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Sample records for crystal gallium nitride

  1. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage.

  2. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  3. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  4. Technology of gallium nitride crystal growth

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrentraut, Dirk; Bockowski, Michal

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with the important technological aspects of the growth of GaN single crystals by HVPE, MOCVD, ammonothermal and flux methods for the purpose of free-standing GaN wafer production. Leading experts from industry and academia report in a very comprehensive way on the current state-of-the-art of the growth technologies and optical and structural properties of the GaN crystals are compared.

  5. Growth of single-crystal gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, R.; Richman, D.; Tietjen, J.

    1970-01-01

    Use of ultrahigh purity ammonia prevents oxygen contamination of GaN during growth, making it possible to grow the GaN at temperatures as high as 825 degrees C, at which point single crystal wafers are deposited on /0001/-oriented sapphire surfaces.

  6. Ultra-low threshold gallium nitride photonic crystal nanobeam laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Nan, E-mail: nanniu@fas.harvard.edu; Woolf, Alexander; Wang, Danqing; Hu, Evelyn L. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Zhu, Tongtong; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Quan, Qimin [Rowland Institute at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 (United States)

    2015-06-08

    We report exceptionally low thresholds (9.1 μJ/cm{sup 2}) for room temperature lasing at ∼450 nm in optically pumped Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanobeam cavity structures. The nanobeam cavity geometry provides high theoretical Q (>100 000) with small modal volume, leading to a high spontaneous emission factor, β = 0.94. The active layer materials are Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) fragmented quantum wells (fQWs), a critical factor in achieving the low thresholds, which are an order-of-magnitude lower than obtainable with continuous QW active layers. We suggest that the extra confinement of photo-generated carriers for fQWs (compared to QWs) is responsible for the excellent performance.

  7. An alternative approach to the growth of single crystal gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, Neville

    1993-06-01

    This project has been primarily concerned with investigating a new approach to the synthesis of epitaxial layers of high purity gallium nitride. The new approach involves the use of hydrazoic acid, HN3, a previously untried precursor as the source of active nitrogen. A new, all-stainless steel apparatus which is UHV compatible, has been constructed. It has been designed to allow growth studies to be made by the chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) technique or by low pressure metal organic vapour phase deposition (LPMOCVD) at pressures up to ca. 1 mbar. During the grant period, the apparatus has been constructed, tested, and modified. Experiments have been carried out which show that gallium nitride and aluminium nitride can be made from the reaction of hydrazoic acid with trimethyl gallium and trimethyl aluminium respectively, at a hot substrate surface. In-situ RHEED patterns and ex-situ Auger spectra and x-ray diffraction data have been obtained. Systematic studies aimed at producing high quality single crystal films have been made. The results are promising and uniform, golden yellow films of gallium nitride can now be produced. RHEED data show that the films are composed of highly orientated crystals. The x-ray results support this, with crystal sizes being at least 1000 A with the crystals strongly orientated along the c-axis.

  8. Near-infrared characterization of gallium nitride photonic-crystal waveguides and cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharanipathy, U; Vico Triviño, N; Yan, C; Diao, Z; Carlin, J-F; Grandjean, N; Houdré, R

    2012-11-15

    We report the design and optical characterization of fully suspended wire waveguides and photonic crystal (PhC) membranes fabricated on a gallium nitride layer grown on silicon substrate operating at 1.5 μm. W1-type PhC waveguides are coupled with suspended wires and are investigated using a standard end-fire setup. The experimental and theoretical dispersion properties of the propagating modes in the wires and photonic-crystal waveguides are shown. Modified L3 cavities with quality factors of up to 2200 and heterostructure cavities with quality factors of up to 5400 are experimentally demonstrated.

  9. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  10. Congruent melting of gallium nitride at 6 GPa and its application to single-crystal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Wataru; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Watanuki, Tetsu; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Shimomura, Osamu

    2003-11-01

    The synthesis of large single crystals of GaN (gallium nitride) is a matter of great importance in optoelectronic devices for blue-light-emitting diodes and lasers. Although high-quality bulk single crystals of GaN suitable for substrates are desired, the standard method of cooling its stoichiometric melt has been unsuccessful for GaN because it decomposes into Ga and N(2) at high temperatures before its melting point. Here we report that applying high pressure completely prevents the decomposition and allows the stoichiometric melting of GaN. At pressures above 6.0 GPa, congruent melting of GaN occurred at about 2,220 degrees C, and decreasing the temperature allowed the GaN melt to crystallize to the original structure, which was confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction. Single crystals of GaN were formed by cooling the melt slowly under high pressures and were recovered at ambient conditions.

  11. Efficient continuous-wave nonlinear frequency conversion in high-Q Gallium Nitride photonic crystal cavities on Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Mohamed Sabry; Carlin, Jean-François; Minkov, Momchil; Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo; Grandjean, Nicolas; Galli, Matteo; Houdré, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    We report on nonlinear frequency conversion from the telecom range via second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) in suspended gallium nitride slab photonic crystal (PhC) cavities on silicon, under continuous-wave resonant excitation. Optimized two-dimensional PhC cavities with augmented far-field coupling have been characterized with quality factors as high as 4.4$\\times10^{4}$, approaching the computed theoretical values. The strong enhancement in light confinement has enabled efficient SHG, achieving normalized conversion efficiency of 2.4$\\times10^{-3}$ $W^{-1}$, as well as simultaneous THG. SHG emission power of up to 0.74 nW has been detected without saturation. The results herein validate the suitability of gallium nitride for integrated nonlinear optical processing.

  12. Gallium nitride electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  13. Indium gallium nitride multijunction solar cell simulation using silvaco atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Baldomero

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential use of wurtzite Indium Gallium Nitride as photovoltaic material. Silvaco Atlas was used to simulate a quad-junction solar cell. Each of the junctions was made up of Indium Gallium Nitride. The band gap of each junction was dependent on the composition percentage of Indium Nitride and Gallium Nitride within Indium Gallium Nitride. The findings of this research show that Indium Gallium Nitride is a promising semiconductor for solar cell use. United...

  14. Materials synthesis: Two-dimensional gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is used as a capping sheet to synthesize 2D gallium nitride by means of migration-enhanced encapsulation growth. This technique may allow the stabilization of 2D materials that are not amenable to synthesis by traditional methods.

  15. CRITICAL ASSESSMENT: Gallium nitride based visible light emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by Maney Publishing. Solid state lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is a technology with the potential to drastically reduce energy usage, made possible by the development of gallium nitride and its alloys. However, the nitride materials family exhibits high defect densities and, in the equilibrium wurtzite crystal phase, large piezo-electric and polarisation fields arising a...

  16. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  17. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Min, E-mail: mlu2006@sinano.ac.c [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Zhang Guoguang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Fu Kai; Yu Guohao [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Su Dan; Hu Jifeng [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. {yields} Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. {yields} The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. {yields} The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 ({sup 63}Ni), which emits {beta} particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm{sup -2}. The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the {beta} particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  18. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  19. Formation of Gallium Nitride Crystal Loops on Silicon (111) Substrate%Si(111)衬底上生长GaN晶环的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王显明; 孙振翠; 魏芹芹; 王强; 曹文田; 薛成山

    2004-01-01

    利用热壁化学气相沉积在Si(111)衬底上获得GaN晶环,采用扫描电镜(SEM)、选择区电子衍射(SAED)、X射线衍射(XRD),光致发光(PL)谱和傅里叶红外吸收谱(FTIR)对晶环的组成、结构、形貌和光学特性进行分析.初步结果证明:在Si(111)衬底上获得择优生长的六方纤锌矿结构的GaN晶环.SEM显示在均匀的薄膜上出现直径约为10μm的5晶环,由XRD和SAED的分析证实晶环呈六方纤矿多晶结构,FTIR显示GaN薄膜的主要成分为GaN,同时含有少量的C污染,PL测试表明晶环呈现不同于GaN薄膜的发光特性.%The crystal loops of Gallium nitride (GaN) were deposited on silicon (111) substrate by using hot-wall chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), x-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier Transform Infrared transmission (FTIR) Spectroscopy were employed to analyze the surface morphology, structure and optical properties of GaN layer.SEM image shows five half-loops attached to a crystal string side by side in the uniform films. XRD, SAED patterns reveal that the formed loops are polycrystalline hexagonal gallium nitride. FTIR pattern shows the main composition of the film is GaN and it contains trifle carbon contamination. New feature is found in PL pattern of the crystal loops,which is different from the bulk GaN films.

  20. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea.

  1. Si(111)衬底上生长GaN晶绳的研究%Formation of gallium nitride crystal string on silicon (111) substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹文田; 孙振翠; 魏芹芹; 薛成山; 王强

    2003-01-01

    利用热壁化学气相沉积在Si(111)衬底上获得GaN晶绳,采用傅里叶红外吸收谱(FTIR)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、选区电子衍射(SAED)、X射线衍射(XRD)和光致发光谱(PL)对晶绳进行组成、结构、形貌和光学特性分析.初步结果证明:在Si(111)衬底上获得择优生长的六方纤锌矿结构的GaN晶绳.SEM显示在均匀的薄膜上出现6μm的晶绳,FTIR显示GaN薄膜的主要成分为GaN同时含有少量的C污染,由XRD和SAED的综合分析得出晶绳呈六方纤锌矿单晶结构,PL测试表明晶绳呈现不同于GaN薄膜的发光特性.%GaN crystal string was deposited on Si (111) substrate by hot- wall chemical vapor depo- sition. Fourier Transform Infrared Transmission (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED), X- Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were employed to analyze the composition, surface morphology, structure, and optical property of GaN layer. FTIR pattern shows the main composition of the film is GaN and it contains trifle carbon contamination. SEM images show a crystal string with a diameter of 6μ m appears in the uniform film. XRD, SAED patterns reveal that the formed string is single- crystalline hexagonal gallium nitride. New feature is found in PL pattern of the crystal string, which is different from the bulk GaN films.

  2. Ellipsometric study of silicon nitride on gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Bu-Abbud, G. H.; Woollam, J. A.; Liu, D.; Chung, Y.; Langer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for optimizing the sensitivity of ellipsometric measurements for thin dielectric films on semiconductors is described in simple physical terms. The technique is demonstrated for the case of sputtered silicon nitride films on gallium arsenide.

  3. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-12-14

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio.

  4. Thickness dependent thermal conductivity of gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziade, Elbara; Yang, Jia; Brummer, Gordie; Nothern, Denis; Moustakas, Theodore; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    As the size of gallium nitride (GaN) transistors is reduced in order to reach higher operating frequencies, heat dissipation becomes the critical bottleneck in device performance and longevity. Despite the importance of characterizing the physics governing the thermal transport in thin GaN films, the literature is far from conclusive. In this letter, we report measurements of thermal conductivity in a GaN film with thickness ranging from 15-1000 nm grown on 4H-SiC without a transition layer. Additionally, we measure the thermal conductivity in the GaN film when it is 1 μm-thick in the temperature range of 300 < T < 600 K and use a phonon transport model to explain the thermal conductivity in this film.

  5. Crystallographic alignment of high-density gallium nitride nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Zhang, Yanfeng; Goldberger, Joshua; Sirbuly, Donald; Denlinger, Jonathan; Yang, Peidong

    2004-08-01

    Single-crystalline, one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are considered to be one of the critical building blocks for nanoscale optoelectronics. Elucidation of the vapour-liquid-solid growth mechanism has already enabled precise control over nanowire position and size, yet to date, no reports have demonstrated the ability to choose from different crystallographic growth directions of a nanowire array. Control over the nanowire growth direction is extremely desirable, in that anisotropic parameters such as thermal and electrical conductivity, index of refraction, piezoelectric polarization, and bandgap may be used to tune the physical properties of nanowires made from a given material. Here we demonstrate the use of metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and appropriate substrate selection to control the crystallographic growth directions of high-density arrays of gallium nitride nanowires with distinct geometric and physical properties. Epitaxial growth of wurtzite gallium nitride on (100) gamma-LiAlO(2) and (111) MgO single-crystal substrates resulted in the selective growth of nanowires in the orthogonal [1\\[Evec]0] and [001] directions, exhibiting triangular and hexagonal cross-sections and drastically different optical emission. The MOCVD process is entirely compatible with the current GaN thin-film technology, which would lead to easy scale-up and device integration.

  6. Dielectric response of wurtzite gallium nitride in the terahertz frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, M. T.; Frey, V.; Spencer, B. F.; Mitchell, P. W.; Dawson, P.; Kappers, M. J.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.; Graham, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the characterization of the intrinsic, anisotropic, dielectric properties of wurtzite gallium nitride in the spectral range of 0.5-11 THz, using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The ordinary (ε˜⊥) and extraordinary (ε˜∥) components of the complex dielectric function were determined experimentally for a semi-insulating, m-plane gallium nitride single crystal, providing measurements of the refractive indices (n⊥,∥) and absorption coefficients (α⊥,∥) . These material parameters were successfully modeled by considering the contribution of the optical phonon modes, measured using Raman spectroscopy, to the dielectric function, giving values for the relative static dielectric constants of ε0⊥ = 9.22 ± 0.02 and ε0∥ = 10.32 ± 0.03 for wurtzite gallium nitride.

  7. Low-threshold indium gallium nitride quantum dot microcavity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Alexander J.

    Gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities with embedded optical emitters have long been sought after as visible light sources as well as platforms for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) experiments. Specifically, materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots (QDs) offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices, such as on-chip light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Inherent advantages of nitride-based microcavities include low surface recombination velocities, enhanced room-temperature performance (due to their high exciton binding energy, as high as 67 meV for InGaN QDs), and emission wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. In spite of these advantages, several challenges must be overcome in order to capitalize on the potential of this material system. Such diffculties include the processing of GaN into high-quality devices due to the chemical inertness of the material, low material quality as a result of strain-induced defects, reduced carrier recombination effciencies due to internal fields, and a lack of characterization of the InGaN QDs themselves due to the diffculty of their growth and therefore lack of development relative to other semiconductor QDs. In this thesis we seek to understand and address such issues by investigating the interaction of light coupled to InGaN QDs via a GaN microcavity resonator. Such coupling led us to the demonstration of the first InGaN QD microcavity laser, whose performance offers insights into the properties and current limitations of the nitride materials and their emitters. This work is organized into three main sections. Part I outlines the key advantages and challenges regarding indium gallium nitride (InGaN) emitters embedded within gallium nitride (GaN) optical microcavities. Previous work is also discussed which establishes context for the work presented here. Part II includes the fundamentals related to laser operation, including the

  8. Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-11

    A ternary, ionically conducting, deep eutectic solvent based on acetamide, urea and gallium nitrate is reported for the electrodeposition of gallium nitride/gallium indium nitride under ambient conditions; blue and white light emitting photoluminescent deposits are obtained under potential control.

  9. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-12-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  10. Imaging Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors to Identify Point Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IMAGING GALLIUM NITRIDE HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS TO IDENTIFY...Identification of these trends will assist in the improvement of gallium nitride HEMT fabrication processes leading to the development of more...reliable devices. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Electron microscopy, Gallium Nitride (GaN), high electron mobility transistor (HEMT

  11. Gallium nitride L3 photonic crystal cavities with an average quality factor of 16 900 in the near infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vico Triviño, Noelia; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Minkov, Momchil, E-mail: momchil.minkov@epfl.ch; Savona, Vincenzo [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics of Nanosystems, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Urbinati, Giulia; Galli, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2014-12-08

    Photonic crystal point-defect cavities were fabricated in a GaN free-standing photonic crystal slab. The cavities are based on the popular L3 design, which was optimized using an automated process based on a genetic algorithm, in order to maximize the quality factor. Optical characterization of several individual cavity replicas resulted in an average unloaded quality factor Q = 16 900 at the resonant wavelength λ∼1.3 μm, with a maximal measured Q value of 22 500. The statistics of both the quality factor and the resonant wavelength are well explained by first-principles simulations including fabrication disorder and background optical absorption.

  12. Gallium nitride L3 photonic crystal cavities with an average quality factor of 16,900 in the near infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Triviño, Noelia Vico; Urbinati, Giulia; Galli, Matteo; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël; Savona, Vincenzo; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystal point-defect cavities were fabricated in a GaN free-standing photonic crystal slab. The cavities are based on the popular L3 design, which was optimized using an automated process based on a genetic algorithm, in order to maximize the quality factor. Optical characterization of several individual cavity replicas resulted in an average unloaded quality factor Q = 16,900 at the resonant wavelength {\\lambda} $\\sim 1.3$ {\\mu}m, with a maximal measured Q value of 22,500. The statistics of both the quality factor and the resonant wavelength are well explained by first-principles simulations including fabrication disorder and background optical absorption.

  13. Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuhiro Atsumi; Yoku Inoue; Hidenori Mimura; Toru Aoki; Takayuki Nakano

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to α-rays but poor sensitivity to γ-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in ...

  14. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm(2) using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  15. Gallium Nitride MMICs for mm-Wave Power Operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quay, R.; Maroldt, S.; Haupt, C.; Heijningen, M. van; Tessmann, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a Gallium Nitride MMIC technology for high-power amplifiers between 27 GHz and 101 GHz based on 150 nm- and 100 nm-gate technologies is presented. The GaN HEMT MMICs are designed using coplanar waveguide transmission-line-technology on 3-inch semi-insulating SiC substrates. The measure

  16. Novel approach for n-type doping of HVPE gallium nitride with germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Patrick; Krupinski, Martin; Habel, Frank; Leibiger, Gunnar; Weinert, Berndt; Eichler, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel method for germanium doping of gallium nitride by in-situ chlorination of solid germanium during the hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE) process. Solid germanium pieces were placed in the doping line with a hydrogen chloride flow directed over them. We deduce a chlorination reaction taking place at 800 ° C , which leads to germanium chloroform (GeHCl3) or germanium tetrachloride (GeCl4). The reactor shows a germanium rich residue after in-situ chlorination experiments, which can be removed by hydrogen chloride etching. All gallium nitride crystals exhibit n-type conductivity, which shows the validity of the in-situ chlorination of germanium for doping. A complex doping profile is found for each crystal, which was assigned to a combination of localised supply of the dopant and sample rotation during growth and switch-off effects of the HVPE reactor.

  17. Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsumi, Katsuhiro [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Inoue, Yoku; Nakano, Takayuki, E-mail: ttnakan@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to α-rays but poor sensitivity to γ-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after α-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

  18. Amorphous carbon buffer layers for separating free gallium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altakhov, A. S.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Kasharina, L. A.; Latyshev, F. E.; Tarala, V. A.; Shreter, Yu. G.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for self-separation of gallium nitride (GaN) layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy has been analyzed. DLC films have been synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under low pressure on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates with a (0001) crystallographic orientation. The samples have been studied by the methods of Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that thin DLC films affect only slightly the processes of nucleation and growth of gallium nitride films. Notably, the strength of the "GaN film-Al2O3" substrate interface decreases, which facilitates separation of the GaN layers.

  19. Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Atsumi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to α-rays but poor sensitivity to γ-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after α-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

  20. Aqueous stability of Ga- and N-polar gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Corey M; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-01-08

    The stability of III-nitride semiconductors in various solutions becomes important as researchers begin to integrate them into sensing platforms. This study quantitatively compares the stability of GaN surfaces with different polarities. This type of quantification is important because it represents the first step toward designing semiconductor material interfaces compatible with solution conditions. A stability study of Ga- and N-polar GaN was conducted by immersion of the surfaces in deionized H(2)O, pH 5, pH 9, and H(2)O(2) solutions for 7 days. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of the solutions was conducted to determine the amount of gallium leached from the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to compare the treated surfaces to untreated surfaces. The results show that both gallium nitride surface types exhibit the greatest stability in acidic and neutral solutions. Gallium polar surfaces were found to exhibit superior stability to nitrogen polar surfaces in the solutions studied. Our findings highlight the need for further research on surface passivation and functionalization techniques for polar III-nitride semiconductors.

  1. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Crystalline Gallium Nitride Nanopowder from Gallium Nitrate Hydrate and Melamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gallium nitride (GaN nanopowder used as a blue fluorescent material was synthesized by using a direct current (DC non-transferred arc plasma. Gallium nitrate hydrate (Ga(NO33∙xH2O was used as a raw material and NH3 gas was used as a nitridation source. Additionally, melamine (C3H6N6 powder was injected into the plasma flame to prevent the oxidation of gallium to gallium oxide (Ga2O3. Argon thermal plasma was applied to synthesize GaN nanopowder. The synthesized GaN nanopowder by thermal plasma has low crystallinity and purity. It was improved to relatively high crystallinity and purity by annealing. The crystallinity is enhanced by the thermal treatment and the purity was increased by the elimination of residual C3H6N6. The combined process of thermal plasma and annealing was appropriate for synthesizing crystalline GaN nanopowder. The annealing process after the plasma synthesis of GaN nanopowder eliminated residual contamination and enhanced the crystallinity of GaN nanopowder. As a result, crystalline GaN nanopowder which has an average particle size of 30 nm was synthesized by the combination of thermal plasma treatment and annealing.

  2. Two-dimensional gallium nitride realized via graphene encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.; Wang, Ke; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Vilá, Rafael A.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Qin, Xiaoye; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Desario, Paul A.; Stone, Greg; Subramanian, Shruti; Paul, Dennis F.; Wallace, Robert M.; Datta, Suman; Redwing, Joan M.; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-11-01

    The spectrum of two-dimensional (2D) and layered materials `beyond graphene’ offers a remarkable platform to study new phenomena in condensed matter physics. Among these materials, layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), with its wide bandgap energy (~5.0-6.0 eV), has clearly established that 2D nitrides are key to advancing 2D devices. A gap, however, remains between the theoretical prediction of 2D nitrides `beyond hBN’ and experimental realization of such structures. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of 2D gallium nitride (GaN) via a migration-enhanced encapsulated growth (MEEG) technique utilizing epitaxial graphene. We theoretically predict and experimentally validate that the atomic structure of 2D GaN grown via MEEG is notably different from reported theory. Moreover, we establish that graphene plays a critical role in stabilizing the direct-bandgap (nearly 5.0 eV), 2D buckled structure. Our results provide a foundation for discovery and stabilization of 2D nitrides that are difficult to prepare via traditional synthesis.

  3. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  4. Visible light metasurfaces based on gallium nitride high contrast gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhai; He, Shumin; Liu, Qifa; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We propose visible-light metasurfaces (VLMs) capable of serving as lens and beam deflecting element based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). By precisely manipulating the wavefront of the transmitted light, we theoretically demonstrate an HCG focusing lens with transmissivity of 86.3%, and a VLM with beam deflection angle of 6.09° and transmissivity as high as 91.4%. The proposed all-dielectric metasurfaces are promising for GaN-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which would be robust and versatile for controlling the output light propagation and polarization, as well as enhancing the extraction efficiency of the LEDs.

  5. Fabrication of hexagonal gallium nitride films on silicon (111) substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; XUE Chengshan; WANG Cuimei; LI Huaixiang; REN Yuwen

    2003-01-01

    Hexagonal gallium nitride films were successfully fabricated through ammoniating Ga2O3 films deposited on silicon (111 ) substrates by electrophoresis. The structure, composition, and surface morphology of the formed films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The measurement results reveal that the polycrystalline GaN films with hexagonal wurtzite structure were successfully grown on the silicon (111) substrates. Preliminary results suggest that varying the ammoniating temperature has obvious effect on the quality of the GaN films formed with this method.

  6. Lasing action in gallium nitride quasicrystal nanorod arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Pang; Sou, Kuok-Pan; Chen, Chieh-Han; Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Huang, Ji-Kai; Lin, Chung-Hsiang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2012-05-21

    We report the observation of lasing action from an optically pumped gallium nitride quasicrystal nanorod arrays. The nanorods were fabricated from a GaN substrate by patterned etching, followed by epitaxial regrowth. The nanorods were arranged in a 12-fold symmetric quasicrystal pattern. The regrowth grew hexagonal crystalline facets and core-shell multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on nanorods. Under optical pumping, multiple lasing peaks resembling random lasing were observed. The lasing was identified to be from the emission of MQWs on the nanorod sidewalls. The resonant spectrum and mode field of the 12-fold symmetric photonic quasicrystal nanorod arrays is discussed.

  7. Gallium nitride electrodes for membrane-based electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, T; Steinhoff, G; von Ribbeck, H-G; Stutzmannn, M; Eickhoff, M; Tanaka, M

    2009-10-01

    We report on the deposition of planar lipid bilayers (supported membranes) on gallium nitride (GaN) electrodes for potential applications as membrane-based biosensors. The kinetics of the lipid membrane formation upon vesicle fusion were monitored by simultaneous measurements of resistance and capacitance of the membrane using AC impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range between 50 mHz and 50 kHz. We could identify a two-step process of membrane spreading and self-healing. Despite its relatively low resistance, the membrane can be modeled by a parallel combination of an ideal resistor and capacitor, indicating that the membrane efficiently blocks the diffusion of ions.

  8. Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al)GaN) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    like HEMTs . A nanolayer of AlGaN over GaN provides extra 2DEG charge density because of the piezoelectric effect of the AlGaN layer. The higher...Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al) GaN ) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates by Iskander G. Batyrev, Chi-Chin Wu...Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al) GaN ) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates Iskander G. Batyrev and N. Scott Weingarten Weapons and

  9. Properties of Erbium and Ytterbium Doped Gallium Nitride Layers Fabricated by Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about some properties of erbium and erbium/ytterbium doped gallium nitride (GaN layers fabricated by magnetron sputtering onsilicon, quartz and Corning glass substrates. For fabricating GaN layers two types of targets were used - gallium in a stainless steel cup anda Ga2O3 target. Deposition was carried out in the Ar+N2 gas mixture. For erbium and ytterbium doping into GaN layers, erbium metallicpowder and ytterbium powder or Er2O3 and Yb2O3 pellets were laid on the top of the target. The samples were characterized by X-raydiffraction (XRD, photoluminescence spectra and nuclear analytical methods. While the use of a metallic gallium target ensured thedeposition of well-developed polycrystalline layers, the use of gallium oxide target provided GaN films with poorly developed crystals. Bothapproaches enabled doping with erbium and ytterbium ions during deposition, and typical emission at 1 530 nm due to the Er3+ intra-4f 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition was observed.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of gallium nitride electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry Wayne

    Gallium nitride (GaN)-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), and Schottky rectifiers were fabricated and characterized. Novel dielectric materials Gd 2O3 and ScO were evaluated as potential gate dielectrics for GaN MOS applications. The devices presented herein show tremendous potential for elevated temperature, high frequency, and/or high voltage operation. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs were grown by MOCVD on sapphire and SiC substrates and by RF-MBE on sapphire substrates. Devices were fabricated with gate lengths from 100 nm to 1.2 mum. Drain current density approached 1 A/mm and extrinsic transconductance exceeded 200 mS/mm for small gate periphery devices. For the shortest gate length, a unity-gain cutoff frequency (fT) of 59 GHz and a maximum frequency of oscillation (fmax) of 90 GHz were extracted from measured scattering parameters. The experimental s-parameters were in excellent agreement with simulated results from small-signal linear modeling. Large signal characterization of 0.25 x 150 mum2 devices produced 2.75 W/mm at 3 GHz and 1.7 W/mm at 10 GHz. Devices fabricated on high thermal conductivity SiC substrates exhibited superior high temperature performance and a reduced density of threading dislocations. Novel gate dielectrics Gd2O3 and ScO were grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE). Current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) data were collected from MOS capacitors to evaluate the bulk and interfacial electrical properties of the insulators. Single crystal Gd2O 3 was demonstrated on GaN, but the resultant MOSFET exhibited a large gate leakage attributed to defects and dislocations in the oxide. MOSFETs with a stacked gate dielectric of Gd2O3/SiO2 were operational at a drain source bias of 80 V and a gate bias of +7 V. Bulk GaN templates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HYPE) were used to fabricate vertical geometry Schottky rectifiers. Size- and temperature

  11. Oligonuclear gallium nitrogen cage compounds: molecular intermediates on the way from gallium hydrazides to gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Werner; Abel, Thomas; Hagemeier, Elke; Hepp, Alexander; Layh, Marcus; Rezaeirad, Babak; Luftmann, Heinrich

    2011-01-03

    Gallium hydrazides are potentially applicable as facile starting compounds for the generation of GaN by thermolysis. The decomposition pathways are, however, complicated and depend strongly on the substituents attached to the gallium atoms and the hydrazido groups. This paper describes some systematic investigations into the thermolysis of the gallium hydrazine adduct Bu(t)(3)Ga←NH(2)-NHMe (1a) and the dimeric gallium hydrazides [R(2)Ga(N(2)H(2)R')](2) (2b, R = Bu(t), R' = Bu(t); 2c, R = Pr(i), R' = Ph; 2d, R = Me, R' = Bu(t)) which have four- or five-membered heterocycles in their molecular cores. Heating of the adduct 1a to 170 °C gave the heterocyclic compound Bu(t)(2)Ga(μ-NH(2))[μ-N(Me)-N(=CH(2))]GaBu(t)(2) (3) by cleavage of N-N bonds and rearrangement. 3 was further converted at 400 °C into the tetrameric gallium cyanide (Bu(t)(2)GaCN)(4) (4). The thermolysis of the hydrazide (Bu(t)(2)Ga)(2)(NH-NHBu(t))(2) (2b) at temperatures between 270 and 420 °C resulted in cleavage of all N-N bonds and the formation of an octanuclear gallium imide, (Bu(t)GaNH)(8) (6). The trimeric dialkylgallium amide (Bu(t)(2)GaNH(2))(3) (5) was isolated as an intermediate. Thermolysis of the hydrazides (Pr(i)(2)Ga)(2)(NH-NHPh)(NH(2)-NPh) (2c) and (Me(2)Ga)(2)(NH-NHBu(t))(2) (2d) proceeded in contrast with retention of the N-N bonds and afforded a variety of novel gallium hydrazido cage compounds with four gallium atoms and up to four hydrazido groups in a single molecule: (Pr(i)Ga)(4)(NH-NPh)(3)NH (7), (MeGa)(4)(NH-NBu(t))(4) (8), (MeGa)(4)(NH-NBu(t))(3)NBu(t) (9), and (MeGa)(4)(NHNBu(t))(3)NH (10). Partial hydrolysis gave reproducibly the unique octanuclear mixed hydrazido oxo compound (MeGa)(8)(NHNBu(t))(4)O(4) (11).

  12. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  13. Localized surface phonon polariton resonances in polar gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kaijun, E-mail: kfeng@nd.edu; Islam, S. M.; Verma, Jai; Hoffman, Anthony J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Streyer, William; Wasserman, Daniel [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States)

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrate the excitation of localized surface phonon polaritons in an array of sub-diffraction pucks fabricated in an epitaxial layer of gallium nitride (GaN) on a silicon carbide (SiC) substrate. The array is characterized via polarization- and angle-dependent reflection spectroscopy in the mid-infrared, and coupling to several localized modes is observed in the GaN Reststrahlen band (13.4–18.0 μm). The same structure is simulated using finite element methods and the charge density of the modes are studied; transverse dipole modes are identified for the transverse electric and magnetic polarizations and a quadrupole mode is identified for the transverse magnetic polarization. The measured mid-infrared spectrum agrees well with numerically simulated spectra. This work could enable optoelectronic structures and devices that support surface modes at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths.

  14. Modeling and simulation of bulk gallium nitride power semiconductor devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sabui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bulk gallium nitride (GaN power semiconductor devices are gaining significant interest in recent years, creating the need for technology computer aided design (TCAD simulation to accurately model and optimize these devices. This paper comprehensively reviews and compares different GaN physical models and model parameters in the literature, and discusses the appropriate selection of these models and parameters for TCAD simulation. 2-D drift-diffusion semi-classical simulation is carried out for 2.6 kV and 3.7 kV bulk GaN vertical PN diodes. The simulated forward current-voltage and reverse breakdown characteristics are in good agreement with the measurement data even over a wide temperature range.

  15. Gallium Nitride Electrical Characteristics Extraction and Uniformity Sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyr-Long Jeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the output electrical characteristics—current-voltage (I-V output, threshold voltage, and parasitic capacitance—of novel gallium nitride (GaN power transistors. Experimental measurements revealed that both enhanced- and depletion-mode GaN field-effect transistors (FETs containing different components of identical specifications yielded varied turn-off impedance; hence, the FET quality was inconsistent. Establishing standardized electrical measurements can provide necessary information for designers, and measuring transistor electrical characteristics establishes its equivalent-circuit model for circuit simulations. Moreover, high power output requires multiple parallel power transistors, and sorting the difference between similar electrical characteristics is critical in a power system. An isolated gate driver detection method is proposed for sorting the uniformity from the option of the turn-off characteristic. In addition, an equivalent-circuit model for GaN FETs is established on the basis of the measured electrical characteristics and verified experimentally.

  16. Low temperature solid-state synthesis of nanocrystalline gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liangbiao, E-mail: wlb6641@163.com [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Liang; Li, Qianwen; Si, Lulu; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► GaN nanocrystalline was prepared via a solid-state reacion at relatively low temperature. ► The sizes and crystallinities of the GaN samples obtained at the different temperatures are investigated. ► The GaN sample has oxidation resistance and good thermal stability below 1000 °C. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline gallium nitride was synthesized by a solid-state reaction of metallic magnesium powder, gallium sesquioxide and sodium amide in a stainless steel autoclave at a relatively low temperature (400–550 °C). The structures and morphologies of the obtained products were derived from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD patterns indicated that the products were hexagonal GaN (JCPDS card no. 76-0703). The influence of reaction temperature on size of the products was studied by XRD and TEM. Furthermore, the thermal stability and oxidation resistance of the nanocrystalline GaN were also investigated. It had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 800 °C in air.

  17. Manganese Atom Ordered Monolayer on Wurtzite Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang, Kangkang; Lin, Wenzhi; Pak, Jeongihm; Liu, Yinghao; Smith, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    While transition-metal-doped gallium nitride (GaN) thin films have been explored as potential dilute magnetic semiconductor bulk layers, the structural and magnetic effects of various transition metal adatoms on GaN surfaces are not even well understood. In this work, we investigate the sub-monolayer deposition of manganese (Mn) onto the N-polar wurtzite GaN (000-1) 1x1 surface. The growth is monitored in-situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). A fresh GaN(000-1) 1x1 surface is prepared by rf nitrogen plasma-assisted MBE followed by annealing to remove excess gallium adatoms. The atomically flat GaN surface, held at 200^o C, is then exposed to submonolayer doses of Mn. The deposition rate is maintained at 0.007 ML per second, and a 3x pattern develops along [10-10]; whereas, only 1x is seen along [11-20]. Analysis of the RHEED pattern and subsequent modeling indicates a 3 x3 R 30^o structure consisting of 2/3 ML Mn atoms in a row-like arrangement having spacing 3a/2 along rows and 3a/2 between rows. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy studies are currently underway to explore this surface further. This work is supported by DOE (Grant No.DE-FG02-06ER46317) and NSF (Grant No. 0730257).

  18. Synthesis of L-cystine nanotubes by alkalinization of L-cysteine in the presence of gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal

    2013-12-01

    The alkaline oxidation of L-cysteine (L-Cys) was conducted in aqueous media forming the insoluble L-cystine dimer as confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In another experiment, a gallium nitride film was added to the L-Cys solution and the L-cystine crystals presented a preferential growth. The transmission electron microscopy images showed the formation of single- and multi-wall L-cystine nanotubes. The infrared and high resolution electron microscopy data suggested that the growth of the tubes resulted from the successive staking of L-cystine dimers onto the (0 0 1) family of planes, which was a consequence of the ionic assembly between L-cystine over a layer of L-Cys molecules previously grafted to the gallium nitride particles.

  19. Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices by Marc Litz...MD 20783-1138 ARL-TR-7082 September 2014 Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN... Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  20. Nanoscale optical properties of indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride nanodisk-in-rod heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Lu, Ming-Yen; Lu, Yu-Jung; Jones, Eric J; Gwo, Shangjr; Gradečak, Silvija

    2015-03-24

    III-nitride based nanorods and nanowires offer great potential for optoelectronic applications such as light emitting diodes or nanolasers. We report nanoscale optical studies of InGaN/GaN nanodisk-in-rod heterostructures to quantify uniformity of light emission on the ensemble level, as well as the emission characteristics from individual InGaN nanodisks. Despite the high overall luminescence efficiency, spectral and intensity inhomogeneities were observed and directly correlated to the compositional variations among nanodisks and to the presence of structural defect, respectively. Observed light quenching is correlated to type I1 stacking faults in InGaN nanodisks, and the mechanisms for stacking fault induced nonradiative recombinations are discussed in the context of band structure around stacking faults and Fermi level pinning at nanorod surfaces. Our results highlight the importance of controlling III-nitride nanostructure growths to further reduce defect formation and ensure compositional homogeneity for optoelectronic devices with high efficiencies and desirable spectrum response.

  1. Studies on the reliability of ni-gate aluminum gallium nitride / gallium nitride high electron mobility transistors using chemical deprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Patrick Guzek

    Aluminum Gallium Nitride / Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors are becoming the technology of choice for applications where hundreds of volts need to be applied in a circuit at frequencies in the hundreds of gigahertz, such as microwave communications. However, because these devices are very new, their reliability in the field is not well understood, partly because of the stochastic nature of the defects which form as a result of their operation. Many analytical techniques are not well suited to the analysis of these defects because they sample regions of the device which are either too small or too large for accurate observation. The use of chemical deprocessing in addition to surface-sensitive analysis techniques such as Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Probe Microscopy can be utilized in the analysis of defect formation in devices formed with nickel gates. Hydrofluoric acid is used to etch the passivation nitride which covers the semiconducting layer of the transistor. A metal etch utilizing FeCN/KI is used to etch the ohmic and gate contacts of the device and a long exposure in various solvent solutions is used to remove organic contaminants, exposing the surface of the semiconducting layer for analysis. Deprocessing was used in conjunction with a variety of metrology techniques to analyze three different defects. One of these defects is a nanoscale crack which emanates from metal inclusions formed during alloying of the ohmic contacts of the device prior to use in the field, could impact the yield of production-level manufacturing of these devices. This defect also appears to grow, in some cases, during electrostatic stressing. Another defect, a native oxide at the surface of the semiconducting layer which appears to react in the presence of an electric field, has not been observed before during post-mortem analysis of degraded devices. It could play a major part in the degredation of the gate contact during high-field, off

  2. A gallium nitride single-photon source operating at 200 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kako, Satoshi; Santori, Charles; Hoshino, Katsuyuki; Götzinger, Stephan; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2006-11-01

    Fundamentally secure quantum cryptography has still not seen widespread application owing to the difficulty of generating single photons on demand. Semiconductor quantum-dot structures have recently shown great promise as practical single-photon sources, and devices with integrated optical cavities and electrical-carrier injection have already been demonstrated. However, a significant obstacle for the application of commonly used III-V quantum dots to quantum-information-processing schemes is the requirement of liquid-helium cryogenic temperatures. Epitaxially grown gallium nitride quantum dots embedded in aluminium nitride have the potential for operation at much higher temperatures. Here, we report triggered single-photon emission from gallium nitride quantum dots at temperatures up to 200 K, a temperature easily reachable with thermo-electric cooling. Gallium nitride quantum dots also open a new wavelength region in the blue and near-ultraviolet portions of the spectrum for single-photon sources.

  3. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Schmid, Martin; Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Adigüzel, Denis; Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2012-07-27

    There is an increasing interest in the integration of hybrid bio-semiconductor systems for the non-invasive evaluation of physiological parameters. High quality gallium nitride and its alloys show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Nevertheless, such applications not only request appropriate sensing capabilities but also the biocompatibility and especially the biofunctionality of materials. Here we show extensive biocompatibility studies of gallium nitride and, for the first time, a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Analytical sensor devices are used in medical settings, as well as for cell- and tissue engineering. Within these fields, semiconductor devices have increasingly been applied for online biosensing on a cellular and tissue level. Integration of advanced materials such as gallium nitride into these systems has the potential to increase the range of applicability for a multitude of test devices and greatly enhance sensitivity and functionality. However, for such applications it is necessary to optimize cell-surface interactions and to verify the biocompatibility of the semiconductor. In this work, we present studies of mouse fibroblast cell activity grown on gallium nitride surfaces after applying external noxa. Cell-semiconductor hybrids were irradiated with X-rays at air kerma doses up to 250 mGy and the DNA repair dynamics, cell proliferation, and cell growth dynamics of adherent cells were compared to control samples. The impact of ionizing radiation on DNA, along with the associated cellular repair mechanisms, is well characterized and serves as a reference tool for evaluation of substrate effects. The results indicate that gallium nitride does not require specific surface treatments to ensure biocompatibility and suggest that cell signaling is not affected by micro-environmental alterations arising from gallium nitride-cell interactions. The observation that gallium nitride provides no bio-functional influence on

  4. Cell behavior on gallium nitride surfaces: peptide affinity attachment versus covalent functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Corey M; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-07-02

    Gallium nitride is a wide band gap semiconductor that demonstrates a unique set of optical and electrical properties as well as aqueous stability and biocompatibility. This combination of properties makes gallium nitride a strong candidate for use in chemical and biological applications such as sensors and neural interfaces. Molecular modification can be used to enhance the functionality and properties of the gallium nitride surface. Here, gallium nitride surfaces were functionalized with a PC12 cell adhesion promoting peptide using covalent and affinity driven attachment methods. The covalent scheme proceeded by Grignard reaction and olefin metathesis while the affinity driven scheme utilized the recognition peptide isolated through phage display. This study shows that the method of attaching the adhesion peptide influences PC12 cell adhesion and differentiation as measured by cell density and morphological analysis. Covalent attachment promoted monolayer and dispersed cell adhesion while affinity driven attachment promoted multilayer cell agglomeration. Higher cell density was observed on surfaces modified using the recognition peptide. The results suggest that the covalent and affinity driven attachment methods are both suitable for promoting PC12 cell adhesion to the gallium nitride surface, though each method may be preferentially suited for distinct applications.

  5. Polarity Control and Doping in Aluminum Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    seems to go hand in hand with a decrease in resistivity. In other words, a more activated sample shows a more intense ABX transition as well as a...Al0.8Ga0.2N grown on c- oriented AlN single crystal substrates; Physica Status Solidi (c) 9 (3-4); 584-587 (2012). 5 Y. Taniyasu, M. Kasu and T. Makimoto ...emitting diodes; Nature 406 (6798); 865-868 (2000). 21 U. T. Schwarz and M. Kneissl; Nitride emitters go nonpolar; physica status solidi (RRL

  6. Gallium Nitride, Indium Nitride, and Heterostructure Development Using The MEAglow Growth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsted, Peter W.

    This thesis presents an in depth study of semiconductor development using a new process termed Migration Enhanced Afterglow (MEAglow). The MEAglow growth reactor is housed in the Lakehead University Semiconductor Research Lab. Thin films of gallium nitride and indium nitride are produced as well as heterostructures comprised of these two films and their ternary alloy InGaN. MEAglow is a form of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) employing migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE). The heterostructure is being developed for a novel field effect transistor (FET) based on the tunnelling of charge carriers which alter the channel conductivity. The configuration of this unique III-Nitride device should allow the FET to function as normally off in either n-type or p-type operation. Due to the difficulties in growing low temperature GaN, test devices of this abstract design were not previously possible. Further details on the device operation and growth parameters are included. Samples produced by the research reactor were characterised through x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-near infrared-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis-NIR), Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Film growth is accomplished by an improved form of pulsed delivery Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). The reactor features a scalable hollow cathode type plasma source. Data obtained through characterisation is subjected to theoretical treatment which explains much not previously understood behaviour of the GaN films. Many challenges in III-Nitride film growth have been overcome during this research project. A method of developing structures consisting of InN and GaN within the same system has been proven.

  7. Growth and fabrication of gallium nitride and indium gallium nitride-based optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, Erkan Acar

    In this study, heteroepitaxial growth of III-Nitrides was performed by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique on (0001) Al 2O3 substrates to develop GaN and InxGa1-x N based optoelectronic devices. Comprehensive experimental studies on emission and relaxation mechanisms of InxGa1-xN quantum wells (QWs) and InxGa 1-xN single layers were performed. The grown films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall Effect measurements, photoluminescence measurements (PL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An investigation on the effect of number and width of QWs on PL emission properties of InxGa 1-xN single QWs and multi-quantum wells (MQW) was conducted. The experimental results were explained by the developed theoretical bandgap model. The study on the single layer InxGa1-xN films within and beyond critical layer thickness (CLT) demonstrated that thick InxGa 1-xN films display simultaneous presence of strained and (partially) relaxed layers. The In incorporation into the lattice was observed to be dependent on the strain state of the film. The findings on InxGa1-xN QWs and single layers were implemented in the development of InxGa1-xN based LEDs and photodiodes, respectively. The as-grown samples were fabricated using conventional lithography techniques into various optoelectronic devices including long wavelength LEDs, dichromatic monolithic white LEDs, and p-i-n photodiodes. Emission from InxGa1-xN/GaN MQW LEDs at wavelengths as long as 625nm was demonstrated. This is one of the longest peak emission wavelengths reported for MOCVD grown InxGa1-xN MQW structures. Dichromatic white emission in LEDs was realized by utilizing two InGaN MQW active regions emitting at complementary wavelengths. InGaN p-i-n photodiodes operating at various regions of the visible spectrum tailored by the i-layer properties were developed. This was achieved by the novel approach of employing InxGa1-xN in all layers of the p-i-n photodiodes, enabling nearly

  8. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Markus [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Howgate, John [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmid, Martin [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Adiguezel, Denis [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Thalhammer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gallium nitride based sensors show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell growth experiments reveal excellent biocompatibiltiy of the host GaN material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair is utilized to evaluate material induced alterations in the cellular behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GaN shows no bio-functional influence on the cellular environment. -- Abstract: There is an increasing interest in the integration of hybrid bio-semiconductor systems for the non-invasive evaluation of physiological parameters. High quality gallium nitride and its alloys show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Nevertheless, such applications not only request appropriate sensing capabilities but also the biocompatibility and especially the biofunctionality of materials. Here we show extensive biocompatibility studies of gallium nitride and, for the first time, a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Analytical sensor devices are used in medical settings, as well as for cell- and tissue engineering. Within these fields, semiconductor devices have increasingly been applied for online biosensing on a cellular and tissue level. Integration of advanced materials such as gallium nitride into these systems has the potential to increase the range of applicability for a multitude of test devices and greatly enhance sensitivity and functionality. However, for such applications it is necessary to optimize cell-surface interactions and to verify the biocompatibility of the semiconductor. In this work, we present studies of mouse fibroblast cell activity grown on gallium nitride surfaces after applying external noxa. Cell-semiconductor hybrids were irradiated with X-rays at air kerma doses up to 250 mGy and the DNA repair dynamics, cell proliferation, and cell growth

  9. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  10. Two single-layer porous gallium nitride nanosheets: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Meng, Fan-Sun; Wu, Yan-Bin

    2017-01-01

    The gallium nitride (GaN) is a novel wide-gap semiconductor for photoelectric devices. In this paper, two 2D single-layer GaN crystal structures, called H-GaN and T-GaN, are discovered by the density functional theory calculations. The phase stability is confirmed by phonon dispersions. The sole-atom-thick crystals of H-GaN and T-GaN, has possess enlarged specific surface area than the graphene-like allotrope (g-GaN) due to the porous structures. In addition, they have indirect band gaps of 1.85-1.89 eV and the electronic structures can be further modulated by applied strains. For example, T-GaN transforms from an indirect semiconductor to a direct one due to compressed strains. Both the combination of high specific surface area and moderate band gaps make these 2D crystals potential high-efficiency photocatalysts. Our results will also stimulate the investigations on 2D GaN nano crystals with rich electronic structures for wide applications.

