.620 (15:0.380 (15. In the crystal, C—N...π interactions [N...ring centroid = 3.607 (4 Å] together with N—H...N and C—H...F hydrogen bonds form a looped chain structure along [10\\overline{1}]. Finally, N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—Cl...π interactions [Cl...ring centroid = 3.5159 (16 Å] generate a three-dimensional structure. Additionally, there are a short intermolecular F... F contacts present.

  1. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, T

    2001-01-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of parac...

  2. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF DIPHENYLTELLURIUM DIBROMIDE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TELLURIUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , BROMIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), X RAY DIFFRACTION, FOURIER ANALYSIS, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS.

  3. REFINEMENT OF THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF GUANIDINIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE HEXAHYDRATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS, * CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*GUANIDINES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), SULFATES, HYDRATES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS

  4. Demonstration of Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment where equal parts of copper and aluminum are heated then cooled to show extremely large crystals. Suggestions are given for changing the orientation of crystals by varying cooling rates. Students are more receptive to concepts of microstructure after seeing this experiment. (DH)

  5. Crystal structure of oxamyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjin Kwon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C7H13N3O3S [systematic name: (Z-methyl 2-dimethylamino-N-(methylcarbamoyloxy-2-oxoethanimidothioate], is an oxime carbamate acaride, insecticide and nematicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules, A and B. The dihedral angles between the mean planes [r.m.s. deviations = 0.0017 (A and 0.0016 Å (B] of the acetamide and oxyimino groups are 88.80 (8° for A and 87.05 (8° for B. In the crystal, N/C—H...O hydrogen bonds link adjacent molecules, forming chains along the a axis. The chains are further linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional network with alternating rows of A and B molecules in the bc plane stacked along the a-axis direction. The structure was refined as an inversion twin with a final BASF parameter of 0.16 (9.

  6. Crystal Structure of Barley Limit Dextrinase-Limit Dextrinase Inhibitor (LD-LDI) Complex Reveals Insights into Mechanism and Diversity of Cereal Type Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Jensen, Johanne M.

    2015-01-01

    , and its endogenous inhibitor (LDI) was solved at 2.7 Å. The structure reveals an entirely new and unexpected binding mode of LDI as compared with previously solved complex structures of related cereal type family inhibitors (CTIs) bound to glycoside hydrolases but is structurally analogous to binding...

  7. High-resolution crystal structure reveals a HEPN domain at the C-terminal region of S. cerevisiae RNA endonuclease Swt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Shuxia, E-mail: pengsx@ihep.ac.cn; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Wenjia; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Liu, Quansheng

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 was determined at 2.3 Å. • Structure of the CT domain was identified as HEPN domain superfamily member. • Low-resolution envelope of Swt1 full-length in solution was analyzed by SAXS. • The middle and CT domains gave good fit to SAXS structural model. - Abstract: Swt1 is an RNA endonuclease that plays an important role in quality control of nuclear messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in eukaryotes; however, its structural details remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which shares common characteristics of higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide binding (HEPN) domain superfamily. To study in detail the full-length protein structure, we analyzed the low-resolution architecture of Swt1 in solution using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. Both the CT domain and middle domain exhibited a good fit upon superimposing onto the molecular envelope of Swt1. Our study provides the necessary structural information for detailed analysis of the functional role of Swt1, and its importance in the process of nuclear mRNP surveillance.

  8. Crystal Structures of Aspergillus japonicus Fructosyltransferase Complex with Donor/Acceptor Substrates Reveal Complete Subsites in the Active Site for Catalysis*

    OpenAIRE

    Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Hsieh, Chih-Yu; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Hsieh, Yi-You; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Tien, Yueh-Chu; Chen, Chung-De; Chiang, Chien-Min; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Fructosyltransferases catalyze the transfer of a fructose unit from one sucrose/fructan to another and are engaged in the production of fructooligosaccharide/fructan. The enzymes belong to the glycoside hydrolase family 32 (GH32) with a retaining catalytic mechanism. Here we describe the crystal structures of recombinant fructosyltransferase (AjFT) from Aspergillus japonicus CB05 and its mutant D191A complexes with various donor/acceptor substrates, including sucrose, 1-kestose, nystose, and ...

  9. Crystal structure of meteoritic schreibersites: determination of absolute structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, Roman; Císařová, Ivana

    Minerals of the schreibersite nickelphosphide series (Fe,Ni)3P crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric space group Ibar 4. As a consequence, they can possess two different spatial arrangements of the constituting atoms within the unit cell, related by the inversion symmetry operation. Here, we present the crystal structure refinements from single crystal X-ray diffraction data for schreibersite grains from iron meteorites Acuña, Carlton, Hex River Mts. (three different crystals), Odessa (two different crystals), Sikhote Alin, and Toluca aiming for the determination of the absolute structure of the examined crystals. The crystals studied cover the composition range from 58 mol% to 80 mol% Fe3P end-member. Unit-cell parameter a and volume of the unit cell V, as well as certain topological structural parameters tightly correlate with Fe3P content. Unit-cell parameter c, on the other hand, does not show such strong correlation. Eight of the nine crystal structure refinements allowed unambiguous absolute structure assignment. The single crystal extracted from Toluca is, however, of poor quality and consequently the structure refinement did not provide as good results as the rest of the materials. Also, this crystal has only weak inversion distinguishing power to provide unequivocal absolute structure determination. Six of the eight unambiguous absolute structure determinations indicated inverted atomic arrangement compared to that reported in earlier structure refinements (here called standard). Only two grains, one taken from Odessa iron and the other from the Hex River Mts. meteorite, reveal the dominance of standard crystal structure setting.

  10. The crystal structure of ferritin from Chlorobium tepidum reveals a new conformation of the 4-fold channel for this protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Townsend, Philip D; Brito, Christian; Marquez, Valeria; Marabolli, Vanessa; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Matias, Cata; Watt, Richard K; López-Castro, Juan D; Domínguez-Vera, José; Pohl, Ehmke; Yévenes, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous iron-storage proteins found in all kingdoms of life. They share a common architecture made of 24 subunits of five α-helices. The recombinant Chlorobium tepidum ferritin (rCtFtn) is a structurally interesting protein since sequence alignments with other ferritins show that this protein has a significantly extended C-terminus, which possesses 12 histidine residues as well as several aspartate and glutamic acid residues that are potential metal ion binding residues. We show that the macromolecular assembly of rCtFtn exhibits a cage-like hollow shell consisting of 24 monomers that are related by 4-3-2 symmetry; similar to the assembly of other ferritins. In all ferritins of known structure the short fifth α-helix adopts an acute angle with respect to the four-helix bundle. However, the crystal structure of the rCtFtn presented here shows that this helix adopts a new conformation defining a new assembly of the 4-fold channel of rCtFtn. This conformation allows the arrangement of the C-terminal region into the inner cavity of the protein shell. Furthermore, two Fe(III) ions were found in each ferroxidase center of rCtFtn, with an average FeA-FeB distance of 3 Å; corresponding to a diferric μ-oxo/hydroxo species. This is the first ferritin crystal structure with an isolated di-iron center in an iron-storage ferritin. The crystal structure of rCtFtn and the biochemical results presented here, suggests that rCtFtn presents similar biochemical properties reported for other members of this protein family albeit with distinct structural plasticity.

  11. New protein fold revealed by a 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island protein IglC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Schubot, Florian D.; Waugh, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes the fulminating disease tularemia and is considered to be a potential bioweapon. F. tularensis pathogenicity island proteins play a key role in modulating phagosome biogenesis and subsequent bacterial escape into the cytoplasm of macrophages. The 23 kDa pathogenicity island protein IglC is essential for the survival and proliferation of F. tularensis in macrophages. Seeking to gain some insight into its function, we determined the crystal structure of IglC at 1.65 Å resolution. IglC adopts a β-sandwich conformation that exhibits no similarity with any known protein structure. PMID:17905833

  12. Crystal Structures of the Helicobacter pylori MTAN Enzyme Reveal Specific Interactions between S-Adenosylhomocysteine and the 5'-Alkylthio Binding Subsite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Vidhi [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Ronning, Donald R. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2012-11-13

    The bacterial 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzyme is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-ribosidic bond of at least four different adenosine-based metabolites: S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), 5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-DOA), and 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine. These activities place the enzyme at the hub of seven fundamental bacterial metabolic pathways: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) utilization, polyamine biosynthesis, the purine salvage pathway, the methionine salvage pathway, the SAM radical pathways, autoinducer-2 biosynthesis, and menaquinone biosynthesis. The last pathway makes MTAN essential for Helicobacter pylori viability. Although structures of various bacterial and plant MTANs have been described, the interactions between the homocysteine moiety of SAH and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of MTAN have never been resolved. We have determined crystal structures of an inactive mutant form of H. pylori MTAN bound to MTA and SAH to 1.63 and 1.20 Å, respectively. The active form of MTAN was also crystallized in the presence of SAH, allowing the determination of the structure of a ternary enzyme–product complex resolved at 1.50 Å. These structures identify interactions between the homocysteine moiety and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of the enzyme. This information can be leveraged for the development of species-specific MTAN inhibitors that prevent the growth of H. pylori.

  13. Crystal structure of the Habc domain of neuronal syntaxin from the squid Loligo pealei reveals conformational plasticity at its C-terminus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracher Andreas

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular membrane fusion processes are mediated by the spatial and temporal control of SNARE complex assembly that results in the formation of a four-helical bundle, composed of one vesicle SNARE and three target membrane SNARE polypeptide chains. Syntaxins are essential t-SNAREs and are characterized by an N-terminal Habc domain, a flexible linker region, a coiled-coil or SNARE motif and a membrane anchor. The N-terminal Habc domain fulfills important regulatory functions while the coiled-coil motif, present in all SNAREs, is sufficient for SNARE complex formation, which is thought to drive membrane fusion. Results Here we report the crystal structure of the Habc domain of neuronal syntaxin from the squid Loligo pealei, s-syntaxin. Squid Habc crystallizes as a dimer and the monomer structure consists of a three-helical bundle. One molecule is strikingly similar to mammalian syntaxin 1A while the second one shows a structural deviation from the common fold in that the C-terminal part of helix C unwinds and adopts an extended conformation. Conclusion Conservation of surface residues indicates that the cytosolic part of s-syntaxin can adopt an auto-inhibitory closed conformation that may bind squid neuronal Sec1, s-Sec1, in the same manner as observed in structure of the rat nSec1/syntaxin 1A complex. Furthermore, despite the overall structural similarity, the observed changes at the C-terminus of one molecule indicate structural plasticity in neuronal syntaxin. Implications of the structural conservation and the changes are discussed with respect to potential Habc domain binding partners such as Munc13, which facilitates the transition from the closed to the open conformation.

  14. Crystal structure of full-length Zika virus NS5 protein reveals a conformation similar to Japanese encephalitis virus NS5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Anup K.; Longenecker, Kenton; Tripathi, Rakesh; Sun, Chaohong; Kempf, Dale J.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid spread of the recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic across various countries in the American continent poses a major health hazard for the unborn fetuses of pregnant women. To date, there is no effective medical intervention. The nonstructural protein 5 of Zika virus (ZIKV-NS5) is critical for ZIKV replication through the 5′-RNA capping and RNA polymerase activities present in its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase) and C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, respectively. The crystal structure of the full-length ZIKV-NS5 protein has been determined at 3.05 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group P21212 and containing two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure is similar to that reported for the NS5 protein from Japanese encephalitis virus and suggests opportunities for structure-based drug design targeting either its MTase or RdRp domain. PMID:28291746

  15. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Theresa

    2001-07-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of paracetamol (acetaminophen), the influence of the variations of the molecular model on the crystal structure lattice energy minima, has also been studied. The general problem of prediction methods based on the assumption that the experimental thermodynamically stable polymorph corresponds to the global lattice energy minimum, is that more hypothetical low lattice energy structures are found within a few kJ mol{sup -1} of the global minimum than are likely to be experimentally observed polymorphs. This is illustrated by the results for molecule I, 3-oxabicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-1,4-diene, studied for the first international blindtest for small organic crystal structures organised by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) in May 1999. To reduce the number of predicted polymorphs, additional factors to thermodynamic criteria have to be considered. Therefore the elastic constants and vapour growth morphologies have been calculated for the lowest lattice energy

  16. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  17. Crystal structure of the functional region of Uro-adherence factor A from Staphylococcus saprophyticus reveals participation of the B domain in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Eriko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Makoto; Shouji, Yuko; Ohta, Toshiko; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococci use cell wall-anchored proteins as adhesins to attach to host tissues. Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a uropathogenic species, has a unique cell wall-anchored protein, uro-adherence factor A (UafA), which shows erythrocyte binding activity. To investigate the mechanism of adhesion by UafA, we determined the crystal structure of the functional region of UafA at 1.5 Å resolution. The structure was composed of three domains, designated as the N2, N3, and B domains, arranged in a triangular relative configuration. Hemagglutination inhibition assay with domain-truncated mutants indicated that both N and B domains were necessary for erythrocyte binding. Based on these results, a novel manner of ligand binding in which the B domain acts as a functional domain was proposed as the adhesion mechanism of S. saprophyticus.

  18. Crystal Structures of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 From Penicillin-Susceptible And -Resistant Strains of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Reveal An Unexpectedly Subtle Mechanism for Antibiotic Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, A.J.; Tomberg, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Nicholas, R.A.; Davies, C.

    2009-05-21

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from N. gonorrhoeae is the major molecular target for {beta}-lactam antibiotics used to treat gonococcal infections. PBP2 from penicillin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae harbors an aspartate insertion after position 345 (Asp-345a) and 4-8 additional mutations, but how these alter the architecture of the protein is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-susceptible strain FA19, which shows that the likely effect of Asp-345a is to alter a hydrogen-bonding network involving Asp-346 and the SXN triad at the active site. We have also solved the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140 that contains four mutations near the C terminus of the protein. Although these mutations lower the second order rate of acylation for penicillin by 5-fold relative to wild type, comparison of the two structures shows only minor structural differences, with the positions of the conserved residues in the active site essentially the same in both. Kinetic analyses indicate that two mutations, P551S and F504L, are mainly responsible for the decrease in acylation rate. Melting curves show that the four mutations lower the thermal stability of the enzyme. Overall, these data suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying antibiotic resistance contributed by the four mutations is subtle and involves a small but measurable disordering of residues in the active site region that either restricts the binding of antibiotic or impedes conformational changes that are required for acylation by {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  19. Crystal structure of cafenstrole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gihaeng Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: N,N-diethyl-3-mesitylsulfonyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-carboxamide, C16H22N4O3S, is a triazole herbicide. The dihedral angle between the planes of the triazole and benzene ring planes is 88.14 (10°. In the crystal, C—H...O hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...π interactions link adjacent molecules, forming one-dimensional chains along the a axis.

  20. Crystal structure of pseudoguainolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Beghidja

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lactone ring in the title molecule, C15H22O3 (systematic name: 3,4a,8-trimethyldodecahydroazuleno[6,5-b]furan-2,5-dione, assumes an envelope conformation with the methine C atom adjacent to the the methine C atom carrying the methyl substituent being the flap atom. The other five-membered ring adopts a twisted conformation with the twist being about the methine–methylene C—C bond. The seven-membered ring is based on a twisted boat conformation. No specific interactions are noted in the the crystal packing.

  1. The crystal structure of the calcium-bound con-G[Q6A] peptide reveals a novel metal-dependent helical trimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cnudde, Sara E.; Prorok, Mary; Jia, Xaofei; Castellino, Francis J.; Geiger, James H. (MSU); (Notre)

    2012-02-15

    The ability to form and control both secondary structure and oligomerization in short peptides has proven to be challenging owing to the structural instability of such peptides. The conantokin peptides are a family of {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid containing peptides produced in the venoms of predatory sea snails of the Conus family. They are examples of short peptides that form stable helical structures, especially in the presence of divalent cations. Both monomeric and dimeric conantokin peptides have been identified and represent a new mechanism of helix association, 'the metallozipper motif' that is devoid of a hydrophobic interface between monomers. In the present study, a parallel/antiparallel three-helix bundle was identified and its crystal structure determined at high resolution. The three helices are almost perfectly parallel and represent a novel helix-helix association. The trimer interface is dominated by metal chelation between the three helices, and contains no interfacial hydrophobic interactions. It is now possible to produce stable monomeric, dimeric, or trimeric metallozippers depending on the peptide sequence and metal ion. Such structures have important applications in protein design.

  2. The crystal structure of human IRE1 luminal domain reveals a conserved dimerization interface required for activation of the unfolded protein response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiahai; Liu, Chuan Yin; Back, Sung Hoon; Clark, Robert L.; Peisach, Daniel; Xu, Zhaohui; Kaufman, Randal J. (Michigan)

    2010-03-08

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which all eukaryotic cells adapt to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1) and PKR-related ER kinase (PERK) are two type I transmembrane ER-localized protein kinase receptors that signal the UPR through a process that involves homodimerization and autophosphorylation. To elucidate the molecular basis of the ER transmembrane signaling event, we determined the x-ray crystal structure of the luminal domain of human IRE1{alpha}. The monomer of the luminal domain comprises a unique fold of a triangular assembly of {beta}-sheet clusters. Structural analysis identified an extensive dimerization interface stabilized by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Dimerization creates an MHC-like groove at the interface. However, because this groove is too narrow for peptide binding and the purified luminal domain forms high-affinity dimers in vitro, peptide binding to this groove is not required for dimerization. Consistent with our structural observations, mutations that disrupt the dimerization interface produced IRE1{alpha} molecules that failed to either dimerize or activate the UPR upon ER stress. In addition, mutations in a structurally homologous region within PERK also prevented dimerization. Our structural, biochemical, and functional studies in vivo altogether demonstrate that IRE1 and PERK have conserved a common molecular interface necessary and sufficient for dimerization and UPR signaling.

  3. Crystal structure of nuarimol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gihaeng Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: (RS-(2-chlorophenyl(4-fluorophenyl(pyrimidin-5-ylmethanol], C17H12ClFN2O, is a pyrimidine fungicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules, A and B, in which the dihedral angles between the plane of the pyrimidine ring and those of the chlorophenyl and fluorophenyl rings are 71.10 (6 and 70.04 (5° in molecule A, and 73.24 (5 and 89.30 (5° in molecule B. In the crystal, O—H...N hydrogen bonds link the components into [010] chains of alternating A and B molecules. The chains are cross-linked by C—H...F hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...π and C—Cl...π [Cl...ring centroid = 3.7630 (8 Å] interactions, generating a three-dimensional network.

  4. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrick, George M

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as `a CIF') containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  5. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstraße 4, Göttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  6. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  7. Crystal structure of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ cyclic nucleotide-binding-B domain : Rp-cGMPS complex reveals an apo-like, inactive conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James C; VanSchouwen, Bryan; Lorenz, Robin; Sankaran, Banumathi; Herberg, Friedrich W; Melacini, Giuseppe; Kim, Choel

    2017-01-01

    The R-diastereomer of phosphorothioate analogs of cGMP, Rp-cGMPS, is one of few known inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKG I); however, its mechanism of inhibition is currently not fully understood. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the PKG Iβ cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (PKG Iβ CNB-B), considered a 'gatekeeper' for cGMP activation, bound to Rp-cGMPS at 1.3 Å. Our structural and NMR data show that PKG Iβ CNB-B bound to Rp-cGMPS displays an apo-like structure with its helical domain in an open conformation. Comparison with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit (PKA RIα) showed that this conformation resembles the catalytic subunit-bound inhibited state of PKA RIα more closely than the apo or Rp-cAMPS-bound conformations. These results suggest that Rp-cGMPS inhibits PKG I by stabilizing the inactive conformation of CNB-B. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Crystal Structure of Jun a 1, the Major Cedar Pollen Allergen from Juniperus ashei, Reveals a Parallel β-Helical Core*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Edmund W.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; White, Mark A.; Brooks, Edward G.; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2008-01-01

    Pollen from cedar and cypress trees is a major cause of seasonal hypersensitivity in humans in several regions of the Northern Hemisphere. We report the first crystal structure of a cedar allergen, Jun a 1, from the pollen of the mountain cedar Juniperus ashei (Cupressaceae). The core of the structure consists primarily of a parallel β-helix, which is nearly identical to that found in the pectin/pectate lyases from several plant pathogenic microorganisms. Four IgE epitopes mapped to the surface of the protein are accessible to the solvent. The conserved vWiDH sequence is covered by the first 30 residues of the N terminus. The potential reactive arginine, analogous to the pectin/pectate lyase reaction site, is accessible to the solvent, but the substrate binding groove is blocked by a histidine-aspartate salt bridge, a glutamine, and an α-helix, all of which are unique to Jun a 1. These observations suggest that steric hindrance in Jun a 1 precludes enzyme activity. The overall results suggest that it is the structure of Jun a 1 that makes it a potent allergen. PMID:15539389

  9. Crystal structure, SAXS and kinetic mechanism of hyperthermophilic ADP-dependent glucokinase from Thermococcus litoralis reveal a conserved mechanism for catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Andrés Rivas-Pardo

    Full Text Available ADP-dependent glucokinases represent a unique family of kinases that belong to the ribokinase superfamily, being present mainly in hyperthermophilic archaea. For these enzymes there is no agreement about the magnitude of the structural transitions associated with ligand binding and whether they are meaningful to the function of the enzyme. We used the ADP-dependent glucokinase from Thermococcus litoralis as a model to investigate the conformational changes observed in X-ray crystallographic structures upon substrate binding and to compare them with those determined in solution in order to understand their interplay with the glucokinase function. Initial velocity studies indicate that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism that correlates with the structural transitions experienced by the enzyme in solution and in the crystal state. The combined data allowed us to resolve the open-closed conformational transition that accounts for the complete reaction cycle and to identify the corresponding clusters of aminoacids residues responsible for it. These results provide molecular bases for a general mechanism conserved across the ADP-dependent kinase family.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Zinc-Binding Transport Protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli Reveals an Unexpected Variation in Metal Coordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,H.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette transport systems for high-affinity uptake of zinc and manganese use a cluster 9 solute-binding protein. Structures of four cluster 9 transport proteins have been determined previously. However, the structural determinants for discrimination between zinc and manganese remain under discussion. To further investigate the variability of metal binding sites in bacterial transporters, we have determined the structure of the zinc-bound transport protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The overall structure of ZnuA is similar to other solute-binding transporters. A scaffolding {alpha}-helix forms the backbone for two structurally related globular domains. The metal-binding site is located at the domain interface. The bound zinc ion is coordinated by three histidine residues (His78, His161 and His225) and one glutamate residue (Glu77). The functional role of Glu77 for metal binding is unexpected, because this residue is not conserved in previously determined structures of zinc and manganese-specific transport proteins. The observed metal coordination by four protein residues differs significantly from the zinc-binding site in the ZnuA transporter from Synechocystis 6803, which binds zinc via three histidine residues. In addition, the E. coli ZnuA structure reveals the presence of a disulfide bond in the C-terminal globular domain that is not present in previously determined cluster 9 transport protein structures.

  11. Crystal structure of pymetrozine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngeun Jeon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C10H11N5O {systematic name: 6-methyl-4-[(E-(pyridin-3-ylmethylideneamino]-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-3(2H-one}, C10H11N5O, is used as an antifeedant in pest control. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules, A and B, in which the dihedral angles between the pyridinyl and triazinyl ring planes [r.m.s. deviations = 0.0132 and 0.0255 ] are 11.60 (6 and 18.06 (4°, respectively. In the crystal, N—H...O, N—H...N, C—H...N and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, together with weak π–π interactions [ring-centroid separations = 3.5456 (9 and 3.9142 (9 Å], link the pyridinyl and triazinyl rings of A molecules, generating a three-dimensional network.

  12. Regio- and stereospecificity of filipin hydroxylation sites revealed by crystal structures of cytochrome P450 105P1 and 105D6 from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lian-Hua; Fushinobu, Shinya; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Ikeda, Haruo; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2010-05-28

    The polyene macrolide antibiotic filipin is widely used as a probe for cholesterol and a diagnostic tool for type C Niemann-Pick disease. Two position-specific P450 enzymes are involved in the post-polyketide modification of filipin during its biosynthesis, thereby providing molecular diversity to the "filipin complex." CYP105P1 and CYP105D6 from Streptomyces avermitilis, despite their high sequence similarities, catalyze filipin hydroxylation at different positions, C26 and C1', respectively. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the CYP105P1-filipin I complex. The distal pocket of CYP105P1 has the second largest size among P450 hydroxylases that act on macrolide substrates. Compared with previously determined substrate-free structures, the FG helices showed significant closing motion on substrate binding. The long BC loop region adopts a unique extended conformation without a B' helix. The binding site is essentially hydrophobic, but numerous water molecules are involved in recognizing the polyol side of the substrate. Therefore, the distal pocket of CYP105P1 provides a specific environment for the large filipin substrate to bind with its pro-S side of position C26 directed toward the heme iron. The ligand-free CYP105D6 structure was also determined. A small sub-pocket accommodating the long alkyl side chain of filipin I was observed in the CYP105P1 structure but was absent in the CYP105D6 structure, indicating that filipin cannot bind to CYP105D6 with a similar orientation due to steric hindrance. This observation can explain the strict regiospecificity of these enzymes.

  13. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Frias, Janice A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wilmot, Carrie M. (UMM)

    2012-10-25

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short {beta}-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117{beta}) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly

  14. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goblirsch, BR; Frias, JA; Wackett, LP; Wilmot, CM

    2012-05-22

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acylcoenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short beta-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117 beta) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly, Glu117

  15. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  16. The Crystal Structure of the Extracellular 11-heme Cytochrome UndA Reveals a Conserved 10-heme Motif and Defined Binding Site for Soluble Iron Chelates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Marcus; Hall, Andrea; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-07-03

    Members of the genus Shewanella translocate deca- or undeca-heme cytochromes to the external cell surface thus enabling respiration using extracellular minerals and polynuclear Fe(III) chelates. The high resolution structure of the first undeca-heme outer membrane cytochrome, UndA, reveals a crossed heme chain with four potential electron ingress/egress sites arranged within four domains. Sequence and structural alignment of UndA and the deca-heme MtrF reveals the extra heme of UndA is inserted between MtrF hemes 6 and 7. The remaining UndA hemes can be superposed over the heme chain of the decaheme MtrF, suggesting that a ten heme core is conserved between outer membrane cytochromes. The UndA structure is the first outer membrane cytochrome to be crystallographically resolved in complex with substrates, an Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetate dimer or an Fe(III)-citrate trimer. The structural resolution of these UndA-Fe(III)-chelate complexes provides a rationale for previous kinetic measurements on UndA and other outer membrane cytochromes.

  17. Crystal structure of the human LRH-1 DBD-DNA complex reveals Ftz-F1 domain positioning is required for receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Isaac H; Hager, Janet M; Safi, Rachid; McDonnell, Donald P; Redinbo, Matthew R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2005-12-16

    The DNA-binding and ligand-binding functions of nuclear receptors are localized to independent domains separated by a flexible hinge. The DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the human liver receptor homologue-1 (hLRH-1), which controls genes central to development and metabolic homeostasis, interacts with monomeric DNA response elements and contains an Ftz-F1 motif that is unique to the NR5A nuclear receptor subfamily. Here, we present the 2.2A resolution crystal structure of the hLRH-1 DBD in complex with duplex DNA, and elucidate the sequence-specific DNA contacts essential for the ability of LRH-1 to bind to DNA as a monomer. We show that the unique Ftz-F1 domain folds into a novel helix that packs against the DBD but does not contact DNA. Mutations expected to disrupt the positioning of the Ftz-F1 helix do not eliminate DNA binding but reduce the transcriptional activity of full-length LRH-1 significantly. Moreover, we find that altering the Ftz-F1 helix positioning eliminates the enhancement of LRH-1-mediated transcription by the coactivator GRIP1, an action that is associated primarily with the distantly located ligand-binding domain (LBD). Taken together, these results indicate that subtle structural changes in a nuclear receptor DBD can exert long-range functional effects on the LBD of a receptor, and significantly impact transcriptional regulation.

