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Sample records for crystal structure binding

  1. Artemin Crystal Structure Reveals Insights into Heparan Sulfate Binding

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    Silvian,L.; Jin, P.; Carmillo, P.; Boriack-Sjodin, P.; Pelletier, C.; Rushe, M.; Gong, B.; Sah, D.; Pepinsky, B.; Rossomando, A.

    2006-01-01

    Artemin (ART) promotes the growth of developing peripheral neurons by signaling through a multicomponent receptor complex comprised of a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor (cRET) and a specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked co-receptor (GFR{alpha}3). Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signals through a similar ternary complex but requires heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for full activity. HSPG has not been demonstrated as a requirement for ART signaling. We crystallized ART in the presence of sulfate and solved its structure by isomorphous replacement. The structure reveals ordered sulfate anions bound to arginine residues in the pre-helix and amino-terminal regions that were organized in a triad arrangement characteristic of heparan sulfate. Three residues in the pre-helix were singly or triply substituted with glutamic acid, and the resulting proteins were shown to have reduced heparin-binding affinity that is partly reflected in their ability to activate cRET. This study suggests that ART binds HSPGs and identifies residues that may be involved in HSPG binding.

  2. Crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M; Pampa, K J; Kumar, S M; Mukherjee, S; Kunishima, N; Rangappa, K S; Lokanath, N K

    2015-03-27

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, represent one of the largest superfamilies of primary transporters, which are very essential for various biological functions. The crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus has been determined at 1.77 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the protomer has two thick arms, (arm I and II), which resemble 'L' shape. The ATP-binding pocket is located close to the end of arm I. ATP molecule is docked into the active site of the protein. The dimeric crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from G. kaustophilus has been compared with the previously reported crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from Salmonella typhimurium.

  3. Crystal structure of the Locusta migratoria odorant binding protein.

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    Zheng, Jiangge; Li, Junru; Han, Lei; Wang, Yang; Wu, Wei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Tao, Ye; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Ziding; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-16

    Locusta migratoria (Lmig) causes enormous losses to agricultural products, especially because it often infests the world with great swarms as locust plagues. Locusts find their plant hosts on which they feed through their olfactory system, in which odorant binding proteins (OBPs) play an important role. Previous study indicated that the amino acid sequences of LmigOBP showed low similarity to OBPs from other insect orders and we speculated that it might perform unique binding behavior. Here, we solved the first LmigOBP1 structure at 1.65Å, which is a monomer in solution and disulfide bonds play a key role in maintaining its function. We show that LmigOBP1 possesses a unique seventh α-helix, which is located at the surface with strong interactions with the LmigOBP1 scaffold consisting of other six α-helices. Moreover, the seventh α-helix forms a wall of an "L" shaped internal hydrophobic cavity to accommodate linear ligands, which is consistent with the binding experiments. We also demonstrate that the ligand-binding pocket in LmigOBP1 is greatly different from that in the closest homologs mosquito OBPs. Taken together, this study provides a structural basis for designing small inhibitors to control locust.

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

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    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

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    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  6. Crystal structure of the single-stranded RNA binding protein HutP from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan; Sivaraman, Padavattan; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder

    2014-04-18

    RNA binding proteins control gene expression by the attenuation/antitermination mechanism. HutP is an RNA binding antitermination protein. It regulates the expression of hut operon when it binds with RNA by modulating the secondary structure of single-stranded hut mRNA. HutP necessitates the presence of l-histidine and divalent metal ion to bind with RNA. Herein, we report the crystal structures of ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)) and EDTA (0.5 M) treated ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)), solved at 1.9 Å and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively, from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. The addition of 0.5 M EDTA does not affect the overall metal-ion mediated ternary complex structure and however, the metal ions at the non-specific binding sites are chelated, as evidenced from the results of structural features.

  7. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

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    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  8. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity.

  9. Ligand binding and crystal structures of the substrate-binding domain of the ABC transporter OpuA.

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    Justina C Wolters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ABC transporter OpuA from Lactococcus lactis transports glycine betaine upon activation by threshold values of ionic strength. In this study, the ligand binding characteristics of purified OpuA in a detergent-solubilized state and of its substrate-binding domain produced as soluble protein (OpuAC was characterized. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The binding of glycine betaine to purified OpuA and OpuAC (K(D = 4-6 microM did not show any salt dependence or cooperative effects, in contrast to the transport activity. OpuAC is highly specific for glycine betaine and the related proline betaine. Other compatible solutes like proline and carnitine bound with affinities that were 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower. The low affinity substrates were not noticeably transported by membrane-reconstituted OpuA. OpuAC was crystallized in an open (1.9 A and closed-liganded (2.3 A conformation. The binding pocket is formed by three tryptophans (Trp-prism coordinating the quaternary ammonium group of glycine betaine in the closed-liganded structure. Even though the binding site of OpuAC is identical to that of its B. subtilis homolog, the affinity for glycine betaine is 4-fold higher. CONCLUSIONS: Ionic strength did not affect substrate binding to OpuA, indicating that regulation of transport is not at the level of substrate binding, but rather at the level of translocation. The overlap between the crystal structures of OpuAC from L.lactis and B.subtilis, comprising the classical Trp-prism, show that the differences observed in the binding affinities originate from outside of the ligand binding site.

  10. Crystal structures and ligand binding of PurM proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus kaustophilus.

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    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Baba, Seiki; Watanabe, Yuzo; Nakagawa, Noriko; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sampei, Gen-Ichi; Kawai, Gota

    2016-03-01

    Crystal structures of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) synthetase, also known as PurM, from Thermus thermophilus (Tt) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (Gk) were determined. For TtPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with four dimers in an asymmetric unit. For GkPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with one monomer in asymmetric unit. The biological unit is dimer for both TtPurM and GkPurM and the dimer structures were similar to previously determined structures of PurM in general. For TtPurM, ∼50 residues at the amino terminal were disordered in the crystal structure whereas, for GkPurM, the corresponding region covered the ATP-binding site forming an α helix in part, suggesting that the N-terminal region of PurM changes its conformation upon binding of ligands. FGAM binding site was predicted by the docking simulation followed by the MD simulation based on the SO4 (2-) binding site found in the crystal structure of TtPurM.

  11. Crystal structures of β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 enzyme reveal conformational changes and substrate binding.

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    Tsutsui, Yuko; Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K

    2013-11-01

    The β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 (β4GalT7) enzyme is involved in proteoglycan synthesis. In the presence of a manganese ion, it transfers galactose from UDP-galactose to xylose on a proteoglycan acceptor substrate. We present here the crystal structures of human β4GalT7 in open and closed conformations. A comparison of these crystal structures shows that, upon manganese and UDP or UDP-Gal binding, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes involving a small and a long loop. We also present the crystal structures of Drosophila wild-type β4GalT7 and D211N β4GalT7 mutant enzymes in the closed conformation in the presence of the acceptor substrate xylobiose and the donor substrate UDP-Gal, respectively. To understand the catalytic mechanism, we have crystallized the ternary complex of D211N β4GalT7 mutant enzyme in the presence of manganese with the donor and the acceptor substrates together in the same crystal structure. The galactose moiety of the bound UDP-Gal molecule forms seven hydrogen bonds with the protein molecule. The nonreducing end of the xylose moiety of xylobiose binds to the hydrophobic acceptor sugar binding pocket created by the conformational changes, whereas its extended xylose moiety forms hydrophobic interactions with a Tyr residue. In the ternary complex crystal structure, the nucleophile O4 oxygen atom of the xylose molecule is found in close proximity to the C1 and O5 atoms of the galactose moiety. This is the first time that a Michaelis complex of a glycosyltransferase has been described, and it clearly suggests an SN2 type catalytic mechanism for the β4GalT7 enzyme.

  12. Crystal structure of cyclic nucleotide-binding-like protein from Brucella abortus.

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    He, Zheng; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Ke, Yuehua; Li, Xuemei; Chen, Zeliang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-12-25

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB)-like protein (CNB-L) from Brucella abortus shares sequence homology with CNB domain-containing proteins. We determined the crystal structure of CNB-L at 2.0 Å resolution in the absence of its C-terminal helix and nucleotide. The 3D structure of CNB-L is in a two-fold symmetric form. Each protomer shows high structure similarity to that of cGMP-binding domain-containing proteins, and likely mimics their nucleotide-free conformation. A key residue, Glu17, mediates the dimerization and prevents binding of cNMP to the canonical ligand-pocket. The structurally observed dimer of CNB-L is stable in solution, and thus is likely to be biologically relevant.

  13. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin

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    Makyio, Hisayoshi [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Kiso, Makoto [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ando, Hiromune, E-mail: hando@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kato, Ryuichi, E-mail: ryuichi.kato@kek.jp [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. - Highlights: • The six-bladed β-propeller structure of AOL was solved by seleno-sugar phasing. • The mode of fucose binding is essentially conserved at all six binding sites. • The seleno-fucosides exhibit slightly different interactions and electron densities. • These findings suggest that the affinity for fucose is not identical at each site.

  14. Structure and binding in crystals of cage-like molecules: hexamine and platonic hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Berland, Kristian; 10.1063/1.3366652

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that first-principle calculations using a van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF), [Phys. Rev. Lett. $\\mathbf{92}$, 246401 (2004)] permits determination of molecular crystal structure. We study the crystal structures of hexamine and the platonic hydrocarbons (cubane and dodecahedrane). The calculated lattice parameters and cohesion energy agree well with experiments. Further, we examine the asymptotic accounts of the van der Waals forces by comparing full vdW-DF with asymptotic atom-based pair potentials extracted from vdW-DF. The character of the binding differ in the two cases, with vdW-DF giving a significant enhancement at intermediate and relevant binding separations. We analyze consequences of this result for methods such as DFT-D, and question DFT-D's transferability over the full range of separations.

  15. The crystal structure of the FAD/NADPH-binding domain of flavocytochrome P450 BM3.

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    Joyce, Michael G; Ekanem, Idorenyin S; Roitel, Olivier; Dunford, Adrian J; Neeli, Rajasekhar; Girvan, Hazel M; Baker, George J; Curtis, Robin A; Munro, Andrew W; Leys, David

    2012-05-01

    We report the crystal structure of the FAD/NADPH-binding domain (FAD domain) of the biotechnologically important Bacillus megaterium flavocytochrome P450 BM3, the last domain of the enzyme to be structurally resolved. The structure was solved in both the absence and presence of the ligand NADP(+), identifying important protein interactions with the NADPH 2'-phosphate that helps to dictate specificity for NADPH over NADH, and involving residues Tyr974, Arg966, Lys972 and Ser965. The Trp1046 side chain shields the FAD isoalloxazine ring from NADPH, and motion of this residue is required to enable NADPH-dependent FAD reduction. Multiple binding interactions stabilize the FAD cofactor, including aromatic stacking with the adenine group from the side chains of Tyr860 and Trp854, and several interactions with FAD pyrophosphate oxygens, including bonding to tyrosines 828, 829 and 860. Mutagenesis of C773 and C999 to alanine was required for successful crystallization, with C773A predicted to disfavour intramolecular and intermolecular disulfide bonding. Multiangle laser light scattering analysis showed wild-type FAD domain to be near-exclusively dimeric, with dimer disruption achieved on treatment with the reducing agent dithiothreitol. By contrast, light scattering showed that the C773A/C999A FAD domain was monomeric. The C773A/C999A FAD domain structure confirms that Ala773 is surface exposed and in close proximity to Cys810, with this region of the enzyme's connecting domain (that links the FAD domain to the FMN-binding domain in P450 BM3) located at a crystal contact interface between FAD domains. The FAD domain crystal structure enables molecular modelling of its interactions with its cognate FMN (flavodoxin-like) domain within the BM3 reductase module.

  16. Crystal structures of multidrug binding protein TtgR in complex with antibiotics and plant antimicrobials.

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    Alguel, Yilmaz; Meng, Cuixiang; Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan L; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2007-06-08

    Antibiotic resistance is a widely spread phenomenon. One major mechanism that underlies antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the active extrusion of toxic compounds through the membrane-bound efflux pumps that are often regulated at the transcriptional level. TtgR represses the transcription of TtgABC, a key efflux pump in Pseudomonas putida, which is highly resistant to antibiotics, solvents and toxic plant secondary products. Previously we showed that TtgR is the only reported repressor that binds to different classes of natural antimicrobial compounds, which are also extruded by the efflux pump. We report here five high-resolution crystal structures of TtgR from the solvent-tolerant strain DOT-T1E, including TtgR in complex with common antibiotics and plant secondary metabolites. We provide structural basis for the unique ligand binding properties of TtgR. We identify two distinct and overlapping ligand binding sites; the first one is broader and consists of mainly hydrophobic residues, whereas the second one is deeper and contains more polar residues including Arg176, a unique residue present in the DOT-T1E strain but not in other Pseudomonas strains. Phloretin, a plant antimicrobial, can bind to both binding sites with distinct binding affinities and stoichiometries. Results on ligand binding properties of native and mutant TtgR proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the binding affinities and stoichiometries, and suggest a potential positive cooperativity between the two binding sites. The importance of Arg176 in phloretin binding was further confirmed by the reduced ability of phloretin in releasing the mutant TtgR from bound DNA compared to the native protein. The results presented here highlight the importance and versatility of regulatory systems in bacterial antibiotic resistance and open up new avenues for novel antimicrobial development.

  17. Post-transcriptional regulator Hfq binds catalase HPII: crystal structure of the complex.

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    Koji Yonekura

    Full Text Available We report a crystal structure of Hfq and catalase HPII from Escherichia coli. The post-transcriptional regulator Hfq plays a key role in the survival of bacteria under stress. A small non-coding RNA (sRNA DsrA is required for translation of the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS, which is the central regulator of the general stress response. Hfq facilitates efficient translation of rpoS mRNA, which encodes RpoS. Hfq helps in the function of other specific proteins involved in RNA processing, indicating its versatility in the cell. However, structural information regarding its interactions with partners is missing. Here we obtained crystals of Hfq and HPII complexes from cell lysates following attempts to overexpress a foreign membrane protein. HPII is one of two catalases in E. coli and its mRNA is transcribed by an RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing RpoS, which in turn is under positive control of small non-coding RNAs and of the RNA chaperone Hfq. This sigma factor is known to have a pronounced effect on the expression of HPII. The crystal structure reveals that a Hfq hexamer binds each subunit of a HPII tetramer. Each subunit of the Hfq hexamer exhibits a unique binding mode with HPII. The hexamer of Hfq interacts via its distal surface. The proximal and distal surfaces are known to specifically bind different sRNAs, and binding of HPII could affect Hfq function. Hfq-HPII complexation has no effect on catalase HPII activity.

  18. Crystal structure of the sugar binding domain of the archaeal transcriptional regulator TrmB.

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    Krug, Michael; Lee, Sung-Jae; Diederichs, Kay; Boos, Winfried; Welte, Wolfram

    2006-04-21

    TrmB is an alpha-glucoside-sensing transcriptional regulator controlling two operons encoding maltose/trehalose and maltodextrin ABC transporters of Pyrococcus furiosus. The crystal structure of an N-terminal truncated derivative of TrmB (amino acids 2-109 deleted; TrmB(delta2-109)) was solved at 1.5 A resolution. This protein has lost its DNA binding domain but has retained its sugar recognition site. The structure represents a novel sugar-binding fold. TrmB(delta2-109) bound maltose, glucose, sucrose, and maltotriose, exhibiting Kd values of 6.8, 25, 34, and 160 microM, respectively. TrmB(delta2-109) behaved as a monomer in dilute buffer solution in contrast to the full-length protein, which is a dimer. Co-crystallization with bound maltose identified a binding site involving seven amino acid residues: Ser229, Asn305, Gly320, Met321, Val324, Ile325, and Glu326. Six of these residues interact with the nonreducing glucosyl residue of maltose. The nonreducing glucosyl residue is shared by all substrates bound to TrmB, suggesting it as a common recognition motif.

  19. Crystal structure of Plasmodium falciparum phosphoglycerate kinase: Evidence for anion binding in the basic patch

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    Smith, Craig D.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish; Pal, Biswajit (UAB)

    2012-11-09

    3-Phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway and catalyzes an important phosphorylation step leading to the production of ATP. The crystal structure of Plasmodium falciparum phosphoglycerate kinase (PfPGK) in the open conformation is presented in two different groups, namely I222 and P6{sub 1}22. The structure in I222 space group is solved using MAD and refined at 3 {angstrom} whereas that in P6{sub 1}22A is solved using MR and refined at 2.7 {angstrom}. I222 form has three monomers in asymmetric unit whereas P6{sub 1}22 form has two monomers in the asymmetric unit. In both crystal forms a sulphate ion is located at the active site where ATP binds, but no Mg{sup 2+} ion is observed. For the first time another sulphate ion is found at the basic patch where the 3-phosphate of 1,3-biphosphoglycerate normally binds. This was found in both chains of P6{sub 1}22 form but only in chain A of I222 form.

  20. Crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

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    Amick, Joseph; Schlanger, Simon E; Wachnowsky, Christine; Moseng, Mitchell A; Emerson, Corey C; Dare, Michelle; Luo, Wen-I; Ithychanda, Sujay S; Nix, Jay C; Cowan, J A; Page, Richard C; Misra, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Mortalin, a member of the Hsp70-family of molecular chaperones, functions in a variety of processes including mitochondrial protein import and quality control, Fe-S cluster protein biogenesis, mitochondrial homeostasis, and regulation of p53. Mortalin is implicated in regulation of apoptosis, cell stress response, neurodegeneration, and cancer and is a target of the antitumor compound MKT-077. Like other Hsp70-family members, Mortalin consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain. We determined the crystal structure of the NBD of human Mortalin at 2.8 Å resolution. Although the Mortalin nucleotide-binding pocket is highly conserved relative to other Hsp70 family members, we find that its nucleotide affinity is weaker than that of Hsc70. A Parkinson's disease-associated mutation is located on the Mortalin-NBD surface and may contribute to Mortalin aggregation. We present structure-based models for how the Mortalin-NBD may interact with the nucleotide exchange factor GrpEL1, with p53, and with MKT-077. Our structure may contribute to the understanding of disease-associated Mortalin mutations and to improved Mortalin-targeting antitumor compounds.

  1. Crystal structures from the Plasmodium peroxiredoxins: new insights into oligomerization and product binding

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    Qiu Wei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite primarily responsible for more than one million malarial deaths, annually, and is developing resistance to current therapies. Throughout its lifespan, the parasite is subjected to oxidative attack, so Plasmodium antioxidant defences are essential for its survival and are targets for disease control. Results To further understand the molecular aspects of the Plasmodium redox system, we solved 4 structures of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins (Prx. Our study has confirmed PvTrx-Px1 to be a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-sensitive peroxiredoxin. We have identified and characterized the novel toroid octameric oligomer of PyTrx-Px1, which may be attributed to the interplay of several factors including: (1 the orientation of the conserved surface/buried arginine of the NNLA(I/LGRS-loop; and (2 the C-terminal tail positioning (also associated with the aforementioned conserved loop which facilitates the intermolecular hydrogen bond between dimers (in an A-C fashion. In addition, a notable feature of the disulfide bonds in some of the Prx crystal structures is discussed. Finally, insight into the latter stages of the peroxiredoxin reaction coordinate is gained. Our structure of PyPrx6 is not only in the sulfinic acid (RSO2H form, but it is also with glycerol bound in a way (not previously observed indicative of product binding. Conclusions The structural characterization of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins provided herein provides insight into their oligomerization and product binding which may facilitate the targeting of these antioxidant defences. Although the structural basis for the octameric oligomerization is further understood, the results yield more questions about the biological implications of the peroxiredoxin oligomerization, as multiple toroid configurations are now known. The crystal structure depicting the product bound active site gives insight into the overoxidation of the active site and

  2. Crystallization and preliminary structural studies of champedak galactose-binding lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Mohamed, Emida; Ibrahim, Wan Izlina Wan; Hashim, Onn Haji; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    Galactose-binding lectin from champedak (Artocarpus integer) consists of two chains: alpha and beta (133 and 21 amino acids, respectively). It has been shown to recognize and bind to carbohydrates involved in IgA and C1 inhibitor molecules. The protein was purified and crystallized at 293 K. Crystals were observed in two space groups, P2(1) and P2(1)2(1)2, and diffracted to 1.65 and 2.6 A, respectively.

  3. The Crystal Structure of the Heparin-Binding Reelin-N Domain of F-Spondin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Liu, Jin-huan; Lawler, Jack; Wang, Jia-huai (BIDMC); (DFCI)

    2008-09-23

    The extracellular matrix protein F-spondin mediates axon guidance during neuronal development. Its N-terminal domain, termed the reelin-N domain, is conserved in F-spondins, reelins, and other extracellular matrix proteins. In this study, a recombinant human reelin-N domain has been expressed, purified, and shown to bind heparin. The crystal structure of the reelin-N domain resolved to 2.0 {angstrom} reveals a variant immunoglobulin-like fold and potential heparin-binding sites. Substantial conformational variations even in secondary structure are observed between the two chemically identical reelin-N domains in one crystallographic asymmetric unit. The variations may result from extensive, highly specific interactions across the interface of the two reelin-N domains. The calculated values of buried surface area and the interface's shape complementarity are consistent with the formation of a weak dimer. The homophilic asymmetric dimer can potentially offer advantages in binding to ligands such as glycosaminoglycans, which may, in turn, bridge the two reelin-N domains and stabilize the dimer.

  4. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  5. The Crystal Structure of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein Reveals the Location of a Frequent Mutation that Impairs Innate Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckert, J.K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, J.I.; Gurtler, K.; Oh, D.Y.; Sur, S.; Lundvall, L.; Hamann, L.; Ploeg, A. van der; Pickkers, P.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E.; Kubarenko, A.V.; Weber, A.N.; Kabesch, M.; Kumpf, O.; An, H.J.; Lee, J.O.; Schumann, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein that initiates an immune response after recognition of bacterial LPS. Here, we report the crystal structure of murine LBP at 2.9 A resolution. Several structural differences were observed between LBP and the related

  6. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Mustafi, Sourajit M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); LeMaster, David M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Li, Zhong [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Héroux, Annie [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda, E-mail: griselda@wadsworth.org [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P2{sub 1} and P3{sub 1}21 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3{sub 1}21 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P2{sub 1} crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring.

  7. Crystal Structure and Mechanism of Activation of TANK-Binding Kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amede Larabi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tank-binding kinase I (TBK1 plays a key role in the innate immune system by integrating signals from pattern-recognition receptors. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of inhibitor-bound inactive and active TBK1 determined to 2.6 Å and 4.0 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal a compact dimer made up of trimodular subunits containing an N-terminal kinase domain (KD, a ubiquitin-like domain (ULD, and an α-helical scaffold dimerization domain (SDD. Activation rearranges the KD into an active conformation while maintaining the overall dimer conformation. Low-resolution SAXS studies reveal that the missing C-terminal domain (CTD extends away from the main body of the kinase dimer. Mutants that interfere with TBK1 dimerization show significantly reduced trans-autophosphorylation but retain the ability to bind adaptor proteins through the CTD. Our results provide detailed insights into the architecture of TBK1 and the molecular mechanism of activation.

  8. Crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiangkai; Li, Bowen; Hu, Fen; Yan, Shufeng; Meloni, Gabriele; Li, Huiliang; Shi, Ning

    2017-06-16

    Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor (MyRF) is one of the master transcription factors controlling myelin formation and development in oligodendrocytes which is crucial for the powerful brain functions. The N-terminal of MyRF, which contains a proline-rich region and a DNA binding domain (DBD), is auto-cleaved from the ER membrane, and then enters the nucleus to participate in transcription regulation of the myelin genes. Here we report the crystal structure of MyRF DBD. It shows an Ig-fold like architecture which consists of two antiparallel β-sheets with 7 main strands, packing against each other, forming a β-sandwich. Compared to its homolog, Ndt80, MyRF has a smaller and less complex DBD lacking the helices and the big loops outside the core. Structural alignment reveals that MyRF DBD possess less interaction sites with DNA than Ndt80 and may bind only at the major groove of DNA. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, agreeing with the previous report that MyRF DBD functions as a trimer. The mutant that we designed based on the structure disturbed trimer formation, but didn't affect the auto-cleavage reaction. It demonstrates that the activation of self-cleavage reaction of MyRF is independent of the presence of its N-terminal DBD homotrimer. The structure reported here will help to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the important roles of MyRF in myelin formation and development.

  9. The APOBEC3C crystal structure and the interface for HIV-1 Vif binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Shingo; Ode, Hirotaka; Nakashima, Masaaki; Imahashi, Mayumi; Naganawa, Yuriko; Kurosawa, Teppei; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Yamane, Takashi; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Suzuki, Atsuo; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2012-10-01

    The human apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3, referred to as A3) proteins are cellular cytidine deaminases that potently restrict retrovirus replication. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) counteracts the antiviral activity of most A3 proteins by targeting them for proteasomal degradation. To date, the structure of an A3 protein containing a Vif-binding interface has not been solved. Here, we report a high-resolution crystal structure of APOBEC3C and identify the HIV-1 Vif-interaction interface. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis revealed the role of a shallow cavity composed of hydrophobic or negatively charged residues between the α2 and α3 helices. This region is distant from the DPD motif (residues 128-130) of APOBEC3G that participates in HIV-1 Vif interaction. These findings provide insight into Vif-A3 interactions and could lead to the development of new pharmacologic anti-HIV-1 compounds.

  10. Crystal structure and biochemical analyses reveal Beclin 1 as a novel membrane binding protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijiao Huang; Feng-Liang Wang; Haiteng Deng; Lei Liu; Ning Gao; Li Yu; Yigong Shi; Wooyoung Choi; Wanqiu Hu; Na Mi; Qiang Guo; Meisheng Ma; Mei Liu; Yuan Tian; Peilong Lu

    2012-01-01

    The Beclin 1 gene is a haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor and plays an essential role in autophagy.However,the molecular mechanism by which Beclin 1 functions remains largely unknown.Here we report the crystal structure of the evolutionarily conserved domain(ECD)of Beclin 1 at 1.6(A)resolution.Beclin 1 ECD exhibits a previously unreported fold,with three structural repeats arranged symmetrically around a central axis.Beclin 1 ECD defines a novel class of membrane-binding domain,with a strong preference for lipid membrane enriched with cardiolipin.The tip of a surface loop in Beclin 1 ECD,comprising three aromatic amino acids,acts as a hydrophobic finger to associate with lipid membrane,consequently resulting in the deformation of membrane and liposomes.Mutation of these aromatic residues rendered Beclin 1 unable to stably associate with lipid membrane in vitro and unable to fully rescue autophagy in Beclin 1-knockdown cells in vivo.These observations form an important framework for deciphering the biological functions of Beclin 1.

  11. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1 Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas Fadel

    Full Text Available Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1 is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD. This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1 structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain.

  12. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Firas; Zhao, Yuguang; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X.; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD). This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family) and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase) comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL) at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1) structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain. PMID:27111557

  13. Insights into binding cooperativity of MATa1/MATα2 from the crystal structure of a MATa1 homeodomain-maltose binding protein chimera

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Ailong; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    The Yeast MATa1 and MATα2 are homeodomain proteins that bind DNA cooperatively to repress transcription of cell type specific genes. The DNA affinity and specificity of MATa1 in the absence of MATα2, however, is very low. MATa1 is converted to a higher affinity DNA-binding protein by its interaction with the C-terminal tail of MATα2. To understand why MATa1 binds DNA weakly by itself, and how the MATα2 tail affects the affinity of MATa1 for DNA, we determined the crystal structure of a maltos...

  14. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H

    2016-01-01

    remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain......The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix...... (cysteine-rich or CysR domain) folds into a new and unique conformation different from the β-trefoil fold of typical CysR domains. The so-called long loop regions (LLRs) of the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) 1 and 2 (the third and fourth domain) mediate the direct contacts between these domains...

  15. Crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations of thermophilic malate dehydrogenase reveal critical loop motion for co-substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Hung; Hwang, Tzann-Shun; Chang, Yu-Yung; Luo, Huei-Ru; Wu, Szu-Pei; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate and malate by using the NAD/NADH coenzyme system. The system is used as a conjugate for enzyme immunoassays of a wide variety of compounds, such as illegal drugs, drugs used in therapeutic applications and hormones. We elucidated the biochemical and structural features of MDH from Thermus thermophilus (TtMDH) for use in various biotechnological applications. The biochemical characterization of recombinant TtMDH revealed greatly increased activity above 60 °C and specific activity of about 2,600 U/mg with optimal temperature of 90 °C. Analysis of crystal structures of apo and NAD-bound forms of TtMDH revealed a slight movement of the binding loop and few structural elements around the co-substrate binding packet in the presence of NAD. The overall structures did not change much and retained all related positions, which agrees with the CD analyses. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at higher temperatures were used to reconstruct structures from the crystal structure of TtMDH. Interestingly, at the simulated structure of 353 K, a large change occurred around the active site such that with increasing temperature, a mobile loop was closed to co-substrate binding region. From biochemical characterization, structural comparison and MD simulations, the thermal-induced conformational change of the co-substrate binding loop of TtMDH may contribute to the essential movement of the enzyme for admitting NAD and may benefit the enzyme's activity.

  16. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Laboratory of Applied Structural Biology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Wataru [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murata, Kousaku, E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  17. Crystal Structure of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase: NAD[superscript +]/NADH Binding and the Structural Basis of Disease-causing Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Machius, Mischa; Chuang, David T. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-07-13

    Human dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (hE3) is an enzymatic component common to the mitochondrial {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase and glycine decarboxylase complexes. Mutations to this homodimeric flavoprotein cause the often-fatal human disease known as E3 deficiency. To catalyze the oxidation of dihydrolipoamide, hE3 uses two molecules: noncovalently bound FAD and a transiently bound substrate, NAD{sup +}. To address the catalytic mechanism of hE3 and the structural basis for E3 deficiency, the crystal structures of hE3 in the presence of NAD{sup +} or NADH have been determined at resolutions of 2.5 {angstrom} and 2.1 {angstrom}, respectively. Although the overall fold of the enzyme is similar to that of yeast E3, these two structures differ at two loops that protrude from the proteins and at their FAD-binding sites. The structure of oxidized hE3 with NAD{sup +} bound demonstrates that the nicotinamide moiety is not proximal to the FAD. When NADH is present, however, the nicotinamide base stacks directly on the isoalloxazine ring system of the FAD. This is the first time that this mechanistically requisite conformation of NAD{sup +} or NADH has been observed in E3 from any species. Because E3 structures were previously available only from unicellular organisms, speculations regarding the molecular mechanisms of E3 deficiency were based on homology models. The current hE3 structures show directly that the disease-causing mutations occur at three locations in the human enzyme: the dimer interface, the active site, and the FAD and NAD{sup +}-binding sites. The mechanisms by which these mutations impede the function of hE3 are discussed.

  18. Crystal structures of starch binding domain from Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase in complex with isomaltooligosaccharide: insights into polysaccharide binding mechanism of CBM21 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chen-Hsi; Li, Kun-Mou; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Jiang, Ting-Ying; Sun, Yuh-Ju

    2014-06-01

    Glucoamylases are responsible for hydrolysis of starch and polysaccharides to yield β-D-glucose. Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoGA) is composed of an N-terminal starch binding domain (SBD) and a C-terminal catalytic domain connected by an O-glycosylated linker. Two carbohydrate binding sites in RoSBD have been identified, site I is created by three highly conserved aromatic residues, Trp47, Tyr83, and Tyr94, and site II is built up by Tyr32 and Phe58. Here, the two crystal structures of RoSBD in complex with only α-(1,6)-linked isomaltotriose (RoSBD-isoG3) and isomaltotetraose (RoSBD-isoG4) have been determined at 1.2 and 1.3 Å, respectively. Interestingly, site II binding is observed in both complexes, while site I binding is only found in the RoSBD-isoG4 complex. Hence, site II acts as the recognition binding site for carbohydrate and site I accommodates site II to bind isoG4. Site I participates in sugar binding only when the number of glucosyl units of oligosaccharides is more than three. Taken together, two carbohydrate binding sites in RoSBD cooperate to reinforce binding mode of glucoamylase with polysaccharides as well as the starch.

  19. Crystal structure and RNA-binding properties of an Hfq homolog from the deep-branching Aquificae: conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Kimberly A; Patterson-West, Jennifer; Randolph, Peter S; Mura, Cameron

    2017-04-01

    The host factor Hfq, as the bacterial branch of the Sm family, is an RNA-binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA expression and turnover. Hfq facilitates pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) and their corresponding mRNA targets by binding both RNAs and bringing them into close proximity. Hfq homologs self-assemble into homo-hexameric rings with at least two distinct surfaces that bind RNA. Recently, another binding site, dubbed the `lateral rim', has been implicated in sRNA·mRNA annealing; the RNA-binding properties of this site appear to be rather subtle, and its degree of evolutionary conservation is unknown. An Hfq homolog has been identified in the phylogenetically deep-branching thermophile Aquifex aeolicus (Aae), but little is known about the structure and function of Hfq from basal bacterial lineages such as the Aquificae. Therefore, Aae Hfq was cloned, overexpressed, purified, crystallized and biochemically characterized. Structures of Aae Hfq were determined in space groups P1 and P6, both to 1.5 Å resolution, and nanomolar-scale binding affinities for uridine- and adenosine-rich RNAs were discovered. Co-crystallization with U6 RNA reveals that the outer rim of the Aae Hfq hexamer features a well defined binding pocket that is selective for uracil. This Aae Hfq structure, combined with biochemical and biophysical characterization of the homolog, reveals deep evolutionary conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode, and lays a foundation for further studies of Hfq-associated RNA biology in ancient bacterial phyla.

  20. Crystal structure of the FK506 binding domain of human FKBP25 in complex with FK506.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajit; Rajan, Sreekanth; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2016-04-01

    Human FKBP25 (hFKBP25) is a nuclear immunophilin and interacts with several nuclear proteins, hence involving in many nuclear events. Similar to other FKBPs, FK506 binding domain (FKBD) of hFKBP25 also binds to immunosuppressive drugs such as rapamycin and FK506, albeit with a lower affinity for the latter. The molecular basis underlying this difference in affinity could not be addressed due to the lack of the crystal structure of hFKBD25 in complex with FK506. Here, we report the crystal structure of hFKBD25 in complex with FK506 determined at 1.8 Å resolution and its comparison with the hFKBD25-rapamycin complex, bringing out the microheterogeneity in the mode of interaction of these drugs, which could possibly explain the lower affinity for FK506.

  1. Crystal structures and inhibitor binding properties of plant class V chitinases: the cycad enzyme exhibits unique structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Osawa, Takuo; Numata, Tomoyuki; Sakuda, Shohei; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2015-04-01

    A class V (glycoside hydrolase family 18) chitinase from the cycad Cycas revoluta (CrChiA) is a plant chitinase that has been reported to possess efficient transglycosylation (TG) activity. We solved the crystal structure of CrChiA, and compared it with those of class V chitinases from Nicotiana tabacum (NtChiV) and Arabidopsis thaliana (AtChiC), which do not efficiently catalyze the TG reaction. All three chitinases had a similar (α/β)8 barrel fold with an (α + β) insertion domain. In the acceptor binding site (+1, +2 and +3) of CrChiA, the Trp168 side chain was found to stack face-to-face with the +3 sugar. However, this interaction was not found in the identical regions of NtChiV and AtChiC. In the DxDxE motif, which is essential for catalysis, the carboxyl group of the middle Asp (Asp117) was always oriented toward the catalytic acid Glu119 in CrChiA, whereas the corresponding Asp in NtChiV and AtChiC was oriented toward the first Asp. These structural features of CrChiA appear to be responsible for the efficient TG activity. When binding of the inhibitor allosamidin was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry, the changes in binding free energy of the three chitinases were found to be similar to each other, i.e. between -9.5 and -9.8 kcal mol(-1) . However, solvation and conformational entropy changes in CrChiA were markedly different from those in NtChiV and AtChiC, but similar to those of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), which also exhibits significant TG activity. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the TG reaction and the molecular evolution from bacterial chitinases to plant class V chitinases.

  2. Crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus phosphoglucose isomerase: Implications for substrate binding and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrisford, J.M.; Akerboom, A.P.; Turnbull, A.P.; Geus, de D.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Staton, I.; McLeod, C.W.; Verhees, C.H.; Oost, van der J.; Rice, D.W.; Baker, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) catalyzes the reversible isomerization between D-fructose 6-phosphate and D-glucose 6-phosphate as part of the glycolytic pathway. PGI from the Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) was crystallized, and its structure was determined by x-ray diffraction to a 2-Angstrom

  3. The crystal structure of the signature domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: implications for collagen, glycosaminoglycan and integrin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lawler, Jack

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), or thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5), is a secreted glycoprotein that is important for growth plate organization and function. Mutations in COMP cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1). In this study, we determined the structure of a recombinant protein that contains the last epidermal growth factor repeat, the type 3 repeats and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of COMP to 3.15-A resolution limit by X-ray crystallography. The CTD is a beta-sandwich that is composed of 15 antiparallel beta-strands, and the type 3 repeats are a contiguous series of calcium binding sites that associate with the CTD at multiple points. The crystal packing reveals an exposed potential metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) on one edge of the beta-sandwich that is common to all TSPs and may serve as a binding site for collagens and other ligands. Disease-causing mutations in COMP disrupt calcium binding, disulfide bond formation, intramolecular interactions, or sites for potential ligand binding. The structure presented here and its unique molecular packing in the crystal identify potential interactive sites for glycosaminoglycans, integrins, and collagens, which are key to cartilage structure and function.

  4. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  5. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  6. Crystal structure of tetranectin, a trimeric plasminogen-binding protein with an alpha-helical coiled coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B B; Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H

    1997-01-01

    Tetranectin is a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. The crystal structure has been determined at 2.8 A resolution using molecular replacement. Human tetranectin is a homotrimer forming a triple alpha-helical coiled coil. Each monomer consists of a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) connected...... to a long alpha-helix. Tetranectin has been classified in a distinct group of the C-type lectin superfamily but has structural similarity to the proteins in the group of collectins. Tetranectin has three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Two of these are conserved in the C-type lectin superfamily, whereas...

  7. Crystal Structure of the VapBC Toxin–Antitoxin Complex from Shigella flexneri Reveals a Hetero-Octameric DNA-Binding Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienemann, Christian; Bøggild, Andreas; Winther, Kristoffer S.

    2011-01-01

    the crystal structure of the intact Shigella flexneri VapBC TA complex, determined to 2.7 Å resolution. Both in solution and in the crystal structure, four molecules of each protein combine to form a large and globular hetero-octameric assembly with SpoVT/AbrB-type DNA-binding domains at each end and a total...

  8. Intricate Crystal Structure of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase (E3) with its Binding Protein: Multiple Copies, Dynamic and Static Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makal, A.; Hong, Y. S.; Potter, R.; Vettaikkorumakankauv, A. K.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Patel, M. S.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Human E3 and binding protein E3BP are two components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Crystallization of E3 with 221-amino acid fragment of E3BP (E3BPdd) led to crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 2.6 Angstroms. Structure determination involved molecular replacement using a dimer of E3 homolog as a search model and de novo building of the E3BPdd peptide. Solution was achieved by inclusion of one E3 dimer at a time, followed by refinement until five E3 dimers were located. This complete content of E3 provided electron density maps suitable for tracing nine peptide chains of E3BPdd, eight of them being identified with partial occupancies. Final content of the asymmetric unit consists of five E3 dimers, each binding one E3BPdd molecule. In four of these molecular complexes, E3BPdd is in static disorder resulting in E3BPdd binding to either one or the other monomer of the E3 dimer. However, E3BPdd of the fifth E3 dimer forms specific contacts that lock it at one monomer. In addition to this static disorder, E3BPdd reveals high mobility in the limited space of the crystal lattice. Support from NIH and NASA.

  9. High resolution crystal structures of unliganded and liganded human liver ACBP reveal a new mode of binding for the acyl-CoA ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskinen, Jukka P; van Aalten, Daan M; Knudsen, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is essential for the fatty acid metabolism, membrane structure, membrane fusion, and ceramide synthesis. Here high resolution crystal structures of human cytosolic liver ACBP, unliganded and liganded with a physiological ligand, myristoyl-CoA are described....... The binding of the acyl-CoA molecule induces only few structural differences near the binding pocket. The crystal form of the liganded ACBP, which has two ACBP molecules in the asymmetric unit, shows that in human ACBP the same acyl-CoA binding pocket is present as previously described for the bovine...... and Plasmodium falciparum ACBP and the mode of binding of the 3'-phosphate-AMP moiety is conserved. Unexpectedly, in one of the acyl-CoA binding pockets the acyl moiety is bound in a reversed mode as compared with the bovine and P. falciparum structures. In this binding mode, the myristoyl-CoA molecule is fully...

  10. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q; Cornea, Razvan L; Fessenden, James D; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-08-06

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca(2+)-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2-1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding.

  11. Crystal structure of TDRD3 and methyl-arginine binding characterization of TDRD3, SMN and SPF30.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Liu

    Full Text Available SMN (Survival motor neuron protein was characterized as a dimethyl-arginine binding protein over ten years ago. TDRD3 (Tudor domain-containing protein 3 and SPF30 (Splicing factor 30 kDa were found to bind to various methyl-arginine proteins including Sm proteins as well later on. Recently, TDRD3 was shown to be a transcriptional coactivator, and its transcriptional activity is dependent on its ability to bind arginine-methylated histone marks. In this study, we systematically characterized the binding specificity and affinity of the Tudor domains of these three proteins quantitatively. Our results show that TDRD3 preferentially recognizes asymmetrical dimethylated arginine mark, and SMN is a very promiscuous effector molecule, which recognizes different arginine containing sequence motifs and preferentially binds symmetrical dimethylated arginine. SPF30 is the weakest methyl-arginine binder, which only binds the GAR motif sequences in our library. In addition, we also reported high-resolution crystal structures of the Tudor domain of TDRD3 in complex with two small molecules, which occupy the aromatic cage of TDRD3.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  13. Mode of binding of the tuberculosis prodrug isoniazid to heme peroxidases: binding studies and crystal structure of bovine lactoperoxidase with isoniazid at 2.7 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K; Kumar, Ramasamy P; Pandey, Nisha; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2010-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is an anti-tuberculosis prodrug that is activated by mammalian lactoperoxidase and Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase peroxidase (MtCP). We report here binding studies, an enzyme assay involving INH, and the crystal structure of the complex of bovine lactoperoxidase (LPO) with INH to illuminate binding properties and INH activation as well as the mode of diffusion and interactions together with a detailed structural and functional comparison with MtCP. The structure determination shows that isoniazid binds to LPO at the substrate binding site on the distal heme side. The substrate binding site is connected to the protein surface through a long hydrophobic channel. The acyl hydrazide moiety of isoniazid interacts with Phe(422) O, Gln(423) O(epsilon1), and Phe(254) O. In this arrangement, pyridinyl nitrogen forms a hydrogen bond with a water molecule, W-1, which in turn forms three hydrogen bonds with Fe(3+), His(109) N(epsilon2), and Gln(105) N(epsilon2). The remaining two sides of isoniazid form hydrophobic interactions with the atoms of heme pyrrole ring A, C(beta) and C(gamma) atoms of Glu(258), and C(gamma) and C(delta) atoms of Arg(255). The binding studies indicate that INH binds to LPO with a value of 0.9 x 10(-6) m for the dissociation constant. The nitro blue tetrazolium reduction assay shows that INH is activated by the reaction of LPO-H(2)O(2) with INH. This suggests that LPO can be used for INH activation. It also indicates that the conversion of INH into isonicotinoyl radical by LPO may be the cause of INH toxicity.

  14. Crystal structure of the MrkD1P receptor binding domain of Klebsiella pneumoniae and identification of the human collagen V binding interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, Ana Toste; Johnson, Jeremiah G; Gelbel, Sebastian; Enguita, Francisco J; Clegg, Steven; Waksman, Gabriel

    2012-11-01

    Klebsiella species are members of the family enterobacteriaceae, opportunistic pathogens that are among the eight most prevalent infectious agents in hospitals. Among other virulence factors in Klebsiella, type 3 pili exhibit a unique binding pattern in the human kidney via interaction of two MrkD adhesion variants 1C1 and 1P to type IV and/or V collagen. However, very little is known about the nature of this recognition. Here we present the crystal structure of the plasmid born MrkD1P receptor domain (MrkDrd). The structure reveals a jelly-roll β-barrel fold comprising 17 β-strands very similar to the receptor domain of GafD, the tip adhesin from the F17 pilus that recognizes n-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc). Analysis of collagen V binding of different MrkD1P mutants revealed that two regions were responsible for its binding: a pocket, that aligns approximately with the GlcNAc binding pocket of GafD involving residues R105 and Y155, and a transversally oriented patch that spans strands β2a, β9b and β6 including residues V49, T52, V91, R102 and I136. Taken together, these data provide structural and functional insights on MrkD1P recognition of host cells, providing a tool for future development of rationally designed drugs with the prospect of blocking Klebsiella adhesion to collagen V.