  11. Bright Room-Temperature Single Photon Emission from Defects in Gallium Nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Berhane, Amanuel M; Bodrog, Zoltán; Fiedler, Saskia; Schröder, Tim; Triviño, Noelia Vico; Palacios, Tomás; Gali, Adam; Toth, Milos; Englund, Dirk; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Single photon emitters play a central role in many photonic quantum technologies. A promising class of single photon emitters consists of atomic color centers in wide-bandgap crystals, such as diamond silicon carbide and hexagonal boron nitride. However, it is currently not possible to grow these materials as sub-micron thick films on low-refractive index substrates, which is necessary for mature photonic integrated circuit technologies. Hence, there is great interest in identifying quantum emitters in technologically mature semiconductors that are compatible with suitable heteroepitaxies. Here, we demonstrate robust single photon emitters based on defects in gallium nitride (GaN), the most established and well understood semiconductor that can emit light over the entire visible spectrum. We show that the emitters have excellent photophysical properties including a brightness in excess of 500x10^3 counts/s. We further show that the emitters can be found in a variety of GaN wafers, thus offering reliable and s...

  12. Numerical investigation of crystal growth process of bulk Si and nitrides - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, K.; Liu, L.; Miyazawa, H.; Nakano, S.; Kashiwagi, D.; Chen, X.J.; Kangawa, Y. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    Heat and mass transfer during crystal growth of bulk Si and nitrides by using numerical analysis was studied. A three-dimensional analysis was carried out to investigate temperature distribution and solid-liquid interface shape of silicon for large-scale integrated circuits and photovoltaic silicon. The analysis enables prediction of the solid-liquid interface shape of silicon crystals. The result shows that the interface shape became bevel like structure in the case without crystal rotation. We also carried out analysis of nitrogen transfer in gallium melt during crystal growth of gallium nitride using liquid-phase epitaxy. The result shows that the growth rate at the center was smaller than that at the center. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Electrical Activation Studies of Silicon Implanted Aluminum Gallium Nitride with High Aluminum Mole Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    important to minimize imperfections and defects as well as the amount of unwanted impurities. The most common bulk method is the Czochralski Method , in...demonstrates a method for producing highly conductive Si- implanted n-type aluminum gallium nitride (AlxGa1-xN) alloys, and represents a comprehensive...54 IV. Experimental Method ..................................................................................... 57 Sample

  14. Effect of variation of silicon nitride passivation layer on electron irradiated aluminum gallium nitride/gallium nitride HEMT structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Helen C.

    Silicon nitride passivation on AlGaNGaN heterojunction devices can improve performance by reducing electron traps at the surface. This research studies the effect of displacement damage caused by 1 MeV electron irradiation as a function of the variation of passivation layer thickness and heterostructure layer variation on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. The effects of passivation layer thickness are investigated at thicknesses of 0, 20, 50 and 120 nanometers on AlGaNGaN test structures with either an AlN nucleation layer or a GaN cap structures which are then measured before and immediately after 1.0 MeV electron irradiation at fluences of 1016 cm-2. Hall system measurements are used to observe changes in mobility, carrier concentration and conductivity as a function of Si3N4 thickness. Models are developed that relate the device structure and passivation layer under 1 MeV radiation to the observed changes to the measured photoluminescence and deep level transient spectroscopy. A software model is developed to determine the production rate of defects from primary 1 MeV electrons that can be used for other energies and materials. The presence of either a 50 or 120 nm Si 3N4 passivation layer preserves the channel current for both and appears to be optimal for radiation hardness.

  15. Growth and characterization of indium antimonide and gallium antimonide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N K Udayashankar; H L Bhat

    2001-10-01

    Indium antimonide and gallium antimonide were synthesized from the respective component elements using an indigenously fabricated synthesis unit. Bulk crystals of indium antimonide and gallium antimonide were grown using both the vertical and horizontal Bridgman techniques. Effect of ampoule shapes and diameters on the crystallinity and homogeneity was studied. The grown crystals were characterized using X-ray analysis, EDAX, chemical etching, Hall effect and conductivity measurements. In the case of gallium antimonide, effect of dopants (Te and In) on transport and photoluminescence properties was investigated.

  16. Advanced W-Band Gallium Nitride Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) for Cloud Doppler Radar Supporting ACE Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop W-band Gallium Nitride (GaN) MMICs to enable the advanced cross-track scanning, dual-frequency Doppler cloud radar concept in support of the...

  17. In situ chemical functionalization of gallium nitride with phosphonic acid derivatives during etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stewart J; Greenough, Michelle; Arellano, Consuelo; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-03-04

    In situ functionalization of polar (c plane) and nonpolar (a plane) gallium nitride (GaN) was performed by adding (3-bromopropyl) phosphonic acid or propyl phosphonic acid to a phosphoric acid etch. The target was to modulate the emission properties and oxide formation of GaN, which was explored through surface characterization with atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and water contact angle. The use of (3-bromopropyl) phosphonic acid and propyl phosphonic acid in phosphoric acid demonstrated lower amounts of gallium oxide formation and greater hydrophobicity for both sample sets, while also improving PL emission of polar GaN samples. In addition to crystal orientation, growth-related factors such as defect density in bulk GaN versus thin GaN films residing on sapphire substrates were investigated as well as their responses to in situ functionalization. Thin nonpolar GaN layers were the most sensitive to etching treatments due in part to higher defect densities (stacking faults and threading dislocations), which accounts for large surface depressions. High-quality GaN (both free-standing bulk polar and bulk nonpolar) demonstrated increased sensitivity to oxide formation. Room-temperature PL stands out as an excellent technique to identify nonradiative recombination as observed in the spectra of heteroepitaxially grown GaN samples. The chemical methods applied to tune optical and physical properties of GaN provide a quantitative framework for future novel chemical and biochemical sensor development.

  18. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  19. Epitaxially-grown Gallium Nitride on Gallium Oxide substrate for photon pair generation in visible and telecomm wavelengths

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Kashif M.

    2016-08-11

    Gallium Nitride (GaN), along with other III-Nitrides, is attractive for optoelectronic and electronic applications due to its wide direct energy bandgap, as well as high thermal stability. GaN is transparent over a wide wavelength range from infra-red to the visible band, which makes it suitable for lasers and LEDs. It is also expected to be a suitable candidate for integrated nonlinear photonic circuits for a wide range of applications from all-optical signal processing to quantum computing and on-chip wavelength conversion. Despite its abundant use in commercial devices, there is still need for suitable substrate materials to reduce high densities of threading dislocations (TDs) and other structural defects like stacking faults, and grain boundaries. All these defects degrade the optical quality of the epi-grown GaN layer as they act as non-radiative recombination centers.

  20. Optical and Micro-Structural Characterization of MBE Grown Indium Gallium Nitride Polar Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    El Afandy, Rami

    2011-07-07

    Gallium nitride and related materials have ushered in scientific and technological breakthrough for lighting, mass data storage and high power electronic applications. These III-nitride materials have found their niche in blue light emitting diodes and blue laser diodes. Despite the current development, there are still technological problems that still impede the performance of such devices. Three-dimensional nanostructures are proposed to improve the electrical and thermal properties of III-nitride optical devices. This thesis consolidates the characterization results and unveils the unique physical properties of polar indium gallium nitride quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy technique. In this thesis, a theoretical overview of the physical, structural and optical properties of polar III-nitrides quantum dots will be presented. Particular emphasis will be given to properties that distinguish truncated-pyramidal III-nitride quantum dots from other III-V semiconductor based quantum dots. The optical properties of indium gallium nitride quantum dots are mainly dominated by large polarization fields, as well as quantum confinement effects. Hence, the experimental investigations for such quantum dots require performing bandgap calculations taking into account the internal strain fields, polarization fields and confinement effects. The experiments conducted in this investigation involved the transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction as well as photoluminescence spectroscopy. The analysis of the temperature dependence and excitation power dependence of the PL spectra sheds light on the carrier dynamics within the quantum dots, and its underlying wetting layer. A further analysis shows that indium gallium nitride quantum dots through three-dimensional confinements are able to prevent the electronic carriers from getting thermalized into defects which grants III-nitrides quantum dot based light emitting diodes superior thermally induced optical

  1. 0.15-micron Gallium Nitride (GaN) Microwave Integrated Circuit Designs Submitted to TriQuint Semiconductor for Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    arsenide GaN gallium nitride LNA low-noise amplifier MMIC monolithic microwave integrated circuit PA power amplifier HEMT high electron mobility...0.15-µm Gallium Nitride ( GaN ) Microwave Integrated Circuit Designs Submitted to TriQuint Semiconductor for Fabrication by John Penn ARL...MD 20783-1197 ARL-TN-0496 September 2012 0.15-µm Gallium Nitride ( GaN ) Microwave Integrated Circuit Designs Submitted to TriQuint

  2. Giant piezoelectric size effects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride nanowires. A first principles investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ravi; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2011-02-09

    Nanowires made of materials with noncentrosymmetric crystal structure are under investigation for their piezoelectric properties and suitability as building blocks for next-generation self-powered nanodevices. In this work, we investigate the size dependence of piezoelectric coefficients in nanowires of two such materials - zinc oxide and gallium nitride. Nanowires, oriented along their polar axis, ranging from 0.6 to 2.4 nm in diameter were modeled quantum mechanically. A giant piezoelectric size effect is identified for both GaN and ZnO nanowires. However, GaN exhibits a larger and more extended size dependence than ZnO. The observed size effect is discussed in the context of charge redistribution near the free surfaces leading to changes in local polarization. The study reveals that local changes in polarization and reduction of unit cell volume with respect to bulk values lead to the observed size effect. These results have strong implication in the field of energy harvesting, as piezoelectric voltage output scales with the piezoelectric coefficient.

  3. Exfoliation of Threading Dislocation-Free, Single-Crystalline, Ultrathin Gallium Nitride Nanomembranes

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2014-04-01

    Despite the recent progress in gallium nitride (GaN) growth technology, the excessively high threading dislocation (TD) density within the GaN crystal, caused by the reliance on heterogeneous substrates, impedes the development of high-efficiency, low-cost, GaN-based heterostructure devices. For the first time, the chemical exfoliation of completely TD-free, single-crystalline, ultrathin (tens of nanometers) GaN nanomembranes is demonstrated using UV-assisted electroless chemical etching. These nanomembranes can act as seeding layers for subsequent overgrowth of high-quality GaN. A model is proposed, based on scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as optical measurements to explain the physical processes behind the formation of the GaN nanomembranes. These novel nanomembranes, once transferred to other substrates, present a unique and technologically attractive path towards integrating high-efficiency GaN optical components along with silicon electronics. Interestingly, due to their nanoscale thickness and macroscopic sizes, these nanomembranes may enable the production of flexible GaN-based optoelectronics. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Photocurrent enhancement of an individual gallium nitride nanowire decorated with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Jency Pricilla; Sargent, Meredith; McIlroy, David N.

    2011-03-01

    Variation in electron transport properties of individual n-type gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire and gold decorated gallium nitride (Au-GaN) nanowire were studied with respect to laser exposure of different wavelength and intensity. Single nanowire devices were manufactured by photolithography process in nanotechnology cleanroom, were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). A drop in electrical conductivity of Au-GaN nanowire was observed relative to bare GaN nanowire. Under laser illumination, we noticed an enhancement in photocurrent in Au-GaN nanowire, which increased with increase in excitation power at ambient conditions. We present a comparative study of the opto-electrical behavior of bare GaN nanowire vs Au-GaN nanowire and explain the IV characteristics and FET characteristics with respect to the length and diameter of nanowire. USDA, UI-BANTech.

  5. Homoepitaxial n-core: p-shell gallium nitride nanowires: HVPE overgrowth on MBE nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Aric; Blanchard, Paul; Bertness, Kris; Brubaker, Matthew; Dodson, Christopher; Harvey, Todd; Herrero, Andrew; Rourke, Devin; Schlager, John; Sanford, Norman; Chiaramonti, Ann N; Davydov, Albert; Motayed, Abhishek; Tsvetkov, Denis

    2011-11-18

    We present the homoepitaxial growth of p-type, magnesium doped gallium nitride shells by use of halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) on n-type gallium nitride nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Scanning electron microscopy shows clear dopant contrast between the core and shell of the nanowire. The growth of magnesium doped nanowire shells shows little or no effect on the lattice parameters of the underlying nanowires, as measured by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Photoluminescence measurements of the nanowires show the appearance of sub-bandgap features in the blue and the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of acceptors. Finally, electrical measurements confirm the presence of electrically active holes in the nanowires.

  6. The Effects of Thermal Cycling on Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Devices for Aerospace Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These Include radiation, extreme temperatures, thermal cycling, to name a few. Preliminary data obtained on new Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide power devices under exposure to radiation followed by long term thermal cycling are presented. This work was done in collaboration with GSFC and JPL in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  7. Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Power Electronics (FY11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    for HPE GaN high electron mobility transistors ( HEMTs ) compared to SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). Although a few...Figure 16. Asymmetric rocking curve for an HVPE film grown on an HVPE substrate. ............19 Figure 17. Schematic of a GaN /AlGaN HEMT structure grown...frequency (RF) HEMTs . These considerable investments can be leveraged for GaN HPE. Some people are concerned about the relative scarcity of gallium

  8. Vertical 2D/3D Semiconductor Heterostructures Based on Epitaxial Molybdenum Disulfide and Gallium Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Zhang, Kehao; Stan, Gheorghe; Kalanyan, Berc; Bhimanapati, Ganesh R; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Burke, Robert A; Shah, Pankaj B; O'Regan, Terrance P; Crowne, Frank J; Birdwell, A Glen; Robinson, Joshua A; Davydov, Albert V; Ivanov, Tony G

    2016-03-22

    When designing semiconductor heterostructures, it is expected that epitaxial alignment will facilitate low-defect interfaces and efficient vertical transport. Here, we report lattice-matched epitaxial growth of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) directly on gallium nitride (GaN), resulting in high-quality, unstrained, single-layer MoS2 with strict registry to the GaN lattice. These results present a promising path toward the implementation of high-performance electronic devices based on 2D/3D vertical heterostructures, where each of the 3D and 2D semiconductors is both a template for subsequent epitaxial growth and an active component of the device. The MoS2 monolayer triangles average 1 μm along each side, with monolayer blankets (merged triangles) exhibiting properties similar to that of single-crystal MoS2 sheets. Photoluminescence, Raman, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses identified monolayer MoS2 with a prominent 20-fold enhancement of photoluminescence in the center regions of larger triangles. The MoS2/GaN structures are shown to electrically conduct in the out-of-plane direction, confirming the potential of directly synthesized 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructures for vertical current flow. Finally, we estimate a MoS2/GaN contact resistivity to be less than 4 Ω·cm(2) and current spreading in the MoS2 monolayer of approximately 1 μm in diameter.

  9. White light-emitting diodes based on nonpolar and semipolar gallium nitride orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demille, Natalie Fellows

    Gallium nitride has become one of the key components when fabricating white light-emitting diodes. Its use as the blue source in conjunction with a wavelength converter such as the yellow emitting phosphor YAG:Ce 3+ is a technology that is commercially available and usable for solid state lighting applications. Currently available white phosphor-based LEDs (pcLEDs) use the basal plane of wurtzite GaN as their source. Although research over the past couple decades has developed this technology into devices with good photometric performance and high reliability, the introduction of nonbasal plane wurtzite GaN orientations have benefits over basal plane GaN that can be incorporated into the white LED. The focus of this research deals with exploring white illumination on nonpolar and semipolar planes of GaN. Light extraction techniques will be described that allowed for high output powers and efficiencies on the c-plane as well as the (1100), (10 11), and (1122) planes of GaN. With higher performing devices, white pcLEDs were fabricated on c-plane, m-plane, and the (1011) semipolar plane. The novelty in the present research is producing white LEDs with nonbasal plane diodes which exhibit optical polarization anisotropy. This feature, absent on the basal plane, allows for tuning photometric quantities both electrically and optically. This is demonstrated on pcLEDs as well as dichromatic LEDs comprised solely of InGaN diodes. As a consequence of these measurements, an apparent optical polarization was seen to be occurring in the luminescence of the YAG:Ce3+ when the system absorbed linearly polarized light. Polarized emission in YAG:Ce3+ was explored by obtaining single crystals of YAG:Ce3+ with different planar orientations. The experiments led to the conclusion that crystal orientation plays no part in the optical polarization. It is suggested that the cause is a result of electric dipole transitions given by various selection rules between the Ce 3+ ion's 4f and 5d

  10. Outphasing Control of Gallium Nitride based Very High Frequency Resonant Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Perreault, David J.; Knott, Arnold;

    2015-01-01

    . Then the modulation technique is described and the design equations given. Finally a design example is given for a converter consisting of two class E inverters with a lossless combiner and a common half bridge rectifier. It is shown how outphasing modulation can be used for line regulation while insuring equal...... and purely resistive loading of the inverters. Combined with a proper design of the inverters that, insures they can achieve zero voltage switching across a wide load range, and gallium nitride FETs for the switching devices, this makes it possible to achieve more than 90% efficiency across most of the input...

  11. Optical polarization based logic functions (XOR or XNOR) with nonlinear Gallium nitride nanoslab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, F A; Larciprete, M C; Giardina, M; Belardini, A; Centini, M; Sibilia, C; Bertolotti, M; Passaseo, A; Tasco, V

    2009-10-26

    We present a scheme of XOR/XNOR logic gate, based on non phase-matched noncollinear second harmonic generation from a medium of suitable crystalline symmetry, Gallium nitride. The polarization of the noncollinear generated beam is a function of the polarization of both pump beams, thus we experimentally investigated all possible polarization combinations, evidencing that only some of them are allowed and that the nonlinear interaction of optical signals behaves as a polarization based XOR. The experimental results show the peculiarity of the nonlinear optical response associated with noncollinear excitation, and are explained using the expression for the effective second order optical nonlinearity in noncollinear scheme.

  12. Effects of Radiation and Long-Term Thermal Cycling on EPC 1001 Gallium Nitride Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Data obtained on long-term thermal cycling of new un-irradiated and irradiated samples of EPC1001 gallium nitride enhancement-mode transistors are presented. This work was done by a collaborative effort including GRC, GSFC, and support the NASA www.nasa.gov 1 JPL in of Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  13. Size and Shape Dependence on Melting Temperature of Gallium Nitride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paneerselvam Antoniammal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the study. A comparative investigation is made between the two shapes, at the range of ~3 nm dia. The cylindrical GaN nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical-shaped nanoparticles. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is in line with the function of radius of curvature.

  14. High-fluence hyperthermal ion irradiation of gallium nitride surfaces at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, A.; Gerlach, J.W., E-mail: juergen.gerlach@iom-leipzig.de; Lorbeer, J.; Frost, F.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Irradiation of gallium nitride films with hyperthermal nitrogen ions. • Surface roughening at elevated sample temperatures was observed. • No thermal decomposition of gallium nitride films during irradiation. • Asymmetric surface diffusion processes cause local roughening. - Abstract: Wurtzitic GaN films deposited on 6H-SiC(0001) substrates by ion-beam assisted molecular-beam epitaxy were irradiated with hyperthermal nitrogen ions with different fluences at different substrate temperatures. In situ observations with reflection high energy electron diffraction showed that during the irradiation process the surface structure of the GaN films changed from two dimensional to three dimensional at elevated temperatures, but not at room temperature. Atomic force microscopy revealed an enhancement of nanometric holes and canyons upon the ion irradiation at higher temperatures. The roughness of the irradiated and heated GaN films was clearly increased by the ion irradiation in accordance with x-ray reflectivity measurements. A sole thermal decomposition of the films at the chosen temperatures could be excluded. The results are discussed taking into account temperature dependent sputtering and surface uphill adatom diffusion as a function of temperature.

  15. Improved heat dissipation in gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with embedded graphene oxide pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nam; Cuong, Tran Viet; Han, Min; Ryu, Beo Deul; Chandramohan, S; Park, Jong Bae; Kang, Ji Hye; Park, Young-Jae; Ko, Kang Bok; Kim, Hee Yun; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Jae Hyoung; Katharria, Y S; Choi, Chel-Jong; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The future of solid-state lighting relies on how the performance parameters will be improved further for developing high-brightness light-emitting diodes. Eventually, heat removal is becoming a crucial issue because the requirement of high brightness necessitates high-operating current densities that would trigger more joule heating. Here we demonstrate that the embedded graphene oxide in a gallium nitride light-emitting diode alleviates the self-heating issues by virtue of its heat-spreading ability and reducing the thermal boundary resistance. The fabrication process involves the generation of scalable graphene oxide microscale patterns on a sapphire substrate, followed by its thermal reduction and epitaxial lateral overgrowth of gallium nitride in a metal-organic chemical vapour deposition system under one-step process. The device with embedded graphene oxide outperforms its conventional counterpart by emitting bright light with relatively low-junction temperature and thermal resistance. This facile strategy may enable integration of large-scale graphene into practical devices for effective heat removal.

  16. Distinctive signature of indium gallium nitride quantum dot lasing in microdisk cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Alexander; Puchtler, Tim; Aharonovich, Igor; Zhu, Tongtong; Niu, Nan; Wang, Danqing; Oliver, Rachel; Hu, Evelyn L

    2014-09-30

    Low-threshold lasers realized within compact, high-quality optical cavities enable a variety of nanophotonics applications. Gallium nitride materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots and quantum wells offer an outstanding platform to study light-matter interactions and realize practical devices such as efficient light-emitting diodes and nanolasers. Despite progress in the growth and characterization of InGaN quantum dots, their advantages as the gain medium in low-threshold lasers have not been clearly demonstrated. This work seeks to better understand the reasons for these limitations by focusing on the simpler, limited-mode microdisk cavities, and by carrying out comparisons of lasing dynamics in those cavities using varying gain media including InGaN quantum wells, fragmented quantum wells, and a combination of fragmented quantum wells with quantum dots. For each gain medium, we use the distinctive, high-quality (Q ∼ 5,500) modes of the cavities, and the change in the highest-intensity mode as a function of pump power to better understand the dominant radiative processes. The variations of threshold power and lasing wavelength as a function of gain medium help us identify the possible limitations to lower-threshold lasing with quantum dot active medium. In addition, we have identified a distinctive lasing signature for quantum dot materials, which consistently lase at wavelengths shorter than the peak of the room temperature gain emission. These findings not only provide better understanding of lasing in nitride-based quantum dot cavity systems but also shed insight into the more fundamental issues of light-matter coupling in such systems.

  17. Strongly localized donor level in oxygen doped gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, C.; Suski, T.; Ager, J.W. III [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Fischer, S.; Meyer, B.K. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-08-01

    A classification in terms of localization of donor defects in GaN is performed by Raman spectroscopy under large hydrostatic pressure. We observe a significant decrease of free carrier concentration in highly O doped GaN epitaxial films at 22 GPa, indicating the presence of a strongly localized donor defect at large pressure. Monitoring the phonon plasmon coupled mode, we find similarities with results on highly n-type bulk crystals. We refine the model of localized defects in GaN and transfer it to the AlGaN system.

  18. Growth of Gallium Nitride Nanorods and Their Coalescence Overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    NRs on silicon substrate, thermal stress can be released such that wafer cracking can be avoided and the crystal quality of the coalesced overgrown...thick GaN template, which is deposited with MOCVD on c-plane sapphire substrate [1, 14]. On the wafer , a two-dimensional (2-D) triangular pattern of...mask to form a triangular bump [1]. Figure 5(a) shows the cross-sectional TEM image of a few fallen QW NRs. We focus the observation at the circled

  19. Gallium Nitride Nanowires Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhan-Hui; XIU Xiang-Qan; YAN Huai-Yue; ZHANG Rong; XIE Zi-Li; HAN Ping; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst.The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy,electron diffraction,roomtemperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy.The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the[0001]direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects.The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.%GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst. The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, room-temperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the [0001] direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects. The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.

  20. Advanced processing of gallium nitride for novel electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian-An

    2000-10-01

    The 1990s have brought commercial viability of GaN-based photonic devices and startling progress of GaN-based field effect transistors. However, continued research is required to explore the full potential offered by the III-V nitride system, especially for microelectronic applications and power switches. Further improvement of fabrication procedures is one of high priorities of current research. A host of processing challenges are presented by GaN and related materials because of their wide-bandgap nature and chemical stability. A complete understanding in the critical areas such as ion implantation doping and isolation, rapid thermal annealing, metal contact, and dry etching process, is necessary to improve the routine device reproducibility, and should directly lead to optimization of device performance. This dissertation has focused on understanding and optimization of several key aspects of GaN device processing. A novel rapid thermal processing up to 1500°C, in conjunction with AlN encapsulation, has been developed. The activation processes of implanted Si or Group VI donors, and common acceptors in GaN by using this ultrahigh temperature annealing, along with its effects on surface degradation, dopant redistribution and damage removal have been examined. 1400°C has proven to be the optimum temperature to achieve high activation efficiency and to repair the ion-induced lattice defects. Ion implantation was also employed to create high resistivity GaN. Damage-related isolation with sheet resistances of 1012 O/□ in n-GaN and 1010 O/□ in p-GaN has been achieved by implant of O and transition metal elements. Effects of surface cleanliness on characteristics of GaN Schottky contacts have been investigated, and the reduction in barrier height was correlated with removing the native oxide that forms an insulating layer on the conventionally-cleaned surface. W alloys have been deposited on Si-implanted samples and Mg-doped epilayers to achieve ohmic contacts

  1. High K Oxide Insulated Gate Group III Nitride-Based FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-21

    the physical and electrical properties of high-k dielectric oxides on gallium nitride were explored. The efficacies of several cleaning procedures...surface roughening. Parameters examined included the oxide composition (AI203, Ti02, and Ga203), the gallium nitride crystallographic orientation (c...and m-plane), and its crystal polarity (Ga- anc N-polar). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Gallium nitride , oxides, atomic layer deposition, capitance-voltage

  2. Gallium nitride nanowire based nanogenerators and light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Zhu, Guang; Hu, Youfan; Yu, Jeng-Wei; Song, Jinghui; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Peng, Lung-Han; Chou, Li-Jen; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-06-26

    Single-crystal n-type GaN nanowires have been grown epitaxially on a Mg-doped p-type GaN substrate. Piezoelectric nanognerators based on GaN nanowires are investigated by conductive AFM, and the results showed an output power density of nearly 12.5 mW/m(2). Luminous LED modules based on n-GaN nanowires/p-GaN substrate have been fabricated. CCD images of the lighted LED and the corresponding electroluminescence spectra are recorded at a forward bias. Moreover, the GaN nanowire LED can be lighted up by the power provided by a ZnO nanowire based nanogenerator, demonstrating a self-powered LED using wurtzite-structured nanomaterials.

  3. Aging and memory effect in magnetoelectric gallium ferrite single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Vijay; Mukherjee, Somdutta [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Mitra, Chiranjib [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata 741252 (India); Garg, Ashish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Gupta, Rajeev, E-mail: guptaraj@iitk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Here, we present a time and temperature dependent magnetization study to understand the spin dynamics in flux grown single crystals of gallium ferrite (GaFeO{sub 3}), a known magnetoelectric, ferroelectric and ferrimagnet. Results of the magnetic measurements conducted in the field-cooled (FC) and zero-field-cooled (ZFC) protocols in the heating and cooling cycles were reminiscent of a “memory” effect. Subsequent time dependent magnetic relaxation measurements carried out in ZFC mode at 30 K with an intermittent cooling to 20 K in the presence of a small field show that the magnetization in the final wait period tends to follow its initial state which was present before the cooling break taken at 20 K. These observations provide an unambiguous evidence of single crystal gallium ferrite having a spin glass like phase. - Highlights: • Gallium ferrite a room temperature magnetoelectric and ferrimagnetic material. • Spin‐glass like phase at low temperatures below ∼200 K. • Observation of memory and aging effects in GFO.

  4. Two-dimensional dopant profiling of gallium nitride p–n junctions by scanning capacitance microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamhamdi, M. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Ecole national des sciences appliquées khouribga, Université Hassan 1er, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Cayrel, F. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Frayssinet, E. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Grégory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Bazin, A.E.; Yvon, A.; Collard, E. [STMicroelectronics, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Cordier, Y. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Grégory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Alquier, D. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France)

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional imaging of dopant profiles for n and p-type regions are relevant for the development of new power semiconductors, especially for gallium nitride (GaN) for which classical profiling techniques are not adapted. This is a challenging task since it needs a technique with simultaneously good sensitivity, high spatial resolution and high dopant gradient resolution. To face these challenges, scanning capacitance microscopy combined with Atomic Force Microscopy is a good candidate, presenting reproducible results, as demonstrated in literature. In this work, we attempt to distinguish reliably and qualitatively the various doping concentrations and type at p–n and unipolar junctions. For both p–n and unipolar junctions three kinds of samples were prepared and measured separately. The space-charge region of the p–n metallurgical junction, giving rise to different contrasts under SCM imaging, is clearly observed, enlightening the interest of the SCM technique.

  5. Imaging the p-n junction in a gallium nitride nanowire with a scanning microwave microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imtiaz, Atif [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Wallis, Thomas M.; Brubaker, Matt D.; Blanchard, Paul T.; Bertness, Kris A.; Sanford, Norman A.; Kabos, Pavel, E-mail: kabos@boulder.nist.gov [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Weber, Joel C. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Coakley, Kevin J. [Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    We used a broadband, atomic-force-microscope-based, scanning microwave microscope (SMM) to probe the axial dependence of the charge depletion in a p-n junction within a gallium nitride nanowire (NW). SMM enables the visualization of the p-n junction location without the need to make patterned electrical contacts to the NW. Spatially resolved measurements of S{sub 11}{sup ′}, which is the derivative of the RF reflection coefficient S{sub 11} with respect to voltage, varied strongly when probing axially along the NW and across the p-n junction. The axial variation in S{sub 11}{sup ′}  effectively mapped the asymmetric depletion arising from the doping concentrations on either side of the junction. Furthermore, variation of the probe tip voltage altered the apparent extent of features associated with the p-n junction in S{sub 11}{sup ′} images.

  6. Positive focal shift of gallium nitride high contrast grating focusing reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shumin; Wang, Zhenhai; Liu, Qifa

    2016-09-01

    We design a type of metasurfaces capable of serving as a visible-light focusing reflector based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). The wavefront of the reflected light is precisely manipulated by spatial variation of the grating periods along the subwavelength ridge array to achieve light focusing. Different from conventional negative focal shift effect, a positive focal shift is observed in such focusing reflectors. Detailed investigations of the influence of device size on the focusing performance, especially the focal length, are preformed via a finite element method . The results show that all performance parameters are greatly affected by the reflector size. A more concentrated focal point, or a better focusing capability, can be achieved by larger size. With increasing reflector size, the achieved focal length decreases and gradually approaches to the design, thus the corresponding positive focal shift decreases. Our results are helpful for understanding the visible-light control of the planar HCG-based focusing reflectors.

  7. Shell Model for Elastic and Thermodynamic Properties of Gallium Nitride with Hexagonal Wurtzite Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yan; TU Ya-Jing; ZENG Zhao-Yi; GOU Qing-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Shell model molecular dynamic simulation with interatomic pair potential is utilized to investigate the elastic and thermodynamic properties of gallium nitride with hexagonal wurtzite structure (w-GaN) at high pressure. The calculated elastic constants Cij at zero pressure and 300 K agree well with the experimental data and other calculated values. Meanwhile, the dependences of the relative volume V/Vo, elastic constants Cij, entropy S, enthalpy H, and heat capacities Cv and Cp on pressure are successfully obtained. From the elastic constants obtained, we also calculate the shear modulus G, bulk modulus B, Young's modulus E, Poisson's ratio v, Debye temperature ΘD, and shear anisotropic factor Ashear on pressures.

  8. Gallium nitride is biocompatible and non-toxic before and after functionalization with peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Scott A; Makowski, Matthew S; Andrews, Benjamin; Manfra, Michael J; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2012-02-01

    The toxicity of semiconductor materials can significantly hinder their use for in vitro and in vivo applications. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a material with remarkable properties, including excellent chemical stability. This work demonstrated that functionalized and etched GaN surfaces were stable in aqueous environments and leached a negligible amount of Ga in solution even in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Also, GaN surfaces in cell culture did not interfere with nearby cell growth, and etched GaN promoted the adhesion of cells compared to etched silicon surfaces. A model peptide, "IKVAV", covalently attached to GaN and silicon surfaces increased the adhesion of PC12 cells. Peptide terminated GaN promoted greater cell spreading and extension of neurites. The results suggest that peptide modified GaN is a biocompatible and non-toxic material that can be used to probe chemical and electrical stimuli associated with neural interfaces.

  9. Radiation and Thermal Cycling Effects on EPC1001 Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Lauenstein, Jean M.; Casey, Megan C.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Information pertaining to performance of electronic parts and systems under hostile environments is very scarce, especially for new devices. Such data is very critical so that proper design is implemented in order to ensure mission success and to mitigate risks associated with exposure of on-board systems to the operational environment. In this work, newly-developed enhancement-mode field effect transistors (FET) based on gallium nitride (GaN) technology were exposed to various particles of ionizing radiation and to long-term thermal cycling over a wide temperature range. Data obtained on control (un-irradiated) and irradiated samples of these power transistors are presented and the results are discussed.

  10. Thin Film Formation of Gallium Nitride Using Plasma-Sputter Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Flauta

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of gallium nitride (GaN thin film using plasma-sputter deposition technique has beenconfirmed. The GaN film deposited on a glass substrate at an optimum plasma condition has shown x-raydiffraction (XRD peaks at angles corresponding to that of (002 and (101 reflections of GaN. The remainingmaterial on the sputtering target exhibited XRD reflections corresponding to that of bulk GaN powder. Toimprove the system’s base pressure, a new UHV compatible system is being developed to minimize theimpurities in residual gases during deposition. The sputtering target configuration was altered to allow themonitoring of target temperature using a molybdenum (Mo holder, which is more stable against Gaamalgam formation than stainless steel.

  11. Free-Standing Self-Assemblies of Gallium Nitride Nanoparticles: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng Lan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gallium nitride (GaN is an III-V semiconductor with a direct band-gap of 3 . 4 e V . GaN has important potentials in white light-emitting diodes, blue lasers, and field effect transistors because of its super thermal stability and excellent optical properties, playing main roles in future lighting to reduce energy cost and sensors to resist radiations. GaN nanomaterials inherit bulk properties of the compound while possess novel photoelectric properties of nanomaterials. The review focuses on self-assemblies of GaN nanoparticles without templates, growth mechanisms of self-assemblies, and potential applications of the assembled nanostructures on renewable energy.

  12. Effects of transverse mode coupling and optical confinement factor on gallium-nitride based laser diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Xiao-Ming; Zhang Bei; Dai Tao; Zhang Guo-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the transverse mode pattern and the optical field confinement factor of gallium nitride (GaN) laser diodes (LDs) theoretically. For the particular LD structure, composed of approximate 4μm thick n-GaN substrate layer, the maximum optical confinement factor was found to be corresponding to the 5th order transverse mode, the so-called lasing mode. Moreover, the value of the maximum confinement factor varies periodically when increasing the n-side GaN layer thickness, which simultaneously changes and increases the oscillation mode order of the GaN LD caused by the effects of mode coupling. The effects of the thickness and the average composition of Al in the AlGaN/GaN superlattice on the optical confinement factor are also presented. Finally, the mode coupling and optimization of the layers in the GaN-based LD are discussed.

  13. A review of gallium nitride LEDs for multi-gigabit-per-second visible light data communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Sujan; McKendry, Jonathan J. D.; Herrnsdorf, Johannes; Chun, Hyunchae; Faulkner, Grahame; Haas, Harald; Watson, Ian M.; O'Brien, Dominic; Dawson, Martin D.

    2017-02-01

    The field of visible light communications (VLC) has gained significant interest over the last decade, in both fibre and free-space embodiments. In fibre systems, the availability of low cost polymer optical fibre (POF) that is compatible with visible data communications has been a key enabler. In free-space applications, the availability of hundreds of THz of the unregulated spectrum makes VLC attractive for wireless communications. This paper provides an overview of the recent developments in VLC systems based on gallium nitride (GaN) light-emitting diodes (LEDs), covering aspects from sources to systems. The state-of-the-art technology enabling bandwidth of GaN LEDs in the range of >400 MHz is explored. Furthermore, advances in key technologies, including advanced modulation, equalisation, and multiplexing that have enabled free-space VLC data rates beyond 10 Gb s-1 are also outlined.

  14. Localized surface plasmon resonances in gold nano-patches on a gallium nitride substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Palma; Inchingolo, Alessio Vincenzo; Perna, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vito; Stomeo, Tiziana; De Vittorio, Massimo; Magno, Giovanni; Grande, Marco; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo; D'Orazio, Antonella

    2012-11-16

    In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and characterization of gold nano-patches, deposited on gallium nitride substrate, acting as optical nanoantennas able to efficiently localize the electric field at the metal-dielectric interface. We analyse the performance of the proposed device, evaluating the transmission and the electric field localization by means of a three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We detail the fabrication protocol and show the morphological characterization. We also investigate the near-field optical transmission by means of scanning near-field optical microscope measurements, which reveal the excitation of a localized surface plasmon resonance at a wavelength of 633 nm, as expected by the FDTD calculations. Such results highlight how the final device can pave the way for the realization of a single optical platform where the active material and the metal nanostructures are integrated together on the same chip.

  15. Gallium Nitride Nanowires and Heterostructures: Toward Color-Tunable and White-Light Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye R; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Aloni, Shaul

    2015-10-14

    Gallium-nitride-based light-emitting diodes have enabled the commercialization of efficient solid-state lighting devices. Nonplanar nanomaterial architectures, such as nanowires and nanowire-based heterostructures, have the potential to significantly improve the performance of light-emitting devices through defect reduction, strain relaxation, and increased junction area. In addition, relaxation of internal strain caused by indium incorporation will facilitate pushing the emission wavelength into the red. This could eliminate inefficient phosphor conversion and enable color-tunable emission or white-light emission by combining blue, green, and red sources. Utilizing the waveguiding modes of the individual nanowires will further enhance light emission, and the properties of photonic structures formed by nanowire arrays can be implemented to improve light extraction. Recent advances in synthetic methods leading to better control over GaN and InGaN nanowire synthesis are described along with new concept devices leading to efficient white-light emission.

  16. Carrier profiling in Si-implanted gallium nitride by Scanning Capacitance Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamhamdi, M., E-mail: mohamed.lamhamdi@gmail.com [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Laboratoire de Microelectronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Cayrel, F. [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Laboratoire de Microelectronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Bazin, A.E. [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Laboratoire de Microelectronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); STMicroelectronics, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Collard, E. [STMicroelectronics, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Alquier, D. [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Laboratoire de Microelectronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-03-15

    To face silicon limits, gallium nitride (GaN) exhibits major interests for optoelectronics and power electronic devices. Nevertheless, several challenges have to be overcome, with local doping by ion implantation as a major one. It requires development of reliable characterization tools able to provide electrical information with nanoscale resolution. In this work, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) combined to its Scanning Capacitance Microscopy (SCM) mode was used for surface damages quantification and nanoscale dopant profiling. GaN samples have been implanted with Si in order to obtain a box-like profile and annealed above 1000 Degree-Sign C under nitrogen with AlN protective cap layer. SCM measurements have led to reliable and quantitative dopant electrical activity measurements thank to calibration sample. Moreover, a good agreement, in terms of depth and shape, has been obtained between SCM and SIMS profiles. This work has evidenced that a high activation rate of implanted Si can be achieved using rapid thermal annealing.

  17. Gallium nitride based thin films for photon and particle radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Markus

    2012-07-23

    Ionization chambers have been used since the beginning of the 20th century for measuring ionizing radiation and still represent the ''gold standard'' in dosimetry. However, since the sensitivity of the devices is proportional to the detection volume, ionization chambers are not common in numerous medical applications, such as imaging. In these fields, spatially resolved dose information is, beside film-systems, usually measured with scintillators and photo-multipliers, which is a relatively complex and expensive technique. For thus much effort has been focused on the development of novel detection systems in the last decades and especially in the last few years. Examples include germanium or silicon photoconductive detectors, MOSFETs, and PIN-diodes. Although for these systems, miniaturization for spatially resolved detection is possible, they suffer from a range of disadvantages. Characteristics such as poor measurement stability, material degradation, and/or a limited measurement range prevent routine application of these techniques in medical diagnostic devices. This work presents the development and evaluation of gallium nitride (GaN) thin films and heterostructures to validate their application in x-ray detection in the medical regime. Furthermore, the impact of particle radiation on device response was investigated. Although previous publications revealed relatively low energy absorption of GaN, it is possible to achieve very high signal amplification factors inside the material due to an appropriate sensor configuration, which, in turn, compensates the low energy absorption. Thus, gallium nitride can be used as a photo-conductor with ohmic contacts. The conductive volume of the sensor changes in the presence of external radiation, which results in an amplified measurement signal after applying a bias voltage to the device. Experiments revealed a sensitivity of the device between air kerma rates of 1 {mu}Gy/s and 20 mGy/s. In this range

  18. Chemical exfoliation and optical characterization of threading-dislocation-free gallium-nitride ultrathin nanomembranes

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2014-11-13

    Semiconductor nanostructures have generated tremendous scientific interests as well as practical applications stemming from the engineering of low dimensional physics phenomena. Unlike 0D and 1D nanostructures, such as quantum dots and nanowires, respectively, 2D structures, such as nanomembranes, are unrivalled in their scalability for high yield manufacture and are less challenging in handling with the current transfer techniques. Furthermore, due to their planar geometry, nanomembranes are compatible with the current complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Due to these superior characteristics, there are currently different techniques in exfoliating nanomembranes with different crystallinities, thicknesses and compositions. In this work we demonstrate a new facile technique of exfoliating gallium nitride (GaN) nanomembranes with novel features, namely with the non-radiative cores of their threading-dislocations (TDs) being etched away. The exfoliation process is based on engineering the gallium vacancy (VGa) density during the GaN epitaxial growth with subsequent preferential etching. Based on scanning and transmission electron microscopies, as well as micro-photoluminescence measurements, a model is proposed to uncover the physical processes underlying the formation of the nanomembranes. Raman measurements are also performed to reveal the internal strain within the nanomembranes. After transferring these freely suspended 25 nm thin GaN nanomembranes to other substrates, we demonstrate the temperature dependence of their bandgap by photoluminescence technique, in order to shed light on the internal carrier dynamics. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  19. Chemical exfoliation and optical characterization of threading-dislocation-free gallium-nitride ultrathin nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAfandy, Rami T.; Majid, Mohammed A.; Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Lan; Cha, Dongkyu; Ooi, Boon S.

    2014-11-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures have generated tremendous scientific interests as well as practical applications stemming from the engineering of low dimensional physics phenomena. Unlike 0D and 1D nanostructures, such as quantum dots and nanowires, respectively, 2D structures, such as nanomembranes, are unrivalled in their scalability for high yield manufacture and are less challenging in handling with the current transfer techniques. Furthermore, due to their planar geometry, nanomembranes are compatible with the current complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Due to these superior characteristics, there are currently different techniques in exfoliating nanomembranes with different crystallinities, thicknesses and compositions. In this work we demonstrate a new facile technique of exfoliating gallium nitride (GaN) nanomembranes with novel features, namely with the non-radiative cores of their threading-dislocations (TDs) being etched away. The exfoliation process is based on engineering the gallium vacancy (VGa) density during the GaN epitaxial growth with subsequent preferential etching. Based on scanning and transmission electron microscopies, as well as micro-photoluminescence measurements, a model is proposed to uncover the physical processes underlying the formation of the nanomembranes. Raman measurements are also performed to reveal the internal strain within the nanomembranes. After transferring these freely suspended 25 nm thin GaN nanomembranes to other substrates, we demonstrate the temperature dependence of their bandgap by photoluminescence technique, in order to shed light on the internal carrier dynamics.

  20. A hybrid density functional view of native vacancies in gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Roland; Robertson, John

    2013-10-09

    We investigated the transition energy levels of the vacancy defects in gallium nitride by means of a hybrid density functional theory approach (DFT). We show that, in contrast to predictions from a recent study on the level of purely local DFT, the inclusion of screened exchange stabilizes the triply positive charge state of the nitrogen vacancy for Fermi energies close to the valence band. On the other hand, the defect levels associated with the negative charge states of the nitrogen vacancy hybridize with the conduction band and turn out to be energetically unfavorable, except for high n-doping. For the gallium vacancy, the increased magnetic splitting between up-spin and down-spin bands due to stronger exchange interactions in sX-LDA pushes the defect levels deeper into the band gap and significantly increases the associated charge transition levels. Based on these results, we propose the ϵ(0| - 1) transition level as an alternative candidate for the yellow luminescence in GaN.

  1. Magnetic properties of gadolinium and carbon co-doped gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Kaleemullah, N.; Ramsubramanian, S.; Mohankumar, R.; Munawar Basha, S.; Rajagopalan, M.; Kumar, J.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out to study the ferromagnetic properties of Gadolinium (Gd) Carbon (C) co-doped wurtzite Gallium Nitride (GaN) using full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the density functional theory. The system shows half-metallic nature when single Gd is substituted in Ga36N36 supercell. The presence of carbon in GaN supercell is found to generate weak magnetic moment (Ms) in the neighbouring atoms. When Carbon is codoped in the Gd-GaN, it increased the total magnetic moment of the system (Mtot). The cause of ferromagnetism in the Gd and C co-doped GaN has been explained by Zener's p-d exchange mechanism. The role of defects in the magnetic property of this system is also investigated. The results indicate the gallium vacancy influences the magnetic moment of the Gd and C codoped GaN more than the nitrogen vacancy. The presence of holes is effective than electrons in achieving the ferromagnetism in the considered system.

  2. Resonant magnetic properties of gadolinium-gallium garnet single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedyukh, A. R.; Danilov, V. V.; Nechiporuk, A. Yu.; Romanyuk, V. F.

    1999-03-01

    The results of experimental investigations of resonant magnetic properties of gadolinium-gallium garnet (GGG) single crystals at temperatures 4.2-300 K in the frequency range 1.6-9.3 GHz are considered. It is found that magnetic losses in GGG are determined by the initial splitting of energy levels for gadolinium ions in the garnet crystal lattice and by the dipole broadening. The width and shape of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line in the GGG crystal, whose asymmetry is manifested most strongly at low frequencies, can be explained by the influence of these factors. Magnetic losses in GGG increase with frequency and upon cooling. It is found that the EPR linewidth increases considerably with decreasing temperature due to the presence of rapidly relaxing impurities.

  3. Thermo-piezo-electro-mechanical simulation of AlGaN (aluminum gallium nitride) / GaN (gallium nitride) High Electron Mobility Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lorin E.

    Due to the current public demand of faster, more powerful, and more reliable electronic devices, research is prolific these days in the area of high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) devices. This is because of their usefulness in RF (radio frequency) and microwave power amplifier applications including microwave vacuum tubes, cellular and personal communications services, and widespread broadband access. Although electrical transistor research has been ongoing since its inception in 1947, the transistor itself continues to evolve and improve much in part because of the many driven researchers and scientists throughout the world who are pushing the limits of what modern electronic devices can do. The purpose of the research outlined in this paper was to better understand the mechanical stresses and strains that are present in a hybrid AlGaN (Aluminum Gallium Nitride) / GaN (Gallium Nitride) HEMT, while under electrically-active conditions. One of the main issues currently being researched in these devices is their reliability, or their consistent ability to function properly, when subjected to high-power conditions. The researchers of this mechanical study have performed a static (i.e. frequency-independent) reliability analysis using powerful multiphysics computer modeling/simulation to get a better idea of what can cause failure in these devices. Because HEMT transistors are so small (micro/nano-sized), obtaining experimental measurements of stresses and strains during the active operation of these devices is extremely challenging. Physical mechanisms that cause stress/strain in these structures include thermo-structural phenomena due to mismatch in both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and mechanical stiffness between different materials, as well as stress/strain caused by "piezoelectric" effects (i.e. mechanical deformation caused by an electric field, and conversely voltage induced by mechanical stress) in the AlGaN and GaN device portions (both

  4. Variation of crystallinity and stoichiometry in films of gallium oxide, gallium nitride and barium zirconate prepared by means of PLD; Variation von Kristallinitaet und Stoechiometrie in mittels PLD hergestellten Schichten aus Galliumoxid, Galliumnitrid und Bariumzirkonat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendt, Jochen

    2011-08-05

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is an ablation technique for thin film preparation of many materials. The film properties can be well controlled by the process parameters. Therefore, in many cases a given material can be deposited with different properties by changing one or more process parameters. In this thesis thin films of gallium oxide, gallium nitride and barium zirconate were deposited with a large variation in structure and stoichiometry by means of Pulsed Laser Deposition. The characterization of the film crystallinity, phase purity and short range structural order was completed by means of X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The stoichiometry was investigated using electron probe microanalysis. For analyzing the correlation between the structure and stoichiometry with the optical and electrical properties, optical absorption and electrical conductivity measurements were carried out. The investigation of all three material systems showed that very unique properties can be realized when combining an amorphous structure and a non-stoichiometric composition. For example, in amorphous and oxygen deficient gallium oxide an insulator-metal-transition can be induced by partial crystallization of the as prepared phase accomplished by annealing at about 400 C in argon atmosphere (as shown in literature). Furthermore, amorphous and highly non-stoichiometric barium zirconate has the ability to split water molecules to hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature. A detailed analysis of both phenomena has been performed by means of photoemission and transmission electron microscopy in the case of gallium oxide and via X-ray absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography in the case of barium zirconate.