  18. The crystal structure of a homodimeric Pseudomonas glyoxalase I enzyme reveals asymmetric metallation commensurate with half-of-sites activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell-Douglas, Rohan; Suttisansanee, Uthaiwan; Flematti, Gavin R; Challenor, Michael; Lee, Mihwa; Panjikar, Santosh; Honek, John F; Bond, Charles S

    2015-01-07

    The Zn inactive class of glyoxalase I (Glo1) metalloenzymes are typically homodimeric with two metal-dependent active sites. While the two active sites share identical amino acid composition, this class of enzyme is optimally active with only one metal per homodimer. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of GloA2, a Zn inactive Glo1 enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The presented structures exhibit an unprecedented metal-binding arrangement consistent with half-of-sites activity: one active site contains a single activating Ni(2+) ion, whereas the other contains two inactivating Zn(2+) ions. Enzymological experiments prompted by the binuclear Zn(2+) site identified a novel catalytic property of GloA2. The enzyme can function as a Zn(2+) /Co(2+) -dependent hydrolase, in addition to its previously determined glyoxalase I activity. The presented findings demonstrate that GloA2 can accommodate two distinct metal-binding arrangements simultaneously, each of which catalyzes a different reaction.

  19. Initiation factor 2 crystal structure reveals a different domain organization from eukaryotic initiation factor 5B and mechanism among translational GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, Daniel; Lin, Jinzhong; Simonetti, Angelita; Klaholz, Bruno P; Steitz, Thomas A

    2013-09-24

    The initiation of protein synthesis uses initiation factor 2 (IF2) in prokaryotes and a related protein named eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) in eukaryotes. IF2 is a GTPase that positions the initiator tRNA on the 30S ribosomal initiation complex and stimulates its assembly to the 50S ribosomal subunit to make the 70S ribosome. The 3.1-Å resolution X-ray crystal structures of the full-length Thermus thermophilus apo IF2 and its complex with GDP presented here exhibit two different conformations (all of its domains except C2 domain are visible). Unlike all other translational GTPases, IF2 does not have an effecter domain that stably contacts the switch II region of the GTPase domain. The domain organization of IF2 is inconsistent with the "articulated lever" mechanism of communication between the GTPase and initiator tRNA binding domains that has been proposed for eIF5B. Previous cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions, NMR experiments, and this structure show that IF2 transitions from being flexible in solution to an extended conformation when interacting with ribosomal complexes.

  20. Crystal Structures of Two Novel Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidases Reveal a Beta-Bar Fold With a Conserved Heme-Binding Motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubieta, C.; Krishna, S.S.; Kapoor, M.; Kozbial, P.; McMullan, D.; Axelrod, H.L.; Miller, M.D.; Abdubek, P.; Ambing, E.; Astakhova, T.; Carlton, D.; Chiu, H.J.; Clayton, T.; Deller, M.C.; Duan, L.; Elsliger, M.A.; Feuerhelm, J.; Grzechnik, S.K.; Hale, J.; Hampton, E.; Han, G.W.; /JCSG /SLAC, SSRL /Burnham Inst. Med. Res. /UC, San Diego /Scripps Res. Inst. /Novartis Res. Found.

    2007-10-31

    BtDyP from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (strain VPI-5482) and TyrA from Shewanella oneidensis are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs), members of a new family of heme-dependent peroxidases recently identified in fungi and bacteria. Here, we report the crystal structures of BtDyP and TyrA at 1.6 and 2.7 Angstroms, respectively. BtDyP assembles into a hexamer, while TyrA assembles into a dimer; the dimerization interface is conserved between the two proteins. Each monomer exhibits a two-domain, {alpha}+{beta} ferredoxin-like fold. A site for heme binding was identified computationally, and modeling of a heme into the proposed active site allowed for identification of residues likely to be functionally important. Structural and sequence comparisons with other DyPs demonstrate a conservation of putative heme-binding residues, including an absolutely conserved histidine. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments confirm heme binding, but with a stoichiometry of 0.3:1 (heme:protein).

  1. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  2. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  3. Crystal structures of the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus protein farnesyltransferase complexed with substrates and inhibitors reveal features for antifungal drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabanglo, Mark F; Hast, Michael A; Lubock, Nathan B; Hellinga, Homme W; Beese, Lorena S

    2014-03-01

    Species of the fungal genus Aspergillus are significant human and agricultural pathogens that are often refractory to existing antifungal treatments. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase), a critical enzyme in eukaryotes, is an attractive potential target for antifungal drug discovery. We report high-resolution structures of A. fumigatus FTase (AfFTase) in complex with substrates and inhibitors. Comparison of structures with farnesyldiphosphate (FPP) bound in the absence or presence of peptide substrate, corresponding to successive steps in ordered substrate binding, revealed that the second substrate-binding step is accompanied by motions of a loop in the catalytic site. Re-examination of other FTase structures showed that this motion is conserved. The substrate- and product-binding clefts in the AfFTase active site are wider than in human FTase (hFTase). Widening is a consequence of small shifts in the α-helices that comprise the majority of the FTase structure, which in turn arise from sequence variation in the hydrophobic core of the protein. These structural effects are key features that distinguish fungal FTases from hFTase. Their variation results in differences in steady-state enzyme kinetics and inhibitor interactions and presents opportunities for developing selective anti-fungal drugs by exploiting size differences in the active sites. We illustrate the latter by comparing the interaction of ED5 and Tipifarnib with hFTase and AfFTase. In AfFTase, the wider groove enables ED5 to bind in the presence of FPP, whereas in hFTase it binds only in the absence of substrate. Tipifarnib binds similarly to both enzymes but makes less extensive contacts in AfFTase with consequently weaker binding.

  4. The Crystal Structure of BRAF in Complex with an Organoruthenium Inhibitor Reveals a Mechanism for Inhibition of an Active Form of BRAF Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Peng; Streu, Craig; Qin, Jie; Bregman, Howard; Pagano, Nicholas; Meggers, Eric; Marmorstein, Ronen (Wistar); (UPENN)

    2012-06-19

    Substitution mutations in the BRAF serine/threonine kinase are found in a variety of human cancers. Such mutations occur in 70% of human malignant melanomas, and a single hyperactivating V600E mutation is found in the activation segment of the kinase domain and accounts for more than 90% of these mutations. Given this correlation, the molecular mechanism for BRAF regulation as well as oncogenic activation has attracted considerable interest, and activated forms of BRAF, such as BRAF{sup V600E}, have become attractive targets for small molecule inhibition. Here we report on the identification and subsequent optimization of a potent BRAF inhibitor, CS292, based on an organometallic kinase inhibitor scaffold. A cocrystal structure of CS292 in complex with the BRAF kinase domain reveals that CS292 binds to the ATP binding pocket of the kinase and is an ATP competitive inhibitor. The structure of the kinase-inhibitor complex also demonstrates that CS292 binds to BRAF in an active conformation and suggests a mechanism for regulation of BRAF by phosphorylation and BRAF{sup V600E} oncogene-induced activation. The structure of CS292 bound to the active form of the BRAF kinase also provides a novel scaffold for the design of BRAF{sup V600E} oncogene selective BRAF inhibitors for therapeutic application.

  5. Structural colours through photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPhedran, R.C.; Nicorovici, N.A.; McKenzie, D.R.; Rouse, G.W.; Botten, L.C.; Welch, V.; Parker, A.R.; Wohlgennant, M.; Vardeny, V

    2003-10-01

    We discuss two examples of living creatures using photonic crystals to achieve iridescent colouration. The first is the sea mouse (Aphroditidae, Polychaeta), which has a hexagonal close packed structure of holes in its spines and lower-body felt, while the second is the jelly fish Bolinopsis infundibulum, which has an oblique array of high index inclusions in its antennae. We show by measurements and optical calculations that both creatures can achieve strong colours despite having access only to weak refractive index contrast.

  6. The 1.6 A crystal structure of pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris rationalizes substrate specificity and reveals a flavin intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Chye Tan

    Full Text Available Pyranose dehydrogenases (PDHs are extracellular flavin-dependent oxidoreductases secreted by litter-decomposing fungi with a role in natural recycling of plant matter. All major monosaccharides in lignocellulose are oxidized by PDH at comparable yields and efficiencies. Oxidation takes place as single-oxidation or sequential double-oxidation reactions of the carbohydrates, resulting in sugar derivatives oxidized primarily at C2, C3 or C2/3 with the concomitant reduction of the flavin. A suitable electron acceptor then reoxidizes the reduced flavin. Whereas oxygen is a poor electron acceptor for PDH, several alternative acceptors, e.g., quinone compounds, naturally present during lignocellulose degradation, can be used. We have determined the 1.6-Å crystal structure of PDH from Agaricus meleagris. Interestingly, the flavin ring in PDH is modified by a covalent mono- or di-atomic species at the C(4a position. Under normal conditions, PDH is not oxidized by oxygen; however, the related enzyme pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O activates oxygen by a mechanism that proceeds via a covalent flavin C(4a-hydroperoxide intermediate. Although the flavin C(4a adduct is common in monooxygenases, it is unusual for flavoprotein oxidases, and it has been proposed that formation of the intermediate would be unfavorable in these oxidases. Thus, the flavin adduct in PDH not only shows that the adduct can be favorably accommodated in the active site, but also provides important details regarding the structural, spatial and physicochemical requirements for formation of this flavin intermediate in related oxidases. Extensive in silico modeling of carbohydrates in the PDH active site allowed us to rationalize the previously reported patterns of substrate specificity and regioselectivity. To evaluate the regioselectivity of D-glucose oxidation, reduction experiments were performed using fluorinated glucose. PDH was rapidly reduced by 3-fluorinated glucose, which has the C2

  7. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (NWU)

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  8. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  9. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ANTIMONY (III) SULFOBROMIDE, SBSBR,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANTIMONY COMPOUNDS, *SULFUR COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , BROMIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), FOURIER ANALYSIS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION.

  10. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    OpenAIRE

    Okuyan, Erhan

    2005-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. This work provides a tool that will extract crystal parameters such as primitive vect...

  11. Crystal Structure of Acivicin-Inhibited [gamma]-Glutamyltranspeptidase Reveals Critical Roles for Its C-Terminus in Autoprocessing and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kristin; Cullati, Sierra; Sand, Aaron; Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.; (UNL)

    2009-03-27

    Helicobacter pylori {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase (HpGT) is a general {gamma}-glutamyl hydrolase and a demonstrated virulence factor. The enzyme confers a growth advantage to the bacterium, providing essential amino acid precursors by initiating the degradation of extracellular glutathione and glutamine. HpGT is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase superfamily and undergoes autoprocessing to generate the active form of the enzyme. Acivicin is a widely used {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor that covalently modifies the enzyme, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. The time-dependent inactivation of HpGT exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on acivicin concentration with k{sub max} = 0.033 {+-} 0.006 s{sup -1} and K{sub I} = 19.7 {+-} 7.2 {micro}M. Structure determination of acivicin-modified HpGT (1.7 {angstrom}; R{sub factor} = 17.9%; R{sub free} = 20.8%) demonstrates that acivicin is accommodated within the {gamma}-glutamyl binding pocket of the enzyme. The hydroxyl group of Thr 380, the catalytic nucleophile in the autoprocessing and enzymatic reactions, displaces chloride from the acivicin ring to form the covalently linked complex. Within the acivicin-modified HpGT structure, the C-terminus of the protein becomes ordered with Phe 567 positioned over the active site. Substitution or deletion of Phe 567 leads to a >10-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, underscoring its importance in catalysis. The mobile C-terminus is positioned by several electrostatic interactions within the C-terminal region, most notably a salt bridge between Arg 475 and Glu 566. Mutational analysis reveals that Arg 475 is critical for the proper placement of the C-terminal region, the Tyr 433 containing loop, and the proposed oxyanion hole.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Golgi-Associated Human Nα-Acetyltransferase 60 Reveals the Molecular Determinants for Substrate-Specific Acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støve, Svein Isungset; Magin, Robert S; Foyn, Håvard; Haug, Bengt Erik; Marmorstein, Ronen; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-07-06

    N-Terminal acetylation is a common and important protein modification catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Six human NATs (NatA-NatF) contain one catalytic subunit each, Naa10 to Naa60, respectively. In contrast to the ribosome-associated NatA to NatE, NatF/Naa60 specifically associates with Golgi membranes and acetylates transmembrane proteins. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the function of Naa60, we developed an Naa60 bisubstrate CoA-peptide conjugate inhibitor, determined its X-ray structure when bound to CoA and inhibitor, and carried out biochemical experiments. We show that Naa60 adapts an overall fold similar to that of the catalytic subunits of ribosome-associated NATs, but with the addition of two novel elongated loops that play important roles in substrate-specific binding. One of these loops mediates a dimer to monomer transition upon substrate-specific binding. Naa60 employs a catalytic mechanism most similar to Naa50. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular basis for Naa60-specific acetyltransferase activity with implications for its Golgi-specific functions.

  13. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  14. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation

  15. Studies on growth, crystal structure and characterization of novel organic nicotinium trifluoroacetate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanaraj, P.V. [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603 110 (India); Rajesh, N.P., E-mail: rajeshnp@hotmail.com [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603 110 (India); Sundar, J. Kalyana; Natarajan, S. [Department of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Vinitha, G. [Department of Physics, Crescent Engineering College, Chennai 600 048 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Good quality crystals of nicotinium trifluoroacetate in monoclinic system were grown for first time. {yields} Nicotinium trifluoroacetate crystal exhibits third order nonlinear optical properties. {yields} The optical spectrum of nicotinium trifluoroacetate crystal reveals the wide transmission in the entire range with cutoff wavelength at 286 nm. {yields} Nicotinium trifluoroacetate is a low dielectric constant material. - Abstract: An organic material, nicotinium trifluoroacetate (NTF) was synthesized and single crystals in monoclinic system were grown from aqueous solution for the first time. Its solubility and metastable zone width were estimated. The crystal structure of NTF was analyzed to reveal the molecular arrangements and the formation of hydrogen bonds in the crystal. High-resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve measurements were performed to analyze the structural perfection of the grown crystals. Functional groups in NTF were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. Thermal behaviour and stability of NTF were studied by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical and dielectric properties of NTF crystals were analyzed. Optical studies reveal that NTF crystals are transparent in the wavelength range 286-1100 nm. The third order nonlinear optical parameters of NTF were derived by the Z-scan technique.

  16. Crystal structure of levomepromazine maleate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Tamás Gál

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C19H25N2OS+·C4H3O4− [systematic name: (S-3-(2-methoxyphenothiazin-10-yl-N,N,2-trimethylpropanaminium hydrogen maleate], comprises two (S-levomepromazine cations and two hydrogen maleate anions. The conformations of the two cations are similar. The major difference relates to the orientation of the methoxy substituent at the phenothiazine ring system. The crystal components form a three-dimensional supramolecular network via N—H...O, C—H...O and C—H...π interactions. A comparison of the conformations of the levomepromazine cations with those of the neutral molecule and similar protonated molecules reveals significant conformational flexibility of the phenothiazine ring system and the substituent at the phenothiazine N atom.

  17. Crystal Structure of Marburg Virus VP24

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Adrianna P. P.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-01-01

    The VP24 protein plays an essential, albeit poorly understood role in the filovirus life cycle. VP24 is only 30% identical between Marburg virus and the ebolaviruses. Furthermore, VP24 from the ebolaviruses is immunosuppressive, while that of Marburg virus is not. The crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24, presented here, reveals that although the core is similar between the viral genera, Marburg VP24 is distinguished by a projecting β-shelf and an alternate conformation of the N-terminal p...

  18. Crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Adrianna P P; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Abelson, Dafna M; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-05-01

    The VP24 protein plays an essential, albeit poorly understood role in the filovirus life cycle. VP24 is only 30% identical between Marburg virus and the ebolaviruses. Furthermore, VP24 from the ebolaviruses is immunosuppressive, while that of Marburg virus is not. The crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24, presented here, reveals that although the core is similar between the viral genera, Marburg VP24 is distinguished by a projecting β-shelf and an alternate conformation of the N-terminal polypeptide.

  19. Crystal structure of fiber structured pentacene thin films

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents a technique based on the grazing incidence crystal truncation rod (GI-CTR) X-ray diffraction method used to solve the crystal structure of substrate induced fiber structured organic thin films. The crystal structures of pentacene thin films grown on technologically relevant gate dielectric substrates are reported. It is widely recognized, that the intrinsic charge transport properties in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) depend strongly on the crystal structur...

  20. Crystal growth and structural analysis of zirconium sulphoselenide single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Patel; R D Vaidya; M S Dave; S G Patel

    2008-08-01

    A series of zirconium sulphoselenide (ZrSSe3–, where = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3) single crystals have been grown by chemical vapour transport technique using iodine as a transporting agent. The optimum condition for the growth of these crystals is given. The stoichiometry of the grown crystals were confirmed on the basis of energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX) and the structural characterization was accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The crystals are found to possess monoclinic structure. The lattice parameters, volume, particle size and X-ray density have been carried out for these crystals. The effect of sulphur proportion on the lattice parameter, unit cell volume and X-ray density in the series of ZrSSe3– single crystals have been studied and found to decrease in all these parameters with rise in sulphur proportion. The grown crystals were examined under optical zoom microscope for their surface topography study. Hall effect measurements were carried out on grown crystals at room temperature. The negative value of Hall coefficient implies that these crystals are -type in nature. The conductivity is found to decrease with increase of sulphur content in the ZrSSe3– series. The electrical resistivity parallel to c-axis as well as perpendicular to -axis have been carried out in the temperature range 303–423 K. The results obtained are discussed in detail.

  1. Influence of microgravity on protein crystal structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Structural determination and comparison of microgravity and ground grown protein crystals have been carried out in order to investigate the effect of microgravity on the structure of protein crystals. Following the structural studies on the hen egg-white lysozyme cystals grown in space and on the ground, the same kind of comparative studies was performed with acidic phospholipase A2 crystals grown in different gravities. Based on the results obtained so far, a conclusion could be made that microgravity might not be strong enough to change the conformation of polypeptide chain of proteins, but it may improve the bound waters' structure, and this might be an important factor for microgravity to improve the protein crystal quality. In addition, the difference in the improvement between the two kinds of protein crystals may imply that the degree of improvement of a protein crystal in microgravity may be related to the solvent content in the protein crystal.

  2. Crystal structure of a 92-residue C-terminal fragment of TonB from Escherichia coli reveals significant conformational changes compared to structures of smaller TonB fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ködding, Jiri; Killig, Frank; Polzer, Patrick; Howard, S Peter; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2005-01-28

    Uptake of siderophores and vitamin B(12) through the outer membrane of Escherichia coli is effected by an active transport system consisting of several outer membrane receptors and a protein complex of the inner membrane. The link between these is TonB, a protein associated with the cytoplasmic membrane, which forms a large periplasmic domain capable of interacting with several outer membrane receptors, e.g. FhuA, FecA, and FepA for siderophores and BtuB for vitamin B(12.) The active transport across the outer membrane is driven by the chemiosmotic gradient of the inner membrane and is mediated by the TonB protein. The receptor-binding domain of TonB appears to be formed by a highly conserved C-terminal amino acid sequence of approximately 100 residues. Crystal structures of two C-terminal TonB fragments composed of 85 (TonB-85) and 77 (TonB-77) amino acid residues, respectively, have been previously determined (Chang, C., Mooser, A., Pluckthun, A., and Wlodawer, A. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 27535-27540 and Koedding, J., Howard, S. P., Kaufmann, L., Polzer, P., Lustig, A., and Welte, W. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 9978-9986). In both cases the TonB fragments form dimers in solution and crystallize as dimers consisting of monomers tightly engaged with one another by the exchange of a beta-hairpin and a C-terminal beta-strand. Here we present the crystal structure of a 92-residue fragment of TonB (TonB-92), which is monomeric in solution. The structure, determined at 1.13-A resolution, shows a dimer with considerably reduced intermolecular interaction compared with the other known TonB structures, in particular lacking the beta-hairpin exchange.

  3. The X-ray Crystal Structure of the Phage Tail Terminator Protein Reveals the Biologically Relevant Hexameric Rang Structure and Demonstrates a Conserved mechanism of Tail Termination among Divrse Long Tailed Phages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pell, L.; Liu, A; Edmonds, L; Donaldson, L; Howell, L; Davidson, A

    2009-01-01

    The tail terminator protein (TrP) plays an essential role in phage tail assembly by capping the rapidly polymerizing tail once it has reached its requisite length and serving as the interaction surface for phage heads. Here, we present the 2.7-A crystal structure of a hexameric ring of gpU, the TrP of phage ?. Using sequence alignment analysis and site-directed mutagenesis, we have shown that this multimeric structure is biologically relevant and we have delineated its functional surfaces. Comparison of the hexameric crystal structure with the solution structure of gpU that we previously solved using NMR spectroscopy shows large structural changes occurring upon multimerization and suggests a mechanism that allows gpU to remain monomeric at high concentrations on its own, yet polymerize readily upon contact with an assembled tail tube. The gpU hexamer displays several flexible loops that play key roles in head and tail binding, implying a role for disorder-to-order transitions in controlling assembly as has been observed with other ? morphogenetic proteins. Finally, we have found that the hexameric structure of gpU is very similar to the structure of a putative TrP from a contractile phage tail even though it displays no detectable sequence similarity. This finding coupled with further bioinformatic investigations has led us to conclude that the TrPs of non-contractile-tailed phages, such as ?, are evolutionarily related to those of contractile-tailed phages, such as P2 and Mu, and that all long-tailed phages may utilize a conserved mechanism for tail termination.

  4. Crystal structures of the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus protein farnesyltransferase complexed with substrates and inhibitors reveal features for antifungal drug design

    OpenAIRE

    Mabanglo, Mark F.; Hast, Michael A.; Lubock, Nathan B; Hellinga, Homme W.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2014-01-01

    Species of the fungal genus Aspergillus are significant human and agricultural pathogens that are often refractory to existing antifungal treatments. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase), a critical enzyme in eukaryotes, is an attractive potential target for antifungal drug discovery. We report high-resolution structures of A. fumigatus FTase (AfFTase) in complex with substrates and inhibitors. Comparison of structures with farnesyldiphosphate (FPP) bound in the absence or presence of peptide ...

  5. Predicting crystal structures of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sarah L

    2014-04-07

    Currently, organic crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods are based on searching for the most thermodynamically stable crystal structure, making various approximations in evaluating the crystal energy. The most stable (global minimum) structure provides a prediction of an experimental crystal structure. However, depending on the specific molecule, there may be other structures which are very close in energy. In this case, the other structures on the crystal energy landscape may be polymorphs, components of static or dynamic disorder in observed structures, or there may be no route to nucleating and growing these structures. A major reason for performing CSP studies is as a complement to solid form screening to see which alternative packings to the known polymorphs are thermodynamically feasible.

  6. Isolation and Crystal Structure of Horminone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓; 廖仁安; 翁林红; 谢庆兰; 邓锋杰

    2000-01-01

    The horminone (C20H28O4, Mr= 332.85) was first isolated from the leaves of Rabdosia Serra (Maxim) Hara and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction method. Horminone is orthorhombic with space group P21P21P21, a=7.7186(7), b=9.5506(9), c=24.227(2) A, V=1785.9(3) A3, Z=4, Dc=1.236g/cm3, λ=0. 71073 A , μ(MoKα)=0. 085mm-1, F(000)=720. The structure was refined to R=0. 0369, wR=0.0978 for 2446 reflections with I>2σ(Ⅰ). X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that there are three six-membered rings in the title molecule. Ring A is in the chair conformation, ring C has the structure of quinone and there are two intermolecular hydrogen bonds between two molecules.

  7. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD–CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs. PMID:23722834

  8. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibitory Factor Cif Reveals Novel Active-Site Features of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Christopher D.; Morisseau, Christophe; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; O'Toole, George A.; Madden, Dean R.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other α/β hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of α/β hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate. PMID:20118260

  10. Crystal Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibitory Factor Cif Reveals Novel Active-Site Features of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahl, C.; Morisseau, C; Bomberger, J; Stanton, B; Hammock, B; O& apos; Toole, G; Madden, D

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  11. Crystal structure of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibitory factor Cif reveals novel active-site features of an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Christopher D; Morisseau, Christophe; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; O'Toole, George A; Madden, Dean R

    2010-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other alpha/beta hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of alpha/beta hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  12. Analysis of the Crystal Structure of the ExsC.ExsE Complex Reveals Distinctive Binding Interactions of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion Chaperone ExsC with ExsE and ExsD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelaar, N.J.; Robinson, H.; Jing, X.; Schubot, F. D.

    2010-07-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, like many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, requires its type III secretion system (T3SS) to facilitate acute infections. In P. aeruginosa, the expression of all T3SS-related genes is regulated by the transcriptional activator ExsA. A signaling cascade involving ExsA and three additional proteins, ExsC, ExsD, and ExsE, directly ties the upregulation of ExsA-mediated transcription to the activation of the type III secretion apparatus. In order to characterize the events underlying the signaling process, the crystal structure of the T3SS chaperone ExsC in complex with its cognate effector ExsE has been determined. The structure reveals critical contacts that mediate the interactions between these two proteins. Particularly striking is the presence of two Arg-X-Val-X-Arg motifs in ExsE that form identical interactions along opposite sides of an ExsC dimer. The structure also provides insights into the interactions of ExsC with the antiactivator protein ExsD. It was shown that the amino-terminal 46 residues of ExsD are sufficient for ExsC binding. On the basis of these findings, a new model for the ExsC {center_dot} ExsD complex is proposed to explain its distinctive 2:2 stoichiometry and why ExsC displays a weaker affinity for ExsD than for ExsE.

  13. Crystal Structure of 8-Demethoxyrunanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Ling

    2008-01-01

    A new hasubanane-type alkaloid, 8-demethoxyrunanine, was isolated from Sino- menium acutum and characterized by melting point, HREIMS, 1H NMR, and X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray diffraction reveals that the title compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, space group P212121 with a = 7.308(1), b = 21.742(5), c = 22.893(4) ?, V = 3637.5(11) ?3, Z = 8, Dx = 1.254 g/cm3, F(000) = 1472, μ(MoKα) = 0.087 mm-1, the final R = 0.0438 and wR = 0.0575 for 4497 independent reflections with Rint = 0.0192 and 2091 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). Four rings (ring A: one benzene ring, ring B: one hexagon carbon ring in a half-chair conformation, ring C: one hexagon carbon ring with α,β-unsaturated ketone segment (-CR2=CR1-C=O) in a screw-boat conformation, and ring D: one nonplanar tetrahydropyrrole) form a hasubanane-type alkaloid.

  14. The Crystal Structure of Human Argonaute2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirle, Nicole T.; MacRae, Ian J. (Scripps)

    2012-07-18

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans.

  15. Crystal structure analysis of intermetallic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, R. A., Jr.; Downey, J. W.; Dwight, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Study concerns crystal structures and lattice parameters for a number of new intermetallic compounds. Crystal structure data have been collected on equiatomic compounds, formed between an element of the Sc, Ti, V, or Cr group and an element of the Co or Ni group. The data, obtained by conventional methods, are presented in an easily usable tabular form.

  16. Crystal fingerprint space--a novel paradigm for studying crystal-structure sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Mario; Oganov, Artem R

    2010-09-01

    The initial aim of the crystal fingerprint project was to solve a very specific problem: to classify and remove duplicate crystal structures from the results generated by the evolutionary crystal-structure predictor USPEX. These duplications decrease the genetic diversity of the population used by the evolutionary algorithm, potentially leading to stagnation and, after a certain time, reducing the likelihood of predicting essentially new structures. After solving the initial problem, the approach led to unexpected discoveries: unforeseen correlations, useful derived quantities and insight into the structure of the overall set of results. All of these were facilitated by the project's underlying idea: to transform the structure sets from the physical configuration space to an abstract, high-dimensional space called the fingerprint space. Here every structure is represented as a point whose coordinates (fingerprint) are computed from the crystal structure. Then the space's distance measure, interpreted as structure 'closeness', enables grouping of structures into similarity classes. This model provides much flexibility and facilitates access to knowledge and algorithms from fields outside crystallography, e.g. pattern recognition and data mining. The current usage of the fingerprint-space model is revealing interesting properties that relate to chemical and crystallographic attributes of a structure set. For this reason, the mapping of structure sets to fingerprint space could become a new paradigm for studying crystal-structure ensembles and global chemical features of the energy landscape.