  15. X-ray crystal structures of Enterococcus faecalis thymidylate synthase with folate binding site inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Alessia; Luciani, Rosaria; Carocci, Alessia; Cortesi, Debora; Pozzi, Cecilia; Borsari, Chiara; Ferrari, Stefania; Mangani, Stefano

    2016-11-10

    Infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) represent nowadays a relevant health problem. We selected Thymidylate synthase (TS) from this organism as a potential specific target for antibacterial therapy. We have previously demonstrated that species-specific inhibition of the protein can be achieved despite the relatively high structural similarity among bacterial TSs and human TS. We had previously obtained the EfTS crystal structure of the protein in complex with the metabolite 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (5-FTHF) suggesting the protein role as metabolite reservoir; however, protein-inhibitors complexes were still missing. In the present work we identified some inhibitors bearing the phthalimidic core from our in-house library and we performed crystallographic screening towards EfTS. We obtained two X-ray crystallographic structures: the first with a weak phthalimidic inhibitor bound in one subunit and 5-hydroxymethylene-6-hydrofolic acid (5-HMHF) in the other subunit; a second X-ray structure complex with methotrexate. The structural information achieved confirm the role of EfTS as an enzyme involved in the folate pool system and provide a structural basis for structure-based drug design.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure and electrochemical and DNA binding studies of oxygen bridged-copper(II) carboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Muhammad, Niaz; Shah, Naseer Ali; Sohail, Manzar; Pandarinathan, Vedapriya

    2015-08-01

    A new binuclear O-bridged Cu(II) complex with 4-chlorophenyl acetate and 2,2‧-bipyridine has been synthesized and characterized using FT-IR, powder and single crystal XRD and electrochemical solution studies. The results revealed that the two penta-coordinated Cu(II) centers are linked by two carboxylate ligands in end-on bonding fashion. The coordination geometry is slightly distorted square pyramidal (SP) with bridging oxygen atoms occupying the apical position and other ligands lying in the equatorial plane. The striking difference in Cu-O bond distance of the bridging oxygen atom in the complex may be responsible for the SP geometry of Cu(II) ion. The complex gave rise to metal centered irreversible electro-activity where one electron Cu(II)/Cu(III) oxidation process and a single step two electron Cu(II)/Cu(0) reduction process was observed. The redox processes were found predominantly adsorption controlled. The values of diffusion coefficient and heterogeneous rate constant for oxidation process were 6.98 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 and 4.60 × 10-5 cm s-1 while the corresponding values for reduction were 5.30 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 and 5.41 × 10-6 cm s-1, respectively. The formal potential and charge transfer coefficient were also calculated. The DNA-binding ability was explored through cyclic voltammetry and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Diminution in the value of Do for oxidation indicated the binding of the complex with DNA corresponding to Kb = 8.58 × 104 M-1. UV-Visible spectroscopy yielded ε = 49 L mol-1 cm-1 and Kb = 2.96 × 104 M-1. The data of both techniques support each other. The self-induced redox activation of the complex, as indicated by cyclic voltammetry heralds its potential applications in redox catalysis and anticancer activity.

  17. Crystal Structure of Okadaic Acid Binding Protein 2.1: A Sponge Protein Implicated in Cytotoxin Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Makino, Marie; Kodama, Koichiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2015-07-06

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a marine polyether cytotoxin that was first isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A, and the structural basis of phosphatase inhibition has been well investigated. However, the role and mechanism of OA retention in the marine sponge have remained elusive. We have solved the crystal structure of okadaic acid binding protein 2.1 (OABP2.1) isolated from H. okadai; it has strong affinity for OA and limited sequence homology to other proteins. The structure revealed that OABP2.1 consists of two α-helical domains, with the OA molecule deeply buried inside the protein. In addition, the global fold of OABP2.1 was unexpectedly similar to that of aequorin, a jellyfish photoprotein. The presence of structural homologues suggested that, by using similar protein scaffolds, marine invertebrates have developed diverse survival systems adapted to their living environments.

  18. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  19. Crystal structure and DNA binding activity of a PadR family transcription regulator from hypervirulent Clostridium difficile R20291.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isom, Catherine E; Menon, Smita K; Thomas, Leonard M; West, Ann H; Richter-Addo, George B; Karr, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-04

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming obligate anaerobe that can remain viable for extended periods, even in the presence of antibiotics, which contributes to the persistence of this bacterium as a human pathogen during host-to-host transmission and in hospital environments. We examined the structure and function of a gene product with the locus tag CDR20291_0991 (cdPadR1) as part of our broader goal aimed at elucidating transcription regulatory mechanisms involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance of the recently emergent hypervirulent C. difficile strain R20291. cdPadR1 is genomically positioned near genes that are involved in stress response and virulence. In addition, it was previously reported that cdPadR1 and a homologue from the historical C. difficile strain 630 (CD630_1154) were differentially expressed when exposed to stressors, including antibiotics. The crystal structure of cdPadR1 was determined to 1.9 Å resolution, which revealed that it belongs to the PadR-s2 subfamily of PadR transcriptional regulators. cdPadR1 binds its own promoter and other promoter regions from within the C. difficile R20291 genome. DNA binding experiments demonstrated that cdPadR1 binds a region comprised of inverted repeats and an AT-rich core with the predicted specific binding motif, GTACTAT(N2)ATTATA(N)AGTA, within its own promoter that is also present in 200 other regions in the C. difficile R20291 genome. Mutation of the highly conserved W in α4 of the effector binding/oligomerization domain, which is predicted to be involved in multi-drug recognition and dimerization in other PadR-s2 proteins, resulted in alterations of cdPadR1 binding to the predicted binding motif, potentially due to loss of higher order oligomerization. Our results indicate that cdPadR1 binds a region within its own promoter consisting of the binding motif GTACTAT(N2)ATTATA(N)AGTA and seems to associate non-specifically with longer DNA fragments in vitro, which may facilitate promoter and

  20. Ligand Binding and Crystal Structures of the Substrate-Binding Domain of the ABC Transporter OpuA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina C.; Berntsson, Ronnie P-A.; Gul, Nadia; Karasawa, Akira; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    The ABC transporter OpuA from Lactococcus lactis transports glycine betaine upon activation by threshold values of ionic strength. In this study, the ligand binding characteristics of purified OpuA in a detergent-solubilized state and of its substrate-binding domain produced as soluble protein (OpuA

  1. Crystal structure and nucleic acid-binding activity of the CRISPR-associated protein Csx1 of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kwan; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2013-02-01

    In many prokaryotic organisms, chromosomal loci known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (CAS) genes comprise an acquired immune defense system against invading phages and plasmids. Although many different Cas protein families have been identified, the exact biochemical functions of most of their constituents remain to be determined. In this study, we report the crystal structure of PF1127, a Cas protein of Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 that is composed of 480 amino acids and belongs to the Csx1 family. The C-terminal domain of PF1127 has a unique β-hairpin structure that protrudes out of an α-helix and contains several positively charged residues. We demonstrate that PF1127 binds double-stranded DNA and RNA and that this activity requires an intact β-hairpin and involve the homodimerization of the protein. In contrast, another Csx1 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 that is composed of 377 amino acids does not have the β-hairpin structure and exhibits no DNA-binding properties under the same experimental conditions. Notably, the C-terminal domain of these two Csx1 proteins is greatly diversified, in contrast to the conserved N-terminal domain, which appears to play a common role in the homodimerization of the protein. Thus, although P. furiosus Csx1 is identified as a nucleic acid-binding protein, other Csx1 proteins are predicted to exhibit different individual biochemical activities. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  3. Crystal structure of YrrB: a TPR protein with an unusual peptide-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dohyun; Oh, Jongkil; Kim, Kyunggon; Lim, Hyosun; Kim, Youngsoo

    2007-09-01

    YrrB is a hypothetical protein containing a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain from a Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. We determined YrrB structure in the C2 space group to 2.5A resolution, which is the first TPR structure of the Gram-positive bacterium B. subtilis. In contrast to other known TPR structures, the concave surface of the YrrB TPR domain is composed of the putative peptide-binding pocket lined with positively-charged residues. This unique charge distribution reveals that YrrB can interact with partner proteins via an unusual TPR-mediated interaction mode, compared to that of other TPR-containing structures. Functional annotation using genomics analysis suggested that YrrB may be an interacting mediator in the complex formation among RNA sulfuration components. No proteins containing a TPR domain have been identified in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. Thus, YrrB could play a new role as a connecting module among those proteins in the conserved gene cluster for RNA sulfuration.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Substrate-Binding Domain from Listeria monocytogenes Bile-Resistance Determinant BilE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J. Ruiz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BilE has been reported as a bile resistance determinant that plays an important role in colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis. The mechanism(s by which BilE mediates bile resistance are unknown. BilE shares significant sequence similarity with ATP-binding cassette (ABC importers that contribute to virulence and stress responses by importing quaternary ammonium compounds that act as compatible solutes. Assays using related compounds have failed to demonstrate transport mediated by BilE. The putative substrate-binding domain (SBD of BilE was expressed in isolation and the crystal structure solved at 1.5 Å. Although the overall fold is characteristic of SBDs, the binding site varies considerably relative to the well-characterized homologs ProX from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and OpuBC and OpuCC from Bacillus subtilis. This suggests that BilE may bind an as-yet unknown ligand. Elucidation of the natural substrate of BilE could reveal a novel bile resistance mechanism.

  5. Crystal structure of human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing antibody reveals insights into receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Lammens

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a multifunctional cytokine playing a key role in tissue regeneration and remodeling. Dysregulation of TWEAK signaling is involved in various pathological processes like autoimmune diseases and cancer. The unique interaction with its cognate receptor Fn14 makes both ligand and receptor promising targets for novel therapeutics. To gain insights into this important signaling pathway, we determined the structure of soluble human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of an antibody selected for inhibition of receptor binding. In the crystallized complex TWEAK is bound by three Fab fragments of the neutralizing antibody. Homology modeling shows that Fab binding overlaps with the putative Fn14 binding site of TWEAK. Docking of the Fn14 cysteine rich domain (CRD to that site generates a highly complementary interface with perfectly opposing charged and hydrophobic residues. Taken together the presented structure provides new insights into the biology of TWEAK and the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway, which will help to optimize the therapeutic strategy for treatment of related cancer types and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Crystal structure of importin-α3 bound to the nuclear localization signal of Ran-binding protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Masako; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-09-23

    Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3) is a primarily nuclear Ran-binding protein that functions as an accessory factor in the Ran GTPase system. RanBP3 associates with Ran-specific nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 and enhances its catalytic activity towards Ran. RanBP3 also promotes CRM1-mediated nuclear export as well as CRM1-independent nuclear export of β-catenin, Smad2, and Smad3. Nuclear import of RanBP3 is dependent on the nuclear import adaptor protein importin-α and, RanBP3 is imported more efficiently by importin-α3 than by other members of the importin-α family. Protein kinase signaling pathways control nucleocytoplasmic transport through phosphorylation of RanBP3 at Ser58, immediately C-terminal to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal region of RanBP3. Here we report the crystal structure of human importin-α3 bound to an N-terminal fragment of human RanBP3 containing the NLS sequence that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear import. The structure reveals that RanBP3 binds to importin-α3 residues that are strictly conserved in all seven isoforms of human importin-α at the major NLS-binding site, indicating that the region of importin-α outside the NLS-binding site, possibly the autoinhibotory importin-β1-binding domain, may be the key determinant for the preferential binding of RanBP3 to importin-α3. Computational docking simulation indicates that phosphorylation of RanBP3 at Ser58 could potentially stabilize the association of RanBP3 with importin-α through interactions between the phosphate moiety of phospho-Ser58 of RanBP3 and a cluster of basic residues (Arg96 and Lys97 in importin-α3) on armadillo repeat 1 of importin-α. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis,Crystal Structure and DNA-binding Properties of a New Copper(Ⅱ) Schiff Base Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Bei

    2012-01-01

    A new asymmetric bidentate copper(Ⅱ) complex,CuL 2(HL=2-((E)-(4-bromophenylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol),has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1 /c with a=11.218(3),b=9.355(3),c=13.449(4),β=108.722(4)°,V=1336.8(6)3,Z=2,Dc=2.008 g/cm 3,μ(MoKα)=7.024 mm-1,F(000)=806,S=0.999,the final R=0.0342 and wR=0.0641for2611observed reflections (I〉2σ(I)).The central copper(Ⅱ) is four-coordinate and bonds to two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms from two Schiff base ligands.The complex is linked into a two-dimensional supramolecular structure by weak intermolecular interactions.In addition,DNA-binding properties of the metal complex were investigated using spectrometric titrations and viscosity measurements.The results show that the complex binds with calf-thymus DNA(CT-DNA),presumably via a partial intercalative mode.The intrinsic binding constant of the Cu(Ⅱ) complex with DNA is 7.335×10 3 M-1.

  8. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Allingham, John S., E-mail: allinghj@queensu.ca [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Fab Fragment of an Anti-ofloxacin Antibody and Exploration of Its Specific Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuo; Du, Xinjun; Sheng, Wei; Zhou, Xiaonan; Wang, Junping; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-30

    The limited knowledge on the mechanism of interactions between small contaminants and the corresponding antibodies greatly inhibits the development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. In this study, the crystal structure of a Fab fragment specific for ofloxacin was obtained. On the basis of the crystal characteristics, the modeling of the interactions between ofloxacin and the Fab revealed that TYR31 and HIS99 of the heavy chain and MET20 and GLN79 of the light chain formed a hydrophobic region and that SER52 and ALA97 of the heavy chain and TYR35 of the light chain formed a salt bridge and two hydrogen bonds for specific binding. The key roles of SER52 and ALA97 were further confirmed by site-directed mutation. A specificity analysis using 14 ofloxacin analogues indicates that the length of the bond formed between the piperazine ring and the antibody plays key roles in specific recognition. This work helps to clarify the mechanisms through which antibodies recognize small molecules and improve immune detection methods.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Receptor-Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type HA, Also Known as Type FA or H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorui Yao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, which have been exploited as cosmetics and muscle-disorder treatment medicines for decades, are well known for their extreme neurotoxicity to humans. They pose a potential bioterrorism threat because they cause botulism, a flaccid muscular paralysis-associated disease that requires immediate antitoxin treatment and intensive care over a long period of time. In addition to the existing seven established BoNT serotypes (BoNT/A–G, a new mosaic toxin type termed BoNT/HA (aka type FA or H was reported recently. Sequence analyses indicate that the receptor-binding domain (HC of BoNT/HA is ~84% identical to that of BoNT/A1. However, BoNT/HA responds differently to some potent BoNT/A-neutralizing antibodies (e.g., CR2 that target the HC. Therefore, it raises a serious concern as to whether BoNT/HA poses a new threat to our biosecurity. In this study, we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of BoNT/HA-HC at 1.8 Å. Sequence and structure analyses reveal that BoNT/HA and BoNT/A1 are different regarding their binding to cell-surface receptors including both polysialoganglioside (PSG and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2. Furthermore, the new structure also provides explanations for the ~540-fold decreased affinity of antibody CR2 towards BoNT/HA compared to BoNT/A1. Taken together, these new findings advance our understanding of the structure and function of this newly identified toxin at the molecular level, and pave the way for the future development of more effective countermeasures.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Receptor-Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type HA, Also Known as Type FA or H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Perry, Kay; Weisemann, Jasmin; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (Cornell); (Dusseldorf); (UCI)

    2017-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which have been exploited as cosmetics and muscle-disorder treatment medicines for decades, are well known for their extreme neurotoxicity to humans. They pose a potential bioterrorism threat because they cause botulism, a flaccid muscular paralysis-associated disease that requires immediate antitoxin treatment and intensive care over a long period of time. In addition to the existing seven established BoNT serotypes (BoNT/A–G), a new mosaic toxin type termed BoNT/HA (aka type FA or H) was reported recently. Sequence analyses indicate that the receptor-binding domain (HC) of BoNT/HA is ~84% identical to that of BoNT/A1. However, BoNT/HA responds differently to some potent BoNT/A-neutralizing antibodies (e.g., CR2) that target the HC. Therefore, it raises a serious concern as to whether BoNT/HA poses a new threat to our biosecurity. In this study, we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of BoNT/HA-HC at 1.8 Å. Sequence and structure analyses reveal that BoNT/HA and BoNT/A1 are different regarding their binding to cell-surface receptors including both polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Furthermore, the new structure also provides explanations for the ~540-fold decreased affinity of antibody CR2 towards BoNT/HA compared to BoNT/A1. Taken together, these new findings advance our understanding of the structure and function of this newly identified toxin at the molecular level, and pave the way for the future development of more effective countermeasures

  12. Crystal Structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase Bound to Inhibitory Analogs Reveal New Insight into Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Skaff, D. Andrew; McWhorter, William J.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2011-10-28

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 {angstrom} resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 {angstrom} resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 {angstrom} resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K{sub i} values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser{sup 192} as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser {yields} Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k{sub cat} by {approx}10{sup 3}-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 {angstrom} cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  13. Crystal Structure of α-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM: Insight into Tetramer Formation and Substrate Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Folmer; Abou Hachem, Maher; Larsen, Rene Jonsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic bacterium known for its beneficial effects on human health. The importance of α-galactosidases (α-Gals) for growth of probiotic organisms on oligosaccharides of the raffinose family present in many foods is increasingly recognized. Here, the crystal...... structure of α-Gal from L. acidophilus NCFM (LaMel36A) of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 36 (GH36) is determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. In addition, a 1.58-Å-resolution crystallographic complex with α-d-galactose at substrate binding subsite −1 was determined. LaMel36A has a large N......-terminal twisted β-sandwich domain, connected by a long α-helix to the catalytic (β/α)8-barrel domain, and a C-terminal β-sheet domain. Four identical monomers form a tightly packed tetramer where three monomers contribute to the structural integrity of the active site in each monomer. Structural comparison of La...

  14. An Evaluation of the Crystal Structure of C-terminal Truncated Apolipoprotein A-I in Solution Reveals Structural Dynamics Related to Lipid Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, John T; Walker, Ryan G; Morris, Jamie; Jones, Martin K; Segrest, Jere P; Lima, Diogo B; Carvalho, Paulo C; Gozzo, Fábio C; Castleberry, Mark; Thompson, Thomas B; Davidson, W Sean

    2016-03-04

    Apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mediates many of the anti-atherogenic functions attributed to high density lipoprotein. Unfortunately, efforts toward a high resolution structure of full-length apoA-I have not been fruitful, although there have been successes with deletion mutants. Recently, a C-terminal truncation (apoA-I(Δ185-243)) was crystallized as a dimer. The structure showed two helical bundles connected by a long, curved pair of swapped helical domains. To compare this structure to that existing under solution conditions, we applied small angle x-ray scattering and isotope-assisted chemical cross-linking to apoA-I(Δ185-243) in its dimeric and monomeric forms. For the dimer, we found evidence for the shared domains and aspects of the N-terminal bundles, but not the molecular curvature seen in the crystal. We also found that the N-terminal bundles equilibrate between open and closed states. Interestingly, this movement is one of the transitions proposed during lipid binding. The monomer was consistent with a model in which the long shared helix doubles back onto the helical bundle. Combined with the crystal structure, these data offer an important starting point to understand the molecular details of high density lipoprotein biogenesis.

  15. Ligand size is a major determinant of specificity in periplasmic oxyanion-binding proteins: the 1.2 A resolution crystal structure of Azotobacter vinelandii ModA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D M; Williams, C E; Mitchenall, L A; Pau, R N

    1998-12-15

    . Periplasmic receptors constitute a diverse class of binding proteins that differ widely in size, sequence and ligand specificity. Nevertheless, almost all of them display a common beta/alpha folding motif and have similar tertiary structures consisting of two globular domains. The ligand is bound at the bottom of a deep cleft, which lies at the interface between these two domains. The oxyanion-binding proteins are notable in that they can discriminate between very similar ligands. . Azotobacter vinelandii is unusual in that it possesses two periplasmic molybdate-binding proteins. The crystal structure of one of these with bound ligand has been determined at 1.2 A resolution. It superficially resembles the structure of sulphate-binding protein (SBP) from Salmonella typhimurium and uses a similar constellation of hydrogen-bonding interactions to bind its ligand. However, the detailed interactions are distinct from those of SBP and the more closely related molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli. . Despite differences in the residues involved in binding, the volumes of the binding pockets in the A. vinelandii and E. coli molybdate-binding proteins are similar and are significantly larger than that of SBP. We conclude that the discrimination between molybdate and sulphate shown by these binding proteins is largely dependent upon small differences in the sizes of these two oxyanions.

  16. Crystal structure of Yersinia pestis virulence factor YfeA reveals two polyspecific metal-binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radka, Christopher D.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, Landon S.; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Perry, Robert D.; Aller, Stephen G.

    2017-06-30

    Gram-negative bacteria use siderophores, outer membrane receptors, inner membrane transporters and substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) to transport transition metals through the periplasm. The SBPs share a similar protein fold that has undergone significant structural evolution to communicate with a variety of differentially regulated transporters in the cell. InYersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, YfeA (YPO2439, y1897), an SBP, is important for full virulence during mammalian infection. To better understand the role of YfeA in infection, crystal structures were determined under several environmental conditions with respect to transition-metal levels. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and anomalous X-ray scattering data show that YfeA is polyspecific and can alter its substrate specificity. In minimal-media experiments, YfeA crystals grown after iron supplementation showed a threefold increase in iron fluorescence emission over the iron fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions, and YfeA crystals grown after manganese supplementation during overexpression showed a fivefold increase in manganese fluorescence emission over the manganese fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions. In all experiments, the YfeA crystals produced the strongest fluorescence emission from zinc and could not be manipulated otherwise. Additionally, this report documents the discovery of a novel surface metal-binding site that prefers to chelate zinc but can also bind manganese. Flexibility across YfeA crystal forms in three loops and a helix near the buried metal-binding site suggest that a structural rearrangement is required for metal loading and unloading.

  17. Deciphering the molecular basis of multidrug recognition: crystal structures of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug binding transcription regulator QacR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Maria A; Brennan, Richard G

    2003-03-01

    Multidrug transporters and their transcriptional regulators are key components of bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR). How these multidrug binding proteins can recognize such chemically disparate compounds represents a fascinating question from a structural standpoint and an important question in future drug development efforts. The Staphylococcus aureus multidrug binding regulator, QacR, is soluble and recognizes an especially wide range of structurally dissimilar compounds, properties making it an ideal model system for deciphering the molecular basis of multidrug recognition. Recent structures of QacR have afforded the first view of any MDR protein bound to multiple drugs, revealing key structural features of multidrug recognition, including a multisite binding pocket.

  18. Crystal structure of U2 snRNP SF3b components: Hsh49p in complex with Cus1p-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Oubridge, Chris; Obayashi, Eiji; Sposito, Benedetta; Newman, Andrew J; Séraphin, Bertrand; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Spliceosomal proteins Hsh49p and Cus1p are components of SF3b, which together with SF3a, Msl1p/Lea1p, Sm proteins, and U2 snRNA, form U2 snRNP, which plays a crucial role in pre-mRNA splicing. Hsh49p, comprising two RRMs, forms a heterodimer with Cus1p. We determined the crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae full-length Hsh49p as well as its RRM1 in complex with a minimal binding region of Cus1p (residues 290-368). The structures show that the Cus1 fragment binds to the α-helical surface of Hsh49p RRM1, opposite the four-stranded β-sheet, leaving the canonical RNA-binding surface available to bind RNA. Hsh49p binds the 5' end region of U2 snRNA via RRM1. Its affinity is increased in complex with Cus1(290-368)p, partly because an extended RNA-binding surface forms across the protein-protein interface. The Hsh49p RRM1-Cus1(290-368)p structure fits well into cryo-EM density of the B(act) spliceosome, corroborating the biological relevance of our crystal structure. © 2017 van Roon et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Crystal structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphate binding protein PstS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades host immune responses by colonizing macrophages. Intraphagosomal M. tuberculosis is exposed to environmental stresses such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates as well as acid shock and inorganic phosphate (Pi) depletion. Experimental evidence suggests that expression levels of mycobacterial protein PstS3 (Rv0928) are significantly increased when M. tuberculosis bacilli are exposed to Pi starvation. Hence, PstS3 may be important for survival of Mtb in conditions where there is limited supply of Pi. We report here the structure of PstS3 from M. tuberculosis at 2.3-Å resolution. The protein presents a structure typical for ABC phosphate transfer receptors. Comparison with its cognate receptor PstS1 showed a different pattern distribution of surface charges in proximity to the Pi recognition site, suggesting complementary roles of the two proteins in Pi uptake. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. All three Ca[superscript 2+]-binding loops of photoproteins bind calcium ions: The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apo-aequorin and apo-obelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Lu; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Markova, Svetlana V.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Lee, John; Rose, John; Wang, Bi-Cheng (Georgia)

    2010-07-13

    The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apoaequorin and apo-obelin have been determined at resolutions 1.7 {angstrom} and 2.2 {angstrom}, respectively. A calcium ion is observed in each of the three EF-hand loops that have the canonical calcium-binding sequence, and each is coordinated in the characteristic pentagonal bipyramidal configuration. The calcium-loaded apo-proteins retain the same compact scaffold and overall fold as the unreacted photoproteins containing the bound substrate, 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, and also the same as the Ca{sup 2+}-discharged obelin bound with the product, coelenteramide. Nevertheless, there are easily discerned shifts in both helix and loop regions, and the shifts are not the same between the two proteins. It is suggested that these subtle shifts are the basis of the ability of these photoproteins to sense Ca{sup 2+} concentration transients and to produce their bioluminescence response on the millisecond timescale. A mechanism of intrastructural transmission of the calcium signal is proposed.

  1. Carboxylate-bridged Cu(II) coordination polymeric complex: synthesis, crystal structure, magnetic properties, DNA binding and electrochemical studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SABITHAKALA THATITURI; BHARGAVI GOVINDUGARI; VENKATA RAMANA REDDY CHITTIREDDY

    2017-08-01

    A novel water-soluble carboxylate-bridged copper(II) coordination polymer,Cu-BIG was formed by the reaction of Cu(ClO₄)₂ ·6H₂O and tridentate benzimidazole-glycine conjugate ligand, 2-((1H-benzimidazol- 2-yl)methylamino) acetic acid, BIGH and its structure has been determined by IR, UV, powder XRD, VSM, CV, TGA, DTA, EPR and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic studies indicate it to be a coordination polymer with P¯ı Space group. The asymmetric unit of complex contains two Cu(II) ions with elongated square pyramid geometry.The axial positions of theCu(II) atoms are occupied by the carbonyl oxygen of the carboxylate group with the bond distances Cu(1)–O(5)axial , 2.28Å, and Cu(2)–O(2)axial , 2.26Å. The two Cu(II) are connected through the carboxylic group present in BIGH, which provides electron mobilisation in the molecule and hence results in the soft ferromagnetic polymer. An in vitro antibacterial activity study of BIGH and Cu-BIG showed moderate activity against Bacillus subtilis. The DNA binding studies showed the interaction of Cu-BIG with CT-DNA.

  2. Corrigendum to "Synthesis, crystal structure and electrochemical and DNA binding studies of oxygen bridged-copper(II) carboxylate" [J. Mol. Struct. 1093 (2015) 135-143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Muhammad, Niaz; Shah, Naseer Ali; Sohail, Manzar; Pandarinathan, Vedapriya

    2017-04-01

    The authors regret to inform that Scheme 1 in the article titled 'Synthesis, crystal structure and electrochemical and DNA binding studies of oxygen bridged-copper(II) carboxylate' in vol. 1093 of the Journal of Molecular Structure is incorrect. The corrected scheme is as shown in this correction. This is purely a copy error. The error does not affect the conclusion in paper. The authors would like to apologize for any inconvenience caused.

  3. Crystal structure of CotA laccase complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) at a novel binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhongchuan; Xie, Tian [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Zhong, Qiuping [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of (China); Wang, Ganggang, E-mail: wanggg@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China)

    2016-03-24

    The crystal structure of CotA complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) in a hole motif has been solved; this novel binding site could be a potential structure-based target for protein engineering of CotA laccase. The CotA laccase from Bacillus subtilis is an abundant component of the spore outer coat and has been characterized as a typical laccase. The crystal structure of CotA complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) in a hole motif has been solved. The novel binding site was about 26 Å away from the T1 binding pocket. Comparison with known structures of other laccases revealed that the hole is a specific feature of CotA. The key residues Arg476 and Ser360 were directly bound to ABTS. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that the residues Arg146, Arg429 and Arg476, which are located at the bottom of the novel binding site, are essential for the oxidation of ABTS and syringaldazine. Specially, a Thr480Phe variant was identified to be almost 3.5 times more specific for ABTS than for syringaldazine compared with the wild type. These results suggest this novel binding site for ABTS could be a potential target for protein engineering of CotA laccases.

  4. Crystal structure of the S. solfataricus archaeal exosome reveals conformational flexibility in the RNA-binding ring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrui Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exosome complex is an essential RNA 3'-end processing and degradation machinery. In archaeal organisms, the exosome consists of a catalytic ring and an RNA-binding ring, both of which were previously reported to assume three-fold symmetry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an asymmetric 2.9 A Sulfolobus solfataricus archaeal exosome structure in which the three-fold symmetry is broken due to combined rigid body and thermal motions mainly within the RNA-binding ring. Since increased conformational flexibility was also observed in the RNA-binding ring of the related bacterial PNPase, we speculate that this may reflect an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to accommodate diverse RNA substrates for degradation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study clearly shows the dynamic structures within the RNA-binding domains, which provides additional insights on mechanism of asymmetric RNA binding and processing.

  5. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  6. Crystal structure and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-04-01

    The notion of structure is central to the subject of chemistry. This review traces the development of the idea of crystal structure since the time when a crystal structure could be determined from a three-dimensional diffraction pattern and assesses the feasibility of computationally predicting an unknown crystal structure of a given molecule. Crystal structure prediction is of considerable fundamental and applied importance, and its successful execution is by no means a solved problem. The ease of crystal structure determination today has resulted in the availability of large numbers of crystal structures of higher-energy polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs. These structural libraries lead to the concept of a crystal structure landscape. A crystal structure of a compound may accordingly be taken as a data point in such a landscape.

  7. Crystal structure of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima for insights into the coordination of conformational changes and an inhibitor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenoya, Mihoko; Ohtaki, Akashi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Endo, Kiwamu; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Ohsawa, Kanju; Yajima, Shunsuke; Yohda, Masafumi

    2010-06-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate is a precursor of various isoprenoids and is produced by the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids of plants, protozoa and many eubacteria. A key enzyme in the MEP pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), has been shown to be the target of fosmidomycin, which works as an antimalarial, antibacterial and herbicidal compound. In this paper, we report studies of kinetics and the crystal structures of the thermostable DXR from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. Unlike the mesophilic DXRs, Thermotoga DXR (tDXR) showed activity only with Mg(2+) at its growth temperature. We solved the crystal structures of tDXR with and without fosmidomycin. The structure without fosmidomycin but unexpectedly bound with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD), revealing a new extra space available for potential drug design. This structure adopted the closed form by rigid domain rotation but without the flexible loop over the active site, which was considered as a novel conformation. Further, the conserved Asp residue responsible for cation binding seemed to play an important role in adjusting the position of fosmidomycin. Taken together, our kinetic and the crystal structures illustrate the binding mode of fosmidomycin that leads to its slow, tight binding according to the conformational changes of DXR.

  8. Co-crystal structures of PKG Iβ (92-227 with cGMP and cAMP reveal the molecular details of cyclic-nucleotide binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Joo Kim

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases (PKGs are central mediators of the NO-cGMP signaling pathway and phosphorylate downstream substrates that are crucial for regulating smooth muscle tone, platelet activation, nociception and memory formation. As one of the main receptors for cGMP, PKGs mediate most of the effects of cGMP elevating drugs, such as nitric oxide-releasing agents and phosphodiesterase inhibitors which are used for the treatment of angina pectoris and erectile dysfunction, respectively.We have investigated the mechanism of cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG by determining crystal structures of the amino-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD-A of human PKG I bound to either cGMP or cAMP. We also determined the structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound nucleotide. The crystal structures of CNBD-A with bound cAMP or cGMP reveal that cAMP binds in either syn or anti configurations whereas cGMP binds only in a syn configuration, with a conserved threonine residue anchoring both cyclic phosphate and guanine moieties. The structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound cyclic nucleotide was similar to that of the cyclic nucleotide bound structures. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that CNBD-A binds both cGMP and cAMP with a relatively high affinity, showing an approximately two-fold preference for cGMP.Our findings suggest that CNBD-A binds cGMP in the syn conformation through its interaction with Thr193 and an unusual cis-peptide forming residues Leu172 and Cys173. Although these studies provide the first structural insights into cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG, our ITC results show only a two-fold preference for cGMP, indicating that other domains are required for the previously reported cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

  9. Crystal structure of a periplasmic solute binding protein in metal-free, intermediate and metal-bound states from Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nidhi; Selvakumar, Purushotham; Bhose, Sumit; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The Znu system, a member of ABC transporter family, is critical for survival and pathogenesis of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLA). Two homologues of this system have been identified in CLA. Here, we report high resolution crystal structure of a periplasmic solute binding protein from second of the two gene clusters of Znu system in CLA (CLas-ZnuA2) in metal-free, intermediate and metal-bound states. CLas-ZnuA2 showed maximum sequence identity to the Mn/Fe-specific solute binding proteins (SBPs) of cluster A-I family. The overall fold of CLas-ZnuA2 is similar to the related cluster A-I family SBPs. The sequence and structure analysis revealed the unique features of CLas-ZnuA2. The comparison of CLas-ZnuA2 structure in three states showed that metal binding and release is facilitated by a large displacement along with a change in orientation of the side chain for one of the metal binding residue (His39) flipped away from metal binding site in metal-free form. The crystal structure captured in intermediate state of metal binding revealed the changes in conformation and interaction of the loop hosting His39 during the metal binding. A rigid body movement of C-domain along with partial unfolding of linker helix at its C-terminal during metal binding, as reported for PsaA, was not observed in CLas-ZnuA2. The present results suggest that despite showing maximum sequence identity to the Mn/Fe-specific SBPs, the mechanistic resemblance of CLas-ZnuA2 seems to be closer to Zn-specific SBPs of cluster A-I family.

  10. A mononuclear zinc(II) complex with piroxicam: crystal structure, DNA- and BSA-binding studies; in vitro cell cytotoxicity and molecular modeling of oxicam complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesari, Zahra; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Amirghofran, Zahra; Simpson, Jim; Khayamian, Taghi; Maleki, Batool

    2015-02-05

    A new mononuclear Zn(II) complex, trans-[Zn(Pir)2(DMSO)2], where Pir(-) is 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (piroxicam), has been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex was obtained by the single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The interaction of the complex with DNA and BSA was investigated. The complex interacts with FS-DNA by two binding modes, viz., electrostatic and groove binding (major and minor). The microenvironment and the secondary structure of BSA are changed in the presence of the complex. The anticancer effects of the seven complexes of oxicam family were also determined on the human K562 cell lines and the results showed reasonable cytotoxicities. The interactions of the oxicam complexes with BSA and DNA were modeled by molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods.

  11. A mononuclear zinc(II) complex with piroxicam: Crystal structure, DNA- and BSA-binding studies; in vitro cell cytotoxicity and molecular modeling of oxicam complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesari, Zahra; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Amirghofran, Zahra; Simpson, Jim; Khayamian, Taghi; Maleki, Batool

    2015-02-01

    A new mononuclear Zn(II) complex, trans-[Zn(Pir)2(DMSO)2], where Pir- is 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (piroxicam), has been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex was obtained by the single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The interaction of the complex with DNA and BSA was investigated. The complex interacts with FS-DNA by two binding modes, viz., electrostatic and groove binding (major and minor). The microenvironment and the secondary structure of BSA are changed in the presence of the complex. The anticancer effects of the seven complexes of oxicam family were also determined on the human K562 cell lines and the results showed reasonable cytotoxicities. The interactions of the oxicam complexes with BSA and DNA were modeled by molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods.

  12. Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming (Michigan-Med); (HHMI)

    2011-09-06

    Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

  13. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent.

  14. Apo and InsP[subscript 3]-bound crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain of an InsP[subscript 3] receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Chi; Baek, Kyuwon; Lu, Zhe (UPENN)

    2012-05-08

    We report the crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a rat inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP{sub 3}R) in its apo and InsP{sub 3}-bound conformations. Comparison of these two conformations reveals that LBD's first {beta}-trefoil fold ({beta}-TF1) and armadillo repeat fold (ARF) move together as a unit relative to its second {beta}-trefoil fold ({beta}-TF2). Whereas apo LBD may spontaneously transition between gating conformations, InsP{sub 3} binding shifts this equilibrium toward the active state.

  15. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity of lanthanide(III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine acetylhydrazone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KARREDDULA RAJA; AKKILI SUSEELAMMA; KATREDDI HUSSAIN REDDY

    2016-08-01

    Lanthanide(III) complexes of general formula [La(BPAH)₂(NO₃)₃] and [Ce(BPAH)₂(NO₃)(H₂O)₂] 2NO₃.H₂O (where, BPAH = 2-benzoylpyridine acetyl hydrazone), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction and Hirschfeld studies. The central metal ion is 12-coordinate in lanthanum complex and 10-coordinated in the cerium complex. The coordination polyhedra around the lanthanum and cerium were found to have distorted icosahedron and distorted bicapped square antiprism respectively. DNA binding and nuclease activity of these complexes were also investigated in the present work.

  16. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and DNA-binding study of four cadmium(II) pyridine-carboxamide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIPLAB MONDAL; BUDDHADEB SEN; SANDIPAN SARKAR; ENNIO ZANGRANDO; PABITRA CHATTOPADHYAY

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of perchlorate or nitrate salt of cadmium(II) with carboxamide derivatives (L) generated four novel mononuclear metal complexes, represented as [Cd(L)₄](ClO₄)₂ (1a and 1b) and [Cd(L)₂(ONO₂)₂] (2a and 2b) in appreciable yields (L = L¹ = N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-2-pyridine carboxamide and L = L² = N-(thiophen-2-ylmethyl)-2-pyridine carboxamide). The complexes have been characterized by FT-IR, UVVisible, elemental analysis and single crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis which revealed eight coordinated cadmium ions, but in different coordination environments, depending on the counter anion used. In addition,electronic absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements revealed a significant interaction of the four complexes with CT-DNA via intercalative/groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constant Kbobtained varies from 0.4 × 10⁴ to 1.11 × 10⁵ M⁻¹. The results suggest that neutral complexes 2a and 2b bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. On the other hand, cationic complexes 1a and 1b bind with DNA via weak electrostatic/covalent interaction.

  17. Crystal structure of the functional region of Uro-adherence factor A from Staphylococcus saprophyticus reveals participation of the B domain in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Eriko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Makoto; Shouji, Yuko; Ohta, Toshiko; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococci use cell wall-anchored proteins as adhesins to attach to host tissues. Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a uropathogenic species, has a unique cell wall-anchored protein, uro-adherence factor A (UafA), which shows erythrocyte binding activity. To investigate the mechanism of adhesion by UafA, we determined the crystal structure of the functional region of UafA at 1.5 Å resolution. The structure was composed of three domains, designated as the N2, N3, and B domains, arranged in a triangular relative configuration. Hemagglutination inhibition assay with domain-truncated mutants indicated that both N and B domains were necessary for erythrocyte binding. Based on these results, a novel manner of ligand binding in which the B domain acts as a functional domain was proposed as the adhesion mechanism of S. saprophyticus.

  18. Crystal structures of the staphylococcal toxin SSL5 in complex with sialyl Lewis X reveal a conserved binding site that shares common features with viral and bacterial sialic acid binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Heather M; Basu, Indira; Chung, Matthew C; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Fraser, John D; Baker, Edward N

    2007-12-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  19. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  20. The Crystal Structure Analysis of Group B Streptococcus Sortase C1: A Model for the ;Lid; Movement upon Substrate Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, Baldeep; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Huang, I-Hsiu; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V.L. (UAB); (Georgia); (UTSMC)

    2012-02-07

    A unique feature of the class-C-type sortases, enzymes essential for Gram-positive pilus biogenesis, is the presence of a flexible 'lid' anchored in the active site. However, the mechanistic details of the 'lid' displacement, suggested to be a critical prelude for enzyme catalysis, are not yet known. This is partly due to the absence of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor complex crystal structures. We have recently described the crystal structures of the Streptococcus agalactiae SAG2603 V/R sortase SrtC1 in two space groups (type II and type III) and that of its 'lid' mutant and proposed a role of the 'lid' as a protector of the active-site hydrophobic environment. Here, we report the crystal structures of SAG2603 V/R sortase C1 in a different space group (type I) and that of its complex with a small-molecule cysteine protease inhibitor. We observe that the catalytic Cys residue is covalently linked to the small-molecule inhibitor without lid displacement. However, the type I structure provides a view of the sortase SrtC1 lid displacement while having structural elements similar to a substrate sorting motif suitably positioned in the active site. We propose that these major conformational changes seen in the presence of a substrate mimic in the active site may represent universal features of class C sortase substrate recognition and enzyme activation.

  1. Crystal structure of Hfq from Bacillus subtilis in complex with SELEX-derived RNA aptamer: insight into RNA-binding properties of bacterial Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Baba, Seiki; Fujimoto, Mai; Kawai, Gota; Kumasaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial Hfq is a protein that plays an important role in the regulation of genes in cooperation with sRNAs. Escherichia coli Hfq (EcHfq) has two or more sites that bind RNA(s) including U-rich and/or the poly(A) tail of mRNA. However, functional and structural information about Bacillus subtilis Hfq (BsHfq) including the RNA sequences that specifically bind to it remain unknown. Here, we describe RNA aptamers including fragment (AG)3A that are recognized by BsHfq and crystal structures of the BsHfq–(AG)3A complex at 2.2 Å resolution. Mutational and structural studies revealed that the RNA fragment binds to the distal site, one of the two binding sites on Hfq, and identified amino acid residues that are critical for sequence-specific interactions between BsHfq and (AG)3A. In particular, R32 appears to interact with G bases in (AG)3A. Poly(A) also binds to the distal site of EcHfq, but the overall RNA structure and protein–RNA interaction patterns engaged in the R32 residues of BsHfq–(AG)3A differ from those of EcHfq–poly(A). These findings provide novel insight into how the Hfq homologue recognizes RNA. PMID:22053080

  2. Crystal structure of the anti-(carcinoembryonic antigen) single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 and a model for antigen binding based on intermolecular contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M K; Corper, A L; Wan, T; Sohi, M K; Sutton, B J; Thornton, J D; Keep, P A; Chester, K A; Begent, R H; Perkins, S J

    2000-03-01

    MFE-23 is the first single-chain Fv antibody molecule to be used in patients and is used to target colorectal cancer through its high affinity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a cell-surface member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. MFE-23 contains an N-terminal variable heavy-chain domain joined by a (Gly(4)Ser)(3) linker to a variable light-chain (V(L)) domain (kappa chain) with an 11-residue C-terminal Myc-tag. Its crystal structure was determined at 2.4 A resolution by molecular replacement with an R(cryst) of 19.0%. Five of the six antigen-binding loops, L1, L2, L3, H1 and H2, conformed to known canonical structures. The sixth loop, H3, displayed a unique structure, with a beta-hairpin loop and a bifurcated apex characterized by a buried Thr residue. In the crystal lattice, two MFE-23 molecules were associated back-to-back in a manner not seen before. The antigen-binding site displayed a large acidic region located mainly within the H2 loop and a large hydrophobic region within the H3 loop. Even though this structure is unliganded within the crystal, there is an unusually large region of contact between the H1, H2 and H3 loops and the beta-sheet of the V(L) domain of an adjacent molecule (strands DEBA) as a result of intermolecular packing. These interactions exhibited remarkably high surface and electrostatic complementarity. Of seven MFE-23 residues predicted to make contact with antigen, five participated in these lattice contacts, and this model for antigen binding is consistent with previously reported site-specific mutagenesis of MFE-23 and its effect on CEA binding.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Zorbamycin-Binding Protein ZbmA, the Primary Self-Resistance Element in Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D. [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Bigelow, Lance [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, Changsoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cuff, Marianne E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lohman, Jeremy R. [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Chang, Chin-Yuan [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Ma, Ming [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Yang, Dong [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Clancy, Shonda [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Babnigg, Gyorgy [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Joachimiak, Andrzej [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Phillips, George N. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Shen, Ben [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs), tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycin, and zorbamycin (ZBM) are members of the BLM family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics. The BLM-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and the TLM-producing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158 both possess at least two self-resistance elements, an N-acetyltransferase and a binding protein. The N-acetyltransferase provides resistance by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotic that is required for activity, while the binding protein confers resistance by sequestering the metal-bound antibiotic and preventing drug activation via molecular oxygen. We recently established that the ZBM producer, Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, lacks the N-acetyltransferase resistance gene and that the ZBM-binding protein, ZbmA, is sufficient to confer resistance in the producing strain. To investigate the resistance mechanism attributed to ZbmA, we determined the crystal structures of apo and Cu(II)-ZBM-bound ZbmA at high resolutions of 1.90 and 1.65 angstrom, respectively. A comparison and contrast with other structurally characterized members of the BLM-binding protein family revealed key differences in the protein ligand binding environment that fine-tunes the ability of ZbmA to sequester metal-bound ZBM and supports drug sequestration as the primary resistance mechanism in the producing organisms of the BLM family of antitumor antibiotics.

  4. The crystal structure of UehA in complex with ectoine-A comparison with other TRAP-T binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecher, Justin; Pittelkow, Marco; Zobel, Silke; Bursy, Jan; Bönig, Tobias; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz; Bremer, Erhard

    2009-05-29

    Substrate-binding proteins or extracellular solute receptors (ESRs) are components of both ABC (ATP binding cassette) and TRAP-T (tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter). The TRAP-T system UehABC from Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3 imports the compatible solutes ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine as nutrients. UehA, the ESR of the UehABC operon, binds both ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine with high affinity (K(d) values of 1.4+/-0.1 and 1.1+/-0.1 microM, respectively) and delivers them to the TRAP-T complex. The crystal structure of UehA in complex with ectoine was determined at 2.9-A resolution and revealed an overall fold common for all ESR proteins from TRAP systems determined so far. A comparison of the recently described structure of TeaA from Halomonas elongata and an ectoine-binding protein (EhuB) from an ABC transporter revealed a conserved ligand binding mode that involves both directed and cation-pi interactions. Furthermore, a comparison with other known TRAP-T ESRs revealed a helix that might act as a selectivity filter imposing restraints on the ESRs that fine-tune ligand recognition and binding and finally might determine the selection of the cognate substrate.