  5. Thermal lensing in silver gallium selenide parametric oscillator crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, C L; Cooper, D G; Budni, P A; Knights, M G; Schepler, K L; Dedomenico, R; Catella, G C

    1994-05-20

    We performed an experimental investigation of thermal lensing in silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe(2)) optical parametric oscillator crystals pumped by a 2-µm laser at ambient temperature. We determined an empirical expression for the effective thermal focusing power in terms of the pump power, beam diameter, crystal length, and absorption coefficient. This relation may be used to estimate average power limitations in designing AgGaSe(2) optical parametric oscillators. We also demonstrated an 18% slope efficiency from a 2-µm pumped AgGaSe(2) optical parametric oscillator operated at 77 K, at which temperature thermal lensing is substantially reduced because of an increase in the thermal conductivity and a decrease in the thermal index gradient dn/dT. Cryogenic cooling may provide an additional option for scaling up the average power capability of a 2-µm pumped AgGaSe(2) optical parametric oscillator.

  6. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Morgan, Kenneth E.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Slack, Glen A.

    2017-06-06

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density .ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  7. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Morgan, Kenneth E.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Stack, Glen A.

    2017-04-18

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density.ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  8. Homoepitaxial growth of gallium nitride and aluminum nitride and its effects on device properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandusky, James R.

    Lattice and thermal mismatch between epitaxial layers and substrates have long been the major challenge in obtaining high quality devices in the III-Nitride material system due to the lack of availability of native substrates. Recently methods for obtaining high quality free standing native substrates have been achieved and these products are beginning to enter the commercial market. However the quality of these substrates is significantly lower than those in traditional substrates such as Si and GaAs and the high cost and low availability makes it difficult to study the homoepitaxial growth. In order to use these substrates for epitaxial growth, one first must understand what features are needed for the substrates to be epi ready. In addition, one must understand what features in the substrates impact optoelectronic device performances most significantly. Initial homoepitaxial growth was carried out on both AIN and GaN substrates. On AIN substrates it was found that annealing the sample prior to growth was very important to obtain improved surface morphologies for the homoepitaxial layers. Similar annealing steps were attempted on GaN substrates, however annealing under hydrogen left large Ga droplets on the surface. For homoepitaxy on HVPE GaN substrates, the substrate characteristics, such as bowing, surface morphology, structural properties, and optical properties were found to have a large influence on growth and device performance. Even with a reduced dislocation density, substrates with poor characteristics performed worse than devices on GaN/sapphire. The effect of polishing process on the substrates was found to be very important and substrates with subsurface damage led to poor growth, even though the starting surface was very smooth. Optimization of a thin GaN layer and a multiple quantum well structure revealed very different optimum growth conditions for the HVPE substrates and the GaN/sapphire templates. Theoretical modeling using density functional

  9. A novel technique based on a plasma focus device for nano-porous gallium nitride formation on P-type silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Malvajerdi, S.; Salar Elahi, A.; Habibi, M.

    2017-04-01

    A new deposition formation was observed with a Mather-type Plasma Focus Device (MPFD). MPFD was unitized to fabricate porous Gallium Nitride (GaN) on p-type Silicon (Si) substrate with a (100) crystal orientation for the first time in a deposition process. GaN was deposited on Si with 4 and 7 shots. The samples were subjected to a 3 phase annealing procedure. First, the semiconductors were annealed in the PFD with nitrogen plasma shots after their deposition. Second, a thermal chemical vapor deposition annealed the samples for 1 h at 1050 °C by nitrogen gas at a pressure of 1 Pa. Finally, an electric furnace annealed the samples for 1 h at 1150 °C with continuous flow of nitrogen. Porous GaN structures were observed by Field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, X-Ray diffraction analysis was carried out to determine the crystallinity of GaN after the samples were annealed. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy indicated the amount of gallium, nitrogen, and oxygen due to the self-oxidation of the samples. Photoluminescence spectroscopy revealed emissions at 2.94 eV and 3.39 eV, which shows that hexagonal wurtzite crystal structures were formed.

  10. Novel approach to the growth and characterization of aligned epitaxial gallium nitride nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Tania Alicia

    Nanowire devices are potential building blocks for complex electronic circuitry, however, challenges such as in-place alignment, precise positioning and nanowire device integration need to be addressed. In this work selective area grown (SAG), micron sized gallium nitride (GaN) mesas were used as growth substrates for lateral epitaxial GaN nanowire arrays. The thermodynamically stable mesa facets provide a crystallographic match for directed nanowire synthesis by minimizing the surface energy at the interface between the nanowire and substrate Nanowires grow from the sidewalls of GaN mesas forming parallel and hexagonal networks. Alignment occurs in the nonpolar m-axis and semipolar directions respectively. Gallium nitride nanowires are interconnected between thermodynamically stable and smooth pyramidal (10ll) , and (1l22) surfaces of adjacent GaN mesas, and they also grow from a single mesa to form free-standing nanowire cantilevers. The synthesis of lateral free-standing nanowires has led to exciting studies of their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Characterization of the electrical properties is carried out by in situ probing of single nanowires on the growth substrate inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The current transport is found to be largely dominated by thermionic field emission and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, and is significantly limited by a large contact resistance at the probe-nanowire interface. The carrier concentration and mobilities of the probed nanowires are extracted and are in agreement with standard field effects transistors (FETs) fabricated from nanowires grown using similar growth conditions. These results reveal that electrical probing of lateral GaN nanowires is a reliable means of characterizing their electrical properties once the interface resistance between the probe and nanowire is considered. The optical properties of the nanowires were investigated. Photon emission at 3.26 eV dominated the

  11. Native point defects in indium nitride and indium-rich indium gallium nitride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sonny Xiao-Zhe

    The recent discovery of the narrow bandgap of InN of 0.7 eV has attracted strong scientific interests on the fundamental properties and possible applications of InN and its ternary alloys. The first part of this thesis was inspired by the proposal of using InxGa1-x N alloy to build high efficiency solar cell for space applications. To test the irradiation hardness of InN and InxGa 1-xN, we have irradiated numerous samples with energetic particles (1-2 MeV electrons, protons, and 4He+ particles). InN and InxGa1-xN displayed superior radiation hardness over current multi-junction solar cell materials such as GaAs and GaInP in terms of electronic and optical properties. Free electron concentrations in InN and In-rich InxGa 1-xN increased with irradiation dose but saturated at a sufficiently high damage dose. According to the amphoteric defect model, the doping effect and the electron concentration saturation originates from irradiation-induced native donors and Fermi level pinning at the Fermi level stabilization energy (EFS). The EFS, an average energy of all localized native defects, dictates the electronic properties (donor or acceptor) of the native point defects. The electron concentration saturation and Fermi level pinning lead to profound changes in the optical properties. Absorption spectra shift to higher energy due to the conduction band-filling effect (Burstein-Moss shift). Photoluminescence (PL) signals broadened and shifted to higher energy as the k-conservation rule collapsed with irradiation damage. The PL intensity of increased slightly with higher carrier concentration before it became quenched by the irradiation-induced carrier traps. Capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements show that the pinning of the surface Fermi energy at EFS is also responsible for the surface electron accumulation effect in InN and In-rich In xGa1-xN alloys. The second part of this thesis focuses on the hydrostatic pressure dependence of group III-nitride alloys. The hydrostatic

  12. Surface and interface properties of polar gallium nitride layers; Oberflaechen- und Grenzflaecheneigenschaften von polaren Galliumnitrid-Schichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Pierre

    2010-07-09

    The material properties of group III-nitrides allows manifold applications. Especially for the GaN-based gas and biosensor technology, an understanding of the GaN surfaces and their interaction with molecules is crucial for the successful development of sensor systems. Especially the influence of crystal orientation, surface termination and reconstruction on the interaction was analysed. To study the interaction of the GaN surface with molecules the reproducible and controllable preparation of GaN surfaces is necessary. Polar GaN layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The surface reconstruction and termination could be selectively adjusted by the growth parameters or further preparation steps. On the Ga-polar surface, gallium-induced and nitrogen-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed as well as non-reconstructed surface modifications could be generated and on the N-polar surface non-reconstructed. The different surface modifications differ considerably in the formation of surface states. The Ga-induced and N-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed surfaces presented two surface states (SS) at 1.4 eV and 3 eV as well as 2 eV and 3 eV, respectively. The non-reconstructed GaN(0001) presented three SS (1.5 eV, 2.5 eV and 3.4 eV) and the GaN(000-1) one SS (2.5 eV). The theoretical predicted surfaces sates (density functional theory) shows a good agreement with the measurements. The analysis revealed a dependence of the interaction of GaN surfaces with O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on the orientation, reconstruction, and surface termination of the films. The GaN(000-1) surface is much more reactive to oxygen and water than the (0001) orientated surfaces, while GaN is in general significantly more sensitive to water than to oxygen. The chemical bond configuration of the adsorbed species shows a significant dependence on surface termination. The measurements presented that the formation of nitrogen oxide and/or gallium oxide bonds depends on the surface modification. Furthermore the interaction

  13. Investigation of phonon modes in gallium nitride nanowires deposited by thermal CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizal, Umesh, E-mail: umeshrizal680@gmail.com; Swain, Bibhu P., E-mail: bibhu.s@smit.smu.edu.in [Nano Processing Laboratory, Centre for Material Science and Nanotechnology, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East Sikkim, India-737136 (India); Swain, Bhabani S., E-mail: bsswain@kookmin.ac.kr [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Sungbuk-gu, Jeongnung-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-13

    Gallium nitride nanowires (GaN-NWs) of diameters ranging from 20 to 80 nm were grown on the p-type Si substrate by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using Iron (Fe) catalyst via VLS mechanism. Raman and FTIR spectra reveal the presence of broad transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) phonon peak spreads over 500-600 cm{sup −1} and 720 cm{sup −1} respectively. The detail deconvolution of integrated transverse and longitudinal phonon analysis reveals phonon confinement brought out by incorporation of hydrogen atom. The red shifts of TO and LO phonon peak position indicates nanosized effect. I{sub A1(LO)}/I{sub A1(TO)} increases from 0.073 to 1.0 and their respective fwhm{sub A1(LO)}/fwhm{sub A1(TO)} also increases from 0.71 to 1.31 with increasing H{sub 2} flow rate. E{sub 1}(LO) - E{sub 1}(TO) and A{sub 1}(LO) - A{sub 1}(TO) increases from 173.83 to 190.73 and 184.89 to 193.22 respectively. Apart from this usual TO and LO phonon, we have found Surface Optic (SO) phonon at 671 cm{sup −1} in FTIR spectra. The intensity of PL peak increases with increasing H{sub 2} dilution reveals efficient passivation of defect centre at surface of GaN-NWs.

  14. Optical waveguide loss minimized into gallium nitride based structures grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, A.; Cho, E.; Dogheche, E.; Androussi, Y.; Troadec, D.; Pavlidis, D.; Decoster, D.

    2011-04-01

    The waveguide properties are reported for wide bandgap gallium nitride (GaN) structures grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on sapphire using a AlN/GaN short period-superlattice (SPS) buffer layer system. A detailed optical characterization of GaN structures has been performed using the prism coupling technique in order to evaluate its properties and, in particular, the refractive index dispersion and the propagation loss. In order to identify the structural defects in the samples, we performed transmission electron microscopy analysis. The results suggest that AlN/GaN SPS plays a role in acting as a barrier to the propagation of threading dislocations in the active GaN epilayer; above this defective region, the dislocations density is remarkably reduced. The waveguide losses were reduced to a value around 0.65dB/cm at 1.55 μm, corresponding to the best value reported so far for a GaN-based waveguide.

  15. Electrical and optical properties of silicon-doped gallium nitride polycrystalline films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R Bhattacharyya; A K Pal

    2008-02-01

    Si-doped GaN films in polycrystalline form were deposited on quartz substrates at deposition temperatures ranging from 300–623 K using r.f. sputtering technique. Electrical, optical and microstructural properties were studied for these films. It was observed that films deposited at room temperature contained mainly hexagonal gallium nitride (ℎ-GaN) while films deposited at 623 K were predominantly cubic (-GaN) in nature. The films deposited at intermediate temperatures were found to contain both the hexagonal and cubic phases of GaN. Studies on the variation of conductivity with temperature indicated Mott’s hopping for films containing -GaN while Efros and Shklovskii (E–S) hopping within the Coulomb gap was found to dominate the carrier transport mechanism in the films containing ℎ-GaN. A crossover from Mott’s hopping to E–S hopping in the `soft’ Coulomb gap was noticed with lowering of temperature for films containing mixed phases of GaN. The relative intensity of the PL peak at ∼ 2.73 eV to that for peak at ∼ 3.11 eV appearing due to transitions from deep donor to valence band or shallow acceptors decreased significantly at higher temperature. Variation of band gap showed a bowing behaviour with the amount of cubic phase present in the films.

  16. Nanoporous Gallium Nitride Through Anisotropic Metal-Assisted Electroless Photochemical Wet Etching Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, R.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Nanoporous gallium nitride (GaN) has many potential applications in light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photovoltaics, templates and chemical sensors. This article reports the porosification of GaN through UV enhanced metal-assisted electroless photochemical wet etching technique using three different acid-based etchants and platinum served as catalyst for porosification. The etching process was conducted at room temperature for a duration of 90min. The morphological, structural, spectral and optical features of the developed porous GaN were studied with appropriate characterization techniques and the obtained results were presented. Field emission scanning electron micrographs exhibited the porosity nature along with excellent porous network of the etched samples. Structural studies confirmed the mono crystalline quality of the porous nanostructures. Raman spectral analyzes inferred the presenting phonon modes such as E2 (TO) and A1 (LO) in fabricated nanoporous structures. The resulted porous nanostructures hold the substantially enhanced photoluminescence intensity compared with the pristine GaN epitaxial film that is interesting and desirable for several advances in the applications of Nano-optoelectronic devices.

  17. Solution-based functionalization of gallium nitride nanowires for protein sensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elissa H.; Davydov, Albert V.; Oleshko, Vladimir P.; Steffens, Kristen L.; Levin, Igor; Lin, Nancy J.; Bertness, Kris A.; Manocchi, Amy K.; Schreifels, John A.; Rao, Mulpuri V.

    2014-09-01

    A solution-based functionalization method for the specific and selective attachment of the streptavidin (SA) protein to gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) is presented. By exploiting streptavidin's strong affinity for its ligand biotin, SA immobilization on GaN NWs was achieved by exposing the GaN NW surface to a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) solution followed by reaction with biotin. Functionalization of the NWs with APTES was facilitated by the presence of an ≈ 1 nm thick surface oxide layer, which formed on the NWs after exposure to air and oxygen plasma. Biotinylation was accomplished by reacting the APTES-functionalized NWs with sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin at slightly alkaline pH. It was determined that the biotinylated GaN NW surface was specific towards the binding of SA and demonstrated no affinity towards a control protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). There was however, evidence of non-specific, electrostatic binding of both the SA protein and the BSA protein to the APTES-coated NWs, revealing the importance of the biotinylation step. Successful SA immobilization on the biotinylated GaN NW surface was verified using fluorescence microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The functionalized GaN NWs demonstrate potential as biosensing platforms for the selective detection of proteins.

  18. On the solubility of gallium nitride in supercritical ammonia-sodium solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Steven; Pimputkar, Siddha; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2016-12-01

    Due to the disparity between observed gallium nitride (GaN) growth under conditions for which literature reports normal solubility, GaN solubility in supercritical NH3-Na containing solutions was re-evaluated. Isothermal gravimetric experiments on polycrystalline GaN were performed in the temperature range (T =415-650 °C) for which retrograde growth of GaN routinely occurs (P ≈ 200 MPa, molar NH3:Na fill ratio =20:1). Two previously-unreported error contributions to the gravimetric determination of GaN solubility were identified: Ga-alloying of exposed Ni-containing components, and the presence of a dense, Ga-absorbing Na-rich, second phase under these conditions. Due to the inability to measure Ga-alloying of the exposed autoclave wall for each experiment, considerable scatter was introduced in the refined GaN solubility curve. No clear dependence of GaN solubility on temperature was resolvable, while most solubility values were determined to be within a band of 0.03-0.10 mol% GaN, normalized by fill NH3.

  19. Enhanced efficiency of Schottky-barrier solar cell with periodically nonhomogeneous indium gallium nitride layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tom H.; Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-element model was developed to simulate the optoelectronic performance of a Schottky-barrier solar cell. The heart of this solar cell is a junction between a metal and a layer of n-doped indium gallium nitride (InξGaN) alloy sandwiched between a reflection-reducing front window and a periodically corrugated metallic back reflector. The bandgap of the InξGaN layer was varied periodically in the thickness direction by varying the parameter ξ∈(0,1). First, the frequency-domain Maxwell postulates were solved to determine the spatial profile of photon absorption and, thus, the generation of electron-hole pairs. The AM1.5G solar spectrum was taken to represent the incident solar flux. Next, the drift-diffusion equations were solved for the steady-state electron and hole densities. Numerical results indicate that a corrugated back reflector of a period of 600 nm is optimal for photon absorption when the InξGaN layer is homogeneous. The efficiency of a solar cell with a periodically nonhomogeneous InξGaN layer may be higher by as much as 26.8% compared to the analogous solar cell with a homogeneous InξGaN layer.

  20. Metasurfaces based on Gallium Nitride High Contrast Gratings at Visible Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhai; He, Shumin; Liu, Qifa; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongjin; Zhu, Hongbo; Grünberg Research Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    Metasurfaces are currently attracting global attention due to their ability to achieve full control of light propagation. However, these metasurfaces have thus far been constructed mostly from metallic materials, which greatly limit the diffraction efficiencies because of the ohmic losses. Semiconducting metasurfaces offer one potential solution to the issue of losses. Besides, the use of semiconducting materials can broaden the applicability of metasurfaces, as they enable facile integration with electronics and mechanical systems and can benefit from mature semiconductor fabrication technologies. We have proposed visible-light metasurfaces (VLMs) capable of serving as lenses and beam deflecting elements based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). By precisely manipulating the wave-fronts of the transmitted light, we theoretically demonstrate an HCG focusing lens with transmissivity of 83.0% and numerical aperture of 0.77, and a VLM with beam deflection angle of 6.03° and transmissivity as high as 93.3%. The proposed metasurfaces are promising for GaN-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which would be robust and versatile for controlling the output light propagation and polarization, as well as enhancing the extraction efficiency of the LEDs.

  1. Platinum nanoparticles on gallium nitride surfaces: effect of semiconductor doping on nanoparticle reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Susanne; Wyrzgol, Sonja A; Caterino, Roberta; Jentys, Andreas; Schoell, Sebastian J; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Lercher, Johannes A; Sharp, Ian D; Stutzmann, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on n- and p-type gallium nitride (GaN) are investigated as novel hybrid systems for the electronic control of catalytic activity via electronic interactions with the semiconductor support. In situ oxidation and reduction were studied with high pressure photoemission spectroscopy. The experiments revealed that the underlying wide-band-gap semiconductor has a large influence on the chemical composition and oxygen affinity of supported nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation. For as-deposited Pt cuboctahedra supported on n-type GaN, a higher fraction of oxidized surface atoms was observed compared to cuboctahedral particles supported on p-type GaN. Under an oxygen atmosphere, immediate oxidation was recorded for nanoparticles on n-type GaN, whereas little oxidation was observed for nanoparticles on p-type GaN. Together, these results indicate that changes in the Pt chemical state under X-ray irradiation depend on the type of GaN doping. The strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the support is consistent with charge transfer of X-ray photogenerated free carriers at the semiconductor-nanoparticle interface and suggests that GaN is a promising wide-band-gap support material for photocatalysis and electronic control of catalysis.

  2. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. McIntyre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  3. Unusual strategies for using indium gallium nitride grown on silicon (111) for solid-state lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon-sik; Brueckner, Eric; Song, Jizhou; Li, Yuhang; Kim, Seok; Lu, Chaofeng; Sulkin, Joshua; Choquette, Kent; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A

    2011-06-21

    Properties that can now be achieved with advanced, blue indium gallium nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) lead to their potential as replacements for existing infrastructure in general illumination, with important implications for efficient use of energy. Further advances in this technology will benefit from reexamination of the modes for incorporating this materials technology into lighting modules that manage light conversion, extraction, and distribution, in ways that minimize adverse thermal effects associated with operation, with packages that exploit the unique aspects of these light sources. We present here ideas in anisotropic etching, microscale device assembly/integration, and module configuration that address these challenges in unconventional ways. Various device demonstrations provide examples of the capabilities, including thin, flexible lighting "tapes" based on patterned phosphors and large collections of small light emitters on plastic substrates. Quantitative modeling and experimental evaluation of heat flow in such structures illustrates one particular, important aspect of their operation: small, distributed LEDs can be passively cooled simply by direct thermal transport through thin-film metallization used for electrical interconnect, providing an enhanced and scalable means to integrate these devices in modules for white light generation.

  4. Basic Equations for the Modeling of Gallium Nitride (gan) High Electron Mobility Transistors (hemts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is a most promising wide band-gap semiconductor for use in high-power microwave devices. It has functioned at 320 C, and higher values are well within theoretical limits. By combining four devices, 20 W has been developed at X-band. GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) are unique in that the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is supported not by intentional doping, but instead by polarization charge developed at the interface between the bulk GaN region and the AlGaN epitaxial layer. The polarization charge is composed of two parts: spontaneous and piezoelectric. This behavior is unlike other semiconductors, and for that reason, no commercially available modeling software exists. The theme of this document is to develop a self-consistent approach to developing the pertinent equations to be solved. A Space Act Agreement, "Effects in AlGaN/GaN HEMT Semiconductors" with Silvaco Data Systems to implement this approach into their existing software for III-V semiconductors, is in place (summer of 2002).

  5. Heat resistive dielectric multi-layer micro-mirror array in epitaxial lateral overgrowth gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Yang; Ku, Hao-Min; Liao, Wei-Tsai; Chao, Chu-Li; Tsay, Jenq-Dar; Chao, Shiuh

    2009-03-30

    Ta2O5 / SiO2 dielectric multi-layer micro-mirror array (MMA) with 3mm mirror size and 6mm array period was fabricated on c-plane sapphire substrate. The MMA was subjected to 1200 degrees C high temperature annealing and remained intact with high reflectance in contrast to the continuous multi-layer for which the layers have undergone severe damage by 1200 degrees C annealing. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) of gallium nitride (GaN) was applied to the MMA that was deposited on both sapphire and sapphire with 2:56 mm GaN template. The MMA was fully embedded in the ELO GaN and remained intact. The result implies that our MMA is compatible to the high temperature growth environment of GaN and the MMA could be incorporated into the structure of the micro-LED array as a one to one micro backlight reflector, or as the patterned structure on the large area LED for controlling the output light.

  6. Improved performance of dye-sensitized solar cells using gallium nitride-titanium dioxide composite photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin-Rou; Huang, Tzu-Wei; Wang, Tzu-Hui; Tsai, Yu-Chen

    2014-08-15

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are fabricated with gallium nitride-titanium dioxide (GaN-TiO2) composite photoelectrodes to enhance the power conversion efficiency. The value of power conversion efficiency increases with the incorporation of GaN in TiO2 matrix and reaches a maximum at 0.05 wt% GaN. Internal resistance in the DSSC is characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the EIS of electrolyte/dye/GaN-TiO2 interface resistances under illumination and in the dark, a decrease in the charge transfer resistance and an increase in the charge recombination resistance of the DSSCs are obtained after the inclusion of GaN (0.01-0.05 wt%) in the TiO2 matrix. The power conversion efficiency of the DSSC based on the GaN (0.05 wt%)-TiO2 composite photoelectrode is enhanced by ∼61% in comparison with a pristine TiO2 photoelectrode.

  7. Observation of surface plasmon polariton pumping of optical eigenmodes of gold-decorated gallium nitride nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Jency Pricilla; Bakharev, Pavel; Niraula, Ishwar; Kengne, Blaise Alexis Fouetio; MacPherson, Quinn; Sargent, Meredith; Hare, Brian; McIlroy, David N

    2012-10-10

    The photocurrent of individual gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires decorated with Au nanoparticles as function of the wavelength of light (405 nm (blue), 532 nm (green), and 632.8 nm (red)) and nanowire diameter (80 to 400 nm) is reported. The photocurrent scales with photon energy but oscillates with nanowire diameter. The oscillations are described in terms of the scattering of surface plasmon polaritons into allowed transverse magnetic electromagnetic modes of the nanowire that have maximum intensities in the undepleted region of the nanowire. These oscillations do not occur below a nanowire diameter of ~200 nm due to the depletion layer formed at the Au-GaN interface, which completely depletes the nanowire, that is, there is an insufficient density of carriers that can be excited into the conduction band. On the basis of estimations of the depletion depth and solutions of the Helmholtz equation, the maxima in the photocurrent for d > 200 nm are assigned to the two lowest azimuthally symmetric transverse magnetic eigenmodes: (m = 0, n = 1) and (m = 0, n = 2), which have maximum electric field intensities within the undepleted region of the GaN nanowire. The outcome of this work could have far reaching implications on the development of nanophotonics.

  8. Photochemical functionalization of gallium nitride thin films with molecular and biomolecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesuk; Colavita, Paula E; Metz, Kevin M; Nichols, Beth M; Sun, Bin; Uhlrich, John; Wang, Xiaoyu; Kuech, Thomas F; Hamers, Robert J

    2006-09-12

    We demonstrate that photochemical functionalization can be used to functionalize and photopattern the surface of gallium nitride crystalline thin films with well-defined molecular and biomolecular layers. GaN(0001) surfaces exposed to a hydrogen plasma will react with organic molecules bearing an alkene (C=C) group when illuminated with 254 nm light. Using a bifunctional molecule with an alkene group at one end and a protected amine group at the other, this process can be used to link the alkene group to the surface, leaving the protected amine exposed. Using a simple contact mask, we demonstrate the ability to directly pattern the spatial distribution of these protected amine groups on the surface with a lateral resolution of <12 mum. After deprotection of the amines, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides were linked to the surface using a bifunctional cross-linker. Measurements using fluorescently labeled complementary and noncomplementary sequences show that the DNA-modified GaN surfaces exhibit excellent selectivity, while repeated cycles of hybridization and denaturation in urea show good stability. These results demonstrate that photochemical functionalization can be used as an attractive starting point for interfacing molecular and biomolecular systems with GaN and other compound semiconductors.

  9. In-situ multi-information measurement system for preparing gallium nitride photocathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiao-Qian; Chang Ben-Kang; Qian Yun-Sheng; Zhang Jun-Ju

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the first domestic in-situ multi-information measurement system for a gallium nitride (GaN) photocathode.This system can successfully fulfill heat cleaning and activation for GaN in an ultrahigh vacuum environment and produce a GaN photocathode with a negative electron affinity (NEA) status.Information including the heat cleaning temperature,vacuum degree,photocurrent,electric current of cesium source,oxygen source,and the most important information about the spectral response,or equivalently,the quantum efficiency (QE) can be obtained during preparation.The preparation of a GaN photocathode with this system indicates that the optimal heating temperature in a vacuum is about 700 ℃.We also develop a method of quickly evaluating the atomically clean surface with the vacuum degree versus wavelength curve to prevent possible secondary contamination when the atomic level cleaning surface is tested with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.The photocurrent shows a quick enhancement when the current ratio between the cesium source and oxygen source is 1.025.The spectral response of the GaN photocathode is fiat in a wavelength range from 240 nm to 365 nm,and an abrupt decline is observed at 365 nm,which demonstrates that with the in-situ multi-information measurement system the NEA GaN photocathode can be successfully prepared.

  10. Design and analysis of vertical-channel gallium nitride (GaN) junctionless nanowire transistors (JNT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Hwan Gi; Yoo, Gwan Min; Jo, Young-Woo; Son, Dong-Hyeok; Lee, Jung-Hee; Cho, Eou-Sik; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2014-11-01

    Vertical-channel gallium nitride (GaN) junctionless nanowire transistor (JNT) has been designed and characterized by technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. Various characteristics such as wide bandgap, strong polariztion field, and high electron velocity make GaN one of the attractive materials in advanced electronics in recent times. Nanowire-structured GaN can be applicable to various transistors for enhanced electrical performances by its geometrical feature. In this paper, we analyze the direct-current (DC) characteristics depending on various channel doping concentrations (N(ch)) and nanowire radii (R(NW)). Furthermore, the radio-frequency (RF) characteristics under optimized conditions are extracted by small-signal equivalent circuit modeling. For the optimally designed vertical GaN JNT demonstrated on-state current (I(on)) of 345 μA/μm and off-state current (I(off)) of 3.7 x 10(-18) A/μm with a threshold voltage (V(t)) of 0.22 V, and subthreshold swing (S) of 68 mV/dec. Besides, f(T) and f(max) under different operating conditions (gate voltage, V(GS)) have been obtained.

  11. In-situ multi-information measurement system for preparing gallium nitride photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Qian; Chang, Ben-Kang; Qian, Yun-Sheng; Zhang, Jun-Ju

    2012-03-01

    We introduce the first domestic in-situ multi-information measurement system for a gallium nitride (GaN) photocathode. This system can successfully fulfill heat cleaning and activation for GaN in an ultrahigh vacuum environment and produce a GaN photocathode with a negative electron affinity (NEA) status. Information including the heat cleaning temperature, vacuum degree, photocurrent, electric current of cesium source, oxygen source, and the most important information about the spectral response, or equivalently, the quantum efficiency (QE) can be obtained during preparation. The preparation of a GaN photocathode with this system indicates that the optimal heating temperature in a vacuum is about 700 °C. We also develop a method of quickly evaluating the atomically clean surface with the vacuum degree versus wavelength curve to prevent possible secondary contamination when the atomic level cleaning surface is tested with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocurrent shows a quick enhancement when the current ratio between the cesium source and oxygen source is 1.025. The spectral response of the GaN photocathode is flat in a wavelength range from 240 nm to 365 nm, and an abrupt decline is observed at 365 nm, which demonstrates that with the in-situ multi-information measurement system the NEA GaN photocathode can be successfully prepared.

  12. The magneto-optical properties of semiconductors and the band structure of gallium nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, P A

    2001-01-01

    the wells, and observing a resonant phenomenon from an undoped GaN/Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x N single heterojunction. The oscillating peak intensity was understood in terms of the changing screening efficiency of the two-dimensional electron gas. Finally, many-body effects within an electron-hole plasma in ln sub x Al sub y Ga sub 1 sub - sub x sub - sub y As quantum wells have been explored to study the effects of mass renormalisation at carrier densities typically present in laser devices. A peak in the mass renormalisation confirms the importance of excitonic correlations in the excited plasma. This thesis has applied magneto-optical techniques to enable a better understanding of the band structure of gallium nitride, particularly the complex behaviour expected as a result of strong valence band mixing. Effective hole masses are deduced from free excitonic-like transitions observed in magneto-reflectivity, to give a heavy A hole mass of 1.3 m sub o and the first experimental suggestion of a light B ban...

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Wurtzite Zinc-Oxide from First-Principles Lattice Dynamics--a Comparative Study with Gallium Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Wohlwend, Jennifer L; Roy, Ajit K; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-03-01

    Wurtzite Zinc-Oxide (w-ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconductor that holds promise in power electronics applications, where heat dissipation is of critical importance. However, large discrepancies exist in the literature on the thermal conductivity of w-ZnO. In this paper, we determine the thermal conductivity of w-ZnO using first-principles lattice dynamics and compare it to that of wurtzite Gallium-Nitride (w-GaN)--another important wide bandgap semiconductor with the same crystal structure and similar atomic masses as w-ZnO. However, the thermal conductivity values show large differences (400 W/mK of w-GaN vs. 50 W/mK of w-ZnO at room temperature). It is found that the much lower thermal conductivity of ZnO originates from the smaller phonon group velocities, larger three-phonon scattering phase space and larger anharmonicity. Compared to w-GaN, w-ZnO has a smaller frequency gap in phonon dispersion, which is responsible for the stronger anharmonic phonon scattering, and the weaker interatomic bonds in w-ZnO leads to smaller phonon group velocities. The thermal conductivity of w-ZnO also shows strong size effect with nano-sized grains or structures. The results from this work help identify the cause of large discrepancies in w-ZnO thermal conductivity and will provide in-depth understanding of phonon dynamics for the design of w-ZnO-based electronics.

  14. Characterization of in-depth cavity distribution after thermal annealing of helium-implanted silicon and gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, B., E-mail: fodor.balint@ttk.mta.hu [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences (MTA TTK MFA), 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33 (Hungary); Faculty of Science, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); Cayrel, F. [GREMAN, pôle MTECH, Université François Rabelais, 16 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, F37071 Tours Cedex (France); Agocs, E. [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences (MTA TTK MFA), 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33 (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem 8200 (Hungary); Alquier, D. [GREMAN, pôle MTECH, Université François Rabelais, 16 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, F37071 Tours Cedex (France); Fried, M.; Petrik, P. [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences (MTA TTK MFA), 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33 (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem 8200 (Hungary)

    2014-11-28

    Single-crystalline silicon wafers covered with sacrificial oxide layer and epitaxially grown gallium nitride layers were implanted with high-fluence helium ions (2–6 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}) at energies of 20–30 keV. Thermal annealings at 650–1000 °C, 1 h were performed on the Si samples and rapid thermal annealings at 600–1000 °C, 120 s under N{sub 2} were performed on the GaN samples. The as-implanted samples and the near-surface cavity distributions of the annealed samples were investigated with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. In-depth defect profiles and cavity profiles can be best described with multiple independent effective medium sublayers of varying ratio of single-crystal/void. The number of sublayers was chosen to maximize the fit quality without a high parameter cross-correlation. The dependence of the implantation fluence, oxide layer thickness and annealing temperature on the cavity distribution was separately investigated. The ellipsometric fitted distributions were compared and cross-checked with analyses of transmission electron micrographs where the average surface cavity was determined sublayer by sublayer. The in-depth profiles were also compared with simulations of He and vacancy distributions. - Highlights: • He implanted and annealed Si and GaN measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry • Effective medium approximation models developed • Cavity formation as function of oxide thickness, ion dose, annealing temperature • Cavity in-depth distributions compared with transmission electron micrographs.

  15. High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Grown by the Electrochemical Solution Growth Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seacrist, Michael [SunEdison Inc., St. Peters, MO (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The objective of this project was to develop the Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) method conceived / patented at Sandia National Laboratory into a commercially viable bulk gallium nitride (GaN) growth process that can be scaled to low cost, high quality, and large area GaN wafer substrate manufacturing. The goal was to advance the ESG growth technology by demonstrating rotating seed growth at the lab scale and then transitioning process to prototype commercial system, while validating the GaN material and electronic / optical device quality. The desired outcome of the project is a prototype commercial process for US-based manufacturing of high quality, large area, and lower cost GaN substrates that can drive widespread deployment of energy efficient GaN-based power electronic and optical devices. In year 1 of the project (Sept 2012 – Dec 2013) the overall objective was to demonstrate crystalline GaN growth > 100um on a GaN seed crystal. The development plan included tasks to demonstrate and implement a method for purifying reagent grade salts, develop the reactor 1 process for rotating seed Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) of GaN, grow and characterize ESG GaN films, develop a fluid flow and reaction chemistry model for GaN film growth, and design / build an improved growth reactor capable of scaling to 50mm seed diameter. The first year’s project objectives were met in some task areas including salt purification, film characterization, modeling, and reactor 2 design / fabrication. However, the key project objective of the growth of a crystalline GaN film on the seed template was not achieved. Amorphous film growth on the order of a few tenths of a micron has been detected with a film composition including Ga and N, plus several other impurities originating from the process solution and hardware. The presence of these impurities, particularly the oxygen, has inhibited the demonstration of crystalline GaN film growth on the seed template. However, the

  16. Surface characterization of gallium nitride modified with peptides before and after exposure to ionizing radiation in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Nora G; Nolan, Michael W; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-12-30

    An aqueous surface modification of gallium nitride was employed to attach biomolecules to the surface. The modification was a simple two-step process using a single linker molecule and mild temperatures. The presence of the peptide on the surface was confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequently, the samples were placed in water baths and exposed to ionizing radiation to examine the effects of the radiation on the material in an environment similar to the body. Surface analysis confirmed degradation of the surface of GaN after radiation exposure in water; however, the peptide molecules successfully remained on the surface following exposure to ionizing radiation. We hypothesize that during radiation exposure of the samples, the radiolysis of water produces peroxide and other reactive species on the sample surface. Peroxide exposure promotes the formation of a more stable layer of gallium oxyhydroxide which passivates the surface better than other oxide species.

  17. GROWTH, MORPHOLOGICAL, STRUCTURAL, ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF NITROGEN DOPED ZINC OXIDE THIN FILM ON POROUS GALLIUM NITRIDE TEMPLATE

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is susceptible of producing efficient display and lighting devices.  Low cost hybrid heterostructured lighting devices are developed by combining zinc oxide (ZnO) with GaN that has gained much more research interest, nowadays.  Porous GaN receives a great deal of attraction by its excellent and improved properties compared with its bulk counterpart.  Several potential applications have been realized, including for serving as a strain-relaxed substrates for...

  18. A Monolithically Integrated Gallium Nitride Nanowire/Silicon Solar Cell Photocathode for Selective Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichen; Fan, Shizhao; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Lu; Mi, Zetian

    2016-06-20

    A gallium nitride nanowire/silicon solar cell photocathode for the photoreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is demonstrated. Such a monolithically integrated nanowire/solar cell photocathode offers several unique advantages, including the absorption of a large part of the solar spectrum and highly efficient carrier extraction. With the incorporation of copper as the co-catalyst, the devices exhibit a Faradaic efficiency of about 19 % for the 8e(-) photoreduction to CH4 at -1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl, a value that is more than thirty times higher than that for the 2e(-) reduced CO (ca. 0.6 %).

  19. Electron-phonon relaxation and excited electron distribution in gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, V. P. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pervomayskaya st. 91, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tyuterev, V. G., E-mail: valtyut00@mail.ru [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Kievskaya st. 60, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Lenin st. 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Chulkov, E. V. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tomsk State University, Lenin st. 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Qumicas, UPV/EHU and Centro de Fisica de Materiales CFM-MPC and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Apdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Echenique, P. M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Qumicas, UPV/EHU and Centro de Fisica de Materiales CFM-MPC and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Apdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2016-08-28

    We develop a theory of energy relaxation in semiconductors and insulators highly excited by the long-acting external irradiation. We derive the equation for the non-equilibrium distribution function of excited electrons. The solution for this function breaks up into the sum of two contributions. The low-energy contribution is concentrated in a narrow range near the bottom of the conduction band. It has the typical form of a Fermi distribution with an effective temperature and chemical potential. The effective temperature and chemical potential in this low-energy term are determined by the intensity of carriers' generation, the speed of electron-phonon relaxation, rates of inter-band recombination, and electron capture on the defects. In addition, there is a substantial high-energy correction. This high-energy “tail” largely covers the conduction band. The shape of the high-energy “tail” strongly depends on the rate of electron-phonon relaxation but does not depend on the rates of recombination and trapping. We apply the theory to the calculation of a non-equilibrium distribution of electrons in an irradiated GaN. Probabilities of optical excitations from the valence to conduction band and electron-phonon coupling probabilities in GaN were calculated by the density functional perturbation theory. Our calculation of both parts of distribution function in gallium nitride shows that when the speed of the electron-phonon scattering is comparable with the rate of recombination and trapping then the contribution of the non-Fermi “tail” is comparable with that of the low-energy Fermi-like component. So the high-energy contribution can essentially affect the charge transport in the irradiated and highly doped semiconductors.

  20. Adsorption and adhesion of common serum proteins to nanotextured gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lauren E; Hoffmann, Marc P; Bryan, Isaac; Collazo, Ramón; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-02-14

    As the broader effort towards device and material miniaturization progresses in all fields, it becomes increasingly important to understand the implications of working with functional structures that approach the size scale of molecules, particularly when considering biological systems. It is well known that thin films and nanostructures feature different optical, electrical, and mechanical properties from their bulk composites; however, interactions taking place at the interface between nanomaterials and their surroundings are less understood. Here, we explore interactions between common serum proteins - serum albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G - and a nanotextured gallium nitride surface. Atomic force microscopy with a carboxyl-terminated colloid tip is used to probe the 'activity' of proteins adsorbed onto the surface, including both the accessibility of the terminal amine to the tip as well as the potential for protein extension. By evaluating the frequency of tip-protein interactions, we can establish differences in protein behaviour on the basis of both the surface roughness as well as morphology, providing an assessment of the role of surface texture in dictating protein-surface interactions. Unidirectional surface features - either the half-unit cell steppes of as-grown GaN or those produced by mechanical polishing - appear to promote protein accessibility, with a higher frequency of protein extension events taking place on these surfaces when compared with less ordered surface features. Development of a full understanding of the factors influencing surface-biomolecule interactions can pave the way for specific surface modification to tailor the bio-material interface, offering a new path for device optimization.

  1. Tuning the surface Fermi level on p-type gallium nitride nanowires for efficient overall water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, M G; Zhao, S; Chowdhury, F A; Wang, Q; Nguyen, H P T; Trudeau, M L; Guo, H; Mi, Z

    2014-04-30

    Solar water splitting is one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis for future carbon-neutral, storable and sustainable source of energy. Here we show that one of the major obstacles for achieving efficient and stable overall water splitting over the emerging nanostructured photocatalyst is directly related to the uncontrolled surface charge properties. By tuning the Fermi level on the nonpolar surfaces of gallium nitride nanowire arrays, we demonstrate that the quantum efficiency can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude. The internal quantum efficiency and activity on p-type gallium nitride nanowires can reach ~51% and ~4.0 mol hydrogen h(-1) g(-1), respectively. The nanowires remain virtually unchanged after over 50,000 μmol gas (hydrogen and oxygen) is produced, which is more than 10,000 times the amount of photocatalyst itself (~4.6 μmol). The essential role of Fermi-level tuning in balancing redox reactions and in enhancing the efficiency and stability is also elucidated.

  2. Bond length variation in hydronitride molecules and nitride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterakos, L. A.; Gibbs, G. V.; Boisen, M. B.

    1992-08-01

    Bond lengths calculated for the coordination polyhedra in hydronitride molecules match average values observed for XN bonds involving main group X-cations in nitride crystals to within ˜0.04 Å. As suggested for oxide and sulfide molecules and crystals, the forces that determine the average bond lengths recorded for coordinated polyhedra in hydronitride molecules and nitride crystals appear to be governed in large part by the atoms that comprise the polyhedra and those that induce local charge balance. The forces exerted on the coordinated polyhedra by other parts of the structure seem to play a small if not an insignificant role in governing bond length variations. Bonded radii for the nitride ion obtained from theoretical electron density maps calculated for the molecules increase linearly with bond length as observed for nitride crystals with the rock salt structure. Promolecule radii calculated for the molecules correlate with bonded and ionic radii, indicating that the electron density distributions in hydronitride molecules possess a significant atomic component, despite bond type.

  3. Gallium vacancies in β-Ga2O3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananen, B. E.; Halliburton, L. E.; Stevens, K. T.; Foundos, G. K.; Giles, N. C.

    2017-05-01

    The gallium vacancy, an intrinsic acceptor, is identified in β-Ga2O3 using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Spectra from doubly ionized ( VG a 2 - ) and singly ionized ( VG a - ) gallium vacancies are observed at room temperature, without photoexcitation, after an irradiation with high-energy neutrons. The VG a 2 - centers (with S = 1/2) have a slight angular variation due to a small anisotropy in the g matrix (principal values are 2.0034, 2.0097, and 2.0322). The VG a 2 - centers also exhibit a resolved hyperfine structure due to equal and nearly isotropic interactions with the 69,71Ga nuclei at two Ga sites (the hyperfine parameters are 1.28 and 1.63 mT for the 69Ga and 71Ga nuclei, respectively, when the field is along the a direction). Based on these g-matrix and hyperfine results, the model for the ground state of the doubly ionized vacancy ( VG a 2 - ) has a hole localized on one threefold-coordinated oxygen ion. The vacancy is located at one of the three neighboring gallium sites, and the remaining two gallium neighbors are responsible for the equal hyperfine interactions. The singly ionized ( VG a - ) gallium vacancies are also paramagnetic. In this latter acceptor, the two holes are localized on separate oxygen ions adjacent to one gallium vacancy. Their spins align parallel to give a triplet S = 1 EPR spectrum with resolved hyperfine structure from interactions with gallium neighbors.

  4. Computational study on the growth of gallium nitride and a possible source of oxygen impurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Mandal, Debasish; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K

    2010-04-15

    The reaction pathways for the gallium nitride GaN growth by gas phase reaction of trimethylgallium (TMG) with ammonia is studied theoretically. Water is the most important impurity in ammonia, therefore its reaction with TMG is investigated as a possible source of oxygen impurity in GaN. Gallium oxide (GaO) formed by the reaction between TMG and H(2)O is predicted to be one of the possible source of oxygen impurity in GaN. The mechanisms and energetics of these reactions in the gas phase have been investigated by density functional B3LYP/[LANL2DZ-ECP + 6-31G(d,p)] method and ab initio MP2/[LANL2DZ-ECP + 6-31G(d,p)], CCSD(T)/[LANL2DZ-ECP + 6-31G(d,p)]//B3LYP/[LANL2DZ-ECP + 6-31G(d,p)], CCSD(T)/[LANL2DZ-ECP + 6-31G(d,p)]//MP2/[LANL2DZ-ECP + 6-31G(d,p)], and CCSD(T)/[LANL2DZ-ECP + Ahlrichs-VTZP]//MP2/[LANL2DZ-ECP + Ahlrichs-VTZP] methods. Both the reactions of TMG with NH(3) and H(2)O are modeled using pre-equilibrium charge-transfer complexes (CH(3))(3)Ga:NH(3) (C1) and (CH(3))(3)Ga:OH(2) (C2) having binding energies of 18.8 and 12.4 kcal/mol, respectively. The first step of the methane elimination reaction from the complexes proceeds through the saddle points TS1 and TS1a having activation barriers 37.0 and 22.6 kcal/mol for C1 and C2, respectively. The first CH(4) elimination step is exothermic for both the cases, but the exothermicity is 15.0 kcal/mol greater for CH(4) elimination from C2. The next step of methane elimination from the stable reaction intermediates (CH(3))(2)GaNH(2) and (CH(3))(3)GaOH has a very high activation barrier of 76.0 and 67.8 kcal/mol via saddle points TS2 and TS2a, respectively. The calculated reaction rates at 298.15 K for both the reactions are low but are comparable to each other. The total rate constant k(tot) for GaN formation is 2.07 x 10(-60) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and that for GaO formation is 6.85 x 10(-62) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1).