  17. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ALPHA-DIMETHYLTELLURIUM DICHLORIDE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TELLURIUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CHLORIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, ANISOTROPY, FOURIER ANALYSIS.

  18. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress response. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stabilizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold.

  19. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms.

  20. A novel β-xylosidase structure from Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius: the first crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family GH52 enzyme reveals unpredicted similarity to other glycoside hydrolase folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina, Giannina; Eley, Kirstin; Pompidor, Guillaume; Schneider, Thomas R; Crennell, Susan J; Danson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius is a thermophilic bacterium that is able to ferment both C6 and C5 sugars to produce ethanol. During growth on hemicellulose biomass, an intracellular β-xylosidase catalyses the hydrolysis of xylo-oligosaccharides to the monosaccharide xylose, which can then enter the pathways of central metabolism. The gene encoding a G. thermoglucosidasius β-xylosidase belonging to CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH52 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme has been characterized and a high-resolution (1.7 Å) crystal structure has been determined, resulting in the first reported structure of a GH52 family member. A lower resolution (2.6 Å) structure of the enzyme-substrate complex shows the positioning of the xylobiose substrate to be consistent with the proposed retaining mechanism of the family; additionally, the deep cleft of the active-site pocket, plus the proximity of the neighbouring subunit, afford an explanation for the lack of catalytic activity towards the polymer xylan. Whilst the fold of the G. thermoglucosidasius β-xylosidase is completely different from xylosidases in other CAZy families, the enzyme surprisingly shares structural similarities with other glycoside hydrolases, despite having no more than 13% sequence identity.

  1. Crystal Structure of Isoquinoline Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Mei; ZHANG Jia-Hai; ZHOU Shi-Ming; SUN Jie; YIN Hao; HU Ke-Liang

    2011-01-01

    The chiral compound 5H-imidazol[2,3-b]isoquinoline-l-ethanol-5-one-1,2, 3, 10b-tetrahydro- β(S)-phenyl-3(S)-phenyl was synthesized from the direct condensation of 2- cyanophenyacetonitrile with optically active (S)-(+)-2-phenylglycinol in chlorobenzene under dry, anaerobic conditions. ZnCl2 was used as a Lewis acid catalyst in this reaction, and the structure of this compound was determined by X-ray diffraction, NMR, MS and IR. Crystal data of the title compound: C25H22N2O2, Mr = 382.45, P 21 21 21, a = 5.341(5), b = 16.735(5), c = 22.129(5) A, γ = 90°, V = 1978(2)A^3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.284 g/cm^3, the final R = 0.0321 for 2269 observed reflections with I 〉 2 σ(I) and Rw = 0.0771 for all data.

  2. Crystal structure of 2-pentyloxybenzamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Bugenhagen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecule, C12H17NO2, the amide NH2 group is oriented toward the pentyloxy substituent and an intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bond is formed with the pentyloxy O atom. The benzene ring forms dihedral angles of 2.93 (2 and 5.60 (2° with the amide group and the pentyloxy group mean planes, respectively. In the crystal, molecules are linked by pairs of N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with their molecular planes parallel, but at an offset of 0.45 (1 Å to each other. These dimers are ordered into two types of symmetry-related columns extended along the a axis, with the mean plane of one set of dimers in a column approximately parallel to (121 and the other in a column approximately parallel to (1-21. The two planes form a dihedral angle of 85.31 (2°, and are linked via C—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...π interactions, forming a three-dimensional framework structure.

  3. Method of fabricating patterned crystal structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Liyang

    2016-12-15

    A method of manufacturing a patterned crystal structure for includes depositing an amorphous material. The amorphous material is modified such that a first portion of the amorphous thin-film layer has a first height/volume and a second portion of the amorphous thin-film layer has a second height/volume greater than the first portion. The amorphous material is annealed to induce crystallization, wherein crystallization is induced in the second portion first due to the greater height/volume of the second portion relative to the first portion to form patterned crystal structures.

  4. Crystal structure of yeast Sco1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abajian, Carnie; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (NWU)

    2010-03-05

    The Sco family of proteins are involved in the assembly of the dinuclear CuA site in cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme in aerobic respiration. These proteins, which are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, are characterized by a conserved CXXXC sequence motif that binds copper ions and that has also been proposed to perform a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase function. The crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae apo Sco1 (apo-ySco1) and Sco1 in the presence of copper ions (Cu-ySco1) were determined to 1.8- and 2.3-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. Yeast Sco1 exhibits a thioredoxin-like fold, similar to that observed for human Sco1 and a homolog from Bacillus subtilis. The Cu-ySco1 structure, obtained by soaking apo-ySco1 crystals in copper ions, reveals an unexpected copper-binding site involving Cys181 and Cys216, cysteine residues present in ySco1 but not in other homologs. The conserved CXXXC cysteines, Cys148 and Cys152, can undergo redox chemistry in the crystal. An essential histidine residue, His239, is located on a highly flexible loop, denoted the Sco loop, and can adopt positions proximal to both pairs of cysteines. Interactions between ySco1 and its partner proteins yeast Cox17 and yeast COX2 are likely to occur via complementary electrostatic surfaces. This high-resolution model of a eukaryotic Sco protein provides new insight into Sco copper binding and function.

  5. Homodiselenacalix[4]arenes: Molecules with Unique Channelled Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joice; Dobrzańska, Liliana; Van Meervelt, Luc; Quevedo, Mario Alfredo; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Stachowicz, Marcin; Smet, Mario; Maes, Wouter; Dehaen, Wim

    2016-01-18

    A synthetic route towards homodiselenacalix[4]arene macrocycles is presented, based on the dynamic covalent chemistry of diselenides. The calixarene inner rim is decorated with either alkoxy or tert-butyl ester groups. Single-crystal X-ray analysis of two THF solvates with methoxy and ethoxy substituents reveals the high similarity of their molecular structures and alterations on the supramolecular level. In both crystal structures, solvent channels are present and differ in both shape and capacity. Furthermore, the methoxy-substituted macrocycle undergoes a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation during which the molecular structure changes its conformation from 1,3-alternate (loaded with THF/water) to 1,2-alternate (apohost form). Molecular modelling techniques were applied to explore the conformational and energetic behaviour of the macrocycles.

  6. Anisotropic crystal structure of magnetized neutron star crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiko, D. A.; Kozhberov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Although crystallized neutron star crust is responsible for many fascinating observational phenomena, its actual microscopic structure in tremendous gravitational and magnetic fields is not understood. Here we show that in a non-uniform magnetic field, three-dimensional ionic Coulomb crystals comprising the crust may stretch or shrink while their electrostatic pressure becomes anisotropic. The pressure depends non-linearly on the magnitude of the stretch, so that a continuous magnetic field evolution may result in an abrupt crystal elongation or contraction. This may provide a trigger for magnetar activity. A phonon mode instability is revealed, which sets the limits of magnetic field variation beyond which the crystal is destroyed. These limits sometimes correspond to surprisingly large deformations. It is not known what happens to crust matter subject to a pressure anisotropy exceeding these limits. We hypothesize that the ion system then possesses a long-range order only in one or two dimensions, that is becomes a liquid crystal.

  7. Structure of initial crystals formed during human amelogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Voegel, J. C.; Yacaman, J.; Frank, R. M.

    1992-02-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis revealed only the existence of carbonated hydroxyapatite (c.HA) during amelogenesis, whereas conventional transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that developing enamel crystals have a ribbon-like habit. The described compositional changes could be an indication for the presence of minerals different from c.HA. However, the absence of identification of such a mineral shows the need of studies by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) of initial formed human enamel crystals. We demonstrate the existence of two crystal families involved in the early stages of biomineralization: (a) nanometer-size particles which appeared as a precursor phase; (b) ribbon-like crystals, with a structure closely related to c.HA, which by a progressive thickening process tend to attain the mature enamel crystal habit.

  8. synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Crystal and molecular structure of the complex ... Coordination chemistry of molybdenum(VI) has attracted considerable attention due to its biochemical significance [1-3] as well as for the efficient catalytic properties in several organic.

  9. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Gülseren, Oğuz

    2007-04-01

    Determining the crystal structure parameters of a material is an important issue in crystallography and material science. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps in understanding the physical behavior of material. It can be difficult to obtain crystal parameters for complex structures, particularly those materials that show local symmetry as well as global symmetry. This work provides a tool that extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and space groups from the atomic coordinates of crystal structures. A visualization tool for examining crystals is also provided. Accordingly, this work could help crystallographers, chemists and material scientists to analyze crystal structures efficiently. Program summaryTitle of program: BilKristal Catalogue identifier: ADYU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYU_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Programming language used: C, C++, Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 and OpenGL Libraries Computer: Personal Computers with Windows operating system Operating system: Windows XP Professional RAM: 20-60 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:899 779 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test date, etc.:9 271 521 Distribution format:tar.gz External routines/libraries: Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1. For visualization tool, graphics card driver should also support OpenGL Nature of problem: Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly, for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. Solution method: The tool extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and identify the space group from

  10. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia R. Gomes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(3-methoxyphenylethan-1-one (1, C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(4-methoxyphenylethan-1-one (2, C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(4-chlorophenylethan-1-one (3, C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(4-bromophenylethan-1-one (4, C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-methoxyphenyl-2-[(9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]ethan-1-one (5, C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2, (3 and (4 are isomorphous and accordingly their molecular and supramolecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the molecules of (1 and (5 are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2, (3 and (4, these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1 all molecules are linked by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π–π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanylethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles.

  11. Photonic-crystal fibre: Mapping the structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of real-time and non-destructive Doppler-assisted tomography of the internal structure of photonic-crystal fibres could aid the fabrication of high-quality fibres with enhanced performance.......The demonstration of real-time and non-destructive Doppler-assisted tomography of the internal structure of photonic-crystal fibres could aid the fabrication of high-quality fibres with enhanced performance....

  12. Crystal structure of the complex between Pseudomonas effector AvrPtoB and the tomato Pto kinase reveals both a shared and a unique interface compared with AvrPto-Pto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Xiao, Fangming; Fan, Fenxia; Gu, Lichuan; Cang, Huaixing; Martin, Gregory B; Chai, Jijie

    2009-06-01

    Resistance to bacterial speck disease in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is activated upon recognition by the host Pto kinase of either one of two sequence-unrelated effector proteins, AvrPto or AvrPtoB, from Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst). Pto induces Pst immunity by acting in concert with the Prf protein. The recently reported structure of the AvrPto-Pto complex revealed that interaction of AvrPto with Pto appears to relieve an inhibitory effect of Pto, allowing Pto to activate Prf. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Pto binding domain of AvrPtoB (residues 121 to 205) at a resolution of 1.9A and of the AvrPtoB(121-205)-Pto complex at a resolution of 3.3 A. AvrPtoB(121-205) exhibits a tertiary fold that is completely different from that of AvrPto, and its conformation remains largely unchanged upon binding to Pto. In common with AvrPto-Pto, the AvrPtoB-Pto complex relies on two interfaces. One of these interfaces is similar in both complexes, although the primary amino acid sequences from the two effector proteins are very different. Amino acid substitutions in Pto at the other interface disrupt the interaction of AvrPtoB-Pto but not that of AvrPto-Pto. Interestingly, substitutions in Pto affecting this unique interface also cause Pto to induce Prf-dependent host cell death independently of either effector protein.

  13. Crystal structure of IgE bound to its B-cell receptor CD23 reveals a mechanism of reciprocal allosteric inhibition with high affinity receptor FcεRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Yuan, Daopeng; Pang, Marie O Y; Henry, Alistair J; Cain, Katharine; Oxbrow, Amanda; Fabiane, Stella M; Beavil, Andrew J; McDonnell, James M; Gould, Hannah J; Sutton, Brian J

    2012-07-31

    The role of IgE in allergic disease mechanisms is performed principally through its interactions with two receptors, FcεRI on mast cells and basophils, and CD23 (FcεRII) on B cells. The former mediates allergic hypersensitivity, the latter regulates IgE levels, and both receptors, also expressed on antigen-presenting cells, contribute to allergen uptake and presentation to the immune system. We have solved the crystal structure of the soluble lectin-like "head" domain of CD23 (derCD23) bound to a subfragment of IgE-Fc consisting of the dimer of Cε3 and Cε4 domains (Fcε3-4). One CD23 head binds to each heavy chain at the interface between the two domains, explaining the known 2:1 stoichiometry and suggesting mechanisms for cross-linking membrane-bound trimeric CD23 by IgE, or membrane IgE by soluble trimeric forms of CD23, both of which may contribute to the regulation of IgE synthesis by B cells. The two symmetrically located binding sites are distant from the single FcεRI binding site, which lies at the opposite ends of the Cε3 domains. Structural comparisons with both free IgE-Fc and its FcεRI complex reveal not only that the conformational changes in IgE-Fc required for CD23 binding are incompatible with FcεRI binding, but also that the converse is true. The two binding sites are allosterically linked. We demonstrate experimentally the reciprocal inhibition of CD23 and FcεRI binding in solution and suggest that the mutual exclusion of receptor binding allows IgE to function independently through its two receptors.

  14. Crystal structures of a yeast 14-3-3 protein from Lachancea thermotolerans in the unliganded form and bound to a human lipid kinase PI4KB-derived peptide reveal high evolutionary conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenreichova, Andrea; Klima, Martin; Boura, Evzen

    2016-11-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind phosphorylated binding partners to regulate several of their properties, including enzymatic activity, stability and subcellular localization. Here, two crystal structures are presented: the crystal structures of the 14-3-3 protein (also known as Bmh1) from the yeast Lachancea thermotolerans in the unliganded form and bound to a phosphopeptide derived from human PI4KB (phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase B). The structures demonstrate the high evolutionary conservation of ligand recognition by 14-3-3 proteins. The structural analysis suggests that ligand recognition by 14-3-3 proteins evolved very early in the evolution of eukaryotes and remained conserved, underlying the importance of 14-3-3 proteins in physiology.

  15. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  16. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Leitold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n=4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply-occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, w...

  17. Crystal structure from one-electron theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated by the the......The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated...... by the theory, the predicted crystal structures are in accord with experiment in all cases except 79Au. In addition, they have investigated the effect of pressure upon the alkali metals (3Li, 11Na, 37Rb, 55Cs) and selected lanthanide metals (57La, 58Ce, 71Lu) and actinide metals (90Th, 91Pa). In these cases...

  18. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  19. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Metronidazole-derived Compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A MET-OH derivative, MET-OTs 1, was designed, prepared and structurally charac- terized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. X-ray structure analysis reveals that 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/c, with a = 16.1178(14), b = 7.5473(6), c = 13.4161(11) (A), V = 1520.3(2) (A)3, β = 111.3210(10)o, Z = 4, Dc = 1.421 g/cm3 and F(000) = 680.

  20. An alternative RNA polymerase I structure reveals a dimer hinge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrewa, Dirk; Kuhn, Claus-D; Engel, Christoph; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is the central, 14-subunit enzyme that synthesizes the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor in eukaryotic cells. The recent crystal structure of Pol I at 2.8 Å resolution revealed two novel elements: the `expander' in the active-centre cleft and the `connector' that mediates Pol I dimerization [Engel et al. (2013), Nature (London), 502, 650-655]. Here, a Pol I structure in an alternative crystal form that was solved by molecular replacement using the original atomic Pol I structure is reported. The resulting alternative structure lacks the expander but still shows an expanded active-centre cleft. The neighbouring Pol I monomers form a homodimer with a relative orientation distinct from that observed previously, establishing the connector as a hinge between Pol I monomers.

  1. Structure of crystals of hard colloidal spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, P.N.; van Megen, W.; Bartlett, P.; Ackerson, B.J.; Rarity, J.G.; Underwood, S.M. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern, WR14 3PS, United Kingsom (GB) Department of Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia School of Chemistry, Bristol University, Bristol, BS8 1TS, United Kingdom Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078)

    1989-12-18

    We report light-scattering measurements of powder diffraction patterns of crystals of essentially hard colloidal spheres. These are consistent with structures formed by stacking close-packed planes of particles in a sequence of permitted lateral positions, {ital A},{ital B},{ital C}, which shows a high degree of randomness. Crystals grown slowly, while still containing many stacking faults, show a tendency towards face-centered-cubic packing: possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  2. Crystal Structure of Macrocalyxin J

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shan; WU Bin; SHI Hao; SUN Cui-Rong

    2007-01-01

    The title compound, (1α,6β, 1 1β, 14α)-1,7:6,20-diepoxy-6,1 1-dihydroxy- 6,7-secoent- kaur-1 6-ene-7,15-dione-14-acetate (macrocalyxin J), is a diterpenoid which was isolated from the leaves of Rabdosia macrocalyx and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in orthorhombic, spac e group P212121 with a = 9.3608(8), b = 14.9787(12), c = 15.5750(13)(A), Z = 4, V = 2183.8(3) (A)3, C22H30O9, Mr = 438.46, Dc = 1.334 g/m3, μ(MoKα) = 0.103 mm-1,F(000) = 936, the final R = 0.0532 and wR = 0.1262 for 2252 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). In the molecule, three six-membered rings adopt chair, boat and slightly distorted boat conformations,respectively, while both five-membered rings have approximate envelope conformations.

  3. Crystal structures of barley thioredoxin h isoforms HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2 reveal features involved in protein recognition and possibly in discriminating the isoform specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Kenji; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine;

    2008-01-01

    H-type thioredoxins (Trxs) constitute a particularly large Trx sub-group in higher plants. Here, the crystal structures are determined for the two barley Trx h isoforms, HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2, in the partially radiation-reduced state to resolutions of 1.7 angstrom, and for HvTrxh2 in the oxidized...... state to 2.0 angstrom. The two Trxs have a sequence identity of 51% and highly similar fold and active-site architecture. Interestingly, the four independent molecules in the crystals of HvTrxh1 form two relatively large and essentially identical protein-protein interfaces. In each interface, a loop......) of the bound loop segment in the proximity of the Cys40 thiol. The interaction involves three characteristic backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds in an antiparallel beta-sheet-like arrangement, similar to the arrangement observed in the structure of an engineered, covalently bound complex between Trx...

  4. Crystal structure of 3-(hydroxymethylchromone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Ishikawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C10H8O3 (systematic name 3-hydroxymethyl-4H-chromen-4-one, the fused-ring system is slightly puckered [dihedral angle between the rings = 3.84 (11°]. The hydroxy O atom deviates from the heterocyclic ring by 1.422 (1 Å. In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of O—H...O hydrogen bonds generate R22(12 loops. The dimers are linked by aromatic π–π stacking [shortest centroid–centroid distance = 3.580 (3 Å], and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating a three-dimensional network.

  5. Crystal structure of 9-methacryloylanthracene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Agrahari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C18H14O, with systematic name 1-(anthracen-9-yl-2-methylprop-2-en-1-one, the ketonic C atom lies 0.2030 (16 Å out of the anthryl-ring-system plane. The dihedral angle between the planes of the anthryl and methacryloyl moieties is 88.30 (3° and the stereochemistry about the Csp2—Csp2 bond in the side chain is transoid. In the crystal, the end rings of the anthryl units in adjacent molecules associate in parallel–planar orientations [shortest centroid–centroid distance = 3.6320 (7 Å]. A weak hydrogen bond is observed between an aromatic H atom and the O atom of a molecule displaced by translation in the a-axis direction, forming sheets of parallel-planar anthryl groups packing in this direction.

  6. The crystal structure and crystal chemistry of fernandinite and corvusite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H.T.; Post, J.E.; Ross, D.R.; Nelen, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Using type material of fernandinite from Minasragra, Peru, and corvusite from the Jack Claim, La Sal Mountains, Utah, the properties and crystal chemistry of these minerals have been determined by Rietveld analysis of the powder X-ray-diffraction patterns. The crystal structure of both species is isotypic with the V2O5 -type layer first found for ??-Ag0.68V2O5; it consists of chains of VO6 octahedra linked by opposite corners (parallel to b) condensed by edge-sharing to form the layer. The vanadium has average valence 4.8, and the resulting layer-charge is balanced by varying amounts of Ca, Na, and K in the interlayer region accompanied by labile water. This study has confirmed the validity of fernandinite as a unique mineral species. It is closely related to corvusite, from which it is distinguished on the basis of the dominant interlayer cation: Ca for fernandinite, Na for curvusite. -Authors

  7. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S

    2017-01-01

    structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full......-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered...

  8. Crystal structure of putrescine aspartic acid complex

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy, S.; Murthy, MRN

    1990-01-01

    Polyamines, putrescine, spermidine and spermine are ubiquitous biogenic cations believed to be important for a variety of cellular processes. In order to obtain structural information on the interaction of these amines with other biomolecules, the structure of a complex of putrescine with aspartic acid was determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The crystals belong monoclinic space group $C_2$ with $a = 21.504 \\AA$, $b = 4.779 \\AA$, $c = 8.350 \\AA$ and $\\beta = {97.63}^{\\ci...

  9. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Hang Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are two canagliflozin molecules (A and B and one water molecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluorophenylthiophen-2-yl]methyl}-4-methylphenyl-6-(hydroxymethyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methylbenzene and thiophene rings are 115.7 (4 and 111.7 (4°, while the dihedral angles between the fluorobenzene and thiophene rings are 24.2 (6 and 20.5 (9° in molecules A and B, respectively. The hydropyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin molecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin molecules and lattice water molecules are connected via O—H...O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture.

  10. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol-ecules (A and B) and one water mol-ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)thio-phen-2-yl]meth-yl}-4-methylphen-yl)-6-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra-hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl-benzene and thio-phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro-benzene and thio-phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol-ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro-pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol-ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol-ecules and lattice water mol-ecules are connected via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture.

  11. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  12. Crystal structure determination of Jatrorrhizine chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI XianRong; YANG JianHua; LIN Xiang; DAI Qin; CHENG Qiang; GUO LingHong; LI Hui

    2009-01-01

    Optimum resolution data of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) for Jatrorrhizine (Jat) were collected by an X' Pert Pro MPD diffractometer with an X'celerator detector under the stepwise scanning condition as 8.255 ms and 0.00836°per step,2θrange of 50°-80° and total scanning period of 8-10 min. Indexing of the crystal system and a search of the space group from the powder X-ray diffraction data were conducted by the computational crystallography method. The pilot crystal models of Jat were globally optimized with Monte Carlo method and then refined with the Rietveld method. In parallel with PXRD test,single crystals of Jat were cultured in an aqueous solution by a slow-decreasing temperature method,then its crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD). Both crystal structures from PXRD and SCXRD are identical. The results show that the crystal structure of Jat belongs to a monoclinic system and the space group P21/c. The parameters of cell dimensions from PXRD are a=7.69(A),b= 12.55(A),c=20.89(A),β=106.53°,Z=4,and V=1933.4(A)3,meanwhile the parameters from SCXRD are a=7.72(A),b=12.61(A),c=20.99(A),β=106.38°,Z=4,and V=1961.3(A)3.

  13. Modular crystals as modulated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elcoro, L.; Perez-Mato, J.M.; Friese, K.;

    2008-01-01

    The use of the superspace formalism is extended to the description and refinement of the homologous series of modular structures with two symmetry-related modules with different orientations. The lillianite homologous series has been taken as a study case. Starting from a commensurate modulated c...

  14. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  15. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  16. Study of crystal structure at high temperature phase in KIO sub 3 crystal by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kasatani, H; Kuroiwa, Y; Yagi, K; Katayama, R; Terauchi, H

    2003-01-01

    The accurate crystal structure of the I-phase in KIO sub 3 crystal has been obtained at 530 K, for the first time, by the MEM/Rietveld analysis from high-energy X-ray powder-diffraction data. The crystal structure of the I-phase is the rhombohedral perovskite structure (space group R3m; Z=1). The MEM charge-density distributions reveal that the shorter I-O bond exhibits a covalent bonding character and others (I-K, K-O and longer I-O bonds) an ionic.

  17. The Crystal Structure of the Fifth Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of Porcine CD163 Reveals an Important Residue Involved in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongfang; Jiang, Longguang; Qiao, Songlin; Zhi, Yubao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yanyan; Huang, Xiaojing; Huang, Mingdong; Li, Rui; Zhang, Gai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has become an economically critical factor in swine industry since its worldwide spread in the 1990s. Infection by its causative agent, PRRS virus (PRRSV), was proven to be mediated by an indispensable receptor, porcine CD163 (pCD163), and the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain (SRCR5) is essential for virus infection. However, the structural details and specific residues of pCD163 SRCR5 involved in infection have not been defined yet. In this study, we prepared recombinant pCD163 SRCR5 in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells and determined its crystal structure at a high resolution of 2.0 Å. This structure includes a markedly long loop region and shows a special electrostatic potential, and these are significantly different from those of other members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily (SRCR-SF). Subsequently, we carried out structure-based mutational studies to identify that the arginine residue at position 561 (Arg561) in the long loop region is important for PRRSV infection. Further, we showed Arg561 probably takes effect on the binding of pCD163 to PRRSV during virus invasion. Altogether the current work provides the first view of the CD163 SRCR domain, expands our knowledge of the invasion mechanism of PRRSV, and supports a molecular basis for prevention and control of the virus. PRRS has caused huge economic losses to pig farming. The syndrome is caused by PRRSV, and PRRSV infection has been shown to be mediated by host cell surface receptors. One of them, pCD163, is especially indispensable, and its SRCR5 domain has been further demonstrated to play a significant role in virus infection. However, its structural details and the residues involved in infection are unknown. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of pCD163 SRCR5 and then carried out site-directed mutational studies based on the crystal structure to elucidate which residue is important. Our

  18. Crystal structures of the staphylococcal toxin SSL5 in complex with sialyl Lewis X reveal a conserved binding site that shares common features with viral and bacterial sialic acid binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Heather M; Basu, Indira; Chung, Matthew C; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Fraser, John D; Baker, Edward N

    2007-12-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  19. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  20. Troublesome Crystal Structures: Prevention, Detection, and Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Richard L

    1996-01-01

    A large number of incorrect crystal structures is being published today. These structures are proving to be a particular problem to those of us who are interested in comparing structural moieties found in the databases in order to develop structure-property relationships. Problems can reside in the input data, e.g., wrong unit cell or low quality intensity data, or in the structural model, e.g., wrong space group or atom types. Many of the common mistakes are, however, relatively easy to detect and thus should be preventable; at the very least, suspicious structures can be flagged, if not by the authors then by the referees and, ultimately, the crystallographic databases. This article describes some of the more common mistakes and their effects on the resulting structures, lists a series of tests that can be used to detect incorrect structures, and makes a strong plea for the publication of higher quality structures.

  1. The crystal structure of Rv1347c, a putative antibiotic resistance protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reveals a GCN5-related fold and suggests an alternative function in siderophore biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Card, G L; Peterson, N A; Smith, C A; Rupp, B; Schick, B M; Baker, E N

    2005-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB, is a devastating human pathogen. The emergence of multi-drug resistance in recent years has prompted a search for new drug targets and for a better understanding of mechanisms of resistance. Here we focus on the gene product of an open reading frame from M. tuberculosis, Rv1347c, which is annotated as a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase. The Rv1347c protein does not show this activity, however, and we show from its crystal structure, coupled with functional and bioinformatic data, that its most likely role is in the biosynthesis of mycobactin, the M. tuberculosis siderophore. The crystal structure of Rv1347c was determined by MAD phasing from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution (R = 0.227, R{sub free} = 0.257). The protein is monomeric, with a fold that places it in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) family of acyltransferases. Features of the structure are an acylCoA binding site that is shared with other GNAT family members, and an adjacent hydrophobic channel leading to the surface that could accommodate long-chain acyl groups. Modeling the postulated substrate, the N{sup {var_epsilon}}-hydroxylysine side chain of mycobactin, into the acceptor substrate binding groove identifies two residues at the active site, His130 and Asp168, that have putative roles in substrate binding and catalysis.

  2. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit pla...

  3. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Jain, Neha; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Koldewey, Philipp; Hettler, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit pla...