  5. Crystal Structures of the Scaffolding Protein LGN Reveal the General Mechanism by Which GoLoco Binding Motifs Inhibit the Release of GDP from Gαi *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Min; Li, Jianchao; Zhu, Jinwei; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie; Wang, Wenning

    2012-01-01

    GoLoco (GL) motif-containing proteins regulate G protein signaling by binding to Gα subunit and acting as guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. GLs of LGN are also known to bind the GDP form of Gαi/o during asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the C-terminal GL domain of LGN binds four molecules of Gαi·GDP. The crystal structures of Gαi·GDP in complex with LGN GL3 and GL4, respectively, reveal distinct GL/Gαi interaction features when compared with the only high resolution structure known with GL/Gαi interaction between RGS14 and Gαi1. Only a few residues C-terminal to the conserved GL sequence are required for LGN GLs to bind to Gαi·GDP. A highly conserved “double Arg finger” sequence (RΨ(D/E)(D/E)QR) is responsible for LGN GL to bind to GDP bound to Gαi. Together with the sequence alignment, we suggest that the LGN GL/Gαi interaction represents a general binding mode between GL motifs and Gαi. We also show that LGN GLs are potent guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. PMID:22952234

  6. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  7. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Debasish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. Results We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2Å resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in

  8. 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol; synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and BSA binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Savithri; Basappa Chidananda, Vasantha Kumar; Hosakere Doddarevanna, Revanasiddappa; Hamse Kameshwar, Vivek; Kaur, Manpreet; Jasinski, Jerry P.

    2017-08-01

    A new imine-based molecule 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol (FBt) was synthesized by microwave and conventional method. It was structurally characterized by spectral techniques (NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS and electronic absorption), elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Hirshfeld surface analysis was employed to ensure the existence of intermolecular interactions in FBt structure. A preliminary in vitro susceptibility test against two pathogenic fungi with respect to standard has shown that the ligand is proved to be a potent antifungal agent. Since the carrying of a drug by BSA may effect on its structure and action, the investigation on the interaction between model protein BSA and FBt was carried out by employing UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characteristics of the binding, i.e., binding constant, number of binding sites, and nature of binding were determined. Besides, the Förster's parameters associated with the binding process were calculated. Molecular docking was also carried on interaction study of the FBt with BSA.

  9. Crystal and solution structures of an odorant-binding protein from the southern house mosquito complexed with an oviposition pheromone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mao, Yang; Xu, Xianzhong; Xu, Wei;

    2010-01-01

    to controlling their populations. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the female's antenna play a crucial, if yet imperfectly understood, role in sensing oviposition cues. Here, we report the X-ray crystallography and NMR 3D structures of OBP1 for Culex quinquefasciatus (CquiOBP1) bound to an oviposition...... of the pheromone from an internal binding pocket in a pH-dependent fashion and (ii) detection of a pheromone-induced conformational change in the OBP·pheromone complex. Although CquiOBP1 binds MOP in a pH-dependent fashion, it lacks the C terminus required for the pH-dependent release model. This study shows...

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure, DFT calculation and DNA binding studies of new water-soluble derivatives of dppz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Mohammad; Eslami, Abbas; Kia, Reza; Aleeshah, Roghayeh

    2017-10-01

    Diquaternarization of dipyrido-[2,3-a:2‧,3‧-c]-phenazine,(dppz) and its analogous dipyrido-[2,3-a:2‧,3‧-c]-dimethylphenazine,(dppx) using 1,3-dibromopropane afford new water-soluble derivatives of phenazine, propylene-bipyridyldiylium-phenazine (1) and propylene-bipyridyldiylium-dimethylphenazine (2). The compounds have been characterized by means of FT-IR, NMR, elemental analysis and conductometric measurements and their structure were determined by X-ray crystallography. The experimental studies on the compounds have been accompanied computationally by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The DNA binding properties of both compounds to calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by UV-Vis absorption and emission methods. The expanded UV-Vis spectral data matrix was analyzed by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique to obtain the concentration profile and pure spectra of all reaction species which existed in the interaction procedure. Multivariate curve resolution may help us to give a better understanding of the 1(Cl)2-ctDNA and 2(Cl)2-ctDNA interaction mechanism. The results suggest that both compounds bind tightly to DNA through intercalation mechanism and the DNA binding affinity of 2 is slightly lower than that of 1 due to steric hindrance of the methyl group. Also, thermal denaturation studies reveal that these compounds show strong affinity for binding with calf thymus DNA. The thermodynamic parameters of the DNA binding process were obtained from the temperature dependence of the binding constants and the results showed that binding of both compounds to DNA is an enthalpically driven process that is in agreement with proposed DNA intercalation capability of these compounds.

  11. Crystal Structures of Mite Allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1 Reveal Differences in Surface-Exposed Residues that May Influence Antibody Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Chapman, Martin D.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Stura, Enrico A.; Saint-Remy, Jean-Marie; Minor, Wladek; Pomés, Anna; (INDOOR Bio.); (CEAS); (Leuven); (UV)

    2009-12-01

    The Group 1 mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, are potent allergens excreted by Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, respectively. The human IgE antibody responses to the Group 1 allergens show more cross-reactivity than the murine IgG antibody responses which are largely species-specific. Here, we report the crystal structure of the mature form of Der f 1, which was isolated from its natural source, and a new, high-resolution structure of mature recombinant Der p 1. Unlike Der p 1, Der f 1 is monomeric both in the crystalline state and in solution. Moreover, no metal binding is observed in the structure of Der f 1, despite the fact that all amino acids involved in Ca{sup 2+} binding in Der p 1 are completely conserved in Der f 1. Although Der p 1 and Der f 1 share extensive sequence identity, comparison of the crystal structures of both allergens revealed structural features which could explain the differences in murine and human IgE antibody responses to these allergens. There are structural differences between Der f 1 and Der p 1 which are unevenly distributed on the allergens' surfaces. This uneven spatial arrangement of conserved versus altered residues could explain both the specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies against Der f 1 and Der p 1.

  12. Crystal structure of TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori in active form reveals the intrinsic molecular flexibility for unique DNA-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Gao

    Full Text Available Tipα (TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori is a carcinogenic effector. Studies on this protein revealed that a homodimer linked by a pair of intermolecular disulfide bridges (Cys25-Cys25 and Cys27-Cys27 was absolutely necessary for its biological functions. The activities of Tipα would be abolished when both disulfide bridges were disrupted. The crystal structures of Tipα reported to date, however, were based on inactive, monomeric mutants with their N-terminal, including residues Cys25 and Cys27, truncated. Here we report the crystal structure of H. pylori Tipα protein, TipαN(25, at 2.2Å resolution, in which Cys25 and Cys27 form a pair of inter-chain disulfide bridges linking an active dimer. The disulfide bridges exhibit structural flexibility in the present structure. A series of structure-based mutagenesis, biochemical assays and molecular dynamic simulations on DNA-Tipα interactions reveal that Tipα utilizes the dimeric interface as the DNA-binding site and that residues His60, Arg77 and Arg81 located at the interface are crucial for DNA binding. Tipα could bind to one ssDNA, two ssDNA or one dsDNA in experiments, respectively, in the native or mutant states. The unique DNA-binding activities of Tipα indicate that the intrinsic flexible nature of disulfide bridges could endow certain elasticity to the Tipα dimer for its unique bioactivities. The results shed light on the possible structural mechanism for the functional performances of Tipα.

  13. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  14. Crystal and solution structures of an odorant-binding protein from the southern house mosquito complexed with an oviposition pheromone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Yang; Xu, Xianzhong; Xu, Wei; Ishida, Yuko; Leal, Walter S.; Ames, James B.; Clardy, Jon (Harvard-Med); (UCD)

    2010-11-15

    Culex mosquitoes introduce the pathogens responsible for filariasis, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis, and other diseases into humans. Currently, traps baited with oviposition semiochemicals play an important role in detection efforts and could provide an environmentally friendly approach to controlling their populations. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the female's antenna play a crucial, if yet imperfectly understood, role in sensing oviposition cues. Here, we report the X-ray crystallography and NMR 3D structures of OBP1 for Culex quinquefasciatus (CquiOBP1) bound to an oviposition pheromone (5R,6S)-6-acetoxy-5-hexadecanolide (MOP). In both studies, CquiOBP1 had the same overall six-helix structure seen in other insect OBPs, but a detailed analysis revealed an important previously undescribed feature. There are two models for OBP-mediated signal transduction: (i) direct release of the pheromone from an internal binding pocket in a pH-dependent fashion and (ii) detection of a pheromone-induced conformational change in the OBP {center_dot} pheromone complex. Although CquiOBP1 binds MOP in a pH-dependent fashion, it lacks the C terminus required for the pH-dependent release model. This study shows that CquiOBP binds MOP in an unprecedented fashion using both a small central cavity for the lactone head group and a long hydrophobic channel for its tail.

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure determination of the N terminal domain of Fhb, a factor H binding protein from Streptococcus suis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunmao [State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijng Institute of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, No. 20 Dongda Street, Fengtai District, Beijing 100071 (China); Yu, You [Key Laboratory for Protein Sciences of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, 100084, Beijing (China); Yang, Maojun, E-mail: maojunyang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Protein Sciences of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, 100084, Beijing (China); Jiang, Yongqiang, E-mail: jiangyq@bmi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijng Institute of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, No. 20 Dongda Street, Fengtai District, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2015-10-23

    Fhb is a surface virulence protein from Streptococcus suis, which could aid bacterial evasion of host innate immune defense by recruiting complement regulator factor H to inactivate C3b deposited on bacterial surface in blood. Here we successfully expressed and purified the N terminal domain of Fhb (N-Fhb) and obtained crystals of the N-Fhb by sitting-drop vapor diffusion method with a resolution of 1.50 Å. The crystals belong to space group C2 with unit cell parameters a = 127.1 Å, b = 77.3 Å, c = 131.6 Å, α = 90°, β = 115.9°, γ = 90°. The structure of N-Fhb was determined by SAD method and the core structure of N-Fhb is a β sandwich. We speculated that binding of Fhb to human factor H may be mainly mediated by surface amino acids with negative charges. - Highlights: • We expressed N-Fhb as the soluble protein in Escherichia coli. • Crystals of N-Fhb were grown by sitting drop vapor diffusion method. • Crystals of N-Fhb could diffracted to 1.5 Å. • The core structure of N-Fhb was a β sandwich. • A part of the surface of N-Fhb was rich with negative charges.

  16. Crystal structure and activity of protein L-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase from Vibrio cholerae, and the effect of AdoHcy binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Mukherjee, Debadrita; Banerjee, Mousumi; Chatterjee, Barun K; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-10-01

    The repair enzyme Protein L-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is widely distributed in various organisms. PIMT catalyzes S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) dependent methylation of abnormal L-isoaspartyl residues, formed by the deamidation of asparagines and isomerization of aspartates. We report the crystal structure of PIMT of Vibrio cholerae (VcPIMT), the aetiological agent for cholera, complexed with the demethylated cofactor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy) to 2.05 Å resolution. A stretch of residues (39-58), lining the substrate-binding site, is disordered. Urea-induced unfolding free energy for apo and VcPIMT-AdoHcy complex reveals greater stability for the cofactor-bound protein. The kinetic parameters for the methyltransferase activity of the recombinant VcPIMT was determined using a continuous spectrophotometric color-based assay using the peptide substrate [VYP(L-isoD)HA]. The enzyme exhibited activity higher than the Escherichia coli enzyme and closer to those from thermophilic bacteria and the mammalian source. The association constant for substrate binding is 2.29 × 10(6) M(-1), quite similar to that for AdoHcy. The crystal structure and the model of the peptide-bound structure indicate that the majority of the interactions used for cofactor/substrate binding are provided by the main-chain atoms. Evolutionary relationships derived based on a phylogenetic tree constructed using the PIMT sequences are in conformity with the crystal structures of nine AdoHcy-bound PIMTs.

  17. Crystal structure and thermodynamic dissection of chitin oligosaccharide binding to the LysM module of chitinase-A from Pteris ryukyuensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Taira, Toki; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kitaoku, Yoshihito; Sørlie, Morten; Numata, Tomoyuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2017-08-31

    We determined the crystal structure of a LysM module from Pteris ryukyuensis chitinase-A (PrLysM2) at a resolution of 1.8 Å. Structural and binding analysis of PrLysM2 indicated that this module recognizes chitin oligosaccharides in a shallow groove comprised of five sugar-binding subsites on one side of the molecule. The free energy changes (ΔGr°) for binding of (GlcNAc)6, (GlcNAc)5, and (GlcNAc)4 to PrLysM2 were determined to be -5.4, -5,4 and -4.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively, by ITC. Thermodynamic dissection of the binding energetics of (GlcNAc)6 revealed that the driving force is the enthalpy change (ΔHr° = -11.7 ± 0.2 kcal/mol) and the solvation entropy change (-TΔSsolv° = -5.9 ± 0.6 kcal/mol). This is the first description of thermodynamic signatures of a chitin oligosaccharide binding to a LysM module. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Crystal structures of antibiotic-bound complexes of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa highlight the diversity in substrate binding modes among aminoglycoside kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kun; Houston, Douglas R; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-07-19

    Aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa [APH(2'')-IVa] is a member of a family of bacterial enzymes responsible for medically relevant resistance to antibiotics. APH(2'')-IVa confers high-level resistance against several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics in various pathogenic Enterococcus species by phosphorylating the drug, thereby preventing it from binding to its ribosomal target and producing a bactericidal effect. We describe here three crystal structures of APH(2'')-IVa, one in its apo form and two in complex with a bound antibiotic, tobramycin and kanamycin A. The apo structure was refined to a resolution of 2.05 Å, and the APH(2'')-IVa structures with tobramycin and kanamycin A bound were refined to resolutions of 1.80 and 2.15 Å, respectively. Comparison among the structures provides insight concerning the substrate selectivity of this enzyme. In particular, conformational changes upon substrate binding, involving rotational shifts of two distinct segments of the enzyme, are observed. These substrate-induced shifts may also rationalize the altered substrate preference of APH(2'')-IVa in comparison to those of other members of the APH(2'') subfamily, which are structurally closely related. Finally, analysis of the interactions between the enzyme and aminoglycoside reveals a distinct binding mode as compared to the intended ribosomal target. The differences in the pattern of interactions can be utilized as a structural basis for the development of improved aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to these resistance factors.

  19. Crystal Structure of a Fibroblast Growth Factor Homologous Factor (FHF) Defines a Conserved Surface on FHFs for Binding and Modulation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, R.; Dover, K; Laezza, F; Shtraizent, N; Huang, X; Tchetchik, D; Eliseenkova, A; Goldfarb, M; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) produce sodium currents that underlie the initiation and propagation of action potentials in nerve and muscle cells. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) bind to the intracellular C-terminal region of the Nav alpha subunit to modulate fast inactivation of the channel. In this study we solved the crystal structure of a 149-residue-long fragment of human FHF2A which unveils the structural features of the homology core domain of all 10 human FHF isoforms. Through analysis of crystal packing contacts and site-directed mutagenesis experiments we identified a conserved surface on the FHF core domain that mediates channel binding in vitro and in vivo. Mutations at this channel binding surface impaired the ability of FHFs to co-localize with Navs at the axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. The mutations also disabled FHF modulation of voltage-dependent fast inactivation of sodium channels in neuronal cells. Based on our data, we propose that FHFs constitute auxiliary subunits for Navs.

  20. Computational analysis of BACE1-ligand complex crystal structures and linear discriminant analysis for identification of BACE1 inhibitors with anti P-glycoprotein binding property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Prabu; Chennoju, Kiranmai; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2017-01-12

    More than 100 years of research on Alzheimer's disease didn't yield a potential cure for this dreadful disease. Poor Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) permeability and P-glycoprotein binding of BACE1 inhibitors are the major causes for the failure of these molecules during clinical trials. The design of BACE1 inhibitors with a balance of sufficient affinity to the binding site and little or no interaction with P-glycoproteins is indispensable. Identification and understanding of protein-ligand interactions are essential for ligand optimization process. Structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts led to a steady accumulation of BACE1-ligand crystal complexes in the PDB. This study focuses on analyses of 153 BACE1-ligand complexes for the direct contacts (hydrogen bonds and weak interactions) observed between protein and ligand and indirect contacts (water-mediated hydrogen bonds), observed in BACE1-ligand complex crystal structures. Intraligand hydrogen bonds were analyzed, with focus on ligand P-glycoprotein efflux. The interactions are dissected specific to subsites in the active site and discussed. The observed protein-ligand and intraligand interactions were used to develop the linear discriminant model for the identification of BACE1 inhibitors with less or no P-glycoprotein binding property. Excellent statistical results and model's ability to correctly predict a new data-set with an accuracy of 92% is achieved. The results are retrospectively analyzed to give input for the design of potential BACE1 inhibitors.

  1. Solution and crystal structures of a C-terminal fragment of the neuronal isoform of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (nPTB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Joshi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB serves primarily as a regulator of alternative splicing of messenger RNA, but is also co-opted to other roles such as RNA localisation and translation initiation from internal ribosome entry sites. The neuronal paralogue of PTB (nPTB is 75% identical in amino acid sequence with PTB. Although the two proteins have broadly similar RNA binding specificities and effects on RNA splicing, differential expression of PTB and nPTB can lead to the generation of alternatively spliced mRNAs. RNA binding by PTB and nPTB is mediated by four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs. We present here the crystal and solution structures of the C-terminal domain of nPTB (nPTB34 which contains RRMs 3 and 4. As expected the structures are similar to each other and to the solution structure of the equivalent fragment from PTB (PTB34. The result confirms that, as found for PTB, RRMs 3 and 4 of nPTB interact with one another to form a stable unit that presents the RNA-binding surfaces of the component RRMs on opposite sides that face away from each other. The major differences between PTB34 and nPTB34 arise from amino acid side chain substitutions on the exposed β-sheet surfaces and adjoining loops of each RRM, which are likely to modulate interactions with RNA.

  2. Crystal Structures of the Helicobacter pylori MTAN Enzyme Reveal Specific Interactions between S-Adenosylhomocysteine and the 5'-Alkylthio Binding Subsite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Vidhi [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Ronning, Donald R. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2012-11-13

    The bacterial 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzyme is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-ribosidic bond of at least four different adenosine-based metabolites: S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), 5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-DOA), and 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine. These activities place the enzyme at the hub of seven fundamental bacterial metabolic pathways: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) utilization, polyamine biosynthesis, the purine salvage pathway, the methionine salvage pathway, the SAM radical pathways, autoinducer-2 biosynthesis, and menaquinone biosynthesis. The last pathway makes MTAN essential for Helicobacter pylori viability. Although structures of various bacterial and plant MTANs have been described, the interactions between the homocysteine moiety of SAH and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of MTAN have never been resolved. We have determined crystal structures of an inactive mutant form of H. pylori MTAN bound to MTA and SAH to 1.63 and 1.20 Å, respectively. The active form of MTAN was also crystallized in the presence of SAH, allowing the determination of the structure of a ternary enzyme–product complex resolved at 1.50 Å. These structures identify interactions between the homocysteine moiety and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of the enzyme. This information can be leveraged for the development of species-specific MTAN inhibitors that prevent the growth of H. pylori.

  3. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  4. Macro Domain from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Is an Efficient ADP-ribose Binding Module: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Hsuan; Chuang, Chien-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The newly emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) encodes the conserved macro domain within non-structural protein 3. However, the precise biochemical function and structure of the macro domain is unclear. Using differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterized the MERS-CoV macro domain as a more efficient adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose binding module than macro domains from other CoVs. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the MERS-CoV macro domain was determined at 1.43-Å resolution in complex with ADP-ribose. Comparison of macro domains from MERS-CoV and other human CoVs revealed structural differences in the α1 helix alters how the conserved Asp-20 interacts with ADP-ribose and may explain the efficient binding of the MERS-CoV macro domain to ADP-ribose. This study provides structural and biophysical bases to further evaluate the role of the MERS-CoV macro domain in the host response via ADP-ribose binding but also as a potential target for drug design.

  5. Crystal structure of MytiLec, a galactose-binding lectin from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis with cytotoxicity against certain cancer cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Daiki; Kawai, Fumihiro; Noguchi, Hiroki; Unzai, Satoru; Hasan, Imtiaj; Fujii, Yuki; Park, Sam-Yong; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Tame, Jeremy R. H.

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is a lectin, isolated from bivalves, with cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines that express globotriaosyl ceramide, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glcα1-Cer, on the cell surface. Functional analysis shows that the protein binds to the disaccharide melibiose, Galα(1,6)Glc, and the trisaccharide globotriose, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glc. Recombinant MytiLec expressed in bacteria showed the same haemagglutinating and cytotoxic activity against Burkitt’s lymphoma (Raji) cells as the native form. The crystal structure has been determined to atomic resolution, in the presence and absence of ligands, showing the protein to be a member of the β-trefoil family, but with a mode of ligand binding unique to a small group of related trefoil lectins. Each of the three pseudo-equivalent binding sites within the monomer shows ligand binding, and the protein forms a tight dimer in solution. An engineered monomer mutant lost all cytotoxic activity against Raji cells, but retained some haemagglutination activity, showing that the quaternary structure of the protein is important for its cellular effects. PMID:27321048

  6. Crystal structures of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the apo and cefotaxime-bound forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hisashi; Kawai, Fumihiro; Obayashi, Eiji; Akashi, Satoko; Roper, David I; Tame, Jeremy R H; Park, Sam-Yong

    2012-10-26

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widespread Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen, and a methicillin-resistant form (MRSA) is particularly difficult to treat clinically. We have solved two crystal structures of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 (PBP3) from MRSA, the apo form and a complex with the β-lactam antibiotic cefotaxime, and used electrospray mass spectrometry to measure its sensitivity to a variety of penicillin derivatives. PBP3 is a class B PBP, possessing an N-terminal non-penicillin-binding domain, sometimes called a dimerization domain, and a C-terminal transpeptidase domain. The model shows a different orientation of its two domains compared to earlier models of other class B PBPs and a novel, larger N-domain. Consistent with the nomenclature of "dimerization domain", the N-terminal region forms an apparently tight interaction with a neighboring molecule related by a 2-fold symmetry axis in the crystal structure. This dimer form is predicted to be highly stable in solution by the PISA server, but mass spectrometry and analytical ultracentrifugation provide unequivocal evidence that the protein is a monomer in solution.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and HSA binding of two new N,O,O-donor Schiff-base ligands derived from dihydroxybenzaldehyde and tert-butylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Iman; Hosseini, Farnaz; Khorshidifard, Mahsa; Sahihi, Mehdi; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri

    2016-09-01

    Two new o-hydroxy Schiff-bases compounds, L1 and L2, were derived from the 1:1 M condensation of 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde with tert-butylamine and were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies. The crystal structure of L2 was also determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The crystal structure of L2 showed that the compound exists as a zwitterionic form in the solid state, with the H atom of the phenol group being transferred to the imine N atom. It adopts an E configuration about the central Cdbnd N double bond. Furthermore, binding of these Schiff base ligands to Human Serum Albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence quenching, absorption spectroscopy, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods. The fluorescence emission of HSA was quenched by ligands. Also, suitable models were used to analyze the UV-vis absorption spectroscopy data for titration of HSA solution by various amounts of Schiff bases. The spectroscopic studies revealed that these Schiff bases formed 1:1 complex with HSA. Energy transfer mechanism of quenching was discussed and the values of 3.35 and 1.57 nm as the mean distances between the bound ligands and the HSA were calculated for L1 and L2, respectively. Molecular docking results indicated that the main active binding site for these Schiff bases ligands is in subdomain IB. Moreover, MD simulation results suggested that this Schiff base complex can interact with HSA, with a slight modification of its tertiary structure.

  8. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  9. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  10. Crystal Structures of Two Novel Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidases Reveal a Beta-Bar Fold With a Conserved Heme-Binding Motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubieta, C.; Krishna, S.S.; Kapoor, M.; Kozbial, P.; McMullan, D.; Axelrod, H.L.; Miller, M.D.; Abdubek, P.; Ambing, E.; Astakhova, T.; Carlton, D.; Chiu, H.J.; Clayton, T.; Deller, M.C.; Duan, L.; Elsliger, M.A.; Feuerhelm, J.; Grzechnik, S.K.; Hale, J.; Hampton, E.; Han, G.W.; /JCSG /SLAC, SSRL /Burnham Inst. Med. Res. /UC, San Diego /Scripps Res. Inst. /Novartis Res. Found.

    2007-10-31

    BtDyP from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (strain VPI-5482) and TyrA from Shewanella oneidensis are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs), members of a new family of heme-dependent peroxidases recently identified in fungi and bacteria. Here, we report the crystal structures of BtDyP and TyrA at 1.6 and 2.7 Angstroms, respectively. BtDyP assembles into a hexamer, while TyrA assembles into a dimer; the dimerization interface is conserved between the two proteins. Each monomer exhibits a two-domain, {alpha}+{beta} ferredoxin-like fold. A site for heme binding was identified computationally, and modeling of a heme into the proposed active site allowed for identification of residues likely to be functionally important. Structural and sequence comparisons with other DyPs demonstrate a conservation of putative heme-binding residues, including an absolutely conserved histidine. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments confirm heme binding, but with a stoichiometry of 0.3:1 (heme:protein).

  11. Mixed-ligand binuclear copper(II) complex of 5-methylsalicylaldehyde and 2,2'-bipyridyl: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA binding and nuclease activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Perumal Gurumoorthy; Jayaram Ravichandran; Aziz Kalilur Rahiman

    2014-05-01

    A new mixed-ligand binuclear copper(II) complex [Cu(MS)(bpy)]2.(ClO4)2, built of 5-methylsalicylaldehyde and 2,2'-bipyridyl has been synthesized and characterized by using elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Crystal structure of the complex shows that copper(II) ion lies in a square pyramidal coordination environment. The structure consists of two symmetrical half units in which the copper(II) ion of one half unit connected with the phenolate oxygen atom of other half unit along with one perchlorate anion in the crystal lattice as free molecule. Presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anion was also confirmed by IR spectroscopy. Absorption spectroscopy exhibits d-d transition at 628 nm, which further supports the square pyramidal geometry around the copper(II) ions. EPR spectrum of the copper(II) complex at room temperature shows a broad signal without any splitting pattern at ∥ = 2.26, ⊥ = 2.03 and the magnetic moment (eff = 1.31 BM) obtained at room temperature indicate an antiferromagnetic interaction between the two copper(II) ions through phenoxide-bridge. Binding studies reveal that the complex possesses good binding propensity (b = 5.2 ± 1.7 × 104 M-1) and bind to nitrogenous bases of DNA through intercalation. Nuclease activity of the complex with pBR322 DNA shows that the effect of hydrolytic cleavage is dose-dependent and the oxidative cleavage indicates the involvement of hydroxyl radical and singlet-oxygen as reactive oxygen species.

  12. Crystal Structures of Apo and Metal-Bound Forms of the UreE Protein from Helicobacter pylori: Role of Multiple Metal Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Munger, Christine; Asinas, Abdalin; Benoit, Stephane L.; Miller, Erica; Matte, Allan; Maier, Robert J.; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (Georgia); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-10-22

    The crystal structure of the urease maturation protein UreE from Helicobacter pylori has been determined in its apo form at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, bound to Cu{sup 2+} at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, and bound to Ni{sup 2+} at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. Apo UreE forms dimers, while the metal-bound enzymes are arranged as tetramers that consist of a dimer of dimers associated around the metal ion through coordination by His102 residues from each subunit of the tetramer. Comparison of independent subunits from different crystal forms indicates changes in the relative arrangement of the N- and C-terminal domains in response to metal binding. The improved ability of engineered versions of UreE containing hexahistidine sequences at either the N-terminal or C-terminal end to provide Ni{sup 2+} for the final metal sink (urease) is eliminated in the H102A version. Therefore, the ability of the improved Ni{sup 2+}-binding versions to deliver more nickel is likely an effect of an increased local concentration of metal ions that can rapidly replenish transferred ions bound to His102.

  13. Crystal Structure of Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2, an Unusual Zinc Binding Aspartic Protease with a Novel Mode of Self-inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustchina, Alla; Li, Mi; Wunschmann, Sabina; Chapman, Martin D.; Pomes, Anna; Wlodawer, Alexander (INDOOR Bio.); (NIH)

    2010-07-19

    The crystal structure of Bla g 2 was solved in order to investigate the structural basis for the allergenic properties of this unusual protein. This is the first structure of an aspartic protease in which conserved glycine residues, in two canonical DTG triads, are substituted by different amino acid residues. Another unprecedented feature revealed by the structure is the single phenylalanine residue insertion on the tip of the flap, with the side-chain occupying the S1 binding pocket. This and other important amino acid substitutions in the active site region of Bla g 2 modify the interactions in the vicinity of the catalytic aspartate residues, increasing the distance between them to {approx}4 {angstrom} and establishing unique direct contacts between the flap and the catalytic residues. We attribute the absence of substantial catalytic activity in Bla g 2 to these unusual features of the active site. Five disulfide bridges and a Zn-binding site confer stability to the protein, which may contribute to sensitization at lower levels of exposure than other allergens.

  14. Crystal structure of the high-affinity Na+,K+-ATPase–ouabain complex with Mg2+ bound in the cation binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mette; Yatime, Laure; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    we describe a crystal structure of the phosphorylated pig kidney Na+,K+-ATPase in complex with the CTS representative ouabain, extending to 3.4 Å resolution. The structure provides key details on CTS binding, revealing an extensive hydrogen bonding network formed by the β-surface of the steroid core......The Na+,K+-ATPase maintains electrochemical gradients for Na+ and K+ that are critical for animal cells. Cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), widely used in the clinic and recently assigned a role as endogenous regulators of intracellular processes, are highly specific inhibitors of the Na+,K+-ATPase. Here...... of ouabain and the side chains of αM1, αM2, and αM6. Furthermore, the structure reveals that cation transport site II is occupied by Mg2+, and crystallographic studies indicate that Rb+ and Mn2+, but not Na+, bind to this site. Comparison with the low-affinity [K2]E2–MgFx–ouabain structure [Ogawa et al...

  15. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas avirulence protein AvrPphB: A papain-like fold with a distinct substrate binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, M.; Shao, F.; Innes, R.W.; Dixon, J.E.; Xu, Z. (Mighigan); (Michigan); (UCSD)

    2010-03-08

    AvrPphB is an avirulence (Avr) protein from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae that can trigger a disease-resistance response in a number of host plants including Arabidopsis. AvrPphB belongs to a novel family of cysteine proteases with the charter member of this family being the Yersinia effector protein YopT. AvrPphB has a very stringent substrate specificity, catalyzing a single proteolytic cleavage in the Arabidopsis serine/threonine kinase PBS1. We have determined the crystal structure of AvrPphB by x-ray crystallography at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. The structure is composed of a central antiparallel {beta}-sheet, with {alpha}-helices packing on both sides of the sheet to form a two-lobe structure. The core of this structure resembles the papain-like cysteine proteases. The similarity includes the AvrPphB active site catalytic triad of Cys-98, His-212, and Asp-227 and the oxyanion hole residue Asn-93. Based on analogy with inhibitor complexes of the papain-like proteases, we propose a model for the substrate-binding mechanism of AvrPphB. A deep and positively charged pocket (S2) and a neighboring shallow surface (S3) likely bind to aspartic acid and glycine residues in the substrate located two (P2) and three (P3) residues N terminal to the cleavage site, respectively. Further implications about the specificity of plant pathogen recognition are also discussed.

  16. Crystal Structures of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 From Penicillin-Susceptible And -Resistant Strains of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Reveal An Unexpectedly Subtle Mechanism for Antibiotic Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, A.J.; Tomberg, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Nicholas, R.A.; Davies, C.

    2009-05-21

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from N. gonorrhoeae is the major molecular target for {beta}-lactam antibiotics used to treat gonococcal infections. PBP2 from penicillin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae harbors an aspartate insertion after position 345 (Asp-345a) and 4-8 additional mutations, but how these alter the architecture of the protein is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-susceptible strain FA19, which shows that the likely effect of Asp-345a is to alter a hydrogen-bonding network involving Asp-346 and the SXN triad at the active site. We have also solved the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140 that contains four mutations near the C terminus of the protein. Although these mutations lower the second order rate of acylation for penicillin by 5-fold relative to wild type, comparison of the two structures shows only minor structural differences, with the positions of the conserved residues in the active site essentially the same in both. Kinetic analyses indicate that two mutations, P551S and F504L, are mainly responsible for the decrease in acylation rate. Melting curves show that the four mutations lower the thermal stability of the enzyme. Overall, these data suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying antibiotic resistance contributed by the four mutations is subtle and involves a small but measurable disordering of residues in the active site region that either restricts the binding of antibiotic or impedes conformational changes that are required for acylation by {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  17. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  18. Crystal Structures of Furazanes

    OpenAIRE

    Klapötke, Thomas; Schmid, Philipp; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Several nitrogen-rich salts of 3-nitramino-4-nitrofurazane and dinitraminoazoxyfurazane were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The crystal structures were determined by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Moreover the sensitivities toward thermal and mechanical stimuli were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and BAM (Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung) methods. The standard enthalpies of formation were calculated for all...

  19. The crystal structure of the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Acinetobacter baumannii suggests a flexible conformational change in the central domain before nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Kim-Hung; Hong, Myoung-ki; Lee, Clarice; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Lee, Sang Hee; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Cha, Sun-Shin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, which is emerging as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen, causes a number of diseases, including pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and skin infections. With ATP hydrolysis, the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) catalyzes the synthesis of D-alanyl-D-alanine, which is an essential component of bacterial peptidoglycan. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of DDL from A. baumannii (AbDDL) at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The asymmetric unit contained six protomers of AbDDL. Five protomers had a closed conformation in the central domain, while one protomer had an open conformation in the central domain. The central domain with an open conformation did not interact with crystallographic symmetry-related protomers and the conformational change of the central domain was not due to crystal packing. The central domain of AbDDL can have an ensemble of the open and closed conformations before the binding of substrate ATP. The conformational change of the central domain is important for the catalytic activity and the detail information will be useful for the development of inhibitors against AbDDL and putative antibacterial agents against A. baumannii. The AbDDL structure was compared with that of other DDLs that were in complex with potent inhibitors and the catalytic activity of AbDDL was confirmed using enzyme kinetics assays.

  20. Crystal structure of FhuD at 1.6 Å resolution: a ferrichrome-binding protein from the animal and human pathogen Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Francesca; Cozzi, Roberta; Maritan, Martina; Lo Surdo, Paola; Maione, Domenico; Malito, Enrico; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a leading cause of disease in dogs, and zoonosis causes human infections. Methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius strains are emerging, resembling the global health threat of S. aureus. Therefore, it is increasingly important to characterize potential targets for intervention against S. pseudintermedius. Here, FhuD, an S. pseudintermedius surface lipoprotein implicated in iron uptake, was characterized. It was found that FhuD bound ferrichrome in an iron-dependent manner, which increased the thermostability of FhuD by >15 °C. The crystal structure of ferrichrome-free FhuD was determined via molecular replacement at 1.6 Å resolution. FhuD exhibits the class III solute-binding protein (SBP) fold, with a ligand-binding cavity between the N- and C-terminal lobes, which is here occupied by a PEG molecule. The two lobes of FhuD were oriented in a closed conformation. These results provide the first detailed structural characterization of FhuD, a potential therapeutic target of S. pseudintermedius.

  1. The 1.9Å crystal structure of Prp20p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its binding properties to Gsp1p and histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fangming; Liu, Yiwei; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hongda; Ding, Bo; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2011-04-01

    Prp20p is the homolog of mammalian RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which acts as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Gsp1p (yeast Ran). Prp20p plays multiple roles in mRNA metabolism, nucleocytoplasmic transport and mitosis regulation. Prp20p also functions as a linker between chromatin and nuclear pore complex (NPC) which regulates the NPC-mediated boundary activity (BA). Prp20p contains an N-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a typical RCC1-like domain (RLD). Here we present the 1.9Å crystal structure of the RCC1-like domain of Prp20p, which exhibits a classical seven-bladed β-propeller. We also proved that the additional β-wedge in Prp20p is essential for the interaction between Prp20p and Gsp1p. Based on this structure, we built a complex model of Prp20p and Gsp1p which was optimized by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our model reveals that Prp20p and RCC1 share similar Ran GTPase binding mode. In addition, we also studied the histone-binding property of Prp20p in vitro. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Insights into the initiation of JC virus DNA replication derived from the crystal structure of the T-antigen origin binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Meinke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available JC virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family of DNA tumor viruses and the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. PML is a disease that occurs primarily in people who are immunocompromised and is usually fatal. As with other Polyomavirus family members, the replication of JC virus (JCV DNA is dependent upon the virally encoded protein T-antigen. To further our understanding of JCV replication, we have determined the crystal structure of the origin-binding domain (OBD of JCV T-antigen. This structure provides the first molecular understanding of JCV T-ag replication functions; for example, it suggests how the JCV T-ag OBD site-specifically binds to the major groove of GAGGC sequences in the origin. Furthermore, these studies suggest how the JCV OBDs interact during subsequent oligomerization events. We also report that the OBD contains a novel "pocket"; which sequesters the A1 & B2 loops of neighboring molecules. Mutagenesis of a residue in the pocket associated with the JCV T-ag OBD interfered with viral replication. Finally, we report that relative to the SV40 OBD, the surface of the JCV OBD contains one hemisphere that is highly conserved and one that is highly variable.

  3. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  4. Crystal structure of the trithorax group protein ASH2L reveals a forkhead-like DNA binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarvan, Sabina; Avdic, Vanja; Tremblay, Véronique; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Blais, Alexandre; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François (Ottawa Hosp.); (Ottawa); (NWU)

    2012-05-02

    Absent, small or homeotic discs-like 2 (ASH2L) is a trithorax group (TrxG) protein and a regulatory subunit of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases. Here we report that ASH2L binds DNA using a forkhead-like helix-wing-helix (HWH) domain. In vivo, the ASH2L HWH domain is required for binding to the {beta}-globin locus control region, histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4) trimethylation and maximal expression of the {beta}-globin gene (Hbb-1), validating the functional importance of the ASH2L DNA binding domain.

  5. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  6. The meloxicam complexes of Co(II) and Zn(II): Synthesis, crystal structures, photocleavage and in vitro DNA-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanatkar, Tahereh Hosseinzadeh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Simpson, Jim; Jannesari, Zahra

    2013-10-01

    Two neutral mononuclear complexes of Co(II) and Zn(II) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam (H2mel, 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(5-methyl-2-thiazolyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxammide-1,1-dioxide), [Co(Hmel)2(EtOH)2] (1), and [Zn(Hmel)2(EtOH)2] (2), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy and their solid-state structures were studied by single-crystal diffraction. The complexes have a distorted octahedral geometry around the metal atom. The experimental data indicate that the meloxicam acts as a deprotonated bidentate ligand (through the amide oxygen and the nitrogen atom of the thiazolyl ring) in the complexes, and a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the amide N-H function and the enolate O atom stabilizes the ZZZ conformation of meloxicam ligands. Absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been used to investigate the binding of the complexes with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA). Additionally, the photocleavage studies have been also used to investigate the binding of the complexes with plasmid DNA. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was monitored by a blue shift and hyperchromism in the UV-Vis spectra attributed to an electrostatic binding mode. A competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that the complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that they bind to DNA in strong competition with EB. The experimental results show that the complexes can cleave pUC57 plasmid DNA.

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) interaction with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP-1 and TIMP-2: binding studies and crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Jyotica; Robinson, Jessica; Soares, Alexei S; Fields, Alan P; Radisky, Derek C; Radisky, Evette S

    2012-05-04

    Matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10, stromelysin-2) is a secreted metalloproteinase with functions in skeletal development, wound healing, and vascular remodeling; its overexpression is also implicated in lung tumorigenesis and tumor progression. To understand the regulation of MMP-10 by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), we have assessed equilibrium inhibition constants (K(i)) of putative physiological inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 for the active catalytic domain of human MMP-10 (MMP-10cd) using multiple kinetic approaches. We find that TIMP-1 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 1.1 × 10(-9) M; this interaction is 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of the similar MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) catalytic domain (MMP-3cd) by TIMP-1. TIMP-2 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 5.8 × 10(-9) M, which is again 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of MMP-3cd by this inhibitor (K(i) = 5.5 × 10(-10) M). We solved the x-ray crystal structure of TIMP-1 bound to the MMP-10cd at 1.9 Å resolution; the structure was solved by molecular replacement and refined with an R-factor of 0.215 (R(free) = 0.266). Comparing our structure of MMP-10cd·TIMP-1 with the previously solved structure of MMP-3cd·TIMP-1 (Protein Data Bank entry 1UEA), we see substantial differences at the binding interface that provide insight into the differential binding of stromelysin family members to TIMP-1. This structural information may ultimately assist in the design of more selective TIMP-based inhibitors tailored for specificity toward individual members of the stromelysin family, with potential therapeutic applications.

  8. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S

    2017-01-01

    structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full......-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered...

  9. Crystal structures of yeast beta-alanine synthase complexes reveal the mode of substrate binding and large scale domain closure movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piskur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-12-07

    Beta-alanine synthase is the final enzyme of the reductive pyrimidine catabolic pathway, which is responsible for the breakdown of uracil and thymine in higher organisms. The fold of the homodimeric enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri identifies it as a member of the AcyI/M20 family of metallopeptidases. Its subunit consists of a catalytic domain harboring a di-zinc center and a smaller dimerization domain. The present site-directed mutagenesis studies identify Glu(159) and Arg(322) as crucial for catalysis and His(262) and His(397) as functionally important but not essential. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type beta-alanine synthase in complex with the reaction product beta-alanine, and of the mutant E159A with the substrate N-carbamyl-beta-alanine, revealing the closed state of a dimeric AcyI/M20 metallopeptidase-like enzyme. Subunit closure is achieved by a approximately 30 degrees rigid body domain rotation, which completes the active site by integration of substrate binding residues that belong to the dimerization domain of the same or the partner subunit. Substrate binding is achieved via a salt bridge, a number of hydrogen bonds, and coordination to one of the zinc ions of the di-metal center.

  10. The GCN4 basic region leucine zipper binds DNA as a dimer of uninterrupted alpha helices: crystal structure of the protein-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, T E; Brandl, C J; Struhl, K; Harrison, S C

    1992-12-24

    The yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 is 1 of over 30 identified eukaryotic proteins containing the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA-binding motif. We have determined the crystal structure of the GCN4 bZIP element complexed with DNA at 2.9 A resolution. The bZIP dimer is a pair of continuous alpha helices that form a parallel coiled coil over their carboxy-terminal 30 residues and gradually diverge toward their amino termini to pass through the major groove of the DNA-binding site. The coiled-coil dimerization interface is oriented almost perpendicular to the DNA axis, giving the complex the appearance of the letter T. There are no kinks or sharp bends in either bZIP monomer. Numerous contacts to DNA bases and phosphate oxygens are made by basic region residues that are conserved in the bZIP protein family. The details of the bZIP dimer interaction with DNA can explain recognition of the AP-1 site by the GCN4 protein.

  11. Binding studies of L-tryptophan to human serum albumin with nanogold-structured sensor by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yumei; Yao, Shouzhuo; Chen, Jinhua

    2011-12-01

    Nanogold-modified sensor was constructed and applied to study the binding of L-tryptophan to human serum albumin (HSA) in situ by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance (PQCI) analysis. It was interesting that the as-prepared nanogold modified sensor was more sensitive and biocompatible than bare gold electrode. The frequency changes due to protein adsorption on the nanogold-modified sensor might be described as a sum of two exponential functions and detailed explanation was given. Additionally, the kinetics of the binding process was also investigated. The binding constant (K) and the number of binding site (n) for the binding process without competitor are fitted to be 1.07 x 10(4) (mol l(-1))(-1) s(-1) and 1.13, respectively, and 2.24 x 10(3) (mol l-(1))(-1) s(-1) and 1.18, respectively for the binding process with competitor.

  12. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides new insight into the reaction mechanism and shows a novel binding mode of the 2'-phosphate of NADP+ and a novel cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Segura, Lilian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A; Horjales, Eduardo

    2009-01-16

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)(+)-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors--abundant at infection sites--and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP(+) and one of the even fewer that require K(+) ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP(+) and K(+) ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the "oxyanion hole." The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2'-phosphate of the NADP(+), thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K(+) binding sites per subunit

  13. Crystal structure of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ cyclic nucleotide-binding-B domain : Rp-cGMPS complex reveals an apo-like, inactive conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James C; VanSchouwen, Bryan; Lorenz, Robin; Sankaran, Banumathi; Herberg, Friedrich W; Melacini, Giuseppe; Kim, Choel

    2017-01-01

    The R-diastereomer of phosphorothioate analogs of cGMP, Rp-cGMPS, is one of few known inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKG I); however, its mechanism of inhibition is currently not fully understood. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the PKG Iβ cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (PKG Iβ CNB-B), considered a 'gatekeeper' for cGMP activation, bound to Rp-cGMPS at 1.3 Å. Our structural and NMR data show that PKG Iβ CNB-B bound to Rp-cGMPS displays an apo-like structure with its helical domain in an open conformation. Comparison with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit (PKA RIα) showed that this conformation resembles the catalytic subunit-bound inhibited state of PKA RIα more closely than the apo or Rp-cAMPS-bound conformations. These results suggest that Rp-cGMPS inhibits PKG I by stabilizing the inactive conformation of CNB-B. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, DNA- and HSA-binding studies of a dinuclear Schiff base Zn(II) complex derived from 2-hydroxynaphtaldehyde and 2-picolylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Zahra; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Sahihi, Mehdi; Moghadam, Majid; Tangestaninejad, Sharam; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj

    2015-09-01

    A tridentate Schiff base ligand NNO donor (HL: 1-((E)-((pyridin-2-yl)methylimino)methyl)naphthalen-2-ol was synthesized from condensation of 2-hydroxynaphtaldehyde and 2-picolylamine. Zinc complex, Zn2L2(NO3)2, was prepared from reaction of Zn(NO3)2 and HL at ambient temperature. The ligand and complex were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and elemental analysis (CHN). Furthermore, the structure of dinuclear Zn(II) complex was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The complex, Zn2L2(NO3)2, is centrosymmetric dimer in which deprotonated phenolates bridge the two Zn(II) atoms and link the two halves of the dimer. In the structure, Zinc(II) ions have a highly distorted six-coordinate structure bonded to two oxygen atoms from a bidentate nitrate group, the pyridine nitrogen, an amine nitrogen and phenolate oxygens. The interaction of dinuclear Zn(II) complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) and HSA was investigated under physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching, UV-Vis spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking methods. The estimated binding constants for the DNA-complex and HSA-complex were (3.60 ± 0.18) × 104 M-1 and (1.35 ± 0.24) × 104 M-1, respectively. The distance between dinuclear Zn(II) complex and HSA was obtained based on the Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer. Molecular docking studies revealed the binding of dinuclear Zn(II) complex to the major groove of FS-DNA and IIA site of protein by formation of hydrogen bond, π-cation and hydrophobic interactions.