  5. SYNTHESIS OF THICK GALLIUM NITRIDE LAYERS BY METHOD OF MULTI-STAGE GROWTH ON SUBSTRATES WITH COLUMN STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Mynbaeva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper deals with processes of formation and transformation of defects during multi-stage growth of thick gallium nitride layers with hydride vapor phase epitaxy on GaN/Al2O3 substrates with buried column pattern formed with the use of metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. Methods. The growth of initial GaN layers was performed with the use of metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. On the surface of the initial layers columns with the height of 800 nm were generated by means of ion etching. These columns were overgrown with 3-4 µm-thick GaN layers. On thus formed substrate multi-stage growth of GaN layers was performed with the use of hydride vapor-phase epitaxy. The total thickness of GaN layers was 100-1500 µm. The grown layers were studied by optical and electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Main Results. Density of threading dislocations in the layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy was (3-6·107 cm-2, that was one order of magnitude lower than in the used substrate, and two to three orders lower than dislocation density in typical GaN layers grown on commercial sapphire substrates. Raman spectroscopy data were indicative of low level of mechanical stress in the layers and their high structural uniformity. It was established that under multi-stage growth conditions, non-catastrophic cracks (those that do not cause sample destruction are able to transform into macropores and appear to be an important structural element, serving to stress relaxation in the bulk of thick gallium nitride layers grown on foreign substrates. Practical Relevance. The results of the study can be used in the development of III-nitride heterostructures for optoelectronics and high-power and high-frequency microelectronics.

  6. Design and Characterization of p-i-n Devices for Betavoltaic Microbatteries on Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Raziuddin A.

    Betavoltaic microbatteries convert nuclear energy released as beta particles directly into electrical energy. These batteries are well suited for electrical applications such as micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), implantable medical devices and sensors. Such devices are often located in hard to access places where long life, micro-size and lightweight are required. The working principle of a betavoltaic device is similar to a photovoltaic device; they differ only in that the electron hole pairs (EHPs) are generated in the device by electrons instead of photons. In this study, the performance of a betavoltaic device fabricated from gallium nitride (GaN) is investigated for beta particle energies equivalent to Tritium (3H) and Nickel-63 (N63) beta sources. GaN is an attractive choice for fabricating betavoltaic devices due to its wide band gap and radiation resistance. Another advantage GaN has is that it can be alloyed with aluminum (Al) to further increase the bandgap, resulting in a higher output power and increased efficiency. Betavoltaic devices were fabricated on p-i-n GaN structures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The devices were characterized using current - voltage (IV) measurements without illumination (light or beta), using a laser driven light source, and under an electron beam. Dark IV measurements showed a turn on-voltage of ~ 3.4 V, specific-on-resistance of 15.1 m O-cm2, and a leakage current of 0.5 mA at -- 10 V. A clear photo-response was observed when IV curves were measured for these devices under a light source at a wavelength of 310 nm (4.0 eV). These devices were tested under an electron beam in order to evaluate their behavior as betavoltaic microbatteries without using radioactive materials. Output power of 70 nW and 640 nW with overall efficiencies of 1.2% and 4.0% were determined at the average energy emission of 3H (5.6 keV) and 63N (17 keV) respectively.

  7. Growth of aluminum nitride bulk crystals by sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei

    The commercial potential of III-nitride semiconductors is already being realized by the appearance of high efficiency, high reliability, blue and green LEDS around the world. However, the lack of a native nitride substrate has hindered the full-realization of more demanding III-nitride devices. To date, single aluminum nitride (AlN) crystals are not commercially available. New process investigation is required to scale up the crystal size. New crucibles stable up to very high temperatures (˜2500°C) are needed which do not incorporate impurities into the growing crystals. In this thesis, the recent progresses in bulk AlN crystal growth by sublimation-recondensation were reviewed first. The important physical, optical and electrical properties as well as chemical and thermal stabilities of AlN were discussed. The development of different types of growth procedures including self-seeding, substrate employed and a new "sandwich" technique were covered in detail. Next, the surface morphology and composition at the initial stages of AlN grown on 6H-SiC (0001) were investigated. Discontinuous AlN coverage occurred after 15 minutes of growth. The initial discontinuous nucleation of AlN and different lateral growth of nuclei indicated discontinuous AIN direct growth on on-axis 6H-SiC substrates. At the temperature in excess of 2100°C, the durability of the furnace fixture materials (crucibles, retorts, etc.) remains a critical problem. The thermal and chemical properties and performance of several refractory materials, including tantalum carbide, niobium carbide, tungsten, graphite, and hot-pressed boron nitride (HPBN), in inert gas, as well as under AIN crystal growth conditions were discussed. TaC and NbC are the most stable crucible materials in the crystal growth system. HPBN crucible is more suitable for AlN self-seeding growth, as crystals tend to nucleate in thin colorless platelets with low dislocation density. Finally, clear and colorless thin platelet Al

  8. High-power X- and Ka-band Gallium Nitride Amplifiers with Exceptional Efficiency Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achieving very high-power amplification with maximum efficiency at X- and Ka-band is challenging using solid-state technology. Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) has been the...

  9. High-Q aluminum nitride photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Pernice, W H P; Schuck, C; Tang, H X

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate high optical quality factors in aluminum nitride (AlN) photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Suspended AlN photonic crystal nanobeams are fabricated in sputter-deposited AlN-on-insulator substrates using a self-protecting release process. Employing one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities coupled to integrated optical circuits we measure quality factors up to 146,000. By varying the waveguide-cavity coupling gap, extinction ratios in excess of 15 dB are obtained. Our results open the door for integrated photonic bandgap structures made from a low loss, wide-transparency, nonlinear optical material system.

  10. A Photonic 1 × 4 Power Splitter Based on Multimode Interference in Silicon–Gallium-Nitride Slot Waveguide Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dror Malka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a design for a 1 × 4 optical power splitter based on the multimode interference (MMI coupler in a silicon (Si–gallium nitride (GaN slot waveguide structure is presented—to our knowledge, for the first time. Si and GaN were found as suitable materials for the slot waveguide structure. Numerical optimizations were carried out on the device parameters using the full vectorial-beam propagation method (FV-BPM. Simulation results show that the proposed device can be useful to divide optical signal energy uniformly in the C-band range (1530–1565 nm into four output ports with low insertion losses (0.07 dB.

  11. Investigation of a Simplified Mechanism Model for Prediction of Gallium Nitride Thin Film Growth through Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Kai Hu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical procedure was performed to simplify the complicated mechanism of an epitaxial thin-film growth process. In this study, three numerical mechanism models are presented for verifying the growth rate of the gallium nitride (GaN mechanism. The mechanism models were developed through rate of production analysis. All of the results can be compared in one schematic diagram, and the differences among these three mechanisms are pronounced at high temperatures. The simplified reaction mechanisms were then used as input for a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT, enabling the accurate prediction of growth rates. Validation studies are presented for two types of laboratory-scale reactors (vertical and horizontal. A computational study including thermal and flow field was also performed to investigate the fluid dynamic in those reactors. For each study, the predictions agree acceptably well with the experimental data, indicating the reasonable accuracy of the reaction mechanisms.

  12. A Photonic 1 × 4 Power Splitter Based on Multimode Interference in Silicon–Gallium-Nitride Slot Waveguide Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Dror; Danan, Yossef; Ramon, Yehonatan; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a design for a 1 × 4 optical power splitter based on the multimode interference (MMI) coupler in a silicon (Si)–gallium nitride (GaN) slot waveguide structure is presented—to our knowledge, for the first time. Si and GaN were found as suitable materials for the slot waveguide structure. Numerical optimizations were carried out on the device parameters using the full vectorial-beam propagation method (FV-BPM). Simulation results show that the proposed device can be useful to divide optical signal energy uniformly in the C-band range (1530–1565 nm) into four output ports with low insertion losses (0.07 dB). PMID:28773638

  13. Gallium nitride nanorod arrays as low-refractive-index transparent media in the entire visible spectral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Ying; Lin, Hon-Way; Wu, Chen-Ying; Chen, Wei-Chun; Chen, Jyh-Shin; Gwo, Shangjr

    2008-05-26

    Vertically aligned gallium nitride (GaN) nanorod arrays grown by the catalyst-free, self-organized method based on plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy are shown to behave as subwavelength optical media with low effective refractive indices. In the reflection spectra measured in the entire visible spectral region, strong reflectivity modulations are observed for all nanorod arrays, which are attributed to the effects of Fabry-Pérot microcavities formed within the nanorod arrays by the optically flat air/nanorods and nanorods/substrate interfaces. By analyzing the reflectivity interference fringes, we can quantitatively determine the refractive indices of GaN nanorod arrays as functions of light wavelength. We also propose a model for understanding the optical properties of GaN nanorod arrays in the transparent region. Using this model, good numerical fitting can be achieved for the reflectivity spectra.

  14. Electrically driven, phosphor-free, white light-emitting diodes using gallium nitride-based double concentric truncated pyramid structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung-Hyuk Lim; Young-Ho Ko; Christophe Rodriguez; Su-Hyun Gong; Yong-Hoon Cho

    2016-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are becoming an alternative general light source,with huge energy savings compared to conventional lighting.However,white LEDs using phosphor(s) suffer from unavoidable Stokes energy converting losses,higher manufacturing cost,and reduced thermal stability.Here,we demonstrate electrically driven,phosphor-free,white LEDs based on three-dimensional gallium nitride structures with double concentric truncated hexagonal pyramids.The electroluminescence spectra are stable with varying current.The origin of the emission wavelength is studied by cathodoluminescence and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments.Spatial variation of the carrier injection efficiency is also investigated by a comparative analysis between spatially resolved photoluminescence and electroluminescence.

  15. Defect free single crystal thin layer

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami Tarek Mahmoud

    2016-01-28

    A gallium nitride film can be a dislocation free single crystal, which can be prepared by irradiating a surface of a substrate and contacting the surface with an etching solution that can selectively etch at dislocations.

  16. The crystal structure and twinning of neodymium gallium perovskite single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubizskii, S.B.; Vasylechko, L.O.; Savytskii, D.I.; Matkovskii, A.O.; Syvorotka, I.M. [Res. Production Amalgamation Carat, L' viv (Ukraine)

    1994-10-01

    By means of X-ray structure analysis, the crystal structure of neodymium gallium perovskite (NGP) single crystals (NdGaO{sub 3}) being used as a substrate for HTSC film epitaxy has been refined and the position of atoms has been determined. The possibility of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} film epitaxy on the plane (110) of NGP crystal as well as its advantages and pitfalls are analysed from structural data. The twinning types in the NGP crystal were established. The twinning structure of NGP substrates is found to be stable up to a temperature of 1173 K, as differentiated from the LaGaO{sub 3} and LaAlO{sub 3} substrates. It is intimated that the twinning in the NGP substrates oriented as (001) can result in creation of 90 degrees twin bonds in a film, and in the case of (110)-oriented plates it is possible to ignore the twinning presence in substrate completely. (author)

  17. The Growth of Gallium Nitride Films via the Innovative Technique of Atomic Layer Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    6 3.2 Aluminum Nitride and AIN/GaN Layered Structures ............ 8 3.3 Boron Nitride and BGaN Graded...of tearing in lower left region, indirectly indicating the presence of multiple layers of BGaN ............................... 14 12. Auger electron...electron spectroscopy sputtered depth profile of a BN/ BGaN /GaN/P-SiC film. Note peak in nitrogen trace as interface of BN is passed

  18. Aluminum nitride bulk crystal growth in a resistively heated reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, Rafael Federico

    A resistively heated reactor capable of temperatures in excess of 2300°C was used to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) bulk single crystals from an AlN powder source by physical vapor transport (PVT) in nitrogen atmosphere. AlN crystals were grown at elevated temperatures by two different methods. Self-seeded crystals were obtained by spontaneous nucleation on the crucible walls, while seeded growth was performed on singular and vicinal (0001) surfaces of silicon carbide (SiC) seeds. During self-seeded growth experiments a variety of crucible materials, such as boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum, rhenium, tantalum nitride, and tantalum carbide, were evaluated. These studies showed that the morphology of crystals grown by spontaneous nucleation strongly depends on the growth temperature and contamination in the reactor. Crucible selection had a profound effect on contamination in the crystal growth environment, influencing nucleation, coalescence, and crystal morphology. In terms of high-temperature stability and compatibility with the growth process, the best results for AlN crystal growth were obtained in crucibles made of sintered tantalum carbide or tantalum nitride. In addition, contamination from the commercially purchased AlN powder source was reduced by presintering the powder prior to growth, which resulted in a drastic reduction of nearly all impurities. Spontaneously grown single crystals up to 15 mm in size were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray topography, glow discharge mass spectrometry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Average dislocation densities were on the order of 103 cm -3, with extended areas virtually free of dislocations. High resolution rocking curves routinely showed peak widths as narrow as 7 arcsec, indicating a high degree of crystalline perfection. Low-temperature partially polarized optical reflectance measurements were used to calculate the crystal-field splitting parameter of AlN, Deltacr = -230 meV, and a low-temperature (1

  19. High magneto-optical characteristics of Holmium-doped terbium gallium garnet crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xiangyong; Yin, Hang

    2016-06-01

    Magneto-optical characteristics of a new magneto-active material, (Tb(1-x)Hox)3Ga5O12 crystal, have been grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method. A high value of the Verdet constant was obtained at room temperature-namely, 214.9 and 77.8  rad·m-1 T-1 for 632.8 and 1064 nm, respectively. The Verdet constant of the Ho-doped terbium gallium garnet crystal at 1064 nm is about 2 times higher than that of terbium gallium garnet crystal. High value of magneto-optical figure-of-merit makes it an attractive next-generation magneto-optics material for high-power Faraday isolators.

  20. Characterization and Reliability of Vertical N-Type Gallium Nitride Schottky Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    fabricating ultra-pure, large diameter Si wafers has enabled rapid advancement in military technologies and consumer electronics; however, material...difference between the metal work function φM and the semiconductor electron affinity χ equals the Schottky barrier height φB : . (12...bandgap of GaN, approximately 3.3 eV, plus the electron affinity , approximately 1.5 eV. Second, the solubility of metals into gallium was taken into

  1. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A J; Chagarov, E; Gu, S; Kaufman-Osborn, T; Madisetti, S; Wu, J; Asbeck, P M; Oktyabrsky, S; Kummel, A C

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al2O3 gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001).

  2. Exciton optical transitions in a hexagonal boron nitride single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Museur, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers - LPL, CNRS UMR 7538, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Brasse, G.; Maine, S.; Ducastelle, F.; Loiseau, A. [ONERA - Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures - LEM, ONERA-CNRS, UMR 104, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); Pierret, A. [ONERA - Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures - LEM, ONERA-CNRS, UMR 104, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); CEA-CNRS, Institut Neel/CNRS, Universite J. Fourier, CEA/INAC/SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Attal-Tretout, B. [ONERA - Departement Mesures Physiques - DMPh, 27 Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Barjon, J. [GEMaC, Universite de Versailles St Quentin, CNRS Bellevue, 1 Place Aristide Briand, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kanaev, A. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procedes et des Materiaux - LSPM, CNRS UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-06-15

    Near band gap photoluminescence (PL) of a hexagonal boron nitride single crystal has been studied at cryogenic temperatures with synchrotron radiation excitation. The PL signal is dominated by trapped-exciton optical transitions, while the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra show features assigned to free excitons. Complementary photoconductivity and PLE measurements set the band gap transition energy to 6.4 eV and the Frenkel exciton binding energy larger than 380 meV. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Properties of atomic intercalated boron nitride K4 type crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Masahiro; Takami, Seiichi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Adschiri, Tadafumi

    2010-01-01

    The stability of atomic intercalated boron nitride K4 crystal structures, XBN (X=H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Rb or Sr) is evaluated by the geometric optimization and frozen phonon calculations based on the first principles calculations. NaBN, MgBN, GaBN, FBN and ClBN are found to be stable. NaBN, GaBN, FBN and ClBN are metallic, whereas MgBN is semiconducting.

  4. Epitaxial growth of III-V nitrides and phase separation and ordering in indium gallium nitride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Dharanipal

    The family of III-V nitrides are wide band-gap semiconductors with a broad range of opto-electronic applications in LEDs, laser diodes, UV detectors as well as high temperature/high frequency devices. Due to the lack of good quality native substrates, GaN is grown on foreign substrates that have a lattice and thermal mismatch with GaN. This results in a material with a high density of defects, which in turn adversely affects the opto-electronic properties of the epilayer. In this study, GaN films were epitaxially grown on various substrates (C-plane sapphire, A-plane sapphire, SiC and ZnO) by molecular beam epitaxy. Additionally, GaN homoepitaxy onto laterally overgrown thick GaN substrates was investigated. It was demonstrated that the polarity of the GaN film plays a major role in determining the properties of the films. The growth parameters were optimized to eliminate inversion domain boundaries, which result in domains of opposite polarity in the GaN lattice. For growth on A-plane sapphire, it was found that substrate nitridation and low temperature buffer deposition are critical in order to obtain good epitaxial growth, in spite of the relatively small mismatch between the film and substrate. A crystallographic model was developed to explain this observation. By optimizing growth parameters, GaN films with excellent structural, transport, optical and device properties were grown. The second part of this research involves growth of ternary alloys and superlattice structures, which are essential in the fabrication of many devices. It was found that the InN-GaN pseudo-binary system is not homogeneous over the entire composition range. Due to the mismatch between the tetrahedral radii of GaN and InN, InGaN alloys exhibited phase separation and long-range atomic ordering. Investigations of InxGa1-xN films grown over a wide range of compositions by XRD and TEM showed that the predominant strain relieving mechanism was phase separation in films with x > 0.2, and

  5. CRYSTAL DEFECTS IN PLASMA NITRIDED LAYER CATALYZED BY RARE EARTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.S. Chen; Y.X. Liu; D.K. Liang; L.M. Xiao

    2002-01-01

    The microstructure of plasma nitrided layer catalyzed by rare-earth elements has beenstudied with TEM. The results show that the grains of γ'-Fe4N phase are refinedby rare-earth elements and the plane defects in boundary are increased by rare-earthelements. The addition of rare-earth element increases the bombardment effect andthe number of crystal defects such as vacancies, dislocation loops, twins and stackingfaults in γ'-Fe4N phase and can produce the high-density dislocations in the ferrite ofdiffusion layer at a distance 0. 08mm from the surface. The production of a numberof crystal defects is one of important reasons why rare-earth element accelerates thediffusion of nitrogen atoms during plasma-nitridiug.

  6. Magnetostrictive iron gallium thin films grown onto antiferromagnetic manganese nitride: Structure and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Corbett, Joseph P.; Richard, Andrea L.; Gallagher, James; Meng, Keng-Yuan; Ingram, David C.; Yang, Fengyuan; Smith, Arthur R.

    2016-10-01

    We report structural and magnetic properties of magnetostrictive Fe100 -xGax (x ≈ 15) alloys when deposited onto antiferromagnetic manganese nitride and non-magnetic magnesium oxide substrates. From X-ray diffraction measurements, we find that the FeGa films are single crystalline. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging reveals that the surface morphologies are dictated by the growth temperature, composition, and substrate. The magnetic properties can be tailored by the substrate, as found by magnetic force microscopy imaging and vibrating sample magnetometry measurements. In addition to pronounced tetragonal deformations, depositing FeGa onto manganese nitride leads to the formation of stripe-like magnetic domain patterns and to the appearance of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  7. Indium gallium nitride-based ultraviolet, blue, and green light-emitting diodes functionalized with shallow periodic hole patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyun; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Lerondel, Gilles; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2017-04-04

    In this study, we investigated the improvement in the light output power of indium gallium nitride (InGaN)-based ultraviolet (UV), blue, and green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by fabricating shallow periodic hole patterns (PHPs) on the LED surface through laser interference lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. Noticeably, different enhancements were observed in the light output powers of the UV, blue, and green LEDs with negligible changes in the electrical properties in the light output power versus current and current versus voltage curves. In addition, confocal scanning electroluminescence microscopy is employed to verify the correlation between the enhancement in the light output power of the LEDs with PHPs and carrier localization of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Light propagation through the PHPs on the UV, blue, and green LEDs is simulated using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method to confirm the experimental results. Finally, we suggest optimal conditions of PHPs for improving the light output power of InGaN LEDs based on the experimental and theoretical results.

  8. Numerical Simulation on Electrical-Thermal Properties of Gallium-Nitride-Based Light-Emitting Diodes Embedded in Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-ming Long

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical-thermal characteristics of gallium-nitride- (GaN- based light-emitting diodes (LED, packaged by chips embedded in board (EIB technology, were investigated using a multiphysics and multiscale finite element code, COMSOL. Three-dimensional (3D finite element model for packaging structure has been developed and optimized with forward-voltage-based junction temperatures of a 9-chip EIB sample. The sensitivity analysis of the simulation model has been conducted to estimate the current and temperature distribution changes in EIB LED as the blue LED chip (substrate, indium tin oxide (ITO, packaging structure (bonding wire and chip numbers, and system condition (injection current changed. This method proved the reliability of simulated results in advance and useful material parameters. Furthermore, the method suggests that the parameter match on Shockley's equation parameters, Rs, nideal, and Is, is a potential method to reduce the current crowding effect for the EIB LED. Junction temperature decreases by approximately 3 K to 10 K can be achieved by substrate thinning, ITO, and wire bonding. The nonlinear-decreasing characteristics of total thermal resistance that decrease with an increase in chip numbers are likely to improve the thermal performance of EIB LED modules.

  9. Current status and scope of gallium nitride-based vertical transistors for high-power electronics application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Srabanti; Swenson, Brian L.; Hoi Wong, Man; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2013-07-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is becoming the material of choice for power electronics to enable the roadmap of increasing power density by simultaneously enabling high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor. This is because the low switching losses of GaN enable high-frequency operation which reduces bulky passive components with negligible change in efficiency. Commercialization of GaN-on-Si materials for power electronics has led to the entry of GaN devices into the medium-power market since the performance-over-cost of even first-generation products looks very attractive compared to today's mature Si-based solutions. On the other hand, the high-power market still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high-power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high-power conversion needs. In this paper vertical GaN devices are discussed with emphasis on current aperture vertical electron transistors (CAVETs) which have shown promising performance. The fabrication-related challenges and the future possibilities enabled by the availability of good-quality, cost-competitive bulk GaN material are also evaluated for CAVETs. This work was done at Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA.

  10. Gallium nitride induces neuronal differentiation markers in neural stem/precursor cells derived from rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ruei; Li, Yi-Chen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2009-09-01

    In the present study, gallium nitride (GaN) was used as a substrate to culture neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs), isolated from embryonic rat cerebral cortex, to examine the effect of GaN on the behavior of NSPCs in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in serum-free medium. Morphological studies showed that neurospheres maintained their initial shape and formed many long and thick processes with the fasciculate feature on GaN. Immunocytochemical characterization showed that GaN could induce the differentiation of NSPCs into neurons and astrocytes. Compared to poly-d-lysine (PDL), the most common substrate used for culturing neurons, there was considerable expression of synapsin I for differentiated neurons on GaN, suggesting GaN could induce the differentiation of NSPCs towards the mature differentiated neurons. Western blot analysis showed that the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) activity was one of the effects of GaN-promoted NSPC differentiation into neurons. Finally, compared to PDL, GaN could significantly improve cell survival to reduce cell death after long-term culture. These results suggest that GaN potentially has a combination of electric characteristics suitable for developing neuron and/or NSPC chip systems.

  11. Application of gallium nitride nanostructures and nitrogen doped carbon spheres as supports for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kente, Thobeka; Dube, Sibongile M A; Coville, Neil J; Mhlanga, Sabelo D

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis and use of nanostructures of gallium nitride (GaN NSs) and nitrogen doped carbon spheres (NCSs) as support materials for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. This study provides the first investigation of GaN as a catalyst support in hydrogenation reactions. The GaN NSs were synthesized via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in a double stage furnace (750 degrees C) while NCSs were made by CVD in a single stage furnace (950 degrees C) respectively. TEM analysis revealed that the GaN NSs were rod-like with average diameters of 200 nm, while the NCSs were solid with smoother surfaces, and with diameters of 450 nm. Pd nanoparticles (1 and 3% loadings) were uniformly dispersed on acid functionalized GaN NSs and NCS. The Pd nanoparticles had average diameters that were influenced by the type of support material used. The GaN NSs and NCSs were tested for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde in isopropanol at 40 and 60 degrees C under atmospheric pressure. A comparative study of the activity of the nanostructured materials revealed that the order of catalyst activity was 3% Pd/GaN > 3% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/GaN. However, 100% selectivity to hydrocinnamaldehyde (HCALD) was obtained with 1% Pd/GaN at reasonable conversion rates.

  12. Optimized Spiral Metal-Gallium-Nitride Nanowire Cavity for Ultra-High Circular Dichroism Ultraviolet Lasing at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Chun; Liao, Shu-Wei; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Hsiao, Yu-Hao; Chang, Shu-Wei; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Shih, Min-Hsiung

    2016-05-25

    Circularly polarized laser sources with small footprints and high efficiencies can possess advanced functionalities in optical communication and biophotonic integrated systems. However, the conventional lasers with additional circular-polarization converters are bulky and hardly compatible with nanophotonic circuits, and most active chiral plasmonic nanostructures nowadays exhibit broadband emission and low circular dichroism. In this work, with spirals of gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWRs) covered by a metal layer, we demonstrated an ultrasmall semiconductor laser capable of emitting circularly-polarized photons. The left- and right-hand spiral metal nanowire cavities with varied periods were designed at ultraviolet wavelengths to achieve the high quality factor circular dichroism metastructures. The dissymmetry factors characterizing the degrees of circular polarizations of the left- and right-hand chiral lasers were 1.4 and -1.6 (±2 if perfectly circular polarized), respectively. The results show that the chiral cavities with only 5 spiral periods can achieve lasing signals with the high degrees of circular polarizations.

  13. Indium gallium nitride-based ultraviolet, blue, and green light-emitting diodes functionalized with shallow periodic hole patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyun; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Lerondel, Gilles; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the improvement in the light output power of indium gallium nitride (InGaN)-based ultraviolet (UV), blue, and green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by fabricating shallow periodic hole patterns (PHPs) on the LED surface through laser interference lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. Noticeably, different enhancements were observed in the light output powers of the UV, blue, and green LEDs with negligible changes in the electrical properties in the light output power versus current and current versus voltage curves. In addition, confocal scanning electroluminescence microscopy is employed to verify the correlation between the enhancement in the light output power of the LEDs with PHPs and carrier localization of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Light propagation through the PHPs on the UV, blue, and green LEDs is simulated using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method to confirm the experimental results. Finally, we suggest optimal conditions of PHPs for improving the light output power of InGaN LEDs based on the experimental and theoretical results.

  14. Faraday effect improvement by Dy{sup 3+}-doping of terbium gallium garnet single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe, E-mail: zhenzhe1201@sina.com; Yang, Lei; Hang, Yin; Wang, Xiangyong

    2016-01-15

    Highly transparent Dy{sup 3+}-doped terbium gallium garnet (TGG) single crystal was grown by Czochralski (Cz) method. Phase composition of the crystal was tested by XRD measurements. The distribution coefficient of Dy{sup 3+} in the crystal was obtained. The optical and magneto-optical properties were analyzed in detail, and magnetic properties of the Dy{sup 3+}-TGG crystal were studied. The paramagnetic behavior is observed down to 10 K. The as-grown crystal exhibited high optical transmittance, particularly in the visible region. The Faraday rotation was investigated over visible and near-infrared regions (VIS–NIR) at room temperature. The Verdet constants increase at measured wavelengths and high thermal stability was found in Dy{sup 3+}-doped TGG, as compared to the properties of pure TGG, indicating that Dy{sup 3+}-doped crystals are preferable for magneto-active materials used in Faraday devices at VIS–NIR wavelengths. - Graphical abstract: Highly transparent Dy{sup 3+}-doped terbium gallium garnet (TGG) and pure TGG single crystals were grown by Czochralski method. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped TGG possesses 20–30% higher Verdet values in reference to TGG independently on wavelength.

  15. Suspended HfO{sub 2} photonic crystal slab on III-nitride/Si platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongjin; Feng, Jiao; Cao, Ziping; Zhu, Hongbo [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Grueenberg Research Centre, Nanjing, Jiang-Su (China)

    2014-06-15

    We present here the fabrication of suspended hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) photonic crystal slab on a III-nitride/Si platform. The calculations are performed to model the suspended HfO{sub 2} photonic crystal slab. Aluminum nitride (AlN) film is employed as the sacrificial layer to form air gap. Photonic crystal patterns are defined by electron beam lithography and transferred into HfO{sub 2} film, and suspended HfO{sub 2} photonic crystal slab is achieved on a III-nitride/Si platform through wet-etching of AlN layer in the alkaline solution. The method is promising for the fabrication of suspended HfO{sub 2} nanostructures incorporating into a III-nitride/Si platform, or acting as the template for epitaxial growth of III-nitride materials. (orig.)

  16. Wet chemical functionalization of III-V semiconductor surfaces: alkylation of gallium arsenide and gallium nitride by a Grignard reaction sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peczonczyk, Sabrina L; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Carim, Azhar I; Maldonado, Stephen

    2012-03-13

    Crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) (111)A and gallium nitride (GaN) (0001) surfaces have been functionalized with alkyl groups via a sequential wet chemical chlorine activation, Grignard reaction process. For GaAs(111)A, etching in HCl in diethyl ether effected both oxide removal and surface-bound Cl. X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectra demonstrated selective surface chlorination after exposure to 2 M HCl in diethyl ether for freshly etched GaAs(111)A but not GaAs(111)B surfaces. GaN(0001) surfaces exposed to PCl(5) in chlorobenzene showed reproducible XP spectroscopic evidence for Cl-termination. The Cl-activated GaAs(111)A and GaN(0001) surfaces were both reactive toward alkyl Grignard reagents, with pronounced decreases in detectable Cl signal as measured by XP spectroscopy. Sessile contact angle measurements between water and GaAs(111)A interfaces after various levels of treatment showed that GaAs(111)A surfaces became significantly more hydrophobic following reaction with C(n)H(2n-1)MgCl (n = 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 18). High-resolution As 3d XP spectra taken at various times during prolonged direct exposure to ambient lab air indicated that the resistance of GaAs(111)A to surface oxidation was greatly enhanced after reaction with Grignard reagents. GaAs(111)A surfaces terminated with C(18)H(37) groups were also used in Schottky heterojunctions with Hg. These heterojunctions exhibited better stability over repeated cycling than heterojunctions based on GaAs(111)A modified with C(18)H(37)S groups. Raman spectra were separately collected that suggested electronic passivation by surficial Ga-C bonds at GaAs(111)A. Specifically, GaAs(111)A surfaces reacted with alkyl Grignard reagents exhibited Raman signatures comparable to those of samples treated with 10% Na(2)S in tert-butanol. For GaN(0001), high-resolution C 1s spectra exhibited the characteristic low binding energy shoulder demonstrative of surface Ga-C bonds following reaction with CH(3)MgCl. In addition, 4

  17. Crystal quality of two-dimensional gallium telluride and gallium selenide using Raman fingerprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannatul Susoma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established Raman fingerprint of GaTe and GaSe to investigate their crystal quality. As unencapsulated, they both oxidise in ambient conditions which can be detected in their Raman analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis shows a good agreement with Raman analysis. 50-nm-thick Al2O3 encapsulation layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD inhibits degradation in ambient conditions.

  18. Effect of Crucibles on Qualities of Self-Seeded Aluminium Nitride Crystals Grown by Sublimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Qi-Feng; WANG Yu-Qi; DUAN Cheng-Hong; QIU Kai; JI Chang-Jian; LI Xin-Hua; ZHONG Fei; YIN Zhi-Jun; CAO Xian-Cun; ZHOU Xiu-Ju

    2007-01-01

    Self-seeded aluminium nitride (AIN)crystals are grown in tungsten and hot pressed boron nitride(HPBN)crucibles With different shapes by a sublimation method.The qualities of the AIN crystals are characterized by high-resolution transmission electronic microscopy(HRTEM),scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and MicroRaman spectroscopy.The results indicate that the better quality crystals can be collected in.conical tungsten crucible.

  19. Low-energy ion beam-based deposition of gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M. R., E-mail: mrvasquez@coe.upd.edu.ph [Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    An ion source with a remote plasma chamber excited by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency power was used for low-energy broad ion beam extraction. Optical emission spectral analyses showed the sputtering and postionization of a liquid gallium (Ga) target placed in a chamber separated from the source bombarded by argon (Ar) plasma guided by a bent magnetic field. In addition, an E × B probe successfully showed the extraction of low-energy Ga and Ar ion beams using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. By introducing dilute amounts of nitrogen gas into the system, formation of thin Ga-based films on a silicon substrate was demonstrated as determined from X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity studies.

  20. Low-energy ion beam-based deposition of gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, M R; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    An ion source with a remote plasma chamber excited by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency power was used for low-energy broad ion beam extraction. Optical emission spectral analyses showed the sputtering and postionization of a liquid gallium (Ga) target placed in a chamber separated from the source bombarded by argon (Ar) plasma guided by a bent magnetic field. In addition, an E × B probe successfully showed the extraction of low-energy Ga and Ar ion beams using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. By introducing dilute amounts of nitrogen gas into the system, formation of thin Ga-based films on a silicon substrate was demonstrated as determined from X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity studies.

  1. Theoretical study of gallium nitride molecules, GaN2 and GaN4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeli, Demeter; Theodorakopoulos, Giannoula; Petsalakis, Ioannis D

    2008-09-18

    The electronic and geometric structures of gallium dinitride GaN 2, and gallium tetranitride molecules, GaN 4, were systematically studied by employing density functional theory and perturbation theory (MP2, MP4) in conjunction with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. In addition, for the ground-state of GaN 4( (2)B 1) a density functional theory study was carried out combining different functionals with different basis sets. A total of 7 minima have been identified for GaN 2, while 37 structures were identified for GaN 4 corresponding to minima, transition states, and saddle points. We report geometries and dissociation energies for all the above structures as well as potential energy profiles, potential energy surfaces and bonding mechanisms for some low-lying electronic states of GaN 4. The dissociation energy of the ground-state GaN 2 ( X (2)Pi) is 1.1 kcal/mol with respect to Ga( (2)P) + N 2( X (1)Sigma g (+)). The ground-state and the first two excited minima of GaN 4 are of (2)B 1( C 2 v ), (2)A 1( C 2 v , five member ring), and (4)Sigma g (-)( D infinityh ) symmetry, respectively. The dissociation energy ( D e) of the ground-state of GaN 4, X (2)B 1, with respect to Ga( (2)P) + 2 N 2( X (1)Sigma g (+)), is 2.4 kcal/mol, whereas the D e of (4)Sigma g (-) with respect to Ga( (4)P) + 2 N 2( X (1)Sigma g (+)) is 17.6 kcal/mol.

  2. A Study of Strain States of Gallium Nitride Prepared Through Solid-State Metathesis Reaction Under High Pressure and High Temperature.%高温高压固态复分解反应法生长氮化镓的应变性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马瑶; 龚敏; 马欢; 贺端威

    2011-01-01

    本文采用高温高压下固态复分解反应法生长氮化镓.用X射线衍射仪、扫描电子显微镜、激光拉曼光谱仪对其进行分析,结果表明生成了六角纤锌矿结构的氮化镓晶体.该样品在宏观上受到了张应力的作用,退火后,宏观的应变状态由张应变向压应变转变;晶体微观应力减小,晶粒尺寸变大,晶体质量变好.%Gallium nitride(GaN) crystals have been prepared through solid-state metathesis reaction under high pressure and high temperature. X-ray diffraction(XRD) ..Scanning e-lectron microscopy(SEM)and Raman spectra (Raman) were used to analyse the crystals. The results indicated that the crystals were hexagonal Gallium nitride and its macrostress was tensile. After anneal, the strain states of the crystals changed from tensile to com-pressive. And the microstress reduced? The size increased and the quality became better.

  3. Development of wide-band gap indium gallium nitride solar cells for high-efficiency photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Omkar K.

    Main objective of the present work is to develop wide-band gap InGaN solar cells in the 2.4--2.9 eV range that can be an integral component of photovoltaic devices to achieve efficiencies greater than 50%. The III-nitride semiconductor material system, which consists of InN, GaN, AlN and their alloys, offers a substantial potential in developing ultra-high efficiency photovoltaics mainly due to its wide range of direct-band gap, and other electronic, optical and mechanical properties. However, this novel InGaN material system poses challenges from theoretical, as well as technological standpoints, which are further extended into the performance of InGaN devices. In the present work, these challenges are identified and overcome individually to build basic design blocks, and later, optimized comprehensively to develop high-performance InGaN solar cells. One of the major challenges from the theoretical aspect arises due to unavailability of a suitable modeling program for InGaN solar cells. As spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization can substantially influence transport of carriers in the III-nitrides, these phenomena are studied and incorporated at a source-code level in the PC1D simulation program to accurately model InGaN solar cells. On the technological front, InGaN with indium compositions up to 30% (2.5 eV band gap) are developed for photovoltaic applications by controlling defects and phase separation using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. InGaN with band gap of 2.5 eV is also successfully doped to achieve acceptor carrier concentration of 1018 cm-3. A robust fabrication scheme for III-nitride solar cells is established to increase reliability and yield; various schemes including interdigitated grid contact and current spreading contacts are developed to yield low-resistance Ohmic contacts for InGaN solar cells. Preliminary solar cells are developed using a standard design to optimize the InGaN material, where the band gap of InGaN is progressively

  4. The effect of gallium nitride on long-term culture induced aging of neuritic function in cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ruei; Young, Tai-Horng

    2008-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) has been developed for a variety of microelectronic and optical applications due to its unique electric property and chemical stability. In the present study, n-type and p-type GaN were used as substrates to culture cerebellar granule neurons to examine the effect of GaN on cell response for a long-term culture period. It was found that GaN could rapidly induce cultured neurons to exhibit a high phosphorylated Akt level after 20h of incubation. It was assumed that the anti-apoptotic effect of Akt phosphorylation could be correlated with cell survival, neurite growth and neuronal function for up to 35 days of incubation. Morphological studies showed GaN induced larger neuronal aggregates and neurite fasciculation to exhibit a dense fiber network after 8 days of incubation. Western blot analysis and immunocytochemical characterization showed that GaN still exhibited the expression of neurite growth and function, such as high levels of GAP-43, synapsin I and synaptophysin even after 35 days of incubation. In addition, survival of cerebellar granule neurons on GaN was improved by the analysis of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from damaged cells. These results indicated that neuronal connections were formed on GaN by a gradual process from Akt activation and cell aggregation to develop neurite growth, fasciculation and function. Therefore, GaN offers a good model system to identify a well-characterized pattern of neuronal behavior for a long-term culture period, consistent with the development of a neurochip requiring the integration of biological system and semiconductor material.

  5. High sensitivity hydrogen sensing with Pt-decorated porous gallium nitride prepared by metal-assisted electroless etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Barrett K; Bohn, Paul W

    2010-05-01

    A unique hydrogen sensor structure based on Pt-decorated porous gallium nitride (PGaN) was fabricated by a two-step process consisting of metal-assisted electroless etching to produce PGaN with highly anisotropic pores followed by electroless deposition of Pt in the pores from an ammoniacal PtCl(6)(2-) solution. The Pt-decorated PGaN structure contains 50-100 nm diameter nanopores which are 400 nm to 1 microm deep and filled with Pt islands. Both electroless etching and deposition steps are done in solution and allow for large-scale production. An AC four-point probe conductivity measurement was implemented at f = 1 kHz, a frequency where the impedance of Pt-PGaN is nearly entirely resistive, and the change in conductance upon H(2) exposure was measured for three sample types: PGaN with a surface sputtered layer of Pt only; unetched GaN (CGaN) with both sputtered and electrolessly deposited Pt; and PGaN with both sputtered and electrolessly deposited Pt. The hydrogen sensing performance of the Pt-filled PGaN sensor was more than an order of magnitude better than either of the other two sample types under all experimental conditions, an observation attributed to the significant increase in Pt-GaN interfacial area in the electrolessly decorated PGaN samples, exhibiting a response to H2 concentrations as low as 1 ppm. The conductance changes are ascribed to adsorption-induced changes in interfacial polarization that produce changes in band bending and thus to the width of the space charge region near the Pt-GaN interface.

  6. Synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of g-phase bismuth titanium oxide with gallium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobato A.R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gallium solubility in the Bi12TiO20 (BTO matrix was investigated by solid state reaction synthesis and Bi12Ti(1-xGa xO20 (BTGaO single crystals were grown by Top Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG. We determined that it is possible to obtain a continuous solid solution from (xBi12TiO20: (1-xBi12[Ga0.7Bi0.3]O20 and that Ga replaces Ti in the BTO matrix giving Bi12Ti(1-xGa(xO20 up to x < 0.2. BTGaO single crystals grown with an excess of Bi2O3 were transparent, a bleaching effect was observed due to the presence of gallium in the crystalline sillenite structure and their lattice parameter was higher than for pure BTO. The results for BTGaO single crystals showed an increase in the optical activity from rho0 = 6.4° ± 0.3°/mm, for BTO, to rho0 = 9.7° ± 0.3°/mm, for BTGaO grown with x = 0.30 in the melt. The BTGaO crystal presented an activation energy value of 0.48 ± 0.02 eV for 100 °C <= T <= 300 °C.

  7. Low Damage, High Anisotropy Inductively Coupled Plasma for Gallium Nitride based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Youssef H.

    2013-05-27

    Group III-nitride semiconductors possess unique properties, which make them versatile materials for suiting many applications. Structuring vertical and exceptionally smooth GaN profiles is crucial for efficient optical device operation. The processing requirements for laser devices and ridge waveguides are stringent as compared to LEDs and other electronic devices. Due to the strong bonding and chemically inert nature of GaN, dry etching becomes a critical fabrication step. The surface morphology and facet etch angle are analyzed using SEM and AFM measurements. The influence of different mask materials is also studied including Ni as well as a SiO2 and resist bilayer. The high selectivity Ni Mask is found to produce high sidewall angles ~79°. Processing parameters are optimized for both the mask material and GaN in order to achieve a highly anisotropic, smooth profile, without resorting to additional surface treatment steps. An optimizing a SF6/O2 plasma etch process resulted in smooth SiO2 mask sidewalls. The etch rate and GaN surface roughness dependence on the RF power was also examined. Under a low 2mTorr pressure, the RF and ICP power were optimized to 150W and 300W respectively, such that a smooth GaN morphology and sidewalls was achieved with reduced ion damage. The The AFM measurements of the etched GaN surface indicate a low RMS roughness ranging from 4.75 nm to 7.66 nm.

  8. Strain compensated superlattices on m-plane gallium nitride by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Bonef, Bastien; Young, Erin C.; Nookala, Nishant; Belkin, Mikhail A.; Speck, James S.

    2017-08-01

    The results of tensile strained AlN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, and compressive strained InGaN/GaN superlattices (SLs) grown by Ammonia MBE (NH3-MBE) are presented. A combination of atom probe tomography and high-resolution X-ray diffraction confirms that periodic heterostructures of high crystallographic quality are achieved. Strain induced misfit dislocations (MDs), however, are revealed by cathodoluminescence (CL) of the strained AlN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, and InGaN/GaN structures. MDs in the active region of a device are a severe problem as they act as non-radiative charge recombination centers, affecting the reliability and efficiency of the device. Strain compensated SL structures are subsequently developed, composed of alternating layers of tensile strained AlGaN and compressively strained InGaN. CL reveals the absence of MDs in such structures, demonstrating that strain compensation offers a viable route towards MD free active regions in III-Nitride SL based devices.

  9. Q-Band (45 GHz) Microwave Integrated Circuit Power Amplifier Designs Submitted to TriQuint Semiconductor for Fabrication with 0.15-micron High-Electron-Mobility Transistors (HEMT) Using 2-mil Gallium Nitride (GaN) on Silicon Carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Electron-Mobility Transistors (HEMT) Using 2-mil Gallium Nitride (GaN) on Silicon Carbide (SiC) by John E. Penn ARL-TN-0574 September 2013...µm High-Electron-Mobility Transistors (HEMT) Using 2-mil Gallium Nitride (GaN) on Silicon Carbide (SiC) John E. Penn Sensors and Electron Devices...with 0.15-µm High- Electron-Mobility Transistors (HEMT) Using 2-mil Gallium Nitride (GaN) on Silicon Carbide (SiC) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  10. Carrier emission of n-type gallium nitride illuminated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runze; Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Jie; Cao, Jianming; Rentzepis, Peter M.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-12-01

    The carrier emission efficiency of light emitting diodes is of fundamental importance for many technological applications, including the performance of GaN and other semiconductor photocathodes. We have measured the evolution of the emitted carriers and the associated transient electric field after femtosecond laser excitation of n-type GaN single crystals. These processes were studied using sub-picosecond, ultrashort, electron pulses and explained by means of a "three-layer" analytical model. We find that for pump laser intensities on the order of 1011 W/cm2, the electrons that escaped from the crystal surface have a charge of ˜2.7 pC and a velocity of ˜1.8 μm/ps. The associated transient electrical field evolves at intervals ranging from picoseconds to nanoseconds. These results provide a dynamic perspective on the photoemission properties of semiconductor photocathodes.

  11. Thermal non-oxidative aromatization of light alkanes catalyzed by gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Mu, Xiaoyue; Liu, Wenbo; Kong, Xianghua; Fan, Shizhao; Mi, Zetian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2014-12-15

    The thermal catalytic activity of GaN in non-oxidative alkane dehydroaromatization has been discovered for the first time. The origin of the catalytic activity was studied experimentally and theoretically. Commercially available GaN powders with a wurtzite crystal structure showed superior stability and reactivity for converting light alkanes, including methane, propane, n-butane, n-hexane and cyclohexane into benzene at an elevated temperature with high selectivity. The catalyst is highly robust and can be used repeatedly without noticeable deactivation.

  12. Direct observation of depth-dependent atomic displacements associated with dislocations in gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, J G; Yang, H; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; D'Alfonso, A J; Yasuhara, A; Okunishi, E; Zhang, S; Humphreys, C J; Allen, L J; Galindo, P L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2014-09-26

    We demonstrate that the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope has a sufficiently small depth of field to observe depth-dependent atomic displacements in a crystal. The depth-dependent displacements associated with the Eshelby twist of dislocations in GaN normal to the foil with a screw component of the Burgers vector are directly imaged. We show that these displacements are observed as a rotation of the lattice between images taken in a focal series. From the sense of the rotation, the sign of the screw component can be determined.

  13. Efficiency droop in indium gallium nitride light emitters: An introduction to photon quenching processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkissian, Raymond

    This thesis contains work from two separate projects, a study of the efficiency of light emitting diodes, and a tapered-fiber approach to photonic crystal integrated photonics. The first part of this thesis describes an experimental investigation of the quantum efficiency of InGaN-based light emitters. Blue and Green LEDs that utilize InGaN quantum wells for their active medium suffer from a reduction in efficiency with increasing bias. This phenomenon is called efficiency droop. In this thesis experimental evidence for significant quenching of photon population in InGaN is presented and its relevance to the efficiency droop problem in InGaN-based light emitting structures is discussed. An equilibrium rate equation model is set up to demonstrate that radiative efficiency for this loss mechanism not only has a similar dependence on carrier density as Auger recombination process, but it also possesses the right order of magnitude making it difficult to distinguish between the two and possibly leading to errors in interpretation. The impact of photon quenching processes on device performance is emphasized by demonstrating loss of efficiency for spectral regions where there is experimental evidence for photon quenching. We have observed this phenomenon for both c-plane and m-plane light emitting structures. Both structures exhibit droop-like behavior for spectral regions where there is evidence for photon quenching. We have also observed and characterized the dynamical Stark effect for an m-plane light emitter considered in this manuscript. Our results revealed localization centers with a corresponding band-edge energy of 388nm and an excitonic binding energy of 17.81mev. Furthermore, fabrication of a photonic crystal waveguide fiber taper coupler is demonstrated with a peak coupling efficiency of 97 %. All four ports of the device are accessible providing an opportunity for investigation of simultaneous interaction of different light sources inside the photonic

  14. Mode-selective phonon excitation in gallium nitride using mid-infrared free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, Muneyuki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heishun; Hachiya, Kan; Sagawa, Takashi; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2017-02-01

    The single-phonon mode was selectively excited in a solid-state sample. A mid-infrared free-electron laser, which was tuned to the target phonon mode, was irradiated onto a crystal cooled to a cryogenic temperature, where modes other than the intended excitation were suppressed. An A 1(LO) vibrational mode excitation on GaN(0001) face was demonstrated. Anti-Stokes Raman scattering was used to observe the excited vibrational mode, and the appearance and disappearance of the scattering band at the target wavenumber were confirmed to correspond to on and off switching of the pump free-electron laser and were fixed to the sample vibrational mode. The sum-frequency generation signals of the pump and probe lasers overlapped the Raman signals and followed the wavenumber shift of the pump laser.