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Enterovirus 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (Sentinext)

    2013-04-08

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus associated with fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Here, we report the crystal structure of enterovirus 71 and show that, unlike in other enteroviruses, the 'pocket factor,' a small molecule that stabilizes the virus, is partly exposed on the floor of the 'canyon.' Thus, the structure of antiviral compounds may require a hydrophilic head group designed to interact with residues at the entrance of the pocket.

  5. Studies on synthesis, growth, structural, optical properties of organic 8-hydroxyquinolinium succinate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirumurugan, R., E-mail: singlecrystalxrd@gmail.com; Anitha, K., E-mail: singlecrystalxrd@gmail.com [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021 (India)

    2014-04-24

    8-hydroxyquinolinium succinate (8HQSU), an organic material has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by employing the technique of slow evaporation. The structure of the grown crystal was elucidated by using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. 8HQSU crystal belongs to the monoclinic crystallographic system with non-centro symmetric space group of P2{sub 1}. FT-IR spectral investigation has been carried out to identify the various functional groups present in the grown crystal. UV–vis spectral studies reveal that 8HQSU crystals are transparent in the entire visible region and the cut-off wavelength has been found to be 220nm.

  6. Growth, Structural and Microhardness Studies on New Semiorganic Single Crystals of Calcium Para Nitrophenolate Dihydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Good quality crystals of calcium p-nitrophenolate (NPCa) were grown from saturated solution by slow evaporation method. The crystal structure analysis and the molecular arrangement of these crystals were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). From single crystal XRD studies, NPCa is found to be crystallized in the monoclinic system with a space group P21/n. The functional groups of the material were confirmed qualitatively by FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) spectral analysis. Optical absorption studies reveal the absorption region and microhardness studies were carried out to confirm the mechanical behaviour of the crystals.

  7. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2,7-DIACETOXYTRANS-15,16-DIMETHYL-15,16-DIHYDROPYRENE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    AROMATIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (* CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS), ESTERS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, SCINTILLATION COUNTERS, CANADA

  8. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  9. Crystal structure and magnetization of a Co3B2O6 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, N. V.; Platunov, M. S.; Ivanova, N. B.; Knyazev, Yu. V.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Eremin, E. V.; Vasil'ev, A. D.; Bayukov, O. A.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Velikanov, D. A.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.

    2013-07-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of Co3B2O6 single crystals are studied. Orthorhombic symmetry with space group Pnnm is detected at room temperature. The measurements of static magnetization and dynamic magnetic susceptibility reveal two magnetic anomalies at T 1 = 33 K and T 2 = 10 K and an easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. The effective magnetic moment indicates a high-spin state of the Co2+ ion. A spin-flop transition is found at low temperatures and H sf = 23 kOe. EXAFS spectra of the K-edge absorption of Co are recorded at various temperatures, the temperature-induced changes in the parameters of the local environment of cobalt are analyzed, and the effective Co-Co and Co-O distances are determined. The magnetic interactions in the crystal are analyzed in terms of an indirect coupling model.

  10. Structural templating in a nonplanar phthalocyanine using single crystal copper iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Rochford, L. A. (Luke A.); Ramadan, Alexandra J.; Keeble, Dean S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Heutz, Sandrine; Jones, T S

    2015-01-01

    Solution-grown copper iodide crystals are used as substrates for the templated growth of the nonplanar vanadyl phthalocyanine using organic molecular beam deposition. Structural characterization reveals a single molecular orientation produced by the (111) Miller plane of the copper iodide crystals. These fundamental measurements show the importance of morphology and structure in templating interactions for organic electronics applications.

  11. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Dehydroandrographolide Dipolycyclophosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The title compound was synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR, H R S I-M S and MS, and its crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal is of orthorhombic system (C4oH52O11P2, Mr= 770.76), space group P21212, with a = 22.562(5), b =29.224(6), c = 7.1953(14) A, V = 4744.2(16) A3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.079 g/cm3, F(000) = 1640 andμ =0.141 mm-1. The final R = 0.0758 and wR = 0.1778 for 2794 observed reflections with I > 2o(I).Intermolecular hydrogen bonds are found between the O atom of carbonyl group and H atoms of olefinic carbon. The absolute configuration of this molecule was confirmed by comparison with that of the original material.

  12. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-02

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood.

  13. Crystal structure of N-(4-hydroxybenzylacetone thiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Argibay-Otero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title compound, C11H15N3OS, shows the flexibility due to the methylene group at the thioamide N atom in the side chain, resulting in the molecule being non-planar. The dihedral angle between the plane of the benzene ring and that defined by the atoms of the thiosemicarbazide arm is 79.847 (4°. In the crystal, the donor–acceptor hydrogen-bond character of the –OH group dominates the intermolecular associations, acting as a donor in an O—H...S hydrogen bond, as well as being a double acceptor in a centrosymmetric cyclic bridging N—H...O,O′ interaction [graph set R22(4]. The result is a one-dimensional duplex chain structure, extending along [111]. The usual N—H...S hydrogen-bonding association common in thiosemicarbazone crystal structures is not observed.

  14. The X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Keratin 1-Keratin 10 Helix 2B Heterodimer Reveals Molecular Surface Properties and Biochemical Insights into Human Skin Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunick, Christopher G; Milstone, Leonard M

    2017-01-01

    Keratins 1 (K1) and 10 (K10) are the primary keratins expressed in differentiated epidermis. Mutations in K1/K10 are associated with human skin diseases. We determined the crystal structure of the complex between the distal (2B) helices of K1 and K10 to better understand how human keratin structure correlates with function. The 3.3 Å resolution structure confirms many features inferred by previous biochemical analyses, but adds unexpected insights. It demonstrates a parallel, coiled-coil heterodimer with a predominantly hydrophobic intermolecular interface; this heterodimer formed a higher order complex with a second K1-K10-2B heterodimer via a Cys401(K10) disulfide link, although the bond angle is unanticipated. The molecular surface analysis of K1-K10-2B identified several pockets, one adjacent to the disulfide linkage and conserved in K5-K14. The solvent accessible surface area of the K1-K10 structure is 20-25% hydrophobic. The 2B region contains mixed acidic and basic patches proximally (N-terminal), whereas it is largely acidic distally (C-terminal). Mapping of conserved and nonconserved residues between K1-K10 and K5-K14 onto the structure demonstrated the majority of unique residues align along the outer helical ridge. Finally, the structure permitted a fresh analysis of the deleterious effects caused by K1/K10 missense mutations found in patients with phenotypic skin disease.

  15. Crystal structure of low-symmetry rondorfite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Zadov, A. E.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-03-01

    The crystal structure of an aluminum-rich variety of the mineral rondorfite with the composition Ca16[Mg2(Si7Al)(O31OH)]Cl4 from the skarns of the Verkhne-Chegemskoe plateau (the Kabardino-Balkarian Republic, the Northern Caucasus Region, Russia) was solved in the triclinic space group with the unit-cell parameters a = 15.100(2) Å, b = 15.110(2) Å, c = 15.092(2) Å, α = 90.06(1)°, β = 90.01(1)°, γ = 89.93(1)°, Z = 4, sp. gr. P1. The structural model consisting of 248 independent atoms was determined by the phase-correction method and refined to R = 3.8% with anisotropic displacement parameters based on all 7156 independent reflections with 7156 F > 3σ( F). The crystal structure is based on pentamers consisting of four Si tetrahedra linked by the central Mg tetrahedron. The structure can formally be refined in the cubic space group ( a = 15.105 Å, sp. gr. Fd overline 3 , seven independent positions) with anisotropic displacement parameters to R = 2.74% based on 579 reflections with F > 3σ( F) without accounting for more than 1000 observed reflections, which are inconsistent with the cubic symmetry of the crystal structure.

  16. Effect of Crystal Growth Direction on Domain Structure of Mn-Doped (Na,K)NbO3 Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Kohei; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi; Kagomiya, Isao

    2013-09-01

    Single crystals of (Na0.55K0.45)(Nb0.995Mn0.005)O3 have been grown by a floating zone method in N2 and decompression atmosphere to avoid alkaline metal volatilization on the SrTiO3 material base. The variation of their ferroelectric domain structure and the chemical composition of the grown crystal in the growth direction were evaluated. In the crystal grown in N2 atmosphere, the Na and K are not distributed homogeneously. In addition, the phase transition temperature TC and TO-T showed different values between the grown crystal and raw material. By using laser scanning confocal microscope, the domain structures of the grown crystal revealed random patterns in the initial growth stage and lamellar patterns in the progressing crystal growth. In decompression atmosphere, the TC and TO-T values of the grown crystal were similar to those of the raw material and the domain structures showed a constant domain size. The electrical property of the crystal became stable and the domain structure was easily switched against applied electrical field because the oriented lamellar domain was created during cooling of the crystal.

  17. The 2.5 Å Crystal Structure of the SIRT1 Catalytic Domain Bound to Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD + ) and an Indole (EX527 Analogue) Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xun; Allison, Dagart; Condon, Bradley; Zhang, Feiyu; Gheyi, Tarun; Zhang, Aiping; Ashok, Sheela; Russell, Marijane; MacEwan, Iain; Qian, Yuewei; Jamison, James A.; Luz, John Gately

    2013-02-14

    The sirtuin SIRT1 is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, a Sir2 family member, and one of seven human sirtuins. Sirtuins are conserved from archaea to mammals and regulate transcription, genome stability, longevity, and metabolism. SIRT1 regulates transcription via deacetylation of transcription factors such as PPARγ, NFκB, and the tumor suppressor protein p53. EX527 (27) is a nanomolar SIRT1 inhibitor and a micromolar SIRT2 inhibitor. To elucidate the mechanism of SIRT inhibition by 27, we determined the 2.5 Å crystal structure of the SIRT1 catalytic domain (residues 241–516) bound to NAD+ and the 27 analogue compound 35. 35 binds deep in the catalytic cleft, displacing the NAD+ nicotinamide and forcing the cofactor into an extended conformation. The extended NAD+ conformation sterically prevents substrate binding. The SIRT1/NAD+/35 crystal structure defines a novel mechanism of histone deacetylase inhibition and provides a basis for understanding, and rationally improving, inhibition of this therapeutically important target by drug-like molecules.

  18. Structure sensitive properties of KTP-type crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Adding various dopants during the growth of the parent KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal has given rise to an extensive series of KTP-type crystals. The doped KTP or KTP-type crystals often have very subtle structural variations from pure KTP crystals. As a result of these structural changes the KTP-type crystals often exhibit different physical properties, which may be referred to as structure sensitive properties. It is possible to fine-tune the nonlinear optical properties of KTP crystals through doping. This results in a broad range of applications for KTP-type crystals.

  19. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2017-01-01

    synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor...... structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full...

  20. Crystal structure of tris(hydroxylammonium orthophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Leinemann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH]+3·[PO4]3−, consists of discrete hydroxylammonium cations and orthophosphate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phosphorus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by intermolecular O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O—H...O, two N—H...O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N—H...O interactions are observed.

  1. Atomic basis for the species-specific inhibition of αV integrins by monoclonal antibody 17E6 is revealed by the crystal structure of αVβ3 ectodomain-17E6 Fab complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Bhuvaneshwari; Van Agthoven, Johannes F; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Alonso, José Luis; Adair, Brian D; Rui, Xianliang; Anand, Saurabh; Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Burger, Christa; Goodman, Simon L; Arnaout, M Amin

    2014-05-16

    The function-blocking, non-RGD-containing, and primate-specific mouse monoclonal antibody 17E6 binds the αV subfamily of integrins. 17E6 is currently in phase II clinical trials for treating cancer. To elucidate the structural basis of recognition and the molecular mechanism of inhibition, we crystallized αVβ3 ectodomain in complex with the Fab fragment of 17E6. Protein crystals grew in presence of the activating cation Mn(2+). The integrin in the complex and in solution assumed the genuflected conformation. 17E6 Fab bound exclusively to the Propeller domain of the αV subunit. At the core of αV-Fab interface were interactions involving Propeller residues Lys-203 and Gln-145, with the latter accounting for primate specificity. The Propeller residue Asp-150, which normally coordinates Arg of the ligand Arg-Gly-Asp motif, formed contacts with Arg-54 of the Fab that were expected to reduce soluble FN10 binding to cellular αVβ3 complexed with 17E6. This was confirmed in direct binding studies, suggesting that 17E6 is an allosteric inhibitor of αV integrins.

  2. Crystal Structures of New Ammonium 5-Aminotetrazolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lampl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of three salts of anionic 5-aminotetrazole are described. The tetramethylammonium salt (P forms hydrogen-bonded ribbons of anions which accept weak C–H···N contacts from the cations. The cystamine salt (C2/c shows wave-shaped ribbons of anions linked by hydrogen bonds to screw-shaped dications. The tetramethylguanidine salt (P21/c exhibits layers of anions hydrogen-bonded to the cations.

  3. Crystal Structure of a New Cembranolide Diterpene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new cembranoide deterpene was isolated from the soft coral Sinularia Tenella. The crystal and chemical structure of the title compound were determined by means of spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction analysis as (1R* , 4R* , 5S* , 12S* , 12R* )-9-acetoxy-cembr-8E, 15 (17)-dien-16,4-olide. It shows a moderate cytotoxicity against P 388 and L 1210 cell lines.

  4. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  6. Revealing digital documents. Concealed structures in data

    CERN Document Server

    Voß, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    This short paper gives an introduction to a research project to analyze how digital documents are structured and described. Using a phenomenological approach, this research will reveal common patterns that are used in data, independent from the particular technology in which the data is available. The ability to identify these patterns, on different levels of description, is important for several applications in digital libraries. A better understanding of data structuring will not only help to better capture singular characteristics of data by metadata, but will also recover intended structures of digital objects, beyond long term preservation.

  7. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  8. Crystal Structure Refinement of Synthetic Pure Gyrolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arūnas Baltušnikas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure calcium silicate hydrate – gyrolite was prepared under the saturated steam pressure at 473 K temperature in rotating autoclave. The crystal structure of synthetic gyrolite was investigated by X-ray diffraction and refined using Le Bail, Rietveld and crystal structure modelling methods. Background, peak shape parameters and verification of the space group were performed by the Le Bail full pattern decomposition. Peculiarities of interlayer sheet X of gyrolite unit cell were highlighted by Rietveld refinement. Possible atomic arrangement in interlayer sheet X was solved by global optimization method. Most likelihood crystal structure model of gyrolite was calculated by final Rietveld refinement. It was crystallographically showed, that cell parameters are: a = 0.9713(2 nm, b = 0.9715(2 nm, c = 2.2442(3 nm and alfa = 95.48(2 º, beta = 91.45(2 °, gamma = l20.05(3 °.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5460

  9. Thermodynamics of sublimation, crystal lattice energies, and crystal structures of racemates and enantiomers: (+)- and (+/-)-ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, German L; Kurkov, Sergey V; Hansen, Lars Kr; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2004-03-01

    Thermodynamic differences between ibuprofen (IBP) racemate and the (+)-enantiomer were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermoanalysis, and crystal energy calculations. The thermodynamic functions of sublimation (as a measure of crystal lattice energy) were obtained by the transpiration method. The sublimation enthalpies (DeltaH(sub)) of (+/-)-IBP and (+)-IBP are 115.8 +/- 0.6 and 107.4 +/- 0.5 kJ. mol(-1), respectively. Using the temperature dependency of the saturated vapor pressure, the relative fractions of enthalpy and entropy of the sublimation process were calculated, and the sublimation process for both the racemate and the enantiomer was found to be enthalpy driven (62%). Two different force fields, Mayo et al. (M) and Gavezzotti (G), were used for comparative analysis of crystal lattice energies. Both force fields revealed that the van der Waals term contributes more to the packing energy in (+)-IBP than in (+/-)-IBP. The hydrogen bonding energy, however, contributes at 29.7 and 32.3% to the total crystal lattice energy in (+)-IBP and (+/-)-IBP (M), respectively. Furthermore, different structure fragments of the IBP molecule were analyzed with respect to their contribution to nonbonded van der Waals interactions. The effect of the C-H distance on the van der Waals term of the crystal lattice energy was also studied.

  10. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors assemble from five subunits (GluK1-5) into tetrameric ion channels. Kainate receptors are located at both pre- and postsynaptic membranes in the central nervous system where they contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges in front of us. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'.

  11. Crystal Structures of Human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 (AS160) RabGTPase-activating Protein (RabGAP) Domains Reveal Critical Elements for GLUT4 Translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Park; W Jin; S Shoelson

    2011-12-31

    We have solved the x-ray crystal structures of the RabGAP domains of human TBC1D1 and human TBC1D4 (AS160), at 2.2 and 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Like the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP domain, whose structure was solved previously in complex with mouse Rab33B, the human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 domains both have 16 {alpha}-helices and no {beta}-sheet elements. We expected the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure to predict the corresponding interfaces between cognate mammalian RabGAPs and Rabs, but found that residues were poorly conserved. We further tested the relevance of this model by Ala-scanning mutagenesis, but only one of five substitutions within the inferred binding site of the TBC1D1 RabGAP significantly perturbed catalytic efficiency. In addition, substitution of TBC1D1 residues with corresponding residues from Gyp1p did not enhance catalytic efficiency. We hypothesized that biologically relevant RabGAP/Rab partners utilize additional contacts not described in the yeast Gyp1p/mouse Rab33B structure, which we predicted using our two new human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 structures. Ala substitution of TBC1D1 Met{sup 930}, corresponding to a residue outside of the Gyp1p/Rab33B contact, substantially reduced catalytic activity. GLUT4 translocation assays confirmed the biological relevance of our findings. Substitutions with lowest RabGAP activity, including catalytically dead RK and Met{sup 930} and Leu{sup 1019} predicted to perturb Rab binding, confirmed that biological activity requires contacts between cognate RabGAPs and Rabs beyond those in the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure.

  12. A DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2,3,4,6-TETRANITROANILINE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (* CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , EXPLOSIVES), (*EXPLOSIVES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), AROMATIC COMPOUNDS, AMINES, NITRATES, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, FOURIER ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL BONDS.

  13. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  14. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick;

    2016-01-01

    the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals...... an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity...

  15. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2-(4’-AMINO-5’AMINO PYRIMIDY) -2-PENTENE-4-ONE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NITROGEN HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*AMINES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*KETONES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), CRYSTAL LATTICES, FOURIER ANALYSIS, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, PYRIMIDINES, CHEMICAL BONDS

  16. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria V. Abzianidze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent molecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the molecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001 plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hydroxy groups located on the interior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O—H...O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001 plane. The butyl chains interdigitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major–minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6:0.282 (6.

  17. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Silveira Belo Nascimento Roque, Paulo Sergio; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K.; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-09-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality.

  18. Synthesis and structural characterization of a single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuyang; Allan, Phoebe K; Renouf, Catherine L; He, Xiang; McCormick, Laura J; Morris, Russell E

    2014-01-28

    A single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer compound was hydrothermally synthesized. The structural rearrangement is induced by selecting a ligand that contains both strong and weaker coordinating groups. Both hydrated and dehydrated structures were determined by single crystal X-ray analysis.

  19. Percolation in photonic crystals revealed by Fano Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Pariente, Jose Angel; Pecharomán, Carlos; Blanco, Alvaro; García-Martín, Antonio; López, Cefe

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how the arrangement of defects in photonic crystals impacts its photonic properties is cru-cial for the design of functional materials based thereon. By preparing photonic crystals with random missing scatterers we create crystals where disorder is embodied as vacancies in an otherwise perfect lattice rather than the usual positional or size disorder. We show that the amount of defects not only determines the intensity but also the nature of the light scattering. As the amount of defects varies, light scattering undergoes a transition whereby the usual signatures of photonic gaps (Bragg peak) suffer line-shape changes (Bragg dip) that can be readily described with the Fano resonance q parameter. When the amount of vacancies reaches the percolation threshold, q undergoes a sign change signaling the transition from a crystal to a mosaic of microcrystals through a state where scattering is maximum. Beyond that point the system reenters a state of low scattering that ap-pears in the guise of ...

  20. Crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum pyruvate kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Cook

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase plays a critical role in cellular metabolism of glucose by serving as a major regulator of glycolysis. This tetrameric enzyme is allosterically regulated by different effector molecules, mainly phosphosugars. In response to binding of effector molecules and substrates, significant structural changes have been identified in various pyruvate kinase structures. Pyruvate kinase of Cryptosporidium parvum is exceptional among known enzymes of protozoan origin in that it exhibits no allosteric property in the presence of commonly known effector molecules. The crystal structure of pyruvate kinase from C. parvum has been solved by molecular replacement techniques and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. In the active site a glycerol molecule is located near the γ-phosphate site of ATP, and the protein structure displays a partially closed active site. However, unlike other structures where the active site is closed, the α6' helix in C. parvum pyruvate kinase unwinds and assumes an extended conformation. In the crystal structure a sulfate ion is found at a site that is occupied by a phosphate of the effector molecule in many pyruvate kinase structures. A new feature of the C. parvum pyruvate kinase structure is the presence of a disulfide bond cross-linking the two monomers in the asymmetric unit. The disulfide bond is formed between cysteine residue 26 in the short N-helix of one monomer with cysteine residue 312 in a long helix (residues 303-320 of the second monomer at the interface of these monomers. Both cysteine residues are unique to C. parvum, and the disulfide bond remained intact in a reduced environment. However, the significance of this bond, if any, remains unknown at this time.

  1. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray analysis of CsdL/TcdA reveal a new tRNA binding motif in the MoeB/E1 superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Ardá, Ana; Savko, Martin; Round, Adam; Shepard, William E; Bruix, Marta; Coll, Miquel; Fernández, Francisco J; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Vega, M Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine ('cyclic t6A', ct(6)A) is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct(6)A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct(6)A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct(6)A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct(6)A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA.

  2. The Crystal Structure and Small-Angle X-Ray Analysis of CsdL/TcdA Reveal a New tRNA Binding Motif in the MoeB/E1 Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Ardá, Ana; Savko, Martin; Round, Adam; Shepard, William E.; Bruix, Marta; Coll, Miquel; Fernández, Francisco J.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Vega, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (‘cyclic t6A’, ct6A) is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA. PMID:25897750

  3. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray analysis of CsdL/TcdA reveal a new tRNA binding motif in the MoeB/E1 superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel López-Estepa

    Full Text Available Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine ('cyclic t6A', ct(6A is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct(6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct(6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct(6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct(6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA.

  4. Diterbium heptanickel: a crystal structure redetermination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Levytskyy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, Tb2Ni7, was redetermined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. In comparison with previous studies based on powder X-ray diffraction data [Lemaire et al. (1967. C. R. Acad. Sci. Ser. B, 265, 1280–1282; Lemaire & Paccard (1969. Bull. Soc. Fr. Mineral. Cristallogr. 92, 9–16; Buschow & van der Goot (1970. J. Less-Common Met. 22, 419–428], the present redetermination affords refined coordinates and anisotropic displacement parameters for all atoms. A partial occupation for one Tb atom results in the non-stoichiometric composition Tb1.962 (4Ni7. The title compound adopts the Ce2Ni7 structure type and can also be derived from the CaCu5 structure type as an intergrowth structure. The asymmetric unit contains two Tb sites (both site symmetries 3m. and five Ni sites (.m., mm2, 3m., 3m., -3m.. The two different coordination polyhedra of Tb are a Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by four Tb and 12 Ni atoms and a pseudo Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by two Tb and 18 Ni atoms. The four different coordination polyhedra of Ni are Frank–Kasper icosahedra formed by five Tb and seven Ni atoms, four Tb and eight Ni atoms, three Tb and nine Ni atoms, and six Tb and six Ni atoms, respectively.

  5. One dimensional coordination polymers: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Şenyel, Mustafa; Şahin, Onur

    2016-11-01

    Two new one dimensional (1D) cyanide complexes, namely [M(4-aepy)2(H2O)2][Pt(CN)4], (4-aepy = 4-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine M = Cu(II) (1) or Zn(II) (2)), have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal and elemental analyses techniques. The crystallographic analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and isostructural, and crystallize in the monoclinic system and C2 space group. The Pt(II) ions are coordinated by four cyanide-carbon atoms in the square-planar geometry and the [Pt(CN)4]2- ions act as a counter ion. The M(II) ions display an N4O2 coordination sphere with a distorted octahedral geometry, the nitrogen donors belonging to four molecules of the organic 4-aepy that act as unidentate ligands and two oxygen atoms from aqua ligands. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are similar each other and linked via intermolecular hydrogen bonding, Pt⋯π interactions to form 3D supramolecular network. Vibration assignments of all the observed bands are given and the spectral features also supported to the crystal structures of the complexes.

  6. Nicotinamide riboside kinase structures reveal new pathways to NAD+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Wolfram; Rabeh, Wael M; Bogan, Katrina L; Belenky, Peter; Wojcik, Marzena; Seidle, Heather F; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Yang, Tianle; Sauve, Anthony A; Park, Hee-Won; Brenner, Charles

    2007-10-02

    The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk) pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+.

  7. Nicotinamide riboside kinase structures reveal new pathways to NAD+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Tempel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+.

  8. Crystal structure prediction from first principles: The crystal structures of glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the genetic algorithms search implemented in MGAC, modified genetic algorithm for crystals, coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable.

  9. Tailoring quantum structures for active photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsova, Nadezda

    This work is dedicated to the tailoring of quantum structures, with particular attention to the integration of selective area grown (SAG) active material into photonic crystal (PhC) slabs. The platform based on active PhC is vital to the realization of highly efficient elements with low energy...... consumption for on-chip and chip-to-chip optical communication. In order to develop metal-organic vapor phase epitaxial selective area etching and growth, a mask was fabricated in the HSQ e-beam resist including optimization of exposure and development conditions. By use of CBr4 as an etchant, in situ etching...... area and between the structures oriented along the [0-1-1] and [0-11] directions. Strong wavelength dependence with variations of the mask width of a few μm and opening sizes of hundreds of nanometers was observed. Incorporation of an active medium into PhC structures has showed promising results...

  10. Crystal structure of (ferrocenylmethyldimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamadou Ndiaye

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title salt, [Fe(C5H5(C8H13N](HC2O4, consists of discrete (ferrocenylmethyldimethylammonium cations and hydrogen oxalate anions. The anions are connected through a strong O—H...O hydrogen bond, forming linear chains running parallel to [100]. The cations are linked to the anions through bifurcated N—H...(O,O′ hydrogen bonds. Weak C—H...π interactions between neighbouring ferrocenyl moieties are also observed.

  11. [Crystal and molecular structure of cytisine salts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiecka, Julia; Przybył, Anna K; Kubicki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Cytisine is an alkaloid of plant origin. It is a toxic substance, obtained on an industrial scale from Laburnum anagyroides also known as common laburnum. Today is used in the preparation of anti-smoking products as an agonist of nicotinic receptors nAChR-alpha4beta2. Thanks to crystallographic methods we can examine and describe with high accuracy the actual structure of complex chemical compounds. This work aims to present a series of tests carried out on crystals of cytisine salts, after a prior isolation of cytisine from the seeds of laburnum anagyroides.

  12. Crystal structure of hexaaquadichloridoytterbium(III chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Knopf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, [YbCl2(H2O6]Cl, was determined at 110 K. Samples were obtained from evaporated acetonitrile solutions containing the title compound, which consists of a [YbCl2(H2O6]+ cation and a Cl− anion. The cations in the title compound sit on a twofold axis and form O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds with the nearby Cl− anion. The coordination geometry around the metal centre forms a distorted square antiprism. The ytterbium complex is isotypic with the europium complex [Tambrornino et al. (2014. Acta Cryst. E70, i27].

  13. Elasticity of some mantle crystal structures. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Simmons, G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants are determined as a function of pressure and temperature for rutile structure germanium dioxide (GeO2). The data are qualitatively similar to those of rutile TiO2 measured by Manghnani (1969). The compressibility in the c direction is less than one-half that in the a direction, the pressure derivative of the shear constant is negative, and the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus has a relatively high value of about 6.2. According to an elastic strain energy theory, the negative shear modulus derivative implies that the kinetic barrier to diffusion decreases with increasing pressure.