  15. Crystal Structure of Human Liver delta {4}-3-Ketosteroid 5 beta-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo,L.; Drury, J.; Penning, T.; Christianson, D.

    2008-01-01

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all 4-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an a,{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a 4-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90 bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human 4-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP+ at 1.79- and 1.35- Angstroms resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP+ and cortisone at 1.90- Angstroms resolution, NADP+ and progesterone at 2.03- Angstroms resolution, and NADP+ and testosterone at 1.62- Angstroms resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP+. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr58 and Glu120. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  16. Crystal structure of the N-terminal anticodon-binding domain of the nondiscriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songsiriritthigul, Chomphunuch; Suebka, Suwimon; Chen, Chun Jung; Fuengfuloy, Pitchayada; Chuawong, Pitak

    2017-02-01

    The N-terminal anticodon-binding domain of the nondiscriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) plays a crucial role in the recognition of both tRNA(Asp) and tRNA(Asn). Here, the first X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of this enzyme (ND-AspRS1-104) from the human-pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The apo form of H. pylori ND-AspRS1-104 shares high structural similarity with the N-terminal anticodon-binding domains of the discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (D-AspRS) from Escherichia coli and ND-AspRS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, allowing recognition elements to be proposed for tRNA(Asp) and tRNA(Asn). It is proposed that a long loop (Arg77-Lys90) in this H. pylori domain influences its relaxed tRNA specificity, such that it is classified as nondiscriminating. A structural comparison between D-AspRS from E. coli and ND-AspRS from P. aeruginosa suggests that turns E and F (78GAGL81 and 83NPKL86) in H. pylori ND-AspRS play a crucial role in anticodon recognition. Accordingly, the conserved Pro84 in turn F facilitates the recognition of the anticodons of tRNA(Asp) ((34)GUC(36)) and tRNA(Asn) ((34)GUU(36)). The absence of the amide H atom allows both C and U bases to be accommodated in the tRNA-recognition site.

  17. Crystal Structures of Furazanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Klapötke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several nitrogen-rich salts of 3-nitramino-4-nitrofurazane and dinitraminoazoxyfurazane were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The crystal structures were determined by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Moreover the sensitivities toward thermal and mechanical stimuli were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA and BAM (Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung methods. The standard enthalpies of formation were calculated for all compounds at the CBS-4M level of theory, and the energetic performance was predicted with the EXPLO5 V6.02 computer code.

  18. Rhenium complexes of chromophore-appended dipicolylamine ligands: syntheses, spectroscopic properties, DNA binding and X-ray crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullice, L.A.; Buurma, N.J.; Pope, S.J.A. [Cardiff Univ., School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Laye, R.H. [Sheffield Univ., Dept. of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Harding, L.P. [Huddersfield Univ., School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The syntheses of two chromophore-appended dipicolylamine-derived ligands and their reactivity with penta-carbonyl-chloro-rhenium have been studied. The resultant complexes each possess the fac-Re(CO){sub 3} core. The ligands L{sup 1} 1-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-pyrene and L{sup 2} 2-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-quinoxaline were isolated via a one-pot reductive amination in moderate yield. The corresponding rhenium complexes were isolated in good yields and characterised by {sup 1}H NMR, MS, IR and UV-Vis studies. X-Ray crystallographic data were obtained for fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}), C{sub 34}H{sub 26}BF{sub 4}N{sub 4}O{sub 3}Re: monoclinic, P2(1)/c, a 18.327(2) Angstroms, {alpha} = 90.00 degrees, b 14.1537(14) Angstroms, {beta}96.263(6) degrees, c = 23.511(3) Angstroms, {gamma} 90.00 Angstroms, 6062.4(11) (Angstroms){sup 3}, Z=8. The luminescence properties of the ligands and complexes were also investigated, with the emission attributed to the appended chromophore in each case. Isothermal titration calorimetry suggests that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) self-aggregates cooperatively in aqueous solution, probably forming micelle-like aggregates with a cmc of 0.18 mM. Investigations into the DNA-binding properties of fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) were undertaken and revealed that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) binding to fish sperm DNA (binding constant 1.5 {+-} 0.2 * 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}, binding site size 3.2 {+-} 0.3 base pairs) is accompanied by changes in the UV-Vis spectrum as typically observed for pyrene-based intercalators while the calorimetrically determined binding enthalpy (-14 {+-} 2 kcal mol{sup -1}) also agrees favourably with values as typically found for intercalators. (authors)

  19. Crystal Structure of the Zinc-Binding Transport Protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli Reveals an Unexpected Variation in Metal Coordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,H.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette transport systems for high-affinity uptake of zinc and manganese use a cluster 9 solute-binding protein. Structures of four cluster 9 transport proteins have been determined previously. However, the structural determinants for discrimination between zinc and manganese remain under discussion. To further investigate the variability of metal binding sites in bacterial transporters, we have determined the structure of the zinc-bound transport protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The overall structure of ZnuA is similar to other solute-binding transporters. A scaffolding {alpha}-helix forms the backbone for two structurally related globular domains. The metal-binding site is located at the domain interface. The bound zinc ion is coordinated by three histidine residues (His78, His161 and His225) and one glutamate residue (Glu77). The functional role of Glu77 for metal binding is unexpected, because this residue is not conserved in previously determined structures of zinc and manganese-specific transport proteins. The observed metal coordination by four protein residues differs significantly from the zinc-binding site in the ZnuA transporter from Synechocystis 6803, which binds zinc via three histidine residues. In addition, the E. coli ZnuA structure reveals the presence of a disulfide bond in the C-terminal globular domain that is not present in previously determined cluster 9 transport protein structures.

  20. The crystal structure of the non-liganded 14-3-3σ protein: insights into determinants of isoform specific ligand binding and dimerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne BENZINGER; Grzegorz M. POPOWICZ; Joma K. JOY; Sudipta MAJUMDAR; Tad A. HOLAK; Heiko HERMEKING

    2005-01-01

    Seven different, but highly conserved 14-3-3 proteins are involved in diverse signaling pathways in human cells. It is unclear how the 14-3-3σ isoform, a transcriptional target of p53, exerts its inhibitory effect on the cell cycle in the presence of other 14-3-3 isoforms, which are constitutively expressed at high levels. In order to identify structural differences between the 14-3-3 isoforms, we solved the crystal structure of the human 14-3-3σ protein at a resolution of 2.8 A and compared it to the known structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ. The global architecture of the 14-3-3σ fold is similar to the previously determined structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ: two 14-3-3σ molecules form a cup-shaped dimer. Significant differences between these 14-3-3 isoforms were detected adjacent to the amphipathic groove, which mediates the binding to phosphorylated consensus motifs in 14-3-3-1igands. Another specificity determining region is localized between amino-acids 203 to 215. These differences presumably select for the interaction with specific ligands,which may explain the different biological functions of the respective 14-3-3 isoforms. Furthermore, the two 14-3-3σ molecules forming a dimer differ by the spatial position of the ninth helix, which is shifted to the inside of the ligand interaction surface, thus indicating adaptability of this part of the molecule. In addition, 5 non-conserved residues are located at the interface between two 14-3-3σ proteins forming a dimer and represent candidate determinants of homoand hetero-dimerization specificity. The structural differences among the 14-3-3 isoforms described here presumably contribute to isoform-specific interactions and functions.

  1. Crystal Structure of a Putative Cytochrome P450 Alkane Hydroxylase (CYP153D17) from Sphingomonas sp. PAMC 26605 and Its Conformational Substrate Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Yu, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Joo-Ho; Park, Sun-Ha; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic alkane hydroxylation reactions are useful for producing pharmaceutical and agricultural chemical intermediates from hydrocarbons. Several cytochrome P450 enzymes catalyze the regio- and stereo-specific hydroxylation of alkanes. We evaluated the substrate binding of a putative CYP alkane hydroxylase (CYP153D17) from the bacterium Sphingomonas sp. PAMC 26605. Substrate affinities to C10–C12 n-alkanes and C10–C14 fatty acids with Kd values varied from 0.42 to 0.59 μM. A longer alkane (C12) bound more strongly than a shorter alkane (C10), while shorter fatty acids (C10, capric acid; C12, lauric acid) bound more strongly than a longer fatty acid (C14, myristic acid). These data displayed a broad substrate specificity of CYP153D17, hence it was named as a putative CYP alkane hydroxylase. Moreover, the crystal structure of CYP153D17 was determined at 3.1 Å resolution. This is the first study to provide structural information for the CYP153D family. Structural analysis showed that a co-purified alkane-like compound bound near the active-site heme group. The alkane-like substrate is in the hydrophobic pocket containing Thr74, Met90, Ala175, Ile240, Leu241, Val244, Leu292, Met295, and Phe393. Comparison with other CYP structures suggested that conformational changes in the β1–β2, α3–α4, and α6–α7 connecting loop are important for incorporating the long hydrophobic alkane-like substrate. These results improve the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of CYP153D17 and provide valuable information for future protein engineering studies. PMID:27941697

  2. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2017-01-01

    synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor...... structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full...

  3. Crystal structures, DNA-binding and cytotoxic activities studies of Cu(II) complexes with 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde Schiff-bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeng-Chen; Wang, Bao-Dui; Li, Bo; Wang, Qin; Yang, Zheng-Yin; Li, Tian-Rong; Li, Yong

    2010-11-01

    Three novel 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde Schiff-bases and their Cu(II) complexes were synthesized. The molecular structures of Cu(II) complexes were determined by X-ray crystal diffraction. The DNA-binding modes of the complexes were also investigated by UV-vis absorption spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, viscosity measurement and EB-DNA displacement experiment. The experimental evidences indicated that the ligands and Cu(II) complexes could interact with CT-DNA (calf-thymus DNA) through intercalation, respectively. Comparative cytotoxic activities of ligands and Cu(II) complexes were also determined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] and SRB (sulforhodamine B) methods. The results showed that the three Cu(II) complexes exhibited more effective cytotoxic activity against HL60 cells and HeLa cells than corresponding ligands. Also, CuL(3) showed higher cytotoxic activity than CuL(1) and CuL(2).

  4. Crystal Structures of Covalent Complexes of [beta]-Lactam Antibiotics with Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5: Toward an Understanding of Antibiotic Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicola, George; Tomberg, Joshua; Pratt, R.F.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher (SC); (UNC); (Wesleyan)

    2010-12-07

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are the molecular targets for the widely used {beta}-lactam class of antibiotics, but how these compounds act at the molecular level is not fully understood. We have determined crystal structures of Escherichia coli PBP 5 as covalent complexes with imipenem, cloxacillin, and cefoxitin. These antibiotics exhibit very different second-order rates of acylation for the enzyme. In all three structures, there is excellent electron density for the central portion of the {beta}-lactam, but weak or absent density for the R1 or R2 side chains. Areas of contact between the antibiotics and PBP 5 do not correlate with the rates of acylation. The same is true for conformational changes, because although a shift of a loop leading to an electrostatic interaction between Arg248 and the {beta}-lactam carboxylate, which occurs completely with cefoxitin and partially with imipenem and is absent with cloxacillin, is consistent with the different rates of acylation, mutagenesis of Arg248 decreased the level of cefoxitin acylation only 2-fold. Together, these data suggest that structures of postcovalent complexes of PBP 5 are unlikely to be useful vehicles for the design of new covalent inhibitors of PBPs. Finally, superimposition of the imipenem-acylated complex with PBP 5 in complex with a boronic acid peptidomimetic shows that the position corresponding to the hydrolytic water molecule is occluded by the ring nitrogen of the {beta}-lactam. Because the ring nitrogen occupies a similar position in all three complexes, this supports the hypothesis that deacylation is blocked by the continued presence of the leaving group after opening of the {beta}-lactam ring.

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Liver [delta][superscript 4]-3-Ketosteroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, Luigi; Drury, Jason E.; Penning, Trevor M.; Christianson, David W. (UPENN); (UPENN-MED)

    2008-07-15

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90{sup o} bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP{sup +} at 1.79- and 1.35-{angstrom} resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP{sup +} and cortisone at 1.90-{angstrom} resolution, NADP{sup +} and progesterone at 2.03-{angstrom} resolution, and NADP{sup +} and testosterone at 1.62-{angstrom} resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP{sup +}. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr{sup 58} and Glu{sup 120}. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  6. Frustrated polymer crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, B.; Strasbourg, 67083

    1997-03-01

    Several crystal structures or polymorphs of chiral or achiral polymers and biopolymers with three fold conformation of the helix have been found to conform to a common and -with one exception(Puterman, M. et al, J. Pol. Sci., Pol. Phys. Ed., 15, 805 (1977))- hitherto unsuspected packing scheme. The trigonal unit-cell contains three isochiral helices; the azimuthal setting of one helix differs significantly from that of the other two, leading to a so-called frustrated packing scheme, in which the environment of conformationally identical helices differs. Two variants of the frustrated scheme are analyzed. Similarities with frustrated two dimensional magnetic systems are underlined. Various examples of frustration in polymer crystallography are illustrated via the elucidation or reinterpretation of crystal phases or polymorphs of polyolefins, polyesters, cellulose derivatives and polypeptides. Structural manifestations (including AFM evidence) and morphological consequences of frustration are presented, which help diagnose the existence of this original packing of polymers.(Work done with L. Cartier, D. Dorset, S. Kopp, T. Okihara, M. Schumacher, W. Stocker.)

  7. Crystal structure and size-dependent neutralization properties of HK20, a human monoclonal antibody binding to the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 of gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Sabin

    Full Text Available The human monoclonal antibody (mAb HK20 neutralizes a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates by targeting the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 (HR1 of gp41, which is transiently exposed during HIV-1 entry. Here we present the crystal structure of the HK20 Fab in complex with a gp41 mimetic 5-Helix at 2.3 Å resolution. HK20 employs its heavy chain CDR H2 and H3 loops to bind into a conserved hydrophobic HR1 pocket that is occupied by HR2 residues in the gp41 post fusion conformation. Compared to the previously described HR1-specific mAb D5, HK20 approaches its epitope with a different angle which might favor epitope access and thus contribute to its higher neutralization breadth and potency. Comparison of the neutralization activities of HK20 IgG, Fab and scFv employing both single cycle and multiple cycle neutralization assays revealed much higher potencies for the smaller Fab and scFv over IgG, implying that the target site is difficult to access for complete antibodies. Nevertheless, two thirds of sera from HIV-1 infected individuals contain significant titers of HK20-inhibiting antibodies. The breadth of neutralization of primary isolates across all clades, the higher potencies for C-clade viruses and the targeting of a distinct site as compared to the fusion inhibitor T-20 demonstrate the potential of HK20 scFv as a therapeutic tool.

  8. Aspirin induces its anti-inflammatory effects through its specific binding to phospholipase A2: crystal structure of the complex formed between phospholipase A2 and aspirin at 1.9 angstroms resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajendra Kumar; Ethayathulla, A S; Jabeen, Talat; Sharma, Sujata; Kaur, Punit; Singh, Tej P

    2005-02-01

    Phospholipase A2 is potentially an important target for structure-based rational drug design. In order to determine the involvement of phospholipase A2 in the action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the crystal structure of the complex formed between phospholipase A2 and aspirin has been determined at 1.9 angstroms resolution. The structure contains 915 protein atoms, 1 calcium ion, 13 atoms of aspirin and 105 water molecules. The observed electron density of the aspirin molecule in the structure was of very high quality thus allowing the precise determination of its atomic coordinates leading to the clear description of its interactions with the enzyme. The structure of the complex clearly shows that aspirin is literally embedded in the hydrophobic environment of PLA2. It is so placed in the substrate binding channel that it forms several important attractive interactions with calcium ion, His 48 and Asp 49. Thus, the structure of the complex clearly shows that aspirin occupies a favourable place in the specific binding site of PLA2. The binding studies have shown that acetyl salicylate (aspirin) binds to PLA2 enzyme specifically with a dissociation constant of 6.4 x 10(-6) M. The structural details and binding data suggest that the inhibition of PLA2 by aspirin is of pharmacological

  9. Conformational landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket: lessons for inhibitor design from a cluster analysis of many crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Kristina A; Haq, Omar; Felts, Anthony K; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-10-22

    Clustering of 99 available X-ray crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at the flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) provides information about features of the conformational landscape for binding non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), including effects of mutation and crystal forms. The ensemble of NNIBP conformations is separated into eight discrete clusters based primarily on the position of the functionally important primer grip, the displacement of which is believed to be one of the mechanisms of inhibition of RT. Two of these clusters are populated by structures in which the primer grip exhibits novel conformations that differ from the predominant cluster by over 4 A and are induced by the unique inhibitors capravirine and rilpivirine/TMC278. This work identifies a new conformation of the NNIBP that may be used to design NNRTIs. It can also be used to guide more complete exploration of the NNIBP free energy landscape using advanced sampling techniques.

  10. Characterization of the cofactor-binding site in the SPOUT-fold methyltransferases by computational docking of S-adenosylmethionine to three crystal structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debski Janusz

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several evolutionarily unrelated and structurally dissimilar superfamilies of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases (MTases. A new superfamily (SPOUT has been recently characterized on a sequence level and three structures of its members (1gz0, 1ipa, and 1k3r have been solved. However, none of these structures include the cofactor or the substrate. Due to the strong evolutionary divergence and the paucity of experimental information, no confident predictions of protein-ligand and protein-substrate interactions could be made, which hampered the study of sequence-structure-function relationships in the SPOUT superfamily. Results We used the computational docking program AutoDock to identify the AdoMet-binding site on the surface of three MTase structures. We analyzed the sequence divergence in two distinct lineages of the SPOUT superfamily in the context of surface features and preferred cofactor binding mode to propose specific function for the conserved residues. Conclusion Our docking analysis has confidently predicted the common AdoMet-binding site in three remotely related proteins structures. In the vicinity of the cofactor-binding site, subfamily-conserved grooves were identified on the protein surface, suggesting location of the target-binding/catalytic site. Functionally important residues were inferred and a general reaction mechanism, involving conformational change of a glycine-rich loop, was proposed.

  11. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  12. Crystal structure of ruthenocenecarbonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Strehler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The molecular structure of ruthenocenecarbonitrile, [Ru(η5-C5H4C[triple-bond]N(η5-C5H5], exhibits point group symmetry m, with the mirror plane bisecting the molecule through the C[triple-bond]N substituent. The RuII atom is slightly shifted from the η5-C5H4 centroid towards the C[triple-bond]N substituent. In the crystal, molecules are arranged in columns parallel to [100]. One-dimensional intermolecular π–π interactions [3.363 (3 Å] between the C[triple-bond]N carbon atom and one carbon of the cyclopentadienyl ring of the overlaying molecule are present.

  13. Crystal structure of propaquizafop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngeun Jeon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C22H22ClN3O5 {systematic name: 2-(propan-2-ylideneaminooxyethyl (R-2-[4-(6-chloroquinoxalin-2-yloxyphenoxy]propionate}, is a herbicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules in which the dihedral angles between the phenyl ring and the quinoxaline ring plane are 75.93 (7 and 82.77 (8°. The crystal structure features C—H...O, C—H...N, and C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, as well as weak π–π interactions [ring-centroid separation = 3.782 (2 and 3.5952 (19 Å], resulting in a three-dimensional architecture.

  14. Crystal structure of an affinity-matured prolactin complexed to its dimerized receptor reveals the topology of hormone binding site 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broutin, Isabelle; Jomain, Jean-Baptiste; Tallet, Estelle;

    2010-01-01

    We report the first crystal structure of a 1:2 hormone.receptor complex that involves prolactin (PRL) as the ligand, at 3.8-A resolution. Stable ternary complexes were obtained by generating affinity-matured PRL variants harboring an N-terminal tail from ovine placental lactogen, a closely relate...

  15. Diorganotin(IV) derivatives of ONO tridentate Schiff base : Synthesis, crystal structure, in vitro antimicrobial, anti-leishmanial and DNA binding studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shujha, Shaukat; Shah, Afzal; Zia-ur-Rehman, [No Value; Muhammad, Niaz; Ali, Saqib; Qureshi, Rumana; Khalid, Nasir; Meetsma, Auke

    2010-01-01

    Six new diorganotin(IV) derivatives of N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)formohydrazide (H2L) with general formula R2SnL, where R = Ph (1), Me (2), Bu (3), Oct (4), t-Bu (5), Et (6), and L = [OC6H4CHNNCHO] have been synthesized and characterized by different analytical techniques. Crystal structure of Me2SnL

  16. Modes of Heme-Binding and Substrate Access for Cytochrome P450 CYP74A Revealed by Crystal Structures of Allene Oxide Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytochrome P450s exist ubiquitously in all organisms and are involved in many biological processes. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a P450 enzyme that plays a key role in the biosynthesis of oxylipin jasmonates which are involved in signal and defense reactions in higher plants. The crystal structure...

  17. Two crystal structures of the FK506-binding domain of Plasmodium falciparum FKBP35 in complex with rapamycin at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Alessandra; Allemand, Frederic; Bell, Angus; Chubb, Anthony J; Guichou, Jean François

    2015-06-01

    Antimalarial chemotherapy continues to be challenging in view of the emergence of drug resistance, especially artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia. It is critical that novel antimalarial drugs are identified that inhibit new targets with unexplored mechanisms of action. It has been demonstrated that the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin, which is currently in clinical use to prevent organ-transplant rejection, has antimalarial effects. The Plasmodium falciparum target protein is PfFKBP35, a unique immunophilin FK506-binding protein (FKBP). This protein family binds rapamycin, FK506 and other immunosuppressive and non-immunosuppressive macrolactones. Here, two crystallographic structures of rapamycin in complex with the FK506-binding domain of PfFKBP35 at high resolution, in both its oxidized and reduced forms, are reported. In comparison with the human FKBP12-rapamycin complex reported previously, the structures reveal differences in the β4-β6 segment that lines the rapamycin binding site. Structural differences between the Plasmodium protein and human hFKBP12 include the replacement of Cys106 and Ser109 by His87 and Ile90, respectively. The proximity of Cys106 to the bound rapamycin molecule (4-5 Å) suggests possible routes for the rational design of analogues of rapamycin with specific antiparasitic activity. Comparison of the structures with the PfFKBD-FK506 complex shows that both drugs interact with the same binding-site residues. These two new structures highlight the structural differences and the specific interactions that must be kept in consideration for the rational design of rapamycin analogues with antimalarial activity that specifically bind to PfFKBP35 without immunosuppressive effects.

  18. Binding modes of aromatic ligands to mammalian heme peroxidases with associated functional implications: crystal structures of lactoperoxidase complexes with acetylsalicylic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, and benzylhydroxamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2009-07-24

    The binding and structural studies of bovine lactoperoxidase with three aromatic ligands, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylhydoxamic acid (SHA), and benzylhydroxamic acid (BHA) show that all the three compounds bind to lactoperoxidase at the substrate binding site on the distal heme side. The binding of ASA occurs without perturbing the position of conserved heme water molecule W-1, whereas both SHA and BHA displace it by the hydroxyl group of their hydroxamic acid moieties. The acetyl group carbonyl oxygen atom of ASA forms a hydrogen bond with W-1, which in turn makes three other hydrogen-bonds, one each with heme iron, His-109 N(epsilon2), and Gln-105 N(epsilon2). In contrast, in the complexes of SHA and BHA, the OH group of hydroxamic acid moiety in both complexes interacts with heme iron directly with Fe-OH distances of 3.0 and 3.2A respectively. The OH is also hydrogen bonded to His-109 N(epsilon2) and Gln-105N(epsilon2). The plane of benzene ring of ASA is inclined at 70.7 degrees from the plane of heme moiety, whereas the aromatic planes of SHA and BHA are nearly parallel to the heme plane with inclinations of 15.7 and 6.2 degrees , respectively. The mode of ASA binding provides the information about the mechanism of action of aromatic substrates, whereas the binding characteristics of SHA and BHA indicate the mode of inhibitor binding.

  19. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  20. Crystal structure of fipronil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjin Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C12H4Cl2F6N4OS {systematic name: 5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethylphenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethanesulfinyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile}, is a member of the phenylpyrazole group of acaricides, and one of the phenylpyrazole group of insecticides. The dihedral angle between the planes of the pyrazole and benzene rings is 89.03 (9°. The fluorine atoms of the trifluoromethyl substituent on the benzene ring are disordered over two sets of sites, with occupancy ratios 0.620 (15:0.380 (15. In the crystal, C—N...π interactions [N...ring centroid = 3.607 (4 Å] together with N—H...N and C—H...F hydrogen bonds form a looped chain structure along [10\\overline{1}]. Finally, N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—Cl...π interactions [Cl...ring centroid = 3.5159 (16 Å] generate a three-dimensional structure. Additionally, there are a short intermolecular F... F contacts present.

  1. New cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyl carbazate Schiff bases: Syntheses, crystal structures, in vitro DNA and HSA binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithya, Palanivelu; Helena, Sannasi; Simpson, Jim; Ilanchelian, Malaichamy; Muthusankar, Aathi; Govindarajan, Subbiah

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, new Schiff base complexes with the composition [M(NCS)2(L1)2]·nH2O, where M=Co (n=0) (1) and Ni (n=2) (2); [M(NCS)2(L2)2], M=Co (3) and Ni (4) as well as [M(NCS)2(L3)2], M=Co (5) and Ni (6); (L1=benzyl 2-(propan-2-ylidene)hydrazinecarboxylate, L2=benzyl 2-(butan-2-ylidene)hydrazinecarboxylate and L3=benzyl 2-(pentan-3-ylidene)hydrazinecarboxylate) have been synthesized by a template method. The complexes were characterised by analytical methods, spectroscopic studies, thermal and X-ray diffraction techniques. The structures of all the complexes explore that the metal(II) cation has a trans-planar coordination environment, the monomeric units containing a six-coordinated metal center in octahedral geometry with N-bound isothiocyanate anions coordinated as terminal ligands. Furthermore, the binding of the two Schiff base ligands to the metal centers involves the azomethine nitrogen and the carbonyl oxygen in mutually trans configuration. The binding interactions of all the complexes with Calf thymus-deoxyribonucleic acid (CT-DNA) and human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated using absorption and emission spectral techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of these complexes reveal that they bind to CT-DNA through a partial intercalation mode and the binding constant values were calculated using the absorption and emission spectral data. The binding constant values (~10×10(6)moldm(-3)) indicate strong binding of metal complexes with CT-DNA. HSA binding interaction studies showed that the cobalt and nickel complexes can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA through static quenching process. Also, molecular docking studies were supported out to apprehend the binding interactions of these complexes with DNA and HSA which offer new understandings into the experimental model observations.

  2. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, T

    2001-01-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of parac...

  3. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF DIPHENYLTELLURIUM DIBROMIDE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TELLURIUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , BROMIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), X RAY DIFFRACTION, FOURIER ANALYSIS, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS.

  4. REFINEMENT OF THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF GUANIDINIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE HEXAHYDRATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS, * CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*GUANIDINES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), SULFATES, HYDRATES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS

  5. Demonstration of Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment where equal parts of copper and aluminum are heated then cooled to show extremely large crystals. Suggestions are given for changing the orientation of crystals by varying cooling rates. Students are more receptive to concepts of microstructure after seeing this experiment. (DH)

  6. Crystal structure of oxamyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjin Kwon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C7H13N3O3S [systematic name: (Z-methyl 2-dimethylamino-N-(methylcarbamoyloxy-2-oxoethanimidothioate], is an oxime carbamate acaride, insecticide and nematicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules, A and B. The dihedral angles between the mean planes [r.m.s. deviations = 0.0017 (A and 0.0016 Å (B] of the acetamide and oxyimino groups are 88.80 (8° for A and 87.05 (8° for B. In the crystal, N/C—H...O hydrogen bonds link adjacent molecules, forming chains along the a axis. The chains are further linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional network with alternating rows of A and B molecules in the bc plane stacked along the a-axis direction. The structure was refined as an inversion twin with a final BASF parameter of 0.16 (9.

  7. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors assemble from five subunits (GluK1-5) into tetrameric ion channels. Kainate receptors are located at both pre- and postsynaptic membranes in the central nervous system where they contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges in front of us. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'.

  8. 2.0A resolution crystal structures of the ternary complexes of human phenylalanine hydroxylase catalytic domain with tetrahydrobiopterin and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine or L-norleucine: substrate specificity and molecular motions related to substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ole Andreas; Stokka, Anne J; Flatmark, Torgeir; Hough, Edward

    2003-10-31

    The crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPheOH) in complex with the physiological cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the substrate analogues 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine (THA) or L-norleucine (NLE) have been determined at 2.0A resolution. The ternary THA complex confirms a previous 2.5A structure, and the ternary NLE complex shows that similar large conformational changes occur on binding of NLE as those observed for THA. Both structures demonstrate that substrate binding triggers structural changes throughout the entire protomer, including the displacement of Tyr138 from a surface position to a buried position at the active site, with a maximum displacement of 20.7A for its hydroxyl group. Two hinge-bending regions, centred at Leu197 and Asn223, act in consort upon substrate binding to create further large structural changes for parts of the C terminus. Thus, THA/L-Phe binding to the active site is likely to represent the epicentre of the global conformational changes observed in the full-length tetrameric enzyme. The carboxyl and amino groups of THA and NLE are positioned identically in the two structures, supporting the conclusion that these groups are of key importance in substrate binding, thus explaining the broad non-physiological substrate specificity observed for artificially activated forms of the enzyme. However, the specific activity with NLE as the substrate was only about 5% of that with THA, which is explained by the different affinities of binding and different catalytic turnover.

  9. Characterization, Crystal Structure and Initial DNA Binding Interaction of Two Cu(Ⅱ) Complexes with 4,5-Diazafluoren-9-one

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG, Yan-Hong; ZHANG, Rong-Lan; SUN, Qing-Jin; XU, Zhan-Wei; GAO, Quan-Chang; LIU, Hua-Qiang; ZHAO, Jian-She

    2007-01-01

    Two new complexes [Cu(dafo)2(en)](ClO4)2·2H2O (en=NH2CH2CH2NH2) 1 and [Cu(dafo)2(dap)](ClO4)2·2H2O [dap=NH2CH2CH(CH3)NH2] 2 (dafo=4,5-diazafluoren-9-one) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV spectra. Meanwhile, the complex 1 has been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The initial DNA binding interactions of the complexes 1 and 2 have been investigated by UV spectra, emission spectra and cyclic voltammogram. Concluding the results of three methods used to measure the interaction of complexes 1 and 2 with DNA, the action mode of the two complexes with DNA is intercalation, and character of ligands and steric effect may affect the interaction of the complexes with DNA.

  10. Structure and localisation of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G

    2009-10-01

    The dopamine (DAT), serotontin (SERT) and noradrenalin (NET) transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. The crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT(Aa) was used as a template for molecular modeling of DAT, SERT and NET, and two putative drug binding sites (pocket 1 and 2) in each transporter were identified. Cocaine was docked into binding pocket 1 of DAT, corresponding to the leucine binding site in LeuT(Aa), which involved transmembrane helices (TMHs) 1, 3, 6 and 8. Clomipramine was docked into binding pocket 2 of DAT, involving TMHs 1, 3, 6, 10 and 11, and extracellular loops 4 and 6, corresponding to the clomipramine binding site in a crystal structure of a LeuT(Aa)-clomipramine complex. The structures of the proposed cocaine- and tricyclic antidepressant-binding sites may be of particular interest for the design of novel DAT interacting ligands.

  11. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic, crystal structure and DNA binding of Ru(II) complexes with 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid [1-(4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-3-yl)-ethylidene]-hydrazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrapriya, Nataraj; Sathiya Kamatchi, Thangavel; Zeller, Matthias; Lee, Hyosun; Natarajan, Karuppannan

    2011-10-01

    Reactions of 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid [1-(4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-3-yl)-ethylidene]-hydrazide (H 2L) with [RuHCl(CO)(EPh 3) 3] (E = P or As) were carried out and the new complexes obtained were characterized by elemental analysis, electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex ( 1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/ c with unit cell dimensions a = 18.6236(17) Å, b = 12.8627(12) Å, c = 21.683(2) Å, α = 90.00, β = 114.626(2), γ = 90.00 V = 4721.8(8) Å, Z = 4. The crystal structure of the complex shows Ru(II) atom is six-coordinated, forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry with two P atoms in axial positions, and three chelating donor atoms of the tridentate Schiff base ligand and one carbonyl group located in the equatorial plane. The molecular structure is stabilized by intramolecular O—H···N interactions. No intermolecular hydrogen bond was observed. The intramolecular hydrogen bond exists between the oxygen atom from salicylic acid moiety and nitrogen from the same moiety. A variety of solution studies were carried out for the determination of DNA binding mode of the complexes. The results suggest that both complexes bind to Herring sperm DNA via non intercalative mode.

  13. Synthesis, crystal structures, in vitro DNA binding, antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of new di- and polynuclear silver(I) saccharinate complexes with tertiary monophosphanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Veysel T; Gocmen, Elif; Icsel, Ceyda; Cengiz, Murat; Susluer, Sunde Y; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2014-02-05

    Four new silver(I) saccharinate (sac) complexes, [Ag(μ-sac)(PPh3)]2 (1), [Ag(μ-sac)(PPh2Cy)]2 (2), [Ag(μ-sac)(PPhCy2)]2 (3) and [Ag(μ-sac)(PCy3)]n (4), where PPh3=triphenylphosphane, PPh2Cy=cyclohexyldiphenylphosphane, PPhCy2=dicyclohexylphenylphosphane and PCy3=tricyclohexylphosphane, have been synthesized and fully characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, ESI-MS and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Fluorescence ethidium bromide displacement indicate that all complexes bind to fish sperm (FS) DNA by intercalation with binding constants (KA) of 29.1±0.26×10(5)M(-1) for 1, 2.54±0.12×10(5)M(-1) for 2, 2.42±0.08×10(5)M(-1) for 3, 0.19±0.03×10(5)M(-1) for 4. The relative viscosities of the FS-DNA solutions increase with increasing of the complex concentration, providing strong evidence for the intercalation mode. The gel electrophoresis assay further confirms their binding with the pBR322 plasmid DNA. The MIC values of the silver(I) complexes are generally higher than those of AgNO3 and silver sulfadiazine, but 1 presents a promising activity against Salmonellatyphimurium and Staphylococcusaureus. All complexes are highly cytotoxic on human lung carcinoma (A549) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 0.82 to 3.13μM.

  14. Crystal structure of shrimp arginine kinase in binary complex with arginine-a molecular view of the phosphagen precursor binding to the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Zavala, Alonso A; García-Orozco, Karina D; Carrasco-Miranda, Jesús S; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Velázquez-Contreras, Enrique F; Criscitiello, Michael F; Brieba, Luis G; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2013-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a key enzyme for energetic balance in invertebrates. Although AK is a well-studied system that provides fast energy to invertebrates using the phosphagen phospho-arginine, the structural details on the AK-arginine binary complex interaction remain unclear. Herein, we determined two crystal structures of the Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) arginine kinase, one in binary complex with arginine (LvAK-Arg) and a ternary transition state analog complex (TSAC). We found that the arginine guanidinium group makes ionic contacts with Glu225, Cys271 and a network of ordered water molecules. On the zwitterionic side of the amino acid, the backbone amide nitrogens of Gly64 and Val65 coordinate the arginine carboxylate. Glu314, one of proposed acid-base catalytic residues, did not interact with arginine in the binary complex. This residue is located in the flexible loop 310-320 that covers the active site and only stabilizes in the LvAK-TSAC. This is the first binary complex crystal structure of a guanidine kinase in complex with the guanidine substrate and could give insights into the nature of the early steps of phosphagen biosynthesis.

  15. A C-terminal segment of the V{sub 1}R vasopressin receptor is unstructured in the crystal structure of its chimera with the maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adikesavan, Nallini Vijayarangan; Mahmood, Syed Saad; Stanley, Nithianantham; Xu, Zhen; Wu, Nan [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Thibonnier, Marc [Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Shoham, Menachem, E-mail: mxs10@case.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The 1.8 Å crystal structure of an MBP-fusion protein with the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment of the V1 vasopressin receptor reveals that the receptor segment is unstructured. The V{sub 1} vascular vasopressin receptor (V{sub 1}R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of body-fluid osmolality, blood volume and blood pressure. Signal transduction is mediated by the third intracellular loop of this seven-transmembrane protein as well as by the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment. A chimera of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) and the C-terminal segment of V{sub 1}R has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.10, b = 66.56, c = 115.72 Å, β = 95.99°. The 1.8 Å crystal structure reveals the conformation of MBP and part of the linker region of this chimera, with the C-terminal segment being unstructured. This may reflect a conformational plasticity in the C-terminal segment that may be necessary for proper function of V{sub 1}R.

  16. Syntheses, crystal structures and DNA-binding studies of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes bearing asymmetrical aroylhydrazone ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueqin; Yang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Minya; He, Jing; Wang, Xuehong; Wu, Yanlong; Wang, Zhuye

    2017-02-01

    Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes with benzophenone benzoyl hydrazone (HBBH) and benzophenone salicylylhydrazone (HBSH) have been synthesized and characterized by different physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques (UV-vis, IR and NMR). The molecular structures of these complexes [Zn(BBH)2, Cu(BBH)2 and Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O] have also been determined by single X-ray diffraction technique. In Zn(BBH)2 and Cu(BBH)2 complexes, each ligand coordinates to metal through enol tautomeric form by azomethine-N and carbonylate-O resulting a 4-coordinate distorted tetrahedral geometry. While in Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O, each ligand coordinates to metal through keto tautomeric form resulting distorted octahedral geometry in which two chlorine atoms occupy the axial positions. The DNA interaction propensity of the complexes with Herring sperm DNA, studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, viscometric techniques and cyclic voltammetry, revealed intercalation as the possible binding mode. Fascinatingly, Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O was found to exhibit greater binding strength than the others. A strong hyperchromism effect and a slight red shift were exhibited by all complexes. The intrinsic binding constants are of moderate values and are about 3.28 × 104 M-1, 4.73 × 104 M-1 and 5.80 × 104 M-1, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry studies of the complexes binding with DNA indicate quasireversible oxidation and reduction potentials. The results suggest that the binding affinity of complexes lies in the order Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O > Cu(BBH)2 > Zn(BBH)2.

  17. Cholesterol crystal binding of biliary immuno globulin A: visualization by fluorescence light microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank Lammert; Stefan Sudfetd; Norbert Busch; Siegfried Matern

    2001-01-01

    AIM To assess potential contributions of biliary IgA for crystal agglomeration into gallstones, we visualized cholesterol crystal binding of biliary IgA.METHODS Crystal-binding biliary proteins were extracted from human gallbladder bile using lectin affinity chromatography. Biliary IgA was isolated from the bound protein fraction by immunoaffinity chromatography. Pure cholesterol monohydrate crystals were incubated with biliary IgA and fluoresceine isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-lgA at 37C. Samples were examined under polarizing and fluorescence light microscopy with digital image processing.RESULTS Binding of biliary IgA to cholesterol monohydrate crystals could be visualized with FITC-conjugated anti-lgA antibodies. Peak fluorescence occurred at crystal edges and dislocations. Controls without biliary IgA or with biliary IgG showed no significant fluorescence.CONCLUSION Fluorescence light microscopy provided evidence for cholesterol crystal binding of biliary IgA. Cholesterol crystalbinding proteins like IgA might be important mediators of crystal agglomeration and growth of cholesterol gallstones by modifying the evolving crystal structures in vivo.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, DFT calculation, DNA binding, and antimicrobial assays of two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Mohamadi, Maryam; Suarez, Sebastian; Baggio, Ricardo; Khaleghi, Moj; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Mostafavi, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(phen)] (1), [Cu(L)(bipy)] (2), where L2- = (3-methoxy-2oxidobenzylidene)benzohydrazidato, phen = 1,10 phenanthroline, and bipy = 2,2‧ bipyridine, were prepared and fully characterized using elemental analyses, FT-IR, molar conductivity, and electronic spectra. The structures of both complexes were also determined by X-ray diffraction. It was found that, both complexes possessed square pyramidal coordination environment in which, Cu(II) ions were coordinated by donor atoms of HL and two nitrogens of heterocyclic bases. Computational studies were performed using DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. DNA binding activities of these complexes were also investigated using electronic absorption, competitive fluorescence titration and cyclic voltammetry studies. The obtained results indicated that binding of the complexes to DNA was of intercalative mode. Furthermore, antimicrobial activities of these compounds were screened against microorganisms.

  19. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Theresa

    2001-07-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of paracetamol (acetaminophen), the influence of the variations of the molecular model on the crystal structure lattice energy minima, has also been studied. The general problem of prediction methods based on the assumption that the experimental thermodynamically stable polymorph corresponds to the global lattice energy minimum, is that more hypothetical low lattice energy structures are found within a few kJ mol{sup -1} of the global minimum than are likely to be experimentally observed polymorphs. This is illustrated by the results for molecule I, 3-oxabicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-1,4-diene, studied for the first international blindtest for small organic crystal structures organised by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) in May 1999. To reduce the number of predicted polymorphs, additional factors to thermodynamic criteria have to be considered. Therefore the elastic constants and vapour growth morphologies have been calculated for the lowest lattice energy

  20. Crystal structure of cafenstrole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gihaeng Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: N,N-diethyl-3-mesitylsulfonyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-carboxamide, C16H22N4O3S, is a triazole herbicide. The dihedral angle between the planes of the triazole and benzene ring planes is 88.14 (10°. In the crystal, C—H...O hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...π interactions link adjacent molecules, forming one-dimensional chains along the a axis.

  1. Crystal structure of pseudoguainolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Beghidja

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lactone ring in the title molecule, C15H22O3 (systematic name: 3,4a,8-trimethyldodecahydroazuleno[6,5-b]furan-2,5-dione, assumes an envelope conformation with the methine C atom adjacent to the the methine C atom carrying the methyl substituent being the flap atom. The other five-membered ring adopts a twisted conformation with the twist being about the methine–methylene C—C bond. The seven-membered ring is based on a twisted boat conformation. No specific interactions are noted in the the crystal packing.

  2. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (NWU)

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  3. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  4. Structural basis for PECAM-1 homophilic binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddock, C.; Zhou, D.; Lertkiatmongkol, P.; Newman, P. J.; Zhu, J.

    2015-12-23

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily (IgSF) that is present on the surface of circulating platelets and leukocytes, and highly expressed at the junctions of confluent endothelial cell monolayers. PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions, known to be mediated by its 2 amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains, are essential for concentrating PECAM-1 at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions to facilitate diapedesis, maintain vascular integrity, and transmit survival signals into the cell. Given the importance of PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions in mediating each of these cell physiological events, and to reveal the nature and orientation of the PECAM-1–PECAM-1 homophilic-binding interface, we undertook studies aimed at determining the crystal structure of the PECAM-1 homophilic-binding domain, which is composed of amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains 1 and 2 (IgD1 and IgD2). The crystal structure revealed that both IgD1 and IgD2 exhibit a classical IgSF fold, having a β-sandwich topology formed by 2 sheets of antiparallel β strands stabilized by the hallmark disulfide bond between the B and F strands. Interestingly, despite previous assignment to the C2 class of immunoglobulin-like domains, the structure of IgD1 reveals that it actually belongs to the I2 set of IgSF folds. Both IgD1 and IgD2 participate importantly in the formation of the trans homophilic-binding interface, with a total buried interface area of >2300 Å2. These and other unique structural features of PECAM-1 allow for the development of an atomic-level model of the interactions that PECAM-1 forms during assembly of endothelial cell intercellular junctions.

  5. Crystal structure of nuarimol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gihaeng Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: (RS-(2-chlorophenyl(4-fluorophenyl(pyrimidin-5-ylmethanol], C17H12ClFN2O, is a pyrimidine fungicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules, A and B, in which the dihedral angles between the plane of the pyrimidine ring and those of the chlorophenyl and fluorophenyl rings are 71.10 (6 and 70.04 (5° in molecule A, and 73.24 (5 and 89.30 (5° in molecule B. In the crystal, O—H...N hydrogen bonds link the components into [010] chains of alternating A and B molecules. The chains are cross-linked by C—H...F hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...π and C—Cl...π [Cl...ring centroid = 3.7630 (8 Å] interactions, generating a three-dimensional network.

  6. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Ethan B.; Xiong, Yong; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6Å crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for ho...