  15. Dislocation Reduction Mechanisms in Gallium Nitride Films Grown by Canti-Bridge Epitaxy Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Zhi-Gang; WANG Jing; PEI Xiao-Jiang; WAN Wei; CHEN Hong; ZHOU Jun-Ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ By using the special maskless V-grooved c-plane sapphire as the substrate, we previously developed a novel GaN LEO method, or the so-called canti-bridge epitaxy (CBE), and consequently wing-tilt-free GaN films were obtained with low dislocation densities, with which all the conventional difficulties can be overcome [J. Vacuum Sci.Technol. B 23 (2005) 2476]. Here the evolution manner of dislocations in the CBE GaN films is investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The mechanisms of dislocation reduction are discussed. Dislocation behaviour is found to be similar to that in the conventional LEO GaN films except the enhanced dislocation-combination at the coalescence boundary that is a major dislocation-reduction mechanism for the bent horizontal-propagating dislocations in the CBE GaN films. The enhancement of this dislocation-combination probability is believed to result from the inclined shape and the undulate morphology of the sidewalls, which can be readily obtained in a wide range of applicable film-growth conditions during the GaN CBE process. Further development of the GaN CBE method and better crystal-quality of the GaN film both are expected.

  16. Optical properties of aluminium-gallium-nitride semiconductors; Optische Eigenschaften von Aluminium-Galliumnitrid-Halbleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeppischer, Marcus

    2011-08-17

    In this work fundamental optical properties of AlN, GaN and their alloys are presented. Spectroscopic ellipsometry from the near infrared (NIR) to the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region was the main tool to investigate these properties. The complete dielectric function (DF) of cubic as well as hexagonal GaN and AlN in the range between 0.6 eV and 20 eV is shown here, for the first time. A layer model including surface roughness and buffer layers was used to separate the DF of the investigated layer from the measured pseudo-DF. Afterwards all absorption structures in the DF's are discussed in detail. Due to the comparison with calculated bandstructures these absorption structures could be connected to interband transitions at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone (BZ). Within this analysis similarities and differences between GaN and AlN are discussed. For zincblende (zb) AlN a pronounced absorption tail below the direct band gap transition was detected. This behaviour is typical for a phonon-assisted indirect absorption. In contrast zb-GaN exhibits a clear direct absorption. Furthermore, a change in the energetic position of the two main interband absorptions E1 and E2 at the L- and X-point of the BZ was found. A detailed analysis of the anisotropic fundamental band gap of hexagonal AlN offers a interchange of the two topmost valance bands at the BZ center compared to GaN. Due to this permutation the fundamental band edge of wurtzit (wz) AlN is only visible for parallel polarized light, while for GaN it can be detect in the perpendicular configuration. By analysing the energetic position of the three excitonic transitions the crystal-field- and spin-orbit-splitting were defined to be {delta}{sub cr}=-226 meV and {delta}{sub so}=14 meV. In addition, the energetic positions for these transitions at T=15 K are 6.0465 eV, 6.2694 eV and 6.2775 eV. The comparison between measurements at room and low temperature shows an energetic shift for both absorption

  17. Pentagonal monolayer crystals of carbon, boron nitride, and silver azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagmurcukardes, M., E-mail: mehmetyagmurcukardes@iyte.edu.tr; Senger, R. T., E-mail: tugrulsenger@iyte.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, 35430 Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Sahin, H.; Kang, J.; Torun, E.; Peeters, F. M. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Campus Groenenborgerlaan, 2020, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a theoretical investigation of structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of pentagonal monolayers of carbon (p-graphene), boron nitride (p-B{sub 2}N{sub 4} and p-B{sub 4}N{sub 2}), and silver azide (p-AgN{sub 3}) by performing state-of-the-art first principles calculations. Our total energy calculations suggest feasible formation of monolayer crystal structures composed entirely of pentagons. In addition, electronic band dispersion calculations indicate that while p-graphene and p-AgN{sub 3} are semiconductors with indirect bandgaps, p-BN structures display metallic behavior. We also investigate the mechanical properties (in-plane stiffness and the Poisson's ratio) of four different pentagonal structures under uniaxial strain. p-graphene is found to have the highest stiffness value and the corresponding Poisson's ratio is found to be negative. Similarly, p-B{sub 2}N{sub 4} and p-B{sub 4}N{sub 2} have negative Poisson's ratio values. On the other hand, the p-AgN{sub 3} has a large and positive Poisson's ratio. In dynamical stability tests based on calculated phonon spectra of these pentagonal monolayers, we find that only p-graphene and p-B{sub 2}N{sub 4} are stable, but p-AgN{sub 3} and p-B{sub 4}N{sub 2} are vulnerable against vibrational excitations.

  18. MQWs InGaN/GaN LED with embedded micro-mirror array in the epitaxial-lateral-overgrowth gallium nitride for light extraction enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Yang; Ku, Hao-Min; Liao, Chen-Zi; Chao, Shiuh

    2010-05-10

    Multi-quantum wells (MQWs) InGaN/GaN LEDs, 300 microm x 300 microm chip size, were fabricated with Ta(2)O(5) / SiO(2) dielectric multi-layer micro-mirror array (MMA) embedded in the epitaxiallateral- overgrowth (ELOG) gallium nitride (GaN) on the c-plane sapphire substrate. MQWs InGaN/GaN LEDs with ELOG embedded patterned SiO(2) array (P-SiO(2)) of the same dimension as the MMA were also fabricated for comparison. Dislocation density was reduced for the ELOG samples. 75.2% light extraction enhancement for P-SiO(2)-LED and 102.6% light extraction enhancement for MMA-LED were obtained over the standard LED. We showed that multiple-diffraction with high intensity from the MMA redirected the trap lights to escape from the LED causing the light extraction enhancement.

  19. The Durability of Various Crucible Materials for Aluminum Nitride Crystal growth by Sublimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu,B.; Edgar, J.; Gu, Z.; Zhuang, D.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Sarua, A.; Kuball, M.; Meyer, H.

    2004-01-01

    Producing high purity aluminum nitride crystals by the sublimation-recondensation technique is difficult due to the inherently reactive crystal growth environment, normally at temperature in excess of 2100 C. The durability of the furnace fixture materials (crucibles, retorts, etc.) at such a high temperature remains a critical problem. In the present study, the suitability of several refractory materials for AlN crystal growth is investigated, including tantalum carbide, niobium carbide, tungsten, graphite, and hot-pressed boron nitride. The thermal and chemical properties and performance of these materials in inert gas, as well as under AlN crystal growth conditions are discussed. TaC and NbC are the most stable crucible materials with very low elemental vapor pressures in the crystal growth system. Compared with refractory material coated graphite crucibles, HPBN crucible is better for AlN self-seeded growth, as crystals tend to nucleate in thin colorless platelets with low dislocation density.

  20. Crystal structure of the ternary semiconductor compound thallium gallium sulfide, TlGaS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, G.E. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)]. E-mail: gerzon@ula.ve; Mora, A.J. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Perez, F.V. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad del Zulia, Zulia (Venezuela); Gonzalez, J. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)

    2007-04-01

    Thallium gallium sulfide, TlGaS{sub 2}, a semiconductor compound, was prepared by solid-state reaction technique. Its crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This material crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group C2/c (No. 15), Z=16 and unit cell parameters a=10.2990(8)A, b=10.2840(8)A, c=15.1750(18)A, {beta}=99.603(4){sup o}. The structural refinement converged to R(F)=0.0999, R(F{sup 2})=0.0764 and S=1.067. The structure consists of a three-dimensional arrangement of distorted TlS{sub 8} and GaS{sub 4} polyhedrons. Four GaS{sub 4} tetrahedra form adamantine-like units of the type Ga{sub 4}S{sub 10}, which in turn connect through the corners forming layers that run along the [100] direction.

  1. Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisielowski, Christian K.; Rubin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

  2. A modification of Eu incorporation sites by the dissociation of hydrogen defect complexes in Mg co-doped Eu doped gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brandon; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Dierolf, Volkmar

    2013-03-01

    Europium doped gallium nitride (Eu:GaN) is a promising candidate as a material for red LEDs that can monolithically be integrated with existing nitride based lighting technology. Photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) studies have revealed, however, that the majority incorporation environment (site) for the Eu is not efficiently excited by electron hole pairs. To improve this efficiency, Mg was co-doped into Eu:GaN during metal organic chemical vapor deposition and multiple new incorporation environments were discovered. These new sites show a high efficiency at room temperature and have been attributed to the coupling of a Mg-H complex to the majority Eu site. However, we also observe that sustained electron beam irradiation produced a semi-permanent change in the CL spectra of the sample. It was demonstrated that this change occurs in two distinct steps which exhibit a pronounced temperature dependence. Our observations point toward a dynamic system in which the Mg-H bond is broken and the hydrogen moves within the epi-layer. Details of this behavior will be discussed.

  3. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  4. Preparation of Crystallized Carbon Nitride Based on Microwave Plasma CVD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masatoshi INOUE; Yukihiro SAKAMOTO; Matsufumi TAKAYA

    2010-01-01

    ... on. To obtain this material, generally CH4 is used as a carbon source. Therefore, to make clear the effects of the reaction gas on the preparation of carbon nitride, we tried to use C2H4 as a carbon source instead of CH4...

  5. Tungsten Incorporation into Gallium Oxide: Crystal Structure, Surface and Interface Chemistry, Thermal Stability and Interdiffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, E. J.; Mates, T. E.; Manandhar, S.; Nandasiri, M.; Shutthanandan, V.; Ramana, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten (W) incorporated gallium oxide (Ga2O3) (GWO) thin films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron co-sputtering of W-metal and Ga2O3-ceramic targets. Films were produced by varying sputtering power applied to the W-target in order to achieve variable W-content (0-12 at%) into Ga2O3 while substrate temperature was kept constant at 500 °C. Chemical composition, chemical valence states, microstructure and crystal structure of as-deposited and annealed GWO films were evaluated as a function of W-content. The structural and chemical analyses indicate that the samples deposited without any W-incorporation are stoichiometric, nanocrystalline Ga2O3 films, which crystallize in β-phase monoclinic structure. While GWO films also crystallize in monoclinic β-Ga2O3 phase, W-incorporation induces surface amorphization as revealed by structural studies. The chemical valence state of Ga ions probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses is characterized by the highest oxidation state i.e., Ga3+. No changes in Ga chemical state are noted for variable W-incorporation in the range of 0-12 at%. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analyses indicate the uniform distribution of W-content in the GWO films. However, XPS analyses indicate the formation of mixed valence states for W ions, which may be responsible for surface amorphization in GWO films. GWO films were stable up to 900 oC, at which point thermally induced secondary phase (W-oxide) formation was observed. A transition to mesoporous structure coupled with W interdiffusion occurs due to thermal annealing as derived from the chemical analyses at the GWO films’ surface as well as depth-profiling towards the GWO-Si interface. A model has been formulated to account for the mechanism of W-incorporation, thermal stability and interdiffusion via pore formation in GWO films.

  6. Optical properties of pure and Ce{sup 3+} doped gadolinium gallium garnet crystals and epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syvorotka, I.I. [Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Sugak, D. [Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12, S. Bandera Street, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Wierzbicka, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Wittlin, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, ul. Dewajtis 5, 01-815 Warsaw (Poland); Przybylińska, H. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Barzowska, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Gdańsk University, ul. Wita Stwosza 57, Gdańsk (Poland); Barcz, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Berkowski, M.; Domagała, J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Mahlik, S.; Grinberg, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Gdańsk University, ul. Wita Stwosza 57, Gdańsk (Poland); Ma, Chong-Geng [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); and others

    2015-08-15

    Results of X-ray diffraction and low temperature optical absorption measurements of cerium doped gadolinium gallium garnet single crystals and epitaxial layers are reported. In the region of intra-configurational 4f–4f transitions the spectra of the bulk crystals exhibit the signatures of several different Ce{sup 3+} related centers. Apart from the dominant center, associated with Ce substituting gadolinium, at least three other centers are found, some of them attributed to the so-called antisite locations of rare-earth ions in the garnet host, i.e., in the Ga positions. X-ray diffraction data prove lattice expansion of bulk GGG crystals due to the presence of rare-earth antisites. The concentration of the additional Ce-related centers in epitaxial layers is much lower than in the bulk crystals. However, the Ce-doped layers incorporate a large amount of Pb from flux, which is the most probable source of nonradiative quenching of Ce luminescence, not observed in crystals grown by the Czochralski method. - Highlights: • Ce{sup 3+} multicenters found in Gadolinium Gallium Garnet crystals and epitaxial layers. • High quality epitaxial layers of pure and Ce-doped GGG were grown. • Luminescence quenching of Ce{sup 3+} by Pb ions from flux detected in GGG epitaxial layers. • X-ray diffraction allows measuring the amount of the rare-earth antisites in GGG.

  7. Specific features of the formation of dislocation structure in gallium arsenide single crystals obtained by the Czochralski method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenteva, I. B.; Pugachev, B. V.; Pavlov, V. F.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Knyazev, C. N.; Yugova, T. G.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of the deviation of seed orientation from the [100] direction on the formation of a dislocation structure of gallium arsenide single crystals grown by the Czochralski method has been revealed. The intensive multiplication of dislocations and formation of a block structure occur at deviation by an angle of more than 3° in the region that is radially shifted to one of crystal sides. The linear density of dislocations in the walls changes from 1 × 104 cm-1 in low-angle boundaries to 6 × 104 cm-1 in subboundaries.

  8. Nitridation process effect on crystal structure and magnetic properties of TbCu7-type SmFe9 alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕彬彬; 于敦波; 张世荣; 罗阳; 靳金玲; 闫文龙; 李红卫

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nitridation process, i.e. temperature and time, on crystal structure and magnetic properties of SmFe9Nx inter-stitial compounds was systematically investigated. After nitridation treatment, nitrogen atoms were incorporated into SmFe9 alloys to form SmFe9Nx interstitial compounds, which increased the distance of Fe-Fe and enhanced Fe-Fe interaction. As a result, SmFe9Nx interstitial compounds had a higher Curie temperature and more excellent magnetic properties than SmFe9 alloys. The relationships between nitridation temperature, nitridation time, nitriding efficiency, magnetic properties and phase transition were researched. It could be concluded that nitriding efficiency was strongly associated with magnetic properties and phase transition at different tem-peratures. The nitriding efficiency also had a connection with magnetic properties under different time, while no obvious phase transi-tion was found during that process. By studying nitridation process under a series of temperatures and time in this experiment, a suit-able nitridation temperature (713 K) and an ideal length of nitridation time (8 h) was decided, which would produce the optimal mag-netic behavior of SmFe9Nx interstitial compounds.

  9. Gallium vacancy complexes as a cause of Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in III-nitride light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Cyrus E.; Alkauskas, Audrius; Lyons, John L.; Speck, James S.; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a mechanism by which complexes between gallium vacancies and oxygen and/or hydrogen act as efficient channels for nonradiative recombination in InGaN alloys. Our identification is based on first-principles calculations of defect formation energies, charge-state transition levels, and nonradiative capture coefficients for electrons and holes. The dependence of these quantities on alloy composition is analyzed. We find that modest concentrations of the proposed defect complexes (˜1016 cm-3) can give rise to Shockley-Read-Hall coefficients A =(107-109) s-1. The resulting nonradiative recombination would significantly reduce the internal quantum efficiency of optoelectronic devices.

  10. Effect of nitrogen doping on the structural, optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering for gallium nitride light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lifei; Cheng, Guoan; Wang, Hougong; Wu, Yulong; Zheng, Ruiting; Ding, Peijun

    2017-01-01

    The indium tin oxide (ITO) films are prepared by the direct current magnetron sputtering technology with an ITO target in a mixture of argon and nitrogen gas at room temperature. The blue transmittance at 455 nm rises from 63% to 83% after nitrogen doping. The resistivity of the ITO film reduces from 4.6 × 10-3 (undoped film) to 5.7 × 10-4 Ω cm (N-doped film). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data imply that the binding energy of the In3d5/2 peak is declined 0.05 eV after nitrogen doping. The high resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the nitrogen loss density of the GaN/ITO interface with N-doped ITO film is smaller than that of the GaN/ITO interface with undoped ITO film. The forward turn-on voltage of gallium nitride light emitting diode reduces by 0.5 V after nitrogen doping. The fabrication of the N-doped ITO film is conducive to modify the N component of the interface between GaN and ITO layer.

  11. Fabrication of conducting-filament-embedded indium tin oxide electrodes: application to lateral-type gallium nitride light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-11-02

    A novel conducting filament (CF)-embedded indium tin oxide (ITO) film is fabricated using an electrical breakdown method. To assess the performance of this layer as an ohmic contact, it is applied to GaN (gallium nitride) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a p-type electrode for comparison with typical GaN LEDs using metallic ITO. The operating voltage and output power of the LED with the CF embedded ITO are 3.93 V and 8.49 mW, respectively, at an injection current of 100 mA. This is comparable to the operating voltage and output power of the conventionally fabricated LEDs using metallic ITO (3.93 V and 8.43 mW). Moreover, the CF-ITO LED displays uniform and bright light emission indicating excellent current injection and spreading. These results suggest that the proposed method of forming ohmic contacts is at least as effective as the conventional method.

  12. Effects of post-deposition annealing ambient on band alignment of RF magnetron-sputtered Y2O3 film on gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Hock Jin; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2013-01-29

    The effects of different post-deposition annealing ambients (oxygen, argon, forming gas (95% N2 + 5% H2), and nitrogen) on radio frequency magnetron-sputtered yttrium oxide (Y2O3) films on n-type gallium nitride (GaN) substrate were studied in this work. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to extract the bandgap of Y2O3 and interfacial layer as well as establishing the energy band alignment of Y2O3/interfacial layer/GaN structure. Three different structures of energy band alignment were obtained, and the change of band alignment influenced leakage current density-electrical breakdown field characteristics of the samples subjected to different post-deposition annealing ambients. Of these investigated samples, ability of the sample annealed in O2 ambient to withstand the highest electric breakdown field (approximately 6.6 MV/cm) at 10-6 A/cm2 was related to the largest conduction band offset of interfacial layer/GaN (3.77 eV) and barrier height (3.72 eV).

  13. Characterization of the Absolute Crystal Polarity across Twin Boundaries in Gallium Phosphide Using Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen; McKernan; Carter

    1999-05-01

    : The measurement of absolute crystal polarity is crucial to understanding the structural properties of many planar defects in compound semiconductors. Grain boundaries, including twin boundaries, in the sphalerite lattice are uniquely characterized by the crystallographic misorientation of individual grains and the direction of the crystal polarity in domains adjoining the grain boundary. To evaluate crystal polarity in gallium phosphide (GaP), asymmetrical interference contrast in convergent-beam electron-diffraction (CBED) patterns was used to ascertain the nature and direction of polar bonds. The direction of the asymmetry in the electron diffraction reflections was correlated with the crystal polarity of a sample with known polarity. The CBED technique was applied to determine the polar orientation of grains adjoining Sigma = 3 coherent and lateral twin boundaries in polycrystalline GaP.

  14. Crystallization behavior of three-dimensional silica fiber reinforced silicon nitride composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gongjin; Zhang, Changrui; Hu, Haifeng; Cao, Feng; Wang, Siqing; Jiang, Yonggang; Li, Bin

    2005-10-01

    The crystallization behavior of a new type of ceramic matrix composites, three-dimensional silica fiber reinforced silicon nitride matrix composite prepared by perhydropolysilazane infiltration and pyrolysis, was investigated by X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. With the post-annealing treatment of the amorphous as-received composite at elevated tempertures of 1400 and 1600 °C in nitrogen atmosphere, there was remarkable suppression of the crystallization of polymer-derived silicon nitride ceramic matrix into α-Si 3N 4 and silica fibers into α-cristobalite, which was probably attributed to the phase of silicon oxynitrides originating from the strong fiber/matrix interfacial chemical reaction.

  15. Embedded Photonic Crystals in Gallium Nitride: MOCVD Growth and LED Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Jason Michael

    For a few years, a new wind measurement instrument has been competing with standard cup anemometers: wind LiDARs. Despite numerous advantages such as ease of deployment and the possibility to scan at multiple heights simultaneously, the performances of this instrument over complex terrain are still a matter of debate. This is mainly due to the flow homogeneity assumption made by the remote sensor which leads to a positive or a negative bias. The objective of this work was to implement a method to evaluate LiDAR bias over complex terrain using OpenFOAM. To accomplish this task, a CFD model capable of dealing with complex terrain and sparse forest was developed in OpenFOAM v1.7. A RANS approach coupled with a modified k-epsilon turbulence model accounting for extra turbulence generated by the forest was used. To estimate LiDAR bias, the method proposed by Bingol et al. (2008) was implemented as a post-processing tool. First, a simple verification of the model was carried out by modeling neutrally stratified boundary layer. Apart from the usual overshoot of k in the near-wall cells, results agreed well with analytical solutions. Then, the modifications brought to the solver to account for the effects of forest were validated. In order to do so, flow over and within a dense forest was modeled and results were compared to experimental data of Amiro (1990) and numerical results of Dalpe and Masson (2008). An innovative top boundary condition totally independent of the forest displacement height developed by Lussier-Clement (2012) was also validated. The experiment showed that, in the presence of forest, imposing fixed values for U, k and epsilon at the top of the domain is not appropriate. The LiDAR bias post-processing algorithm was also validated for flow over an isolated Gaussian hill. The effects of the scanning height as well as the slope of the hill were investigated. For terrain slopes ranging from ˜25% to ˜43%, LiDAR bias ranging from 2% up to 10% was observed. The generalization of the method for large areas revealed to be particulary useful at showing the extant of the bias. Finally, a real case scenario was studied where a LiDAR was sited in the Gaspe peninsula on a complex and densely forested terrain. The assessment of the CFD model for this site firstly revealed the significant impact of both the location and nature of the inlet boundary condition. Then, the LiDAR bias was estimated with the help of OpenFOAM v1.7, MeteoDyn WT 4.0 and WAsP Engineering. Numerical results were compared to experimental data. Despite the presence of terrain complexity up to a distance of eight times the radius of the scanned disc around the remote sensor, very little error was observed, suggesting that the LiDAR is only affected by topographic variations closer to the scanned volume.

  16. N2 plasma etching processes of microscopic single crystals of cubic boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takahiro; Takami, Takuya; Yanase, Takashi; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2017-06-01

    We studied the N2 plasma etching of cubic boron nitride (cBN). We have developed experimental techniques for handling 200-µm-size single crystals for the preparation of surfaces with arbitrary crystal indexes, plasma processes, and surface analyses. We successfully prepared smooth surfaces of cBN with roughness smaller than 10 nm and found that the etching behavior was strongly influenced by the surface indexes. The morphology of the etched surfaces can be explained by the chemical stability of (111)B surfaces.

  17. Seebeck Coefficient Measurements on Micron-Size Single-Crystal Zinc Germanium Nitride Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, J. S.; Colvin, J. R.; Quayle, P. C.; Peshek, T. J.; Kash, K.

    2016-06-01

    II-IV-nitride compounds are tetrahedrally bonded, heterovalent ternary semiconductors that have recently garnered attention for their potential technological applications. These materials are derived from the parent III-nitride compounds; ZnGeN2 is the II-IV-nitride analogue to the III-nitride GaN. Very little is known about the transport properties of ZnGeN2. In this work, we present Seebeck coefficient ( S) data on 3-micron-diameter, 70-micron-long, single-crystal ZnGeN2 rods, employing a novel measurement approach. The measurements of S show that the majority free carriers are electrons, and imply that the carrier gas is degenerate. Within a single-band model for the conduction band, a carrier concentration of order 1019 cm-3 was estimated for a measured S = -90 μV/K. Together with electrical transport measurements, a lower limit for the electron mobility is estimated to be ˜20 cm2/V-s. A discussion of this material as a thermoelectric is presented. The background level of free electrons in this unintentionally doped ZnGeN2 is very near the predicted optimum value for maximum thermoelectric performance.

  18. Simulation of Transport Phenomena in Aluminum Nitride Single-Crystal Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, V F

    2002-04-03

    The goal of this project is to apply advanced computer-aided modeling techniques for simulating coupled radiation transfer present in the bulk growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) single-crystals. Producing and marketing high-quality single-crystals of AlN is currently the focus of Crystal IS, Inc., which is engaged in building a new generation of substrates for electronic and optical-electronic devices. Modeling and simulation of this company's proprietary innovative processing of AlN can substantially improve the understanding of physical phenomena, assist design, and reduce the cost and time of research activities. This collaborative work supported the goals of Crystal IS, Inc. in process scale-up and fundamental analysis with promising computational tools.

  19. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  20. Enhanced current transport and injection in thin-film gallium-nitride light-emitting diodes by laser-based doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Chung, Ho Young; Shin, Hee Woong; Lee, Byeong Ryong; Jeong, Tak; Park, Hyung Jo; Kim, Tae Geun

    2014-10-08

    This paper reports improvements in the electrical and optical properties of blue-emission gallium nitride (GaN)-based thin-film light-emitting diodes (TFLEDs) after laser-based Si doping (LBSD) of a nitrogen-face n-GaN (denoted as hereafter n-GaN) layer. Experimental results show that the light-output powers of the flat- and rough-surface TFLEDs after LBSD are 52.1 and 11.35% higher than those before LBSD, respectively, at a current of 350 mA, while the corresponding operating voltages are decreased by 0.22 and 0.28 V for the flat- and rough-surface TFLEDs after LBSD, respectively. The reduced operating voltage after LBSD of the top n-GaN layer may result from the remarkably decreased specific contact resistance at the metal/n-GaN interface and the low series resistance of the TFLED device. The LBSD of n-GaN increases the number of nitrogen vacancies, and Si substitutes for Ga (SiGa) at the metal/n-GaN interface to produce highly Si-doped regions in n-GaN, leading to a decrease in the Schottky barrier height and width. As a result, the specific contact resistances are significantly decreased to 1.56 × 10(-5) and 2.86 × 10(-5) Ω cm(2) for the flat- and rough-surface samples after LBSD, respectively. On the other hand, the increased light-output power after LBSD can be explained by the uniform current spreading, efficient current injection, and enhanced light scattering resulting from the low contact resistivity, low lateral current resistance, and additional textured surface, respectively. Furthermore, LBSD did not degrade the electrical properties of the TFLEDs owing to low reverse leakage currents. The results indicate that our approach could potentially enable high-efficiency and high-power capabilities for optoelectronic devices.

  1. Complete Stokes polarimetry of magneto-optical Faraday effect in a terbium gallium garnet crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Shaheen, Amrozia; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2013-10-21

    We report the complete determination of the polarization changes caused in linearly polarized incident light due to propagation in a magneto-optically active terbium gallium garnet (TGG) single crystal, at temperatures ranging from 6.3 to 300 K. A 28-fold increase in the Verdet constant of the TGG crystal is seen as its temperature decreases to 6.3 K. In contrast with polarimetry of light emerging from a Faraday material at room temperature, polarimetry at cryogenic temperatures cannot be carried out using the conventional fixed polarizer-analyzer technique because the assumption that ellipticity is negligible becomes increasingly invalid as temperature is lowered. It is shown that complete determination of light polarization in such a case requires the determination of its Stokes parameters, otherwise inaccurate measurements will result with negative implications for practical devices.

  2. Fabrication defects and grating couplers in III-nitride photonic crystal nanobeam lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Ian; Sánchez Arribas, Irene; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël.; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    We report a numerical and experimental investigation of fabrication tolerances and outcoupling in optically pumped III-nitride nanolasers operating near λ = 460 nm, in which feedback is provided by a one-dimensional photonic crystal nanobeam cavity and gain is supplied by a single InGaN/GaN quantum well. Using this platform, we and others previously demonstrated single-μW lasing thresholds due to the high βQ-product inherent to the nanobeam geometry (β is spontaneous emission coupling fraction into desired mode). In this work, we improved the fraction of emission emitted into our microscope's light cone by combining a redesigned photonic crystal cavity (c.f. [3]) with a cross-grating coupler with period approximately twice the photonic crystal lattice constant. The samples were fabricated in epitaxial III-nitride layers grown on (111) silicon substrates using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The photonic crystal and output couplers were patterned using a single electron beam lithography exposure and subsequently transferred to the underlying III-nitride layers using dry etching. The nanobeams were then suspended via vapor phase etching of silicon in XeF2. Scanning electron microscopy cross-sections revealed high-aspect ratio (>5), sub-70 nanometer diameter holes with near-vertical sidewalls. Fabrication-induced geometry errors were characterized by processing scanning electron micrographs with custom critical dimension software. Using UV micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy at room temperature, we measured the nanobeams' emission intensity, far-field profile, and quality factor. By comparing more than ten nominally identical nanobeams for each geometry with finite-difference time-domain simulations taking into account the geometrical deviations measured during fabrication, we characterized the role of fabrication-induced imperfections. Finally, we explored the trade-off between the quality factor and collected signal via lithographic variations of the output

  3. Nanopipe formation as a result of boron impurity segregation in gallium nitride grown by halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Taishi; Aoki, Yuko; Horibuchi, Kayo; Nakamura, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    The work reported herein demonstrated that nanopipes can be formed via a surfactant effect, in which boron impurities preferentially migrate to semipolar and nonpolar facets. Approximately 3 μm-thick GaN layers were grown using halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy. All layers grown in pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) crucibles were found to contain a high density of nanopipes in the range of 1010 to 1011 cm-2. The structural properties of these nanopipes were analyzed by X-ray rocking curve measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) tomography. The resulting 3DAP maps showed nanopipe-sized regions of boron segregation, and these nanopipes were not associated with the presence of dislocations. A mechanism for nanopipe formation was developed based on the role of boron as a surfactant and considering energy minima. A drastic reduction in the nanopipe density was achieved upon replacing the pBN crucibles with tantalum carbide-coated carbon crucibles. Consequently, we have confirmed that nanopipes can be formed solely due to surface energy changes induced by boron impurity surface segregation. For this reason, these results also indicate that nanopipes should be formed by other surfactant impurities such as Mg and Si.

  4. Observation of Transparency of Erbium-doped Silicon nitride in photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yiyang; Yerci, Selcuk; Li, Rui; Stevens, Martin J; Baek, Burm; Nam, Sae Woo; Negro, Luca Dal; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    One-dimensional nanobeam photonic crystal cavities are fabricated in an Er-doped amorphous silicon nitride layer. Photoluminescence from the cavities around 1.54 um is studied at cryogenic and room temperatures at different optical pump powers. The resonators demonstrate Purcell enhanced absorption and emission rates, also confirmed by time-resolved measurements. Resonances exhibit linewidth narrowing with pump power, signifying absorption bleaching and the onset of stimulated emission in the material at both 5.5 K and room temperature. We estimate from the cavity linewidths that Er has been pumped to transparency at the cavity resonance wavelength.

  5. Fabrication and Characterization of Vertical Gallium Nitride Power Schottky Diodes on Bulk GaN Substrates FY2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    crystal GaN substrate grown using the ammonothermal growth technique . To investigate the electrical performance of the SDs as a function of diode size...availability and use of high-quality native substrates, demonstrating an ideal route for achieving GaN-based device structures with low-threading dislocation...30 s on a hot plate and subsequently flood exposed for 8 s. After flood exposure, the sample was developed for 60 s in an AZ300 Metal Ion Free

  6. High-Efficiency Nitride-Base Photonic Crystal Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Speck; Evelyn Hu; Claude Weisbuch; Yong-Seok Choi; Kelly McGroddy; Gregor Koblmuller; Elison Matioli; Elizabeth Rangel; Fabian Rol; Dobri Simeonov

    2010-01-31

    The research activities performed in the framework of this project represent a major breakthrough in the demonstration of Photonic Crystals (PhC) as a competitive technology for LEDs with high light extraction efficiency. The goals of the project were to explore the viable approaches to manufacturability of PhC LEDS through proven standard industrial processes, establish the limits of light extraction by various concepts of PhC LEDs, and determine the possible advantages of PhC LEDs over current and forthcoming LED extraction concepts. We have developed three very different geometries for PhC light extraction in LEDs. In addition, we have demonstrated reliable methods for their in-depth analysis allowing the extraction of important parameters such as light extraction efficiency, modal extraction length, directionality, internal and external quantum efficiency. The information gained allows better understanding of the physical processes and the effect of the design parameters on the light directionality and extraction efficiency. As a result, we produced LEDs with controllable emission directionality and a state of the art extraction efficiency that goes up to 94%. Those devices are based on embedded air-gap PhC - a novel technology concept developed in the framework of this project. They rely on a simple and planar fabrication process that is very interesting for industrial implementation due to its robustness and scalability. In fact, besides the additional patterning and regrowth steps, the process is identical as that for standard industrially used p-side-up LEDs. The final devices exhibit the same good electrical characteristics and high process yield as a series of test standard LEDs obtained in comparable conditions. Finally, the technology of embedded air-gap patterns (PhC) has significant potential in other related fields such as: increasing the optical mode interaction with the active region in semiconductor lasers; increasing the coupling of the incident

  7. Quantification of scattering loss of III-nitride photonic crystal cavities in the blue spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Ian; Sánchez-Arribas, Irene; Shojiki, Kanako; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    The mechanisms contributing to experimental quality factors of short wavelength (λ =440 -480 nm) III-nitride on silicon one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities were quantified. Fluctuations in fundamental and first-order cavity mode wavelength and quality factor were compared over sets of nominally identical cavities. Unlike at λ =1.5 μ m , experimental quality factors were not limited by fabrication disorder modeled as smooth, normally distributed hole size and position variations; after ruling out absorption losses, additional scattering losses were found to predominate at short wavelengths. Experimental quality factors were sensitive to conformal deposition of few nanometer thin films on the photonic crystal surface, suggesting that the additional scattering losses were linked to the surface.

  8. Evaluation of the indium gallium nitride/silicon broken-gap heterojunction and its potential application for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan

    InGaN (especially In-rich alloy) has been actively studied for decades since the band gap of InN was revised downward from ˜2.0 eV to 0.64 eV. The potential applications for alloys of In-rich InGaN hence became apparent. Despite the promising potential, photovoltaic devices based on InGaN have struggled due to a number of key limitations and fundamental physical problems. Firstly, due to the deep excursion of the InN conduction band at the gamma point, defects in InN are almost universally n-type leading to unintentional degenerate doping. This also leads to the problem of electron accumulation at all surfaces and interfaces of InN. Secondly, p-type doping is problematic, partially due to the degenerate doping effect of defects, but it has also been observed that Mg-doping, while leading to a p-type layer, dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency. This thesis explores an alternative approach using n-type InGaN to form a heterojunction with a p-type Si substrate. One potential benefit to using p-type Si as a substrate material for InGaN is that the valence band of Si possibly lines up with the conduction band of InGaN for a specific mole fraction of indium. Such a band alignment is known as a broken gap heterojunction, an example of which is the interface between InAs and AlxGa 1--xSb. The benefits of this broken-gap junction include a low series resistance, high electron mobility, and mobility only weakly dependent on temperature. These properties enable new approach to photovoltaic devices. The InGaN/Si heterojunctions were fabricated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under stoichiometric flux conditions. An ultra-thin SiN interface layer was introduced, by Si nitridation process, to passivate the substrate surface and prevent In-Si and Ga-Si eutectic problems. InGaN films with a variety of indium mole fractions were grown by calibrating the In/Ga flux ratio during the deposition. The chemical composition of as-grown films was characterized by x

  9. Improvement of radiation stability of semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals by deposition of diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyui, N. I.; Lozinskii, V. B.; Liptuga, A. I.; Izotov, V. Yu.; Han, Wei; Liu, Bingbing

    2016-12-01

    We studied the properties of optical elements for the IR spectral range based on semi-insulating gallium arsenide (SI-GaAs) and antireflecting diamond-like carbon films (DLCF). Particular attention has been paid to the effect of penetrating γ-radiation on transmission of the developed optical elements. A Co60 source and step-by-step gaining of γ-irradiation dose were used for treatment of both an initial SI-GaAs crystal and DLCF/SI-GaAs structures. It was shown that DLCF deposition essentially increases degradation resistance of the SI-GaAs-based optical elements to γ-radiation. Particularly, the transmittance of the DLCF/SI-GaAs structure after γ-irradiation with a dose 9ṡ104 Gy even exceeds that of initial structures. The possible mechanism that explains the effect of γ-radiation on the SI-GaAs crystals and the DLCF/SI-GaAs structures at different irradiation doses was proposed. The effect of small doses is responsible for non-monotonic transmission changes in both SI-GaAs crystals and DLCF/SI-GaAs structures. At further increasing the γ-irradiation dose, the variation of properties of both DLCF and SI-GaAs crystal influences on the transmission of DLCF/SI-GaAs system. At high γ-irradiation dose 1.4ṡ105 Gy, passivation of radiation defects in the SI-GaAs bulk by hydrogen diffused from DLCF leads to increasing the degradation resistance of the SI-GaAs crystals coated with DLCF as compared with the crystals without DLCF.

  10. Negative Refraction with Superior Transmission in Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) Multilayer Hyper Crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Ayed Al Sayem; Md. Masudur Rahman; Mahdy, M. R. C.; Ifat Jahangir; Md. Saifur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we have theoretically investigated the performance of graphene-hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) multilayer structure (hyper crystal) to demonstrate all angle negative refraction along with superior transmission. hBN, one of the latest natural hyperbolic materials, can be a very strong contender to form a hyper crystal with graphene due to its excellence as a graphene-compatible substrate. Although bare hBN can exhibit negative refraction, the transmission is generally low due to...

  11. Measurement of the linear electro-optic tensor of cubic boron nitride single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Wang; Gang Jia; Xiuhuan Liu; Shipeng Chi; Jingcheng Zhu; Yanjun Gao; Pingwei Zhou; Zhanguo Chen

    2012-01-01

    The transverse electro-optic (EO) modulation system is built based on cubic boron nitride (cBN) single crystals unintentionally doped and synthesized at a high pressure and high temperature.The photoelectric output of the system includes two parts that can be measured respectively and the value of elements in the linear EO tensor of the cBN crystal can be obtained.This method does not need to measure the absolute light intensity.All of the surfaces of the tiny cBN crystals whose hardness is next to the hardest diamonds are {111} planes.The rectangular parallelepiped cBN samples are obtained by cleaving along {110} planes and subsequently grinding and polishing {112} planes of the tiny octahedral cBN flakes.Three identical non-zero elements of the EO tensor of the cBN crystal are measured via two sample configurations,and the measured results are very close,about 3.68 and 3.95 pm/V,respectively,which are larger than the linear EO coefficients of the general Ⅲ-Ⅴ compounds.

  12. Enhanced optical nonlinearities in CMOS-compatible ultra-silicon-rich nitride photonic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, E.; Ooi, K. J. A.; Chen, G. F. R.; Ng, D. K. T.; Png, C. E.; Tan, D. T. H.

    2017-09-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) on an ultra-silicon-rich nitride (USRN) platform, with the goal of augmenting the optical nonlinearities. The design goals are to achieve an optimized group index curve on the PhCW band edge with a non-membrane PhCW with symmetric SiO2 undercladding and overcladding, so as to maintain back-end CMOS compatibility and better structural robustness. Linear optical characterization, as well as nonlinear optical characterization of PhCWs on ultra-silicon-rich nitride is performed at the telecommunication wavelengths. USRN's negligible two-photon absorption and free carrier losses at the telecommunication wavelengths ensure that there is no scaling of two-photon related losses with the group index, thus maintaining a high nonlinear efficiency. Self-phase modulation experiments are performed using a 96.6 μm PhCW. A 1.5π phase shift is achieved with an input peak power of 2.5 W implying an effective nonlinear parameter of 1.97 × 104 (W m)-1. This nonlinear parameter represents a 49× enhancement in the nonlinear parameter from the slow light effect, in good agreement with expected scaling from the measured group index.

  13. Crystal structure and chemotherapeutic efficacy of the novel compound, gallium tetrachloride betaine, against breast cancer using nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Noaman, Eman; Kandil, Eman; Badawi, Abdelfattah; Mostafa, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor efficacy of a novel synthesized compound, betaine gallium-tetrachloride (BTG), alone or combined with ZnO-nanoparticles (BTG + ZnO-NPs) on the incidence of 7, 12-dimethylbenz-anthrathene-induced mammary tumor in female rats. Crystal and molecular structure of the prepared BTG were identified using X-ray crystallography. In vitro study revealed BTG more cytotoxic than BTG + ZnO-NPs on human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. In vivo study demonstrated that the blood antioxidant status of tumor-bearing rats (DMBA group) was significantly lower than normal noticeable by a significant decrease in GSH content, GPx, SOD, and CAT activities associated with a significantly high MDA content. Both treatments have significantly elevated SOD and CAT activities with a concomitant decrease of MDA level compared to DMBA group. However, BTG + ZnO-NPs accentuated the decrease of GSH regarding DMBA group. The results showed also that both treatments significantly activate caspase-3 enzyme and apoptosis in mammary glands. Their administration to tumor-bearing rats was found to significantly reduce plasma iron and iron-binding capacity (TIBC) compared to DMBA group. Regarding liver function, both treatments significantly reduced the increase of ALT and AST activities compared to DMBA group. However, BTG + ZnO-NPs decreased albumin below normal level. Histopathological studies showed that normalization of tissue structures was higher in BTG than BTG + ZnO-NPs treatment. According to the results obtained, it is observed that the antitumor effect of BTG alone was as strong as BTG + ZnO-NPs and even more efficient in some aspects accordingly, a combination is not needed. Thus, the novel synthetic gallium derivatives may potentially present a new hope for the development of breast cancer therapeutics, which should attract further scientific and pharmaceutical interest.

  14. Point defects and electric compensation in gallium arsenide single crystals; Punktdefekte und elektrische Kompensation in Galliumarsenid-Einkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzer, Ulrich

    2007-12-10

    In the present thesis the point-defect budget of gallium arsenide single crystals with different dopings is studied. It is shown, in which way the concentration of the single point defects depende on the concentration of the dopants, the stoichiometry deviation, and the position of the Fermi level. For this serve the results of the measurement-technical characterization of a large number of samples, in the fabrication of which these parameters were directedly varied. The main topic of this thesis lies in the development of models, which allow a quantitative description of the experimentally studied electrical and optical properties of gallium arsenide single crystals starting from the point-defect concentrations. Because from point defects charge carriers can be set free, their concentration determines essentially the charge-carrier concentration in the bands. In the ionized state point defects act as scattering centers for free charge carriers and influence by this the drift mobility of the charge carriers. A thermodynamic modeling of the point-defect formation yields statements on the equilibrium concentrations of the point defects in dependence on dopant concentration and stoichiometry deviation. It is show that the electrical properties of the crystals observed at room temperature result from the kinetic suppression of processes, via which the adjustment of a thermodynamic equilibrium between the point defects is mediated. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird der Punktdefekthaushalt von Galliumarsenid-Einkristallen mit unterschiedlichen Dotierungen untersucht. Es wird gezeigt, in welcher Weise die Konzentration der einzelnen Punktdefekte von der Konzentration der Dotierstoffe, der Stoechiometrieabweichung und der Lage des Ferminiveaus abhaengen. Dazu dienen die Ergebnisse der messtechnischen Charakterisierung einer grossen Anzahl von Proben, bei deren Herstellung diese Parameter gezielt variiert wurden. Der Schwerpunkt der Arbeit liegt in der Entwicklung

  15. Efficient single photon emission from a high-purity hexagonal boron nitride crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, L. J.; Pelini, T.; Waselowski, V.; Maze, J. R.; Gil, B.; Cassabois, G.; Jacques, V.

    2016-09-01

    Among a variety of layered materials used as building blocks in van der Waals heterostructures, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) appears as an ideal platform for hosting optically active defects owing to its large band gap (˜6 eV ). Here we study the optical response of a high-purity hBN crystal under green laser illumination. By means of photon correlation measurements, we identify individual defects emitting a highly photostable fluorescence under ambient conditions. A detailed analysis of the photophysical properties reveals a high quantum efficiency of the radiative transition, leading to a single photon source with very high brightness (˜4 ×106 counts s-1). These results illustrate how the wide range of applications offered by hBN could be further extended to photonic-based quantum information science and metrology.

  16. Photonic crystal dumbbell resonators in silicon and aluminum nitride integrated optical circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pernice, W H P; Tang, H X

    2014-01-01

    Tight confinement of light in photonic cavities provides an efficient template for the realization of high optical intensity with strong field gradients. Here we present such a nanoscale resonator device based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal slot cavity. Our design allows for realizing highly localized optical modes with theoretically predicted Q factors in excess of 106. The design is demonstrated experimentally both in a high-contrast refractive index system (silicon), as well as in medium refractive index contrast devices made from aluminum nitride. We achieve extinction ratio of 21dB in critically coupled resonators using an on-chip readout platform with loaded Q factors up to 33,000. Our approach holds promise for realizing ultra-small opto-mechanical resonators for high-frequency operation and sensing applications.

  17. Fabrication and secondary-phase crystallization of rare-earth disilicate-silicon nitride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinibulk, M.K.; Thomas, G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Center for Advanced Materials); Johnson, S.M. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Materials Research Lab.)

    1992-08-01

    In this paper, the fabrication and intergranular-phase devitrification of silicon nitride densified with rare-earth (RE) oxide additives is investigated. The additions of the oxides of Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, and Yb, having high melting points and behaving similarly to Y[sub 2]O[sub 3], were compositionally controlled to tailor a microstructure with a crystalline secondary phase of RE[sub 2]Si[sub 2]O[sub 7]. The lanthanide oxides were found to be ass effective as Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] in densifying Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], resulting in identical microstructures and densities of 98-99% of theoretical density. The crystallization behavior of all six disilicates was similar, characterized by a limited nucleation and rapid growth mechanism resulting in large single crystals. Complete crystallization of the intergranular phase was obtained with the exception of a thin residual amorphous film which was observed at interfaces and believed to be rich in impurities, the cause of incomplete devitrification.