  14. Syntheses and Crystal Structures of Pyrazoline Derivants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hai-Bin; JI Shun-Jun; ZHANG Yong

    2005-01-01

    Two pyrazoline derivants 1-(2-benzothiazole)-3-phenyl-5-(3-thiophene)-2- pyrazoline (BPTP) and 1-(2-benzothiazole)-3-(2-thiophene)-5-phenyl-2-pyrazoline (BTPP) have been synthe- sized and their crystal structures were determined by X-ray single-crystal diffraction.Crystal of BPTP belongs to triclinic, space group P with a = 9.4430(11), b = 9.9384(13), c = 9.9394(13) (A), α = 83.107(10), β = 79.947(10), γ = 70.221(7)o, V = 862.42(19) (A)3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.392 g/cm3, μ(MoKα) = 0.316 mm-1, F(000) = 376, λ = 0.71070 (A), (Δρ)max = 0.348, (Δρ)min = -0.481 e/(A)3, the final R = 0.0407 and wR = 0.1055 for 2844 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I).Crystal of BTPP is of monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 11.6158(17), b = 11.2796(18), c = 13.082(2) (A), α = 90, β = 91.087(4), γ = 90o, V = 1713.7(5) (A)3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.401 g/cm3, μ(MoKα) = 0.318 mm-1, Mr = 361.07, F(000) = 752, λ = 0.71070 (A), (Δρ)max = 0.322, (Δρ)min = -0.330 e/(A)3, the final R = 0.0563 and wR = 0.1058 for 3434 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I).

  15. Band structure characteristics of T-square fractal phononic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-Jian; Fan You-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The T-square fractal two-dimensional phononic crystal model is presented in this article.A comprehensive study is performed for the Bragg scattering and locally resonant fractal phononic crystal.We find that the band structures of the fractal and non-fractal phononic crystals at the same filling ratio are quite different through using the finite element method.The fractal design has an important impact on the band structures of the two-dimensional phononic crystals.

  16. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David [UCLA; (UCB)

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  17. Crystal structure of lead(II tartrate: a redetermination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of poly[μ4-tartrato-κ6O1,O3:O1′:O2,O4:O4′-lead], [Pb(C4H4O6]n, were grown in a gel medium. In comparison with the previous structure determination of this compound from laboratory powder X-ray diffraction data [De Ridder et al. (2002. Acta Cryst. C58, m596–m598], the redetermination on the basis of single-crystal data reveals the absolute structure, all atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and a much higher accuracy in terms of bond lengths and angles. It could be shown that a different space group or incorporation of water as reported for similarly gel-grown lead tartrate crystals is incorrect. In the structure, each Pb2+ cation is bonded to eight O atoms of five tartrate anions, while each tartrate anion links four Pb2+ cations. The resulting three-dimensional framework is stabilized by O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the OH groups of one tartrate anion and the carboxylate O atoms of adjacent anions.

  18. Crystal structure of lead(II) tartrate: a redetermination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of poly[μ4-tartrato-κ(6) O (1),O (3):O (1'):O (2),O (4):O (4')-lead], [Pb(C4H4O6)] n , were grown in a gel medium. In comparison with the previous structure determination of this compound from laboratory powder X-ray diffraction data [De Ridder et al. (2002 ▶). Acta Cryst. C58, m596-m598], the redetermination on the basis of single-crystal data reveals the absolute structure, all atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and a much higher accuracy in terms of bond lengths and angles. It could be shown that a different space group or incorporation of water as reported for similarly gel-grown lead tartrate crystals is incorrect. In the structure, each Pb(2+) cation is bonded to eight O atoms of five tartrate anions, while each tartrate anion links four Pb(2+) cations. The resulting three-dimensional framework is stabilized by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the OH groups of one tartrate anion and the carboxyl-ate O atoms of adjacent anions.

  19. Modeling of photonic crystal waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Ivan; Kwiecien, Pavel; Šiňor, Milan; Haiduk, Adam

    2007-05-01

    Photonic crystal (PhC) structures and photonic structures based on them represent nowadays very promising structures of artificial origin. Since they exhibit very specific properties and characteristics that can be very difficult (or even impossible) to realize by other means, they represent a significant part of new artificially made metamaterial classes. For studying and modeling properties of PhC structures, we have applied, implemented and partially improved various complementary techniques: the 2D plane wave expansion (PWE) method, and the 2D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method with perfectly matched layers. Also, together with these in-house methods, other tools available in the field have been applied, including, e.g. MIT MPB (PWE), F2P (FDTD) and CAMFR (bidirectional expansion and propagation mode matching method) packages. We have applied these methods to several PhC waveguide structure examples, studying the effects of varying the key parameters and geometry. Such a study is relevant for proper understanding of physical mechanisms and for optimization and fabrication recommendations. Namely, in this contribution, we have concentrated on several examples of PhC waveguide structure simulations, of two types of guides (dielectric-rode type and air-hole type), with several geometries: rectangular lattice with either rectangular or chessboard inclusions. The modeling results are compared and discussed.

  20. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. The active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution.

  1. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Y.C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.G., E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chun, S.H.; Kim, K.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state. - Highlights: • For the first time Ferromagnetic Resonance is used to probe the local magnetic structure of Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22.} • The multiphases in the single crystal is identified, which provides important information toward its future application for the magnetoelectric devices.

  2. Syntheses and Crystal Structures of Ferrocenoindenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Laus

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferrocenoindenes display planar chirality and thus represent valuable ligands for asymmetric catalysis. Here, we report on the synthesis of novel 3-(1,1-dibromomethyleneferroceno[1,2-a]indene, (Z-3-(1-bromomethylene-6-iodoferroceno[1,2-a]indene, and benzo[5,6-f]ferroceno[2,3,a]inden-1-one. Any application-oriented design of chiral catalysts requires fundamental knowledge about the ligands involved, not only in terms of atom-connectivity, but also in terms of their three-dimensional structure and steric demand. Therefore, the crystal structures of 2-ferrocenylbenzoic acid, ferroceno[1,2-a]indene, and (Z-3-(1-bromomethylene-6-iodoferroceno[1,2-a]indene have been determined. The bond-lengths that can be retrieved therefrom also allow for an estimation of the reactivity of the aryl-iodo, bromo-methylidene and dibromomethylidene moieties.

  3. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  5. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  6. Crystal structures of Aedes aegypti alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi Gui; Vogelaar, Nancy; Wilson, Scott R; Rizzi, Menico; Li, Jianyong

    2006-12-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75A high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1A resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  7. Photonic crystal digital alloys and their band structure properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongkug; Kim, Dong-Uk; Jeon, Heonsu

    2011-09-26

    We investigated semi-disordered photonic crystals (PCs), digital alloys, and made thorough comparisons with their counterparts, random alloys. A set of diamond lattice PC digital alloys operating in a microwave regime were prepared by alternately stacking two kinds of sub-PC systems composed of alumina and silica spheres of the same size. Measured transmission spectra as well as calculated band structures revealed that when the digital alloy period is short, band-gaps of the digital alloys are practically the same as those of the random alloys. This study indicates that the concept of digital alloys holds for photons in PCs as well.

  8. Crystal structure determination of anti-DNA Fab A52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Eilat, Dan

    2014-08-01

    A52 is a murine monoclonal antibody isolated from autoimmune New Zealand Black/New Zealand White F1 mice that recognizes single and double stranded DNA. This mouse strain spontaneously develops systemic lupus erythematosus-like symptoms and has served as a model for that disease for many years. The 1.62 Å crystal structure of the A52 Fab fragment reveals an H3 complementarity determining region with four closely spaced arginine residues, creating a positively charged surface to accommodate bound DNA.

  9. Effect of local structures on crystallization in deeply undercooled metallic glass-forming liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S. Q.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, M. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The crystallization mechanism in deeply undercooled ZrCu metallic glass-forming liquids was investigated via molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that the crystallization process is mainly controlled by the growth of crystal nuclei formed by the BCC-like atomic clusters, consistent with experimental speculations. The crystallization rate is found to relate to the number of growing crystal nuclei in the crystallization process. The crystallization rate in systems with more crystal nuclei is significantly hindered by the larger surface fractions of crystal nuclei and their different crystalline orientations. It is further revealed that in the crystallization in deeply undercooled regions, the BCC-like crystal nuclei are formed from the inside of the precursors formed by the FCC-like atomic clusters, and growing at the expense of the precursors. Meanwhile, the precursors are expanding at the expense of the outside atomic clusters. This process is consistent with the so-called Ostwald step rule. The atomic structures of metallic glasses are found to have significant impact on the subsequent crystallization process. In the Zr85Cu15 system, the stronger spatial correlation of Cu atoms could hinder the crystallization processes in deeply undercooled regions.

  10. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose A.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F.; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-07-01

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates.

  11. Physical and Structural Studies on the Cryo-cooling of Insulin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    Reflection profiles were analyzed from microgravity-(mg) and earth-grown insulin crystals to measure mosaicity (h) and to reveal mosaic domain structure and composition. The effects of cryocooling on single and multi-domain crystals were compared. The effects of cryocooling on insulin structure were also re-examined. Microgravity crystals were larger, more homogeneous, and more perfect than earth crystals. Several mg crystals contained primarily a single mosaic domain with havg of 0.005deg. The earth crystals varied in quality and all contained multiple domains with havg of 0.031deg. Cryocooling caused a 43-fold increase in h for mg crystals (havg=0.217deg) and an %fold increase for earth crystals (havg=0.246deg). These results indicate that very well-ordered crystals are not completely protected from the stresses associated with cryocooling, especially when structural perturbations occur. However, there were differences in the reflection profiles. For multi-mosaic domain crystals, each domain individually broadened and separated from the other domains upon cryo-cooling. Cryo-cooling did not cause an increase in the number of domains. A crystal composed of a single domain retained this domain structure and the reflection profiles simply broadened. Therefore, an improved signal-to-noise ratio for each reflection was measured from cryo-cooled single domain crystals relative to cryo-cooled multi-domain crystals. This improved signal, along with the increase in crystal size, facilitated the measurement of the weaker high- resolution reflections. The observed broadening of reflection profiles indicates increased variation in unit cell dimensions which may be linked to cryo-cooling-associated structural changes and disorder.

  12. Crystal structure of strontium dinickel iron orthophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Ouaatta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, SrNi2Fe(PO43, synthesized by solid-state reaction, crystallizes in an ordered variant of the α-CrPO4 structure. In the asymmetric unit, two O atoms are in general positions, whereas all others atoms are in special positions of the space group Imma: the Sr cation and one P atom occupy the Wyckoff position 4e (mm2, Fe is on 4b (2/m, Ni and the other P atom are on 8g (2, one O atom is on 8h (m and the other on 8i (m. The three-dimensional framework of the crystal structure is built up by [PO4] tetrahedra, [FeO6] octahedra and [Ni2O10] dimers of edge-sharing octahedra, linked through common corners or edges. This structure comprises two types of layers stacked alternately along the [100] direction. The first layer is formed by edge-sharing octahedra ([Ni2O10] dimer linked to [PO4] tetrahedra via common edges while the second layer is built up from a strontium row followed by infinite chains of alternating [PO4] tetrahedra and FeO6 octahedra sharing apices. The layers are held together through vertices of [PO4] tetrahedra and [FeO6] octahedra, leading to the appearance of two types of tunnels parallel to the a- and b-axis directions in which the Sr cations are located. Each Sr cation is surrounded by eight O atoms.

  13. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-03-19

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome-the high-eukaryote-specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)-remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  14. The crystal structure of human GDP-L-fucose synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Sun, Lihua; Li, Jian; Xu, Chunyan; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yahui; Ji, Chaoneng; He, Jianhua

    2013-09-01

    Human GDP-l-fucose synthase, also known as FX protein, synthesizes GDP-l-fucose from its substrate GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose. The reaction involves epimerization at both C-3 and C-5 followed by an NADPH-dependent reduction of the carbonyl at C-4. In this paper, the first crystal structure of human FX protein was determined at 2.37 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit of the crystal structure contains four molecules which form two homodimers. Each molecule consists of two domains, a Rossmann-fold NADPH-binding motif and a carboxyl terminal domain. Compared with the Escherichia coli GDP-l-fucose synthase, the overall structures of these two enzymes have four major differences. There are four loops in the structure of human FX protein corresponding to two α-helices and two β-sheets in that of the E. coli enzyme. Besides, there are seven different amino acid residues binding with NAPDH comparing human FX protein with that from E. coli. The structure of human FX reveals the key catalytic residues and could be useful for the design of drugs for the treatment of inflammation, auto-immune diseases, and possibly certain types of cancer.

  15. Using crystal structure prediction to rationalize the hydration propensities of substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sharmarke; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Naumov, Panče

    2016-08-01

    The crystal energy landscapes of the salts of two rigid pharmaceutically active molecules reveal that the experimental structure of amantadine hydrochloride is the most stable structure with the majority of low-energy structures adopting a chain hydrogen-bond motif and packings that do not have solvent accessible voids. By contrast, memantine hydrochloride which differs in the substitution of two methyl groups on the adamantane ring has a crystal energy landscape where all structures within 10 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum have solvent-accessible voids ranging from 3 to 14% of the unit-cell volume including the lattice energy minimum that was calculated after removing water from the hydrated memantine hydrochloride salt structure. The success in using crystal structure prediction (CSP) to rationalize the different hydration propensities of these substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts allowed us to extend the model to predict under blind test conditions the experimental crystal structures of the previously uncharacterized 1-(methylamino)adamantane base and its corresponding hydrochloride salt. Although the crystal structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane was correctly predicted as the second ranked structure on the static lattice energy landscape, the crystallization of a Z' = 3 structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane hydrochloride reveals the limits of applying CSP when the contents of the crystallographic asymmetric unit are unknown.

  16. Steady distribution structure of point defects near crystal-melt interface under pulling stop of CZ Si crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T.; Takahashi, T.; Shirai, K.

    2017-02-01

    In order to reveal a steady distribution structure of point defects of no growing Si on the solid-liquid interface, the crystals were grown at a high pulling rate, which Vs becomes predominant, and the pulling was suddenly stopped. After restoring the variations of the crystal by the pulling-stop, the crystals were then left in prolonged contact with the melt. Finally, the crystals were detached and rapidly cooled to freeze point defects and then a distribution of the point defects of the as-grown crystals was observed. As a result, a dislocation loop (DL) region, which is formed by the aggregation of interstitials (Is), was formed over the solid-liquid interface and was surrounded with a Vs-and-Is-free recombination region (Rc-region), although the entire crystals had been Vs rich in the beginning. It was also revealed that the crystal on the solid-liquid interface after the prolonged contact with the melt can partially have a Rc-region to be directly in contact with the melt, unlike a defect distribution of a solid-liquid interface that has been growing. This experimental result contradicts a hypothesis of Voronkov's diffusion model, which always assumes the equilibrium concentrations of Vs and Is as the boundary condition for distribution of point defects on the growth interface. The results were disscussed from a qualitative point of view of temperature distribution and thermal stress by the pulling-stop.

  17. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  18. Extraction and Crystal Structure of Karounidiol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巢志茂; 王诚

    2003-01-01

    The title compound of karounidiol (C30H48O2), a main active triterpene component of snakegourd seed, was isolated from unsaponifiable matter of the seed oil of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim., and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. It crystallizes in orthorhombic system, space group P212121 with C30H48O2·CH3OH·H2O (C31H54O4), a = 7.515(1), b = 14.407(1), c = 27.799(2) (A。), V = 3009.8(5)(A。)3, Z = 4, Dx = 1.087 g/cm3, Mr = 490.77, F(000) = 1088 and μ = 0.086 mm-1. The final R = 0.0840 and wR = 0.2289 for 2752 observed reflections (|F|2 ≥ 2σ|F|2). The molecular crystal structure of karounidiol shows relative stereochemistry of (3α,13α,14β, 20α)-3,29-dihydroxy-13-methyl-26-norolean-7,9(11)-diene. The molecule is composed of five six- membered rings with ring junctures of A/B trans, C/D trans and D/E cis.

  19. Crystal and molecular structure of aflatrem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno N. Lenta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, C32H39NO4, confirms the absolute configuration of the seven chiral centres in the molecule. The molecule has a 1,1-dimethylprop-2-enyl substituent on the indole nucleus and this nucleus shares one edge with the five-membered ring which is, in turn, connected to a sequence of three edge-shared fused rings. The skeleton is completed by the 7,7-trimethyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one group connected to the terminal cyclohexene ring. The two cyclohexane rings adopt chair and half-chair conformations, while in the dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one unit, the six-membered ring has a half-chair conformation. The indole system of the molecule exhibits a tilt of 2.02 (1° between its two rings. In the crystal, O—H...O hydrogen bonds connect molecules into chains along [010]. Weak N—H...π interactions connect these chains, forming sheets parallel to (10-1.

  20. Crystal structure of zirconia by Rietveld refinement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王大宁; 郭永权; 梁开明; 陶琨

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structures and phase transformation of zirconia ceramics have been investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld powder diffraction profile fitting technique. A structural transition from monoclinic to tetragonal occurs when Y2O3 and CeO2 are doped into zirconia. The space group of the tetragonal structure is P42/nmc, Z=2. The lattice parameters are α=0.362 6(5) nm, c=0.522 6(3)nm for CeO2 doped zirconia and α=0. 360 2(8)nm, c=0. 517 9(1)nm for Y2O3 doped zirconia, respectively. In each unit cell, there are two kinds of equivalent positions, i. e. 2b and 4d, which are occupied by Zr4+, M(M=Y3+, Ce4+) cations and O2- anions, respectively. The crystallographic correlation among the cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic structures of ZrO2 is discussed.

  1. Iron-Ion Implantation into the Structure of Rock Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Mukhametshin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron ions with the energy of 40 keV have been implanted into colorless natural rock crystals to high fluencies of 1.0∙1017 and 1.5∙1017 ion/cm2. These crystals were selected from Svetlinsky deposits of the Southern Urals, which are well-known as minerals with high quality and low content of impurities. A radical change in the color of the crystals after iron-ion implantation and subsequent high-temperature annealing in air has been revealed. The origin of color changes has been studied by using optical methods, as well as Mössbauer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been established that the high-dose and high-energy flow of ions results in the formation of various kinds of structural defects on the surface layer of the matrix, such as electron-hole centers, as well as in the formation at a specific depth of the irradiated matrix of the ultrafine iron-containing phases with a structure, which is non-coherent to the structure of the original matrix. The subsequent high-temperature annealing of the implanted quartz has changed the color of the samples to orange-yellow. This color is similar to the color of natural citrine. The orange color richness of the heat-treated samples grew with increasing amounts of embedded iron impurity in the crystal. The nature of orange-yellow coloration of the implanted and annealed quartz plates can be explained by the formation of ultrafine hematite nanoparticles located in a layer at a depth of ~15 nm. The possibility of refining the color of minerals by ion-beam exposure has been discussed.

  2. Validation of experimental molecular crystal structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Streek, Jacco; Neumann, Marcus A

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the validation of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (d-DFT) method for the purpose of assessing the correctness of experimental organic crystal structures and enhancing the information content of purely experimental data. 241 experimental organic crystal structures from the August 2008 issue of Acta Cryst. Section E were energy-minimized in full, including unit-cell parameters. The differences between the experimental and the minimized crystal structures were subjected to statistical analysis. The r.m.s. Cartesian displacement excluding H atoms upon energy minimization with flexible unit-cell parameters is selected as a pertinent indicator of the correctness of a crystal structure. All 241 experimental crystal structures are reproduced very well: the average r.m.s. Cartesian displacement for the 241 crystal structures, including 16 disordered structures, is only 0.095 Å (0.084 Å for the 225 ordered structures). R.m.s. Cartesian displacements above 0.25 A either indicate incorrect experimental crystal structures or reveal interesting structural features such as exceptionally large temperature effects, incorrectly modelled disorder or symmetry breaking H atoms. After validation, the method is applied to nine examples that are known to be ambiguous or subtly incorrect.

  3. Crystal structure of the bacteriophage P2 integrase catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaar, Karin; Claesson, Magnus; Odegrip, Richard; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2015-11-30

    Bacteriophage P2 is a temperate phage capable of integrating its DNA into the host genome by site-specific recombination upon lysogenization. Integration and excision of the phage genome requires P2 integrase, which performs recognition, cleavage and joining of DNA during these processes. This work presents the high-resolution crystal structure of the catalytic domain of P2 integrase, and analysis of the structure-function relationship of several previously identified non-functional P2 integrase mutants. The DNA binding area is characterized by a large positively charged patch, harboring key residues. The structure reveals potential for large dimer flexibility, likely essential for rearrangement of DNA strands upon integration and excision of the phage DNA.

  4. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  5. Crystal structure of phenyl N-(4-nitrophenylcarbamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. AaminaNaaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C13H10N2O4, contains two independent molecules (A and B. The dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 48.18 (14° in molecule A and 45.81 (14° in molecule B. The mean plane of the carbamate N—C(=O—O group is twisted slightly from the attached benzene and phenyl rings, making respective dihedral angles of 12.97 (13 and 60.93 (14° in A, and 23.11 (14 and 59.10 (14° in B. In the crystal, A and B molecules are arranged alternately through N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...π interactions, forming chains along the a axis. The chains are further linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a double-chain structure.

  6. New Tricks of the Trade for Crystal Structure Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinjin; Abramov, Yuriy A; Doherty, Michael F

    2017-07-26

    Accurate crystal structures and their experimental uncertainties, determined by X-ray diffraction/neutron diffraction techniques, are vital for crystal engineering studies, such as polymorph stability and crystal morphology calculations. Because of differences in crystal growth and data measurement conditions, crystallographic databases often contain multiple entries of varying quality of the same compound. The choice of the most reliable and best quality crystal structure from many very similar structures remains an unresolved problem, especially for nonexperts. In addition, while crystallographers can make use of some professional software (i.e., Materials Studio) for structure refinement, noncrystallographers may not have access to it. In the present paper, we propose a simple method to study the sensitivity of the crystal lattice energy to changes in the structural parameters, which creates a diagnostic tool to test the quality of crystal structure files and to improve the low-quality structures based on lattice energy distribution. Thus, noncrystallographers could take the proposed idea and program/optimize crystal structure by themselves. They can have their in-house program to determine the reliability of the selected crystal data and then use the best quality data or carry out structural optimization for low-quality data. The proposed method will benefit a broad cross-section of scientific researchers, especially those in solid-state and physical chemistry.

  7. Stability of orientationally disordered crystal structures of colloidal hard dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marechal, Matthieu; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2008-06-01

    We study the stability of orientationally disordered crystal phases in a suspension of colloidal hard dumbbells using Monte Carlo simulations. For dumbbell bond length L/sigmafcc structure for a large part of the stable plastic crystal regime. In addition, we study the stability of an orientationally disordered aperiodic crystal structure in which the spheres of the dumbbells are on a random-hexagonal-close-packed lattice, and the dumbbells are formed by taking random pairs of neighboring spheres. Using free-energy calculations, we determine the fluid-aperiodic crystal and periodic-aperiodic crystal coexistence regions for L/sigma>0.88 .

  8. Affine structures and a tableau model for E_6 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Brant

    2009-01-01

    We provide the unique affine crystal structure for type E_6^{(1)} Kirillov-Reshetikhin crystals corresponding to the multiples of fundamental weights s Lambda_1, s Lambda_2, and s Lambda_6 for all s \\geq 1 (in Bourbaki's labeling of the Dynkin nodes, where 2 is the adjoint node). Our methods introduce a generalized tableaux model for classical highest weight crystals of type E and use the order three automorphism of the affine E_6^{(1)} Dynkin diagram. In addition, we provide a conjecture for the affine crystal structure of type E_7^{(1)} Kirillov-Reshetikhin crystals corresponding to the adjoint node.

  9. Isomorph invariance of the structure and dynamics of classical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Dan; Olsen, Andreas Elmerdahl; Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk

    2014-01-01

    of a defective fcc crystal is also shown to be isomorph invariant. In contrast, a NaCl crystal model does not exhibit isomorph invariances. Other systems simulated, though in less detail, are the Wahnström binary Lennard-Jones crystal with the MgZn2 Laves crystal structure, monatomic fcc crystals of particles......This paper shows by computer simulations that some crystalline systems have curves in their thermodynamic phase diagrams, so-called isomorphs, along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. The crystals are studied in a classical-mechanical framework......, which is generally a good description except significantly below melting. The existence of isomorphs for crystals is validated by simulations of particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones pair potential arranged into a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystalline structure; the slow vacancy-jump dynamics...

  10. Unusually High Archaeal Diversity in a Crystallizer Pond, Pomorie Salterns, Bulgaria, Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kambourova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on archaeal diversity in few salterns have revealed heterogeneity between sites and unique structures of separate places that hinder drawing of generalized conclusions. Investigations on the archaeal community composition in P18, the biggest crystallizer pond in Pomorie salterns (PS (34% salinity, demonstrated unusually high number of presented taxa in hypersaline environment. Archaeal clones were grouped in 26 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs assigned to 15 different genera from two orders, Halobacteriales and Haloferacales. All retrieved sequences were related to culturable halophiles or unculturable clones from saline (mostly hypersaline niches. New sequences represented 53.9% of archaeal OTUs. Some of them formed separate branches with 90% similarity to the closest neighbor. Present results significantly differed from the previous investigations in regard to the number of presented genera, the domination of some genera not reported before in such extreme niche, and the identification of previously undiscovered 16S rRNA sequences.

  11. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Envelope Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, Vincent C.; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A.; Fremont, Daved H. (WU-MED)

    2012-03-13

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  13. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  14. Crystal structure of the petal death protein from carnation flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Liu, Sijiu; Lu, Zhibing; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2005-12-20

    Expression of the PSR132 protein from Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation, clover pink) is induced in response to ethylene production associated with petal senescence, and thus the protein is named petal death protein (PDP). Recent work has established that despite the annotation of PDP in sequence databases as carboxyphosphoenolpyruvate mutase, the enzyme is actually a C-C bond cleaving lyase exhibiting a broad substrate profile. The crystal structure of PDP has been determined at 2.7 A resolution, revealing a dimer-of-dimers oligomeric association. Consistent with sequence homology, the overall alpha/beta barrel fold of PDP is the same as that of other isocitrate lyase/PEP mutase superfamily members, including a swapped eighth helix within a dimer. Moreover, Mg(2+) binds in the active site of PDP with a coordination pattern similar to that seen in other superfamily members. A compound, covalently bound to the catalytic residue, Cys144, was interpreted as a thiohemiacetal adduct resulting from the reaction of glutaraldehyde used to cross-link the crystals. The Cys144-carrying flexible loop that gates access to the active site is in the closed conformation. Models of bound substrates and comparison with the closed conformation of isocitrate lyase and 2-methylisocitrate lyase revealed the structural basis for the broad substrate profile of PDP.

  15. Polymorphic crystal structures of an all-AT DNA dodecamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J; Subirana, Juan A; Pous, Joan; Sánchez-Giraldo, Raquel; Condom, Núria; Baldini, Roberto; Malinina, Lucy; Campos, J Lourdes

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we explore the influence of different solvents and ions on the crystallization behavior of an all-AT dodecamer d(AATAAATTTATT)2 In all cases, the oligonucleotides are found as continuous columns of stacked duplexes. The spatial organization of such columns is variable; consequently we have obtained seven different crystal forms. The duplexes can be made to crystallize in either parallel or crossed columns. Such versatility in the formation of a variety of crystal forms is characteristic for this sequence. It had not been previously reported for any other sequence. In all cases, the oligonucleotide duplexes have been found to crystallize in the B form. The crystallization conditions determine the organization of the crystal, although no clear local interactions have been detected. Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) can be used in order to obtain compact crossed structures. DNA-DNA interactions in the crystals of our all-AT duplexes present crossovers which are different from those previously reported for mixed sequence oligonucleotides. Our results demonstrate that changes in the ionic atmosphere and the crystallization solvent have a strong influence on the DNA-DNA interactions. Similar ionic changes will certainly influence the biological activity of DNA. Modulation of the crystal structure by ions should also be explored in DNA crystal engineering. Liquid crystals with a peculiar macroscopic shape have also been observed.

  16. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination.