  7. The 1.7 A X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain and binding analysis to anti-human C2 domain antibodies and phospholipid surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caileen M Brison

    Full Text Available The factor VIII C2 domain is essential for binding to activated platelet surfaces as well as the cofactor activity of factor VIII in blood coagulation. Inhibitory antibodies against the C2 domain commonly develop following factor VIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A patients, or they may spontaneously arise in cases of acquired hemophilia. Porcine factor VIII is an effective therapeutic for hemophilia patients with inhibitor due to its low cross-reactivity; however, the molecular basis for this behavior is poorly understood. In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain was determined, and superposition of the human and porcine C2 domains demonstrates that most surface-exposed differences cluster on the face harboring the "non-classical" antibody epitopes. Furthermore, antibody-binding results illustrate that the "classical" 3E6 antibody can bind both the human and porcine C2 domains, although the inhibitory titer to human factor VIII is 41 Bethesda Units (BU/mg IgG versus 0.8 BU/mg IgG to porcine factor VIII, while the non-classical G99 antibody does not bind to the porcine C2 domain nor inhibit porcine factor VIII activity. Further structural analysis of differences between the electrostatic surface potentials suggest that the C2 domain binds to the negatively charged phospholipid surfaces of activated platelets primarily through the 3E6 epitope region. In contrast, the G99 face, which contains residue 2227, should be distal to the membrane surface. Phospholipid binding assays indicate that both porcine and human factor VIII C2 domains bind with comparable affinities, and the human K2227A and K2227E mutants bind to phospholipid surfaces with similar affinities as well. Lastly, the G99 IgG bound to PS-immobilized factor VIII C2 domain with an apparent dissociation constant of 15.5 nM, whereas 3E6 antibody binding to PS-bound C2 domain was not observed.

  8. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrick, George M

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as `a CIF') containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  9. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstraße 4, Göttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  10. Crystal structure of pymetrozine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngeun Jeon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C10H11N5O {systematic name: 6-methyl-4-[(E-(pyridin-3-ylmethylideneamino]-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-3(2H-one}, C10H11N5O, is used as an antifeedant in pest control. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent molecules, A and B, in which the dihedral angles between the pyridinyl and triazinyl ring planes [r.m.s. deviations = 0.0132 and 0.0255 ] are 11.60 (6 and 18.06 (4°, respectively. In the crystal, N—H...O, N—H...N, C—H...N and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, together with weak π–π interactions [ring-centroid separations = 3.5456 (9 and 3.9142 (9 Å], link the pyridinyl and triazinyl rings of A molecules, generating a three-dimensional network.

  11. Crystal structure and DNA binding studies of a cobalt(II) complex containing mixed-ligands of 1, 10-phenathroline and glycollic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Bin Lin; Qing Xiang Wang; Cong Min Zhang; Wen Qi Li

    2011-01-01

    A cobalt(II) complex containing mixed-ligands of 1, 10-phenathrolinc (phen) and glycollic acid (GA). [Co(GA)2(phen)] was synthesized and its structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction. The interaction of the complex with DNA was investigated by electronic absorption spectra and electrochemical methods. Electronic absorption spectrum experiments showed that after interaction with DNA, the characteristic absorption peaks of [Co(GA)2(phen)] underwent hypochromic effect as well as red-shift. Also, the binding strength of 3.8 × l04 L/mol was estimated by titration method. Electrochemical assays revealed that the redox peak currents of the complex decreased obviously accompanied by a positive shift of the formal potential after association with DNA. All these results revealed that the synthesized cobalt complex bound with DNA via an intercalation mode. ? 2011 Wen Qi Li. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystal Structure of Dengue Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and its Implication for Receptor Binding, Membrane Fusion and Antibody Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, V.; Dessau, M; Kucera, K; Anthony, K; Ledizet, M; Modis, Y

    2009-01-01

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the pH sensor that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  13. The Crystal Structure of Human Argonaute2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirle, Nicole T.; MacRae, Ian J. (Scripps)

    2012-07-18

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans.

  14. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt); (MCW)

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  15. Crystal structure of yeast Sco1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abajian, Carnie; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (NWU)

    2010-03-05

    The Sco family of proteins are involved in the assembly of the dinuclear CuA site in cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme in aerobic respiration. These proteins, which are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, are characterized by a conserved CXXXC sequence motif that binds copper ions and that has also been proposed to perform a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase function. The crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae apo Sco1 (apo-ySco1) and Sco1 in the presence of copper ions (Cu-ySco1) were determined to 1.8- and 2.3-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. Yeast Sco1 exhibits a thioredoxin-like fold, similar to that observed for human Sco1 and a homolog from Bacillus subtilis. The Cu-ySco1 structure, obtained by soaking apo-ySco1 crystals in copper ions, reveals an unexpected copper-binding site involving Cys181 and Cys216, cysteine residues present in ySco1 but not in other homologs. The conserved CXXXC cysteines, Cys148 and Cys152, can undergo redox chemistry in the crystal. An essential histidine residue, His239, is located on a highly flexible loop, denoted the Sco loop, and can adopt positions proximal to both pairs of cysteines. Interactions between ySco1 and its partner proteins yeast Cox17 and yeast COX2 are likely to occur via complementary electrostatic surfaces. This high-resolution model of a eukaryotic Sco protein provides new insight into Sco copper binding and function.

  16. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  17. Structural dynamics of the cereblon ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus D Hartmann

    Full Text Available Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution.

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Christian, E-mail: clin180@ec.auckland.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Proft, Thomas [School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Baker, Edward N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  19. Structural colours through photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPhedran, R.C.; Nicorovici, N.A.; McKenzie, D.R.; Rouse, G.W.; Botten, L.C.; Welch, V.; Parker, A.R.; Wohlgennant, M.; Vardeny, V

    2003-10-01

    We discuss two examples of living creatures using photonic crystals to achieve iridescent colouration. The first is the sea mouse (Aphroditidae, Polychaeta), which has a hexagonal close packed structure of holes in its spines and lower-body felt, while the second is the jelly fish Bolinopsis infundibulum, which has an oblique array of high index inclusions in its antennae. We show by measurements and optical calculations that both creatures can achieve strong colours despite having access only to weak refractive index contrast.

  20. Production in Pichia pastoris, antifungal activity and crystal structure of a class I chitinase from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata): Insights into sugar binding mode and hydrolytic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landim, Patrícia G Castro; Correia, Tuana O; Silva, Fredy D A; Nepomuceno, Denise R; Costa, Helen P S; Pereira, Humberto M; Lobo, Marina D P; Moreno, Frederico B M B; Brandão-Neto, José; Medeiros, Suelen C; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José T A; Sousa, Bruno L; Barroso-Neto, Ito L; Freire, Valder N; Carvalho, Cristina P S; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Grangeiro, Thalles B

    2017-04-01

    A cowpea class I chitinase (VuChiI) was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris. The recombinant protein was secreted into the culture medium and purified by affinity chromatography on a chitin matrix. The purified chitinase migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as two closely-related bands with apparent molecular masses of 34 and 37 kDa. The identity of these bands as VuChiI was demonstrated by mass spectrometry analysis of tryptic peptides and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The recombinant chitinase was able to hydrolyze colloidal chitin but did not exhibit enzymatic activity toward synthetic substrates. The highest hydrolytic activity of the cowpea chitinase toward colloidal chitin was observed at pH 5.0. Furthermore, most VuChiI activity (approximately 92%) was retained after heating to 50 °C for 30 min, whereas treatment with 5 mM Cu(2+) caused a reduction of 67% in the enzyme's chitinolytic activity. The recombinant protein had antifungal activity as revealed by its ability to inhibit the spore germination and mycelial growth of Penicillium herquei. The three-dimensional structure of VuChiI was resolved at a resolution of 1.55 Å by molecular replacement. The refined model had 245 amino acid residues and 381 water molecules, and the final R-factor and Rfree values were 14.78 and 17.22%, respectively. The catalytic domain of VuChiI adopts an α-helix-rich fold, stabilized by 3 disulfide bridges and possessing a wide catalytic cleft. Analysis of the crystallographic model and molecular docking calculations using chito-oligosaccharides provided evidences about the VuChiI residues involved in sugar binding and catalysis, and a possible mechanism of antifungal action is suggested.

  1. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  2. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ANTIMONY (III) SULFOBROMIDE, SBSBR,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANTIMONY COMPOUNDS, *SULFUR COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , BROMIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), FOURIER ANALYSIS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION.

  3. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    OpenAIRE

    Okuyan, Erhan

    2005-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. This work provides a tool that will extract crystal parameters such as primitive vect...

  4. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  6. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  7. Analysis of the Crystal Structure of the ExsC.ExsE Complex Reveals Distinctive Binding Interactions of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion Chaperone ExsC with ExsE and ExsD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelaar, N.J.; Robinson, H.; Jing, X.; Schubot, F. D.

    2010-07-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, like many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, requires its type III secretion system (T3SS) to facilitate acute infections. In P. aeruginosa, the expression of all T3SS-related genes is regulated by the transcriptional activator ExsA. A signaling cascade involving ExsA and three additional proteins, ExsC, ExsD, and ExsE, directly ties the upregulation of ExsA-mediated transcription to the activation of the type III secretion apparatus. In order to characterize the events underlying the signaling process, the crystal structure of the T3SS chaperone ExsC in complex with its cognate effector ExsE has been determined. The structure reveals critical contacts that mediate the interactions between these two proteins. Particularly striking is the presence of two Arg-X-Val-X-Arg motifs in ExsE that form identical interactions along opposite sides of an ExsC dimer. The structure also provides insights into the interactions of ExsC with the antiactivator protein ExsD. It was shown that the amino-terminal 46 residues of ExsD are sufficient for ExsC binding. On the basis of these findings, a new model for the ExsC {center_dot} ExsD complex is proposed to explain its distinctive 2:2 stoichiometry and why ExsC displays a weaker affinity for ExsD than for ExsE.

  8. Crystal structure and pharmacological characterization of a novel N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist at the GluN1 glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Steffensen, Thomas Bielefeldt; Greenwood, Jeremy R;

    2013-01-01

    glycine site antagonist, 1-thioxo-1,2-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-4(5H)-one (TK40). Here, we show by Schild analysis that TK40 is a potent competitive antagonist with Kb values of 21-63 nm at the GluN1 glycine-binding site of the four recombinant GluN1/N2A-D receptors. In addition, TK40...

  9. Crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum pyruvate kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Cook

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase plays a critical role in cellular metabolism of glucose by serving as a major regulator of glycolysis. This tetrameric enzyme is allosterically regulated by different effector molecules, mainly phosphosugars. In response to binding of effector molecules and substrates, significant structural changes have been identified in various pyruvate kinase structures. Pyruvate kinase of Cryptosporidium parvum is exceptional among known enzymes of protozoan origin in that it exhibits no allosteric property in the presence of commonly known effector molecules. The crystal structure of pyruvate kinase from C. parvum has been solved by molecular replacement techniques and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. In the active site a glycerol molecule is located near the γ-phosphate site of ATP, and the protein structure displays a partially closed active site. However, unlike other structures where the active site is closed, the α6' helix in C. parvum pyruvate kinase unwinds and assumes an extended conformation. In the crystal structure a sulfate ion is found at a site that is occupied by a phosphate of the effector molecule in many pyruvate kinase structures. A new feature of the C. parvum pyruvate kinase structure is the presence of a disulfide bond cross-linking the two monomers in the asymmetric unit. The disulfide bond is formed between cysteine residue 26 in the short N-helix of one monomer with cysteine residue 312 in a long helix (residues 303-320 of the second monomer at the interface of these monomers. Both cysteine residues are unique to C. parvum, and the disulfide bond remained intact in a reduced environment. However, the significance of this bond, if any, remains unknown at this time.

  10. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  11. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  12. Fractal aspects of calcium binding protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvoran, Adriana [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Pitulice, Laura [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Craescu, Constantin T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, Adrian [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2008-03-15

    The structures of EF-hand calcium binding proteins may be classified into two distinct groups: extended and compact structures. In this paper we studied 20 different structures of calcium binding proteins using the fractal analysis. Nine structures show extended shapes, one is semi-compact and the other 10 have compact shapes. Our study reveals different fractal characteristics for protein backbones belonging to different structural classes and these observations may be correlated to the physicochemical forces governing the protein folding.

  13. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction-diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  14. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  15. Crystal structure of fiber structured pentacene thin films

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents a technique based on the grazing incidence crystal truncation rod (GI-CTR) X-ray diffraction method used to solve the crystal structure of substrate induced fiber structured organic thin films. The crystal structures of pentacene thin films grown on technologically relevant gate dielectric substrates are reported. It is widely recognized, that the intrinsic charge transport properties in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) depend strongly on the crystal structur...

  16. Crystal growth and structural analysis of zirconium sulphoselenide single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Patel; R D Vaidya; M S Dave; S G Patel

    2008-08-01

    A series of zirconium sulphoselenide (ZrSSe3–, where = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3) single crystals have been grown by chemical vapour transport technique using iodine as a transporting agent. The optimum condition for the growth of these crystals is given. The stoichiometry of the grown crystals were confirmed on the basis of energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX) and the structural characterization was accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The crystals are found to possess monoclinic structure. The lattice parameters, volume, particle size and X-ray density have been carried out for these crystals. The effect of sulphur proportion on the lattice parameter, unit cell volume and X-ray density in the series of ZrSSe3– single crystals have been studied and found to decrease in all these parameters with rise in sulphur proportion. The grown crystals were examined under optical zoom microscope for their surface topography study. Hall effect measurements were carried out on grown crystals at room temperature. The negative value of Hall coefficient implies that these crystals are -type in nature. The conductivity is found to decrease with increase of sulphur content in the ZrSSe3– series. The electrical resistivity parallel to c-axis as well as perpendicular to -axis have been carried out in the temperature range 303–423 K. The results obtained are discussed in detail.

  17. Influence of microgravity on protein crystal structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Structural determination and comparison of microgravity and ground grown protein crystals have been carried out in order to investigate the effect of microgravity on the structure of protein crystals. Following the structural studies on the hen egg-white lysozyme cystals grown in space and on the ground, the same kind of comparative studies was performed with acidic phospholipase A2 crystals grown in different gravities. Based on the results obtained so far, a conclusion could be made that microgravity might not be strong enough to change the conformation of polypeptide chain of proteins, but it may improve the bound waters' structure, and this might be an important factor for microgravity to improve the protein crystal quality. In addition, the difference in the improvement between the two kinds of protein crystals may imply that the degree of improvement of a protein crystal in microgravity may be related to the solvent content in the protein crystal.

  18. Modulation of inhibitory activity of xylanase - α-amylase inhibitor protein (XAIP: binding studies and crystal structure determination of XAIP- II from Scadoxus multiflorus at 1.2 Å resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Sharmistha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants produce a wide range of proteinaceous inhibitors to protect themselves against hydrolytic enzymes. Recently a novel protein XAIP belonging to a new sub-family (GH18C was reported to inhibit two structurally unrelated enzymes xylanase GH11 and α-amylase GH13. It was shown to inhibit xylanase GH11 with greater potency than that of α-amylase GH13. A new form of XAIP (XAIP-II that inhibits α-amylase GH13 with a greater potency than that of XAIP and xylanase GH11 with a lower potency than that of XAIP, has been identified in the extracts of underground bulbs of Scadoxus multiflorus. This kind of occurrence of isoforms of inhibitor proteins is a rare observation and offers new opportunities for understanding the principles of protein engineering by nature. Results In order to determine the structural basis of the enhanced potency of XAIP-II against α-amylase GH13 and its reduced potency against xylanase GH11 as compared to that of XAIP, we have purified XAIP-II to homogeneity and obtained its complete amino acid sequence using cloning procedure. It has been crystallized with 0.1 M ammonium sulphate as the precipitating agent and the three-dimensional structure has been determined at 1.2 Å resolution. The binding studies of XAIP-II with xylanase GH11 and α-amylase GH13 have been carried out with surface plasmon resonance (SPR. Conclusion The structure determination revealed that XAIP-II adopts the well known TIM barrel fold. The xylanase GH11 binding site in XAIP-II is formed mainly with loop α3-β3 (residues, 102 - 118 which has acquired a stereochemically less favorable conformation for binding to xylanase GH11 because of the addition of an extra residue, Ala105 and due to replacements of two important residues, His106 and Asn109 by Thr107 and Ser110. On the other hand, the α-amylase binding site, which consists of α-helices α6 (residues, 193 - 206, α7 (residues, 230 - 243 and loop β6-α6 (residues, 180 - 192

  19. Predicting crystal structures of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sarah L

    2014-04-07

    Currently, organic crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods are based on searching for the most thermodynamically stable crystal structure, making various approximations in evaluating the crystal energy. The most stable (global minimum) structure provides a prediction of an experimental crystal structure. However, depending on the specific molecule, there may be other structures which are very close in energy. In this case, the other structures on the crystal energy landscape may be polymorphs, components of static or dynamic disorder in observed structures, or there may be no route to nucleating and growing these structures. A major reason for performing CSP studies is as a complement to solid form screening to see which alternative packings to the known polymorphs are thermodynamically feasible.

  20. The Crystal Structure of the Extracellular 11-heme Cytochrome UndA Reveals a Conserved 10-heme Motif and Defined Binding Site for Soluble Iron Chelates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Marcus; Hall, Andrea; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-07-03

    Members of the genus Shewanella translocate deca- or undeca-heme cytochromes to the external cell surface thus enabling respiration using extracellular minerals and polynuclear Fe(III) chelates. The high resolution structure of the first undeca-heme outer membrane cytochrome, UndA, reveals a crossed heme chain with four potential electron ingress/egress sites arranged within four domains. Sequence and structural alignment of UndA and the deca-heme MtrF reveals the extra heme of UndA is inserted between MtrF hemes 6 and 7. The remaining UndA hemes can be superposed over the heme chain of the decaheme MtrF, suggesting that a ten heme core is conserved between outer membrane cytochromes. The UndA structure is the first outer membrane cytochrome to be crystallographically resolved in complex with substrates, an Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetate dimer or an Fe(III)-citrate trimer. The structural resolution of these UndA-Fe(III)-chelate complexes provides a rationale for previous kinetic measurements on UndA and other outer membrane cytochromes.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factor Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Worzalla, Gregory A.; Ginster, Aaron M.; Forest, Katrina T. (UW)

    2012-09-07

    Virulence factor regulator (Vfr) enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity through its role as a global transcriptional regulator. The crystal structure of Vfr shows that it is a winged-helix DNA-binding protein like its homologue cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). In addition to an expected primary cyclic AMP-binding site, a second ligand-binding site is nestled between the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. Unlike CRP, Vfr is a symmetric dimer in the absence of DNA. Removal of seven disordered N-terminal residues of Vfr prvents the growth of P. aeruginosa.

  2. The Crystal Structure of a Ternary Complex of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides New Insight Into the Reaction Mechansim and Shows A Novel Binding Mode of the 2'-Phosphate of NADP+ and A Novel Cation Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Segura, L.; Rudino-Pinera, E; Munoz-Clares, R; Horjales, E

    2009-01-01

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)+-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors-abundant at infection sites-and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP+ and one of the even fewer that require K+ ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP+ and K+ ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the 'oxyanion hole.' The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2?-phosphate of the NADP+, thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K+ binding sites per subunit. One is

  3. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress response. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stabilizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold.

  4. Crystal structure analysis of intermetallic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, R. A., Jr.; Downey, J. W.; Dwight, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Study concerns crystal structures and lattice parameters for a number of new intermetallic compounds. Crystal structure data have been collected on equiatomic compounds, formed between an element of the Sc, Ti, V, or Cr group and an element of the Co or Ni group. The data, obtained by conventional methods, are presented in an easily usable tabular form.

  5. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David [UCLA; (UCB)

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  6. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ALPHA-DIMETHYLTELLURIUM DICHLORIDE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TELLURIUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CHLORIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, ANISOTROPY, FOURIER ANALYSIS.

  7. GPCR crystal structures: Medicinal chemistry in the pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Kling, Ralf C; Gmeiner, Peter; Löber, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    Recent breakthroughs in GPCR structural biology have significantly increased our understanding of drug action at these therapeutically relevant receptors, and this will undoubtedly lead to the design of better therapeutics. In recent years, crystal structures of GPCRs from classes A, B, C and F have been solved, unveiling a precise snapshot of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, some receptors have been crystallized in different functional states in complex with antagonists, partial agonists, full agonists, biased agonists and allosteric modulators, providing further insight into the mechanisms of ligand-induced GPCR activation. It is now obvious that there is enormous diversity in the size, shape and position of the ligand binding pockets in GPCRs. In this review, we summarise the current state of solved GPCR structures, with a particular focus on ligand-receptor interactions in the binding pocket, and how this can contribute to the design of GPCR ligands with better affinity, subtype selectivity or efficacy.

  8. Crystal Structure of Isoquinoline Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Mei; ZHANG Jia-Hai; ZHOU Shi-Ming; SUN Jie; YIN Hao; HU Ke-Liang

    2011-01-01

    The chiral compound 5H-imidazol[2,3-b]isoquinoline-l-ethanol-5-one-1,2, 3, 10b-tetrahydro- β(S)-phenyl-3(S)-phenyl was synthesized from the direct condensation of 2- cyanophenyacetonitrile with optically active (S)-(+)-2-phenylglycinol in chlorobenzene under dry, anaerobic conditions. ZnCl2 was used as a Lewis acid catalyst in this reaction, and the structure of this compound was determined by X-ray diffraction, NMR, MS and IR. Crystal data of the title compound: C25H22N2O2, Mr = 382.45, P 21 21 21, a = 5.341(5), b = 16.735(5), c = 22.129(5) A, γ = 90°, V = 1978(2)A^3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.284 g/cm^3, the final R = 0.0321 for 2269 observed reflections with I 〉 2 σ(I) and Rw = 0.0771 for all data.

  9. Crystal structure of 2-pentyloxybenzamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Bugenhagen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecule, C12H17NO2, the amide NH2 group is oriented toward the pentyloxy substituent and an intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bond is formed with the pentyloxy O atom. The benzene ring forms dihedral angles of 2.93 (2 and 5.60 (2° with the amide group and the pentyloxy group mean planes, respectively. In the crystal, molecules are linked by pairs of N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with their molecular planes parallel, but at an offset of 0.45 (1 Å to each other. These dimers are ordered into two types of symmetry-related columns extended along the a axis, with the mean plane of one set of dimers in a column approximately parallel to (121 and the other in a column approximately parallel to (1-21. The two planes form a dihedral angle of 85.31 (2°, and are linked via C—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...π interactions, forming a three-dimensional framework structure.

  10. Method of fabricating patterned crystal structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Liyang

    2016-12-15

    A method of manufacturing a patterned crystal structure for includes depositing an amorphous material. The amorphous material is modified such that a first portion of the amorphous thin-film layer has a first height/volume and a second portion of the amorphous thin-film layer has a second height/volume greater than the first portion. The amorphous material is annealed to induce crystallization, wherein crystallization is induced in the second portion first due to the greater height/volume of the second portion relative to the first portion to form patterned crystal structures.

  11. Synthesis and crystal structure elucidation of new copper(II)-based chemotherapeutic agent coupled with 1,2-DACH and orthovanillin: Validated by in vitro DNA/HSA binding profile and pBR322 cleavage pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mehvash; Afzal, Mohd; Ahmad, Musheer; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2016-08-01

    New copper(II)-based complex (1) was synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in vitro binding studies of complex 1 with CT DNA and HSA have been investigated by employing biophysical techniques to examine the binding propensity of 1 towards DNA and HSA. The results showed that 1 avidly binds to CT DNA via electrostatic mode along with the hydrogen bonding interaction of NH2 and CN groups of Schiff base ligand with the base pairs of DNA helix, leads to partial unwinding and destabilization of the DNA double helix. Moreover, the CD spectral studies revealed that complex 1 binds through groove binding interaction that stabilizes the right-handed B-form of DNA. Complex 1 showed an impressive photoinduced nuclease activity generating single-strand breaks in comparison with the DNA cleavage activity in presence of visible light. The mechanistic investigation revealed the efficiency of 1 to cleave DNA strands by involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the time dependent DNA cleavage activity showed that there was gradual increase in the amount of NC DNA on increasing the photoexposure time. However, the interaction of 1 and HSA showed that the change of intrinsic fluorescence intensity of HSA was induced by the microenvironment of Trp residue.

  12. Structural and histone binding ability characterizations of human PWWP domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. CONCLUSIONS: PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical β-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third β-strands and a C-terminal α-helix bundle. Both the canonical β-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web

  13. Crystal structure of sulfotransferase STF9 from Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Murad; Moriizumi, Yuuji; Tanaka, Shotaro; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2012-02-01

    Sulfotransferases catalyze the sulfate conjugation of a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous molecules. Human pathogenic mycobacteria produce numerous sulfated molecules including sulfolipids which are well related to the virulence of several strains. The genome of Mycobacterium avium encodes eight putative sulfotransferases (stf1, stf4-stf10). Among them, STF9 shows higher similarity to human heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase isoforms than to the bacterial STs. Here, we determined the crystal structure of sulfotransferase STF9 in complex with a sulfate ion and palmitic acid at a resolution of 2.6 Å. STF9 has a spherical structure utilizing the classical sulfotransferase fold. STF9 exclusively possesses three N-terminal α-helices (α1, α2, α3) parallel to the 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) binding motif. The sulfate ion binds to the PAPS binding structural motif and the palmitic acid molecule binds in the deep cleft of the predicted substrate binding site suggesting the nature of endogenous acceptor substrate of STF9 resembles palmitic acid. The substrate binding site is covered by a flexible loop which may have involvement in endogenous substrate recognition. Based on the mutational study (Hossain et al., Mol Cell Biochem 350:155-162; 2011) and structural resemblance of STF9-sulfate ion-palmitic acid complex to the hHS3OST3 complex with PAP (3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate) and an acceptor sugar chain, Glu170 and Arg96 are appeared to be catalytic residues in STF9 sulfuryl transfer mechanism.

  14. synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Crystal and molecular structure of the complex ... Coordination chemistry of molybdenum(VI) has attracted considerable attention due to its biochemical significance [1-3] as well as for the efficient catalytic properties in several organic.

  15. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Gülseren, Oğuz

    2007-04-01

    Determining the crystal structure parameters of a material is an important issue in crystallography and material science. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps in understanding the physical behavior of material. It can be difficult to obtain crystal parameters for complex structures, particularly those materials that show local symmetry as well as global symmetry. This work provides a tool that extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and space groups from the atomic coordinates of crystal structures. A visualization tool for examining crystals is also provided. Accordingly, this work could help crystallographers, chemists and material scientists to analyze crystal structures efficiently. Program summaryTitle of program: BilKristal Catalogue identifier: ADYU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYU_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Programming language used: C, C++, Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 and OpenGL Libraries Computer: Personal Computers with Windows operating system Operating system: Windows XP Professional RAM: 20-60 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:899 779 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test date, etc.:9 271 521 Distribution format:tar.gz External routines/libraries: Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1. For visualization tool, graphics card driver should also support OpenGL Nature of problem: Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly, for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. Solution method: The tool extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and identify the space group from

  16. Photonic-crystal fibre: Mapping the structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of real-time and non-destructive Doppler-assisted tomography of the internal structure of photonic-crystal fibres could aid the fabrication of high-quality fibres with enhanced performance.......The demonstration of real-time and non-destructive Doppler-assisted tomography of the internal structure of photonic-crystal fibres could aid the fabrication of high-quality fibres with enhanced performance....

  17. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  18. Crystal structure of meteoritic schreibersites: determination of absolute structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, Roman; Císařová, Ivana

    Minerals of the schreibersite nickelphosphide series (Fe,Ni)3P crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric space group Ibar 4. As a consequence, they can possess two different spatial arrangements of the constituting atoms within the unit cell, related by the inversion symmetry operation. Here, we present the crystal structure refinements from single crystal X-ray diffraction data for schreibersite grains from iron meteorites Acuña, Carlton, Hex River Mts. (three different crystals), Odessa (two different crystals), Sikhote Alin, and Toluca aiming for the determination of the absolute structure of the examined crystals. The crystals studied cover the composition range from 58 mol% to 80 mol% Fe3P end-member. Unit-cell parameter a and volume of the unit cell V, as well as certain topological structural parameters tightly correlate with Fe3P content. Unit-cell parameter c, on the other hand, does not show such strong correlation. Eight of the nine crystal structure refinements allowed unambiguous absolute structure assignment. The single crystal extracted from Toluca is, however, of poor quality and consequently the structure refinement did not provide as good results as the rest of the materials. Also, this crystal has only weak inversion distinguishing power to provide unequivocal absolute structure determination. Six of the eight unambiguous absolute structure determinations indicated inverted atomic arrangement compared to that reported in earlier structure refinements (here called standard). Only two grains, one taken from Odessa iron and the other from the Hex River Mts. meteorite, reveal the dominance of standard crystal structure setting.

  19. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  20. Oxygen binding by alpha(Fe2+)2beta(Ni2+)2 hemoglobin crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, S; Bettati, S; Manfredini, M; Mozzarelli, A; Bolognesi, M; Deriu, D; Rosano, C; Tsuneshige, A; Yonetani, T; Henry, E R

    2000-04-01

    Oxygen binding by hemoglobin fixed in the T state either by crystallization or by encapsulation in silica gels is apparently noncooperative. However, cooperativity might be masked by different oxygen affinities of alpha and beta subunits. Metal hybrid hemoglobins, where the noniron metal does not bind oxygen, provide the opportunity to determine the oxygen affinities of alpha and beta hemes separately. Previous studies have characterized the oxygen binding by alpha(Ni2+)2beta(Fe2+)2 crystals. Here, we have determined the three-dimensional (3D) structure and oxygen binding of alpha(Fe2+)2beta(Ni2+)2 crystals grown from polyethylene glycol solutions. Polarized absorption spectra were recorded at different oxygen pressures with light polarized parallel either to the b or c crystal axis by single crystal microspectrophotometry. The oxygen pressures at 50% saturation (p50s) are 95 +/- 3 and 87 +/- 4 Torr along the b and c crystal axes, respectively, and the corresponding Hill coefficients are 0.96 +/- 0.06 and 0.90 +/- 0.03. Analysis of the binding curves, taking into account the different projections of the alpha hemes along the optical directions, indicates that the oxygen affinity of alpha1 hemes is 1.3-fold lower than alpha2 hemes. Inspection of the 3D structure suggests that this inequivalence may arise from packing interactions of the Hb tetramer within the monoclinic crystal lattice. A similar inequivalence was found for the beta subunits of alpha(Ni2+)2beta(Fe2+)2 crystals. The average oxygen affinity of the alpha subunits (p50 = 91 Torr) is about 1.2-fold higher than the beta subunits (p50 = 110 Torr). In the absence of cooperativity, this heterogeneity yields an oxygen binding curve of Hb A with a Hill coefficient of 0.999. Since the binding curves of Hb A crystals exhibit a Hill coefficient very close to unity, these findings indicate that oxygen binding by T-state hemoglobin is noncooperative, in keeping with the Monod, Wyman, and Changeux model.

  1. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  2. Synthesis, spectral properties and DNA binding and nuclease activity of lanthanide (III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine benzhydrazone: X-ray crystal structure, Hirshfeld studies and nitrate- interactions of cerium(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karreddula Raja; Akkili Suseelamma; Katreddi Hussain Reddy

    2016-01-01

    The lanthanide(III) complexes of general formula of [Ln(BPBH)2(NO3)3] (where, Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd and BPBH = 2-benzoylpyridine benzhydrazone) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, spectroscopic (UV, IR), electrochemical and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The coordination mode of the ligand and the geometry of [Ce(BPBH)2(NO3)3] are confirmed by single crystal X-ray studies. The crystals are monoclinic with C2/c crystallographic symmetry. The central metal is 12 coordinated and the coordination polyhedron around the cerium atom can be described as a distorted icosahedron. The existence of nitrate. . . and CH. . . stacking interactions in the [Ce(BPBH)2(NO3)3] leads to a supramolecular arrangement in its network. The binding properties of these complexes with calf-thymus DNA have been investigated by viscosity measurements. The complexes show more nuclease activity in the presences of H2O2.

  3. Comparative structural analysis of lipid binding START domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Gerd Thorsell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein related lipid transfer (START domains are small globular modules that form a cavity where lipids and lipid hormones bind. These domains can transport ligands to facilitate lipid exchange between biological membranes, and they have been postulated to modulate the activity of other domains of the protein in response to ligand binding. More than a dozen human genes encode START domains, and several of them are implicated in a disease. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report crystal structures of the human STARD1, STARD5, STARD13 and STARD14 lipid transfer domains. These represent four of the six functional classes of START domains. SIGNIFICANCE: Sequence alignments based on these and previously reported crystal structures define the structural determinants of human START domains, both those related to structural framework and those involved in ligand specificity. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  4. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Leitold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n=4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply-occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, w...

  5. Crystal structure from one-electron theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated by the the......The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated...... by the theory, the predicted crystal structures are in accord with experiment in all cases except 79Au. In addition, they have investigated the effect of pressure upon the alkali metals (3Li, 11Na, 37Rb, 55Cs) and selected lanthanide metals (57La, 58Ce, 71Lu) and actinide metals (90Th, 91Pa). In these cases...

  6. V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane and manganese(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huilu; Yang, Zaihui; Wang, Fei; Peng, Hongping; Zhang, Han; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Kaitong

    2015-07-01

    A V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane (bebt) and its transition metal complexes, [Mn(bebt)(pic)2]·CH3OH (pic=picrate) 1, [Co(bebt)2](pic)22 and [Cu(bebt)2](pic)2·2DMF 3, have been synthesized and characterized. The coordinate forms of complexes 1 and 2 are basically alike, which can be described as six-coordinated distorted octahedron. The geometric structure around Cu(II) atom can be described as distorted tetrahedral in complex 3. The DNA-binding properties of the ligand bebt and complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that bebt and complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative binding mode and the order of the binding affinity is 1<2<3structure and DNA-binding properties are also discussed. Moreover, the complex 3 possess significant antioxidant activity against superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and the scavenging effects of it are stronger than standard mannitol and vitamin C.

  7. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  8. Structure of crystals of hard colloidal spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, P.N.; van Megen, W.; Bartlett, P.; Ackerson, B.J.; Rarity, J.G.; Underwood, S.M. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern, WR14 3PS, United Kingsom (GB) Department of Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia School of Chemistry, Bristol University, Bristol, BS8 1TS, United Kingdom Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078)

    1989-12-18

    We report light-scattering measurements of powder diffraction patterns of crystals of essentially hard colloidal spheres. These are consistent with structures formed by stacking close-packed planes of particles in a sequence of permitted lateral positions, {ital A},{ital B},{ital C}, which shows a high degree of randomness. Crystals grown slowly, while still containing many stacking faults, show a tendency towards face-centered-cubic packing: possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  9. Crystal structure of cytotoxin protein suilysin from Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingfeng; Huang, Bo; Du, Huamao; Zhang, Xuejun C; Xu, Jianguo; Li, Xuemei; Rao, Zihe

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDC) are pore forming toxins. A prototype of the CDC family members is perfringolysin O (PFO), which directly binds to the cell membrane enriched in cholesterol, causing cell lysis. However, an exception of this general observation is intermedilysin (ILY) of Streptococcus intermedius, which requires human CD59 as a receptor in addition to cholesterol for its hemolytic activity. A possible explanation of this functional difference is the conformational variation between the C-terminal domains of the two toxins, particularly in the highly conserved undecapeptide termed tryptophan rich motif. Here, we present the crystal structure of suilysin, a CDC toxin from the infectious swine pathogen Streptococcus suis. Like PFO, suilysin does not require a host receptor for hemolytic activity; yet the crystal structure of suilysin exhibits a similar conformation in the tryptophan rich motif to ILY. This observation suggests that the current view of the structure-function relationship between CDC proteins and membrane association is far from complete.

  10. Crystal Structure of Macrocalyxin J

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shan; WU Bin; SHI Hao; SUN Cui-Rong

    2007-01-01

    The title compound, (1α,6β, 1 1β, 14α)-1,7:6,20-diepoxy-6,1 1-dihydroxy- 6,7-secoent- kaur-1 6-ene-7,15-dione-14-acetate (macrocalyxin J), is a diterpenoid which was isolated from the leaves of Rabdosia macrocalyx and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in orthorhombic, spac e group P212121 with a = 9.3608(8), b = 14.9787(12), c = 15.5750(13)(A), Z = 4, V = 2183.8(3) (A)3, C22H30O9, Mr = 438.46, Dc = 1.334 g/m3, μ(MoKα) = 0.103 mm-1,F(000) = 936, the final R = 0.0532 and wR = 0.1262 for 2252 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). In the molecule, three six-membered rings adopt chair, boat and slightly distorted boat conformations,respectively, while both five-membered rings have approximate envelope conformations.

  11. Microscopic verification of topological electron-vortex binding in the lowest Landau-level crystal state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Jeon, Gun Sang; Jain, Jainendra K

    2005-01-14

    When two-dimensional electrons are subjected to a very strong magnetic field, they are believed to form a triangular crystal. By a direct comparison with the exact wave function, we demonstrate that this crystal is not a simple Hartree-Fock crystal of electrons but an inherently quantum mechanical crystal characterized by a nonperturbative binding of quantized vortices to electrons. It is suggested that this has qualitative consequences for experiment.

  12. Crystal structure of dengue virus methyltransferase without S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Christian G; Li, Shi-Hua; Dong, Hongping; Chew, Sock Hui; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2014-11-01

    Flavivirus methyltransferase is a genetically-validated antiviral target. Crystal structures of almost all available flavivirus methyltransferases contain S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), the methyl donor molecule that co-purifies with the enzymes. This raises a possibility that SAM is an integral structural component required for the folding of dengue virus (DENV) methyltransferase. Here we exclude this possibility by solving the crystal structure of DENV methyltransferase without SAM. The SAM ligand was removed from the enzyme through a urea-mediated denaturation-and-renaturation protocol. The crystal structure of the SAM-depleted enzyme exhibits a vacant SAM-binding pocket, with a conformation identical to that of the SAM-enzyme co-crystal structure. Functionally, equivalent enzymatic activities (N-7 methylation, 2'-O methylation, and GMP-enzyme complex formation) were detected for the SAM-depleted and SAM-containing recombinant proteins. These results clearly indicate that the SAM molecule is not an essential component for the correct folding of DENV methyltransferase. Furthermore, the results imply a potential antiviral approach to search for inhibitors that can bind to the SAM-binding pocket and compete against SAM binding. To demonstrate this potential, we have soaked crystals of DENV methyltransferase without a bound SAM with the natural product Sinefungin and show that preformed crystals are capable of binding ligands in this pocket.

  13. Crystal structure of levomepromazine maleate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Tamás Gál

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C19H25N2OS+·C4H3O4− [systematic name: (S-3-(2-methoxyphenothiazin-10-yl-N,N,2-trimethylpropanaminium hydrogen maleate], comprises two (S-levomepromazine cations and two hydrogen maleate anions. The conformations of the two cations are similar. The major difference relates to the orientation of the methoxy substituent at the phenothiazine ring system. The crystal components form a three-dimensional supramolecular network via N—H...O, C—H...O and C—H...π interactions. A comparison of the conformations of the levomepromazine cations with those of the neutral molecule and similar protonated molecules reveals significant conformational flexibility of the phenothiazine ring system and the substituent at the phenothiazine N atom.

  14. Crystal structure of 3-(hydroxymethylchromone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Ishikawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C10H8O3 (systematic name 3-hydroxymethyl-4H-chromen-4-one, the fused-ring system is slightly puckered [dihedral angle between the rings = 3.84 (11°]. The hydroxy O atom deviates from the heterocyclic ring by 1.422 (1 Å. In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of O—H...O hydrogen bonds generate R22(12 loops. The dimers are linked by aromatic π–π stacking [shortest centroid–centroid distance = 3.580 (3 Å], and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating a three-dimensional network.

  15. Crystal structure of 9-methacryloylanthracene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Agrahari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C18H14O, with systematic name 1-(anthracen-9-yl-2-methylprop-2-en-1-one, the ketonic C atom lies 0.2030 (16 Å out of the anthryl-ring-system plane. The dihedral angle between the planes of the anthryl and methacryloyl moieties is 88.30 (3° and the stereochemistry about the Csp2—Csp2 bond in the side chain is transoid. In the crystal, the end rings of the anthryl units in adjacent molecules associate in parallel–planar orientations [shortest centroid–centroid distance = 3.6320 (7 Å]. A weak hydrogen bond is observed between an aromatic H atom and the O atom of a molecule displaced by translation in the a-axis direction, forming sheets of parallel-planar anthryl groups packing in this direction.

  16. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Anna T; Kirby, Karen A; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Tanner, John J; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2015-07-03

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Crystal structure of rofecoxib bound to human cyclooxygenase-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, Benjamin J.; Malkowski, Michael G. (Buffalo)

    2016-10-26

    Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was one of the first selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) to be approved for use in humans. Within five years after its release to the public, Vioxx was withdrawn from the market owing to the adverse cardiovascular effects of the drug. Despite the widespread knowledge of the development and withdrawal of Vioxx, relatively little is known at the molecular level about how the inhibitor binds to COX-2. Vioxx is unique in that the inhibitor contains a methyl sulfone moiety in place of the sulfonamide moiety found in other coxibs such as celecoxib and valdecoxib. Here, new crystallization conditions were identified that allowed the structural determination of human COX-2 in complex with Vioxx and the structure was subsequently determined to 2.7- Å resolution. The crystal structure provides the first atomic level details of the binding of Vioxx to COX-2. As anticipated, Vioxx binds with its methyl sulfone moiety located in the side pocket of the cyclooxygenase channel, providing support for the isoform selectivity of this drug.

  18. Crystal structure of rofecoxib bound to human cyclooxygenase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Benjamin J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-10-01

    Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was one of the first selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) to be approved for use in humans. Within five years after its release to the public, Vioxx was withdrawn from the market owing to the adverse cardiovascular effects of the drug. Despite the widespread knowledge of the development and withdrawal of Vioxx, relatively little is known at the molecular level about how the inhibitor binds to COX-2. Vioxx is unique in that the inhibitor contains a methyl sulfone moiety in place of the sulfonamide moiety found in other coxibs such as celecoxib and valdecoxib. Here, new crystallization conditions were identified that allowed the structural determination of human COX-2 in complex with Vioxx and the structure was subsequently determined to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystal structure provides the first atomic level details of the binding of Vioxx to COX-2. As anticipated, Vioxx binds with its methyl sulfone moiety located in the side pocket of the cyclooxygenase channel, providing support for the isoform selectivity of this drug.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Vanadate-Inhibited Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Johannes D; Bublitz, Maike; Arnou, Bertrand; Olesen, Claus; Andersen, Jens Peter; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nissen, Poul

    2016-04-05

    Vanadate is the hallmark inhibitor of the P-type ATPase family; however, structural details of its inhibitory mechanism have remained unresolved. We have determined the crystal structure of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with bound vanadate in the absence of Ca(2+). Vanadate is bound at the catalytic site as a planar VO3(-) in complex with water and Mg(2+) in a dephosphorylation transition-state-like conformation. Validating bound VO3(-) by anomalous difference Fourier maps using long-wavelength data we also identify a hitherto undescribed Cl(-) site near the dephosphorylation site. Crystallization was facilitated by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-derivatized nucleotides that bind with the TNP moiety occupying the binding pocket that normally accommodates the adenine of ATP, rationalizing their remarkably high affinity for E2P-like conformations of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the configurations of bound nucleotide analogs in the E2·VO3(-) structure with that in E2·BeF3(-) (E2P ground state analog) reveals multiple binding modes to the Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  20. The crystal structure and crystal chemistry of fernandinite and corvusite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H.T.; Post, J.E.; Ross, D.R.; Nelen, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Using type material of fernandinite from Minasragra, Peru, and corvusite from the Jack Claim, La Sal Mountains, Utah, the properties and crystal chemistry of these minerals have been determined by Rietveld analysis of the powder X-ray-diffraction patterns. The crystal structure of both species is isotypic with the V2O5 -type layer first found for ??-Ag0.68V2O5; it consists of chains of VO6 octahedra linked by opposite corners (parallel to b) condensed by edge-sharing to form the layer. The vanadium has average valence 4.8, and the resulting layer-charge is balanced by varying amounts of Ca, Na, and K in the interlayer region accompanied by labile water. This study has confirmed the validity of fernandinite as a unique mineral species. It is closely related to corvusite, from which it is distinguished on the basis of the dominant interlayer cation: Ca for fernandinite, Na for curvusite. -Authors

  1. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  2. Crystal structure of putrescine aspartic acid complex

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy, S.; Murthy, MRN

    1990-01-01

    Polyamines, putrescine, spermidine and spermine are ubiquitous biogenic cations believed to be important for a variety of cellular processes. In order to obtain structural information on the interaction of these amines with other biomolecules, the structure of a complex of putrescine with aspartic acid was determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The crystals belong monoclinic space group $C_2$ with $a = 21.504 \\AA$, $b = 4.779 \\AA$, $c = 8.350 \\AA$ and $\\beta = {97.63}^{\\ci...

  3. Coupled ion Binding and Structural Transitions Along the Transport Cycle of Glutamate Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdon, Gregory [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Oh, SeCheol [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Serio, Ryan N. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Boudker, Olga [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Membrane transporters that clear the neurotransmitter glutamate from synapses are driven by symport of sodium ions and counter-transport of a potassium ion. Previous crystal structures of a homologous archaeal sodium and aspartate symporter showed that a dedicated transport domain carries the substrate and ions across the membrane. We report new crystal structures of this homologue in ligand-free and ions-only bound outward- and inward-facing conformations. We then show that after ligand release, the apo transport domain adopts a compact and occluded conformation that can traverse the membrane, completing the transport cycle. Sodium binding primes the transport domain to accept its substrate and triggers extracellular gate opening, which prevents inward domain translocation until substrate binding takes place. Moreover, we describe a new cation-binding site ideally suited to bind a counter-transported ion. We suggest that potassium binding at this site stabilizes the translocation-competent conformation of the unloaded transport domain in mammalian homologues.