  18. Discovery of earth-abundant nitride semiconductors by computational screening and high-pressure synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinuma, Yoyo; Hatakeyama, Taisuke; Kumagai, Yu; Burton, Lee A; Sato, Hikaru; Muraba, Yoshinori; Iimura, Soshi; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Tanaka, Isao; Hosono, Hideo; Oba, Fumiyasu

    2016-06-21

    Nitride semiconductors are attractive because they can be environmentally benign, comprised of abundant elements and possess favourable electronic properties. However, those currently commercialized are mostly limited to gallium nitride and its alloys, despite the rich composition space of nitrides. Here we report the screening of ternary zinc nitride semiconductors using first-principles calculations of electronic structure, stability and dopability. This approach identifies as-yet-unreported CaZn2N2 that has earth-abundant components, smaller carrier effective masses than gallium nitride and a tunable direct bandgap suited for light emission and harvesting. High-pressure synthesis realizes this phase, verifying the predicted crystal structure and band-edge red photoluminescence. In total, we propose 21 promising systems, including Ca2ZnN2, Ba2ZnN2 and Zn2PN3, which have not been reported as semiconductors previously. Given the variety in bandgaps of the identified compounds, the present study expands the potential suitability of nitride semiconductors for a broader range of electronic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

  19. Discovery of earth-abundant nitride semiconductors by computational screening and high-pressure synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinuma, Yoyo; Hatakeyama, Taisuke; Kumagai, Yu; Burton, Lee A.; Sato, Hikaru; Muraba, Yoshinori; Iimura, Soshi; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Tanaka, Isao; Hosono, Hideo; Oba, Fumiyasu

    2016-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors are attractive because they can be environmentally benign, comprised of abundant elements and possess favourable electronic properties. However, those currently commercialized are mostly limited to gallium nitride and its alloys, despite the rich composition space of nitrides. Here we report the screening of ternary zinc nitride semiconductors using first-principles calculations of electronic structure, stability and dopability. This approach identifies as-yet-unreported CaZn2N2 that has earth-abundant components, smaller carrier effective masses than gallium nitride and a tunable direct bandgap suited for light emission and harvesting. High-pressure synthesis realizes this phase, verifying the predicted crystal structure and band-edge red photoluminescence. In total, we propose 21 promising systems, including Ca2ZnN2, Ba2ZnN2 and Zn2PN3, which have not been reported as semiconductors previously. Given the variety in bandgaps of the identified compounds, the present study expands the potential suitability of nitride semiconductors for a broader range of electronic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications. PMID:27325228

  20. Synthesis of a mixed-valent tin nitride and considerations of its possible crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Christopher M; Holder, Aaron; Shulda, Sarah; Christensen, Steven T; Diercks, David; Schwartz, Craig P; Biagioni, David; Nordlund, Dennis; Kukliansky, Alon; Natan, Amir; Prendergast, David; Orvananos, Bernardo; Sun, Wenhao; Zhang, Xiuwen; Ceder, Gerbrand; Ginley, David S; Tumas, William; Perkins, John D; Stevanovic, Vladan; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Lany, Stephan; Richards, Ryan M; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-04-14

    Recent advances in theoretical structure prediction methods and high-throughput computational techniques are revolutionizing experimental discovery of the thermodynamically stable inorganic materials. Metastable materials represent a new frontier for these studies, since even simple binary non-ground state compounds of common elements may be awaiting discovery. However, there are significant research challenges related to non-equilibrium thin film synthesis and crystal structure predictions, such as small strained crystals in the experimental samples and energy minimization based theoretical algorithms. Here, we report on experimental synthesis and characterization, as well as theoretical first-principles calculations of a previously unreported mixed-valent binary tin nitride. Thin film experiments indicate that this novel material is N-deficient SnN with tin in the mixed ii/iv valence state and a small low-symmetry unit cell. Theoretical calculations suggest that the most likely crystal structure has the space group 2 (SG2) related to the distorted delafossite (SG166), which is nearly 0.1 eV/atom above the ground state SnN polymorph. This observation is rationalized by the structural similarity of the SnN distorted delafossite to the chemically related Sn3N4 spinel compound, which provides a fresh scientific insight into the reasons for growth of polymorphs of metastable materials. In addition to reporting on the discovery of the simple binary SnN compound, this paper illustrates a possible way of combining a wide range of advanced characterization techniques with the first-principle property calculation methods, to elucidate the most likely crystal structure of the previously unreported metastable materials.

  1. Synthesis of a mixed-valent tin nitride and considerations of its possible crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Christopher M.; Holder, Aaron; Shulda, Sarah; Christensen, Steven T.; Diercks, David; Schwartz, Craig P.; Biagioni, David; Nordlund, Dennis; Kukliansky, Alon; Natan, Amir; Prendergast, David; Orvananos, Bernardo; Sun, Wenhao; Zhang, Xiuwen; Ceder, Gerbrand; Ginley, David S.; Tumas, William; Perkins, John D.; Stevanovic, Vladan; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Lany, Stephan; Richards, Ryan M.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in theoretical structure prediction methods and high-throughput computational techniques are revolutionizing experimental discovery of the thermodynamically stable inorganic materials. Metastable materials represent a new frontier for these studies, since even simple binary non-ground state compounds of common elements may be awaiting discovery. However, there are significant research challenges related to non-equilibrium thin film synthesis and crystal structure predictions, such as small strained crystals in the experimental samples and energy minimization based theoretical algorithms. Here, we report on experimental synthesis and characterization, as well as theoretical first-principles calculations of a previously unreported mixed-valent binary tin nitride. Thin film experiments indicate that this novel material is N-deficient SnN with tin in the mixed ii/iv valence state and a small low-symmetry unit cell. Theoretical calculations suggest that the most likely crystal structure has the space group 2 (SG2) related to the distorted delafossite (SG166), which is nearly 0.1 eV/atom above the ground state SnN polymorph. This observation is rationalized by the structural similarity of the SnN distorted delafossite to the chemically related Sn3N4 spinel compound, which provides a fresh scientific insight into the reasons for growth of polymorphs of metastable materials. In addition to reporting on the discovery of the simple binary SnN compound, this paper illustrates a possible way of combining a wide range of advanced characterization techniques with the first-principle property calculation methods, to elucidate the most likely crystal structure of the previously unreported metastable materials.

  2. CCDC 1477678: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (1,3-dimesitylimidazolidin-2-ylidene)-trimethyl-gallium

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  3. Synthesis of Gallium Nitride Nanowire Bundles Using Carbon Nanotubes as Template%基于碳纳米管模板的氮化镓纳米线束合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严晗; 刘胜; 甘志银; 宋晓辉; 徐静平

    2009-01-01

    通过金属有机物化学气相沉积方法在碳纳米管模板上生长氮化镓纳米线束.对所生长的纳米结构进行了扫描电镜和X射线能谱分析,结果显示氮化镓纳米晶体可以与碳纳米管形成纳米线束状复合物.纳米线柬状复合物直径为100~200 nm,长度为1.5~2.5 μm,纳米线的两端呈现尖角状.由于氨气很容易吸附在碳纳米管表面.可知所获得的纳米结构的初始生长机制为碳纳米管的表面氮化.该研究也证明金属有机物化学气相沉积将是用于制造化合物纳米结构材料的一项有效的技术.%Template growth of gallium nitride nanowires was demonstrated by metal organic chemical va-por deposition (MOCVD) with carbon nanotubes as templates in this paper. The fabricated nanostruc-tures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrosco-py (EDX). The results reveal that gallium nitride nanocrystals are grown on carbon nanotubes in the form of composite nanowire bundles. The composite nanowire bundles are 100-200 nm thick with typical lengths of 1.5-2.5 μm, while there is a shape with a slight tapering toward the tip of the wire. The growth mechanism of the obtained nanostructures is initiated by nitridation of carbon nanotube surfaces, due to the fact that ammonia is easily adsorbed on carbon nanotube surface. MOCVD is also suggested to be an effective technology for the fabrication of compound nanostructure material in the future.

  4. Poly-crystalline thin-film by aluminum induced crystallization on aluminum nitride substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopal, Muhammad Fahad; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-09-01

    Thin-film polycrystalline silicon ( pc-Si) on foreign (non-silicon) substrates has been researched by various research groups for the production of photovoltaic cells. High quality pc-Si deposition on foreign substrates with superior optical properties is considered to be the main hurdle in cell fabrication. Metal induced crystallization (MIC) is one of the renowned techniques used to produce this quality of material. In the current study, an aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method was adopted to produce pc-Si thin-film on aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate by a seed layer approach. Aluminum and a-Si layer were deposited using an e-beam evaporator. Various annealing conditions were used in order to investigate the AIC grown pc-Si seed layers for process optimization. The effect of thermal annealing on grain size, defects preferentially crystallographic orientation of the grains were analyzed. Surface morphology was studied using an optical microscope. Poly-silicon film with a crystallinity fraction between 95-100% and an FWHM between 5-6 cm-1 is achievable at low temperatures and for short time intervals. A grain size of about 10 micron can be obtained at a low deposition rate on an AIN substrate. Similarly, Focused ion beam (FIB) also showed that at 425 °C sample B and at 400 °C sample A were fully crystallized. The crystalline quality of pc-Si was evaluated using μ-Raman spectroscopy as a function of annealed conditions and Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to determine the phase direction of the pc-Si layer. The current study implicates that a poly-silicon layer with good crystallographic orientation and crystallinity fraction is achievable on AIN substrate at low temperatures and short time frames.

  5. Effect of X-radiation on single crystals of gallium and indium monoselenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akopyan, R.A.; Zhuravlev, V.M. (Moskovskij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Tekhniki (USSR))

    1983-06-01

    InSe and GaSe monocrystals doped with lead reveal considerable sensitivity to 0.1-0.5 A x radiation. The relation well describing the effect of x radiation on these single crystals is proposed. The prevailing mechanism of the effect is photoelectric absorption on k shells of component atoms.

  6. Continuous and discontinuous precipitation in Fe-1 at.%Cr-1 at.%Mo alloy upon nitriding; crystal structure and composition of ternary nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Tobias; Ramudu Meka, Sai; Rheingans, Bastian; Bischoff, Ewald; Waldenmaier, Thomas; Yeli, Guma; Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-05-01

    The internal nitriding response of a ternary Fe-1 at.%Cr-1 at.%Mo alloy, which serves as a model alloy for many CrMo-based steels, was investigated. The nitrides developing upon nitriding were characterised by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The developed nitrides were shown to be (metastable) ternary mixed nitrides, which exhibit complex morphological, compositional and structural transformations as a function of nitriding time. Analogous to nitrided binary Fe-Cr and Fe-Mo alloys, in ternary Fe-Cr-Mo alloys initially continuous precipitation of fine, coherent, cubic, NaCl-type nitride platelets, here with the composition (Cr½,Mo½)N¾, occurs, with the broad faces of the platelets parallel to the {1 0 0}α-Fe lattice planes. These nitrides undergo a discontinuous precipitation reaction upon prolonged nitriding leading to the development of lamellae of a novel, hexagonal CrMoN2 nitride along {1 1 0}α-Fe lattice planes, and of spherical cubic, NaCl-type (Cr,Mo)Nx nitride particles within the ferrite lamellae. The observed structural and compositional changes of the ternary nitrides have been attributed to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints for the internal precipitation of (misfitting) nitrides in the ferrite matrix.

  7. Investigation on cubic boron nitride crystals doped with Si by high temperature thermal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlu; Feng, Shuang; Liu, Xiuhuan; Hou, Lixin; Gao, Yanjun; Wang, Qi; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Zhanguo; Zheng, Jie; Jia, Gang

    2014-07-01

    The method of high temperature thermal diffusion was successfully applied for doping Si impurities into cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystals. X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics at different temperatures were respectively used for analyzing the chemical states and the activation energy of Si impurity in cBN. According to the XPS results, Si impurities mainly replace B atoms bonding with the adjacent N atoms and become donors in cBN. Without surface cleaning, there are a lot of C and O contaminations on the surface of cBN, so a small quantity of C-Si and Si-N-O bonds also exist at the surface of cBN. Most Si impurities distribute in the shallow layer underneath the surface of cBN. Based on the electric measurement, Si impurities in cBN usually have the activation energy beyond 0.4 eV, and they can only be slightly ionized at room temperature, therefore the resistivity of Si-doped cBN is still high, and the space charge limited current becomes the main conductive mechanism in cBN. However, the conductivity of Si-doped cBN can rapidly increase with the temperature. In addition, the activation energy and the concentration of Si impurity in cBN can be affected by the temperature and the time of thermal diffusion, which needs to be verified further.

  8. Preparation and Crystal Structure of Lithium Nitride Chloride Li 4NCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Rupert

    1997-02-01

    Li4NCl was prepared from Li3N and dry OH-free LiCl at 450°C. It is found to be the more nitrogen-rich of two compounds in the quasi-binary system Li3-2xN1-xClx. Following unit cell indexing using laboratory X-ray powder data, the previously unknown structure of the title compound was solved from neutron powder diffraction data recorded using the flat-cone and powder diffractometer E2 at the Berlin BERII reactor. Li4NCl crystallizes in the hexagonal rhombohedral space groupRoverline3=m(No. 166),a=366.225(4),c=1977.18(4) pm with three formula units per unit cell. Its structure comprises a 1:1-ordering variant of a cubic close anion packing, N3-and Cl-forming layers perpendicular to [001]. Li atoms occupy all the triangular voids of the N layers and all the NCl3-tetrahedral holes. Nitrogen is in lithium nitride-like hexagonal bipyramidal coordination by Li, the equatorial six-membered ring being slightly puckered, while Cl is in distorted octahedral coordination. Calculation of the Madelung part of the lattice energy shows that the nitrogen hexagonal bipyramidal coordination polyhedron, peculiar for Li4NCl and the Li3N parent structure, is in agreement with a simple ionic picture and does not imply any covalent bonding.

  9. Synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles using mesoporous carbon nitride as reactive template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anna; Müller, Jens Oliver; Antonietti, Markus; Thomas, Arne

    2008-12-23

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride was used as both a nanoreactor and a reactant for the synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles. By infiltration of a mixture of two metal precursors into mesoporous carbon nitride, the pores act first as a nanoconfinement, generating amorphous mixed oxide nanoparticles. During heating and decomposition, the carbon nitride second acts as reactant or, more precisely, as a nitrogen source, which converts the preformed mixed oxide nanoparticles into the corresponding nitride (reactive templating). Using this approach, ternary metal nitride particles with diameters smaller 10 nm composed of aluminum gallium nitride (Al-Ga-N) and titanium vanadium nitride (Ti-V-N) were synthesized. Due to the confinement effect of the carbon nitride matrix, the composition of the resulting metal nitride can be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the preceding precursor solution. Thus, ternary metal nitride nanoparticles with continuously adjustable metal composition can be produced.

  10. Characteristics of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Shuang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Hou, Lixin, E-mail: houlixin_2000@126.com [College of Information and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, 2888 Xincheng Street, Changchun 130118 (China); Liu, Xiuhuan [College of Telecommunication Engineering, Jilin University, 5372 Nanhu Road, Changchun 130012 (China); Gao, Yanjun; Li, Xinlu; Wang, Qi [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Chen, Zhanguo, E-mail: czg@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Jia, Gang; Zheng, Jie [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The polarities of a kind of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystal were extensively investigated by microscopy, chemical etching, XPS, Raman scattering, and current–voltage measurements. The {1 1 1}B faces and {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces of the cBN samples can be easily distinguished by optical microscope as there are a lot of defects incorporate in {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N sectors serving as the color centers, while the {1 1 1}B sectors have less defects and are nearly colorless. Both XPS and Raman spectra also revealed the uneven distributions of N vacancies and substitutional impurities in cBN crystals. The determination of {1 1 1}B faces and {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces can also be verified by the results of the chemical etching because the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces have much faster etch rates than the {1 1 1}B faces. According to XPS, the {1 1 1}B faces have more C and O contaminations than the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces, however the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces have larger atomic ratio of B:N after surface cleaning by Ar{sup +} sputtering. In the Raman spectra of the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N sectors of cBN, several small broad infrared-active phonon bands emerge nearby TO and LO modes because of the disorder-activated Raman scattering. As for the {1 1 1}B sectors, this phenomenon disappears. In addition, the {1 1 1}B faces have much smaller leakage current than the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces, which indicates that the {1 1 1}B sectors have higher crystalline quality.

  11. Modifications of gallium phosphide single crystals using slow highly charged ions and swift heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, A. S.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Heller, R.; Akhmadaliev, Sh.; Schumann, E.; Sorokin, M.; Facsko, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2016-09-01

    GaP single crystals were irradiated with slow highly charged ions (HCI) using 114 keV 129Xe(33-40)+ and with various swift heavy ions (SHI) of 30 MeV I9+ and 374 MeV-2.2 GeV 197Au25+. The irradiated surfaces were investigated by scanning force microscopy (SFM). The irradiations with SHI lead to nanohillocks protruding from the GaP surfaces, whereas no changes of the surface topography were observed after the irradiation with HCI. This result indicates that a potential energy above 38.5 keV is required for surface nanostructuring of GaP. In addition, strong coloration of the GaP crystals was observed after irradiation with SHI. The effect was stronger for higher energies. This was confirmed by measuring an increased extinction coefficient in the visible light region.

  12. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D₀=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s⁻¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  13. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E. [Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation. (orig.)

  14. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E.

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation.

  15. The 3-5 semiconductor solid solution single crystal growth. [low gravity float zone growth experiments using gallium indium antimonides and cadmium tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques used for liquid and vapor phase epitaxy of gallium indium arsenide are described and the difficulties encountered are examined. Results show that the growth of bulk III-V solid solution single crystals in a low gravity environment will not have a major technological impact. The float zone technique in a low gravity environment is demonstrated using cadmium telluride. It is shown that this approach can result in the synthesis of a class of semiconductors that can not be grown in normal gravity because of growth problems rooted in the nature of their phase diagrams.

  16. Pressure-induced luminescence of cerium-doped gadolinium gallium garnet crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, A.; Duzynska, A.; Berkowski, M.; Trushkin, S.; Suchocki, A.

    2012-04-01

    Studies of the spectroscopic properties of Ce3+ dopant in bulk Gd3Ga5O12:Ce crystal under pressure are presented. In spite of strong intershell 4f→5d absorption bands at ambient pressure, the cerium luminescence in Gd3Ga5O12 is entirely quenched even at low temperature. It has been shown that applying pressure allows for recovery of the 5d→4f radiative transitions. Further increase of pressure improves the emission efficiency. This effect is analyzed in terms of two possible phenomena: (i) by pressure-induced electronic crossover of the excited 5d energy level of the Ce3+ with the conduction band bottom of the host crystal, and (ii) by decrease of electron-lattice coupling with increasing pressure, resulting in reduction of the Stokes shift and nonradiative transitions between the low vibrational levels of the 5d state and high vibrational levels of the ground 4f state. The results of high-pressure absorption and luminescence measurements point out that the ambient-pressure luminescence quenching is caused by the donor-like charge transfer processes due to the resonant location of the Ce3+ 5d electronic levels with respect to the host conduction band. In such a situation, the ionization of Ce3+ to Ce4+ occurs, accompanied by large lattice relaxation, which enables the nonradiative recombination to the Ce 4f state. The pressure-induced approach of the conduction-band bottom of the host crystal by the excited 5d energy level of the Ce3+ results in mixing between conduction band states and the 5d state, and the broadband luminescence from this mixed state is observed at pressures from 30 up to about 60 kbar. Then, for pressures exceeding 60 kbar, this luminescence is replaced by the classic Ce3+5d→4f transitions. Using a simple anticrossing model and configuration coordinate model in the appropriate pressure range, quantitative description of the system has been carried out, and the pressure-induced decrease of electron-lattice coupling has been shown.

  17. Crystal structure and electronic properties of the new structure dinitride-nitride N{sub 2}MN (M: Cu, Ag)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, Yuriy [Physical Faculty, Department of General Physics, Kemerovo State University, Red st. 6, 650043 Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Lisitsyn, Viktor; Morozova, Yelena [Department of Lasers and Lighting Engineering, Institute of High Technology Physics, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av. 30, 634030 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15

    Copper and nitrogen compounds and silver and nitrogen compounds have been researched with the first-principle linear combination of the atomic orbitals in full-screen basis with the local gradient and hybrid potential of the density functional theory (DFT) realized in the CRYSTAL09 program code. We have found the structural N{sub 2}MN (M: Cu, Ag) dinitride-nitride phase having an orthorhombic structure, the spatial group of the Ibam symmetry and four formula units in the primitive cell that have not been reported before. The structure was found to be layered, the metal atoms are linearly circled by the nitride N atoms, whereas, the other two atoms make a molecule with a small negative charge of {proportional_to}0.02 e. The volume elastic modules in N{sub 2}CuN, N{sub 2}AgN crystals are equal to 4.3 and 6.6 GPa, respectively, and their pressure derivatives are equal to 6.7 and 5.3, respectively. The electron energy spectrum makes a superposition of weakly interacting molecular states of N{sub 2} and metal states of MN. The bandgap width equals {proportional_to}0.05 eV. The estimations of the enthalpy energies show that N{sub 2}MN possess large energy content and in its decomposition into metal and gaseous nitride the energy release can reach 8 eV cell{sup -1}, which appears to be higher than that in the known metal azides. Thus, the new structure of the dinitride-nitride N{sub 2}MN combines the properties of molecular and semiconductor crystals: high compressibility, strong mechanical anisotropy, localized vacant states in the zone spectrum, and small bandgap. The unique physical properties can ensure their application as energy materials, the source of chemically pure nitride, and in semiconductor and optical material science. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. XPS analysis for cubic boron nitride crystal synthesized under high pressure and high temperature using Li{sub 3}N as catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaofei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Ji’nan 250101 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); Xu, Bin, E-mail: xubin@sdjzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Ji’nan 250101 (China); Zhang, Wen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Ji’nan 250101 (China); Cai, Zhichao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); Wen, Zhenxing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Ji’nan 250101 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • The cBN was synthesized by Li{sub 3}N as catalyst under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT). • The film coated on the as-grown cBN crystals was studied by XPS. • The electronic structure variation in the film was investigated. • The growth mechanism of cubic boron nitride crystal was analyzed briefly. - Abstract: Cubic boron nitride (cBN) single crystals are synthesized with lithium nitride (Li3N) as catalyst under high pressure and high temperature. The variation of electronic structures from boron nitride of different layers in coating film on the cBN single crystal has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Combining the atomic concentration analysis, it was shown that from the film/cBN crystal interface to the inner, the sp{sup 2} fractions are decreasing, and the sp{sup 3} fractions are increasing in the film at the same time. Moreover, by transmission electron microscopy, a lot of cBN microparticles are found in the interface. For there is no Li{sub 3}N in the film, it is possible that Li{sub 3}N first reacts with hexagonal boron nitride to produce Li{sub 3}BN{sub 2} during cBN crystals synthesis under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT). Boron and nitrogen atoms, required for cBN crystals growth, could come from the direct conversion from hexagonal boron nitride with the catalysis of Li{sub 3}BN{sub 2} under high pressure and high temperature, but not directly from the decomposition of Li{sub 3}BN{sub 2}.

  19. Molybdenum Nitride Films: Crystal Structures, Synthesis, Mechanical, Electrical and Some Other Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jauberteau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Among transition metal nitrides, molybdenum nitrides have been much less studied even though their mechanical properties as well as their electrical and catalytic properties make them very attractive for many applications. The δ-MoN phase of hexagonal structure is a potential candidate for an ultra-incompressible and hard material and can be compared with c-BN and diamond. The predicted superconducting temperature of the metastable MoN phase of NaCl-B1-type cubic structure is the highest of all refractory carbides and nitrides. The composition of molybdenum nitride films as well as the structures and properties depend on the parameters of the process used to deposit the films. They are also strongly correlated to the electronic structure and chemical bonding. An unusual mixture of metallic, covalent and ionic bonding is found in the stoichiometric compounds.

  20. Characteristics of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuang; Hou, Lixin; Liu, Xiuhuan; Gao, Yanjun; Li, Xinlu; Wang, Qi; Chen, Zhanguo; Jia, Gang; Zheng, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The polarities of a kind of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystal were extensively investigated by microscopy, chemical etching, XPS, Raman scattering, and current-voltage measurements. The {1 1 1}B faces and {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces of the cBN samples can be easily distinguished by optical microscope as there are a lot of defects incorporate in {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N sectors serving as the color centers, while the {1 1 1}B sectors have less defects and are nearly colorless. Both XPS and Raman spectra also revealed the uneven distributions of N vacancies and substitutional impurities in cBN crystals. The determination of {1 1 1}B faces and {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces can also be verified by the results of the chemical etching because the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces have much faster etch rates than the {1 1 1}B faces. According to XPS, the {1 1 1}B faces have more C and O contaminations than the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces, however the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces have larger atomic ratio of B:N after surface cleaning by Ar+ sputtering. In the Raman spectra of the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N sectors of cBN, several small broad infrared-active phonon bands emerge nearby TO and LO modes because of the disorder-activated Raman scattering. As for the {1 1 1}B sectors, this phenomenon disappears. In addition, the {1 1 1}B faces have much smaller leakage current than the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces, which indicates that the {1 1 1}B sectors have higher crystalline quality.

  1. Experimental observation of optical bandgaps for surface electromagnetic waves in a periodically corrugated one-dimensional silicon nitride photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Michelotti, Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Dispersion curves of surface electromagnetic waves (SEWs) in 1D silicon nitride photonic crystals having periodic surface corrugations are considered. We experimentally demonstrate that a bandgap for SEWs can be obtained by fabricating a polymeric grating on the multilayered structure. Close to the boundary of the first Brillouin zone connected to the grating, we observe the splitting of the SEW dispersion curve into two separate branches and identify two regions of very low group velocity. The proper design of the structure allows the two folded branches to lie beyond the light line in a wide spectral range, thus doubling the density of modes available for SEWs and avoiding light scattering.

  2. Observation of band gaps in the gigahertz range and deaf bands in a hypersonic aluminum nitride phononic crystal slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorisse, M.; Benchabane, S.; Teissier, G.; Billard, C.; Reinhardt, A.; Laude, V.; Defaÿ, E.; Aïd, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the observation of elastic waves propagating in a two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of air holes drilled in an aluminum nitride membrane. The theoretical band structure indicates the existence of an acoustic band gap centered around 800 MHz with a relative bandwidth of 6.5% that is confirmed by gigahertz optical images of the surface displacement. Further electrical measurements and computation of the transmission reveal a much wider attenuation band that is explained by the deaf character of certain bands resulting from the orthogonality of their polarization with that of the source.

  3. Common features of gallium perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksiyko, R; Berkowski, M; Byszewski, P; Dabrowski, B; Diduszko, R; Fink-Finowicki, J; Vasylechko, LO

    2001-01-01

    The Czochralski and floating zone methods have been used to grow single crystals of gallium perovskites solid solutions with rare earth elements La, Pr, Nd, Sm and with Sr. The structure of the crystals has been investigated by powder X-ray, synchrotron radiation and neutron diffraction methods over

  4. Negative Refraction with Superior Transmission in Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) Multilayer Hyper Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Rahman, Md. Masudur; Mahdy, M. R. C.; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md. Saifur

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we have theoretically investigated the performance of graphene-hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) multilayer structure (hyper crystal) to demonstrate all angle negative refraction along with superior transmission. hBN, one of the latest natural hyperbolic materials, can be a very strong contender to form a hyper crystal with graphene due to its excellence as a graphene-compatible substrate. Although bare hBN can exhibit negative refraction, the transmission is generally low due to its high reflectivity. Whereas due to graphene’s 2D nature and metallic characteristics in the frequency range where hBN behaves as a type-I hyperbolic material, we have found graphene-hBN hyper-crystals to exhibit all angle negative refraction with superior transmission. Interestingly, superior transmission from the whole structure can be fully controlled by the tunability of graphene without hampering the negative refraction originated mainly from hBN. We have also presented an effective medium description of the hyper crystal in the low-k limit and validated the proposed theory analytically and with full wave simulations. Along with the current extensive research on hybridization of graphene plasmon polaritons with (hyperbolic) hBN phonon polaritons, this work might have some substantial impact on this field of research and can be very useful in applications such as hyper-lensing.

  5. Negative Refraction with Superior Transmission in Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) Multilayer Hyper Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Rahman, Md Masudur; Mahdy, M R C; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md Saifur

    2016-05-05

    In this article, we have theoretically investigated the performance of graphene-hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) multilayer structure (hyper crystal) to demonstrate all angle negative refraction along with superior transmission. hBN, one of the latest natural hyperbolic materials, can be a very strong contender to form a hyper crystal with graphene due to its excellence as a graphene-compatible substrate. Although bare hBN can exhibit negative refraction, the transmission is generally low due to its high reflectivity. Whereas due to graphene's 2D nature and metallic characteristics in the frequency range where hBN behaves as a type-I hyperbolic material, we have found graphene-hBN hyper-crystals to exhibit all angle negative refraction with superior transmission. Interestingly, superior transmission from the whole structure can be fully controlled by the tunability of graphene without hampering the negative refraction originated mainly from hBN. We have also presented an effective medium description of the hyper crystal in the low-k limit and validated the proposed theory analytically and with full wave simulations. Along with the current extensive research on hybridization of graphene plasmon polaritons with (hyperbolic) hBN phonon polaritons, this work might have some substantial impact on this field of research and can be very useful in applications such as hyper-lensing.

  6. Development of gallium nitride-based ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes using hydride vapor-phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabalu, Jasper Sicat

    Much of the work done on ultraviolet (UV) and visible III-Nitrides-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) involves growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). In this dissertation, the growth, development, and fabrication of III-Nitrides-based UV and visible LEDs with very high photon conversion and extraction efficiencies using hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) and radio frequency (rf) plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) is presented. High-power electrically-pumped UV-LEDs based on GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting at 340 nm and 350 nm have been fabricated in a flip-chip configuration and evaluated. Under pulsed operation, UV-LEDs emitting at 340 nm have output powers that saturate, due to device heating, at approximately 3 mW. Devices emitting at 350 nm show DC operation output powers as high as 4.5 mW under 200 mA drive current. These results were found to be equivalent with those of UV-LEDs produced by the MOCVD and HVPE methods. The concept of using textured MQWs on UV-LED structures was tested by optical pumping of GaN/AlGaN MQWs grown on textured GaN templates. Results show highly enhanced (>700 times) blue-shifted photoluminescence (PL) at 360 nm compared to similarly produced MQWs on smooth GaN templates whose PL emission is red-shifted. These results are attributed partly to enhancement in light extraction efficiency (LEE) and partly to enhancement in internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The origin of the increase in IQE is partly due to reduction of the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) on QW-planes not perpendicular to the polarization direction and partly due to charge redistribution in the QWs caused by the polarization component parallel to the planes of the QWs. Similar studies have been done for visible LEDs using InGaN/GaN MQWs. Growth of LED structures on textured GaN templates employing textured MQW-active regions resulted in the production of dichromatic (430 nm and 530 nm) phosphorless white LEDs with

  7. Magnetic properties of single crystalline expanded austenite obtained by plasma nitriding of austenitic stainless steel single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Enric; Templier, Claude; Garcia-Ramirez, Pablo; Santiso, José; Vantomme, André; Temst, Kristiaan; Nogués, Josep

    2013-10-23

    Ferromagnetic single crystalline [100], [110], and [111]-oriented expanded austenite is obtained by plasma nitriding of paramagnetic 316L austenitic stainless steel single crystals at either 300 or 400 °C. After nitriding at 400 °C, the [100] direction appears to constitute the magnetic easy axis due to the interplay between a large lattice expansion and the expected decomposition of the expanded austenite, which results in Fe- and Ni-enriched areas. However, a complex combination of uniaxial (i.e., twofold) and biaxial (i.e., fourfold) in-plane magnetic anisotropies is encountered. It is suggested that the former is related to residual stress-induced effects while the latter is associated to the in-plane projections of the cubic lattice symmetry. Increasing the processing temperature strengthens the biaxial in-plane anisotropy in detriment of the uniaxial contribution, in agreement with a more homogeneous structure of expanded austenite with lower residual stresses. In contrast to polycrystalline expanded austenite, single crystalline expanded austenite exhibits its magnetic easy axes along basic directions.

  8. Trialkylphosphine-stabilized copper(I) gallium(III) phenylchalcogenolate complexes: crystal structures and generation of ternary semiconductors by thermolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Oliver; Krautscheid, Harald

    2012-06-18

    A series of organometallic trialkylphosphine-stabilized copper gallium phenylchalcogenolate complexes [(R(3)P)(m)Cu(n)Me(2-x)Ga(EPh)(n+x+1)] (R = Me, Et, (i)Pr, (t)Bu; E = S, Se, Te; x = 0, 1) has been prepared and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. From their molecular structures three groups of compounds can be distinguished: ionic compounds, ring systems, and cage structures. All these complexes contain one gallium atom bound to one or two methyl groups, whereas the number of copper atoms, and therefore the nuclearity of the complexes, is variable and depends mainly on size and amount of phosphine ligand used in synthesis. The Ga-E bonds are relatively rigid, in contrast to flexible Cu-E bonds. The lengths of the latter are controlled by the coordination number and steric influences. The Ga-E bond lengths depend systematically on the number of methyl groups bound to the gallium atom, with somewhat shorter bonds in monomethyl compounds compared to dimethyl compounds. Quantum chemical computations reproduce this trend and show furthermore that the rotation of one phenyl group around the Ga-E bond is a low energy process with two distinct minima, corresponding to two different conformations found experimentally. Mixtures of different types of chalcogen atoms on molecular scale are possible, and then ligand exchange reactions in solution lead to mixed site occupation. In thermogravimetric studies the complexes were converted into the ternary semiconductors CuGaE(2). The thermolysis reaction is completed at temperatures between 250 and 400 °C, typically with lower temperatures for the heavier chalcogens. Because of significant release of Me(3)Ga during the thermolysis process, and especially in case of copper excess in the precursor complexes, binary copper chalcogenides are obtained as additional thermolysis products. Quaternary semiconductors can be obtained from mixed chalcogen precursors.

  9. High-Speed Electro-Optic Modulator Integrated with Graphene-Boron Nitride Heterostructure and Photonic Crystal Nanocavity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yuanda; Gan, Xuetao; Li, Luozhou; Peng, Cheng; Meric, Inanc; Wang, Lei; Szep, Attila; Walker, Dennis; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale and power-efficient electro-optic (EO) modulators are essential components for optical interconnects that are beginning to replace electrical wiring for intra- and inter-chip communications. Silicon-based EO modulators show sufficient figures of merits regarding device footprint, speed, power consumption and modulation depth. However, the weak electro-optic effect of silicon still sets a technical bottleneck for these devices, motivating the development of modulators based on new materials. Graphene, a two-dimensional carbon allotrope, has emerged as an alternative active material for optoelectronic applications owing to its exceptional optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate a high-speed graphene electro-optic modulator based on a graphene-boron nitride (BN) heterostructure integrated with a silicon photonic crystal nanocavity. Strongly enhanced light-matter interaction of graphene in a submicron cavity enables efficient electrical tuning of the cavity reflection. We observe a modul...

  10. Crystal structure of polymeric carbon nitride and the determination of its process-temperature-induced modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyborski, T.; Merschjann, C.; Orthmann, S.; Yang, F.; Lux-Steiner, M.-Ch; Schedel-Niedrig, Th

    2013-10-01

    Based on the arrangement of two-dimensional ‘melon’, we construct a unit cell for polymeric carbon nitride (PCN) synthesized via thermal polycondensation, whose theoretical diffraction powder pattern includes all major features measured in x-ray diffraction. With the help of this unit cell, we describe the process-temperature-induced crystallographic changes in PCN that occur within a temperature interval between 510 and 610 °C. We also discuss further potential modifications of the unit cell for PCN. It is found that both triazine- and heptazine-based g-C3N4 can only account for minor phases within the investigated synthesis products.

  11. High performance gallium nitride based blue light emitting diode material epitaxy and dry etching fabrication technology%氮化镓基高亮度发光二极管材料外延和干法刻蚀技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗毅; 邵嘉平; 郭文平; 韩彦军; 胡卉; 薛松; 孙长征; 郝智彪

    2004-01-01

    通过对氮化镓(Gallium nitride,GaN)基蓝色高亮度发光二极管(High brightness light emitting diode,HB-LED)材料金属有机气相外延(Metal organic vapor phase epitaxy,MOVPE)生长技术的研究和优化以及在有源区内引入新型InxGa1-xN/GaN多量子阱(Multiple quantum wells,MQWs)结构,获得了高性能的HB-LED外延片材料.高分辨率X射线衍射(High resolution X-ray diffraction,HR-XRD)和变温光致荧光谱(Temperature dependent photoluminescence spectra,TD-PL Spectra)测量表明外延材料的异质界面陡峭,单晶质量优异,并由变注入电致荧光谱(Injection dependent electroluminescence spectra,ID-EL spectra)测量获得:HB-LED芯片的峰值发光波长在注入电流为2 mA至120 mA变化下蓝移量小于1 nm,电致荧光谱的半高全宽值(Full width hlf maximum,FWHM)在注入电流为20 mA时仅为18 nm.此外,还介绍了GaN基材料感应耦合等离子体(Inductivelycoupled plasma,ICP)干法刻蚀技术.考虑实际需要,本文作者开发了AlGaN/GaN异质材料的非选择性刻蚀工艺,原子力显微镜(Atomic force microscope,AFM)观察得到AlGaN/GaN刻蚀表面均方根粗糙度RMS仅为0.85nm,与外延片的表面平整度相当.还获得了AlGaN/GaN高选择比的刻蚀技术,GaN和AlGaN的刻蚀选择比为60.

  12. First-Principles Study of Structural and Electronic Properties of Chromium Nitride/Gallium Nitride Multilayer (CrN/GaN Estudio por primeros principios de las propiedades estructurales y electrónicas de la multicapa CrN/GaN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Eulises Báez Cruz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we perform first-principles calculations to investigate the structural and electronic properties of the 1x1 CrN/GaN multilayer. The calculations were executed in zincblende and wurtzite phase, since they are the ground states of chromium nitride CrN and gallium nitride GaN, respectively. However, we study the stability of the multilayer in the NaCl phase, in order to predict possible phase transitions. We found that the most favorable phase for the multilayer is the hexagonal wurtzite type, with possibility of passing to the NaCl phase by applying an external pressure. Our calculations indicate that the pressure of transition is 13,5 GPa. From the density of states, we found that the multilayer present a metallic behavior produced by the hybrid orbitals d-Cr and N-p that cross level Fermi.En este trabajo realizamos cálculos de primeros principios para investigar las propiedades estructurales y electrónicas de la multicapa 1x1 CrN/GaN. Los cálculos se realizan en las fases zincblenda y wurtzita, debido a que este es el estado base del nitruro de cromo CrN y el nitruro de galio GaN, respectivamente. Sin embargo, se estudia la estabilidad de la multicapa en la fase NaCl, con el fin predecir posibles transiciones de fase. Encontramos que la fase más favorable para multicapa, es la hexagonal tipo wurtzita, con posibilidad de pasar a la fase NaCl mediante la aplicación de una presión externa. Nuestros cálculos nos permiten predecir que la presión de transición es 13,5 GPa. A partir de la densidad de estados encontramos que la multicapa posee un comportamiento metálico debido a la hibridación de los orbitales Cr-d y N-p que atraviesan el nivel de Fermi.

  13. Oxide-cladding aluminum nitride photonic crystal slab: Design and investigation of material dispersion and fabrication induced disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, E. G., E-mail: emerdemelo@usp.br; Alvarado, M. A.; Carreño, M. N. P.; Alayo, M. I. [Electronic Systems Engineering Department, University of São Paulo, CEP 05508-010 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, D. O. [UNESP - São Paulo State University, CEP 13874-149 São João da Boa Vista, SP (Brazil); Ferlauto, A. S. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-01-14

    Photonic crystal slabs with a lower-index material surrounding the core layer are an attractive choice to circumvent the drawbacks in the fabrication of membranes suspended in air. In this work we propose a photonic crystal (PhC) slab structure composed of a triangular pattern of air holes in a multilayer thin film of aluminum nitride embedded in silicon dioxide layers designed for operating around 450 nm wavelengths. We show the design of an ideal structure and analyze the effects of material dispersion based on a first-order correction perturbation theory approach using dielectric functions obtained by experimental measurements of the thin film materials. Numerical methods were used to investigate the effects of fabrication induced disorder of typical nanofabrication processes on the bandgap size and spectral response of the proposed device. Deviation in holes radii and positions were introduced in the proposed PhC slab model with a Gaussian distribution profile. Impacts of slope in holes sidewalls that might result from the dry etching of AlN were also evaluated. The results show that for operation at the midgap frequency, slope in holes sidewalls is more critical than displacements in holes sizes and positions.

  14. Lung gallium scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallium 67 lung scan; Lung scan; Gallium scan - lung; Scan - lung ... Gallium is injected into a vein. The scan will be taken 6 to 24 hours after the gallium is injected. (Test time depends on whether your condition is acute or chronic .) ...

  15. A modern perspective on the history of semiconductor nitride blue light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruska, Herbert Paul; Rhines, Walden Clark

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we shall discuss the development of blue light-emitting (LED) and laser diodes (LD), starting early in the 20th century. Various materials systems were investigated, but in the end, the nitrides of aluminum, gallium and indium proved to be the most effective. Single crystal thin films of GaN first emerged in 1968. Blue light-emitting diodes were first reported in 1971. Devices grown in the 1970s were prepared by the halide transport method, and were never efficient enough for commercial products due to contamination. Devices created by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy gave far superior performance. Actual true blue LEDs based on direct band-to-band transitions, free of recombination through deep levels, were finally developed in 1994, leading to a breakthrough in LED performance, as well as nitride based laser diodes in 1996. In 2014, the scientists who achieved these critical results were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics.

  16. Growth of large aluminum nitride single crystals with thermal-gradient control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Rao, Shailaja P.; Schowalter, Leo J.

    2017-02-28

    In various embodiments, non-zero thermal gradients are formed within a growth chamber both substantially parallel and substantially perpendicular to the growth direction during formation of semiconductor crystals, where the ratio of the two thermal gradients (parallel to perpendicular) is less than 10, by, e.g., arrangement of thermal shields outside of the growth chamber.

  17. Acoustic and NMR investigations of melting and crystallization of indium-gallium alloys in pores of synthetic opal matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozerskii, A. L.; Charnaya, E. V.; Lee, M. K.; Chang, L. J.; Nedbai, A. I.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Fokin, A. V.; Samoilovich, M. I.; Lebedeva, E. L.; Bugaev, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the results of studying the crystallization and melting processes of Ga-In eutectic alloys, which are embedded in opal matrices, using acoustic and NMR methods. The indium concentrations in the alloys were 4, 6, 9, and 15 at %. Measurements were performed upon cooling from room temperature to complete crystallization of the alloys and subsequent heating. It is revealed how the size effects and alloy composition influence the formation of phases with α- and β-Ga structures and on changes in the melting-temperature ranges. A difference was observed between the results obtained using acoustic and NMR methods, which was attributed to different temperature measurement conditions.

  18. Ionic liquid assisted chemical strategy to TiO2 hollow nanocube assemblies with surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy crystal facet exposure for enhanced photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengli; Liu, Baocang; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yuxi; Shi, Ying; Feng, Xue; An, Xiaoting; Liu, Lixia; Zhang, Jun

    2014-07-09

    Realization of anionic nonmetal doping and high energy crystal facet exposure in TiO2 photocatalysts has been proven to be an effective approach for significantly improving their photocatalytic performance. A facile strategy of ionic liquid assisted etching chemistry by simply hydrothermally etching hollow TiO2 spheres composed of TiO2 nanoparticles with an ionic liquid of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate without any other additives is developed to create highly active anatase TiO2 nanocubes and TiO2 nanocube assemblies. With this one-pot ionic liquid assisted etching process, the surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy {001} crystal facets exposure can be readily realized simultaneously. Compared with the benchmark materials of P25 and TiO2 nanostructures with other hierarchical architectures of hollow spheres, flaky spheres, and spindles synthesized by hydrothermally etching hollow TiO2 spheres with nonionic liquid of NH4F, the TiO2 nanocubes and TiO2 nanocube assemblies used as efficient photocatalysts show super high photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, and rhodamine B, due to their surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy crystal facet exposure. The ionic liquid assisted etching chemistry is facile and robust and may be a general strategy for synthesizing other metal oxides with high energy crystal facets and surface doping for improving photocatalytic activity.

  19. Etch-Tuning and Design of Silicon Nitride Photonic Crystal Reflectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Simon; Dumont, Vincent; Peter, Yves-Alain; Sankey, Jack C

    2016-01-01

    By patterning a freestanding dielectric membrane into a photonic crystal reflector (PCR), it is possible to resonantly enhance its normal-incidence reflectivity, thereby realizing a thin, single-material mirror. In many PCR applications, the operating wavelength (e.g. that of a low-noise laser or emitter) is not tunable, imposing tolerances on crystal geometry that are not reliably achieved with standard nanolithography. Here we present a gentle technique to finely tune the resonant wavelength of a \\SiN PCR using iterative hydrofluoric acid etches. With little optimization, we achieve a 57-nm-thin photonic crystal having an operating wavelength within 0.15 nm (0.04 resonance linewidths) of our target (1550 nm). Our thin structure exhibits a broader and less pronounced transmission dip than is predicted by plane wave simulations, and we identify two effects leading to these discrepancies, both related to the divergence angle of a collimated laser beam. To overcome this limitation in future devices, we distill ...

  20. Luminescent properties of Cr-doped gallium garnet crystals grown by the micro-pulling-down method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Akira; Yamaji, Akihiro; Kamada, Kei; Pejchal, Jan; Ohashi, Yuji; Yokota, Yuui; Chani, Valery Ivanovich; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Cr-doped (GdxY1-x)3Ga5O12 crystals (x=0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00) were grown by the micro-pulling-down method and examined for their possible application as red and infrared scintillating detectors in medical field. Although Cr:(Gd0.75Y0.25)3Ga5O12 and Cr:Gd3Ga5O12 had similar X-ray diffraction patterns, other samples showed some change in lattice constant. All the crystals had broad emission bands in the red and infrared region when excited by either 450 nm photons or X rays. These bands were associated with 4T2→A2 transitions. Moreover, redshift of the emission-peak wavelengths (4T2→4A2) and absorption peaks (4A2→4T1 and 4T2) was observed with increase of Gd content (x) in Cr-doped (GdxY1-x)3Ga5O12 due to the change of the crystal fields. The crystals had scintillation emissions in the wavelength region suitable for the real time dose monitoring in radiation therapy.

  1. Ohmic contacts to Gallium Nitride materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Giuseppe; Iucolano, Ferdinando; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    In this review article, a comprehensive study of the mechanisms of Ohmic contact formation on GaN-based materials is presented. After a brief introduction on the physics of Ohmic contacts, a resume of the most important results obtained in literature is reported for each of the systems taken in consideration (n-type GaN, p-type GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures). The optimal metallization schemes and processing conditions to obtain low resistance Ohmic contacts are presented, discussing the role of the single metals composing the stack and the modification induced by the thermal annealing, either on the metal layers or at the interface with GaN. Physical insights on the mechanism of Ohmic contact formation have been gained by correlating the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters with a morphological/structural analysis of the interface. In the case of the AlGaN/GaN systems, the influence of the heterostructure parameters on the Ohmic contacts has been taken into account adapting the classical thermionic field emission model to the presence of the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Finally, the state of the art of "Au-free" metallization to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is also presented, being this latter a relevant topic for the integration of GaN technology on large scale Silicon devices fabs.

  2. New applications advisable for gallium nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Pearton

    2002-06-01

    The explosive increase of interest in the AlGaInN family of materials in recent years has been fueled by the application of blue/green/UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs in full-color displays, traffic lights, automotive lighting, and general room lighting (using so-called white LEDs1. In addition, blue/green laser diodes can be used in high storage-capacity digital versatile disk (DVD systems2. AlGaN-based photodetectors are also useful for solar-blind UV detection and have applications as flame sensors for control of gas turbines or detection of missiles.

  3. Ohmic contacts to Gallium Nitride materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greco, Giuseppe [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche—Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM), Strada VIII, n. 5 - Zona Industriale, 95121 Catania (Italy); Iucolano, Ferdinando [STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy); Roccaforte, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.roccaforte@imm.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche—Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM), Strada VIII, n. 5 - Zona Industriale, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Ohmic contacts are a crucial issue for wide band gap semiconductors devices. • This paper reviews the mechanisms of Ohmic contact formation on GaN-based materials. • Ti/Al-based contacts and multilayers (Ti/Al/X/Au) are used for n-type GaN. • Ni/Au-based bilayers are used for Ohmic contacts to p-type GaN. • Several parameters affect Ohmic contact formation to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures . • Au-free contacts are important for the integration of GaN technology on Si-fabs. - Abstract: In this review article, a comprehensive study of the mechanisms of Ohmic contact formation on GaN-based materials is presented. After a brief introduction on the physics of Ohmic contacts, a resume of the most important results obtained in literature is reported for each of the systems taken in consideration (n-type GaN, p-type GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures). The optimal metallization schemes and processing conditions to obtain low resistance Ohmic contacts are presented, discussing the role of the single metals composing the stack and the modification induced by the thermal annealing, either on the metal layers or at the interface with GaN. Physical insights on the mechanism of Ohmic contact formation have been gained by correlating the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters with a morphological/structural analysis of the interface. In the case of the AlGaN/GaN systems, the influence of the heterostructure parameters on the Ohmic contacts has been taken into account adapting the classical thermionic field emission model to the presence of the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Finally, the state of the art of “Au-free” metallization to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is also presented, being this latter a relevant topic for the integration of GaN technology on large scale Silicon devices fabs.