  17. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy of cortical bone reveals details of extrafibrillar crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Henry P; McNally, Elizabeth A; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study we showed that most of the mineral in bone is present in the form of "mineral structures", 5-6nm-thick, elongated plates which surround and are oriented parallel to collagen fibrils. Using dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we viewed mineral structures in ion-milled sections of cortical human bone cut parallel to the collagen fibrils. Within the mineral structures we observe single crystals of apatite averaging 5.8±2.7nm in width and 28±19nm in length, their long axes oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Some appear to be composite, co-aligned crystals as thin as 2nm. From their similarity to TEM images of crystals liberated from deproteinated bone we infer that we are viewing sections through platy crystals of apatite that are assembled together to form the mineral structures.

  18. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Isosteviol Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jing-Chao; Tian Guo-Qiang; Zhang Yan-Bing; Wu Ya; Liu Hong-Min

    2004-01-01

    Isosteviol (ent-16-ketobeyeran-19-oic acid, I) is a tetracyclic diterpenoid with a beyerane skeleton obtained by acid hydrolysis of stevioside.1 Several tetracyclic diterpenoids, specially the kaurenes, have important biological activities. Recent studies on the microbial transformation of isosteviol have revealed that it is metabolized by Cunninghamella bainieri, Actinoplanes sp., Mucor recurvatus, and Cunninghamella blackesleeana to yield five new metabolites.2 The hydroxylation pattern of these bioactive compounds may influence their binding on to the receptors, as was proposed for the Rabdosia diterpenoids. Therefore, the introduction of hydroxyl groups or unsaturated bonds in saturated and non-hydroxylated diterpenoids, like isosteviol, may enhance existing properties or lead to new biological activities. Although some beyeranes have been subjected to biotransformations by fungi,4 there are few report in the literature related the chemical transformation of Isosteviol. In the present study, we try to develop the chemical transformation of isosteviol and other beyeranes in order to obtaining some bioactive compounds with beyerane skeleton. Seven isosteviol derivatives, Ⅱ-Ⅷ, were therefore synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal strcture of H(R = H) was also determined.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Vanadate-Inhibited Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Johannes D; Bublitz, Maike; Arnou, Bertrand; Olesen, Claus; Andersen, Jens Peter; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nissen, Poul

    2016-04-05

    Vanadate is the hallmark inhibitor of the P-type ATPase family; however, structural details of its inhibitory mechanism have remained unresolved. We have determined the crystal structure of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with bound vanadate in the absence of Ca(2+). Vanadate is bound at the catalytic site as a planar VO3(-) in complex with water and Mg(2+) in a dephosphorylation transition-state-like conformation. Validating bound VO3(-) by anomalous difference Fourier maps using long-wavelength data we also identify a hitherto undescribed Cl(-) site near the dephosphorylation site. Crystallization was facilitated by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-derivatized nucleotides that bind with the TNP moiety occupying the binding pocket that normally accommodates the adenine of ATP, rationalizing their remarkably high affinity for E2P-like conformations of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the configurations of bound nucleotide analogs in the E2·VO3(-) structure with that in E2·BeF3(-) (E2P ground state analog) reveals multiple binding modes to the Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  20. Crystal structure refinement a crystallographers guide to SHELXL

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A crystallographers guide to SHELXL, covering various aspects of practical crystal structure refinement, from the treatment of hydrogen atoms to the assignment of atom types, and more. After an introduction to SHELXL, a brief survey of crystal structure refinement is provided.

  1. The Crystal Structure of Cu4Bi4Se9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makovicky, E.; Søtofte, Inger; Karup-Møller, S.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structure Of Cu4Bi4Se9,, synthesized at 400 degreesC, was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to the R, value of 0.05. The compound is orthorhombic, with a = 32.692 Angstrom, b = 4.120 Angstrom, and c = 12.202 Angstrom, space group Pnma. The structure...

  2. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  3. The Crystal Structure of Cu4Bi4Se9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makovicky, E.; Søtofte, Inger; Karup-Møller, S.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structure Of Cu4Bi4Se9,, synthesized at 400 degreesC, was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to the R, value of 0.05. The compound is orthorhombic, with a = 32.692 Angstrom, b = 4.120 Angstrom, and c = 12.202 Angstrom, space group Pnma. The structure...

  4. CCDC 1416891: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Methyl-triphenyl-germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  5. Preparation and Crystal Structure of Acetyl Hemerocallin and Structural Revision of Hemerocallin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-ze; WU Jie; ZHU Yu; DU Chen-xia; CHANG Jun-biao; XIE Jing-xi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To revise the structure of hemerocallin,an active and toxic compound isolated from the roots of Hemerocallis fulva,which was first reported in 1974 based on the chemical and spectral data.Methods The structure of acetyl hemerocallin was determined through the acetyl derivative preparing and X-ray diffraction.Results The title compound acetyl hemerocallin (1) has been prepared and structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction method.X-ray analysis revealed that the two naphthalene rings in compound 1 were significantly twisted with an average dihedral angle of 44.1°.The two acetate groups in each naphthalene ring adopted anti-parallel conformation.In addition,the π-π stacking interactions were found in the crystal structure,the molecules were linked into a supramolecular network,and the crystal structure was stabilized.Conclusion The structure of hemerocallin is identified as 2,2'-bi(1,8-dihydroxy-6-methyl-7-acetylnaphthalene) (3).

  6. Chiral Asymmetric Structures in Aspartic Acid and Valine Crystals Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez

    2016-03-29

    Structures of crystallized deposits formed by the molecular self-assembly of aspartic acid and valine on silicon substrates were imaged by atomic force microscopy. Images of d- and l-aspartic acid crystal surfaces showing extended molecularly flat sheets or regions separated by single molecule thick steps are presented. Distinct orientation surfaces were imaged, which, combined with the single molecule step size, defines the geometry of the crystal. However, single molecule step growth also reveals the crystal chirality, i.e., growth orientations. The imaged ordered lattice of aspartic acid (asp) and valine (val) mostly revealed periodicities corresponding to bulk terminations, but a previously unreported molecular hexagonal lattice configuration was observed for both l-asp and l-val but not for d-asp or d-val. Atomic force microscopy can then be used to identify the different chiral forms of aspartic acid and valine crystals.

  7. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  8. High-speed prediction of crystal structures for organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Shigeaki; Goto, Hitoshi

    2015-02-01

    We developed a master-worker type parallel algorithm for allocating tasks of crystal structure optimizations to distributed compute nodes, in order to improve a performance of simulations for crystal structure predictions. The performance experiments were demonstrated on TUT-ADSIM supercomputer system (HITACHI HA8000-tc/HT210). The experimental results show that our parallel algorithm could achieve speed-ups of 214 and 179 times using 256 processor cores on crystal structure optimizations in predictions of crystal structures for 3-aza-bicyclo(3.3.1)nonane-2,4-dione and 2-diazo-3,5-cyclohexadiene-1-one, respectively. We expect that this parallel algorithm is always possible to reduce computational costs of any crystal structure predictions.

  9. Observed and predicted hydrogen bond motifs in crystal structures of hydantoins, dihydrouracils and uracils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz-Cabeza, A.J.; Schwalbe, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of crystal structures containing hydantoin, dihydrouracil and uracil derivatives in the Cambridge Structural Database revealed four main types of hydrogen bond motifs when derivatives with extra substituents able to interfere with the main motif are excluded. All these molecules contain two

  10. Evolutionary crystal structure prediction and novel high-pressure phases

    OpenAIRE

    Oganov, A. R.; Ma, Y.; Lyakhov, A. O.; Valle, M.; C. Gatti

    2010-01-01

    Prediction of stable crystal structures at given pressure-temperature conditions, based only on the knowledge of the chemical composition, is a central problem of condensed matter physics. This extremely challenging problem is often termed "crystal structure prediction problem", and recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX (Universal Structure Predictor: Evolutionary Xtallography) made an important progress in solving it, enabling efficient and reliable prediction of structures with up...

  11. PLANAR OPTICAL WAVEGUIDES WITH PHOTONIC CRYSTAL STRUCTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Planar optical waveguide comprising a core region and a cladding region comprising a photonic crystal material, said photonic crystal material having a lattice of column elements, wherein at least a number of said column elements are elongated substantially in an axial direction for said core reg...

  12. Anisotropic domain structure of KTiOPO4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urenski, P.; Lesnykh, M.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Rosenman, G.; Molotskii, M.

    2001-08-01

    Highly anisotropic ferroelectric domain structure is observed in KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystals reversed by low electric field. The applied Miller-Weinreich model for sidewise motion of domain walls indicates that this anisotropy results from the peculiarities of KTP crystal lattice. The domain nuclei of dozen nanometer size, imaged by atomic force microscopy method, demonstrate regular hexagonal forms. The orientation of domain walls of the elementary nuclei coincides with the orientation of the facets of macroscopic KTP crystals. The observed strong domain elongation along one principal crystal axis allows us to improve tailoring of ferroelectric domain engineered structures for nonlinear optical converters.

  13. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies on manganous malate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J., E-mail: smartlabindia@gmail.com; Lincy, A., E-mail: lincymaria@gmail.com; Mahalakshmi, V.; Saban, K. V. [Smart Materials Analytic Research and Technology (SMART), Department of Physics, St. Berchmans College (India)

    2013-01-15

    Prismatic crystals of manganous malate have been prepared by controlled ionic diffusion in hydrosilica gel. The structure was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystals are orthorhombic with space group Pbca. Vibrations of the functional groups were identified by the FTIR spectrum. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) were carried out to explore the thermal decomposition pattern of the material. Structural information derived from FTIR and TG-DTA studies is in conformity with the single crystal XRD data.

  14. Crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M; Pampa, K J; Kumar, S M; Mukherjee, S; Kunishima, N; Rangappa, K S; Lokanath, N K

    2015-03-27

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, represent one of the largest superfamilies of primary transporters, which are very essential for various biological functions. The crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus has been determined at 1.77 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the protomer has two thick arms, (arm I and II), which resemble 'L' shape. The ATP-binding pocket is located close to the end of arm I. ATP molecule is docked into the active site of the protein. The dimeric crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from G. kaustophilus has been compared with the previously reported crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from Salmonella typhimurium.

  15. Synthesis, Character and Crystal Structure of the Complex {Er(DMSO)7} PW12O40

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Qiu-Xia; ZHANG Da-Li; MA Jian-Ru; WANG Jing-Ping; NIU Jing-Yang

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, thermal properties and electrochemistry of the new complex formulated as {Er(DMSO)7}PW12O40 are reported. The single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals that the crystal crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/c with a=11.767(2), b=14.909(3), c=34.905(7)(A), β=98.97(3)°, Mr=3591.33, V=6049(2) (A)3, Dc=3.944g/em3, Z=4, GOOF=1.098, F(000)=6340, R=0.0490 and wR=0.1202. Crystal structure analysis indicates that the Er(Ⅲ) is seven-coordinate with a distorted pentagonal bipyramid and combines to the anion [PW12O40]3- via static electric force.

  16. Structural features of Ge(Ga) single crystals grown by the floating zone method in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, I. A.; Zakharov, B. G.; Senchenkov, A. S.; Egorov, A. V.; Camel, D.; Tison, P.

    2008-11-01

    Structural features of the Ge(Ga) single crystal grown by the floating zone (FZ) method in microgravity environment aboard the FOTON-9 spacecraft are investigated by methods of X-ray topography, double-crystal diffractometry, selective chemical etching and spreading resistance measurements. It is established that the crystal structure is characterized by the presence of an incompletely melted region and defects caused by its formation. Growth striations revealed in regrown part of the crystal, testify to development of non-stationary capillary Marangoni convection in melt at the realized parameters of FZ remelting under space conditions. Periodicity of the growth striations is compared to frequency characteristics of heat flux pulsations through the crystallization front, found as a result of numerical simulation of melt hydrodynamics.

  17. Self-assembled ordered structures in thin films of HAT5 discotic liquid crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Morales

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of the discotic liquid crystal hexapentyloxytriphenylene (HAT5, prepared from solution via casting or spin-coating, were investigated by atomic force microscopy and polarizing optical microscopy, revealing large-scale ordered structures substantially different from those typically observed in standard samples of the same material. Thin and very long fibrils of planar-aligned liquid crystal were found, possibly formed as a result of an intermediate lyotropic nematic state arising during the solvent evaporation process. Moreover, in sufficiently thin films the crystallization seems to be suppressed, extending the uniform order of the liquid crystal phase down to room temperature. This should be compared to the bulk situation, where the same material crystallizes into a polymorphic structure at 68 °C.

  18. Crystal origins and magmatic system beneath Ngauruhoe volcano (New Zealand) revealed by plagioclase textures and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coote, Alisha C.; Shane, Phil

    2016-09-01

    The textural variation and compositional zoning of plagioclase in pre-historic and historic basaltic andesite lava flows from Ngauruhoe volcano reveals extensive crystal recycling from a multi-level magma system. Most phenocrysts have a calcic (~ An80-90) resorbed core with diffuse or no zonation that is depleted in Fe and Mg. Some cores display patchy zonation from replacement by high An crystallization prior to resorption. The cores are mantled by oscillatory-zoned rims of lower An content (Mg. Rim zones vary in relative thickness and textural complexity, and include sieve-textured bands, and/or cyclic calcic growth following dissolution events. A subordinate crystal population display similar features, but lack a resorbed core. These latter crystals display overall rimward enrichment in An, Fe and Mg. The resorbed cores crystallized from magmas more mafic than those erupted at Ngauruhoe, and slow cooling and prolonged storage resulted in loss of An zoning patterns and depletion of Fe and Mg by diffusion. These crystals are likely to have originated from deep cumulates or intrusions, and were subsequently entrained in ascending magmas. Patchy-textured cores were produced during decompression in a water under-saturated magma and staged ascent. The diversity in crystal cores reflect different conduits and ascent histories. The crystal rims grew in a more differentiated magma reservoir, and are in equilibrium with the erupted melt. Most of the zoning patterns in the rim zone require water pressure and/or temperature changes. These changes could have been caused by convective self-mixing in a closed system and/or the intrusion of hydrous melts of similar bulk composition. Other crystals display rimward elemental enrichments consistent with mafic recharge. Previously reported rimward enrichment in 87Sr-86Sr compositions can be explained by the re-cycled origin of the crystal cores and progressive crustal assimilation at shallower depths in the magma system where

  19. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome: Photoconversion and signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith (UC)

    2008-11-12

    Phytochromes are red-light photoreceptors that regulate light responses in plants, fungi, and bacteria via reversible photoconversion between red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution of a bacteriophytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an intact, fully photoactive photosensory core domain in its dark-adapted Pfr state. This structure reveals how unusual interdomain interactions, including a knot and an 'arm' structure near the chromophore site, bring together the PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim), GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA), and PHY (phytochrome) domains to achieve Pr/Pfr photoconversion. The PAS, GAF, and PHY domains have topologic elements in common and may have a single evolutionary origin. We identify key interactions that stabilize the chromophore in the Pfr state and provide structural and mutational evidence to support the essential role of the PHY domain in efficient Pr/Pfr photoconversion. We also identify a pair of conserved residues that may undergo concerted conformational changes during photoconversion. Modeling of the full-length bacteriophytochrome structure, including its output histidine kinase domain, suggests how local structural changes originating in the photosensory domain modulate interactions between long, cross-domain signaling helices at the dimer interface and are transmitted to the spatially distant effector domain, thereby regulating its histidine kinase activity.

  20. SiBr4--prediction and determination of crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alexandra K; Glinnemann, Jürgen; Schmidt, Martin U; Tong, Jianwei; Dinnebier, Robert E; Simon, Arndt; Köhler, Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    For SiBr4 no crystal structures have been reported yet. In this work the crystal structures of SiBr4 were predicted by global lattice-energy minimizations using force-field methods. Over an energy range of 5 kJ mol(-1) above the global minimum ten possible structures were found. Two of these structures were experimentally determined from X-ray synchrotron powder diffraction data: The low-temperature beta phase crystallizes in P2(1)/c, the high-temperature alpha phase in Pa3. Temperature-dependant X-ray powder diffraction shows that the phase transition occurs at 168 K.

  1. SiBr4 - Prediction and Determination of Crystal Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Glinnemann, J; Schmidt, M; Tong, J; Dinnebier, R; Simon, A; Kohler, J

    2009-01-01

    For SiBr4 no crystal structures have been reported yet. In this work the crystal structures of SiBr4 were predicted by global lattice-energy minimizations using force-field methods. Over an energy range of 5 kJ mol-1 above the global minimum ten possible structures were found. Two of these structures were experimentally determined from X-ray synchrotron powder diffraction data: The low-temperature [beta] phase crystallizes in P21/c, the high-temperature [alpha] phase in Pa overline3. Temperature-dependant X-ray powder diffraction shows that the phase transition occurs at 168 K.

  2. Investigation on growth, structure and characterization of succinate salt of 8-hydroxyquinoline: an organic NLO crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurugan, R; Babu, B; Anitha, K; Chandrasekaran, J

    2015-04-05

    8-Hydroxyquinolinium succinate (8-HQSU) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown from ethanol solvent by employing the technique of slow evaporation at room temperature. The structure of the grown crystal has been elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. It reveals that 8-HQSU crystallizes in monoclinic system with non-centro symmetric space group P2(1). FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR spectral investigations have been carried out to identify the vibrational modes of various functional groups and placement of proton and carbon in the 8-HQSU compound, respectively. UV-vis-NIR transmission spectrum shows the cutoff wavelength around 357 nm. In addition, a photoluminescence spectral analysis was carried out for 8-HQSU crystals. The thermal properties of crystals were evaluated from TGA and DTA techniques and the crystal was found to be stable up to 145°C. The dielectric studies show that the dielectric constant and dielectric loss decrease exponentially with frequency at different temperatures. Photoconductivity studies were carried out on the grown crystals it reveals the positive photo conducting nature. Powder second harmonic generation property of the crystal was confirmed by Kurtz and Perry powder SHG technique and it is found to be 1.3 times greater than that of KDP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystal structure of K[Hg(SCN)3] - a redetermination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Matthias; Häusler, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The crystal structure of the room-temperature modification of K[Hg(SCN)3], potassium tri-thio-cyanato-mercurate(II), was redetermined based on modern CCD data. In comparison with the previous report [Zhdanov & Sanadze (1952 ▶). Zh. Fiz. Khim. 26, 469-478], reliability factors, standard deviations of lattice parameters and atomic coordinates, as well as anisotropic displacement parameters, were revealed for all atoms. The higher precision and accuracy of the model is, for example, reflected by the Hg-S bond lengths of 2.3954 (11), 2.4481 (8) and 2.7653 (6) Å in comparison with values of 2.24, 2.43 and 2.77 Å. All atoms in the crystal structure are located on mirror planes. The Hg(2+) cation is surrounded by four S atoms in a seesaw shape [S-Hg-S angles range from 94.65 (2) to 154.06 (3)°]. The HgS4 polyhedra share a common S atom, building up chains extending parallel to [010]. All S atoms of the resulting (1) ∞[HgS2/1S2/2] chains are also part of SCN(-) anions that link these chains with the K(+) cations into a three-dimensional network. The K-N bond lengths of the distorted KN7 polyhedra lie between 2.926 (2) and 3.051 (3) Å.

  4. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a New Mononuclear Copper Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new kind of Cu (Ⅱ) complex [Cu(tpmb)2Cl2]@CH3OH@H2O (tpmb = 1,3,5-tri(2- pyrimidinyl)sulfanylmethyl-2,4,6-trimethylbenzene) was synthesized, and its structure has been determined by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. It crystallizes in the triclinic, space group P ī with a = 8.8397(2), b = 13.327(3), c = 13.926(3) (A), ( = 63.27(3), ( = 86.96(3), ( = 80.68(3)°, V = 1445.6(5) (A)3, C49H51Cl2CuN12O2S6, Mr = 1166.82, Z = 1, F(000) = 604, Dc = 1.340 g/cm3, μ = 0.735 mm-1, R = 0.0545 and wR = 0.1575 for 4521 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). X-ray analysis reveals that the Cu (Ⅱ) ion is coordinated by two Cl- anions and two nitrogen atoms from different pyrimidine groups, forming a square structure.

  5. Crystallization and Characterization of Galdieria sulphuraria RUBISCO in Two Crystal Forms: Structural Phase Transition Observed in P21 Crystal Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguslaw Stec

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCOfrom the red algae Galdieria Sulphuraria. The protein crystallized in two different crystalforms, the I422 crystal form being obtained from high salt and the P21 crystal form beingobtained from lower concentration of salt and PEG. We report here the crystallization,preliminary stages of structure determination and the detection of the structural phasetransition in the P21 crystal form of G. sulphuraria RUBISCO. This red algae enzymebelongs to the hexadecameric class (L8S8 with an approximate molecular weight 0.6MDa.The phase transition in G. sulphuraria RUBISCO leads from two hexadecamers to a singlehexadecamer per asymmetric unit. The preservation of diffraction power in a phasetransition for such a large macromolecule is rare.

  6. Origin and structure of polar domains in doped molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirzadeh, E.; Azuri, I.; Qi, Y.; Ehre, D.; Rappe, A. M.; Lahav, M.; Kronik, L.; Lubomirsky, I.

    2016-11-01

    Doping is a primary tool for the modification of the properties of materials. Occlusion of guest molecules in crystals generally reduces their symmetry by the creation of polar domains, which engender polarization and pyroelectricity in the doped crystals. Here we describe a molecular-level determination of the structure of such polar domains, as created by low dopant concentrations (<0.5%). The approach comprises crystal engineering and pyroelectric measurements, together with dispersion-corrected density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics calculations of the doped crystals, using neutron diffraction data of the host at different temperatures. This approach is illustrated using centrosymmetric α-glycine crystals doped with minute amounts of different L-amino acids. The experimentally determined pyroelectric coefficients are explained by the structure and polarization calculations, thus providing strong support for the local and global understanding of how different dopants influence the properties of molecular crystals.

  7. Structural Color Patterns by Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printed Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Tian, Lei; Liu, Cihui; Fu, Guangbin; Shang, Luoran; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-02-09

    In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal patterns with controllable morphologies and structural colors utilizing electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing with colloidal crystal inks. The final shape of photonic crystal units is controlled by the applied voltage signal and wettability of the substrate. Optical properties of the structural color patterns are tuned by the self-assembly of the silica nanoparticle building blocks. Using this direct printing technique, it is feasible to print customized functional patterns composed of photonic crystal dots or photonic crystal lines according to relevant printing mode and predesigned tracks. This is the first report for E-jet printing with colloidal crystal inks. Our results exhibit promising applications in displays, biosensors, and other functional devices.

  8. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  9. Nanoconfinement-Induced Structures in Chiral Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations in a specialized isothermal-isobaric and in the grand canonical ensemble to study structure formation in chiral liquid crystals as a function of molecular chirality. Our model potential consists of a simple Lennard-Jones potential, where the attractive contribution has been modified to represent the orientation dependence of the interaction between a pair of chiral liquid-crystal molecules. The liquid crystal is confined between a pair of planar and atomicall...

  10. Crystal structure and characterization of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikemoto Kazuto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, a tricarboxylic acid, has attracted attention as a growth factor, and its application to supplements and cosmetics is underway. The product used for these purposes is a water-soluble salt of PQQ disodium. Although in the past, PQQ disodiumpentahydrates with a high water concentration were used, currently, low hydration crystals of PQQ disodiumpentahydrates are preferred. Results We prepared a crystal of PQQ disodium trihydrate in a solution of ethanol and water, studied its structure, and analyzed its properties. In the prepared crystal, the sodium atom interacted with the oxygen atom of two carboxylic acids as well as two quinones of the PQQ disodium trihydrate. In addition, the hydration water of the prepared crystal was less than that of the conventional PQQ disodium crystal. From the results of this study, it was found that the color and the near-infrared (NIR spectrum of the prepared crystal changed depending on the water content in the dried samples. Conclusions The water content in the dried samples was restored to that in the trihydrate crystal by placing the samples in a humid environment. In addition, the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray diffraction-differential calorimetry (XRD-DSC analyses show that the phase of the trihydrate crystal changed when the crystallization water was eliminated. The dried crystal has two crystalline forms that are restored to the original trihydrate crystals in 20% relative humidity (RH. This crystalline (PQQ disodium trihydrate is stable under normal environment.

  11. Crystal structure of Leishmania tarentolae hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Glaucius

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT (EC 2.4.2.8 is a central enzyme in the purine recycling pathway. Parasitic protozoa of the order Kinetoplastida cannot synthesize purines de novo and use the salvage pathway to synthesize purine bases, making this an attractive target for antiparasitic drug design. Results The glycosomal HGPRT from Leishmania tarentolae in a catalytically active form purified and co-crystallized with a guanosine monophosphate (GMP in the active site. The dimeric structure of HGPRT has been solved by molecular replacement and refined against data extending to 2.1 Å resolution. The structure reveals the contacts of the active site residues with GMP. Conclusion Comparative analysis of the active sites of Leishmania and human HGPRT revealed subtle differences in the position of the ligand and its interaction with the active site residues, which could be responsible for the different reactivities of the enzymes to allopurinol reported in the literature. The solution and analysis of the structure of Leishmania HGPRT may contribute to further investigations leading to a full understanding of this important enzyme family in protozoan parasites.

  12. Structure and Properties of Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, Lev M

    2011-01-01

    This book by Lev M. Blinov is ideal to guide researchers from their very first encounter with liquid crystals to the level where they can perform independent experiments on liquid crystals with a thorough understanding of their behaviour also in relation to the theoretical framework. Liquid crystals can be found everywhere around us. They are used in virtually every display device, whether it is for domestic appliances of for specialized technological instruments. Their finely tunable optical properties make them suitable also for thermo-sensing and laser technologies. There are many monographs written by prominent scholars on the subject of liquid crystals. The majority of them presents the subject in great depth, sometimes focusing on a particular research aspect, and in general they require a significant level of prior knowledge. In contrast, this books aims at an audience of advanced undergraduate and graduate students in physics, chemistry and materials science. The book consists of three parts: the firs...

  13. The crystal structure of some rhenium and technetium dichalcogenides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamfers, H.J; Meetsma, A.; Wiegers, G.A; deBoer, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of ReSe2,ReS2, ReSSe and TcS2 are determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds are triclinic with space group P (1) over bar. ReSe2, Res(2) and ReSSe have a distorted CdCl2-type structure; TcS2 has a distorted Cd(OH)(2)-type structure. In the case of Res,

  14. Photonic Crystal Structures with Tunable Structure Color as Colorimetric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Qin Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors.

  15. Structural insights into the mycobacteria transcription initiation complex from analysis of X-ray crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A.; Lilic, Mirjana; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.

    2017-07-13

    The mycobacteria RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a target for antimicrobials against tuberculosis, motivating structure/function studies. Here we report a 3.2 Å-resolution crystal structure of a Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) open promoter complex (RPo), along with structural analysis of the Msm RPo and a previously reported 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of an Msm transcription initiation complex with a promoter DNA fragment. We observe the interaction of the Msm RNAP α-subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) with DNA, and we provide evidence that the αCTD may play a role in Mtb transcription regulation. Our results reveal the structure of an Actinobacteria-unique insert of the RNAP β' subunit. Finally, our analysis reveals the disposition of the N-terminal segment of Msm σA, which may comprise an intrinsically disordered protein domain unique to mycobacteria. The clade-specific features of the mycobacteria RNAP provide clues to the profound instability of mycobacteria RPo compared with E. coli.

  16. Neutron crystallography of photoactive yellow protein reveals unusual protonation state of Arg52 in the crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Kento; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Kurihara, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Yoichi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio

    2017-08-24

    Because of its high pKa, arginine (Arg) is believed to be protonated even in the hydrophobic environment of the protein interior. However, our neutron crystallographic structure of photoactive yellow protein, a light sensor, demonstrated that Arg52 adopts an electrically neutral form. We also showed that the hydrogen bond between the chromophore and Glu46 is a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB). Because both the neutral Arg and LBHB are unusual in proteins, these observations remain controversial. To validate our findings, we carried out neutron crystallographic analysis of the E46Q mutant of PYP. The resultant structure revealed that the proportion of the cationic form is higher in E46Q than in WT, although the cationic and neutral forms of Arg52 coexist in E46Q. These observations were confirmed by the occupancy of the deuterium atom bound to the N η1 atom combined with an alternative conformation of the N(η2)D2 group comprising sp(2) hybridisation. Based on these results, we propose that the formation of the LBHB decreases the proton affinity of Arg52, stabilizing the neutral form in the crystal.