  4. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  5. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Hang Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are two canagliflozin molecules (A and B and one water molecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluorophenylthiophen-2-yl]methyl}-4-methylphenyl-6-(hydroxymethyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methylbenzene and thiophene rings are 115.7 (4 and 111.7 (4°, while the dihedral angles between the fluorobenzene and thiophene rings are 24.2 (6 and 20.5 (9° in molecules A and B, respectively. The hydropyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin molecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin molecules and lattice water molecules are connected via O—H...O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture.

  6. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol-ecules (A and B) and one water mol-ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)thio-phen-2-yl]meth-yl}-4-methylphen-yl)-6-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra-hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl-benzene and thio-phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro-benzene and thio-phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol-ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro-pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol-ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol-ecules and lattice water mol-ecules are connected via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture.

  7. Crystal Structure of 8-Demethoxyrunanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Ling

    2008-01-01

    A new hasubanane-type alkaloid, 8-demethoxyrunanine, was isolated from Sino- menium acutum and characterized by melting point, HREIMS, 1H NMR, and X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray diffraction reveals that the title compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, space group P212121 with a = 7.308(1), b = 21.742(5), c = 22.893(4) ?, V = 3637.5(11) ?3, Z = 8, Dx = 1.254 g/cm3, F(000) = 1472, μ(MoKα) = 0.087 mm-1, the final R = 0.0438 and wR = 0.0575 for 4497 independent reflections with Rint = 0.0192 and 2091 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). Four rings (ring A: one benzene ring, ring B: one hexagon carbon ring in a half-chair conformation, ring C: one hexagon carbon ring with α,β-unsaturated ketone segment (-CR2=CR1-C=O) in a screw-boat conformation, and ring D: one nonplanar tetrahydropyrrole) form a hasubanane-type alkaloid.

  8. Crystal structure determination of Jatrorrhizine chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI XianRong; YANG JianHua; LIN Xiang; DAI Qin; CHENG Qiang; GUO LingHong; LI Hui

    2009-01-01

    Optimum resolution data of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) for Jatrorrhizine (Jat) were collected by an X' Pert Pro MPD diffractometer with an X'celerator detector under the stepwise scanning condition as 8.255 ms and 0.00836°per step,2θrange of 50°-80° and total scanning period of 8-10 min. Indexing of the crystal system and a search of the space group from the powder X-ray diffraction data were conducted by the computational crystallography method. The pilot crystal models of Jat were globally optimized with Monte Carlo method and then refined with the Rietveld method. In parallel with PXRD test,single crystals of Jat were cultured in an aqueous solution by a slow-decreasing temperature method,then its crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD). Both crystal structures from PXRD and SCXRD are identical. The results show that the crystal structure of Jat belongs to a monoclinic system and the space group P21/c. The parameters of cell dimensions from PXRD are a=7.69(A),b= 12.55(A),c=20.89(A),β=106.53°,Z=4,and V=1933.4(A)3,meanwhile the parameters from SCXRD are a=7.72(A),b=12.61(A),c=20.99(A),β=106.38°,Z=4,and V=1961.3(A)3.

  9. The crystal structure of human GDP-L-fucose synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Sun, Lihua; Li, Jian; Xu, Chunyan; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yahui; Ji, Chaoneng; He, Jianhua

    2013-09-01

    Human GDP-l-fucose synthase, also known as FX protein, synthesizes GDP-l-fucose from its substrate GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose. The reaction involves epimerization at both C-3 and C-5 followed by an NADPH-dependent reduction of the carbonyl at C-4. In this paper, the first crystal structure of human FX protein was determined at 2.37 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit of the crystal structure contains four molecules which form two homodimers. Each molecule consists of two domains, a Rossmann-fold NADPH-binding motif and a carboxyl terminal domain. Compared with the Escherichia coli GDP-l-fucose synthase, the overall structures of these two enzymes have four major differences. There are four loops in the structure of human FX protein corresponding to two α-helices and two β-sheets in that of the E. coli enzyme. Besides, there are seven different amino acid residues binding with NAPDH comparing human FX protein with that from E. coli. The structure of human FX reveals the key catalytic residues and could be useful for the design of drugs for the treatment of inflammation, auto-immune diseases, and possibly certain types of cancer.

  10. Dihydroxo-bridged dimeric Cu(II) system containing sandwiched non-coordinating phenylacetate anion: Crystal structure, spectroscopic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and DNA-binding studies of [(phen)(H2O)Cu(OH)2Cu(H2O)(phen)]2L.6H2O: (HL = phenylacetic acid; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Shah, Naseer Ali

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports the synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA-binding, antibacterial and antifungal studies of a rare dihydroxo-bridged dinuclear copper(II) complex including 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) ligands and phenylacetate (L) anions, [Cu2(Phen)2(OH)2(H2O)2].2L.6H2O. Structural data revealed distorted square-pyramidal geometry for each copper(II) atom with the basal plane formed by the two nitrogen atoms of the phenantroline ligand and the oxygen atoms of two bridging hydroxyl groups. The apical positions are filled by the oxygen atom from a water molecule. This forms a centrosymmetric cationic dimer where the uncoordinated phenylacetate ligands serve to balance the electrical charge. The dimers interact by means of hydrogen bonds aided by the coordinated as well as uncoordinated water molecules and phenyl-acetate moieties in the crystal lattice. The binding ability of the complex with salmon sperm DNA was determined using cyclic voltammetry and absorption spectroscopy yielding binding constants 2.426 × 104 M-1 and 1.399 × 104 M-1, respectively. The complex was screened against two Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis) and one Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains exhibiting significant activity against all the three strains. The complex exhibited significant, moderate and no activity against fungal strains Mucor piriformis, Helminthosporium solani and Aspergillus Niger, respectively. These preliminary tests indicate the competence of the complex towards the development of a potent biological drug.

  11. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  12. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  13. Crystal structures of Aedes aegypti alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi Gui; Vogelaar, Nancy; Wilson, Scott R; Rizzi, Menico; Li, Jianyong

    2006-12-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75A high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1A resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  14. Modular crystals as modulated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elcoro, L.; Perez-Mato, J.M.; Friese, K.;

    2008-01-01

    The use of the superspace formalism is extended to the description and refinement of the homologous series of modular structures with two symmetry-related modules with different orientations. The lillianite homologous series has been taken as a study case. Starting from a commensurate modulated c...

  15. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylation-coupled Saccharide Transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Cao; X Jin; E Levin; H Huang; Y Zong; W Hendrickson; J Javitch; K Rajashankar; M Zhou; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Saccharides have a central role in the nutrition of all living organisms. Whereas several saccharide uptake systems are shared between the different phylogenetic kingdoms, the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system exists almost exclusively in bacteria. This multi-component system includes an integral membrane protein EIIC that transports saccharides and assists in their phosphorylation. Here we present the crystal structure of an EIIC from Bacillus cereus that transports diacetylchitobiose. The EIIC is a homodimer, with an expansive interface formed between the amino-terminal halves of the two protomers. The carboxy-terminal half of each protomer has a large binding pocket that contains a diacetylchitobiose, which is occluded from both sides of the membrane with its site of phosphorylation near the conserved His250 and Glu334 residues. The structure shows the architecture of this important class of transporters, identifies the determinants of substrate binding and phosphorylation, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of sugar translocation.

  16. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  17. The substrate binding domains of human SIAH E3 ubiquitin ligases are now crystal clear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zhongduo; Hou, Feng; Harding, Rachel; Huang, Xinyi; Dong, Aiping; Walker, John R.; Tong, Yufeng

    2017-01-01

    Seven in absentia homologs (SIAHs) comprise a family of highly conserved E3 ubiquitin ligases that play an important role in regulating signalling pathways in tumorigenesis, including the DNA damage repair and hypoxia response pathways. SIAH1 and SIAH2 have been found to function as a tumour repressor and a proto-oncogene, respectively, despite the high sequence identity of their substrate binding domains (SBDs). Ubiquitin-specific protease USP19 is a deubiquitinase that forms a complex with SIAHs and counteracts the ligase function. Much effort has been made to find selective inhibitors of the SIAHs E3 ligases. Menadione was reported to inhibit SIAH2 specifically. We used X-ray crystallography, peptide array, bioinformatic analysis, and biophysical techniques to characterize the structure and interaction of SIAHs with deubiquitinases and literature reported compounds. We solved the crystal structures of SIAH1 in complex with a USP19 peptide and of the apo form SIAH2. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the SIAH/USP19 complex is conserved in evolution. We demonstrated that menadione destabilizes both SIAH1 and SIAH2 non-specifically through covalent modification. The SBDs of SIAH E3 ligases are structurally similar with a subtle stability difference. USP19 is the only deubiquitinase that directly binds to SIAHs through the substrate binding pocket. Menadione is not a specific inhibitor for SIAH2. The crystallographic models provide structural insights into the substrate binding of the SIAH family E3 ubiquitin ligases that are critically involved in regulating cancer-related pathways. Our results suggest caution should be taken when using menadione as a specific SIAH2 inhibitor.

  18. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  19. Troublesome Crystal Structures: Prevention, Detection, and Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Richard L

    1996-01-01

    A large number of incorrect crystal structures is being published today. These structures are proving to be a particular problem to those of us who are interested in comparing structural moieties found in the databases in order to develop structure-property relationships. Problems can reside in the input data, e.g., wrong unit cell or low quality intensity data, or in the structural model, e.g., wrong space group or atom types. Many of the common mistakes are, however, relatively easy to detect and thus should be preventable; at the very least, suspicious structures can be flagged, if not by the authors then by the referees and, ultimately, the crystallographic databases. This article describes some of the more common mistakes and their effects on the resulting structures, lists a series of tests that can be used to detect incorrect structures, and makes a strong plea for the publication of higher quality structures.

  20. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit pla...

  1. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Jain, Neha; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Koldewey, Philipp; Hettler, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit pla...

  2. Crystal Structure of Human Enterovirus 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (Sentinext)

    2013-04-08

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus associated with fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Here, we report the crystal structure of enterovirus 71 and show that, unlike in other enteroviruses, the 'pocket factor,' a small molecule that stabilizes the virus, is partly exposed on the floor of the 'canyon.' Thus, the structure of antiviral compounds may require a hydrophilic head group designed to interact with residues at the entrance of the pocket.

  3. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2,7-DIACETOXYTRANS-15,16-DIMETHYL-15,16-DIHYDROPYRENE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    AROMATIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (* CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS), ESTERS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, SCINTILLATION COUNTERS, CANADA

  4. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  5. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Dehydroandrographolide Dipolycyclophosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The title compound was synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR, H R S I-M S and MS, and its crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal is of orthorhombic system (C4oH52O11P2, Mr= 770.76), space group P21212, with a = 22.562(5), b =29.224(6), c = 7.1953(14) A, V = 4744.2(16) A3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.079 g/cm3, F(000) = 1640 andμ =0.141 mm-1. The final R = 0.0758 and wR = 0.1778 for 2794 observed reflections with I > 2o(I).Intermolecular hydrogen bonds are found between the O atom of carbonyl group and H atoms of olefinic carbon. The absolute configuration of this molecule was confirmed by comparison with that of the original material.

  6. Crystal structure of N-(4-hydroxybenzylacetone thiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Argibay-Otero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title compound, C11H15N3OS, shows the flexibility due to the methylene group at the thioamide N atom in the side chain, resulting in the molecule being non-planar. The dihedral angle between the plane of the benzene ring and that defined by the atoms of the thiosemicarbazide arm is 79.847 (4°. In the crystal, the donor–acceptor hydrogen-bond character of the –OH group dominates the intermolecular associations, acting as a donor in an O—H...S hydrogen bond, as well as being a double acceptor in a centrosymmetric cyclic bridging N—H...O,O′ interaction [graph set R22(4]. The result is a one-dimensional duplex chain structure, extending along [111]. The usual N—H...S hydrogen-bonding association common in thiosemicarbazone crystal structures is not observed.

  7. Crystal structure of low-symmetry rondorfite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Zadov, A. E.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-03-01

    The crystal structure of an aluminum-rich variety of the mineral rondorfite with the composition Ca16[Mg2(Si7Al)(O31OH)]Cl4 from the skarns of the Verkhne-Chegemskoe plateau (the Kabardino-Balkarian Republic, the Northern Caucasus Region, Russia) was solved in the triclinic space group with the unit-cell parameters a = 15.100(2) Å, b = 15.110(2) Å, c = 15.092(2) Å, α = 90.06(1)°, β = 90.01(1)°, γ = 89.93(1)°, Z = 4, sp. gr. P1. The structural model consisting of 248 independent atoms was determined by the phase-correction method and refined to R = 3.8% with anisotropic displacement parameters based on all 7156 independent reflections with 7156 F > 3σ( F). The crystal structure is based on pentamers consisting of four Si tetrahedra linked by the central Mg tetrahedron. The structure can formally be refined in the cubic space group ( a = 15.105 Å, sp. gr. Fd overline 3 , seven independent positions) with anisotropic displacement parameters to R = 2.74% based on 579 reflections with F > 3σ( F) without accounting for more than 1000 observed reflections, which are inconsistent with the cubic symmetry of the crystal structure.

  8. Crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase Gnd1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Cong-Zhao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the third enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH is the main generator of cellular NADPH. Both thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase require NADPH as the electron donor to reduce oxidized thioredoxin or glutathione (GSSG. Since thioredoxin and GSH are important antioxidants, it is not surprising that 6PGDH plays a critical role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Furthermore the activity of 6PGDH is associated with several human disorders including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. The 3D structural investigation would be very valuable in designing small molecules that target this enzyme for potential therapeutic applications. Results The crystal structure of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH/Gnd1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined at 2.37 Å resolution by molecular replacement. The overall structure of Gnd1 is a homodimer with three domains for each monomer, a Rossmann fold NADP+ binding domain, an all-α helical domain contributing the majority to hydrophobic interaction between the two subunits and a small C-terminal domain penetrating the other subunit. In addition, two citrate molecules occupied the 6PG binding pocket of each monomer. The intact Gnd1 had a Km of 50 ± 9 μM for 6-phosphogluconate and of 35 ± 6 μM for NADP+ at pH 7.5. But the truncated mutants without the C-terminal 35, 39 or 53 residues of Gnd1 completely lost their 6PGDH activity, despite remaining the homodimer in solution. Conclusion The overall tertiary structure of Gnd1 is similar to those of 6PGDH from other species. The substrate and coenzyme binding sites are well conserved, either from the primary sequence alignment, or from the 3D structural superposition. Enzymatic activity assays suggest a sequential mechanism of catalysis, which is in agreement with previous studies. The C-terminal domain of Gnd1 functions as a hook to further tighten the dimer, but it is not

  9. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  10. Origins of Water Molecules in the Photosystem II Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Naoki; Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Ikeda, Takuya; Saito, Keisuke; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2017-06-20

    The cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) crystal structure includes more than 1300 water molecules in each monomer unit; however, their precise roles in water oxidation are unclear. To understand the origins of water molecules in the PSII crystal structure, the accessibility of bulk water molecules to channel inner spaces in PSII was investigated using the water-removed PSII structure and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The inner space of the channel that proceeds toward the D1-Glu65/D2-Glu312 pair (E65/E312 channel) was entirely filled with water molecules from the bulk region. In the same channel, a diamond-shaped cluster of water molecules formed near redox-active TyrZ in MD simulations. Reorientation of the D2-Leu352 side chain resulted in formation of a hexagonal water network at the Cl(-)2 binding site. Water molecules could not enter the main region of the O4-water chain, which proceeds from the O4 site of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. However, in the O4-water chain, the two water binding sites that are most distant from the protein bulk surface were occupied by water molecules that approached along the E65/E312 channel, one of which formed an H-bond with the O4 site. These findings provide key insights into the significance of the channel ends, which may utilize water molecules during the PSII photocycle.

  11. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacruz, C. P.; Balan, A.; Ferreira, L. C. S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barbosa, J. A. R. G., E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Estrutural (CeBiMe), Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), CP 6192, Campinas, SP 13084-971 (Brazil); Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2006-03-01

    The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from X. axonopodis pv. citri was crystallized with sodium molybdate in the presence of PEG or sulfate. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1,} with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ModA protein is the ABC periplasmic binding component responsible for the capture of molybdate. The protein was crystallized with sodium molybdate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG or sulfate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  12. Determination of specific binding interactions at L-cystine crystal surfaces with chemical force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Trinanjana; Ward, Michael D

    2013-04-17

    The pathogenesis of L-cystine kidney stones involves four critical steps: nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation, and crystal adhesion to cells. Although inhibition of crystal growth by L-cystine "imposters" at L-cystine crystal surfaces has been suggested as a plausible route for the suppression of stones, understanding the factors that govern crystal-crystal aggregation and adhesion of crystals to epithelial cells also is essential for devising strategies to mitigate L-cystine stone formation. Chemical force microscopy performed with atomic force microscope tips decorated with functional groups commonly found in urinary constituents that likely mediate aggregation and attachment (e.g., COOH, NH2, SH, CH3, OH) revealed signatures that reflect differences in the chemical affinity of these groups for the (001) and {100} faces of the naturally occurring hexagonal form of L-cystine single crystals and the {110} faces of the non-native tetragonal form. These signatures can be explained by the different chemical compositions of the crystal faces, and they reveal a remarkable binding specificity of the thiol group for the sulfur-rich {100} and {110} faces of the hexagonal and tetragonal forms, respectively. Collectively, these observations suggest that alterations of the crystal habit and polymorph by crystal growth inhibitors may not affect crystal aggregation or adhesion to cells significantly.

  13. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D.; Betz, Robin M.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L.; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dror, Ron O.; Roth, Bryan L. (UNCSM); (UNC); (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (UCSF)

    2017-01-01

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD’s key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR—a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD’s slow binding kinetics may be due to a “lid” formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD’s binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD’s actions at human serotonin receptors.

  14. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D; Betz, Robin M; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E; Shoichet, Brian K; Dror, Ron O; Roth, Bryan L

    2017-01-26

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD's key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR-a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD's slow binding kinetics may be due to a "lid" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD's binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD's actions at human serotonin receptors. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2016-05-23

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)+as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD+versusNADP+, but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase fromClostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia colienzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP+cofactor from the parentE. colidomain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity.

  16. Structure sensitive properties of KTP-type crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Adding various dopants during the growth of the parent KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal has given rise to an extensive series of KTP-type crystals. The doped KTP or KTP-type crystals often have very subtle structural variations from pure KTP crystals. As a result of these structural changes the KTP-type crystals often exhibit different physical properties, which may be referred to as structure sensitive properties. It is possible to fine-tune the nonlinear optical properties of KTP crystals through doping. This results in a broad range of applications for KTP-type crystals.

  17. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  18. Pressure effects on crystal and electronic structure of bismuth tellurohalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinov, I. P.; Menshchikova, T. V.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K.-P.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    We study the possibility of pressure-induced transitions from a normal semiconductor to a topological insulator (TI) in bismuth tellurohalides using density functional theory and tight-binding method. In BiTeI this transition is realized through the formation of an intermediate phase, a Weyl semimetal, that leads to modification of surface state dispersions. In the topologically trivial phase, the surface states exhibit a Bychkov-Rashba type dispersion. The Weyl semimetal phase exists in a narrow pressure interval of 0.2 GPa. After the Weyl semimetal-TI transition occurs, the surface electronic structure is characterized by gapless states with linear dispersion. The peculiarities of the surface states modification under pressure depend on the band-bending effect. We have also calculated the frequencies of Raman active modes for BiTeI in the proposed high-pressure crystal phases in order to compare them with available experimental data. Unlike BiTeI, in BiTeBr and BiTeCl the topological phase transition does not occur. In BiTeBr, the crystal structure changes with pressure but the phase remains a trivial one. However, the transition appears to be possible if the low-pressure crystal structure is retained. In BiTeCl under pressure, the topological phase does not appear up to 18 GPa due to a relatively large band gap width in this compound.

  19. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of a mannose-binding lectin from champedak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Isaacs, Neil W; Hashim, Onn Haji; Cogdell, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    Mannose-binding lectin from champedak (Artocarpus integer) is a homotetramer with a single-monomer molecular weight of 16 800 Da. Previous work has shown it to bind IgE and IgM, as well as being a mitogen of T cells in humans. Champedak mannose-binding lectin has successfully been used to detect altered glycosylation states of serum proteins. The protein was crystallized at 293 K in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 76.89, b = 86.22, c = 95.37 A) and the crystals diffracted to 2.0 A resolution.

  20. Structural Insights into the Phospholipid Binding Specificity of Human Evectin-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Seiji; Kato, Ryuichi; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Uchida, Yasunori; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    Evectin-2 is a recycling endosomal protein and plays an essential role in retrograde transport from recycling endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Evectin-2 can specifically binds to phosphatidylserine (PS), which is enriched in recycling endosomes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism how it specifically binds to PS, we solved the crystal structures of human Evectin-2 PH domain for apo and O-phospho-L-serine complexed forms at 1.75 and 1.00 Å resolution, respectively. These structural analyses clearly show that PS-induced conformational change of Evectin-2 PH domain effectively explains the strict phospholipid binding specificity.

  1. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  2. Crystal structure of tris(hydroxylammonium orthophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Leinemann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH]+3·[PO4]3−, consists of discrete hydroxylammonium cations and orthophosphate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phosphorus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by intermolecular O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O—H...O, two N—H...O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N—H...O interactions are observed.

  3. Crystal structure of the Rasputin NTF2-like domain from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vognsen, Tina Reinholdt; Kristensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of the Drosophila homolog of Ras GTPase SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), Rasputin, was determined at 2.7Å resolution. The overall structure is highly similar to nuclear transport factor 2: It is a homodimer comprised of a ß-sheet and three a-helices forming...

  4. Crystal Structures of New Ammonium 5-Aminotetrazolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lampl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of three salts of anionic 5-aminotetrazole are described. The tetramethylammonium salt (P forms hydrogen-bonded ribbons of anions which accept weak C–H···N contacts from the cations. The cystamine salt (C2/c shows wave-shaped ribbons of anions linked by hydrogen bonds to screw-shaped dications. The tetramethylguanidine salt (P21/c exhibits layers of anions hydrogen-bonded to the cations.

  5. Crystal Structure of a New Cembranolide Diterpene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new cembranoide deterpene was isolated from the soft coral Sinularia Tenella. The crystal and chemical structure of the title compound were determined by means of spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction analysis as (1R* , 4R* , 5S* , 12S* , 12R* )-9-acetoxy-cembr-8E, 15 (17)-dien-16,4-olide. It shows a moderate cytotoxicity against P 388 and L 1210 cell lines.

  6. Crystal Structure Refinement of Synthetic Pure Gyrolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arūnas Baltušnikas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure calcium silicate hydrate – gyrolite was prepared under the saturated steam pressure at 473 K temperature in rotating autoclave. The crystal structure of synthetic gyrolite was investigated by X-ray diffraction and refined using Le Bail, Rietveld and crystal structure modelling methods. Background, peak shape parameters and verification of the space group were performed by the Le Bail full pattern decomposition. Peculiarities of interlayer sheet X of gyrolite unit cell were highlighted by Rietveld refinement. Possible atomic arrangement in interlayer sheet X was solved by global optimization method. Most likelihood crystal structure model of gyrolite was calculated by final Rietveld refinement. It was crystallographically showed, that cell parameters are: a = 0.9713(2 nm, b = 0.9715(2 nm, c = 2.2442(3 nm and alfa = 95.48(2 º, beta = 91.45(2 °, gamma = l20.05(3 °.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5460

  7. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase ll)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, F.; Zhang, J; Nemet, I; Qanungo, K; Monnier, V; Yee, V

    2008-01-01

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6{angstrom} resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12{angstrom} deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, François; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Qanungo, Kaustubha R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Yee, Vivien C. (Case Western)

    2009-01-12

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6{angstrom} resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12{angstrom} deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase II)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, François; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Qanungo, Kaustubha R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2008-01-01

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6Å resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12Å deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates. PMID:18667417

  10. Crystal structure of the deglycating enzyme fructosamine oxidase (amadoriase II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, François; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Qanungo, Kaustubha R; Monnier, Vincent M; Yee, Vivien C

    2008-10-03

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6A resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12A deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates.

  11. Crystal structure of the bacteriophage P2 integrase catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaar, Karin; Claesson, Magnus; Odegrip, Richard; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2015-11-30

    Bacteriophage P2 is a temperate phage capable of integrating its DNA into the host genome by site-specific recombination upon lysogenization. Integration and excision of the phage genome requires P2 integrase, which performs recognition, cleavage and joining of DNA during these processes. This work presents the high-resolution crystal structure of the catalytic domain of P2 integrase, and analysis of the structure-function relationship of several previously identified non-functional P2 integrase mutants. The DNA binding area is characterized by a large positively charged patch, harboring key residues. The structure reveals potential for large dimer flexibility, likely essential for rearrangement of DNA strands upon integration and excision of the phage DNA.

  12. Structure and binding properties of a cameloid nanobody raised against KDM5B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuf, Anders; Kristensen, Line Hyltoft; Kristensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The histone demethylase KDM5B is considered to be a promising target for anticancer therapy. Single-chain antibodies from llama (nanobodies) have been raised to aid in crystallization and structure determination of this enzyme. The antigen-binding properties of 15 of these nanobodies have been...

  13. Structure and Mode of Peptide Binding of Pheromone Receptor PrgZ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Dunny, Gary; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Wepresent the crystal structure of the pheromone receptor protein PrgZ from Enterococcus faecalis in complex with the heptapeptide cCF10 (LVTLVFV), which is used in signaling between conjugative recipient and donor cells. Comparison of PrgZ with homologous oligopeptide-binding proteins (AppA and Opp

  14. Structural Insight into Multivalent Galactoside Binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lectin LecA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visini, Ricardo; Jin, Xian; Bergmann, Myriam; Michaud, Gaelle; Pertici, Francesca; Fu, Ou; Pukin, Aliaksei; Branson, Thomas R.; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Kemmink, Johan; Gillon, Emilie; Imberty, Anne; Stocker, Achim; Darbre, Tamis; Pieters, Roland J.; Reymond, Jean Louis

    2015-01-01

    Multivalent galactosides inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms may help control this problematic pathogen. To understand the binding mode of tetravalent glycopeptide dendrimer GalAG2 [(Gal-β-OC6H4CO-Lys-Pro-Leu)4(Lys-Phe-Lys-Ile)2Lys-His-Ile-NH2] to its target lectin LecA, crystal structures of

  15. Accurate Modeling of Organic Molecular Crystals by Dispersion-Corrected Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2014-06-05

    The ambitious goal of organic crystal structure prediction challenges theoretical methods regarding their accuracy and efficiency. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) in principle is applicable, but the computational demands, for example, to compute a huge number of polymorphs, are too high. Here, we demonstrate that this task can be carried out by a dispersion-corrected density functional tight binding (DFTB) method. The semiempirical Hamiltonian with the D3 correction can accurately and efficiently model both solid- and gas-phase inter- and intramolecular interactions at a speed up of 2 orders of magnitude compared to DFT-D. The mean absolute deviations for interaction (lattice) energies for various databases are typically 2-3 kcal/mol (10-20%), that is, only about two times larger than those for DFT-D. For zero-point phonon energies, small deviations of <0.5 kcal/mol compared to DFT-D are obtained.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  17. Crystal structure of the Rasputin NTF2-like domain from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vognsen, Tina; Kristensen, Ole

    2012-03-30

    The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of the Drosophila homolog of Ras GTPase SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), Rasputin, was determined at 2.7Å resolution. The overall structure is highly similar to nuclear transport factor 2: It is a homodimer comprised of a β-sheet and three α-helices forming a cone-like shape. However, known binding sites for RanGDP and FxFG containing peptides show electrostatic and steric differences compared to nuclear transport factor 2. A HEPES molecule bound in the structure suggests a new, and possibly physiologically relevant, ligand binding site.

  18. A DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2,3,4,6-TETRANITROANILINE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (* CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , EXPLOSIVES), (*EXPLOSIVES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), AROMATIC COMPOUNDS, AMINES, NITRATES, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, FOURIER ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL BONDS.

  19. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-03-19

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome-the high-eukaryote-specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)-remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  20. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  1. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray analysis of CsdL/TcdA reveal a new tRNA binding motif in the MoeB/E1 superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Ardá, Ana; Savko, Martin; Round, Adam; Shepard, William E; Bruix, Marta; Coll, Miquel; Fernández, Francisco J; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Vega, M Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine ('cyclic t6A', ct(6)A) is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct(6)A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct(6)A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct(6)A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct(6)A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA.

  2. The Crystal Structure and Small-Angle X-Ray Analysis of CsdL/TcdA Reveal a New tRNA Binding Motif in the MoeB/E1 Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Ardá, Ana; Savko, Martin; Round, Adam; Shepard, William E.; Bruix, Marta; Coll, Miquel; Fernández, Francisco J.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Vega, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (‘cyclic t6A’, ct6A) is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA. PMID:25897750

  3. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray analysis of CsdL/TcdA reveal a new tRNA binding motif in the MoeB/E1 superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel López-Estepa

    Full Text Available Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine ('cyclic t6A', ct(6A is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct(6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct(6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct(6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct(6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA.

  4. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2-(4’-AMINO-5’AMINO PYRIMIDY) -2-PENTENE-4-ONE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NITROGEN HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*AMINES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*KETONES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), CRYSTAL LATTICES, FOURIER ANALYSIS, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, PYRIMIDINES, CHEMICAL BONDS

  5. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria V. Abzianidze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent molecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the molecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001 plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hydroxy groups located on the interior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O—H...O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001 plane. The butyl chains interdigitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major–minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6:0.282 (6.

  6. Structural characterization of metal binding to a cold-adapted frataxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Martín E; Roman, Ernesto A; Rigal, Juan B; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Frataxin is an evolutionary conserved protein that participates in iron metabolism. Deficiency of this small protein in humans causes a severe neurodegenerative disease known as Friedreich's ataxia. A number of studies indicate that frataxin binds iron and regulates Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Previous structural studies showed that metal binding occurs mainly in a region of high density of negative charge. However, a comprehensive characterization of the binding sites is required to gain further insights into the mechanistic details of frataxin function. In this work, we have solved the X-ray crystal structures of a cold-adapted frataxin from a psychrophilic bacterium in the presence of cobalt or europium ions. We have identified a number of metal-binding sites, mainly solvent exposed, several of which had not been observed in previous studies on mesophilic homologues. No major structural changes were detected upon metal binding, although the structures exhibit significant changes in crystallographic B-factors. The analysis of these B-factors, in combination with crystal packing and RMSD among structures, suggests the existence of localized changes in the internal motions. Based on these results, we propose that bacterial frataxins possess binding sites of moderate affinity for a quick capture and transfer of iron to other proteins and for the regulation of Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, modulating interactions with partner proteins.

  7. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Silveira Belo Nascimento Roque, Paulo Sergio; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K.; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-09-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality.

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of a single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuyang; Allan, Phoebe K; Renouf, Catherine L; He, Xiang; McCormick, Laura J; Morris, Russell E

    2014-01-28

    A single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer compound was hydrothermally synthesized. The structural rearrangement is induced by selecting a ligand that contains both strong and weaker coordinating groups. Both hydrated and dehydrated structures were determined by single crystal X-ray analysis.

  9. Structural Basis for Sialoglycan Binding by the Streptococcus sanguinis SrpA Adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensing, Barbara A; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; McCulloch, Kathryn M; Yu, Hai; Vann, Kendra R; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Anderson, Spencer; Chen, Xi; Sullam, Paul M; Iverson, T M

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus sanguinisis a leading cause of infective endocarditis, a life-threatening infection of the cardiovascular system. An important interaction in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is attachment of the organisms to host platelets.S. sanguinisexpresses a serine-rich repeat adhesin, SrpA, similar in sequence to platelet-binding adhesins associated with increased virulence in this disease. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the putative binding region of SrpA (SrpABR) both unliganded and in complex with a synthetic disaccharide ligand at 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. We identified a conserved Thr-Arg motif that orients the sialic acid moiety and is required for binding to platelet monolayers. Furthermore, we propose that sequence insertions in closely related family members contribute to the modulation of structural and functional properties, including the quaternary structure, the tertiary structure, and the ligand-binding site.

  10. Diterbium heptanickel: a crystal structure redetermination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Levytskyy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, Tb2Ni7, was redetermined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. In comparison with previous studies based on powder X-ray diffraction data [Lemaire et al. (1967. C. R. Acad. Sci. Ser. B, 265, 1280–1282; Lemaire & Paccard (1969. Bull. Soc. Fr. Mineral. Cristallogr. 92, 9–16; Buschow & van der Goot (1970. J. Less-Common Met. 22, 419–428], the present redetermination affords refined coordinates and anisotropic displacement parameters for all atoms. A partial occupation for one Tb atom results in the non-stoichiometric composition Tb1.962 (4Ni7. The title compound adopts the Ce2Ni7 structure type and can also be derived from the CaCu5 structure type as an intergrowth structure. The asymmetric unit contains two Tb sites (both site symmetries 3m. and five Ni sites (.m., mm2, 3m., 3m., -3m.. The two different coordination polyhedra of Tb are a Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by four Tb and 12 Ni atoms and a pseudo Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by two Tb and 18 Ni atoms. The four different coordination polyhedra of Ni are Frank–Kasper icosahedra formed by five Tb and seven Ni atoms, four Tb and eight Ni atoms, three Tb and nine Ni atoms, and six Tb and six Ni atoms, respectively.

  11. Structural aspects of dog allergies: the crystal structure of a dog dander allergen Can f 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Merja H; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Jänis, Janne; Virtanen, Tuomas; Rouvinen, Juha

    2014-09-01

    Four out of six officially recognized dog allergens are members of the lipocalin protein family. So far, a three-dimensional structure has been determined for only one dog allergen, Can f 2, which is a lipocalin protein. We present here the crystal structure of a second lipocalin allergen from dog, a variant of Can f 4. Moreover, we have compared and analyzed the structures of these two weakly homologous (amino acid identity 21%) dog allergens. The size and the amino acid composition of the ligand-binding pocket indicate that Can f 4 is capable of binding only relatively small hydrophobic molecules which are different from those that Can f 2 is able to bind. The crystal structure of Can f 4 contained both monomeric and dimeric forms of the allergen, suggesting that Can f 4 is able to form transient (weak) dimers. The existence of transient dimers in solution was confirmed by use of native mass spectrometry. The dimeric structure of Can f 4 is formed when the ends of four β-strands are packed against the same strands from the second monomer. The residues in the interface are mainly hydrophobic and the formation of the dimer is similar to the major horse allergen Equ c 1. Interestingly, the crystal structure of dog Can f 2 has been reported to show a different type of dimer formation. The capability of these allergens to form dimers may be important for the development of immediate allergic reaction (mast cell activation) because oligomeric allergens can effectively present multivalent epitopes.

  12. Structure of the Taz2 domain of p300: insights into ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Maria, E-mail: mariami@mail.nih.gov [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E. [Protein Purification Core, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States); Wlodawer, Alexander [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The crystal structure of the Taz2 zinc-finger domain of the human p300 transcriptional coactivator was determined using the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. Crystal contacts suggested a possible novel mode of Taz2–peptide ligand interactions. CBP and its paralog p300 are histone acetyl transferases that regulate gene expression by interacting with multiple transcription factors via specialized domains. The structure of a segment of human p300 protein (residues 1723–1836) corresponding to the extended zinc-binding Taz2 domain has been investigated. The crystal structure was solved by the SAD approach utilizing the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. The structure comprises an atypical helical bundle stabilized by three Zn ions and closely resembles the solution structures determined previously for shorter peptides. Residues 1813–1834 from the current construct form a helical extension of the C-terminal helix and make extensive crystal-contact interactions with the peptide-binding site of Taz2, providing additional insights into the mechanism of the recognition of diverse transactivation domains (TADs) by Taz2. On the basis of these results and molecular modeling, a hypothetical model of the binding of phosphorylated p53 TAD1 to Taz2 has been proposed.

  13. Crystal structure of a family 80 chitosanase from Mitsuaria chitosanitabida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorinaga, Yutaka; Kumasaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Hamada, Kensaku; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    Chitosanases belong to glycoside hydrolase families 5, 7, 8, 46, 75 and 80 and hydrolyse glucosamine polymers produced by partial or full deacetylation of chitin. Herein, we determined the crystal structure of chitosanase from the β-proteobacterium, Mitsuaria chitosanitabida, (McChoA) at 1.75 Å resolution; the first structure of a family 80 chitosanase. McChoA is a 34 kDa extracellular protein of 301 amino acids that fold into two (upper and lower) globular domains with an active site cleft between them. Key substrate-binding features are conserved with family 24 lysozymes and family 46 chitosanases. The distance between catalytic residues E41 and E61 (10.8 Å) indicates an inverting type mechanism. Uniquely, three disulphide bridges and the C terminus might contribute to enzyme activity.

  14. Crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain visualize FxFG Nup Repeat Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vognsen, Tina Reinholdt; Möller, Ingvar Rúnar; Kristensen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Ras GTPase Activating Protein SH3 Domain Binding Protein (G3BP) is a potential anti-cancer drug target implicated in several cellular functions. We have used protein crystallography to solve crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain both alone and in complex with an FxFG Nup repeat...... crystal form might indicate a novel ligand binding site that, however, remains to be validated. The crystal structures give insight into the nuclear transportation mechanisms of G3BP and provide a basis for future structure based drug design....

  15. X-ray crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yennawar, Hemant; Møller, Magda; Gillilan, Richard;

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (slSDH) has been determined using the crystal structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (hSDH) as a molecular-replacement model. slSDH crystallized in space group I222 with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. A conserved tetramer...... the substrate-binding pocket together with the acetate designed by nature to fit large polyol substrates. The substrate-binding pocket is seen to be in close proximity to the tetramer interface, which explains the need for the structural integrity of the tetramer for enzyme activity. Small-angle X...

  16. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

  17. Crystal structure prediction from first principles: The crystal structures of glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the genetic algorithms search implemented in MGAC, modified genetic algorithm for crystals, coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable.

  18. Tailoring quantum structures for active photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsova, Nadezda

    This work is dedicated to the tailoring of quantum structures, with particular attention to the integration of selective area grown (SAG) active material into photonic crystal (PhC) slabs. The platform based on active PhC is vital to the realization of highly efficient elements with low energy...... consumption for on-chip and chip-to-chip optical communication. In order to develop metal-organic vapor phase epitaxial selective area etching and growth, a mask was fabricated in the HSQ e-beam resist including optimization of exposure and development conditions. By use of CBr4 as an etchant, in situ etching...... area and between the structures oriented along the [0-1-1] and [0-11] directions. Strong wavelength dependence with variations of the mask width of a few μm and opening sizes of hundreds of nanometers was observed. Incorporation of an active medium into PhC structures has showed promising results...

  19. Isolation and Crystal Structure of Horminone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓; 廖仁安; 翁林红; 谢庆兰; 邓锋杰

    2000-01-01

    The horminone (C20H28O4, Mr= 332.85) was first isolated from the leaves of Rabdosia Serra (Maxim) Hara and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction method. Horminone is orthorhombic with space group P21P21P21, a=7.7186(7), b=9.5506(9), c=24.227(2) A, V=1785.9(3) A3, Z=4, Dc=1.236g/cm3, λ=0. 71073 A , μ(MoKα)=0. 085mm-1, F(000)=720. The structure was refined to R=0. 0369, wR=0.0978 for 2446 reflections with I>2σ(Ⅰ). X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that there are three six-membered rings in the title molecule. Ring A is in the chair conformation, ring C has the structure of quinone and there are two intermolecular hydrogen bonds between two molecules.

  20. Structural basis of Ets1 cooperative binding to widely separated sites on promoter DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar D Babayeva

    Full Text Available Ets1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors. Ets1 is expressed in autoinhibited form and its DNA binding depends on partner proteins bound to adjacent sequences or the relative positioning of a second Ets-binding site (EBS. The autoinhibition of Ets1 is mediated by structural coupling of regions flanking the DNA-binding domain. The NMR structure of Ets1 revealed that the inhibitory regions comprised of helices HI1 and HI2 and H4 are packed together on the Ets domain to form an inhibitory module. The crystal structure of Ets1 unexpectedly revealed a homodimer in which homodimerisation occurs via swapping of HI1 helices. Modeling of DNA binding indicates that the Ets1 dimer can bind to two antiparallel pieces of DNA. To verify this, we crystallized and solved the structure of the complex comprised of Ets1 dimer and two pieces of DNA. DNA binding by Ets1 dimer resulted in formation of additional intermolecular protein•DNA interactions, implying that the complex formation is cooperative.

  1. Structure and binding efficiency relations of QB site inhibitors of photosynthetic reaction centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husu, Ivan; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Fiser, Béla; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Nagy, László

    2015-04-01

    Many herbicides employed in agriculture and also some antibiotics bind to a specific site of the reaction centre protein (RC) blocking the photosynthetic electron transport. Crystal structures showed that all these compounds bind at the secondary ubiquinone (QB) site albeit to slightly different places. Different herbicide molecules have different binding affinities (evaluated as inhibition constants, KI, and binding enthalpy values, ΔHbind). The action of inhibitors depends on the following parameters: (i) herbicide molecular structure; (ii) interactions between herbicide and quinone binding site; (iii) protein environment. In our investigations KI and ΔHbind were determined for several inhibitors. Bound herbicide structures were optimized and their intramolecular charge distributions were calculated. Experimental and calculated data were compared to those available from databank crystal structures. We can state that the herbicide inhibition efficiency depends on steric and electronic, i.e. geometry of binding with the protein and molecular charge distribution, respectively. Apolar bulky groups on N-7 atom of the inhibitor molecule (like t-buthyl in terbutryn) are preferable for establishing stronger interactions with QB site, while such substituents are not recommended on N-8. The N-4,7,8 nitrogen atoms maintain a larger electron density so that more effective H-bonds are formed between the inhibitor and the surrounding amino acids of the protein.

  2. Crystal structure of (ferrocenylmethyldimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamadou Ndiaye

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title salt, [Fe(C5H5(C8H13N](HC2O4, consists of discrete (ferrocenylmethyldimethylammonium cations and hydrogen oxalate anions. The anions are connected through a strong O—H...O hydrogen bond, forming linear chains running parallel to [100]. The cations are linked to the anions through bifurcated N—H...(O,O′ hydrogen bonds. Weak C—H...π interactions between neighbouring ferrocenyl moieties are also observed.

  3. [Crystal and molecular structure of cytisine salts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiecka, Julia; Przybył, Anna K; Kubicki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Cytisine is an alkaloid of plant origin. It is a toxic substance, obtained on an industrial scale from Laburnum anagyroides also known as common laburnum. Today is used in the preparation of anti-smoking products as an agonist of nicotinic receptors nAChR-alpha4beta2. Thanks to crystallographic methods we can examine and describe with high accuracy the actual structure of complex chemical compounds. This work aims to present a series of tests carried out on crystals of cytisine salts, after a prior isolation of cytisine from the seeds of laburnum anagyroides.

  4. Crystal structure of hexaaquadichloridoytterbium(III chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Knopf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, [YbCl2(H2O6]Cl, was determined at 110 K. Samples were obtained from evaporated acetonitrile solutions containing the title compound, which consists of a [YbCl2(H2O6]+ cation and a Cl− anion. The cations in the title compound sit on a twofold axis and form O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds with the nearby Cl− anion. The coordination geometry around the metal centre forms a distorted square antiprism. The ytterbium complex is isotypic with the europium complex [Tambrornino et al. (2014. Acta Cryst. E70, i27].

  5. Crystal Structure of Marburg Virus VP24

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Adrianna P. P.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-01-01

    The VP24 protein plays an essential, albeit poorly understood role in the filovirus life cycle. VP24 is only 30% identical between Marburg virus and the ebolaviruses. Furthermore, VP24 from the ebolaviruses is immunosuppressive, while that of Marburg virus is not. The crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24, presented here, reveals that although the core is similar between the viral genera, Marburg VP24 is distinguished by a projecting β-shelf and an alternate conformation of the N-terminal p...

  6. Crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Adrianna P P; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Abelson, Dafna M; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-05-01

    The VP24 protein plays an essential, albeit poorly understood role in the filovirus life cycle. VP24 is only 30% identical between Marburg virus and the ebolaviruses. Furthermore, VP24 from the ebolaviruses is immunosuppressive, while that of Marburg virus is not. The crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24, presented here, reveals that although the core is similar between the viral genera, Marburg VP24 is distinguished by a projecting β-shelf and an alternate conformation of the N-terminal polypeptide.

  7. Elasticity of some mantle crystal structures. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Simmons, G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants are determined as a function of pressure and temperature for rutile structure germanium dioxide (GeO2). The data are qualitatively similar to those of rutile TiO2 measured by Manghnani (1969). The compressibility in the c direction is less than one-half that in the a direction, the pressure derivative of the shear constant is negative, and the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus has a relatively high value of about 6.2. According to an elastic strain energy theory, the negative shear modulus derivative implies that the kinetic barrier to diffusion decreases with increasing pressure.

  8. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms.