  4. New Kagome metal Sc₃Mn₃Al₇Si₅ and its gallium-doped analogues: synthesis, crystal structure, and physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua; Miiller, Wojciech; Aronson, Meigan C

    2014-09-01

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, and basic properties of the new intermetallic compound Sc3Mn3Al7Si5. The structure of the compound was established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and it crystallizes with a hexagonal structure (Sc3Ni11Si4 type) with Mn atoms forming the Kagome nets. The dc magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal a Curie-Weiss moment of ~0.51 μ(B)/Mn; however, no magnetic order is found for temperatures as low as 1.8 K. Electrical resistivity and heat capacity measurements show that this compound is definitively metallic, with a relatively large specific heat Sommerfeld coefficient, indicating strong electronic correlations. Intriguingly, these features have revealed Sc3Mn3Al7Si5 as a possible quantum spin liquid. With chemical and lattice disorder introduced by doping, a spin liquid to spin glass transition is observed in the highest Ga-doped compounds. The roles of the geometrically frustrated structure and Mn-ligand hybridization in the magnetism of the title compounds are also discussed.

  5. Platinum nitride with fluorite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2005-01-31

    The mechanical stability of platinum nitride has been studied using first-principles calculations. By calculating the single-crystal elastic constants, we show that platinum nitride can be stabilized in the fluorite structure, in which the nitrogen atoms occupy all the tetrahedral interstitial sites of the metal lattice. The stability is attributed to the pseudogap effect from analysis of the electronic structure.

  6. Investigation of thermal conductivity of nitride mixed crystals and superlattices by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Takahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University (Japan); Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    The thermal conductivities of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N mixed crystal and AlN/GaN superlattices were investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. We used Stillinger-Weber potentials, and Green-Kubo's formula was employed to calculate thermal conductivity. The results showed that the value of thermal conductivity of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N was about 1/20 smaller than that of GaN. It was also found that the thermal conductivity of AlN/GaN superlattices along the c-axis, which is parallel to the growth direction, was much less than that of bulk GaN. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  8. Fabrication of La2Ti2O7 crystals using an alkali-metal molybdate flux growth method and their nitridability to form LaTiO2N crystals under a high-temperature NH3 atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Yubuta, Kunio; Oishi, Shuji; Teshima, Katsuya

    2015-04-06

    Flux growth is a promising method that allows one to control over the crystalline phase, crystal shape, crystal size, and crystal surface through the selection of a suitable flux. In this work, lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) crystals with different morphologies were grown using the Na2MoO4, K2MoO4, NaCl, and mixed NaCl + K2MoO4 (molar ratio = 3:7) fluxes, and their nitridability to form LaTiO2N crystals under a high-temperature NH3 atmosphere was also investigated. The effects of the solute concentration and cooling rate on the growth of the La2Ti2O7 crystals were also studied. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that the {100} plane was dominant in the La2Ti2O7 platelet crystals grown using the alkali-metal molybdate fluxes. When the solute concentration was increased from 1 to 20 mol %, the average size of the crystals decreased without considerable alteration of the overall crystal morphology. The La2Ti2O7 crystals with the preferred ⟨010⟩ and ⟨001⟩ growth directions along the b and c axes were grown using the Na2MoO4 and K2MoO4 fluxes, respectively. Compared to the Na2MoO4 flux, the K2MoO4 flux did not show a cooling-rate-dependent effect on the growth of the La2Ti2O7 crystals. It was found that conversion of the La2Ti2O7 crystals to the LaTiO2N crystals was strongly dependent on the flux used to grow the precursor La2Ti2O7 crystals. That is, the La2Ti2O7 crystals grown using the K2MoO4 and NaCl fluxes were nearly completely converted into the LaTiO2N crystals, while conversion of the La2Ti2O7 crystals grown using the Na2MoO4 and mixed NaCl + K2MoO4 fluxes to the LaTiO2N crystals seemed to be not completed yet even after nitridation at 950 °C for 15 h using NH3 because of the larger crystal size and the presence of unintentional impurities (sodium and molybdenum from the flux) in the La2Ti2O7 crystal lattice. Nevertheless, the LaTiO2N crystals fabricated by nitriding the La2Ti2O7 crystals grown using the K2MoO4 and NaCl fluxes should be suitable for

  9. Investigations in gallium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Beard, C.A. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  10. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average...

  11. Characterization and reliability of aluminum gallium nitride/gallium nitride high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Erica Ann

    Compound semiconductor devices, particularly those based on GaN, have found significant use in military and civilian systems for both microwave and optoelectronic applications. Future uses in ultra-high power radar systems will require the use of GaN transistors operated at very high voltages, currents and temperatures. GaN-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have proven power handling capability that overshadows all other wide band gap semiconductor devices for high frequency and high-power applications. Little conclusive research has been reported in order to determine the dominating degradation mechanisms of the devices that result in failure under standard operating conditions in the field. Therefore, it is imperative that further reliability testing be carried out to determine the failure mechanisms present in GaN HEMTs in order to improve device performance, and thus further the ability for future technologies to be developed. In order to obtain a better understanding of the true reliability of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs and determine the MTTF under standard operating conditions, it is crucial to investigate the interaction effects between thermal and electrical degradation. This research spans device characterization, device reliability, and device simulation in order to obtain an all-encompassing picture of the device physics. Initially, finite element thermal simulations were performed to investigate the effect of device design on self-heating under high power operation. This was then followed by a study of reliability of HEMTs and other tests structures during high power dc operation. Test structures without Schottky contacts showed high stability as compared to HEMTs, indicating that degradation of the gate is the reason for permanent device degradation. High reverse bias of the gate has been shown to induce the inverse piezoelectric effect, resulting in a sharp increase in gate leakage current due to crack formation. The introduction of elevated temperatures during high reverse gate bias indicated that device failure is due to the breakdown of an unintentional gate oxide. RF stress of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs showed comparable critical voltage breakdown regime as that of similar devices stressed under dc conditions. Though RF device characteristics showed stability up to a drain bias of 20 V, Schottky diode characteristics degraded substantially at all voltages investigated. Results from both dc and RF stress conditions, under several bias regimes, confirm that the primary root for stress induced degradation was due to the Schottky contact. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  12. Two-Dimensional Modeling of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Binari, Dr. Mario Ancona, Dr. Weber, Dr. Specht, and Dr. Feick for beginning this valuable work. My parents, Ossie and Jewell Henry , for their love...33, No.14, pp. 1230-1231. 20. Petrosky , K.J., “High-Power High-Frequency SiC and GaN Devices for Microwave Amplifier Applications,” 12 March 2002

  13. Solution-Based High-Density Arrays of Dielectric Microsphere Structures for Improved Crystal Quality of III-Nitride Layers on Si Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Jun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of dielectric microsphere lithography has been able to open up new means of performing simple and easy patterning on the semiconductor surfaces. Here, we report uniform and high-density arrays of microspheres using a solution-based spin-coating method. The arrays of microspheres were used for etching mask to form the arrays of III-nitride microrods. By regrowing GaN layer on the microrod structures, high-quality GaN layer was achieved in terms of surface morphology as well as XRD characterization. To apply the advantages such as improved crystal quality and light extraction enhancement, light-emitting diodes (LEDs were grown and then fabricated. The regrown LEDs with microspheres showed much improved optical output power and forward voltage characteristics in the same current injection. Therefore, we believe that this approach is quite useful for the development of high efficiency LEDs for future lighting.

  14. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  15. Effect of nucleation layer morphology on crystal quality, surface morphology and electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Huantao; Hao Yue; Zhang Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    Nucleation layer formation is a key factor for high quality gallium nitride (GaN) growth on a sapphire substrate. We found that the growth rate substantially affected the nucleation layer morphology, thereby having a great impact on the crystal quality, surface morphology and electrical properties of AIGaN/GaN heterostructures on sapphire substrates. A nucleation layer with a low growth rate of 2.5 nm/min is larger and has better coalescence than one grown at a high growth rate of 5 nm/min. AIGaN/GaN heterostructures on a nucleation layer with low growth rate have better crystal quality, surface morphology and electrical properties.

  16. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    topics including growth and heteroepitaxy, bulk GaN substrates, theory and modelling, optical properties, laser diodes and LEDs as well as transport properties and electronics. Farrell et al review materials and growth issues for high-performance non- and semipolar light-emitting devices, and Scholz provides an overview of heteroepitaxial growth of semipolar GaN. Okada et al review growth mechanisms of non- and semipolar GaN layers on patterned sapphire substrates, and Vennéguès discusses defect reduction methods for heteroepitaxially grown non- and semipolar III-nitride films. Leung et al explain how kinetic Wulff plots can be used to design and control non-polar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy, and a contribution by Sawaki et al explores the impurity incorporation in (1-101) GaN grown on Si substrates. In the area of bulk crystal growth Kucharski et al review non- and semipolar GaN substrates by ammonothermal growth, and Chichibu et al discuss the challenges for epitaxial growth of InGaN on free-standing m-plane GaN substrates. Calculation of semipolar orientations for wurtzitic semiconductor heterostructures and their application to nitrides and oxides are reviewed by Bigenwald et al, and Ito et al present an ab initio approach to reconstruction, adsorption, and incorporation on GaN surfaces. Finally, the theoretical description of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductor quantum-well structures is presented by Ahn et al. In a discussion of the optical properties, Kisin et al discuss the effect of the quantum well population on the optical characteristics of polar, semipolar and non-polar III-nitride light emitters, and Jönen et al investigate the indium incorporation and optical properties of non- and semipolar GaInN QW structures. Wernicke et al explore the emission wavelength of polar, non-polar, and semipolar InGaN quantum wells and the incorporation of indium. In a contribution by Melo et al, the gain in polar and non-polar/semipolar gallium-nitride

  17. Gallium Arsenide Photocathode Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    r ~\\ 1 1 AD-A018 619 ■ i I 1 GALLIUM ARSENIDE PHOTOCATHODE DEVELOPMENT I Terry Roach, et al 1 1 ■f EPSCO ...aiwiiwnHWlffl’Wip m, «swwerf^MW^S’ GALLIUM ARSENIDE PHOTOCATHODE DEVELOPMENT T. J. Roach Bianca Contractor: EPSCO Laboratories Contract Number: F08606...PHOTOCATHODE DEVELOPMENT 7. AUTHORfaJ T. Roach J. Bianca t. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND AOORESS EPSCO Laboratories 227 High Ridge Road Stauford CT

  18. The crystal structure and luminescent properties of nitrogen-rich Ca-α-sialon:Eu with saturated calcium solubility fabricated by the alloy-nitridation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jian-Jun; Chen Guo-Dong; Du Fei-Fei; Liu Quan-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-rich Ca-α-sialon:Eu2+ phosphors with saturated calcium solubility are synthesized through a solidstate reaction (SSR) at 2173 K with stable alloy and nitride as the starting materials.The Ca1.83-1.5xSi8.34 A13.66OxN16-x:xEu phosphors have intensive orange emissions,whose peaks are located at approximately 585-600 nm,and the emission wavelengths tend to shift toward the red region when the Eu concentrations increase from 0.5% to 18% (mole percentage).When the Eu concentration is equal to 9%,the phosphors suffer from concentration quenching.The low-temperature photoluminescence properties indicate that Ca1.83-1.5xSi8.34Al3.66OxN16-x:xEu phosphors show excellent thermal quenching.The crystal structures of Ca1.83-1.5xSis.34Al3.66OxN16-x:xEu are also investigated,and are found to have nitrogen-rich compositions with saturated calcium cations at the interstitial sites of the α-sialons.In addition,the influencing factors of α-sialons with different compositions on the crystal lattice are discussed in detail.

  19. Effect of Variation of Silicon Nitride Passivation Layer on Electron Irradiated Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride HEMT Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-19

    dioxide for passivation. As early as the 1980s, use of a Si3N4 layer on silicon operational amplifiers to achieve 4 radiation resistant...resistance of a precision operational amplifier .” IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 28, no. 6 (1981): 4325-27. Fagerlind, M., Allerstain, F...172 6.3. Transconductance and Diode Measurements .......................................... 181 6.4. Deep Level Transient

  20. Electrodeposition of gallium for photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2016-08-09

    An electroplating solution and method for producing an electroplating solution containing a gallium salt, an ionic compound and a solvent that results in a gallium thin film that can be deposited on a substrate.

  1. Thermal cycling, DLTS, and PEC studies on LEC gallium arsenide. [GaAs:Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanaraghavan, P. (Anna Univ., Madras (India). Crystal Growth Centre); Sankaranarayanan, K. (Anna Univ., Madras (India). Crystal Growth Centre); Arokiaraj, J. (Anna Univ., Madras (India). Crystal Growth Centre); Anbukumar, S. (Anna Univ., Madras (India). Crystal Growth Centre); Kumar, J. (Anna Univ., Madras (India). Crystal Growth Centre); Ramasamy, P. (Anna Univ., Madras (India). Crystal Growth Centre)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the growth of gallium arsenide single crystals using the LEC technique. The Semi-insulating gallium arsenide was studied. The defect investigations were made by DLTS and etching studies. The variation of deep level concentration along the wafer was estimated using DLTS. The fabrication and efficiency of the PEC Solar cells are also reported. (orig.)

  2. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  3. Method of synthesizing cubic system boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuzu, S.; Sumiya, H.; Degawa, J.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described for synthetically growing cubic system boron nitride crystals by using boron nitride sources, solvents for dissolving the boron nitride sources, and seed crystals under conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature for maintaining the cubic system boron nitride stable. The method comprises the following steps: preparing a synthesizing vessel having at least two chambers, arrayed in order in the synthesizing vessel so as to be heated according to a temperature gradient; placing the solvents having different eutectic temperatures in each chamber with respect to the boron nitride sources according to the temperature gradient; placing the boron nitride source in contact with a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively higher temperature and placing at least a seed crystal in a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively lower temperature; and growing at least one cubic system boron nitride crystal in each of the solvents in the chambers by heating the synthesizing vessel for establishing the temperature gradient while maintaining conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature.

  4. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Study of the Thermal Oxide on Gallium Nitride%GaN基热氧化物的XPS和椭偏光谱研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜江锋; 赵金霞; 于奇; 杨谟华

    2009-01-01

    The physical characteristics such as composition, thickness and optical constant of the oxide thin films are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectrocopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). XPS spectra of Ga_(3d) and O_(1s), core levels indicate that the thermal oxide is gallium oxide (Ga_2O_3) and the ratio of Ga to O is about 1.2 which is induced by the existence of much oxygen loss. SE metrical results indicate the linear grown rate is ~40nm/h and the average grown rate is ~25nm/h. The refractive index of Ga_2O_3 is 1.9~2.2 in the wavelength range of 300~800nm which agree with the previous study results. However, The anomalous refractive phenomenon appeares at 300~400nm, the reason is probably interrelated with the strong absorbance of GaN in this wavelength range and needs to study deeply in the future.%采用X射线光谱R(XPS)和椭偏测试仪(SE)对GaN材料干氧氧化所得氧化物薄膜的组分、厚度、光学常数等物理特性进行了研究.当氧化温度为900℃、氧化时间为15~240min时,XPS测试结果表明,所得氧化物类型为Ga_2O_3,且由于大量O空位的存在,其表面Ga/O比率约为1.2.SE测试结果表明,GaN线性氧化速率约为40nm/h,呈抛物线生长,最终平均氧化速率约为25nm/h.在300~800nm测试范围内,Ga_2O_3折射率为1.9~2.2,与文献测试结果相符.但在300~400nm测试范围内存在反常色散现象,这与GaN在此波段的强吸收有关.

  5. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-02-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs.

  6. CCDC 1477674: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene)-trimethyl-gallium

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  7. CCDC 1477681: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolidin-2-ylidene)-trimethyl-gallium

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  8. CCDC 1477677: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene)-trimethyl-gallium

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  9. Synthesis of Large-Sized Single-Crystal Hexagonal Boron Nitride Domains on Nickel Foils by Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haolin; Zhang, Xingwang; Liu, Heng; Yin, Zhigang; Meng, Junhua; Xia, Jing; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Jinliang; You, Jingbi

    2015-12-22

    Large-sized single-crystal h-BN domains with a lateral size up to 100 μm are synthesized on Ni foils by ion-beam sputtering deposition. The nucleation density of h-BN is dramatically decreased by reducing the concentrations of both active sites and species on the Ni surface through a brief in situ pretreatment of the substrate and optimization of the growth parameters, enabling the growth of large-sized domains.

  10. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  11. Gallium-containing anticancer compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Chitambar, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    There is an ever pressing need to develop new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and has shown activity against non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and bladder cancer in clinical trials. Gallium can function as an iron mimetic and perturb iron-dependent proliferation and other iron-related processes in tumor cells. Gallium nitrate lacks cross resistance with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and is n...

  12. Microstructural investigations of manganese-doped gallium nitride by modern methods of high resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy; Mikrostrukturelle Untersuchungen an Mangan-dotiertem Galliumnitrid mittels fortgeschrittener Methoden der hochaufloesenden und analytischen Transmissionselektronenmikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niermann, T.

    2006-10-30

    The magnetic properties of a diluted magnetic semiconductor depend on the microstructure of the material. In this work transmission electron microscopy was applied to Mn-doped GaN to investigate the incorporation of Mn and the occurring crystal defects. The novel method of object wave reconstruction was used for the imaging of extended defects. This technique allowed the observation of core structures of various defects. The strain fields of these defects were measured using geometric phase analysis. Precipitates of GaMn{sub 3}N were identified by analytical measurements. A further investigation of material free of precipitates revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of the Mn, which is reported for the first time. The ratio between substitutional and interstitial incorporation of Mn was measured by angular resolved X-ray spectroscopy. The Mn was found predominantly on the substitutional site. (orig.)

  13. Fabrication of large flat gallium nitride templates with extremely low dislocation densities in the 106 cm-2 range by novel two-side hydride vapor-phase epitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Hajime; Konno, Taichiro

    2017-10-01

    Large GaN templates with high flatness (i.e., negligible wafer bowing and smooth as-grown surfaces) and low threading dislocation densities (TTDs) were fabricated by a novel two-side hydride vapor-phase epitaxial (HVPE) growth, beginning with deposition of polycrystalline GaN on the rear side of the wafer. Appropriate gas-flow management realized by our homemade HVPE system permitted the growth of a GaN layer with a smooth as-grown surface and excellent thickness uniformity on the front surfaces of 4- or 6-inch patterned sapphire substrates (PSSs). However, when the grown thickness exceeded 20 μm, single-side HVPE-growth induced fractures in GaN crystals. The fracture resistance of the GaN increased markedly when it was in a cleavage-resistant polycrystalline form (poly-GaN), permitting its growth to a thickness of 100 μm. In the presence of a back-side poly-GaN layer, extremely thick GaN crystal layers could be grown on the front side without fractures. An 80-μm-thick GaN template fabricated by two-side growth on a 4-inch PSS had a device-quality surface, negligible bowing, and low TDD (7 × 106 cm-2). Issues of high fabrication costs, unavailability of large-size wafers, and large off-angle variations associated with native GaN wafers could be overcome by using our high-quality GaN templates as alternative substrates.

  14. Modeling of the effects of different substrate materials on the residual thermal stresses in the aluminum nitride crystal grown by sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. G.; Idesman, A.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2009-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical finite element modeling method is applied to compare interfacial residual thermal stress distribution in AlN single crystals grown by using different substrates such as silicon carbide, boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum carbide, and niobium carbide. A dimensionless coordinate system is used which reduces the numbers of computations and hence simplifies the stress analysis. All components of the stress distribution, both in the film and in the substrate, including the normal stress along the growth direction as well as in-plane normal stresses and shear stresses are fully investigated. This information about the stress distribution provides insight into understanding and controlling the AlN single crystal growth by the sublimation technique. The normal stress in the film at the interface along the growth direction and the shear stresses are zero except at the edges, whereas in-plane stresses are nonzero. The in-plane stresses are compressive when TaC and NbC substrates are used. A small compressive stress might be beneficial in prohibiting crack growth in the film. The compressive stress in the AlN is lower for the TaC substrate than that for the NbC. Tensile in-plane stresses are formed in the AlN for 6H-SiC, BN, and W substrates. This tensile stress in the film is detrimental as it will assist in the crack growth. The stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film at the interface is compressive in nature when TaC and NbC are used as a substrate. This causes the film to bend downward (i.e., convex shape) and assist it to adhere to the substrate. The AlN film curves upward or in a concave shape when SiC, BN, and W substrates are used since the stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film is tensile at the interface and this may cause detachment of the film from the substrate.

  15. Magnetostriction and magnetic heterogeneities in iron-gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, M; Mudivarthi, C; Cullen, J R; Flatau, A B; Chen, W-C; Watson, S M; Wuttig, M

    2010-07-09

    Iron-gallium alloys Fe(1-x)Ga(x) exhibit an exceptional increase in magnetostriction with gallium content. We present small-angle neutron scattering investigations on a Fe(0.81)Ga(0.19) single crystal. We uncover heterogeneities with an average spacing of 15 nm and with magnetizations distinct from the matrix. The moments in and around the heterogeneities are observed to reorient with an applied magnetic field or mechanical strain. We discuss the possible roles played by nanoscale magnetic heterogeneities in the mechanism for magnetostriction in this material.

  16. Magnetostriction and Magnetic Heterogeneities in Iron-Gallium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laver, Mark; Mudivarthi, C.; Cullen, J.R.;

    2010-01-01

    Iron-gallium alloys Fe1-xGax exhibit an exceptional increase in magnetostriction with gallium content. We present small-angle neutron scattering investigations on a Fe0.81Ga0.19 single crystal. We uncover heterogeneities with an average spacing of 15 nm and with magnetizations distinct from...... the matrix. The moments in and around the heterogeneities are observed to reorient with an applied magnetic field or mechanical strain. We discuss the possible roles played by nanoscale magnetic heterogeneities in the mechanism for magnetostriction in this material. © 2010 The American Physical Society...

  17. Gallium--A smart metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium is a soft, silvery metallic element with an atomic number of 31 and the chemical symbol Ga. The French chemist Paul-Emile Lecoq de Boisbaudran discovered gallium in sphalerite (a zinc-sulfide mineral) in 1875 using spectroscopy. He named the element "gallia" after his native land of France (formerly Gaul; in Latin, Gallia). The existence of gallium had been predicted in 1871 by Dmitri Mendeleev, the Russian chemist who published the first periodic table of the elements. Mendeleev noted a gap in his table and named the missing element "eka-aluminum" because he determined that its location was one place away from aluminum in the table. Mendeleev thought that the missing element (gallium) would be very much like aluminum in its chemical properties, and he was right. Solid gallium has a low melting temperature (~29 degrees Celsius, or °C) and an unusually high boiling point (~2,204 °C). Because of these properties, the earliest uses of gallium were in high-temperature thermometers and in designing metal alloys that melt easily. The development of a gallium-based direct band-gap semiconductor in the 1960s led to what is now one of the most well-known applications for gallium-based products--the manufacture of smartphones and data-centric networks.

  18. Estimations of the spontaneous polarization of binary and ternary compounds of group III nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, S. Yu.; Posrednik, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    The dependences of spontaneous polarizations P sp of solid solutions of aluminum, gallium, and indium nitrides on the compositions were estimated using the Harrison bond-orbital method. A simple formula was proposed to estimate P sp using only lengths of the interatomic bonds between the nearest neighbor atoms and the angles between these bonds.

  19. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  20. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  1. Optical pressure and temperature sensor based on the luminescence properties of Nd3+ ion in a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Luis, S F; Muñoz-Santiuste, J E; Lavín, V; Rodríguez-Mendoza, U R

    2012-04-23

    Hypersensitivity to pressure and temperature is observed in the near-infrared emission lines of the Nd(3+) ion in a Cr(3+),Nd(3+):Gd(3)Sc(2)Ga(3)O(12) crystal, associated to the R(1,2)((4)F(3/2))→Z(5)((4)I(9/2)) and R(1,2)((4)F(3/2))→Z(1)((4)I(9/2)) transitions. The former emissions show large linear pressure coefficients of -11.3 cm(-1)/GPa and -8.8 cm(-1)/GPa, while the latter show high thermal sensitivity in the low temperature range. Thus this garnet crystal can be considered a potential optical pressure and/or temperature sensor in high pressure and temperature experiments up to 12 GPa and below room temperature, used in diamond anvil cells and excited with different UV and visible commercial laser due to the multiple Cr(3+) and Nd(3+) absorption bands.

  2. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  3. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  4. Gallium Arsenide Domino Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Long, Stephen I.

    1990-01-01

    Advantages include reduced power and high speed. Experimental gallium arsenide field-effect-transistor (FET) domino circuit replicated in large numbers for use in dynamic-logic systems. Name of circuit denotes mode of operation, which logic signals propagate from each stage to next when successive stages operated at slightly staggered clock cycles, in manner reminiscent of dominoes falling in a row. Building block of domino circuit includes input, inverter, and level-shifting substages. Combinational logic executed in input substage. During low half of clock cycle, result of logic operation transmitted to following stage.

  5. Phase diagrams and synthesis of cubic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Turkevich, V Z

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of phase equilibria, the lowest temperatures, T sub m sub i sub n , above which at high pressures cubic boron nitride crystallization from melt solution is allowable in terms of thermodynamics have been found for a number of systems that include boron nitride.

  6. Atomic scale piezo electricity and giant piezo electric resistance effect in gallium nitride tunnel junctions under compressive strain%压缩应变载荷下氮化镓隧道结微观压电特性及其巨压电电阻效应∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耿鸿; 朱佳; 姜格蕾; 王彪; 郑跃

    2016-01-01

    电子器件可控性研究在日益追求器件智能化和可控化的当今社会至关重要.基于第一性原理和量子输运计算,本文研究了压缩应变载荷对氮化镓(GaN)隧道结基态电学性质和电流输运的影响,在原子尺度上窥视了氮化镓隧道结的微观压电性,验证了其内在的巨压电电阻(GPR)效应.计算结果表明,压缩应变载荷可以调节隧道结内氮化镓势垒层的电势能降、内建电场、电荷密度和极化强度,进而实现对隧道结电流输运和隧穿电阻的调控.在−1.0 V的偏置电压下,−5%的压缩应变载荷将使氮化镓隧道结的隧穿电阻增至4倍.本研究展现了氮化镓隧道结在可控电子器件中的应用潜力,也展现了应变工程在调控电子器件性能方面的光明前景.%It is an urgent and significant issue to investigate the influence factors of functional devices and then improve, modify or control their performances, which has important significance for the practical application and electronic industry. Based on first principle and quantum transport calculations, the effects of compressive strain on the current transport and relative electrical properties (such as the electrostatic potential energy, built-in electric field, charge density and polarization, etc.) in gallium nitride (GaN) tunnel junctions are investigated. It is found that there are potential energy drop, built-in electric field and spontaneous polarization in the GaN barrier of the tunnel junction due to the non-centrosymmetric structure of GaN. Furthermore, results also show that all these electrical properties can be adjusted by compressive strain. With the increase of the applied in-plane compressive strain, the piezocharge density in the GaN barrier of the tunnel junction gradually increases. Accordingly, the potential energy drop throughout the GaN barrier gradually flattens and the built-in electric field decreases. Meanwhile, the average

  7. Ordered arrays of bottom-up III-nitride core-shell nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Nami, Mohsen; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Eller, Rhett F.; Shima, Darryl M.; Fairchild, Michael N.; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Brueck, S. R. J.; Feezell, Daniel F.

    2015-08-01

    The growth of ordered arrays of group III-nitride nanostructures on c-plane gallium nitride (GaN) on sapphire using selective-area metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is presented. The growth of these nanostructures promotes strain relaxation that allows the combination of high indium content active regions with very low dislocation densities and also gives access to nonpolar and semipolar crystallographic orientations of GaN. The influence of the starting template and the growth conditions on the growth rate and morphology is discussed. The growth of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) active region shells on these nanostructures is discussed and the stability of various crystallographic orientations under typical growth conditions is studied. Finally, the effect of the growth conditions on the morphology of pyramidal stripe LEDs is discussed and preliminary results on electrical injection of these LEDs are presented.

  8. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  9. Light propagation in two-dimensional photonic crystals based on uniaxial polar materials: results on polaritonic spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Urrea, H. A.; Duque, C. A.; Pérez-Quintana, I. V.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.

    2017-03-01

    The dispersion relations of two-dimensional photonic crystals made of uniaxial polaritonic cylinders arranged in triangular lattice are calculated. The particular case of the transverse magnetic polarization is taken into account. Three different uniaxial materials showing transverse phonon-polariton excitations are considered: aluminum nitride, gallium nitride, and indium nitride. The study is carried out by means of the finite-difference time-domain technique for the solution of Maxwell equations, together with the method of the auxiliary differential equation. It is shown that changing the filling fraction can result in the modification of both the photonic and polaritonic bandgaps in the optical dispersion relations. Wider gaps appear for smaller filling fraction values, whereas a larger number of photonic bandgaps will occur within the frequency range considered when a larger filling fraction is used. The effect of including the distinct wurtzite III-V nitride semiconductors as core materials in the cylinders embedded in the air on the photonic properties is discussed as well, highlighting the effect of the dielectric anisotropy on the properties of the polaritonic part of the photonic spectrum.

  10. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  11. The fundamental surface science of wurtzite gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    A review is presented that covers the experimental and theoretical literature relating to the preparation, electronic structure and chemical and physical properties of the surfaces of the wurtzite form of GaN. The discussion includes the adsorption of various chemical elements and of inorganic, organometallic and organic species. The focus is on work that contributes to a microscopic, atomistic understanding of GaN surfaces and interfaces, and the review concludes with an assessment of possible future directions.

  12. Review of using gallium nitride for ionizing radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jinghui [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Mulligan, Padhraic; Cao, Lei R., E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Brillson, Leonard [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    With the largest band gap energy of all commercial semiconductors, GaN has found wide application in the making of optoelectronic devices. It has also been used for photodetection such as solar blind imaging as well as ultraviolet and even X-ray detection. Unsurprisingly, the appreciable advantages of GaN over Si, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), SiC, amorphous SiC (a-SiC), and GaAs, particularly for its radiation hardness, have drawn prompt attention from the physics, astronomy, and nuclear science and engineering communities alike, where semiconductors have traditionally been used for nuclear particle detection. Several investigations have established the usefulness of GaN for alpha detection, suggesting that when properly doped or coated with neutron sensitive materials, GaN could be turned into a neutron detection device. Work in this area is still early in its development, but GaN-based devices have already been shown to detect alpha particles, ultraviolet light, X-rays, electrons, and neutrons. Furthermore, the nuclear reaction presented by {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C and various other threshold reactions indicates that GaN is intrinsically sensitive to neutrons. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art development of GaN detectors for detecting directly and indirectly ionizing radiation. Particular emphasis is given to GaN's radiation hardness under high-radiation fields.

  13. Neutron irradiation effects on gallium nitride-based Schottky diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chung-Han; Katz, Evan J.; Zhang, Zhichun [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio 43210 (United States); Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Mishra, Umesh K. [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Brillson, Leonard J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2013-10-14

    Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS), time-resolved surface photovoltage spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and current-voltage measurements together show that fast versus thermal neutrons differ strongly in their electronic and morphological effects on metal-GaN Schottky diodes. Fast and thermal neutrons introduce GaN displacement damage and native point defects, while thermal neutrons also drive metallurgical reactions at metal/GaN interfaces. Defect densities exhibit a threshold neutron fluence below which thermal neutrons preferentially heal versus create new native point defects. Scanning XPS and DRCLS reveal strong fluence- and metal-dependent electronic and chemical changes near the free surface and metal interfaces that impact diode properties.

  14. Neutron irradiation effects on metal-gallium nitride contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Evan J.; Lin, Chung-Han; Zhang, Zhichun [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Mishra, Umesh K. [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Brillson, Leonard J., E-mail: brillson.1@osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-03-28

    We have measured the effect of fast and thermal neutrons on GaN Schottky barriers and ohmic contacts using current–voltage and transmission line method electrical techniques, optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy morphological techniques, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy chemical techniques. These studies reveal a 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} neutron threshold for Schottky barrier ideality factor increases, a 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} fast plus thermal neutron threshold for ohmic contact sheet and contact resistance increases, and 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2} neutron fluence threshold for major device degradation identified with thermally driven diffusion of Ga and N into the metal contacts and surface phase changes. These results demonstrate the need for protecting metal-GaN contacts in device applications subject to neutron radiation.

  15. Gallium nitride epitaxy on silicon: Importance of substrate preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G.A.; Sverdlov, B.N.; Botchkarev, A.; Morkoc, H.; Thompson, W.H.; Nayfeh, M.H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Smith, D.J.; Tsen, S.C.Y. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Hexagonal GaN films grown on non-isomorphic substrates are usually characterized by numerous threading defects which are essentially boundaries between wurtzite GaN domains where the stacking sequences do not align. One origin of these defects is irregularities on the substrate surface such as surface steps. Using Si <111> substrates and a substrate preparation procedure that makes wide atomically flat terraces, the authors demonstrate that reduction of these irregularities greatly improves the crystalline and luminescent quality of GaN films grown by plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray rocking curve width decreases from over 1 degree to less than 20 minutes, while PL halfwidth decreases from over 15 meV to less than 10 meV.

  16. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  17. Experimental studies of electron-phonon interactions in gallium nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Stanton, N M

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental investigation of the electron-phonon interaction in GaN. Bulk epilayers, grown by MBE, and AIGaN/GaN heterostructure grown by MOCVD, have been studied. The energy relaxation rate for hot electrons has been measured over a wide range of temperatures, allowing both acoustic and optic phonon emission to be studied in GaN epilayers. Direct phonon measurements, both studying the emission and absorption processes, have been performed. Detection of phonons emitted when hot electrons relax their excess energy complements the measurements of relaxation rates. Absorption of acoustic phonons by the epilayers, using both fixed and extended metal film phonon sources, allowed investigation into the effectiveness of the 2k sub F cutoff in the low mobility layers. The experimental findings are compared with the predictions of theory. AIGaN/GaN heterostructures were characterised and measurements of the energy relaxation rate in the temperature range 4K-40K obtained. Excellent agreement wi...

  18. Gallium nitride nanoparticles for solar-blind detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dinesh Kabra; Kripasindhu Sardar; K S Narayan

    2003-10-01

    We investigate the properties of GaN semiconducting nanoparticles as a potential candidate for photodetection in the solar-blind region. The photocurrent spectral response is studied spanning the range 1.6-5.5 eV. A significant fraction of the response is in the range 4-5.5 eV. The results are compared to other optical properties and the origins of the features observed in the spectra are speculated upon.

  19. Electrical Activation Studies of Ion Implanted Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-20

    Amplifier Electromagnet Controller Lakeshore DRC -91CA Temperature Controller 706 Scanner 196 Digital Multimeter 220 Current Source 617 Electrometer...complete list of publications resulting from this doctoral research. The list is divided into three sections: journal articles, refereed conference...2001. Refereed Conference Proceedings: “Optical Characterization of Mg- and Si-Implanted GaN,” Fellows J., Yeo Y.K., Hengehold R., and Krasnobaev

  20. Density and morphology adjustments of gallium nitride nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teker, Kasif

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the morphology and density adjustments of GaN nanostructures via CVD process. GaN nanostructure growth has been carried out using Ga and NH3 as source materials with various catalyst materials, such as Au, Ni, Ag, and Fe between 800 and 1100 °C. The investigation has focused on the effects of process parameters, such as growth temperature and catalyst materials on the GaN nanowire morphology and density. Low temperature (contamination and produces high density of long nanowires, which is very crucial for scale-up manufacturing opportunities.

  1. Auger Recombination in Indium Gallium Nitride: Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krames, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Progress in InGaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) technology has resulted in white-light emitters with efficiencies far exceeding those of conventional light sources such as tungsten-filament-based incandescence and mercury-vapor based fluorescence. Indeed, by now efficacies exceeding 150 lumens per Watt for InGaN-based phosphor-converted white LEDs are claimed, which represent a 90% energy savings compared to the conventional incandescent (i.e., ``light bulb'') solution. However, these high performance levels are obtained under conditions of very low forward current-density for the InGaN LED and do not represent true operating conditions (nor cost-effective utilization) for the device. In order to reduce the cost (and thus increase market penetration of) solid-state lighting, more lumens per unit of semiconductor area are required which in practice necessitates higher drive current densities. Unfortunately, at these higher driver current densities, the internal quantum efficiency of InGaN-based LEDs is observed to decrease significantly. In the fall of 2007, researchers at the Advanced Laboratories of Philips Lumileds were the first to propose Auger recombination as the root-cause mechanism in InGaN which was behind this ``efficiency droop'' [1]. They further proposed to circumvent the problem by employing InGaN-based active region designs that maintain low carrier density, and demonstrated an LED device design that reaches a maximum quantum efficiency above 200 A/cm2, compared to ˜1-10 A/cm^2 for typical multiple-quantum-well heterostructures [2]. In this talk we will review the experimental evidence for Auger recombination in InGaN, beginning with the early work from 2007 and then considering additional work from more recent efforts to better understand the details behind this loss mechanism. [4pt] [1] Y. C. Shen, G. O. M"uller, S. Watanabe, N. F. Gardner, A. Munkholm, and M. R. Krames, ``Auger recombination in InGaN measured by photoluminescence'', Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 141101 (2007). [0pt] [2] N. F. Gardner, G. O. M"uller, Y. C. Shen, G. Chen, S. Watanabe, W. G"otz, and M. R. Krames, ``Blue-emitting InGaN--GaN double-heterostructure light-emitting diodes reaching maximum quantum efficiency above 200 A/cm^2'', Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 243506 (2007).

  2. Kinase detection with gallium nitride based high electron mobility transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Matthew S; Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Arellano, Consuelo; Xie, Jinqiao; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-07-01

    A label-free kinase detection system was fabricated by the adsorption of gold nanoparticles functionalized with kinase inhibitor onto AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The HEMTs were operated near threshold voltage due to the greatest sensitivity in this operational region. The Au NP/HEMT biosensor system electrically detected 1 pM SRC kinase in ionic solutions. These results are pertinent to drug development applications associated with kinase sensing.

  3. Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

  4. Yellow luminescence of gallium nitride generated by carbon defect complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, D O; Diallo, I C; Reshchikov, M A

    2013-02-22

    We demonstrate that yellow luminescence often observed in both carbon-doped and pristine GaN is the result of electronic transitions via the C(N)-O(N) complex. In contrast to common isolated defects, the C(N)-O(N) complex is energetically favorable, and its calculated optical properties, such as absorption and emission energies, a zero phonon line, and the thermodynamic transition level, all show excellent agreement with measured luminescence data. Thus, by combining hybrid density functional theory and experimental measurements, we propose a solution to a long-standing problem of the GaN yellow luminescence.

  5. Review of using gallium nitride for ionizing radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghui; Mulligan, Padhraic; Brillson, Leonard; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-09-01

    With the largest band gap energy of all commercial semiconductors, GaN has found wide application in the making of optoelectronic devices. It has also been used for photodetection such as solar blind imaging as well as ultraviolet and even X-ray detection. Unsurprisingly, the appreciable advantages of GaN over Si, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), SiC, amorphous SiC (a-SiC), and GaAs, particularly for its radiation hardness, have drawn prompt attention from the physics, astronomy, and nuclear science and engineering communities alike, where semiconductors have traditionally been used for nuclear particle detection. Several investigations have established the usefulness of GaN for alpha detection, suggesting that when properly doped or coated with neutron sensitive materials, GaN could be turned into a neutron detection device. Work in this area is still early in its development, but GaN-based devices have already been shown to detect alpha particles, ultraviolet light, X-rays, electrons, and neutrons. Furthermore, the nuclear reaction presented by 14N(n,p)14C and various other threshold reactions indicates that GaN is intrinsically sensitive to neutrons. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art development of GaN detectors for detecting directly and indirectly ionizing radiation. Particular emphasis is given to GaN's radiation hardness under high-radiation fields.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of radiation-induced defects in gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing

    Radiation damage studies of GaN provide insights into the fundamental properties of the material as well as the basic knowledge needed to predict degradation of GaN-based devices in space-based applications or other radiation environments. The main interests are in investigating the properties of radiation-induced defects at the microscopic level and providing data to evaluate the radiation hardness of the material. Selective damage of the N-sublattice is achieved with 0.42 MeV electron irradiation. Two new luminescence lines at 3.4732 eV and 3.4545 eV are detected by time-resolved photoluminescence after irradiation. The two lines are associated with the ground state bound exciton of a new donor B1 and its two-electron transition. The donor binding energy of B1 is determined as 24.9 +/- 0.4 meV, shallower than the impurity donors ON and Si Ga. Among the possible defects, the nitrogen vacancy (VN) is the best candidate for the new donor B1. In addition, a change under focused 267 nm laser beam is observed at cryogenic temperatures in the excitonic luminescence of the irradiated sample. The donor bound exciton intensity of ON and SiGa, the total band edge luminescence intensity, and the luminescence decay lifetime of free and bound excitons all increase with laser exposure time. In contrast, the relative intensity of the B 1 bound exciton emission decreases. The change is not observed with below bandgap illumination. We propose that the light-induced change reflects the illumination-assisted dissociation of non-radiative defect complexes O N-Ni and SiGa-Ni, and subsequently the migration of Ni and at least partial annihilation of N i at VN. The new donor B1 bound exciton emission and the light-induced change starts to disappear at annealing temperature around 300°C, indicating the annihilation of the irradiation-induced vacancy and interstitial defects. An activation energy of 1.5 eV is obtained, which is proposed to be the sum of the dissociation energy of the ON-N i and SiGa-Ni complexes and the migration barrier of the Ni-. Irradiation with 25 MeV and 55 MeV protons causes damage in both Ga and N-sublattices. A radiation-induced increase in the yellow luminescence and red-shift of the YL peak are observed in a free-standing HVPE GaN after proton irradiation, indicating the introduction of Ga-vacancies. Time-resolved photoluminescence reveals a significant reduction of the carrier lifetime in addition to the decrease in luminescence intensity. Carrier lifetime degradation constants are in the range of 10-15 to 10-14 cm 2/ns, which is 5 to 25 times better than for GaAs. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  7. Design of Ceramic Springs for Use in Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaforey, M. F.; Deeb, C. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    Segregation studies can be done in microgravity to reduce buoyancy driven convection and investigate diffusion-controlled growth during the growth of semiconductor crystals. During these experiments, it is necessary to prevent free surface formation in order to avoid surface tension driven convection (Marangoni convection). Semiconductor materials such as gallium arsenide and germanium shrink upon melting, so a spring is necessary to reduce the volume of the growth chamber and prevent the formation of a free surface when the sample melts. A spring used in this application must be able to withstand both the high temperature and the processing atmosphere. During the growth of gallium arsenide crystals during the GTE Labs/USAF/NASA GaAs GAS Program and during the CWRU GaAs programs aboard the First and Second United States microgravity Laboratories, springs made of pyrolytic boron nitride (PBN) leaves were used. The mechanical properties of these PBN springs have been investigated and springs having spring constants ranging from 0.25 N/mm to 25 N/mm were measured. With this improved understanding comes the ability to design springs for more general applications, and guidelines are given for optimizing the design of PBN springs for crystal growth applications.

  8. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2003-06-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  9. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  10. Gallium-67 myocardial scintigraphy in dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Toshikazu; Konishi, Tokuji; Koyama, Takao; Morita, Yuriko; Futagami, Yasuo; Hayashi, Takamaro; Hamada, Masayuki; Nakano, Takeshi

    1988-12-01

    Gallium-67 imaging has been employed clinically in the detection of malignant tumor or chronic inflammatory disease. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of Gallium-67 myocardial imaging as an adjunct to endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. Nine patients who had been diagnosed clinically as dilated cardiomyopathy underwent Gallium-67 myocardial imaging. Left ventricular endomyocardial biopsy was performed on all patients. Two had positive Gallium-67 imaging, but myocarditis was not proven in their tissue specimen. Two others with proven myocarditis had negative Gallium-67 imaging. These results suggest that Gallium-67 imaging is not always a useful tool to detect latent myocarditis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  11. Microwave power aluminum gallium nitride/gallium nitride heterojunction field effect transistor for X-band applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shujun

    GaN material has been considered in recent years an attractive candidate for microwave power applications owing to its strong piezo-electric (PZ) and spontaneous polarization (SP) effects, high saturation velocity and wideband gap. AlGaN/GaN Heterojunction Field Effect Transistor (HFET) is chosen to overcome the disadvantages of low mobility in wide bandgap materials so that both high power and high speed are feasible. Analysis and simulation are performed to understand the enhancement of sheet charge density due to the PZ and SP effects in the AlGaN/GaN material system. Major factors affecting the sheet channel charge density are discussed. To verify the PZ and SP charge effects, testing structures of AlGaN/GaN with various Al contents for Hall measurement are then fabricated. Results support our analysis. GaN-based HFET devices with 25% Al content are fabricated after solving process issues. An external transconductance of 200 mS/mm, a saturation current density of 800 mA/mm and a breakdown voltage of 40 V to 50 V are achieved. A CW power amplifier with the output of 8 W at 9 GHz is achieved from a single 5 mm AlGaN/GaN HFET device. A novel process, referred to as Gamma gate process, is developed to realize high breakdown performance as well as small gate length. As a result, a 0.3 mum gate length device with an integrated field plate is fabricated using 1 mum conventional optical lithograph techniques. Improvements of breakdown voltage and RF performance by a factor of over 2 have been achieved. High temperature storage and measurement show that the AlGaN/GaN HFET devices can survive at an environment temperature as high as 592°C. The devices also survive after exposing to proton irradiation at a dosage of 1 x 1014 cm-2, indicating its intrinsic resistance to radiation.

  12. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN, InGaN, ScN, and ScAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD); hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE); gallium nitride (GaN); indium gallium nitride (InGaN); scandium nitride (ScN); scandium aluminum nitride (ScAlN); semiconductors; thin films; nanowires; III nitrides; crystal growth - We studied the HVPE growth of different III ni

  13. Gallium localization in peritonitis. Two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaManna, M.M.; Saluk, P.H.; Zekavat, P.P.; Mobini, J.; Parker, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse abdominal localization of gallium was found in two patients with peritonitis, one due to M. tuberculosis and the other presumably pyogenic. Gallium scanning may be useful in the diagnosis of peritonitis and perhaps of other serosal infections.

  14. Field-effect transistors based on cubic indium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseki, Masaaki; Okubo, Kana; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2014-02-04

    Although the demand for high-speed telecommunications has increased in recent years, the performance of transistors fabricated with traditional semiconductors such as silicon, gallium arsenide, and gallium nitride have reached their physical performance limits. Therefore, new materials with high carrier velocities should be sought for the fabrication of next-generation, ultra-high-speed transistors. Indium nitride (InN) has attracted much attention for this purpose because of its high electron drift velocity under a high electric field. Thick InN films have been applied to the fabrication of field-effect transistors (FETs), but the performance of the thick InN transistors was discouraging, with no clear linear-saturation output characteristics and poor on/off current ratios. Here, we report the epitaxial deposition of ultrathin cubic InN on insulating oxide yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates and the first demonstration of ultrathin-InN-based FETs. The devices exhibit high on/off ratios and low off-current densities because of the high quality top and bottom interfaces between the ultrathin cubic InN and oxide insulators. This first demonstration of FETs using a ultrathin cubic indium nitride semiconductor will thus pave the way for the development of next-generation high-speed electronics.