  17. Hierarchical structuring of liquid crystal polymer-Laponite hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Zlotnikov, Igor; Zaslansky, Paul; Aichmayer, Barbara; Fratzl, Peter; Schlaad, Helmut; Cölfen, Helmut

    2013-09-03

    Biomimetic organic-inorganic composite materials were fabricated via one-step self-organization on three hierarchical levels. The organic component was a polyoxazoline with pendent cholesteryl and carboxyl (N-Boc-protected amino acid) side chains that was able to form a chiral nematic lyotropic phase and bind to positively charged inorganic faces of Laponite. The Laponite particles formed a mesocrystalline arrangement within the liquid-crystal (LC) polymer phase upon shearing a viscous dispersion of Laponite nanoparticles and LC polymer in DMF. Complementary analytical and mechanical characterization techniques (AUC, POM, TEM, SEM, SAXS, μCT, and nanoindentation) covering the millimeter, micrometer, and nanometer length scales reveal the hierarchical structures and properties of the composite materials consisting of different ratios of Laponite nanoparticles and liquid-crystalline polymer.

  18. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶大年; 马哲生; 赫伟; 李哲; 施倪承; D.Pushcharovsky

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-0 and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures. Therefore, those silicates may be named titano-and zircono-silicates. Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra, the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet, respectively. As a new concept, the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  19. Optically induced structural phase transitions in ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horak, Peter; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    , such as body-centered cubic and face-centered cubic, can be suppressed by a proper choice of the potential depth and periodicity. Furthermore, by varying the harmonic trap parameters and/or the optical potential in time, controlled transitions between crystal structures can be obtained with close to unit......We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures...

  20. X-Ray structural investigation of VAS-393 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Martirosian, A H; Harurtjunian, V S

    2001-01-01

    X-ray structural study of VAS-393 crystals was performed. Investigations were carried out with the use of the Weissenberg rotating and powder (employing the Bjornstrem diagrams) methods. The lattice constants ''c'' and ''a''are calculated. The crystal is shown to belong to the trigonal syngony (medium category)

  1. Missing strings of residues in protein crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Carugo, Oliviero

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of the protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are incomplete, since the position of one or more residues is not reported, despite these residues are part of the material that was analyzed. This may bias the use of the protein crystal structures by molecular biologists. Here we observe that in the large majority of the protein crystal structures strings of residues are missing. Polar residues incline to occur in missing strings together with glycine, while apolar and aromatic residues tend to avoid them. Particularly flexible residues, as shown by their extremely high B-factors, by their exposure to the solvent and by their secondary structures, flank the missing strings. These data should be a helpful guideline for crystallographers that encounter regions of flat and uninterpretable electron density as well as end-users of crystal structures.

  2. Structural unsafety revealed by failure databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, K.C.; Boot, W.; Nelisse, M.

    2014-01-01

    After several major structural incidents in the Netherlands, such as the collapse of five balconies in Maastricht in 2001 resulting in two fatalities, various initiatives have been started to improve structural safety. Research studies were initiated on the characteristics, causes and consequences

  3. Structural unsafety revealed by failure databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, K.; Boot, W.; Nelisse, M.

    2014-01-01

    After several major structural incidents in the Netherlands, such as the collapse of five balconies in Maastricht in 2001 resulting in two fatalities, various initiatives have been started to improve structural safety. Research studies were initiated on the characteristics, causes and consequences o

  4. Growth morphology and structural characteristic of C70single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周维亚; 解思深; 吴源; 常保和; 王刚; 钱露茜

    1999-01-01

    Large size C70 single crystals with the dimension of more than 5 mm are grown from the vapor phase by controlling nucleation. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction confirm that in the C70 single crystal a phase of the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure coexists with a minor face-center-cubic (fcc) phase at room temperature. The morphologies and their formation mechanism of the C70 single crystals are investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The influence of growth conditions on the morphologies of C70 single crystals is discussed.

  5. Structural and mechanical studies of cadmium manganese thiocyanate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; babu, G. Anandha; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) have been synthesized successfully and grown by slow evaporation method. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), which shows the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal is quite good. Optical behavior was assessed by UV-Vis analysis and found that no absorption in the UV visible region and it may be useful for second harmonic applications. The mechanical hardness of the grown crystals was studied and Vicker's microhardness, Stiffness constant was calculated.

  6. Revealing of defects in CdTe crystals by DSL etching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bissoli, F.; Weyher, J.L.; Zappettini, A.; Zha, M.; Zanotti, L.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of DS(L) (Diluited Sirtl with or without Light) solution on CadmiumTelluride crystals has been studied in comparison with the actions due to Inoue and Nakagawa etching solutions. The use of chemical etching to reveal extended defects is a fast and useful technique for characterizing the

  7. Revealing of defects in CdTe crystals by DSL etching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bissoli, F.; Weyher, J.L.; Zappettini, A.; Zha, M.; Zanotti, L.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of DS(L) (Diluited Sirtl with or without Light) solution on CadmiumTelluride crystals has been studied in comparison with the actions due to Inoue and Nakagawa etching solutions. The use of chemical etching to reveal extended defects is a fast and useful technique for characterizing the c

  8. Crystal structure and magnetization of a Co{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 6} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazak, N. V.; Platunov, M. S., E-mail: platunov@iph.krasn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Ivanova, N. B. [Siberian Federal University (Russian Federation); Knyazev, Yu. V.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Eremin, E. V.; Vasil' ev, A. D.; Bayukov, O. A.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Velikanov, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Zubavichus, Ya. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of Co{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 6} single crystals are studied. Orthorhombic symmetry with space group Pnnm is detected at room temperature. The measurements of static magnetization and dynamic magnetic susceptibility reveal two magnetic anomalies at T{sub 1} = 33 K and T{sub 2} = 10 K and an easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. The effective magnetic moment indicates a high-spin state of the Co{sup 2+} ion. A spin-flop transition is found at low temperatures and H{sub sf} = 23 kOe. EXAFS spectra of the K-edge absorption of Co are recorded at various temperatures, the temperature-induced changes in the parameters of the local environment of cobalt are analyzed, and the effective Co-Co and Co-O distances are determined. The magnetic interactions in the crystal are analyzed in terms of an indirect coupling model.

  9. Unique Reversible Crystal-to-Crystal Phase Transition – Structural and Functional Properties of Fused Ladder Thienoarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Abe, Yuichiro

    2017-08-15

    Donor-acceptor type molecules based on fused ladder thienoarenes, indacenodithiophene (IDT) and dithienocyclopenta-thienothiophene (DTCTT), coupled with benzothiadiazole, are prepared and their solid-state structures are investigated. They display a rich variety of solid phases ranging from amorphous glass states to crystalline states, upon changes in the central aromatic core and side group structures. Most notably, the DTCTT-based derivatives showed reversible crystal-to-crystal phase transitions in heating and cooling cycles. Unlike what has been seen in π−conjugated molecules variable temperature XRD revealed that structural change occurs continuously during the transition. A columnar self-assembled structure with slip-stacked π−π interaction is proposed to be involved in the solid-state. This research provides the evidence of unique structural behavior of the DTCTT-based molecules through the detailed structural analysis. This unique structural transition paves the way for these materials to have self-healing of crystal defects, leading to improved optoelectronic properties.

  10. Growth and structure of a new photonic crystal: Chlorine substituted chalcone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarveshwara, H. P.; Raghavendra, S.; A, Jayarama; Menezes, Anthoni Praveen; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    A new organic photonic material 3-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-1-(2,5-dimethylthiophen-3-yl)propan-1-one(DMTP) has been synthesized and crystallised in acetone solution. The functional groups present in the new material were identified by FTIR spectroscopy. The material is optically transparent in the wavelength range of 400-1100 nm. The crystal structure of DMTP was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The title compound crystallizes in monoclinic system with a centrosymmetric space group P21/c. The Z-scan study revealed that the optical limiting property exhibited by the DMTP molecule is based on the reverse saturable absorption phenomena.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

  12. Crystal-Structure-Guided Design of Self-Assembling RNA Nanotriangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerneke, Mark A; Dibrov, Sergey M; Hermann, Thomas

    2016-03-14

    RNA nanotechnology uses RNA structural motifs to build nanosized architectures that assemble through selective base-pair interactions. Herein, we report the crystal-structure-guided design of highly stable RNA nanotriangles that self-assemble cooperatively from short oligonucleotides. The crystal structure of an 81 nucleotide nanotriangle determined at 2.6 Å resolution reveals the so-far smallest circularly closed nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The assembly of the nanotriangle architecture involved RNA corner motifs that were derived from ligand-responsive RNA switches, which offer the opportunity to control self-assembly and dissociation.

  13. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D.; Betz, Robin M.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L.; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dror, Ron O.; Roth, Bryan L. (UNCSM); (UNC); (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (UCSF)

    2017-01-01

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD’s key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR—a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD’s slow binding kinetics may be due to a “lid” formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD’s binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD’s actions at human serotonin receptors.

  14. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D; Betz, Robin M; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E; Shoichet, Brian K; Dror, Ron O; Roth, Bryan L

    2017-01-26

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD's key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR-a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD's slow binding kinetics may be due to a "lid" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD's binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD's actions at human serotonin receptors. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (UCSF)

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  16. Construction of crystal structure prototype database: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chuanxun; Lv, Jian; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2017-04-26

    Crystal structure prototype data have become a useful source of information for materials discovery in the fields of crystallography, chemistry, physics, and materials science. This work reports the development of a robust and efficient method for assessing the similarity of structures on the basis of their interatomic distances. Using this method, we proposed a simple and unambiguous definition of crystal structure prototype based on hierarchical clustering theory, and constructed the crystal structure prototype database (CSPD) by filtering the known crystallographic structures in a database. With similar method, a program structure prototype analysis package (SPAP) was developed to remove similar structures in CALYPSO prediction results and extract predicted low energy structures for a separate theoretical structure database. A series of statistics describing the distribution of crystal structure prototypes in the CSPD was compiled to provide an important insight for structure prediction and high-throughput calculations. Illustrative examples of the application of the proposed database are given, including the generation of initial structures for structure prediction and determination of the prototype structure in databases. These examples demonstrate the CSPD to be a generally applicable and useful tool for materials discovery.

  17. Construction of crystal structure prototype database: methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chuanxun; Lv, Jian; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2017-04-01

    Crystal structure prototype data have become a useful source of information for materials discovery in the fields of crystallography, chemistry, physics, and materials science. This work reports the development of a robust and efficient method for assessing the similarity of structures on the basis of their interatomic distances. Using this method, we proposed a simple and unambiguous definition of crystal structure prototype based on hierarchical clustering theory, and constructed the crystal structure prototype database (CSPD) by filtering the known crystallographic structures in a database. With similar method, a program structure prototype analysis package (SPAP) was developed to remove similar structures in CALYPSO prediction results and extract predicted low energy structures for a separate theoretical structure database. A series of statistics describing the distribution of crystal structure prototypes in the CSPD was compiled to provide an important insight for structure prediction and high-throughput calculations. Illustrative examples of the application of the proposed database are given, including the generation of initial structures for structure prediction and determination of the prototype structure in databases. These examples demonstrate the CSPD to be a generally applicable and useful tool for materials discovery.

  18. Molecular and Crystal Structures of Three Berberine Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Dostál; Zdirad Žák; Marek NeÄÂas; Milan PotáÄÂek; Stanislav Man

    2001-01-01

    Berberine azide, berberine thiocyanate, and 8-cyano-8H-berberine were prepared from berberine chloride, a quaternary protoberberine alkaloid. The molecular and crystal structures of all compounds are reported and discussed.

  19. Determination of channeling perspectives for complex crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, W.R.

    1993-03-01

    Specification of the atomic arrangement for axes and planes of high symmetry is essential for crystal alignment using Rutherford backscattering and for studies of the lattice location of impurities in single crystals. By rotation of an inscribed orthogonal coordinate system, a visual image for a given perspective of a crystal structure can be specified. Knowledge of the atomic arrangement permits qualitative channeling perspectives to be visualized and calculation of continuum potentials for channeling. Channeling angular-yield profiles can then be analytically modeled and, subsequently, shadowing by host atoms of positions within the unit cell predicted. Software to calculate transformed atom positions for a channeling perspective in a single crystal are described and illustrated for the spinel crystal structure.

  20. Fast motif-network scheme for extensive exploration of complex crystal structures in silicate cathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xin; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    A motif-network search scheme is proposed to study the crystal structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4. Using this fast and efficient method, the structures of all six combinations with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co were extensively explored. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. These tetrahedral-network-based structures can be classified into 1D, 2D and 3D types based on M-Si-O frames. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.

  1. 2.5 D Transrotational Microcrystals and Nanostructures Revealed by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    Unexpected transrotational microcrystals can be grown in thin 10-100 nm amorphous films. Crystals of different morphology (from nanowhiskers to spherulites, complex textures) and chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) grown in thin films prepared by various methods are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We use primarily our TEM bend-contour method and SAED (HREM, AFM are also performed). The phenomenon resides in strong (up to 300 degrees/ μm) regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. It can be traced inside TEM in situ. Usual translation is complicated by slight regular rotation of the crystal unit cell (transrotation) most prominent at the mesoscale. Different geometries of transrotation of positive and negative curvature are revealed. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. It can be also considered similar to hypothetical endless 2.5 D analogy of MW nanotube/nano-onion halves. Transrotation is strongly increasing as the film gets thinner in the range 100-15 nm. Transrotations supplement dislocations and disclinations. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is proposed. Support of Ministry of Higher Education and Science is acknowledged.

  2. Improving nanocavity switching using Fano resonances in photonic crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Elesin, Yuriy;

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple design for achieving Fano resonances in photonic crystal coupled waveguide-cavity structures. A coupled mode theory analysis shows an order of magnitude reduction in switching energy compared to conventional Lorentz resonances.......We present a simple design for achieving Fano resonances in photonic crystal coupled waveguide-cavity structures. A coupled mode theory analysis shows an order of magnitude reduction in switching energy compared to conventional Lorentz resonances....

  3. Crystal structure of an antifungal osmotin-like protein from Calotropis procera and its effects on Fusarium solani spores, as revealed by atomic force microscopy: Insights into the mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Marcio V; de Oliveira, Raquel S B; Pereira, Humberto M; Moreno, Frederico B M B; Lobo, Marina D P; Rebelo, Luciana M; Brandão-Neto, José; de Sousa, Jeanlex S; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Freitas, Cléverson D T; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa

    2015-11-01

    CpOsm is an antifungal osmotin/thaumatin-like protein purified from the latex of Calotropis procera. The protein is relatively thermostable and retains its antifungal activity over a wide pH range; therefore, it may be useful in the development of new antifungal drugs or transgenic crops with enhanced resistance to phytopathogenic fungi. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of CpOsm, its three-dimensional structure was determined, and the effects of the protein on Fusarium solani spores were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The atomic structure of CpOsm was solved at a resolution of 1.61Å, and it contained 205 amino acid residues and 192 water molecules, with a final R-factor of 18.12% and an Rfree of 21.59%. The CpOsm structure belongs to the thaumatin superfamily fold and is characterized by three domains stabilized by eight disulfide bonds and a prominent charged cleft, which runs the length of the front side of the molecule. Similarly to other antifungal thaumatin-like proteins, the cleft of CpOsm is predominantly acidic. AFM images of F. solani spores treated with CpOsm resulted in striking morphological changes being induced by the protein. Spores treated with CpOsm were wrinkled, and the volume of these cells was reduced by approximately 80%. Treated cells were covered by a shell of CpOsm molecules, and the leakage of cytoplasmic content from these cells was also observed. Based on the structural features of CpOsm and the effects that the protein produces on F. solani spores, a possible mechanism of action is suggested and discussed.

  4. Crystal structure of S-(4-methylbenzyl piperidinedithiocarbamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Rahima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C14H19NS2, crystallizes in the thione form with the presence of a C=S bond. The piperidine ring adopts a chair conformation. The dihedral angle between the essentially planar dithiocarbamate and p-tolyl fragments is 74.46 (10°

  5. Effect of antimony incorporation on structural properties of CuInS{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Rabeh, M., E-mail: mohamedbenrabeh@yahoo.f [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et Materiaux Semi-Conducteurs - ENIT BP 37, Le belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Chaglabou, N., E-mail: nadia_chaglabou@yahoo.f [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et Materiaux Semi-Conducteurs - ENIT BP 37, Le belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Kanzari, M., E-mail: Mounir.Kanzari@ipeit.rnu.t [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et Materiaux Semi-Conducteurs - ENIT BP 37, Le belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2010-02-15

    CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) single crystals doped with 1, 2, 3 and 4 atomic percent (at.%) of antimony (Sb) were grown by the horizontal Bridgman method. The effect of Sb doping on the structural properties of CIS crystal was studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and PL measurements. X-ray diffraction data suggests that the doping of Sb in the CIS single crystals does not affect the tetragonal (chalcopyrite) crystal structure and exhibited a (1 1 2) preferred orientation. In addition, with increasing Sb concentration, the X-ray diffraction analysis show that Sb doped CIS crystals are more crystallized and the diffraction peaks of the CuInS{sub 2} phase were more pronounced in particular the (1 1 2) plane. EDAX study revealed that Sb atoms can occupy the indium site and/or occupying the sulfur site to make an acceptor. PL spectra of undoped and Sb doped CIS crystals show two emission peaks at 1.52 and 1.62 eV, respectively which decreased with increasing atomic percent antimony. Sb doped CIS crystals show p-type conductivity.

  6. Crystal structures of trypanosomal histidyl-tRNA synthetase illuminate differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic homologs

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, Ethan A.; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, J Robert; Larson, Eric T.; Kelley, Angela; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J.; Kim, Jessica; Li ZHANG; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Crystal structures of histidyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi provide a first structural view of a eukaryotic form of this enzyme, and reveal differences from bacterial homologs. Histidyl-tRNA synthetases in general contain an extra domain inserted between conserved motifs 2 and 3 of the Class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic core. The current structures show that the three dimensional topology of this domain is very different in b...

  7. Change in crystal structure and physical properties of the Multiferroics YMnO3 single crystals by Strong gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, M.; Weijian, M.; Hayami, S.; Yoshiasa, A.; Mashimo, T.

    2017-04-01

    Many researchers have studied the multiferroicity of the hexagonal RMnO3 (R: rare-earth element) for both applications and fundamental studies. To investigate the relationship between the structure and physical properties of materials, some people apply the chemical pressure effect. The procedure of chemical pressure effect involves substituting rare-earth elements for ones which have a different ionic radius. Mashimo et al. have developed a high-temperature ultracentrifuge apparatus that can generate extended duration strong gravitational field in excess of 106 G under a wide range of temperatures (up to 500°C). Strong gravitational fields directly act on each atom as a different body force. This can cause the change in crystal structure. Thus, we subjected YMnO3 single crystal to strong gravity experiments (0.78×106 G, 400°C, 2 h) and investigated the resulting changes in the crystal structure and physical properties of the gravity sample. The single crystal four-circle X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the change in the nearest neighboring Mn-Mn and M-O bond distances. The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility by SQUID showed the change in the magnetic anisotropy of gravity sample.

  8. Icosahedral symmetry described by an incommensurately modulated crystal structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolny, Janusz; Lebech, Bente

    1986-01-01

    A crystal structure model of an incommensurately modulated structure is presented. Although six different reciprocal vectors are used to describe the model, all calculations are done in three dimensions making calculation of the real-space structure trivial. Using this model, it is shown that both...

  9. A pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene cage: Synthesis and X-ray crystal structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent A.; Jeppesen, Jan O.; Levillain, Eric

    2002-01-01

    A novel type of tetrathiafulvalene-cage 4 containing three monopyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene units has been prepared employing a general and efficient synthetic approach. X-ray crystal structure analysis revealed that the cage is able to accommodate solvent molecules within a cavity in the solid state....

  10. Full analysis of feldspar texture and crystal structure by combining X-ray and electron techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci; Piazolo, Sandra; Katerinopoulou, Anna;

    2013-01-01

    identification plus crystal structure refinement of all components in a feldspar intergrowth. This procedure was applied to perthitic intergrowths in feldspars from two different pegmatites in the Larvik plutonic complex in the southern part of the Oslo region, Norway. It revealed that the two starting high...

  11. Crystal structures and photoelectron spectra of some trimethanoanthracenes, tetramethanonaphthacenes, and pentamethanopentacenes. Experimental evidence for laticyclic hyperconjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paddon-Row, Michael N.; Englehardt, Lutz M.; Skelton, Brian W.

    1987-01-01

    Photoelectron (p.e.) spectra of the series of dienes (), (), ()-(), and crystal structures for the dodecachlorodienes()-() are reported. The spectra revealed large [small pi]-splitting energies of 0.32 and 0.52 eV for () and () respectively. The value of () is attributed to the presence of orbita...

  12. Crystal structure of the RNA component of bacterial ribonuclease P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K.; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.; Pan, Tao; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (UC)

    2010-03-08

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is produced as a precursor molecule that needs to be processed at its 3' and 5' ends. Ribonuclease P is the sole endonuclease responsible for processing the 5' end of tRNA by cleaving the precursor and leading to tRNA maturation. It was one of the first catalytic RNA molecules identified and consists of a single RNA component in all organisms and only one protein component in bacteria. It is a true multi-turnover ribozyme and one of only two ribozymes (the other being the ribosome) that are conserved in all kingdoms of life. Here we show the crystal structure at 3.85 {angstrom} resolution of the RNA component of Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease P. The entire RNA catalytic component is revealed, as well as the arrangement of the two structural domains. The structure shows the general architecture of the RNA molecule, the inter- and intra-domain interactions, the location of the universally conserved regions, the regions involved in pre-tRNA recognition and the location of the active site. A model with bound tRNA is in agreement with all existing data and suggests the general basis for RNA-RNA recognition by this ribozyme.

  13. Crystal structure of the RNA component of bacterial ribonuclease P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Pan, Tao; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2005-09-22

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is produced as a precursor molecule that needs to be processed at its 3' and 5' ends. Ribonuclease P is the sole endonuclease responsible for processing the 5' end of tRNA by cleaving the precursor and leading to tRNA maturation. It was one of the first catalytic RNA molecules identified and consists of a single RNA component in all organisms and only one protein component in bacteria. It is a true multi-turnover ribozyme and one of only two ribozymes (the other being the ribosome) that are conserved in all kingdoms of life. Here we show the crystal structure at 3.85 A resolution of the RNA component of Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease P. The entire RNA catalytic component is revealed, as well as the arrangement of the two structural domains. The structure shows the general architecture of the RNA molecule, the inter- and intra-domain interactions, the location of the universally conserved regions, the regions involved in pre-tRNA recognition and the location of the active site. A model with bound tRNA is in agreement with all existing data and suggests the general basis for RNA-RNA recognition by this ribozyme.

  14. Crystal structure of inhibitor of ;#954;B kinase [beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Guozhou; Lo, Yu-Chih; Li, Qiubai; Napolitano, Gennaro; Wu, Xuefeng; Jiang, Xuliang; Dreano, Michel; Karin, Michael; Wu, Hao (Weill-Med); (Merck-Serono); (UCSD); (EMD Serono)

    2011-07-26

    Inhibitor of {kappa}B (I{kappa}B) kinase (IKK) phosphorylates I{kappa}B proteins, leading to their degradation and the liberation of nuclear factor {kappa}B for gene transcription. Here we report the crystal structure of IKK{beta} in complex with an inhibitor, at a resolution of 3.6 {angstrom}. The structure reveals a trimodular architecture comprising the kinase domain, a ubiquitin-like domain (ULD) and an elongated, {alpha}-helical scaffold/dimerization domain (SDD). Unexpectedly, the predicted leucine zipper and helix-loop-helix motifs do not form these structures but are part of the SDD. The ULD and SDD mediate a critical interaction with I{kappa}B{alpha} that restricts substrate specificity, and the ULD is also required for catalytic activity. The SDD mediates IKK{beta} dimerization, but dimerization per se is not important for maintaining IKK{beta} activity and instead is required for IKK{beta} activation. Other IKK family members, IKK{alpha}, TBK1 and IKK-i, may have a similar trimodular architecture and function.

  15. Chiral Liquid Crystals: Structures, Phases, Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Dierking

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of chirality, i.e., the lack of mirror symmetry, has a profound effect on liquid crystals, not only on the molecular scale but also on the supermolecular scale and phase. I review these effects, which are related to the formation of supermolecular helicity, the occurrence of novel thermodynamic phases, as well as electro-optic effects which can only be observed in chiral liquid crystalline materials. In particular, I will discuss the formation of helical superstructures in cholesteric, Twist Grain Boundary and ferroelectric phases. As examples for the occurrence of novel phases the Blue Phases and Twist Grain Boundary phases are introduced. Chirality related effects are demonstrated through the occurrence of ferroelectricity in both thermotropic as well as lyotropic liquid crystals. Lack of mirror symmetry is also discussed briefly for some biopolymers such as cellulose and DNA, together with its influence on liquid crystalline behavior.

  16. Crystal structure of human insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with specificity for cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Stefan J; Ascher, David B; Hancock, Nancy C; Holien, Jessica K; Michell, Belinda J; Chai, Siew Yeen; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP or oxytocinase) is a membrane-bound zinc-metallopeptidase that cleaves neuroactive peptides in the brain and produces memory enhancing effects when inhibited. We have determined the crystal structure of human IRAP revealing a closed, four domain arrangement with a large, mostly buried cavity abutting the active site. The structure reveals that the GAMEN exopeptidase loop adopts a very different conformation from other aminopeptidases, thus explaining IRAP's unique specificity for cyclic peptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin. Computational docking of a series of IRAP-specific cognitive enhancers into the crystal structure provides a molecular basis for their structure-activity relationships and demonstrates that the structure will be a powerful tool in the development of new classes of cognitive enhancers for treating a variety of memory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a New Manganese Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LIU Ping; CHEN Yun

    2003-01-01

    @@ In order to study the relationship between the manganese ion and the biological coordination agent, the role ofmanganese ion in the active sites and the structure of the active sites in the manganese enzymes, small molecule complexes are often applied to modeling the structure and the properties of reaction in the active centers. In this pa per, we will report the synthesis and crystal structure of a new manganese(Ⅱ) complex, catena[ aqua-(p-methoxybenzoato- O, O′ ) - (p-methoxybenzoato- O )- (2,2′-bipyridine)-manganese (Ⅱ) ] (p-methoxybenzoic acid). The crystal structure was confirmeded by X-ray crystallography analysis.

  18. Structural, spectral, thermal, dielectric, mechanical and optical properties of urea L-alanine acetate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikumar, D.; Kalainathan, S.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2010-05-01

    A new organic nonlinear optical crystal, urea L-alanine acetate (ULAA) has been grown by solution growth using slow cooling technique with the vision to improve the properties of the L-alanine crystals. Urea and L-alanine material were mixed in the molar ratio 1:4. Solubility and metastable zone width were determined. Single crystal XRD analyses revealed that the crystal lattice of ULAA is orthorhombic system, primitive lattice with cell parameters a=5.7971 Å, b=6.0391 Å, c=12.3276 Å with space group P2 12 12 1 (D 24). High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) analysis was carried out to study their crystalline perfection. FTIR spectrum was recorded to identify the presence of functional groups and molecular structure was confirmed by 1H NMR spectrum. From the mass spectrum, the ratio of compound formation of ULAA was analyzed. Thermal strength of the grown crystal has been studied using thermo-gravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Dielectric measurements reveal that the grown crystals have very low dielectric loss. The mechanical behavior was studied by Vickers microhardness test. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. Preliminary measurement using Kurtz powder technique with Nd-YAG laser light of wavelength 1064 nm indicates that their second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency is roughly equal to that of pure KDP.