  9. Syntheses and Crystal Structures of Pyrazoline Derivants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hai-Bin; JI Shun-Jun; ZHANG Yong

    2005-01-01

    Two pyrazoline derivants 1-(2-benzothiazole)-3-phenyl-5-(3-thiophene)-2- pyrazoline (BPTP) and 1-(2-benzothiazole)-3-(2-thiophene)-5-phenyl-2-pyrazoline (BTPP) have been synthe- sized and their crystal structures were determined by X-ray single-crystal diffraction.Crystal of BPTP belongs to triclinic, space group P with a = 9.4430(11), b = 9.9384(13), c = 9.9394(13) (A), α = 83.107(10), β = 79.947(10), γ = 70.221(7)o, V = 862.42(19) (A)3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.392 g/cm3, μ(MoKα) = 0.316 mm-1, F(000) = 376, λ = 0.71070 (A), (Δρ)max = 0.348, (Δρ)min = -0.481 e/(A)3, the final R = 0.0407 and wR = 0.1055 for 2844 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I).Crystal of BTPP is of monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 11.6158(17), b = 11.2796(18), c = 13.082(2) (A), α = 90, β = 91.087(4), γ = 90o, V = 1713.7(5) (A)3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.401 g/cm3, μ(MoKα) = 0.318 mm-1, Mr = 361.07, F(000) = 752, λ = 0.71070 (A), (Δρ)max = 0.322, (Δρ)min = -0.330 e/(A)3, the final R = 0.0563 and wR = 0.1058 for 3434 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I).

  10. Tight Binding Calculation of Electric Field Gradients in Arsenic Chalcogenide Crystals and Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Chris B.; Taylor, P. Craig; Harrison, Walter A.

    2000-03-01

    We apply a tight binding approach to calculate the electric field gradient at As atoms due to three nearest neighbor chalcogen atoms in the two inequivalent As sites of crystalline As_2S_3, As_2Se_3, orthorhombic As (Or-As), and rhombohedral As (Rh-As). We first orthogonalize the 4s and 4p valence states on an As atom with respect to sp hybride states constructed on the three nearest neighbor chalcogen atoms. The orthogonalized As valence states are then othogonalized with respect to the As 2p and 3p core states using the Gramm-Schmidt procedure. The resulting state is used aa a first approximation to calculate the electric field gradient at the As nuclear site. Using Harrison's tight binding parameters,[1] which were constructed for tetrahedrally-coordinated semiconductors, we obtain excellent agreement with experiment for Rh-As and are within a factor of 2 ~ 4 for the Or-As, As_2S_3, As_2Se_3, crystal structures. Because the calculation depends only on the number of nearest neighbors it may be extendable to disordered systems, such as a glass. 1. S.Froyen and W.A. Harrison, Phys. Rev. B, 20, 2420 (1979).

  11. Structure of the homodimeric androgen receptor ligand-binding domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Marta; Prekovic, Stefan; Gallastegui, Nerea; Helsen, Christine; Abella, Montserrat; Zielinska, Karolina; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta; Taulès, Marta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van Royen, Martin E.; Claessens, Frank; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a crucial role in normal physiology, development and metabolism as well as in the aetiology and treatment of diverse pathologies such as androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS), male infertility and prostate cancer (PCa). Here we show that dimerization of AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is induced by receptor agonists but not by antagonists. The 2.15-Å crystal structure of homodimeric, agonist- and coactivator peptide-bound AR-LBD unveils a 1,000-Å2 large dimerization surface, which harbours over 40 previously unexplained AIS- and PCa-associated point mutations. An AIS mutation in the self-association interface (P767A) disrupts dimer formation in vivo, and has a detrimental effect on the transactivating properties of full-length AR, despite retained hormone-binding capacity. The conservation of essential residues suggests that the unveiled dimerization mechanism might be shared by other nuclear receptors. Our work defines AR-LBD homodimerization as an essential step in the proper functioning of this important transcription factor. PMID:28165461

  12. Band structure characteristics of T-square fractal phononic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-Jian; Fan You-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The T-square fractal two-dimensional phononic crystal model is presented in this article.A comprehensive study is performed for the Bragg scattering and locally resonant fractal phononic crystal.We find that the band structures of the fractal and non-fractal phononic crystals at the same filling ratio are quite different through using the finite element method.The fractal design has an important impact on the band structures of the two-dimensional phononic crystals.

  13. Modeling of photonic crystal waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Ivan; Kwiecien, Pavel; Šiňor, Milan; Haiduk, Adam

    2007-05-01

    Photonic crystal (PhC) structures and photonic structures based on them represent nowadays very promising structures of artificial origin. Since they exhibit very specific properties and characteristics that can be very difficult (or even impossible) to realize by other means, they represent a significant part of new artificially made metamaterial classes. For studying and modeling properties of PhC structures, we have applied, implemented and partially improved various complementary techniques: the 2D plane wave expansion (PWE) method, and the 2D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method with perfectly matched layers. Also, together with these in-house methods, other tools available in the field have been applied, including, e.g. MIT MPB (PWE), F2P (FDTD) and CAMFR (bidirectional expansion and propagation mode matching method) packages. We have applied these methods to several PhC waveguide structure examples, studying the effects of varying the key parameters and geometry. Such a study is relevant for proper understanding of physical mechanisms and for optimization and fabrication recommendations. Namely, in this contribution, we have concentrated on several examples of PhC waveguide structure simulations, of two types of guides (dielectric-rode type and air-hole type), with several geometries: rectangular lattice with either rectangular or chessboard inclusions. The modeling results are compared and discussed.

  14. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Y.C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.G., E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chun, S.H.; Kim, K.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state. - Highlights: • For the first time Ferromagnetic Resonance is used to probe the local magnetic structure of Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22.} • The multiphases in the single crystal is identified, which provides important information toward its future application for the magnetoelectric devices.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo, E-mail: max.paoli@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding.

  16. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L. [Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fox, Gavin C. [Spanish CRG Beamline BM16, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Raaij, Mark J. van, E-mail: vanraaij@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  17. Syntheses and Crystal Structures of Ferrocenoindenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Laus

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferrocenoindenes display planar chirality and thus represent valuable ligands for asymmetric catalysis. Here, we report on the synthesis of novel 3-(1,1-dibromomethyleneferroceno[1,2-a]indene, (Z-3-(1-bromomethylene-6-iodoferroceno[1,2-a]indene, and benzo[5,6-f]ferroceno[2,3,a]inden-1-one. Any application-oriented design of chiral catalysts requires fundamental knowledge about the ligands involved, not only in terms of atom-connectivity, but also in terms of their three-dimensional structure and steric demand. Therefore, the crystal structures of 2-ferrocenylbenzoic acid, ferroceno[1,2-a]indene, and (Z-3-(1-bromomethylene-6-iodoferroceno[1,2-a]indene have been determined. The bond-lengths that can be retrieved therefrom also allow for an estimation of the reactivity of the aryl-iodo, bromo-methylidene and dibromomethylidene moieties.

  18. Crystal structure of KLHL3 in complex with Cullin3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan X Ji

    Full Text Available KLHL3 is a BTB-BACK-Kelch family protein that serves as a substrate adapter in Cullin3 (Cul3 E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes. KLHL3 is highly expressed in distal nephron tubules where it is involved in the regulation of electrolyte homeostasis and blood pressure. Mutations in KLHL3 have been identified in patients with inherited hypertension disorders, and several of the disease-associated mutations are located in the presumed Cul3 binding region. Here, we report the crystal structure of a complex between the KLHL3 BTB-BACK domain dimer and two copies of an N terminal fragment of Cul3. We use isothermal titration calorimetry to directly demonstrate that several of the disease mutations in the KLHL3 BTB-BACK domains disrupt the association with Cul3. Both the BTB and BACK domains contribute to the Cul3 interaction surface, and an extended model of the dimeric CRL3 complex places the two E2 binding sites in a suprafacial arrangement with respect to the presumed substrate-binding sites.

  19. Conformational energy range of ligands in protein crystal structures: The difficult quest for accurate understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Megan L; Cachau, Raul E; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2017-02-24

    In this review, we address a fundamental question: What is the range of conformational energies seen in ligands in protein-ligand crystal structures? This value is important biophysically, for better understanding the protein-ligand binding process; and practically, for providing a parameter to be used in many computational drug design methods such as docking and pharmacophore searches. We synthesize a selection of previously reported conflicting results from computational studies of this issue and conclude that high ligand conformational energies really are present in some crystal structures. The main source of disagreement between different analyses appears to be due to divergent treatments of electrostatics and solvation. At the same time, however, for many ligands, a high conformational energy is in error, due to either crystal structure inaccuracies or incorrect determination of the reference state. Aside from simple chemistry mistakes, we argue that crystal structure error may mainly be because of the heuristic weighting of ligand stereochemical restraints relative to the fit of the structure to the electron density. This problem cannot be fixed with improvements to electron density fitting or with simple ligand geometry checks, though better metrics are needed for evaluating ligand and binding site chemistry in addition to geometry during structure refinement. The ultimate solution for accurately determining ligand conformational energies lies in ultrahigh-resolution crystal structures that can be refined without restraints.

  20. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose A.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F.; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-07-01

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates.

  1. Crystal quality and inhibitor binding by aspartic proteinases; preparation of high quality crystals of mouse renin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badasso, M.; Sibanda, B. L.; Cooper, J. B.; Dealwis, C. G.; Wood, S. P.

    1992-08-01

    Renin from mouse submandibular glands has been highly purified and co-crystallized with a synthetic nonapeptide fragment of rat angiotensionogen in which the scissile Leu-Leu bond has been modified as a hydroxyethylene mimic of the transition state. The strong diffraction from these crystals compared to the native form is discussed in relation to the behaviour of other members of the aspartic proteinase family in crystallisation.

  2. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Isosteviol Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jing-Chao; Tian Guo-Qiang; Zhang Yan-Bing; Wu Ya; Liu Hong-Min

    2004-01-01

    Isosteviol (ent-16-ketobeyeran-19-oic acid, I) is a tetracyclic diterpenoid with a beyerane skeleton obtained by acid hydrolysis of stevioside.1 Several tetracyclic diterpenoids, specially the kaurenes, have important biological activities. Recent studies on the microbial transformation of isosteviol have revealed that it is metabolized by Cunninghamella bainieri, Actinoplanes sp., Mucor recurvatus, and Cunninghamella blackesleeana to yield five new metabolites.2 The hydroxylation pattern of these bioactive compounds may influence their binding on to the receptors, as was proposed for the Rabdosia diterpenoids. Therefore, the introduction of hydroxyl groups or unsaturated bonds in saturated and non-hydroxylated diterpenoids, like isosteviol, may enhance existing properties or lead to new biological activities. Although some beyeranes have been subjected to biotransformations by fungi,4 there are few report in the literature related the chemical transformation of Isosteviol. In the present study, we try to develop the chemical transformation of isosteviol and other beyeranes in order to obtaining some bioactive compounds with beyerane skeleton. Seven isosteviol derivatives, Ⅱ-Ⅷ, were therefore synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal strcture of H(R = H) was also determined.

  3. Phosphate-binding protein from Polaromonas JS666: purification, characterization, crystallization and sulfur SAD phasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Hey, Louis; LaMirande, Jacob; Pfeffer, Rachel; Lipsh, Rosalie; Amitay, Moshe; Gonzalez, Daniel; Elias, Mikael (JCT-Israel); (UMM); (CNRS-UMR)

    2017-05-25

    Phosphate-binding proteins (PBPs) are key proteins that belong to the bacterial ABC-type phosphate transporters. PBPs are periplasmic (or membrane-anchored) proteins that capture phosphate anions from the environment and release them to the transmembrane transporter. Recent work has suggested that PBPs have evolved for high affinity as well as high selectivity. In particular, a short, unique hydrogen bond between the phosphate anion and an aspartate residue has been shown to be critical for selectivity, yet is not strictly conserved in PBPs. Here, the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is focused on. Interestingly, this PBP is predicted to harbor different phosphate-binding residues to currently known PBPs. Here, it is shown that the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is capable of binding phosphate, with a maximal binding activity at pH 8. Its structure is expected to reveal its binding-cleft configuration as well as its phosphate-binding mode. Here, the expression, purification, characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection to 1.35 Å resolution of the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 are reported.

  4. Z-score biological significance of binding hot spots of protein interfaces by using crystal packing as the reference state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of binding hot spots of protein interfaces is a fundamental study in molecular biology. Many computational methods have been proposed to identify binding hot spots. However, there are few studies to assess the biological significance of binding hot spots. We introduce the notion of biological significance of a contact residue for capturing the probability of the residue occurring in or contributing to protein binding interfaces. We take a statistical Z-score approach to the assessment of the biological significance. The method has three main steps. First, the potential score of a residue is defined by using a knowledge-based potential function with relative accessible surface area calculations. A null distribution of this potential score is then generated from artifact crystal packing contacts. Finally, the Z-score significance of a contact residue with a specific potential score is determined according to this null distribution. We hypothesize that residues at binding hot spots have big absolute values of Z-score as they contribute greatly to binding free energy. Thus, we propose to use Z-score to predict whether a contact residue is a hot spot residue. Comparison with previously reported methods on two benchmark datasets shows that this Z-score method is mostly superior to earlier methods. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Methods for Protein Interaction and Structural Prediction.

  5. Targeted binding of the M13 bacteriophage to thiamethoxam organic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Whirang; Fowler, Jeffrey D; Furst, Eric M

    2012-04-10

    Phage display screening with a combinatorial library was used to identify M13-type bacteriophages that express peptides with selective binding to organic crystals of thiamethoxam. The six most strongly binding phages exhibit at least 1000 times the binding affinity of wild-type M13 and express heptapeptide sequences that are rich in hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding amino acids and proline. Among the peptide sequences identified, M13 displaying the pIII domain heptapeptide ASTLPKA exhibits the strongest binding to thiamethoxam in competitive binding assays. Electron and confocal microscopy confirm the specific binding affinity of ASTLPKA to thiamethoxam. Using atomic force microscope (AFM) probes functionalized with ASTLPKA expressing phage, we found that the average adhesion force between the bacteriophage and a thiamethoxam surface is 1.47 ± 0.80 nN whereas the adhesion force of wild-type M13KE phage is 0.18 ± 0.07 nN. Such a strongly binding bacteriophage could be used to modify the surface chemistry of thiamethoxam crystals and other organic solids with a high degree of specificity.

  6. Crystal structure of the petal death protein from carnation flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Liu, Sijiu; Lu, Zhibing; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2005-12-20

    Expression of the PSR132 protein from Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation, clover pink) is induced in response to ethylene production associated with petal senescence, and thus the protein is named petal death protein (PDP). Recent work has established that despite the annotation of PDP in sequence databases as carboxyphosphoenolpyruvate mutase, the enzyme is actually a C-C bond cleaving lyase exhibiting a broad substrate profile. The crystal structure of PDP has been determined at 2.7 A resolution, revealing a dimer-of-dimers oligomeric association. Consistent with sequence homology, the overall alpha/beta barrel fold of PDP is the same as that of other isocitrate lyase/PEP mutase superfamily members, including a swapped eighth helix within a dimer. Moreover, Mg(2+) binds in the active site of PDP with a coordination pattern similar to that seen in other superfamily members. A compound, covalently bound to the catalytic residue, Cys144, was interpreted as a thiohemiacetal adduct resulting from the reaction of glutaraldehyde used to cross-link the crystals. The Cys144-carrying flexible loop that gates access to the active site is in the closed conformation. Models of bound substrates and comparison with the closed conformation of isocitrate lyase and 2-methylisocitrate lyase revealed the structural basis for the broad substrate profile of PDP.

  7. Crystal structure of strontium dinickel iron orthophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Ouaatta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, SrNi2Fe(PO43, synthesized by solid-state reaction, crystallizes in an ordered variant of the α-CrPO4 structure. In the asymmetric unit, two O atoms are in general positions, whereas all others atoms are in special positions of the space group Imma: the Sr cation and one P atom occupy the Wyckoff position 4e (mm2, Fe is on 4b (2/m, Ni and the other P atom are on 8g (2, one O atom is on 8h (m and the other on 8i (m. The three-dimensional framework of the crystal structure is built up by [PO4] tetrahedra, [FeO6] octahedra and [Ni2O10] dimers of edge-sharing octahedra, linked through common corners or edges. This structure comprises two types of layers stacked alternately along the [100] direction. The first layer is formed by edge-sharing octahedra ([Ni2O10] dimer linked to [PO4] tetrahedra via common edges while the second layer is built up from a strontium row followed by infinite chains of alternating [PO4] tetrahedra and FeO6 octahedra sharing apices. The layers are held together through vertices of [PO4] tetrahedra and [FeO6] octahedra, leading to the appearance of two types of tunnels parallel to the a- and b-axis directions in which the Sr cations are located. Each Sr cation is surrounded by eight O atoms.

  8. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia R. Gomes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(3-methoxyphenylethan-1-one (1, C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(4-methoxyphenylethan-1-one (2, C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(4-chlorophenylethan-1-one (3, C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]-1-(4-bromophenylethan-1-one (4, C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-methoxyphenyl-2-[(9H-purin-6-ylsulfanyl]ethan-1-one (5, C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2, (3 and (4 are isomorphous and accordingly their molecular and supramolecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the molecules of (1 and (5 are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2, (3 and (4, these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1 all molecules are linked by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π–π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanylethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles.

  9. Hierarchical structuring of liquid crystal polymer-Laponite hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Zlotnikov, Igor; Zaslansky, Paul; Aichmayer, Barbara; Fratzl, Peter; Schlaad, Helmut; Cölfen, Helmut

    2013-09-03

    Biomimetic organic-inorganic composite materials were fabricated via one-step self-organization on three hierarchical levels. The organic component was a polyoxazoline with pendent cholesteryl and carboxyl (N-Boc-protected amino acid) side chains that was able to form a chiral nematic lyotropic phase and bind to positively charged inorganic faces of Laponite. The Laponite particles formed a mesocrystalline arrangement within the liquid-crystal (LC) polymer phase upon shearing a viscous dispersion of Laponite nanoparticles and LC polymer in DMF. Complementary analytical and mechanical characterization techniques (AUC, POM, TEM, SEM, SAXS, μCT, and nanoindentation) covering the millimeter, micrometer, and nanometer length scales reveal the hierarchical structures and properties of the composite materials consisting of different ratios of Laponite nanoparticles and liquid-crystalline polymer.

  10. Characterization and Crystal Structure of a Robust Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Elvira; Castellanos, J Rubén Gómez; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-12-19

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a promising biocatalyst for industrial reactions owing to its broad substrate spectrum and excellent regio-, chemo-, and enantioselectivity. However, the low stability of many Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases is an obstacle for their exploitation in industry. Characterization and crystal structure determination of a robust CHMO from Thermocrispum municipale is reported. The enzyme efficiently converts a variety of aliphatic, aromatic, and cyclic ketones, as well as prochiral sulfides. A compact substrate-binding cavity explains its preference for small rather than bulky substrates. Small-scale conversions with either purified enzyme or whole cells demonstrated the remarkable properties of this newly discovered CHMO. The exceptional solvent tolerance and thermostability make the enzyme very attractive for biotechnology.

  11. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  12. Extraction and Crystal Structure of Karounidiol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巢志茂; 王诚

    2003-01-01

    The title compound of karounidiol (C30H48O2), a main active triterpene component of snakegourd seed, was isolated from unsaponifiable matter of the seed oil of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim., and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. It crystallizes in orthorhombic system, space group P212121 with C30H48O2·CH3OH·H2O (C31H54O4), a = 7.515(1), b = 14.407(1), c = 27.799(2) (A。), V = 3009.8(5)(A。)3, Z = 4, Dx = 1.087 g/cm3, Mr = 490.77, F(000) = 1088 and μ = 0.086 mm-1. The final R = 0.0840 and wR = 0.2289 for 2752 observed reflections (|F|2 ≥ 2σ|F|2). The molecular crystal structure of karounidiol shows relative stereochemistry of (3α,13α,14β, 20α)-3,29-dihydroxy-13-methyl-26-norolean-7,9(11)-diene. The molecule is composed of five six- membered rings with ring junctures of A/B trans, C/D trans and D/E cis.

  13. Crystal and molecular structure of aflatrem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno N. Lenta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, C32H39NO4, confirms the absolute configuration of the seven chiral centres in the molecule. The molecule has a 1,1-dimethylprop-2-enyl substituent on the indole nucleus and this nucleus shares one edge with the five-membered ring which is, in turn, connected to a sequence of three edge-shared fused rings. The skeleton is completed by the 7,7-trimethyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one group connected to the terminal cyclohexene ring. The two cyclohexane rings adopt chair and half-chair conformations, while in the dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one unit, the six-membered ring has a half-chair conformation. The indole system of the molecule exhibits a tilt of 2.02 (1° between its two rings. In the crystal, O—H...O hydrogen bonds connect molecules into chains along [010]. Weak N—H...π interactions connect these chains, forming sheets parallel to (10-1.

  14. Crystal structure of zirconia by Rietveld refinement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王大宁; 郭永权; 梁开明; 陶琨

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structures and phase transformation of zirconia ceramics have been investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld powder diffraction profile fitting technique. A structural transition from monoclinic to tetragonal occurs when Y2O3 and CeO2 are doped into zirconia. The space group of the tetragonal structure is P42/nmc, Z=2. The lattice parameters are α=0.362 6(5) nm, c=0.522 6(3)nm for CeO2 doped zirconia and α=0. 360 2(8)nm, c=0. 517 9(1)nm for Y2O3 doped zirconia, respectively. In each unit cell, there are two kinds of equivalent positions, i. e. 2b and 4d, which are occupied by Zr4+, M(M=Y3+, Ce4+) cations and O2- anions, respectively. The crystallographic correlation among the cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic structures of ZrO2 is discussed.

  15. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  16. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Biogenic Amine-binding Proteins in Soft Ticks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M.C.; Andersen, John F. (NIH)

    2008-08-19

    Two highly abundant lipocalins, monomine and monotonin, have been isolated from the salivary gland of the soft tick Argas monolakensis and shown to bind histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), respectively. The crystal structures of monomine and a paralog of monotonin were determined in the presence of ligands to compare the determinants of ligand binding. Both the structures and binding measurements indicate that the proteins have a single binding site rather than the two sites previously described for the female-specific histamine-binding protein (FS-HBP), the histamine-binding lipocalin of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding sites of monomine and monotonin are similar to the lower, low affinity site of FS-HBP. The interaction of the protein with the aliphatic amine group of the ligand is very similar for the all of the proteins, whereas specificity is determined by interactions with the aromatic portion of the ligand. Interestingly, protein interaction with the imidazole ring of histamine differs significantly between the low affinity binding site of FS-HBP and monomine, suggesting that histamine binding has evolved independently in the two lineages. From the conserved features of these proteins, a tick lipocalin biogenic amine-binding motif could be derived that was used to predict biogenic amine-binding function in other tick lipocalins. Heterologous expression of genes from salivary gland libraries led to the discovery of biogenic amine-binding proteins in soft (Ornithodoros) and hard (Ixodes) tick genera. The data generated were used to reconstruct the most probable evolutionary pathway for the evolution of biogenic amine-binding in tick lipocalins.

  17. Structure of a family 3b' carbohydrate-binding module from the Cel9V glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium thermocellum: structural diversity and implications for carbohydrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkun, Svetlana; Jindou, Sadanari; Shimon, Linda J W; Rosenheck, Sonia; Bayer, Edward A; Lamed, Raphael; Frolow, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Family 3 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM3s) are associated with both cellulosomal scaffoldins and family 9 glycoside hydrolases (GH9s), which are multi-modular enzymes that act on cellulosic substrates. CBM3s bind cellulose. X-ray crystal structures of these modules have established an accepted cellulose-binding mechanism based on stacking interactions between the sugar rings of cellulose and a planar array of aromatic residues located on the CBM3 surface. These planar-strip residues are generally highly conserved, although some CBM3 sequences lack one or more of these residues. In particular, CBM3b' from Clostridium thermocellum Cel9V exhibits such sequence changes and fails to bind cellulosic substrates. A crystallographic investigation of CBM3b' has been initiated in order to understand the structural reason(s) for this inability. CBM3b' crystallized in space group C222(1) (diffraction was obtained to 2.0 A resolution in-house) with three independent molecules in the asymmetric unit and in space group P4(1)2(1)2 (diffraction was obtained to 1.79 A resolution in-house and to 1.30 A resolution at a synchrotron) with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecular structure of Cel9V CBM3b' revealed that in addition to the loss of several cellulose-binding residues in the planar strip, changes in the backbone create a surface 'hump' which could interfere with the formation of cellulose-protein surface interactions and thus prevent binding to crystalline cellulose.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K. (NIH)

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  19. Crystal structure of phenyl N-(4-nitrophenylcarbamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. AaminaNaaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C13H10N2O4, contains two independent molecules (A and B. The dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 48.18 (14° in molecule A and 45.81 (14° in molecule B. The mean plane of the carbamate N—C(=O—O group is twisted slightly from the attached benzene and phenyl rings, making respective dihedral angles of 12.97 (13 and 60.93 (14° in A, and 23.11 (14 and 59.10 (14° in B. In the crystal, A and B molecules are arranged alternately through N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...π interactions, forming chains along the a axis. The chains are further linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a double-chain structure.

  20. New Tricks of the Trade for Crystal Structure Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinjin; Abramov, Yuriy A; Doherty, Michael F

    2017-07-26

    Accurate crystal structures and their experimental uncertainties, determined by X-ray diffraction/neutron diffraction techniques, are vital for crystal engineering studies, such as polymorph stability and crystal morphology calculations. Because of differences in crystal growth and data measurement conditions, crystallographic databases often contain multiple entries of varying quality of the same compound. The choice of the most reliable and best quality crystal structure from many very similar structures remains an unresolved problem, especially for nonexperts. In addition, while crystallographers can make use of some professional software (i.e., Materials Studio) for structure refinement, noncrystallographers may not have access to it. In the present paper, we propose a simple method to study the sensitivity of the crystal lattice energy to changes in the structural parameters, which creates a diagnostic tool to test the quality of crystal structure files and to improve the low-quality structures based on lattice energy distribution. Thus, noncrystallographers could take the proposed idea and program/optimize crystal structure by themselves. They can have their in-house program to determine the reliability of the selected crystal data and then use the best quality data or carry out structural optimization for low-quality data. The proposed method will benefit a broad cross-section of scientific researchers, especially those in solid-state and physical chemistry.

  1. Stability of orientationally disordered crystal structures of colloidal hard dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marechal, Matthieu; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2008-06-01

    We study the stability of orientationally disordered crystal phases in a suspension of colloidal hard dumbbells using Monte Carlo simulations. For dumbbell bond length L/sigmafcc structure for a large part of the stable plastic crystal regime. In addition, we study the stability of an orientationally disordered aperiodic crystal structure in which the spheres of the dumbbells are on a random-hexagonal-close-packed lattice, and the dumbbells are formed by taking random pairs of neighboring spheres. Using free-energy calculations, we determine the fluid-aperiodic crystal and periodic-aperiodic crystal coexistence regions for L/sigma>0.88 .

  2. Affine structures and a tableau model for E_6 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Brant

    2009-01-01

    We provide the unique affine crystal structure for type E_6^{(1)} Kirillov-Reshetikhin crystals corresponding to the multiples of fundamental weights s Lambda_1, s Lambda_2, and s Lambda_6 for all s \\geq 1 (in Bourbaki's labeling of the Dynkin nodes, where 2 is the adjoint node). Our methods introduce a generalized tableaux model for classical highest weight crystals of type E and use the order three automorphism of the affine E_6^{(1)} Dynkin diagram. In addition, we provide a conjecture for the affine crystal structure of type E_7^{(1)} Kirillov-Reshetikhin crystals corresponding to the adjoint node.

  3. STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF PLANT CHITINASES AND CHITIN-BINDING PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1994-01-01

    Structural features of plant chitinases and chitin-binding proteins are discussed. Many of these proteins consist of multiple domains,of which the chitin-binding hevein domain is a predominant one. X-ray and NMR structures of representatives of the major classes of these proteins are available now,

  4. Isomorph invariance of the structure and dynamics of classical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Dan; Olsen, Andreas Elmerdahl; Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk

    2014-01-01

    of a defective fcc crystal is also shown to be isomorph invariant. In contrast, a NaCl crystal model does not exhibit isomorph invariances. Other systems simulated, though in less detail, are the Wahnström binary Lennard-Jones crystal with the MgZn2 Laves crystal structure, monatomic fcc crystals of particles......This paper shows by computer simulations that some crystalline systems have curves in their thermodynamic phase diagrams, so-called isomorphs, along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. The crystals are studied in a classical-mechanical framework......, which is generally a good description except significantly below melting. The existence of isomorphs for crystals is validated by simulations of particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones pair potential arranged into a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystalline structure; the slow vacancy-jump dynamics...

  5. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  6. [Calculation of mobility and entropy of the binding of molecules by crystals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzynskiy, S O; Finkelstein, A V

    2016-01-01

    A simple method for evaluating a range of molecular movements in crystals has been developed. This estimate is needed to calculate the entropy of binding, in particular in protein-ligand complexes. The estimate is based on experimental data concerning the enthalpy of sublimation and saturated vapor pressure obtained for 15 organic crystals with melting temperatures of 25-80°С. For this set, we calculated the values of the average range and the corresponding average amplitude of molecular movements in crystals that constituted 0.75 ± 0.14 Å and 0.18 ± 0.03 Å, respectively. The entropy of sublimation calculated based on the average range of molecular movements in crystals was well consistent with the experimental data.

  7. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  8. Hardware device to physical structure binding and authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Stein, David J.; Bauer, Todd M.

    2013-08-20

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a binding of the hardware device and a physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generate an internal PUF value. Binding logic is coupled to receive the internal PUF value, as well as an external PUF value associated with the physical structure, and generates a binding PUF value, which represents the binding of the hardware device and the physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit also includes a cryptographic unit that uses the binding PUF value to allow a challenger to authenticate the binding.

  9. Structural basis for antifreeze activity of ice-binding protein from arctic yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Park, Ae Kyung; Do, Hackwon; Park, Kyoung Sun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Chi, Young Min; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-03-30

    Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. produces a glycosylated ice-binding protein (LeIBP) with a molecular mass of ∼25 kDa, which can lower the freezing point below the melting point once it binds to ice. LeIBP is a member of a large class of ice-binding proteins, the structures of which are unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of non-glycosylated LeIBP and glycosylated LeIBP at 1.57- and 2.43-Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis of the LeIBPs revealed a dimeric right-handed β-helix fold, which is composed of three parts: a large coiled structural domain, a long helix region (residues 96-115 form a long α-helix that packs along one face of the β-helix), and a C-terminal hydrophobic loop region ((243)PFVPAPEVV(251)). Unexpectedly, the C-terminal hydrophobic loop region has an extended conformation pointing away from the body of the coiled structural domain and forms intertwined dimer interactions. In addition, structural analysis of glycosylated LeIBP with sugar moieties attached to Asn(185) provides a basis for interpreting previous biochemical analyses as well as the increased stability and secretion of glycosylated LeIBP. We also determined that the aligned Thr/Ser/Ala residues are critical for ice binding within the B face of LeIBP using site-directed mutagenesis. Although LeIBP has a common β-helical fold similar to that of canonical hyperactive antifreeze proteins, the ice-binding site is more complex and does not have a simple ice-binding motif. In conclusion, we could identify the ice-binding site of LeIBP and discuss differences in the ice-binding modes compared with other known antifreeze proteins and ice-binding proteins.

  10. Scaffold mining of kinase hinge binders in crystal structure database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Li; Rai, Brajesh; Lunney, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases are the second most prominent group of drug targets, after G-protein-coupled receptors. Despite their distinct inhibition mechanisms, the majority of kinase inhibitors engage the conserved hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone of hinge residues. We mined Pfizer internal crystal structure database (CSDb) comprising of several thousand of public as well as internal X-ray binary complexes to compile an inclusive list of hinge binding scaffolds. The minimum ring scaffolds with directly attached hetero-atoms and functional groups were extracted from the full compounds by applying a rule-based filtering procedure employing a comprehensive annotation of ATP-binding site of the human kinase complements. The results indicated large number of kinase inhibitors of diverse chemical structures are derived from a relatively small number of common scaffolds, which serve as the critical recognition elements for protein kinase interaction. Out of the nearly 4,000 kinase-inhibitor complexes in the CSDb we identified approximately 600 unique scaffolds. Hinge scaffolds are overwhelmingly flat with very little sp3 characteristics, and are less lipophilic than their corresponding parent compounds. Examples of the most common as well as the uncommon hinge scaffolds are presented. Although the most common scaffolds are found in complex with multiple kinase targets, a large number of them are uniquely bound to a specific kinase, suggesting certain scaffolds could be more promiscuous than the others. The compiled collection of hinge scaffolds along with their three-dimensional binding coordinates could serve as basis set for hinge hopping, a practice frequently employed to generate novel invention as well as to optimize existing leads in medicinal chemistry.

  11. Crystal structure of the tetrameric fibrinogen-like recognition domain of Fibrinogen C domain containing 1 (FIBCD1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrive, Annette K; Moeller, Jesper B; Burns, Ian;

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structures of a recombinant fragment of the C-terminal fibrinogen-like recognition domain of FIBCD1, a vertebrate receptor that binds chitin, have been determined. The overall tetrameric structure shows similarity in structure and aggregation to the horseshoe crab innate...

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the oxysterol-binding protein Osh3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Ha, Subin; Lee, Youngjin; Eom, Soo Hyun; Im, Young Jun

    2012-12-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) related proteins (ORPs) are conserved from yeast to humans and are implicated in regulation of sterol homeostasis and in signal transduction pathways. Osh3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain-containing ORP member that regulates phosphoinositide metabolism at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites. The N-terminal PH domain of Osh3 was purified and crystallized as a lysozyme fusion and the resulting crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=98.03, b=91.31, c=84.13 Å, β=81.41°. With two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient was 3.13 Å3 Da(-1). Initial attempts to solve the structure by molecular-replacement techniques using T4 lysozyme as a search model were successful. The C-terminal OSBP-related domain (OBD) of Osh3 was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method and the resulting crystal diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution. The crystal was orthorhombic, belonging to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a=41.57, b=87.52, c=100.58 Å. With one molecule in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient was 2.01 Å3 Da(-1). Initial attempts to solve the structure by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique using bromine were successful.

  13. Structural Basis for p53 Lys120-Acetylation-Dependent DNA-Binding Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainer, Radion; Cohen, Sarit; Shahar, Anat; Zarivach, Raz; Arbely, Eyal

    2016-07-31

    Normal cellular homeostasis depends on tight regulation of gene expression, which requires the modulation of transcription factors' DNA-binding specificity. That said, the mechanisms that allow transcription factors to distinguish between closely related response elements following different cellular signals are not fully understood. In the tumor suppressor protein p53, acetylation of loop L1 residue Lys120 within the DNA-binding domain has been shown to promote the transcription of proapoptotic genes such as bax. Here, we report the crystal structures of Lys120-acetylated p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with a consensus response element and with the natural BAX response element. Our structural analyses reveal that Lys120 acetylation expands the conformational space of loop L1 in the DNA-bound state. Loop L1 flexibility is known to increase p53's DNA-binding specificity, and Lys120-acetylation-dependent conformational changes in loop L1 enable the formation of sequence-dependent DNA-binding modes for p53. Furthermore, binding to the natural BAX response element is accompanied by global conformational changes, deformation of the DNA helical structure, and formation of an asymmetric tetrameric complex. Based on these findings, we suggest a model for p53's Lys120 acetylation-dependent DNA-binding mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  15. Structural Analysis of Rtt106p Reveals a DNA Binding Role Required for Heterochromatin Silencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Huang, H; Zhou, B; Wang, S; Hu, Y; Li, X; Liu, J; Niu, L; Wu, J; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Rtt106p is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone chaperone with roles in heterochromatin silencing and nucleosome assembly. The molecular mechanism by which Rtt106p engages in chromatin dynamics remains unclear. Here, we report the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of the core domain of Rtt106p, which adopts an unusual 'double pleckstrin homology' domain architecture that represents a novel structural mode for histone chaperones. A histone H3-H4-binding region and a novel double-stranded DNA-binding region have been identified. Mutagenesis studies reveal that the histone and DNA binding activities of Rtt106p are involved in Sir protein-mediated heterochromatin formation. Our results uncover the structural basis of the diverse functions of Rtt106p and provide new insights into its cellular roles.

  16. Polymorphic crystal structures of an all-AT DNA dodecamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J; Subirana, Juan A; Pous, Joan; Sánchez-Giraldo, Raquel; Condom, Núria; Baldini, Roberto; Malinina, Lucy; Campos, J Lourdes

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we explore the influence of different solvents and ions on the crystallization behavior of an all-AT dodecamer d(AATAAATTTATT)2 In all cases, the oligonucleotides are found as continuous columns of stacked duplexes. The spatial organization of such columns is variable; consequently we have obtained seven different crystal forms. The duplexes can be made to crystallize in either parallel or crossed columns. Such versatility in the formation of a variety of crystal forms is characteristic for this sequence. It had not been previously reported for any other sequence. In all cases, the oligonucleotide duplexes have been found to crystallize in the B form. The crystallization conditions determine the organization of the crystal, although no clear local interactions have been detected. Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) can be used in order to obtain compact crossed structures. DNA-DNA interactions in the crystals of our all-AT duplexes present crossovers which are different from those previously reported for mixed sequence oligonucleotides. Our results demonstrate that changes in the ionic atmosphere and the crystallization solvent have a strong influence on the DNA-DNA interactions. Similar ionic changes will certainly influence the biological activity of DNA. Modulation of the crystal structure by ions should also be explored in DNA crystal engineering. Liquid crystals with a peculiar macroscopic shape have also been observed.

  17. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Non-heme Iron Dixoygenase PtlH in Pentalenolactone Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You,Z.; Omura, S.; Ikeda, H.; Cane, D.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    The non-heme iron dioxygenase PtlH from the soil organism Streptomyces avermitilis is a member of the iron(II)/{alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily and catalyzes an essential reaction in the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpenoid antibiotic pentalenolactone. To investigate the structural basis for substrate recognition and catalysis, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of PtlH in several complexes with the cofactors iron, a-ketoglutarate, and the non-reactive enantiomer of the substrate, ent-1-deoxypentalenic acid, in four different crystal forms to up to 1.31 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure of PtlH forms a double-stranded barrel helix fold, and the cofactor-binding site for iron and a-ketoglutarate is similar to other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Additional secondary structure elements that contribute to the substrate-binding site in PtlH are not conserved in other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Binding of the substrate enantiomer induces a reorganization of the monoclinic crystal lattice leading to a disorder-order transition of a C-terminal {alpha}-helix. The newly formed helix blocks the major access to the active site and effectively traps the bound substrate. Kinetic analysis of wild type and site-directed mutant proteins confirms a critical function of two arginine residues in substrate binding, while simulated docking of the enzymatic reaction product reveals the likely orientation of bound substrate.

  19. Structural basis of human transcription factor Sry-related box 17 binding to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nana; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Hai; Cheng, Zhong; Qian, Huolian; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Sry-related box (Sox) transcription factors share a conserved high-mobility-group box domain (HMG-domain) that binds DNA in the minor groove and bends DNA for further assembly of transcriptional machineries. During organogenesis, each member of the Sox family triggers a specific cell lineage differentiation, indicating that their interactions with DNA are different from each other. Therefore, investigating structural rearrangement of each Sox transcription factor HMG-domain upon binding to DNA would help to elucidate the distinctive molecular mechanism by which they interact with DNA. Previous studies have determined the crystal structures of Sox2 HMG-domain/DNA, Sox4 HMGdomain/ DNA, Sox9 HMG-domain/DNA and Sox17 HMG-domain/DNA complexes. However, major gaps remain in the structural information on the Sox transcription factor HMG-domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human Sox17 HMG-domain alone at 2.4 A resolution. Comparing this structure and the structure of the mouse Sox17 HMGdomain/ DNA complex provides structural understanding of the mechanism of Sox17 binding to DNA. Specifically, after electrostatic interactions attract Sox17 to DNA, Asn73, Ser99, and Trp106 form hydrogen bonds with DNA, Arg70, Lys80, Arg83, His94, and Asn95 on Sox17 undergo conformational changes and form hydrogen bonds with DNA, contributing to the electrostatic interaction between Sox17 and DNA.

  20. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signaling to numerous G protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveal...

  1. Crystal Structure of the Oxazolidinone Antibiotic Linezolid Bound to the 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito,J.; Kanyo, Z.; Wang, D.; Franceschi, F.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.; Duffy, E.

    2008-01-01

    The oxazolidinone antibacterials target the 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes. To gain insight into their mechanism of action, the crystal structure of the canonical oxazolidinone, linezolid, has been determined bound to the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. Linezolid binds the 50S A-site, near the catalytic center, which suggests that inhibition involves competition with incoming A-site substrates. These results provide a structural basis for the discovery of improved oxazolidinones active against emerging drug-resistant clinical strains.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi G Burke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, a dsDNA, enveloped virus, is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes lifelong latent infections and caused disease in persons with compromised immune systems, e.g., organ transplant recipients or AIDS patients. HCMV is also a leading cause of congenital viral infections in newborns. Entry of HCMV into cells requires the conserved glycoprotein B (gB, thought to function as a fusogen and reported to bind signaling receptors. gB also elicits a strong immune response in humans and induces the production of neutralizing antibodies although most anti-gB Abs are non-neutralizing. Here, we report the crystal structure of the HCMV gB ectodomain determined to 3.6-Å resolution, which is the first atomic-level structure of any betaherpesvirus glycoprotein. The structure of HCMV gB resembles the postfusion structures of HSV-1 and EBV homologs, establishing it as a new member of the class III viral fusogens. Despite structural similarities, each gB has a unique domain arrangement, demonstrating structural plasticity of gB that may accommodate virus-specific functional requirements. The structure illustrates how extensive glycosylation of the gB ectodomain influences antibody recognition. Antigenic sites that elicit neutralizing antibodies are more heavily glycosylated than those that elicit non-neutralizing antibodies, which suggest that HCMV gB uses glycans to shield neutralizing epitopes while exposing non-neutralizing epitopes. This glycosylation pattern may have evolved to direct the immune response towards generation of non-neutralizing antibodies thus helping HCMV to avoid clearance. HCMV gB structure provides a starting point for elucidation of its antigenic and immunogenic properties and aid in the design of recombinant vaccines and monoclonal antibody therapies.

  3. Structure and Metal Binding Properties of ZnuA, a Periplasmic Zinc Transporter from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsunyk,L.; Easton, J.; Kim, L.; Sugarbaker, S.; Bennett, B.; Breece, R.; Vorontsov, I.; Tierney, D.; Crowder, M.; Rosenzweig, A.

    2008-01-01

    ZnuA is the periplasmic Zn(2+)-binding protein associated with the high-affinity ATP-binding cassette ZnuABC transporter from Escherichia coli. Although several structures of ZnuA and its homologs have been determined, details regarding metal ion stoichiometry, affinity, and specificity as well as the mechanism of metal uptake and transfer remain unclear. The crystal structures of E. coli ZnuA (Eco-ZnuA) in the apo, Zn(2+)-bound, and Co(2+)-bound forms have been determined. ZnZnuA binds at least two metal ions. The first, observed previously in other structures, is coordinated tetrahedrally by Glu59, His60, His143, and His207. Replacement of Zn(2+) with Co(2+) results in almost identical coordination geometry at this site. The second metal binding site involves His224 and several yet to be identified residues from the His-rich loop that is unique to Zn(2+) periplasmic metal binding receptors. Electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopic data on CoZnuA provide additional insight into possible residues involved in this second site. The second site is also detected by metal analysis and circular dichroism (CD) titrations. Eco-ZnuA binds Zn(2+) (estimated K (d) < 20 nM), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Cu(+), and Cd(2+), but not Mn(2+). Finally, conformational changes upon metal binding observed in the crystal structures together with fluorescence and CD data indicate that only Zn(2+) substantially stabilizes ZnuA and might facilitate recognition of ZnuB and subsequent metal transfer.

  4. Structural and energetic effects of A2A adenosine receptor mutations on agonist and antagonist binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Keränen

    Full Text Available To predict structural and energetic effects of point mutations on ligand binding is of considerable interest in biochemistry and pharmacology. This is not only useful in connection with site-directed mutagenesis experiments, but could also allow interpretation and prediction of individual responses to drug treatment. For G-protein coupled receptors systematic mutagenesis has provided the major part of functional data as structural information until recently has been very limited. For the pharmacologically important A(2A adenosine receptor, extensive site-directed mutagenesis data on agonist and antagonist binding is available and crystal structures of both types of complexes have been determined. Here, we employ a computational strategy, based on molecular dynamics free energy simulations, to rationalize and interpret available alanine-scanning experiments for both agonist and antagonist binding to this receptor. These computer simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental data and, most importantly, reveal the molecular details behind the observed effects which are often not immediately evident from the crystal structures. The work further provides a distinct validation of the computational strategy used to assess effects of point-mutations on ligand binding. It also highlights the importance of considering not only protein-ligand interactions but also those mediated by solvent water molecules, in ligand design projects.

  5. Structural basis of substrate discrimination and integrin binding by autotaxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, Jens; Kamtekar, Satwik; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Day, Jacqueline E.; Wu, Tao; Fulkerson, Zachary; Albers, Harald M.H.G.; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Houben, Anna J.S.; van Zeijl, Leonie; Jansen, Silvia; Andries, Maria; Hall, Troii; Pegg, Lyle E.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kasiem, Mobien; Harlos, Karl; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Smyth, Susan S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bollen, Mathieu; Morris, Andrew J.; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Perrakis, Anastassis (Pfizer); (Leuven); (Oxford); (NCI-Netherlands); (Kentucky)

    2013-09-25

    Autotaxin (ATX, also known as ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-2, ENPP2) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogen and chemoattractant for many cell types. ATX-LPA signaling is involved in various pathologies including tumor progression and inflammation. However, the molecular basis of substrate recognition and catalysis by ATX and the mechanism by which it interacts with target cells are unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of ATX, alone and in complex with a small-molecule inhibitor. We have identified a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and mapped key residues for catalysis and selection between nucleotide and phospholipid substrates. We have shown that ATX interacts with cell-surface integrins through its N-terminal somatomedin B-like domains, using an atypical mechanism. Our results define determinants of substrate discrimination by the ENPP family, suggest how ATX promotes localized LPA signaling and suggest new approaches for targeting ATX with small-molecule therapeutic agents.