  19. New crystal structures of adenylate kinase from Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 in two conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Trung Thanh; Lee, Sangho

    2014-11-01

    Adenylate kinases (AdKs; EC 2.7.3.4) play a critical role in intercellular homeostasis by the interconversion of ATP and AMP to two ADP molecules. Crystal structures of adenylate kinase from Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 (SpAdK) have recently been determined using ligand-free and inhibitor-bound crystals belonging to space groups P21 and P1, respectively. Here, new crystal structures of SpAdK in ligand-free and inhibitor-bound states determined at 1.96 and 1.65 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. The new ligand-free crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=73.5, b=54.3, c=62.7 Å, β=118.8°. The new ligand-free structure revealed an open conformation that differed from the previously determined conformation, with an r.m.s.d on Cα atoms of 1.4 Å. The new crystal of the complex with the two-substrate-mimicking inhibitor P1,P5-bis(adenosine-5'-)pentaphosphate (Ap5A) belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a=53.9, b=62.3, c=63.0 Å, α=101.9, β=112.6, γ=89.9°. Despite belonging to the same space group as the previously reported crystal, the new Ap5A-bound crystal contains four molecules in the asymmetric unit, compared with two in the previous crystal, and shows slightly different lattice contacts. These results demonstrate that SpAdK can crystallize promiscuously in different forms and that the open structure is flexible in conformation.

  20. High-Pressure Crystal Structure, Lattice Vibrations, and Band Structure of BiSbO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errandonea, Daniel; Muñoz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Hernández, Placida; Gomis, Oscar; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Popescu, Catalin; Patwe, Sadeque J; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2016-05-16

    The high-pressure crystal structure, lattice-vibrations, and electronic band structure of BiSbO4 were studied by ab initio simulations. We also performed Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance measurements, as well as synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. High-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements show that the crystal structure of BiSbO4 remains stable up to at least 70 GPa, unlike other known MTO4-type ternary oxides. These experiments also give information on the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameters. Calculations properly describe the crystal structure of BiSbO4 and the changes induced by pressure on it. They also predict a possible high-pressure phase. A room-temperature pressure-volume equation of state is determined, and the effect of pressure on the coordination polyhedron of Bi and Sb is discussed. Raman- and infrared-active phonons were measured and calculated. In particular, calculations provide assignments for all the vibrational modes as well as their pressure dependence. In addition, the band structure and electronic density of states under pressure were also calculated. The calculations combined with the optical measurements allow us to conclude that BiSbO4 is an indirect-gap semiconductor, with an electronic band gap of 2.9(1) eV. Finally, the isothermal compressibility tensor for BiSbO4 is given at 1.8 GPa. The experimental (theoretical) data revealed that the direction of maximum compressibility is in the (0 1 0) plane at ∼33° (38°) to the c-axis and 47° (42°) to the a-axis. The reliability of the reported results is supported by the consistency between experiments and calculations.

  1. Single-Crystal Structure of a Covalent Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, YB; Su, J; Furukawa, H; Yun, YF; Gandara, F; Duong, A; Zou, XD; Yaghi, OM

    2013-11-06

    The crystal structure of a new covalent organic framework, termed COF-320, is determined by single-crystal 3D electron diffraction using the rotation electron diffraction (RED) method for data collection. The COF crystals are prepared by an imine condensation of tetra-(4-anilyl)methane and 4,4'-biphenyldialdehyde in 1,4-dioxane at 120 degrees C to produce a highly porous 9-fold interwoven diamond net. COF-320 exhibits permanent porosity with a Langmuir surface area of 2400 m(2)/g and a methane total uptake of 15.0 wt % (176 cm(3)/cm(3)) at 25 degrees C and 80 bar. The successful determination of the structure of COF-320 directly from single-crystal samples is an important advance in the development of COF chemistry.

  2. Crystal structure of 4-(4-methoxyphenoxybenzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schäfer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C14H12O3, was synthesized via the nucleophilic addition of 4-methoxyphenol to 4-fluorobenzaldehyde. The dihedral angle between the least-squares planes of the benzene rings is 71.52 (3° and the C—O—C angle at the central O atom is 118.82 (8°. In the crystal, weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules to generate supramolecular layers in the bc plane. The layers are linked by weak C—H...π interactions.

  3. The different conformations and crystal structures of dihydroergocristine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönch, B.; Kraus, W.; Köppen, R.; Emmerling, F.

    2016-02-01

    The identification of different forms of dihydroergocristine (DHEC) was carried out by crystallization from different organic solvents. DHEC was identified as potential template for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the epimeric specific analysis of ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food. DHEC was crystallized from different solvents in order to mimic the typical MIP synthesis conditions. Four new solvatomorphs of DHEC were obtained. All solvatomorphs contain a water molecule in the crystal structure, whereas three compounds contain an additional solvent molecule. Based on the conformation of DHEC a comparison with typical EA molecules was possible. The analysis showed that DHEC is a suitable template for MIPs for EAs.

  4. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Nissen, Poul; de Groot, Bert L; Kjellbom, Per; Gourdon, Pontus; Johanson, Urban

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins) have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding of how aquaporins facilitate ammonia flux across membranes could potentially be used to modulate ammonia losses over the plasma membrane to the atmosphere, e.g., during photorespiration, and thereby to modify the nitrogen use efficiency of plants.

  5. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van [School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Klein, Susanne [HP Laboratories, Filton Road, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS34 8QZ (United Kingdom); Leach, Edward [HP Laboratories, Filton Road, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS34 8QZ (United Kingdom); Pizzey, Claire [School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Richardson, Robert M [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-20

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of Diisopropylammonium bromide molecular ferroelectric crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, A.; Qattan, I. A.; Ahmad, A. A.; Al-Aqtash, N.; Sabirianov, R. F.

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of ab-initio calculations based on Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) and hybrid functional (HSE06) of electronic band structure, density of states and partial density of states to get a deep insight into structural and electronic properties of P21 ferroelectric phase of Diisopropylammonium Bromide molecular crystal (DIPAB). We found that the optical band gap of the polar phase of DIPAB is ∼ 5 eV confirming it as a good dielectric. Examination of the density of states and partial density of states reveal that the valence band maximum is mainly composed of bromine 4p orbitals and the conduction band minimum is dominated by carbon 2p, carbon 2s, and nitrogen 2s orbitals. A unique aspect of P21 ferroelectric phase is the permanent dipole within the material. We found that P21 DIPAB has a spontaneous polarization of 22.64 consistent with recent findings which make it good candidate for the creation of ferroelectric tunneling junctions (FTJs) which have the potential to be used as memory devices.

  7. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kirscht

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding of how aquaporins facilitate ammonia flux across membranes could potentially be used to modulate ammonia losses over the plasma membrane to the atmosphere, e.g., during photorespiration, and thereby to modify the nitrogen use efficiency of plants.

  8. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2016-05-23

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)+as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD+versusNADP+, but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase fromClostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia colienzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP+cofactor from the parentE. colidomain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity.

  9. Crystal structure of ethyl 2,4-dichloroquinoline-3-carboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cabrera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C12H9Cl2NO2, the mean planes through the quinoline and carboxylate groups have r.m.s. deviations of 0.006 and 0.021 Å, respectively, and form a dihedral angle of 87.06 (19°. In the crystal, molecules are linked via very weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming chains, which propagate along the c-axis direction.

  10. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhizhong, E-mail: zzyan@bit.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57078 Siegen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  11. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2012-03-01

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  12. Protein dynamics derived from clusters of crystal structures.

    OpenAIRE

    van Aalten, D M; Conn, D A; de Groot, B L; Berendsen, H J; Findlay, J B; Amadei, A

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented to mathematically extract concerted structural transitions in proteins from collections of crystal structures. The "essential dynamics" procedure is used to filter out small-amplitude fluctuations from such a set of structures; the remaining large conformational changes describe motions such as those important for the uptake/release of substrate/ligand and in catalytic reactions. The method is applied to sets of x-ray structures for a number of proteins, and the results ...

  13. Crystal Structure of the Vanadate-Inhibited Ca2+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Johannes D.; Bublitz, Maike; Arnou, Bertrand Jean-Paul;

    2016-01-01

    Vanadate is the hallmark inhibitor of the P-type ATPase family; however, structural details of its inhibitory mechanism have remained unresolved. We have determined the crystal structure of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase with bound vanadate in the absence of Ca2+. Vanadate is bound...

  14. Optimization of liquid crystal structures for real time holography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, B; Anczykowska, A; Bartkiewicz, S; Mysliwiec, J

    2011-11-21

    In this paper we present results of experiments designed to increase our understanding of the photorefractive effect occurring during processes of dynamic hologram generation in Hybrid Photorefractive Liquid Crystal Structures (HPLCS). We also propose equivalent mathematical model which can be used to optimize those structures in order to obtain the highest diffraction efficiency in possibly shortest time.

  15. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure.

  16. Subtleties in crystal structure solution from powder diffraction data using simulated annealing: ranitidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Ashfia; Stephens, P W

    2003-02-01

    Recent advances in crystallographic computing and availability of high-resolution diffraction data have made it relatively easy to solve crystal structures from powders that would have traditionally required single crystal samples. The success of direct space methods depends heavily on starting with an accurate molecular model. In this paper we address the applicability of using these methods in finding subtleties such as disorder in the molecular conformation that might not be known a priori. We use ranitidine HCl as our test sample as it is known to have a conformational disorder from single crystal structural work. We redetermine the structure from powder data using simulated annealing and show that the conformational disorder is clearly revealed by this method.

  17. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signaling to numerous G protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveal...

  18. Studies decode crystal structure of a neurotrophic factor and the p75 neurotrophin receptor complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ CAS biophysicists have made new discoveries about the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR).Under the guidance of Prof.JIANG Tao of the CAS Institute of Biophysics (IBP),Dr.GONG Yong and Dr.CAO Peng revealed crystal structure of a symmetrical complex of the neurotrophin-3 and p75NTR,bringing to light the mode of their interaction and their structural basis.The work was published by the ioumal Nature on 7 August.

  19. Crystal structure of 1-(4-formylbenzylidenethiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Carballo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C9H9N3OS, contains two approximately planar molecules (r.m.s. deviations for 14 non-H atoms = 0.094 and 0.045 Å, with different conformations. In one of them, the C=O group is syn to the S atom and in the other it is anti. Each molecule features an intramolecular N—H...N hydrogen bond, which generates an S(5 ring. In the crystal, molecules are linked by N—H...O and N—H...S hydrogen bonds, generating discrete networks; the syn molecules form [010] chains and the anti molecules form (100 sheets.

  20. Crystal structure of 4-methylsulfanyl-2-phenylquinazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed B. Alshammari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C15H12N2S, the methylthioquinazoline group is planar with the methyl C displaced by only 0.116 (3 Å from the plane of the quinazoline moiety. The dihedral angle between the phenyl ring and the quinazoline ring system is 13.95 (5°. In the crystal, each molecule is linked by π–π stacking between to two adjacent inversion-related molecules. On one side, the inverted quinazoline groups interact with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.7105 (9 Å. On the other side, the quinazoline group interacts with the pyrimidine and phenyl rings of the second neighbour with centroid–centroid distances of 3.5287 (8 and 3.8601 (9 Å, respectively.

  1. Crystal structure of 1-bromo-2-(phenylselenylbenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronte J. Charette

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C12H9BrSe, the Se atom exhibits a bent geometry, with a C—Se—C bond angle of 99.19 (6°. The ortho Se and Br atoms are slightly displaced from opposite faces of the mean plane of the benzene ring [by 0.129 (2 and 0.052 (2 Å, respectively]. The planes of the benzene and phenyl rings form a dihedral angle of 72.69 (5°. In the crystal, π-stacking interactions between inversion-related phenyl rings are observed, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.630 (1 Å.

  2. Crystal structure of 2-aminopyridinium 6-chloronicotinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jeeva Jasmine

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title salt, C5H7N+·C6H3ClNO−, the 2-aminopyridinium cation interacts with the carboxylate group of the 6-chloronicotinate anion through a pair of independent N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming an R22(8 ring motif. In the crystal, these dimeric units are connected further via N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [001]. In addition, weak C—H...N and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, together with weak π–π interactions, with centroid–centroid distances of 3.6560 (5 and 3.6295 (5 Å, connect the chains, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (100.

  3. Crystal Structures of Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase Ⅳ in its Apo and Diprotin B-complexed Forms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajime HIRAMATSU; Kiyoshi KYONO; Atsushi YAMAMOTO; Kazuhiko SAEKI; Hideaki SHIMA; Shigeru SUGIYAMA; Koji INAKA; Ryo SHIMIZU

    2007-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase Ⅳ (DPPIV), which belongs to the prolyl oligopeptidase family of serine proteases, is known to have a variety of regulatory biological functions and has been shown to be implicated in type 2 diabetes. It is therefore important to develop selective human DPPIV (hDPPIV) inhibitors. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of apo hDPPIV at 1.9 (A) resolution. Our high-resolution crystal structure of apo hDPPIV revealed the presence of sodium ion and glycerol molecules at the active site. In order to elucidate the hDPPIV binding mode and substrate specificity, we determined the crystal structure of hDPPIV-diprotin B (Val-Pro-Leu) complex at 2.1 (A) resolution, and clarified the difference in binding mode between diprotin B and diprotin A (Ile-Pro-Ile) into the active site of hDPPIV. Comparison between our crystal structures and the reported apo hDPPIV structures revealed that positively charged functional groups and conserved water molecules contributed to the interaction of ligands with hDPPIV. These results are useful for the design of potent hDPPIV inhibitors.

  4. Structure and properties of MTiOXO sub 4 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Latham, T J

    2000-01-01

    linked to chains of particular atoms along the three crystallographic axes. Dielectric measurements of a series of arsenate crystals and various doped phosphate crystals demonstrate that MTiOXO sub 4 isomorphs exhibit dielectric relaxation of a non-Debye type and appear to conform to the hopping charge-carrier and low frequency dispersion response models. A reduction in the ionic conductivity is observed in the arsenate crystals and phosphate crystals doped with trivalent ions. Arrhenius plots indicate that the activation energies of the mixed cation arsenate crystals are significantly higher than the other KTiOPO sub 4 isomorphs. This observation suggests that the modified oxygen framework in these mixed arsenate crystals contributes intrinsically to the large activation energies required for ionic conduction. This thesis is a study of the structural, optical and electrical properties of MTiOXO sub 4 crystals, where M is a monovalent cation such as K, Rb etc and X is P or As. Low and high-temperature single-...

  5. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-O and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures.Therefore,those silicates may be named titano- and zircono-silicates.Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra,the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet,respectively.As a new concept,the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  6. Electron Crystallographic Study on Structure Determination for Minute Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fanghua; FAN Haifu; WAN Zhenghua; HU Jianjun; TANG Dong

    2007-01-01

    @@ In the 1970s the development of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) provided a new approach to structure determination for minute crystals, which is thoroughly different from the diffraction methods.However, the previous method of trial and error has its own limits, such as some preliminary structural information must be known in advance; the crystals must be sufficient strong under the electron beam irradiation;and not all atoms can be seen in the image. Two ideas were proposed to initiate the present research project:one is to transform an arbitrary image into the crystal structure map, and the other is to enhance the image resolution by combining the information contained in the image and the corresponding electron diffraction pattern. These ideas have been realized via the combination of electron microscopy and diffraction crystallography.

  7. A crystal structure prediction enigma solved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoser, Anna Agnieszka; Sovago, Ioana; Lanzac, A.

    2017-01-01

    The seemingly unpredictable structure of gallic acid monohydrate form IV has been investigated using accurate X-ray diffraction measurements at temperatures of 10 and 123 K. The measurements demonstrate that the structure is commensurately modulated at 10 K and disordered at higher temperatures. ...

  8. Crystal structure of lactoperoxidase at 2.4 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Nagendra; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, S Baskar; Kaur, Punit; Bhushan, A; Srinivasan, A; Singh, Tej P

    2008-02-29

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is a member of the mammalian peroxidase superfamily. It catalyzes the oxidation of thiocyanate and halides. Freshly isolated and purified samples of caprine LPO were saturated with ammonium iodide and crystallized using 20% polyethylene glycol 3350 in a hanging drop vapor diffusion setup. The structure has been determined using X-ray crystallographic method and refined to R(cryst) and R(free) factors of 0.196 and 0.203, respectively. The structure determination revealed an unexpected phosphorylation of Ser198 in LPO, which is also confirmed by anti-phosphoserine antibody binding studies. The structure is also notable for observing densities for glycan chains at all the four potential glycosylation sites. Caprine LPO consists of a single polypeptide chain of 595 amino acid residues and folds into an oval-shaped structure. The structure contains 20 well-defined alpha-helices of varying lengths including a helix, H(2a), unique to LPO, and two short antiparallel beta-strands. The structure confirms that the heme group is covalently linked to the protein through two ester linkages involving carboxylic groups of Glu258 and Asp108 and modified methyl groups of pyrrole rings A and C, respectively. The heme moiety is slightly distorted from planarity, but pyrrole ring B is distorted considerably. However, an iron atom is displaced only by 0.1 A from the plane of the heme group toward the proximal site. The substrate diffusing channel in LPO is cylindrical in shape with a diameter of approximately 6 A. Two histidine residues and six buried water molecules are connected through a hydrogen-bonded chain from the distal heme cavity to the surface of protein molecule and seemingly form the basis of proton relay for catalytic action. Ten iodide ions have been observed in the structure. Out of these, only one iodide ion is located in the distal heme cavity and is hydrogen bonded to the water molecule W1. W1 is also hydrogen bonded to the heme iron as well as

  9. Solving Crystal Structures from Powder Diffraction Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A. Nørlund; Lehmann, M. S.; Nielsen, Mogens

    1985-01-01

    High resolution powder data from both neutron and X-ray (synchrotron) sources have been used to estimate the possibility of direct structure determination from powder data. Two known structures were resolved by direct methods with neutron and X-ray data. With synchrotron X-ray data, the measured...... range of data was insufficient for a structure analysis, but the R-factor calculations showed the intensities extracted from the profile data to be of acceptable quality. The results were used to estimate the largest structure that might be solved using routine techniques. It was found that the limit...... would be near twenty atoms in the asymmetric part of a centro-symmetric structure....

  10. Crystal structure of aspartame anhydrate from powder diffraction data. Structural aspects of the dehydration process of aspartame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guguta, C.; Meekes, H.L.M.; Gelder, R. de

    2006-01-01

    Aspartame has three pseudo-polymorphic forms, two hydrates and a hemi-hydrate, for which crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffraction data. This paper presents the crystal structure of the anhydrate, which was obtained by dehydrating the hemi-hydrate. The crystal structure of a

  11. Polymorph identification and crystal structure determination by a combined crystal structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Mark D; Hejczyk, Katarzyna E; Bithell, Erica G; Day, Graeme M; Jones, William

    2013-06-10

    Electron diffraction offers advantages over X-ray based methods for crystal structure determination because it can be applied to sub-micron sized crystallites, and picogram quantities of material. For molecular organic species, however, crystal structure determination with electron diffraction is hindered by rapid crystal deterioration in the electron beam, limiting the amount of diffraction data that can be collected, and by the effect of dynamical scattering on reflection intensities. Automated electron diffraction tomography provides one possible solution. We demonstrate here, however, an alternative approach in which a set of putative crystal structures of the compound of interest is generated by crystal structure prediction methods and electron diffraction is used to determine which of these putative structures is experimentally observed. This approach enables the advantages of electron diffraction to be exploited, while avoiding the need to obtain large amounts of diffraction data or accurate reflection intensities. We demonstrate the application of the methodology to the pharmaceutical compounds paracetamol, scyllo-inositol and theophylline. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Crystal-Size-Dependent Structural Transitions in Nanoporous Crystals: Adsorption-Induced Transitions in ZIF-8

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2014-09-04

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Understanding the crystal-size dependence of both guest adsorption and structural transitions of nanoporous solids is crucial to the development of these materials. We find that nano-sized metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals have significantly different guest adsorption properties compared to the bulk material. A new methodology is developed to simulate the adsorption and transition behavior of entire MOF nanoparticles. Our simulations predict that the transition pressure significantly increases with decreasing particle size, in agreement with crystal-size-dependent experimental measurements of the N2-ZIF-8 system. We also propose a simple core-shell model to examine this effect on length scales that are inaccessible to simulations and again find good agreement with experiments. This study is the first to examine particle size effects on structural transitions in ZIFs and provides a thermodynamic framework for understanding the underlying mechanism.

  13. Synthesis, crystal structure and biological activity of novel diester cyclophanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Bingqin; Fang, Xianwen; Cheng, Zhao; Yang, Meipan, E-mail: yangbq@nwu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, Northwest University, Shaanxi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A series of novel diester cyclophanes was synthesized by esterification of 1,2-benzenedicarbonyl chloride with eight different diols under high dilution conditions. The structures of the compounds were verified by elemental analysis, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), IR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The crystal structures of two compounds were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffractometry (XRD). All the new cyclophanes were evaluated for biological activities and the results showed that some of these compounds have low antibacterial or antifungal activities (author)

  14. Fine structure of fields in 2D photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Volkov, V. S.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.

    2006-01-01

    We resolve fine structure of fields in a single-row missing photonic crystal waveguide by finite-difference time-domain modelling and SNOM measurements. Both linear dispersion and slow-light regimes in proximity of the cutoff are addressed in the analysis.......We resolve fine structure of fields in a single-row missing photonic crystal waveguide by finite-difference time-domain modelling and SNOM measurements. Both linear dispersion and slow-light regimes in proximity of the cutoff are addressed in the analysis....

  15. Template Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanocrystals with Unusual Crystal Structures and Their Catalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Hua

    2016-12-20

    Noble metal nanocrystals own high chemical stability, unique plasmonic and distinctive catalytic properties, making them outstanding in many applications. However, their practical applications are limited by their high cost and scarcity on the earth. One promising strategy to solve these problems is to boost their catalytic performance in order to reduce their usage amount. To realize this target, great research efforts have been devoted to the size-, composition-, shape- and/or architecture-controlled syntheses of noble metal nanocrystals during the past two decades. Impressively, recent experimental studies have revealed that the crystal structure of noble metal nanocrystals can also significantly affect their physicochemical properties, such as optical, magnetic, catalytic, mechanical, electrical and electronic properties. Therefore, besides the well-established size, composition, shape, and architecture control, the rise of crystal structure-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals will open up new opportunities to further improve their functional properties, and thus promote their potential applications in energy conversion, catalysis, biosensing, information storage, surface enhanced Raman scattering, waveguide, near-infrared photothermal therapy, controlled release, bioimaging, biomedicine, and so on. In this Account, we review the recent research progress on the crystal structure control of noble metal nanocrystals with a template synthetic approach and their crystal structure-dependent catalytic properties. We first describe the template synthetic methods, such as epitaxial growth and galvanic replacement reaction methods, in which a presynthesized noble metal nanocrystal with either new or common crystal structure is used as the template to direct the growth of unusual crystal structures of other noble metals. Significantly, the template synthetic strategy described here provides an efficient, simple and straightforward way to synthesize unusual

  16. Clathrate Structure Determination by Combining Crystal Structure Prediction with Computational and Experimental (129) Xe NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selent, Marcin; Nyman, Jonas; Roukala, Juho; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Oilunkaniemi, Raija; Bygrave, Peter J; Laitinen, Risto; Jokisaari, Jukka; Day, Graeme M; Lantto, Perttu

    2017-01-23

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of clathrates using NMR spectroscopy of enclathrated xenon to select from a set of predicted crystal structures. Crystal structure prediction methods have been used to generate an ensemble of putative structures of o- and m-fluorophenol, whose previously unknown clathrate structures have been studied by (129) Xe NMR spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of the (129) Xe chemical shift tensor to the chemical environment and shape of the crystalline cavity makes it ideal as a probe for porous materials. The experimental powder NMR spectra can be used to directly confirm or reject hypothetical crystal structures generated by computational prediction, whose chemical shift tensors have been simulated using density functional theory. For each fluorophenol isomer one predicted crystal structure was found, whose measured and computed chemical shift tensors agree within experimental and computational error margins and these are thus proposed as the true fluorophenol xenon clathrate structures.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure, crystal growth and physical properties of N,N-diethyl anilinium picrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan @ Raja, R.; Anandha Babu, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2011-11-01

    Crystalline substance of N,N-diethyl anilinium picrate (NNDEAP) has been synthesized and single crystals of NNDEAP were successfully grown for the first time by the slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature with dimensions 14×10×10 mm3. The formation of the new crystal has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The structural perfection of the grown crystal was analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. The functional groups of NNDEAP have been identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral studies. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) have also been carried out and the thermal behavior of NNDEAP has been studied. The UV-vis-NIR studies have been carried out to identify the optical transmittance and the cut off wavelength of NNDEAP is identified. The dielectric loss and the dielectric constant as a function of frequency and temperature were measured for the grown crystal and the nature of variation of dielectric constant εr and dielectric losses (tan δ) were studied. Vicker's hardness test has been carried out on NNDEAP to measure the load dependent hardness. The laser induced surface damage threshold for the grown crystal was measured using Nd:YAG laser.

  18. Crystal structure of 2-methoxy-1-nitronaphthalene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasna Yassine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C11H9NO3, contains two molecules, A and B. In molecule A, the dihedral angle between the planes of the naphthalene ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.003 Å and the nitro group is 89.9 (2°, and the C atom of the methoxy group deviates from the naphthyl plane by 0.022 (2 Å. Equivalent data for molecule B are 0.008 Å, 65.9 (2° and −0.198 (2 Å, respectively. In the crystal, molecules are linked by weak C—H...O interactions, forming [100] chains of alternating A and B molecules. Weak aromatic π–π stacking contacts, with a range of centroid–centroid distances from 3.5863 (9 to 3.8048 (9 Å, are also observed.

  19. Anisotropy of hardness and laser damage threshold of unidirectional organic NLO crystal in relation to the internal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, V. [Department of Physics, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur, Tamil Nadu (India); Arivanandhan, M., E-mail: arivu_cz@yahoo.co.in [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Sankaranarayanan, K. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Hayakawa, Y. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {center_dot} Growth rate of the unidirectional organic crystals were measured and the variation in the growth rate was explained based on the attachment energy model. {center_dot} Anisotropic behaviors of hardness and laser damage threshold of the unidirectional materials were analyzed. {center_dot} The obtained results were explained based on the crystal structure of the material. - Abstract: Unidirectional benzophenone crystals were grown along <1 1 0>, <0 1 0> and <0 0 1> directions by uniaxially solution crystallization method at ambient temperature. The growth rate of the grown crystals was varied with orientation. The optical absorption coefficients of benzophenone were measured as a function of wavelength. The optical absorption study reveals that the benzophenone crystal has very low absorption in the wavelength range of interest. Moreover, the laser damage threshold and micro hardness for <1 1 0>, <0 1 0> and <0 0 1> oriented unidirectional benzophenone crystals were measured using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm radiation and Vicker's micro hardness tester, respectively. The laser damage threshold is larger for the <1 1 0> and <0 1 0> oriented crystals compared to <0 0 1> oriented crystal at 1064 nm wavelength. The result is consistent with the hardness variation observed for the three different crystallographic directions of benzophenone crystal. The relation between the laser damage profile and mechanical hardness anisotropy is discussed based on the crystal structure of benzophenone.

  20. Photonics of liquid-crystal structures: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palto, S. P., E-mail: palto@online.ru; Blinov, L. M.; Barnik, M. I.; Lazarev, V. V.; Umanskii, B. A.; Shtykov, N. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    The original results of studies of the electro-optical and laser effects which have been performed at the Laboratory of Liquid Crystals of the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, over the last few years are reviewed. Cholesteric liquid crystals as vivid representatives of photonic structures and their behavior in an electric field are considered in detail. The formation of higher harmonics in the periodic distribution of the director field in a helical liquid crystal structure and, correspondingly, the new (anharmonic) mode of electro-optical effects are discussed. Another group of studies is devoted to bistable light switching by an electric field in chiral nematics. Polarization diffraction gratings controlled by an electric field are also considered. The results of studies devoted to microlasers on various photonic structures with cholesteric and nematic liquid crystals are considered in detail. Particular attention is given to the new regime: leaky-mode lasing. Designs of liquid crystal light amplifiers and their polarization, field, and spectral characteristics are considered in the last section.