  6. Crystal structure refinement a crystallographers guide to SHELXL

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A crystallographers guide to SHELXL, covering various aspects of practical crystal structure refinement, from the treatment of hydrogen atoms to the assignment of atom types, and more. After an introduction to SHELXL, a brief survey of crystal structure refinement is provided.

  7. The Crystal Structure of Cu4Bi4Se9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makovicky, E.; Søtofte, Inger; Karup-Møller, S.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structure Of Cu4Bi4Se9,, synthesized at 400 degreesC, was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to the R, value of 0.05. The compound is orthorhombic, with a = 32.692 Angstrom, b = 4.120 Angstrom, and c = 12.202 Angstrom, space group Pnma. The structure...

  8. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  9. The Crystal Structure of Cu4Bi4Se9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makovicky, E.; Søtofte, Inger; Karup-Møller, S.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structure Of Cu4Bi4Se9,, synthesized at 400 degreesC, was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to the R, value of 0.05. The compound is orthorhombic, with a = 32.692 Angstrom, b = 4.120 Angstrom, and c = 12.202 Angstrom, space group Pnma. The structure...

  10. CCDC 1416891: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Methyl-triphenyl-germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  11. Structural insights into human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-delta selective ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A H Batista

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs δ, α and γ are closely related transcription factors that exert distinct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism, cardiac disease, inflammatory response and other processes. Several groups developed PPAR subtype specific modulators to trigger desirable effects of particular PPARs without harmful side effects associated with activation of other subtypes. Presently, however, many compounds that bind to one of the PPARs cross-react with others and rational strategies to obtain highly selective PPAR modulators are far from clear. GW0742 is a synthetic ligand that binds PPARδ more than 300-fold more tightly than PPARα or PPARγ but the structural basis of PPARδ:GW0742 interactions and reasons for strong selectivity are not clear. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex. Comparisons of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex with published structures of PPARs in complex with α and γ selective agonists and pan agonists suggests that two residues (Val312 and Ile328 in the buried hormone binding pocket play special roles in PPARδ selective binding and experimental and computational analysis of effects of mutations in these residues confirms this and suggests that bulky substituents that line the PPARα and γ ligand binding pockets as structural barriers for GW0742 binding. This analysis suggests general strategies for selective PPARδ ligand design.

  12. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  13. Crystal Structures of Human GlyRα3 Bound to Ivermectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xin; Chen, Hao; Shaffer, Paul L.

    2017-06-01

    Ivermectin acts as a positive allosteric modulator of several Cys-loop receptors including the glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls), γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs), glycine receptors (GlyRs), and neuronal α7-nicotinic receptors (α7 nAChRs). The crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans GluCl complexed with ivermectin revealed the details of its ivermectin binding site. Although the electron microscopy structure of zebrafish GlyRα1 complexed with ivermectin demonstrated a similar binding orientation, detailed structural information on the ivermectin binding and pore opening for Cys-loop receptors in vertebrates has been elusive. Here we present the crystal structures of human GlyRα3 in complex with ivermectin at 2.85 and 3.08 Å resolution. Our structures allow us to explore in detail the molecular recognition of ivermectin by GlyRs, GABAARs, and α7 nAChRs. Comparisons with previous structures reveal how the ivermectin binding expands the ion channel pore. Our results hold promise in structure-based design of GlyR modulators for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  14. Quartz crystal microbalance for the cardiac markers/antibodies binding kinetic measurements in the plasma samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, L. E.; Shumyantseva, V. V.; Archakov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was exploited for cardiac markers detection and kinetic studies of immunochemical reaction of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and human heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) with the corresponding monoclonal antibodies in undiluted plasma (serum) and standard solutions. The QCM technique allowed to dynamically monitor the kinetic differences in specific interactions and nonspecific sorption, without multiple labeling procedures and separation steps. The affinity binding process was characterized by the association (ka) and the dissociation (kd) kinetic constants and the equilibrium association (K) constant, all of which were obtained from experimental data.

  15. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  17. High-speed prediction of crystal structures for organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Shigeaki; Goto, Hitoshi

    2015-02-01

    We developed a master-worker type parallel algorithm for allocating tasks of crystal structure optimizations to distributed compute nodes, in order to improve a performance of simulations for crystal structure predictions. The performance experiments were demonstrated on TUT-ADSIM supercomputer system (HITACHI HA8000-tc/HT210). The experimental results show that our parallel algorithm could achieve speed-ups of 214 and 179 times using 256 processor cores on crystal structure optimizations in predictions of crystal structures for 3-aza-bicyclo(3.3.1)nonane-2,4-dione and 2-diazo-3,5-cyclohexadiene-1-one, respectively. We expect that this parallel algorithm is always possible to reduce computational costs of any crystal structure predictions.

  18. The Structural Basis for the Sensing and Binding of Cyclic di-GMP by STING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Under a research project funded by NSFC, Prof. Su Xiaodong and his team of the National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, BIOPIC, the School of Life Sciences of Peking Uni- versity, obtained remarkable achievement and published recently a paper entitled "The Structural Basis for the Sensing and Binding of Cyclic di-GMP by STING" on online Natural Structural and Molecular Biolo- gY. STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is an essential signaling adaptor that mediates cytokine pro- duction in response to microbial invasion by directly sensing bacterial secondary messengers such as the cy- clic dinucleotide bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (e-di-GMP). STING's structure and its binding mecha- nism to cyclic dinucleotides were unknown. We report here the crystal structures of the STING cytoplas- mic domain and its complex with c-di-GMP, thus providing the structural basis for understanding STING function.

  19. On the binding of small polarons in a mean-field quantum crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Lewin, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    We consider a small multi-polaron model obtained by coupling the many-body Schr\\"odinger equation for N interacting electrons with the energy functional of a mean- field crystal with a localized defect, obtaining a highly non linear many-body problem. The physical picture is that the electrons constitue a charge defect in an otherwise perfect periodic crystal. A remarkable feature of such a system is the possibility to form a bound state of electrons via their interaction with the polarizable background. We first prove that a single polaron always binds, i.e. the energy functional has a minimizer for N = 1. Then we discuss the case of multi-polarons containing two electrons or more. We show that their existence is guaranteed when certain quantized binding inequalities of HVZ type are satisfied.

  20. Evolutionary crystal structure prediction and novel high-pressure phases

    OpenAIRE

    Oganov, A. R.; Ma, Y.; Lyakhov, A. O.; Valle, M.; C. Gatti

    2010-01-01

    Prediction of stable crystal structures at given pressure-temperature conditions, based only on the knowledge of the chemical composition, is a central problem of condensed matter physics. This extremely challenging problem is often termed "crystal structure prediction problem", and recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX (Universal Structure Predictor: Evolutionary Xtallography) made an important progress in solving it, enabling efficient and reliable prediction of structures with up...

  1. PLANAR OPTICAL WAVEGUIDES WITH PHOTONIC CRYSTAL STRUCTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Planar optical waveguide comprising a core region and a cladding region comprising a photonic crystal material, said photonic crystal material having a lattice of column elements, wherein at least a number of said column elements are elongated substantially in an axial direction for said core reg...

  2. Crystal structure of the Rasputin NTF2-like domain from Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vognsen, Tina, E-mail: tv@farma.ku.dk [Biostructural Research, Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Kristensen, Ole, E-mail: ok@farma.ku.dk [Biostructural Research, Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of Rasputin protein is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences to known ligand binding sites of nuclear transport factor 2 are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new ligand binding site for the Rasputin and G3BP proteins is proposed. -- Abstract: The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of the Drosophila homolog of Ras GTPase SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), Rasputin, was determined at 2.7 A resolution. The overall structure is highly similar to nuclear transport factor 2: It is a homodimer comprised of a {beta}-sheet and three {alpha}-helices forming a cone-like shape. However, known binding sites for RanGDP and FxFG containing peptides show electrostatic and steric differences compared to nuclear transport factor 2. A HEPES molecule bound in the structure suggests a new, and possibly physiologically relevant, ligand binding site.

  3. Crystal structure of the three tandem FF domains of the transcription elongation regulator CA150.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Yang, Jun; Ren, Zhiyong; Sabui, Subir; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T; Jacobson, Raymond H; Jeruzalmi, David; McMurray, John S; Chen, Xiaomin

    2009-10-23

    FF domains are small protein-protein interaction modules that have two flanking conserved phenylalanine residues. They are present in proteins involved in transcription, RNA splicing, and signal transduction, and often exist in tandem arrays. Although several individual FF domain structures have been determined by NMR, the tandem nature of most FF domains has not been revealed. Here we report the 2.7-A-resolution crystal structure of the first three FF domains of the human transcription elongation factor CA150. Each FF domain is composed of three alpha-helices and a 3(10) helix between alpha-helix 2 and alpha-helix 3. The most striking feature of the structure is that an FF domain is connected to the next by an alpha-helix that continues from helix 3 to helix 1 of the next. The consequent elongated arrangement allows exposure of many charged residues within the region that can be engaged in interaction with other molecules. Binding studies using a peptide ligand suggest that a specific conformation of the FF domains might be required to achieve higher-affinity binding. Additionally, we explore potential DNA binding of the FF construct used in this study. Overall, we provide the first crystal structure of an FF domain and insights into the tandem nature of the FF domains and suggest that, in addition to protein binding, FF domains might be involved in DNA binding.

  4. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  5. Crystal structure of the G3BP2 NTF2-like domain in complex with a canonical FGDF motif peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of the human Ras GTPase SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), isoform 2, was determined at a resolution of 2.75 Å in complex with a peptide containing a FGDF sequence motif. The overall structure of the protein is highly similar to the homodimeric N...... molecular modeling suggested that FGDF-motif containing peptides bind in an extended conformation into a hydrophobic groove on the surface of the G3BP NTF2-like domain in a manner similar to the known binding of FxFG nucleoporin repeats. The results in this paper provide evidence for a different binding...

  6. Molecular structure of the Brucella abortus metalloprotein RicA, a Rab2-binding virulence effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrou, Julien; Crosson, Sean

    2013-12-17

    The Gram-negative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus is the causative agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonoses globally. The B. abortus RicA protein binds the host-expressed guanosine nucleotide-binding protein, Rab2, and modulates B. abortus infection biology. We have solved the first X-ray crystal structure of RicA to 2.7 Å resolution and have quantified the affinity of RicA binding to human Rab2 in its GDP-bound and nucleotide-free forms. RicA adopts a classic γ-carbonic anhydrase (γ-CA) fold containing a left-handed β-helix followed by a C-terminal α-helix. Two homotrimers of RicA occupy the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Though no zinc was included in the purification or crystallization buffers, zinc is contained within the RicA crystals, as demonstrated by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Electron density for a Zn(2+) ion coordinated by three histidine residues is evident in the putative active site of RicA. However, purified RicA preparations do not exhibit carbonic anhydrase activity, suggesting that Zn(2+) may not be the physiologically relevant metal cofactor or that RicA is not a bona fide carbonic anhydrase enzyme. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements of purified RicA binding to purified human Rab2 and GDP-Rab2 revealed similar equilibrium affinities (Kd ≈ 35 and 40 μM, respectively). This study thus defines RicA as a Zn(2+)-binding γ-carbonic anhydrase-like protein that binds the human membrane fusion/trafficking protein Rab2 with low micromolar affinity in vitro. These results support a model in which γ-CA family proteins may evolve unique cellular functions while retaining many of the structural hallmarks of archetypal γ-CA enzymes.

  7. Anisotropic domain structure of KTiOPO4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urenski, P.; Lesnykh, M.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Rosenman, G.; Molotskii, M.

    2001-08-01

    Highly anisotropic ferroelectric domain structure is observed in KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystals reversed by low electric field. The applied Miller-Weinreich model for sidewise motion of domain walls indicates that this anisotropy results from the peculiarities of KTP crystal lattice. The domain nuclei of dozen nanometer size, imaged by atomic force microscopy method, demonstrate regular hexagonal forms. The orientation of domain walls of the elementary nuclei coincides with the orientation of the facets of macroscopic KTP crystals. The observed strong domain elongation along one principal crystal axis allows us to improve tailoring of ferroelectric domain engineered structures for nonlinear optical converters.

  8. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies on manganous malate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J., E-mail: smartlabindia@gmail.com; Lincy, A., E-mail: lincymaria@gmail.com; Mahalakshmi, V.; Saban, K. V. [Smart Materials Analytic Research and Technology (SMART), Department of Physics, St. Berchmans College (India)

    2013-01-15

    Prismatic crystals of manganous malate have been prepared by controlled ionic diffusion in hydrosilica gel. The structure was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystals are orthorhombic with space group Pbca. Vibrations of the functional groups were identified by the FTIR spectrum. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) were carried out to explore the thermal decomposition pattern of the material. Structural information derived from FTIR and TG-DTA studies is in conformity with the single crystal XRD data.

  9. Protein-protein binding detection with nanoparticle photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (NP-PCEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Tian, Limei; Chen, Weili; Yu, Hojeong; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel microscopy-based biosensing approach that utilizes a photonic crystal (PC) surface to detect protein-protein binding with the functionalized nanoparticles as tags. This imaging approach utilizes the measurement of localized shifts in the resonant wavelength and resonant reflection magnitude from the PC biosensor in the presence of individual nanoparticles. Moreover, it substantially increases the sensitivity of the imaging approach through tunable localized surface plasmon resonant frequency of the nanoparticle matching with the resonance of the PC biosensor. Experimental demonstrations of photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (PCEM) imaging with single nanoparticle resolution are supported by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer simulations. The ability to detect the surface adsorption of individual nanoparticles as tags offers a route to single molecule biosensing with photonic crystal biosensor in the future.

  10. SiBr4--prediction and determination of crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alexandra K; Glinnemann, Jürgen; Schmidt, Martin U; Tong, Jianwei; Dinnebier, Robert E; Simon, Arndt; Köhler, Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    For SiBr4 no crystal structures have been reported yet. In this work the crystal structures of SiBr4 were predicted by global lattice-energy minimizations using force-field methods. Over an energy range of 5 kJ mol(-1) above the global minimum ten possible structures were found. Two of these structures were experimentally determined from X-ray synchrotron powder diffraction data: The low-temperature beta phase crystallizes in P2(1)/c, the high-temperature alpha phase in Pa3. Temperature-dependant X-ray powder diffraction shows that the phase transition occurs at 168 K.

  11. SiBr4 - Prediction and Determination of Crystal Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Glinnemann, J; Schmidt, M; Tong, J; Dinnebier, R; Simon, A; Kohler, J

    2009-01-01

    For SiBr4 no crystal structures have been reported yet. In this work the crystal structures of SiBr4 were predicted by global lattice-energy minimizations using force-field methods. Over an energy range of 5 kJ mol-1 above the global minimum ten possible structures were found. Two of these structures were experimentally determined from X-ray synchrotron powder diffraction data: The low-temperature [beta] phase crystallizes in P21/c, the high-temperature [alpha] phase in Pa overline3. Temperature-dependant X-ray powder diffraction shows that the phase transition occurs at 168 K.

  12. Observation of Protein Structural Vibrational Mode Sensitivity to Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first measurements of the dependence of large-scale protein intramolecular vibrational modes on ligand binding. These collective vibrational modes in the terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) are of great interest due to their predicted relation to protein function. Our technique, Crystals Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), allows for room temperature, table-top measurements of the optically active intramolecular modes. CATM measurements have revealed surprisingly narrowband features. CATM measurements are performed on single crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as well as CEWL bound to tri-N-acetylglucosamine (CEWL-3NAG) inhibitor. We find narrow band resonances that dramatically shift with binding. Quasiharmonic calculations are performed on CEWL and CEWL-3NAG proteins with CHARMM using normal mode analysis. The expected CATM response of the crystals is then calculated by summing over all protein orientations within the unit cell. We will compare the CATM measurements with the calculated results and discuss the changes which arise with protein-ligand binding. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI 2 grant DBI2959989.

  13. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Neil G., E-mail: neison@chem.gla.ac.uk; Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Timothy J. [Division of Infection and Immunity (IBLS), Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Isaacs, Neil W. [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V{sub M} = 2.77 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å.

  14. Structural basis of heme binding in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töro, Imre; Petrutz, Cristiana; Pacello, Francesca; D'Orazio, Melania; Battistoni, Andrea; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2009-02-20

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi is characterized by the unique ability to bind heme at its dimer interface. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structures of this protein in the heme-loaded (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Heme is asymmetrically bound between the two enzyme subunits, where heme iron is coordinated by two histidine residues, His64 and His 124, provided by the two subunits. Moreover, the binding of heme to the protein is ensured by stabilizing contacts between the prosthetic group and a limited number of other residues, most of which are not present in other bacterial enzyme variants. We show that the introduction of only three mutations at the dimer interface of the enzyme from Haemophilus parainfluenzae, a closely related bacterial species, is sufficient to induce heme-binding ability by this enzyme variant. Heme binding does not alter protein activity. Moreover, the binding of the prosthetic group does not induce any significant structural perturbation at the subunit level and requires only limited local structural rearrangements that widen the cleft at the dimer interface and cause a limited shift in the relative orientation between the subunits. The presence of a preformed heme-binding pocket and the significant solvent exposure of the cofactor to the solvent are compatible with the suggested protective role of the enzyme against heme toxicity or with its involvement in heme trafficking in the periplasmic space.

  15. Crystallization and Characterization of Galdieria sulphuraria RUBISCO in Two Crystal Forms: Structural Phase Transition Observed in P21 Crystal Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguslaw Stec

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCOfrom the red algae Galdieria Sulphuraria. The protein crystallized in two different crystalforms, the I422 crystal form being obtained from high salt and the P21 crystal form beingobtained from lower concentration of salt and PEG. We report here the crystallization,preliminary stages of structure determination and the detection of the structural phasetransition in the P21 crystal form of G. sulphuraria RUBISCO. This red algae enzymebelongs to the hexadecameric class (L8S8 with an approximate molecular weight 0.6MDa.The phase transition in G. sulphuraria RUBISCO leads from two hexadecamers to a singlehexadecamer per asymmetric unit. The preservation of diffraction power in a phasetransition for such a large macromolecule is rare.

  16. Crystal Structures of Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase Ⅳ in its Apo and Diprotin B-complexed Forms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajime HIRAMATSU; Kiyoshi KYONO; Atsushi YAMAMOTO; Kazuhiko SAEKI; Hideaki SHIMA; Shigeru SUGIYAMA; Koji INAKA; Ryo SHIMIZU

    2007-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase Ⅳ (DPPIV), which belongs to the prolyl oligopeptidase family of serine proteases, is known to have a variety of regulatory biological functions and has been shown to be implicated in type 2 diabetes. It is therefore important to develop selective human DPPIV (hDPPIV) inhibitors. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of apo hDPPIV at 1.9 (A) resolution. Our high-resolution crystal structure of apo hDPPIV revealed the presence of sodium ion and glycerol molecules at the active site. In order to elucidate the hDPPIV binding mode and substrate specificity, we determined the crystal structure of hDPPIV-diprotin B (Val-Pro-Leu) complex at 2.1 (A) resolution, and clarified the difference in binding mode between diprotin B and diprotin A (Ile-Pro-Ile) into the active site of hDPPIV. Comparison between our crystal structures and the reported apo hDPPIV structures revealed that positively charged functional groups and conserved water molecules contributed to the interaction of ligands with hDPPIV. These results are useful for the design of potent hDPPIV inhibitors.

  17. Origin and structure of polar domains in doped molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirzadeh, E.; Azuri, I.; Qi, Y.; Ehre, D.; Rappe, A. M.; Lahav, M.; Kronik, L.; Lubomirsky, I.

    2016-11-01

    Doping is a primary tool for the modification of the properties of materials. Occlusion of guest molecules in crystals generally reduces their symmetry by the creation of polar domains, which engender polarization and pyroelectricity in the doped crystals. Here we describe a molecular-level determination of the structure of such polar domains, as created by low dopant concentrations (<0.5%). The approach comprises crystal engineering and pyroelectric measurements, together with dispersion-corrected density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics calculations of the doped crystals, using neutron diffraction data of the host at different temperatures. This approach is illustrated using centrosymmetric α-glycine crystals doped with minute amounts of different L-amino acids. The experimentally determined pyroelectric coefficients are explained by the structure and polarization calculations, thus providing strong support for the local and global understanding of how different dopants influence the properties of molecular crystals.

  18. Structural Color Patterns by Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printed Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Tian, Lei; Liu, Cihui; Fu, Guangbin; Shang, Luoran; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-02-09

    In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal patterns with controllable morphologies and structural colors utilizing electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing with colloidal crystal inks. The final shape of photonic crystal units is controlled by the applied voltage signal and wettability of the substrate. Optical properties of the structural color patterns are tuned by the self-assembly of the silica nanoparticle building blocks. Using this direct printing technique, it is feasible to print customized functional patterns composed of photonic crystal dots or photonic crystal lines according to relevant printing mode and predesigned tracks. This is the first report for E-jet printing with colloidal crystal inks. Our results exhibit promising applications in displays, biosensors, and other functional devices.

  19. 六元瓜环与含双苯并咪唑功能基烷烃的自组装模式及晶体结构%Self-assembly binding models and crystal structure of cucurbit[6]uril with dibenzimidazoly-bearing alkane compoud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易君明; 张云黔; 薛赛凤; 陶朱

    2012-01-01

    以含有双苯并咪唑功能基的烷烃化合物二氯化1,4-二(2,2′-苯并咪唑基)丁烷(SBB)为客体,普通六元瓜环(Q[6])为主体,利用1H NMR技术、荧光发射光谱和X-单晶衍射实验等考察了主客体的自组装模式.1 H NMR技术结果显示,当主客体的比例为1∶1时,在水溶液中,1个Q[6]包结1个客体分子的一端苯并咪唑基团;在结晶固态条件下,X-单晶衍射实验测试结果是Q[6]包结客体分子的烷基链.荧光发射光谱表明,当主客体比例为2∶1时,2个Q[6]分别包结1个客体分子的两端苯并咪唑基团形成哑铃型的实体配合物.%The self-assembly binding models and crystal structure of cucurbitC6]uril with 2 ,2'-(butane-1,4-dily) dibenzimidazolium dichloride were investigated by means of 1H NMR spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrophotometry and single crystal X-ray diffraction determination. The experimental results of 1H NMR and fluorescence spectra revealed that cucurbit[6]uril(Q[6]) can interact with guest salt of 2,2'-(butane-l ,4-dily) dibenzimidazolium dichloride(SBB) with two ratios of 1:1 and 2 :1. The 1H NMR experimental results shows that the host Q[6] includes include guest benzimidozlyl moieties of the protonated SBB to form a simple 1:1 interaction model at a lower ratio of nq[6]/nsbb in water medium, but in solid-crystal state, single crystal X-ray diffraction shows that the host include the lon ger bridged alkylene chain of the guest. While at higher ratios of Q[6] to guest, fluorescence spectra results suggest that a chain shape guest could be borne two Q[6] molecules and form a dumbbell shape inclusion complex.

  20. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  1. Structural and mutational analyses of the receptor binding domain of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin: Insight into the ganglioside binding mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuemket, Nipawan [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshikazu [Creative Research Institution ' Sousei,' Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao [Department of Microbiology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji [Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka 598-8531 (Japan); Yao, Min [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao, E-mail: tanaka@castor.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT in complex with 3'-sialyllactose. {yields} An electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. {yields} Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed that GBS and GBL are important for ganglioside binding. {yields} A cell binding mechanism, which involves cooperative contribution of two sites, was proposed. -- Abstract: Clostridium botulinum type D strain OFD05, which produces the D/C mosaic neurotoxin, was isolated from cattle killed by the recent botulism outbreak in Japan. The D/C mosaic neurotoxin is the most toxic of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) characterized to date. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT from strain OFD05 in complex with 3'-sialyllactose at a resolution of 3.0 A. In the structure, an electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed the significant contribution of the residues surrounding the cleft to ganglioside recognition. In addition, a loop adjoining the cleft also plays an important role in ganglioside recognition. In contrast, little effect was observed when the residues located around the surface previously identified as the protein receptor binding site in other BoNTs were substituted. The results of cell binding analysis of the mutants were significantly correlated with the ganglioside binding properties. Based on these observations, a cell binding mechanism of BoNT from strain OFD05 is proposed, which involves cooperative contribution of two ganglioside binding sites.

  2. Crystal fingerprint space--a novel paradigm for studying crystal-structure sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Mario; Oganov, Artem R

    2010-09-01

    The initial aim of the crystal fingerprint project was to solve a very specific problem: to classify and remove duplicate crystal structures from the results generated by the evolutionary crystal-structure predictor USPEX. These duplications decrease the genetic diversity of the population used by the evolutionary algorithm, potentially leading to stagnation and, after a certain time, reducing the likelihood of predicting essentially new structures. After solving the initial problem, the approach led to unexpected discoveries: unforeseen correlations, useful derived quantities and insight into the structure of the overall set of results. All of these were facilitated by the project's underlying idea: to transform the structure sets from the physical configuration space to an abstract, high-dimensional space called the fingerprint space. Here every structure is represented as a point whose coordinates (fingerprint) are computed from the crystal structure. Then the space's distance measure, interpreted as structure 'closeness', enables grouping of structures into similarity classes. This model provides much flexibility and facilitates access to knowledge and algorithms from fields outside crystallography, e.g. pattern recognition and data mining. The current usage of the fingerprint-space model is revealing interesting properties that relate to chemical and crystallographic attributes of a structure set. For this reason, the mapping of structure sets to fingerprint space could become a new paradigm for studying crystal-structure ensembles and global chemical features of the energy landscape.

  3. Nanoconfinement-Induced Structures in Chiral Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations in a specialized isothermal-isobaric and in the grand canonical ensemble to study structure formation in chiral liquid crystals as a function of molecular chirality. Our model potential consists of a simple Lennard-Jones potential, where the attractive contribution has been modified to represent the orientation dependence of the interaction between a pair of chiral liquid-crystal molecules. The liquid crystal is confined between a pair of planar and atomicall...

  4. Structural determinants of nuclear export signal orientation in binding to exportin CRM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu-Chin; Brautigam, Chad A; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-09-08

    The Chromosome Region of Maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein mediates nuclear export of hundreds of proteins through recognition of their nuclear export signals (NESs), which are highly variable in sequence and structure. The plasticity of the CRM1-NES interaction is not well understood, as there are many NES sequences that seem incompatible with structures of the NES-bound CRM1 groove. Crystal structures of CRM1 bound to two different NESs with unusual sequences showed the NES peptides binding the CRM1 groove in the opposite orientation (minus) to that of previously studied NESs (plus). Comparison of minus and plus NESs identified structural and sequence determinants for NES orientation. The binding of NESs to CRM1 in both orientations results in a large expansion in NES consensus patterns and therefore a corresponding expansion of potential NESs in the proteome.

  5. Crystal structure and characterization of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikemoto Kazuto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, a tricarboxylic acid, has attracted attention as a growth factor, and its application to supplements and cosmetics is underway. The product used for these purposes is a water-soluble salt of PQQ disodium. Although in the past, PQQ disodiumpentahydrates with a high water concentration were used, currently, low hydration crystals of PQQ disodiumpentahydrates are preferred. Results We prepared a crystal of PQQ disodium trihydrate in a solution of ethanol and water, studied its structure, and analyzed its properties. In the prepared crystal, the sodium atom interacted with the oxygen atom of two carboxylic acids as well as two quinones of the PQQ disodium trihydrate. In addition, the hydration water of the prepared crystal was less than that of the conventional PQQ disodium crystal. From the results of this study, it was found that the color and the near-infrared (NIR spectrum of the prepared crystal changed depending on the water content in the dried samples. Conclusions The water content in the dried samples was restored to that in the trihydrate crystal by placing the samples in a humid environment. In addition, the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray diffraction-differential calorimetry (XRD-DSC analyses show that the phase of the trihydrate crystal changed when the crystallization water was eliminated. The dried crystal has two crystalline forms that are restored to the original trihydrate crystals in 20% relative humidity (RH. This crystalline (PQQ disodium trihydrate is stable under normal environment.

  6. Structure and Properties of Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, Lev M

    2011-01-01

    This book by Lev M. Blinov is ideal to guide researchers from their very first encounter with liquid crystals to the level where they can perform independent experiments on liquid crystals with a thorough understanding of their behaviour also in relation to the theoretical framework. Liquid crystals can be found everywhere around us. They are used in virtually every display device, whether it is for domestic appliances of for specialized technological instruments. Their finely tunable optical properties make them suitable also for thermo-sensing and laser technologies. There are many monographs written by prominent scholars on the subject of liquid crystals. The majority of them presents the subject in great depth, sometimes focusing on a particular research aspect, and in general they require a significant level of prior knowledge. In contrast, this books aims at an audience of advanced undergraduate and graduate students in physics, chemistry and materials science. The book consists of three parts: the firs...

  7. The first X-ray crystal structure of the glucocorticoid receptor bound to a non-steroidal agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Mclay, Iain; Stewart, Eugene L.; Uings, Iain J.; Weingarten, Gordon; Williams, Shawn P. (GSKNC); (GSK)

    2009-07-23

    The amino-pyrazole 2,6-dichloro-N-ethyl benzamide 1 is a selective GR agonist with dexamethasone-like in vitro potency. Its X-ray crystal structure in the GR LBD (Glucocorticoid ligand-binding domain) is described and compared to other reported structures of steroidal GR agonists in the GR LBD (3E7C).

  8. The crystal structure of some rhenium and technetium dichalcogenides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamfers, H.J; Meetsma, A.; Wiegers, G.A; deBoer, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of ReSe2,ReS2, ReSSe and TcS2 are determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds are triclinic with space group P (1) over bar. ReSe2, Res(2) and ReSSe have a distorted CdCl2-type structure; TcS2 has a distorted Cd(OH)(2)-type structure. In the case of Res,

  9. Photonic Crystal Structures with Tunable Structure Color as Colorimetric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Qin Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors.

  10. Studies on growth, crystal structure and characterization of novel organic nicotinium trifluoroacetate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanaraj, P.V. [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603 110 (India); Rajesh, N.P., E-mail: rajeshnp@hotmail.com [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603 110 (India); Sundar, J. Kalyana; Natarajan, S. [Department of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Vinitha, G. [Department of Physics, Crescent Engineering College, Chennai 600 048 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Good quality crystals of nicotinium trifluoroacetate in monoclinic system were grown for first time. {yields} Nicotinium trifluoroacetate crystal exhibits third order nonlinear optical properties. {yields} The optical spectrum of nicotinium trifluoroacetate crystal reveals the wide transmission in the entire range with cutoff wavelength at 286 nm. {yields} Nicotinium trifluoroacetate is a low dielectric constant material. - Abstract: An organic material, nicotinium trifluoroacetate (NTF) was synthesized and single crystals in monoclinic system were grown from aqueous solution for the first time. Its solubility and metastable zone width were estimated. The crystal structure of NTF was analyzed to reveal the molecular arrangements and the formation of hydrogen bonds in the crystal. High-resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve measurements were performed to analyze the structural perfection of the grown crystals. Functional groups in NTF were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. Thermal behaviour and stability of NTF were studied by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical and dielectric properties of NTF crystals were analyzed. Optical studies reveal that NTF crystals are transparent in the wavelength range 286-1100 nm. The third order nonlinear optical parameters of NTF were derived by the Z-scan technique.

  11. Structural insight into DNA binding and oligomerization of the multifunctional Cox protein of bacteriophage P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Odegrip, Richard; Sehlén, Wilhelmina; Skaar, Karin; Svensson, Linda M; Massad, Tariq; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 is a small multifunctional DNA-binding protein. It is involved in site-specific recombination leading to P2 prophage excision and functions as a transcriptional repressor of the P2 Pc promoter. Furthermore, it transcriptionally activates the unrelated, defective prophage P4 that depends on phage P2 late gene products for lytic growth. In this article, we have investigated the structural determinants to understand how P2 Cox performs these different functions. We have solved the structure of P2 Cox to 2.4 Å resolution. Interestingly, P2 Cox crystallized in a continuous oligomeric spiral with its DNA-binding helix and wing positioned outwards. The extended C-terminal part of P2 Cox is largely responsible for the oligomerization in the structure. The spacing between the repeating DNA-binding elements along the helical P2 Cox filament is consistent with DNA binding along the filament. Functional analyses of alanine mutants in P2 Cox argue for the importance of key residues for protein function. We here present the first structure from the Cox protein family and, together with previous biochemical observations, propose that P2 Cox achieves its various functions by specific binding of DNA while wrapping the DNA around its helical oligomer.

  12. Crystal structure of nitrogen regulatory protein IIANtr from Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stammers David K

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NMB0736 gene of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 encodes the putative nitrogen regulatory protein, IIANtr (abbreviated to NM-IIANtr. The homologous protein present in Escherichia coli is implicated in the control of nitrogen assimilation. As part of a structural proteomics approach to the study of pathogenic Neisseria spp., we have selected this protein for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Results The NM-IIANtr was over-expressed in E. coli and was shown to be partially mono-phosphorylated, as assessed by mass spectrometry of the purified protein. Crystals of un-phosphorylated protein were obtained and diffraction data collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The structure of NM-IIANtr was solved by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the E. coli nitrogen regulatory protein IIAntr [PDB: 1A6J] as the starting model. The overall fold of the Neisseria enzyme shows a high degree of similarity to the IIANtr from E. coli, and the position of the phosphoryl acceptor histidine residue (H67 is conserved. The orientation of an adjacent arginine residue (R69 suggests that it may also be involved in coordinating the phosphate group. Comparison of the structure with that of E. coli IIAmtl complexed with HPr [PDB: 1J6T] indicates that NM-IIANtr binds in a similar way to the HPr-like enzyme in Neisseria. Conclusion The structure of NM-IIANtr confirms its assignment as a homologue of the IIANtr proteins found in a range of other Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that the NM- IIANtr protein functions as part of a phosphorylation cascade which, in contrast to E. coli, shares the upstream phosphotransfer protein with the sugar uptake phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS, but in common with E. coli has a distinct downstream effector mechanism.

  13. Crystal structure engineering for improved performance of emerging nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimalgi, Vinay Uday

    Recent advances in growth techniques and increasing number of experimental studies have made nanostructures grown along different crystallographic directions a reality. These new structures could not only benefit the electronic devices used in mainstream information technology but also show great promise for applications in lasers, solid-state lighting, near-field photolithography, free-space quantum cryptography, consumer displays, quantum computation, as well as diagnostic medicine and imaging. However, only few theoretical investigations have been performed on these structures due to the complex nature of the interplay of atomicity, structural fields, polarization, and quantum size-quantization, all strong function of the crystallographic direction. The objective of this work is mainly four-fold: (1) Integrate a computational framework employing a combination of fully atomistic valence force-field molecular mechanics and 20-band sp3s*d5-SO tight-binding based electronic band­structure models, and numerically investigate the effects of internal fields on the electronic and optical properties of zincblende InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on (100), (110), and (111) orientated substrates. (2) Augment/extend the open source NEMO 3-D bandstructure simulator by incorporating a recently proposed first principles based model to gauge the importance of nonlinear piezoelectricity on the single-particle electronic states and interband optical transitions in emerging In(Ga)N/GaN disk-in-wire LED structures having c-plane and m-plane wurtzite crystal symmetry. (3) Coupling the NEMO 3-D software toolkit with a commercial TCAD simulator to determine the terminal electrical and optical characteristics of InGaN/GaN disk-in-wire LEDs; and (4) Finding an optimum crystallographic device for InGaN/GaN disk-in-wire LEDs to achieve improved internal quantum efficiency (IQE).

  14. Crystal structure of apo-avidin from hen egg-white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, L; Malcovati, M; Coda, A; Bolognesi, M

    1994-01-07

    The three-dimensional structure of hen egg-white apo-avidin, crystallized in a tetragonal crystal form, has been refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 0.164 (for the 6390 observed reflections in the 10.0 to 2.8 A resolution range). As in the case of holo-avidin, from which starting atomic co-ordinates were derived, the functional tetramer shows 2-pseudo 22 molecular symmetry. Each promoter is organized in an eight-stranded antiparallel orthogonal beta-barrel, with extended loop regions, which define the biotin binding pocket in the protomer core. In the absence of biotin the binding site is only partly occupied by water molecules. The structure of the binding site residues, as observed in apo-avidin, is highly complementary to that of the incoming biotin molecule, accounting for prompt and specific recognition. A crystal lattice contact may play a role in stabilizing the conformation of one protein loop, part of the biotin-binding pocket.

  15. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  16. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael E; Benner, Steven A

    2006-01-01

    Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1) multiple sequence alignments, 2) mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3) phylogenetic trees, 4) inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5) amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural bioinformatics resources that

  17. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, DNA and BSA binding, molecular docking and in vitro anticancer activities of a mononuclear dioxido-uranium(VI) complex derived from a tridentate ONO aroylhydrazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, Maryam; Ebrahimipour, S Yousef; Castro, Jesus; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2016-05-01

    A mononuclear dioxido-uranium(IV) complex [UO2(L)(DMSO)2], was prepared from the reaction of (2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide [HL] with UO2(OAc)2·2H2O in DMSO. The obtained complex was fully characterized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of [UO2(L)(DMSO)2] revealed that U(VI) ion has been coordinated by ONO donor atoms of the dianionic ligand (L(2-)), oxo groups and two DMSO molecules in a pentagonal bipyramid geometry. In addition, interactions of the complex with salmon sperm DNA and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were thoroughly investigated using UV-vis absorption, voltammetry and molecular docking methods. The experimental studies showed an intercalative mode of interaction between the complex and DNA. Experiments on BSA interaction indicated a change in the polarity of the environment surrounded the complex as a result of the interaction between BSA and [UO2(L)(DMSO)2]. Finally, MTT assays indicated that the U(VI) complex had excellent cytotoxicity against human carcinoma cell lines of MCF-7, HPG-2, and HT-29, with IC50 values of 8.4, 10.6 and 10.0μM, respectively.

  18. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶大年; 马哲生; 赫伟; 李哲; 施倪承; D.Pushcharovsky

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-0 and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures. Therefore, those silicates may be named titano-and zircono-silicates. Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra, the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet, respectively. As a new concept, the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  19. Optically induced structural phase transitions in ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horak, Peter; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    , such as body-centered cubic and face-centered cubic, can be suppressed by a proper choice of the potential depth and periodicity. Furthermore, by varying the harmonic trap parameters and/or the optical potential in time, controlled transitions between crystal structures can be obtained with close to unit......We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures...

  20. Crystal Structures of Fluoride and Chloride Complexes of Tris[(2-benzimidazolyl)methyl]amine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structures of fluoride and chloride complexes of tris[(2-benzimida-zolyl)methyl]amine 1 were characterized by X-ray crystallography.1 adopts C3 symmetrical geometry and cone-like conformation so as to allow its three NHs to associate with the anions through hydrogen bonds.Despite the different sizes of the anions, the two crystals are unexpectedly isostructural.The binding ability of the anions of 1 in solution was also studied by using of UV-vis spectroscopy.

  1. X-Ray structural investigation of VAS-393 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Martirosian, A H; Harurtjunian, V S

    2001-01-01

    X-ray structural study of VAS-393 crystals was performed. Investigations were carried out with the use of the Weissenberg rotating and powder (employing the Bjornstrem diagrams) methods. The lattice constants ''c'' and ''a''are calculated. The crystal is shown to belong to the trigonal syngony (medium category)

  2. Missing strings of residues in protein crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Carugo, Oliviero

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of the protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are incomplete, since the position of one or more residues is not reported, despite these residues are part of the material that was analyzed. This may bias the use of the protein crystal structures by molecular biologists. Here we observe that in the large majority of the protein crystal structures strings of residues are missing. Polar residues incline to occur in missing strings together with glycine, while apolar and aromatic residues tend to avoid them. Particularly flexible residues, as shown by their extremely high B-factors, by their exposure to the solvent and by their secondary structures, flank the missing strings. These data should be a helpful guideline for crystallographers that encounter regions of flat and uninterpretable electron density as well as end-users of crystal structures.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of human ribosomal protein L30e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Akiko; Ose, Toyoyuki; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2011-12-01

    Many functions have been reported for the eukaryotic ribosomal protein L30e. L30e makes several inter-subunit and intra-subunit interactions with protein or RNA components of the 80S ribosome. Yeast L30e has been shown to bind to its own transcript to autoregulate expression at both the transcriptional and the translational levels. Furthermore, it has been reported that mammalian L30e is a component of the selenocysteine-incorporation machinery by binding to the selenocysteine-insertion sequence on mRNA. As high-resolution crystal structures of mammalian L30e are not available, the purification, crystallization and X-ray structure analysis of human L30e are presented here.

  4. Structure of the Taz2 domain of p300: insights into ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Maria; Dauter, Zbigniew; Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E.; Wlodawer, Alexander; (NCI)

    2010-01-12

    CBP and its paralog p300 are histone acetyl transferases that regulate gene expression by interacting with multiple transcription factors via specialized domains. The structure of a segment of human p300 protein (residues 1723-1836) corresponding to the extended zinc-binding Taz2 domain has been investigated. The crystal structure was solved by the SAD approach utilizing the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. The structure comprises an atypical helical bundle stabilized by three Zn ions and closely resembles the solution structures determined previously for shorter peptides. Residues 1813-1834 from the current construct form a helical extension of the C-terminal helix and make extensive crystal-contact interactions with the peptide-binding site of Taz2, providing additional insights into the mechanism of the recognition of diverse transactivation domains (TADs) by Taz2. On the basis of these results and molecular modeling, a hypothetical model of the binding of phosphorylated p53 TAD1 to Taz2 has been proposed.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of the YAP-binding domain of human TEAD2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jianzhong; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian (JHU-MED); (UTSMC)

    2010-06-15

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size and suppresses tumorigenesis in metazoans by blocking cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. The TEAD1-4 proteins (which contain a DNA-binding domain but lack an activation domain) interact with YAP (which lacks a DNA-binding domain but contains an activation domain) to form functional heterodimeric transcription factors that activate proliferative and prosurvival gene expression programs. The Hippo pathway inhibits the YAP-TEAD hybrid transcription factors by phosphorylating and promoting cytoplasmic retention of YAP. Here we report the crystal structure of the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of human TEAD2. TEAD2 YBD adopts an immunoglobulin-like {beta}-sandwich fold with two extra helix-turn-helix inserts. NMR studies reveal that the TEAD-binding domain of YAP is natively unfolded and that TEAD binding causes localized conformational changes in YAP. In vitro binding and in vivo functional assays define an extensive conserved surface of TEAD2 YBD as the YAP-binding site. Therefore, our studies suggest that a short segment of YAP adopts an extended conformation and forms extensive contacts with a rigid surface of TEAD. Targeting a surface-exposed pocket of TEAD might be an effective strategy to disrupt the YAP-TEAD interaction and to reduce the oncogenic potential of YAP.

  6. Structural and functional analysis of the YAP-binding domain of human TEAD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jianzhong; Tomchick, Diana R; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian

    2010-04-20

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size and suppresses tumorigenesis in metazoans by blocking cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. The TEAD1-4 proteins (which contain a DNA-binding domain but lack an activation domain) interact with YAP (which lacks a DNA-binding domain but contains an activation domain) to form functional heterodimeric transcription factors that activate proliferative and prosurvival gene expression programs. The Hippo pathway inhibits the YAP-TEAD hybrid transcription factors by phosphorylating and promoting cytoplasmic retention of YAP. Here we report the crystal structure of the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of human TEAD2. TEAD2 YBD adopts an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich fold with two extra helix-turn-helix inserts. NMR studies reveal that the TEAD-binding domain of YAP is natively unfolded and that TEAD binding causes localized conformational changes in YAP. In vitro binding and in vivo functional assays define an extensive conserved surface of TEAD2 YBD as the YAP-binding site. Therefore, our studies suggest that a short segment of YAP adopts an extended conformation and forms extensive contacts with a rigid surface of TEAD. Targeting a surface-exposed pocket of TEAD might be an effective strategy to disrupt the YAP-TEAD interaction and to reduce the oncogenic potential of YAP.

  7. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate.

  8. Growth morphology and structural characteristic of C70single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周维亚; 解思深; 吴源; 常保和; 王刚; 钱露茜

    1999-01-01

    Large size C70 single crystals with the dimension of more than 5 mm are grown from the vapor phase by controlling nucleation. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction confirm that in the C70 single crystal a phase of the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure coexists with a minor face-center-cubic (fcc) phase at room temperature. The morphologies and their formation mechanism of the C70 single crystals are investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The influence of growth conditions on the morphologies of C70 single crystals is discussed.

  9. Structural and mechanical studies of cadmium manganese thiocyanate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; babu, G. Anandha; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) have been synthesized successfully and grown by slow evaporation method. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), which shows the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal is quite good. Optical behavior was assessed by UV-Vis analysis and found that no absorption in the UV visible region and it may be useful for second harmonic applications. The mechanical hardness of the grown crystals was studied and Vicker's microhardness, Stiffness constant was calculated.

  10. Structural Insights into Substrate Binding of Brown Spider Venom Class II Phospholipases D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, M A; Ullah, A; da Silva, L S; Chaves-Moreira, D; Vuitika, L; Chaim, O M; Veiga, S S; Chahine, J; Murakami, M T; Arni, R K

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipases D (PLDs), the major dermonecrotic factors from brown spider venoms, trigger a range of biological reactions both in vitro and in vivo. Despite their clinical relevance in loxoscelism, structural data is restricted to the apo-form of these enzymes, which has been instrumental in understanding the functional differences between the class I and II spider PLDs. The crystal structures of the native class II PLD from Loxosceles intermedia complexed with myo-inositol 1-phosphate and the inactive mutant H12A complexed with fatty acids indicate the existence of a strong ligand-dependent conformation change of the highly conserved aromatic residues, Tyr 223 and Trp225 indicating their roles in substrate binding.