  15. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, P.E.; Dinetta, L.C.; Goetz, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) energy converters may be successfully deployed to provide new mission capabilities for spacecraft. Betavoltaic power supplies based on the conversion of tritium beta decay to electricity using GaP energy converters can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. High temperature solar cells, also based on GaP, can be used in inward-bound missions greatly reducing the need for thermal dissipation. Results are presented for GaP direct conversion devices powered by Ni-63 and compared to the conversion of light emitted by tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp {minus}17) A/sq cm have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. Temperature dependent IV, QE, R(sub sh), and V(sub oc) results are also presented. These data are used to predict the high-temperature solar cell and betacell performance of GaP devices and suggest appropriate applications for the deployment of this technology.

  16. Medical Applications and Toxicities of Gallium Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Chitambar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two to three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in the fields of medicine and electronics. In clinical medicine, radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human disease while more recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may function as antimicrobial agents against certain pathogens. In a totally different realm, the chemical properties of gallium arsenide have led to its use in the semiconductor industry. Gallium compounds, whether used medically or in the electronics field, have toxicities. Patients receiving gallium nitrate for the treatment of various diseases may benefit from such therapy, but knowledge of the therapeutic index of this drug is necessary to avoid clinical toxicities. Animals exposed to gallium arsenide display toxicities in certain organ systems suggesting that environmental risks may exist for individuals exposed to this compound in the workplace. Although the arsenic moiety of gallium arsenide appears to be mainly responsible for its pulmonary toxicity, gallium may contribute to some of the detrimental effects in other organs. The use of older and newer gallium compounds in clinical medicine may be advanced by a better understanding of their mechanisms of action, drug resistance, pharmacology, and side-effects. This review will discuss the medical applications of gallium and its mechanisms of action, the newer gallium compounds and future directions for development, and the toxicities of gallium compounds in current use.

  17. Elastic properties of indium nitrides grown on sapphire substrates determined by nano-indentation: In comparison with other nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yonenaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The hardness of wurtzite indium nitride (α-InN films of 0.5 to 4 μm in thickness was measured by the nano-indentation method at room temperature. After investigation of crystalline quality by x-ray diffraction, the hardness and Young’s modulus were determined to be 8.8 ± 0.4 and 184 ± 5 GPa, respectively, for the In (0001- and N ( 000 1 ̄ -growth faces of InN films. The bulk and shear moduli were then derived to be 99 ± 3 and 77 ± 2 GPa, respectively. The Poisson’s ratio was evaluated to be 0.17 ± 0.03. The results were examined comprehensively in comparison with previously reported data of InN as well as those of other nitrides of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride. The underlying physical process determining the moduli and hardness was examined in terms of atomic bonding and dislocation energy of the nitrides and wurtzite zinc oxide.

  18. Crystal structure and hard magnetic properties of TbCu7-type Sm0.98Fe9.02-xGax nitrides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    权宁涛; 张世荣; 于敦波; 李扩社; 罗阳; 靳金玲; 张坤; 刘宇超; 李红卫

    2014-01-01

    The compound Sm0.98Fe9.02-xGaxNδ(x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) were prepared by melt-spun method and subsequent annealing and nitriding. The Rietveld analysis showed that the lattice expansion played an important role in improving the Curie temperature. An obvious development of the Curie temperature was obtained with the increased Ga content from x=0-1 (ΔTc=90 ºC). The opti-mum coercivity of nitrides was obtained at x=0.25 with the value Hcj=652 kA/m (8.15 kOe) after annealing, which corresponded to a reasonable distribution of grain sizes of both TbCu7-type SmFe9Nδandα-Fe. However, an excess of Ga doping might lead to an ab-normal growth ofα-Fe, which in turn deteriorated the magnetic properties. It was concluded that a moderate Ga content was very ef-fective in raising the coercivity and Curie temperament in the TbCu7-type Sm-Fe-N.

  19. Nitridogermanate nitrides Sr7[GeN4]N2 and Ca7[GeN4]N2: synthesis employing sodium melts, crystal structure, and density-functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junggeburth, Sebastian C; Oeckler, Oliver; Johrendt, Dirk; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2008-12-15

    The alkaline earth nitridogermanate nitrides AE(7)[GeN(4)]N(2) (AE = Ca, Sr) have been synthesized using a Na flux technique in sealed Ta tubes. According to single-crystal X-ray diffraction the isotypic compounds crystallize in space group Pbcn (No. 60) with Z = 4, (Sr(7)[GeN(4)]N(2): a = 1152.6(2), b = 658.66(13), c = 1383.6(3) pm, V = 1050.5(4) x 10(6) pm(3), R1 = 0.049; Ca(7)[GeN(4)]N(2): a = 1082.6(2), b = 619.40(12), c = 1312.1(3) pm, V = 879.8(3) x 10(6) pm(3), R1 = 0.016). Owing to the high N/Ge ratio, the compounds contain discrete N(3-) ions coordinated by six AE(2+) besides discrete [GeN(4)](8-) tetrahedrons. One of the AE(2+) ion is coordinated by only four N(3-) ions, which is rather an unusual low coordination number for Sr(2+). Together with the isolated [GeN(4)](8-) tetrahedrons, these Sr(2+) ions form chains of alternating cation centered edge sharing tetrahedrons. The electronic structure and chemical bonding in Sr(7)[GeN(4)]N(2) has been analyzed employing linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) band structure calculations.

  20. Design of nitride semiconductors for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors are a promising class of materials for solar energy conversion applications, such as photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells. Nitrides can have better solar absorption and electrical transport properties than the more widely studied oxides, as well as the potential for better scalability than other pnictides or chalcogenides. In addition, nitrides are also relatively unexplored compared to other chemistries, so they provide a great opportunity for new materials discovery. This paper reviews the recent advances in the design of novel semiconducting nitrides for solar energy conversion technologies. Both binary and multinary nitrides are discussed, with a range of metal chemistries (Cu3N, ZnSnN2, Sn3N4, etc.) and crystal structures (delafossite, perovskite, spinel, etc.), including a brief overview of wurtzite III-N materials and devices. The current scientific challenges and promising future directions in the field are also highlighted.

  1. Performance of GaN-on-Si-based vertical light-emitting diodes using silicon nitride electrodes with conducting filaments: correlation between filament density and device reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Heon; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Byeong Ryong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2016-08-08

    Transparent conductive electrodes with good conductivity and optical transmittance are an essential element for highly efficient light-emitting diodes. However, conventional indium tin oxide and its alternative transparent conductive electrodes have some trouble with a trade-off between electrical conductivity and optical transmittance, thus limiting their practical applications. Here, we present silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes with conducting filaments embedded using the electrical breakdown process and investigate the dependence of the conducting filament density formed in the transparent conductive electrode on the device performance of gallium nitride-based vertical light-emitting diodes. Three gallium nitride-on-silicon-based vertical light-emitting diodes using silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes with high, medium, and low conducting filament densities were prepared with a reference vertical light-emitting diode using metal electrodes. This was carried to determine the optimal density of the conducting filaments in the proposed silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes. In comparison, the vertical light-emitting diodes with a medium conducting filament density exhibited the lowest optical loss, direct ohmic behavior, and the best current injection and distribution over the entire n-type gallium nitride surface, leading to highly reliable light-emitting diode performance.

  2. Process and Equipment of Gallium Nitride Single Crystal Growth with Ammonothermal Method%氨热法生长氮化镓体单晶的工艺与设备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周海涛; 李东平; 何小玲; 张昌龙

    2013-01-01

    由于大尺寸氮化镓单晶难以获得,只能用异质衬底来制作氮化镓器件,因此现在的氮化镓基器件的性能指标还远低于其理论值.氢化物外延法、高压熔体法、助熔剂法和氨热法等许多方法已经用做生长氮化镓大尺寸单晶.其中,氨热法易于实现尺寸扩大,有批量化生产低成本氮化镓晶片的潜力.目前有两个问题仍有待解决.首先是设备,如何增大高压釜口径为液氨溶液提供可靠的设备;第二个是生长工艺,如何以较低的成本得到大面积,低缺陷密度的氮化镓.本文简单综述了氨热法生长大尺寸氮化镓晶体进展.主要内容是关注氨热法的设备和生长工艺.最后探讨了氨热法合成氮化镓单晶的发展前景.

  3. Gallium antimonide texturing for enhanced light extraction from infrared optoelectronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassweiler, Ella; Toor, Fatima

    2016-06-01

    The use of gallium antimonide (GaSb) is increasing, especially for optoelectronic devices in the infrared wavelengths. It has been demonstrated in gallium nitride (GaN) devices operating at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, that surface textures increase the overall device efficiency. In this work, we fabricated eight different surface textures in GaSb to be used in enhancing efficiency in infrared wavelength devices. Through chemical etching with hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and tartaric acid we characterize the types of surface textures formed and the removal rate of entire layers of GaSb. Through optimization of the etching recipes we lower the reflectivity from 35.7% to 1% at 4 μm wavelength for bare and textured GaSb, respectively. In addition, we simulate surface textures using ray optics in finite element method solver software to provide explanation of our experimental findings.

  4. Gallium antimonide texturing for enhanced light extraction from infrared optoelectronics devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Wassweiler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of gallium antimonide (GaSb is increasing, especially for optoelectronic devices in the infrared wavelengths. It has been demonstrated in gallium nitride (GaN devices operating at ultraviolet (UV wavelengths, that surface textures increase the overall device efficiency. In this work, we fabricated eight different surface textures in GaSb to be used in enhancing efficiency in infrared wavelength devices. Through chemical etching with hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and tartaric acid we characterize the types of surface textures formed and the removal rate of entire layers of GaSb. Through optimization of the etching recipes we lower the reflectivity from 35.7% to 1% at 4 μm wavelength for bare and textured GaSb, respectively. In addition, we simulate surface textures using ray optics in finite element method solver software to provide explanation of our experimental findings.

  5. Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te (x=0,00 and 0,20) alloying with gallium and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, A.V.; Zlomanov, V.P.; Gas' kov, A.M.; Ryabova, L.I.; Lazarenko, M.A.; Lisina, N.G.

    Investigation results of doping conditions of PbTe and Pbsub(O.8)Snsub(0.2)Te crystals with gallium and cadmium both in the process of growing and diffusional annealing in component vapours are presented. The concentration of the introduced addition in alloyed samples is determined by chemical analysis; homogeneity of its distribution in crystal volume is studied using the Auger-electron microanalysis. Kinetics of gallium solid solution decomposition in lead telluride is investigated. Galvanomagentic and photoelectric properties of the doped crystals are studied in the temperature range of 4-300 K.

  6. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  7. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  8. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M

    2014-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window. With dimensions optimized for efficient cellular uptake, the nanoparticles demonstrate a high photothermal conversion efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization.

  9. Effect of Nitridation on Morphology, Structural Properties and Stress of A1N Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wei-Guo; JIAO Chun-Mei; WEI Hong-Yuan; ZHANG Pan-Feng; KANG Wing-Ting; ZHANG Ri-Qing; LIU Xiang-Lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate effects of nitridation on A1N morphology, structural properties and stress.It is found that 3 min nitridation can prominently improve A1N crystal structure, and slightly smooth the surface morphology.However, 10min nitridation degrades out-of-plane crystal structure and surface morphology instead.Additionally, 3-min nitridation introduces more tensile stress (1.5 GPa) in A1N films, which can be attributed to the weaker islands 2D coalescent.Nitridation for 10 rain can introduce more defects, or even forms polycrystallinity interlayer, which relaxes the stress.Thus, the stress in A1N with 10 min nitridation decreases to -0.2 GPa compressive stress.

  10. Construction of Gallium Point at NMIJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiatmo, J. V.; Saito, I.; Yamazawa, K.

    2017-03-01

    Two open-type gallium point cells were fabricated using ingots whose nominal purities are 7N. Measurement systems for the realization of the melting point of gallium using these cells were built. The melting point of gallium is repeatedly realized by means of the measurement systems for evaluating the repeatability. Measurements for evaluating the effect of hydrostatic pressure coming from the molten gallium existing during the melting process and the effect of gas pressure that fills the cell were also performed. Direct cell comparisons between those cells were conducted. This comparison was aimed to evaluate the consistency of each cell, especially related to the nominal purity. Direct cell comparison between the open-type and the sealed-type gallium point cell was also conducted. Chemical analysis was conducted using samples extracted from ingots used in both the newly built open-type gallium point cells, from which the effect of impurities in the ingot was evaluated.

  11. Structure refinement for tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lianyun [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shang Yuan Cun, Haidian District, Beijing 100044 (China); Huang, Kai; Hou, Jungang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, Hongmin, E-mail: hzhu@metall.ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various phases and morphologies for the first time have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. Highlights: ► The spherical TaN, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. ► The crystal structures of different tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement on the X-ray diffraction data and the examinations of electron microcopies. ► The specific surface area of the tantalum nitrides powders was around 10 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. ► Tantalum nitrides powders could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitrides (TaN{sub x}) nanocrystals with different phase and morphology have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. The crystal structures of tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement based on the X-ray diffraction data. The morphologies of various tantalum nitrides nanocrystals in high quality were analyzed through the electron microcopies examinations. The spherical TaN nanoparticles, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been selectively prepared at different annealing temperatures. In addition, the specific surface areas of the tantalum nitrides nanocrystals measured by BET method were around 9.87–11.64 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, indicating that such nano-sized tantalum nitrides could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance.

  12. Magnetoelectric effect in layered structures of amorphous ferromagnetic alloy and gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichurin, M. I.; Petrov, V. M.; Leontiev, V. S.; Ivanov, S. N.; Sokolov, O. V.

    2017-02-01

    A paper devotes to theoretical and experimental studying the magnetoelectric interaction in layered structures of amorphous ferromagnetic alloy and single- crystal gallium arsenide. The authors investigated the magnetoelectric effect in the (100) plane of gallium arsenide in the electromechanical resonance range of 200-240 kHz and obtained maximal ME voltage coefficient of 120 V/A at bias field equaled 3.6 kA/m for the direction parallel to the [011] axis. Also the magnetoelectric effect in the (110) and (111) planes is discussed. The results can be used for design of new electronic devices based on the magnetostrictive-semiconductor materials.

  13. Microscopic Optical Characterization of Free Standing III-Nitride Substrates, ZnO Bulk Crystals, and III-V Structures for Non-Linear Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    range in high pressure autoclaves and supercritical ammonia. Thick hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE) or ammonothermal seeds, cut from ammonothermal...something similar to an intrusion of the crystal inside the seed, which is probably the consequence of a partial dissolving of the seed in that zone

  14. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  15. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride graphene-like few layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S.; Toury, B.; Journet, C.; Brioude, A.

    2014-06-01

    Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction.Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01017e

  16. Optical control of gallium nanoparticle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, K. F.; Fedotov, V. A.; Pochon, S.; Ross, K. J.; Stevens, G. C.; Zheludev, N. I.; Brocklesby, W. S.; Emel'yanov, V. I.

    2002-03-01

    We report that low-intensity light can dramatically influence and regulate the nanoparticle self-assembly process: Illumination of a substrate exposed to a beam of gallium atoms results in the formation of gallium nanoparticles with a relatively narrow size distribution. Very low light intensities, below the threshold for thermally induced evaporation, exert considerable control over nanoparticle formation.

  17. Gallium-67 citrate scan in extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Wanyu [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Hsieh Jihfang [Chi-Mei Foundation Hospital, Tainan (Taiwan)

    1999-07-01

    Aim: Whole-body gallium scan was performed to evaluate the usefulness of gallium scan for detecting extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) lesions. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with extrapulmonary TB were included in this study. Four patients were found to have two lesions. Totally, 41 lesions were identified, including 19 TB arthritis, 8 spinal TB, 5 TB meningitis, 3 TB lymphadenopathy, 2 TB pericarditis, 1 TB peritonitis, 1 intestinal TB, 1 skin TB and 1 renal TB. Results: Of the 41 extrapulmonary TB lesions, gallium scan detected 32 lesions with a sensitivity of 78%. All the patients with TB meningitis showed negative gallium scan. When the five cases of TB meningitis were excluded, the detection sensitivity of gallium scan increased to 88.9% (32/36). Conclusion: Our data revealed that gallium scan is a convenient and useful method for evaluating extrapulmonary TB lesions other than TB-meningitis. We suggest that gallium scan be included in the clinical routine for patients with suspected extrapulmonary TB. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es wurden Ganzkoerper-Gallium-Szintigramme angefertigt, um den Nutzen der Gallium-Szintigraphie zur Erfassung von extrapulmonalen Tuberkuloseherden (TB) zu erfassen. Methoden: 37 Patienten mit extrapulmonaler TB wurden eingeschlossen. 4 Patienten hatten 2 Laesionen. Insgesamt wurden 41 Laesionen identifiziert, hierunter 19 TB-Arthritis, 8 spinale TB, 5 TB-Meningitis, 3 TB-Lymphadenopathie, 2 TB-Perikarditis, 1 TB-Peritonitis, 1 intestinale TB, 1 Haut-TB und eine Nieren-TB. Ergebnisse: Von den 41 extrapulmonalen TB-Herden erfasste die Gallium-Szintigraphie 32 Herde mit einer Sensitivitaet von 78%. Alle Patienten mit TB-Meningitis zeigten einen negativen Gallium-Scan. Wenn die 5 Faelle mit TB-Meningitis ausgeschlossen wurden, stieg die Sensitivititaet der Gallium-Szintigraphie auf 88,9% (32/36). Schlussfolgerung: Die Daten zeigen, dass die Gallium-Szintigraphie eine einfache und nuetzliche Methode zur Erfassung extrapulmonaler TB-Herde ist

  18. Facile synthesis of efficient photocatalytic tantalum nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheng; Wang, Jiangting; Hou, Jungang; Huang, Kai; Jiao, Shuqiang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, Hongmin, E-mail: hzhu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitride nanoparticles as a visible-light-driven photocatalyst prepared by a novel homogeneously chemical reduction of tantalum pentachloride using sodium in liquid ammonia and the morphologies, visible-light photocatalytic properties and stability of tantalum nitride nanoparticles were investigated. Highlights: ► Tantalum nitride nanoparticles have been prepared by a homogeneously chemical reduction. ► The crystal structure of tantalum nitride was determined by Rietveld refinement and XRD patterns. ► The Tantalum nitride nanoparticle size was in the range of 20–50 nm. ► Much high photocatalytic activities of Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles were obtained under visible-light irradiation. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitride nanoparticles, as visible-light photocatalysts were synthesized by a two-step homogeneously chemical reduction without any polymers and templates. The well-crystallized Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles with a range of 20–50 nm in size have been characterized by a number of techniques, such as XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, BET and UV–Vis spectrum. Most importantly, the Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles with good stability exhibited higher photooxidation activities in the water splitting and degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation than bulk Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} particles and commercial P25 TiO{sub 2}, demonstrating that Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticle is a promising candidate as a visible-light photocatalyst.

  19. A first principle study of band structure of III-nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rashid [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: rasofi@hotmail.com; Akbarzadeh, H. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 841546 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazal-e-Aleem [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2005-12-15

    The band structure of both phases, zinc-blende and wurtzite, of aluminum nitride, indium nitride and gallium nitride has been studied using computational methods. The study has been done using first principle full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). For the exchange correlation potential, generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and an alternative form of GGA proposed by Engel and Vosko (GGA-EV) have been used. Results obtained for band structure of these compounds have been compared with experimental results as well as other first principle computations. Our results show a significant improvement over other theoretical work and are closer to the experimental data.

  20. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  1. Bond Angles in the Crystalline Silicon/Silicon Nitride Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Robert H.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2006-03-01

    Silicon nitride deposited on a silicon substrate has major applications in both dielectric layers in microelectronics and as antireflection and passivation coatings in photovoltaic applications. Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to investigate the influence of temperature and rate of externally applied strain on the structural and mechanical properties of the silicon/silicon nitride interface. Bond-angles between various atom types in the system are used to find and understand more about the mechanisms leading to the failure of the crystal. Ideally in crystalline silicon nitride, bond angles of 109.5 occur when a silicon atom is at the vertex and 120 angles occur when a nitrogen atom is at the vertex. The comparison of the calculated angles to the ideal values give information on the mechanisms of failure in silicon/silicon nitride system.

  2. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  3. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  4. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  5. Dielectric properties of highly resistive GaN crystals grown by ammonothermal method at microwave frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Krupka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Permittivity, the dielectric loss tangent and conductivity of semi-insulating Gallium Nitride crystals have been measured as functions of frequency from 10 GHz to 50 GHz and temperature from 295 to 560 K employing quasi TE0np mode dielectric resonator technique. Crystals were grown using ammonothermal method. Two kinds of doping were used to obtain high resistivity crystals; one with deep acceptors in form of transition metal ions, and the other with shallow Mg acceptors. The sample compensated with transition metal ions exhibited semi-insulating behavior in the whole temperature range. The sample doped with Mg acceptors remained semi-insulating up to 390 K. At temperatures exceeding 390 K the conductivity term in the total dielectric loss tangent of Mg compensated sample becomes dominant and it increases exponentially with activation energy of 1.14 eV. It has been proved that ammonothermal method with appropriate doping allows growth of high quality, temperature stable semi-insulating GaN crystals.

  6. Bismuth incorporation into gallium phosphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Puru [Virginia Commonwealth Univ. (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [West Chester Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States); Christian, Theresa M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States); Beaton, Daniel A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States); Mascarenhas, Angelo [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States); Alberi, Kirstin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States)

    2016-12-21

    Gallium phosphide bismide (GaP1-xBix) epilayers with bismuth fractions from 0.9% to 3.2%, as calculated from lattice parameter measurements, were studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to directly measure bismuth incorporation. The total bismuth fractions found by RBS were higher than expected from the lattice parameter calculations. Furthermore, in one analyzed sample grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 300 degrees C, 55% of incorporated bismuth was found to occupy interstitial sites. We discuss implications of this high interstitial incorporation fraction and its possible relationship to x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements of GaP0.99Bi0.01.

  7. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  8. Macroscopic diffusion models for precipitation in crystalline gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmerle, Sven-Joachim Wolfgang

    2009-09-21

    Based on a thermodynamically consistent model for precipitation in gallium arsenide crystals including surface tension and bulk stresses by Dreyer and Duderstadt, we propose two different mathematical models to describe the size evolution of liquid droplets in a crystalline solid. The first model treats the diffusion-controlled regime of interface motion, while the second model is concerned with the interface-controlled regime of interface motion. Our models take care of conservation of mass and substance. These models generalise the well-known Mullins- Sekerka model for Ostwald ripening. We concentrate on arsenic-rich liquid spherical droplets in a gallium arsenide crystal. Droplets can shrink or grow with time but the centres of droplets remain fixed. The liquid is assumed to be homogeneous in space. Due to different scales for typical distances between droplets and typical radii of liquid droplets we can derive formally so-called mean field models. For a model in the diffusion-controlled regime we prove this limit by homogenisation techniques under plausible assumptions. These mean field models generalise the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner model, which can be derived from the Mullins-Sekerka model rigorously, and is well understood. Mean field models capture the main properties of our system and are well adapted for numerics and further analysis. We determine possible equilibria and discuss their stability. Numerical evidence suggests in which case which one of the two regimes might be appropriate to the experimental situation. (orig.)

  9. Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy of Gallium in Bladder Tissue following Gallium Maltolate Administration during Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Katherine R.; Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L.; Blyth, Robert I. R.; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M.; Thompson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived ...

  10. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  11. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  12. Thermodynamic ground states of platinum metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberg, D; Sadigh, B; Crowhurst, J; Goncharov, A

    2007-10-09

    We have systematically studied the thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum metal elements using density functional theory. We show that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability can extend up to 17 GPa for PtN{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that according to calculations using the local density approximation, these new compounds are also thermodynamically stable at ambient pressure and thus may be the ground state phases for these materials. We further discuss the fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures.

  13. Optical Design of Dilute Nitride Quantum Wells Vertical Cavity Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers for Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten A. Chaqmaqchee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available III-V semiconductors components such as Gallium Arsenic (GaAs, Indium Antimony (InSb, Aluminum Arsenic (AlAs and Indium Arsenic (InAs have high carrier mobilities and direct energy gaps. This is making them indispensable for today’s optoelectronic devices such as semiconductor lasers and optical amplifiers at 1.3 μm wavelength operation. In fact, these elements are led to the invention of the Gallium Indium Nitride Arsenic (GaInNAs, where the lattice is matched to GaAs for such applications. This article is aimed to design dilute nitride GaInNAs quantum wells (QWs enclosed between top and bottom of Aluminum (Gallium Arsenic Al(GaAs distributed bragg mirrors (DBRs using MATLAB® program. Vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (VCSOAs structures are based on Fabry Perot (FP method to design optical gain and bandwidth gain to be operated in reflection and transmission modes. The optical model gives access to the contact layer of epitaxial structure and the reflectivity for successive radiative modes, their lasing thresholds, emission wavelengths and optical field distributions in the laser cavity.

  14. Nitride quantum light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype nitride quantum light sources, particularly single-photon emitters, have been successfully demonstrated, despite the challenges inherent in this complex materials system. The large band offsets available between different nitride alloys have allowed device operation at easily accessible temperatures. A wide range of approaches has been explored: not only self-assembled quantum dot growth but also lithographic methods for site-controlled nanostructure formation. All these approaches face common challenges, particularly strong background signals which contaminate the single-photon stream and excessive spectral diffusion of the quantum dot emission wavelength. If these challenges can be successfully overcome, then ongoing rapid progress in the conventional III-V semiconductors provides a roadmap for future progress in the nitrides.

  15. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  16. Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,W.Q.

    2008-08-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c

  17. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2005-07-30

    In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 {micro}m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of {approx} 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light

  18. Nanoscale photonics of structural transformations in gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Fedotov, V. A.; MacDonald, K. F.; Stevens, G. C.; Pochon, Sebastien C.; Woodford, M.

    2002-11-01

    We have found recently that Gallium, confined at an interface with silica, responds dramatically to low power optical excitation when held at temperatures close to its melting point (29.8oC). Intensities of just a few kW/cm2 can reversibly modulate the intensity (by up to 40%) and phase (by as much as several degrees) of reflected light as the result of a light-induced structural transition occurring in a layer of gallium of only a few nm thick. Here, we report that this concept - of achieving a nonlinearity via a light-induced transformation in a confined solid at a temperature close to a phase transition temperature - can also be applied to gallium nanoparticles. We present the transient all-optical switching characteristics of gallium nanoparticle films comprising particles, typically 80 nm in diameter, which were formed directly on the ends of optical fibers using a new light-assisted self-assembly technique. We also report, for the first time, that this light-induced structural transition in gallium confined at an interface with silica underlies a new mechanism for photoconductivity. In our opinion, the exploitation of the light-induced phase transition in gallium may be a means of enabling the development of nanoscale photonic devices.

  19. Novel ethylenediamine-gallium phosphate containing 6-fold coordinated gallium atoms with unusual four equatorial Ga–N bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torre-Fernández, Laura [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Espina, Aránzazu; Khainakov, Sergei A.; Amghouz, Zakariae [Servicios Científico Técnicos, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); García, José R. [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); García-Granda, Santiago, E-mail: sgg@uniovi.es [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    A novel ethylenediamine-gallium phosphate, formulated as Ga(H{sub 2}NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O, was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure, including hydrogen positions, was determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (monoclinic, a=9.4886(3) Å, b=6.0374(2) Å, c=10.2874(3) Å, and β=104.226(3)°, space group Pc) and the bulk was characterized by chemical (Ga–P–C–H–N) and thermal analysis (TG–MS and DSC), including activation energy data of its thermo-oxidative degradation, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, SAED/NBD, and STEM BF-EDX). The crystal structure is built up of infinite zig-zag chains running along the c-axis, formed by vertex-shared (PO{sub 4}) and (GaO{sub 2}N{sub 4}) polyhedra. The new compound is characterized by unusual four equatorial Ga–N bonds coming from two nonequivalent ethylenediamine molecules and exhibits strong blue emission at 430 nm (λ{sub ex}=350 nm) in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of a new ethylenediamine-gallium phosphate, Ga(H{sub 2}NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O, were obtained and the structural features presented. This structure is one of the scarce examples of GaPO with Ga–N bonds reported. - Highlights: • A novel ethylenediamine-gallium phosphate was hydrothermally synthesized. • The new compound is characterized by unusual four equatorial Ga–N bonds. • Void-volume analysis shows cages and channels with sizes ideally suited to accommodate small molecules. • The new compound exhibits strong blue emission.

  20. Adsorption of sugars on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride surfaces: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Ahmed A. [Center for Nanotechnology, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Department of Nuclear and Radiation Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Fadlallah, Mohamed M. [Center for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha (Egypt); Badawi, Ashraf [Center for Nanotechnology, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Maarouf, Ahmed A., E-mail: ahmed.maarouf@egnc.gov.eg [Center for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Egypt Nanotechnology Center & Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • Doping boron nitride sheets with aluminum or gallium atoms significantly enhances their molecular adsorption properties. • Adsorption of glucose or glucosamine on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride sheets changes the band gap. • Doping concentration changes the bad gap, but has a minor effect on the adsorption energy. - Abstract: Molecular adsorption on surfaces is a key element for many applications, including sensing and catalysis. Non-invasive sugar sensing has been an active area of research due to its importance to diabetes care. The adsorption of sugars on a template surface study is at the heart of matter. Here, we study doped hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNNs) as adsorbing and sensing template for glucose and glucosamine. Using first principles calculations, we find that the adsorption of glucose and glucosamine on h-BNNs is significantly enhanced by the substitutional doping of the sheet with Al and Ga. Including long range van der Waals corrections gives adsorption energies of about 2 eV. In addition to the charge transfer occurring between glucose and the Al/Ga-doped BN sheets, the adsorption alters the size of the band gap, allowing for optical detection of adsorption. We also find that Al-doped boron nitride sheet is better than Ga-doped boron nitride sheet to enhance the adsorption energy of glucose and glucosamine. The results of our work can be potentially utilized when designing support templates for glucose and glucosamine.

  1. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  2. Synthesis of Single Crystal GaN Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lining Fang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The straight and curved gallium nitride (GaN nanowires were successfully synthesized by controlling the gallium/ nitrogen reactant ratio via a chemical vapour deposition method. The structure and morphology of nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The straight and curved GaN nanowires are composed of wurtzite and a zinc blende structure, respectively. Photoluminescence (PL spectra of zinc blende GaN nanowires showed a strong UV emission band at 400 nm, indicating potential application in optoe‐ lectronic devices.

  3. Scanning proximal microscopy study of the thin layers of silicon carbide-aluminum nitride solid solution manufactured by fast sublimation epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tománek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is a growth of SiC/(SiC1−x(AlNx structures by fast sublimation epitaxy of the polycrystalline source of (SiC1−x(AlNx and their characterisation by proximal scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. For that purpose optimal conditions of sublimation process have been defined. Manufactured structures could be used as substrates for wide-band-gap semiconductor devices on the basis of nitrides, including gallium nitride, aluminum nitride and their alloys, as well as for the production of transistors with high mobility of electrons and also for creation of blue and ultraviolet light emitters (light-emitted diodes and laser diodes. The result of analysis shows that increasing of the growth temperature up to 2300 K allows carry out sublimation epitaxy of thin layers of aluminum nitride and its solid solution.

  4. Gallium doping in transparent conductive ZnO thin films prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, A. R.; Deshamukh, P. R.; Deokate, R. J.; Haranath, D.; Bhosale, C. H.; Rajpure, K. Y.

    2008-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and ZnO : Ga films have been deposited by the spray pyrolysis method onto preheated glass substrates using zinc acetate and gallium nitrate as precursors for Zn and Ga ions, respectively. The effect of Ga doping on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of sprayed ZnO thin films were investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and Hall effect techniques. XRD studies reveal that films are polycrystalline with hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure. The thin films were oriented along the (0 0 2) plane. Room temperature PL measurements indicate that the deposited films exhibit proper doping of Ga in ZnO lattice. The average transparency in the visible range was around ~85-95% for typical thin film deposited using 2 at% gallium doping. The optical band gap increased from 3.31 to 3.34 eV with Ga doping of 2 at%. The addition of gallium induces a decrease in electrical resistivity of the ZnO : Ga films up to 2 at% gallium doping. The highest figure of merit observed in this present study was 3.09 × 10-3 cm2 Ω-1.

  5. Gallium doping in transparent conductive ZnO thin films prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babar, A R; Deshamukh, P R; Deokate, R J; Bhosale, C H; Rajpure, K Y [Electrochemical Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004 (India); Haranath, D [National Physical Laboratory, Dr K S Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110 012 (India)], E-mail: rajpure@yahoo.com

    2008-07-07

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and ZnO : Ga films have been deposited by the spray pyrolysis method onto preheated glass substrates using zinc acetate and gallium nitrate as precursors for Zn and Ga ions, respectively. The effect of Ga doping on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of sprayed ZnO thin films were investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and Hall effect techniques. XRD studies reveal that films are polycrystalline with hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure. The thin films were oriented along the (0 0 2) plane. Room temperature PL measurements indicate that the deposited films exhibit proper doping of Ga in ZnO lattice. The average transparency in the visible range was around {approx}85-95% for typical thin film deposited using 2 at% gallium doping. The optical band gap increased from 3.31 to 3.34 eV with Ga doping of 2 at%. The addition of gallium induces a decrease in electrical resistivity of the ZnO : Ga films up to 2 at% gallium doping. The highest figure of merit observed in this present study was 3.09 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2} {omega}{sup -1}.

  6. Gallium-67 uptake in cutaneous lesions of mycosis fungoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimi, L.; Chen, D.C.; Ansari, A.N.; Siegel, M.E.

    1988-02-01

    The literature on gallium imaging in mycosis fungoides is limited and conflicting. A case of mycosis fungoides with increased uptake of Ga-67 in clinically noninfected skin lesions is reported. The literature regarding mycosis fungoides and gallium imaging is reviewed.

  7. Role of gallium and bone scintigraphy in disseminated coccidioidomycosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A.J.; Braunstein, P.; Pais, M.J.

    1984-09-01

    The osseous lesions of disseminated coccidioidomycosis may be detected by bone but not by gallium scintigraphy or vice versa. This case emphasizes the need for performing both bone and gallium scans to avoid missing potentially serious bone lesions.

  8. New amorphous interface for precipitate nitrides in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    to be enveloped in an amorphous shell a few nm thick, thus leaving them without any coherency with the matrix. The amorphous nature of the shells could be ascertained with high resolution microscopy and dark field techniques. When extracted from the ferrite matrix the amorphous shells were observed to crystallize...... during electron beam exposure. The amorphous shells were observed around Ta- and Nb-based nitrides, which are considered to have a high interfacial energy with the ferrite matrix. They were not observed around V-based nitrides which have a Baker–Nutting relationship with low-misfit to the matrix....

  9. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Urcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm, which was found to be the optimum size for cellular uptake with gold nanoparticles [1], exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window and demonstrate a high absorption efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications.

  10. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  11. Progress in III–nitrides: Process issue and purity perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Kumar

    2005-07-01

    The growth of good quality layers of gallium nitride (GaN) as suitable for epitaxial growth is of great technological importance. Chloride vapour phase epitaxy (Cl–VPE) has been employed to grow good quality layers of GaN. The grown layers have been extensively characterized for their structural and optical properties. MOVPE grown GaN layers have been used to address process issues on device structuring and fabrication. GaN samples with different transition metal dopants have been synthesized and their usefulness as semi-magnetic materials, which are also identified as dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS), have been evaluated. Better results have been obtained on the magnetic characteristics of GaN with ruthenium as the dopant. Nano dimensional structures of GaN have been obtained with excellent control of the growth parameters.

  12. III-Nitride advanced technologies and equipment for microelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, S. I.; Alexeev, A. N.; Mamaev, V. V.; Krasovitsky, D. M.; Chaly, V. P.

    2016-12-01

    Using of complex equipment SemiTEq shown in example of a closed cycle of basic technological operations for production of high-power field microwave transistors based on gallium nitride in the "Svetlana-Rost" JSC. Basic technological operations are shown: MBE growth of heterostructures, metal deposition of contacts using electron-beam evaporation system, thermal annealing of ohmic contacts, meza-isolation plasma-chemical etching and dielectric plasma deposition. The main problems during the technological route as well as ways to solve are discussed. In particular, ways to reduce the dislocation density in the active region of the transistor heterostructures grown on the mismatched substrates are described in detail. Special attention given to the homogeneity and reproducibility both after some manufacturing operations and applied to the end product.

  13. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Römer, Friedhard, E-mail: froemer@uni-kassel.de; Witzigmann, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.witzigmann@uni-kassel.de [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Kassel, 34121 Kassel (Germany)

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  14. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  15. Impurities interactions in the crytal growth of LEC gallium arsenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucchino, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy). Lab. MASPEC; Goeroeg, T. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy). Lab. MASPEC; Zanotti, L. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy). Lab. MASPEC; Mignoni, G. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy). Lab. MASPEC; Catellani, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy). Lab. MASPEC

    1996-06-01

    The control of low level impurities is still considered to play a key role in obtaining GaAs based devices with an high degree of uniformity and reproducibility. Although in the recent years the importance of appropriate post growth thermal treatments has been recognized as the most relevant step in achieving homogeneous material, the contamination reduction of the melt is a fundamental requisite for growing crystals with good electric characteristics and morphology. In this work we report on new results obtained from boron and silicon doped gallium arsenide crystals grown by LEC technique in a high pressure puller: different doping procedures for heavily Si doped crystals are described and interactions between silicon and boron in the liquid, are discussed together with the analysis of their distribution in the ingot. On the basis of our experimental data from crystals doped with either B or B and Si together, a tentative explanation of the incorporation mechanism of such elements is given and a comparison with previously reported results is made. (orig.)

  16. Development of a Multi-layer Anti-reflective Coating for Gallium Arsenide/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells by Kimberley A Olver Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...Development of a Multi-layer Anti-reflective Coating for Gallium Arsenide/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells by Kimberley A Olver...Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Solar Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kimberley A Olver

  17. L-Cysteine-assisted Synthesis of Copper Gallium Sulfide Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-juan; ZHONG Jia-song; CAI Qian; HUANG Hai-yu; LIU Hai-tao; XIANG Wei-dong; SUN Jun-cai

    2012-01-01

    An effective L-cysteine-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare copper gallium sulfide(CuGaS2) microspheres under solvothermal conditions with CuCI2-2H2O,GaCl3 and L-cysteine as source materials,in which L-cysteine was used as the sulfide source and eomplexing molecule.The experiments revealed that the synthesized sample was of a typical CuGaS2 tetragonal structure.Moreover,the prepared CuGaS2 crystals consisting of microspheres made up of nanoflakes,and the diameter of the nanoflakes was about 20 nm.Raman spectrum of the obtained CuGaS2 exhibits a high-intensity peak of the A1 mode at 306 cm-1.Meanwhile,a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the investigations.

  18. Preparation of carbon-nitride bulk samples in the presence of seed carbon-nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. I. [Korea University of Technology and Education, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Zorov, N. B. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-05-15

    A procedure was developed for preparing bulk carbon-nitride crystals from polymeric alpha-C{sub 3}N{sub 4.2} at high pressure and high temperature in the presence of seeds of crystalline carbon-nitride films prepared by using a high-voltage discharge plasma combined with pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target. The samples were evaluated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Notably, XPS studies of the film composition before and after thermobaric treatments demonstrated that the nitrogen composition in the alpha-C{sub 3}N{sub 4.2} material, which initially contained more than 58 % nitrogen, decreased during the annealing process and reached a common, stable composition of approx 45 %. The thermobaric experiments were performed at 10 - 77 kbar and 350 - 1200 .deg. C.

  19. Analysis of plasma nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  20. Symmetry reduction due to gallium substitution in the garnet Li6.43(2)Ga0.52(3)La2.67(4)Zr2O12

    OpenAIRE

    Lars Robben; Elena Merzlyakova; Paul Heitjans; Gesing, Thorsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal structure refinements on lithium lanthanum zirconate (LLZO; Li7La3Zr2O12) substituted with gallium were successfully carried out in the cubic symmetry space group I\\overline{4}3d. Gallium was found on two lithium sites as well as on the lanthanum position. Due to the structural distortion of the resulting Li6.43(2)Ga0.52(3)La2.67(4)Zr2O12 (Ga–LLZO) single crystals, a reduction of the LLZO cubic garnet symmetry from Ia\\overline{3}d to I\\overline{4}3d was necessary, which could h...

  1. Symmetry reduction due to gallium substitution in the garnet Li6.43(2)Ga0.52(3)La2.67(4)Zr2O12

    OpenAIRE

    Robben, Lars; Merzlyakova, Elena; Heitjans, Paul; Gesing, Thorsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal structure refinements on lithium lanthanum zirconate (LLZO; Li7La3Zr2O12) substituted with gallium were successfully carried out in the cubic symmetry space group I [Formula: see text]3d. Gallium was found on two lithium sites as well as on the lanthanum position. Due to the structural distortion of the resulting Li6.43(2)Ga0.52(3)La2.67(4)Zr2O12 (Ga-LLZO) single crystals, a reduction of the LLZO cubic garnet symmetry from Ia[Formula: see text] d to I [Formula: see text]3d was ...

  2. Fatigue modelling for gas nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Weil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to develop an algorithm able to predict the fatigue lifetime of nitrided steels. Linear multi-axial fatigue criteria are used to take into account the gradients of mechanical properties provided by the nitriding process. Simulations on rotating bending fatigue specimens are made in order to test the nitrided surfaces. The fatigue model is applied to the cyclic loading of a gear from a simulation using the finite element software Ansys. Results show the positive contributions of nitriding on the fatigue strength

  3. Titanium Nitride Cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-07-01

    C ermets 7 Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Ni-Cr....26 Cerme ts S Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Co-Cr....27 Cermets 9...Figures 7 and 8. Titanium Nitride-Nickel-Chromium Cerme ts From Figure 7, it can be seen that 2900OF was the better firing temperature. The 20% metal

  4. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped terbium gallium garnet with high magneto-optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Hang, Yin; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiangyong; Hong, Jiaqi; Zhang, Peixiong; Shi, Chunjun; Wang, Yaqi

    2015-03-01

    High optical quality (Tb((1-x))Ce(x))₃Ga₅O₁₂ (TCGG) single crystal has been grown by the Czochralski method. The optical and magneto-optical properties of the TCGG are analyzed in detail and the Verdet constant (V) of TCGG is compared with that of undoped terbium gallium garnet (TGG) crystal. TCGG presents a very high transmittance, particularly in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR) region, and its V is obviously larger than that of TGG in the VIS-NIR region. The figure of merit and optical features point out the superior characteristics of TCGG with respect to TGG.

  5. Gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with hemochromatosis treated by deferoxamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Ono, Seiji; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1988-05-01

    Gallium scintigraphy was performed as an aid for determining the presence or absence of malignant neoplasm in two patients with hemochromatosis treated by deferoxamine. However, gallium scan images could not be obtained. So gallium scintigraphy was performed once more to investigate the cause of low activity. Both patients had heavy urinary excretion of gallium in the first 24 hrs after the injection, and activity was very low on the day of examination. This phenomenon may be attributed to the effect of deferoxamine which is highly bound to the gallium.

  6. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energ...

  7. Chlorine and gallium solar neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Cleveland, B. T.; Davis, R., Jr.; Rowley, J. K.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reevaluate the expected capture rates and their uncertainties for the chlorine and gallium solar neutrino experiments using improved laboratory data and new theoretical calculations. They also derive a minimum value for the flux of solar neutrinos that is expected provided only (1) that the sun is currently producing energy by fusing light nuclei at the rate that it is emitting energy in the form of photons from its surface and (2) that nothing happens to solar neutrinos on their way to earth. These results are used - together with Monte Carlo simulations - to determine how much gallium is required for a solar neutrino experiment.

  8. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy study on silicon nitride/stainless steel bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poza, P. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de los Materiales, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Miranzo, P. [Institute of Ceramics and Glass, CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Osendi, M.I. [Institute of Ceramics and Glass, CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: miosendi@icv.csic.es

    2008-11-28

    The reaction zone of a diffusion bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/stainlees steel (ss) interface formed at 1100 deg. C was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Besides the formation of various iron silicides, iron nitride and chromium nitride phases detected by XRD, Cr{sub 3}Ni{sub 5}Si{sub 2} crystals were identified at the interface by TEM.

  10. Using coupling slabs to tailor surface-acoustic-wave band structures in phononic crystals consisting of pillars attached to elastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Yu, SiYuan; Liu, FuKang; Wang, Zhen; Lu, MingHui; Hu, XiaoBo; Chen, YanFeng; Xu, XianGang

    2017-04-01

    The propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in two-dimensional phononic crystals (PnCs) with and without coupling-enhancement slabs was theoretically investigated using a three-dimensional finite element method. Different piezoelectric substrates, for example, lithium niobate (LiNbO3), gallium nitride (GaN), and aluminium nitride (AlN), were taken into account. Compared to the PnCs without coupling-enhancement slabs, the coupling between each pillar and its nearest neighbor was largely enhanced in the presence of slabs. The bandwidth of the first directional band gap increased markedly compared with its initial value for the PnCs without a slab (within square symmetry). In addition, with increasing thicknesses of the slabs bonded between neighboring pillars, the first directional band-gap and second directional band gap of the PnCs tend to merge. Therefore, the structure with coupling-enhancement slabs can be used as an excellent electrical band elimination filter for most electro-SAW devices, offering a new strategy to realize chip-scale applications in electroacoustic signal processing, optoacoustic modulation, and even SAW microfluidic devices.

  11. Using coupling slabs to tailor surface-acoustic-wave band structures in phononic crystals consisting of pillars attached to elastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Yu, SiYuan; Liu, FuKang; Wang, Zhen; Lu, MingHui; Hu, XiaoBo; Chen, YanFeng; Xu, XianGang

    2017-04-01

    The propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in two-dimensional phononic crystals (PnCs) with and without coupling-enhancement slabs was theoretically investigated using a three-dimensional finite element method. Different piezoelectric substrates, for example, lithium niobate (LiNbO3), gallium nitride (GaN), and aluminium nitride (AlN), were taken into account. Compared to the PnCs without coupling-enhancement slabs, the coupling between each pillar and its nearest neighbor was largely enhanced in the presence of slabs. The bandwidth of the first directional band gap increased markedly compared with its initial value for the PnCs without a slab (within square symmetry). In addition, with increasing thicknesses of the slabs bonded between neighboring pillars, the first directional band-gap and second directional band gap of the PnCs tend to merge. Therefore, the structure with coupling-enhancement slabs can be used as an excellent electrical band elimination filter for most electro-SAW devices, offering a new strategy to realize chip-scale applications in electroacoustic signal processing, optoacoustic modulation, and even SAW microfluidic devices.

  12. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  13. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  14. Gallium Oxide Nanostructures for High Temperature Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintalapalle, Ramana V. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were produced by sputter deposition by varying the substrate temperature (Ts) in a wide range (Ts=25-800 °C). The structural characteristics and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of growth temperature is significant on the chemistry, crystal structure and morphology of Ga2O3 films. XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the Ga2O3 films grown at lower temperatures were amorphous while those grown at Ts≥500 oC were nanocrystalline. RBS measurements indicate the well-maintained stoichiometry of Ga2O3 films at Ts=300-800 °C. The electronic structure determination indicated that the nanocrystalline Ga2O3films exhibit a band gap of ~5 eV. Tungsten (W) incorporated Ga2O3 films were produced by co-sputter deposition. W-concentration was varied by the applied sputtering-power. No secondary phase formation was observed in W-incorporated Ga2O3 films. W-induced effects were significant on the structure and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films. The band gap of Ga2O3 films without W-incorporation was ~5 eV. Oxygen sensor characteristics evaluated using optical and electrical methods indicate a faster response in W-doped Ga2O3 films compared to intrinsic Ga2O3 films. The results demonstrate the applicability of both intrinsic and W-doped Ga-oxide films for oxygen sensor application at temperatures ≥700 °C.

  15. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  16. Determination of the Peltier coefficient for gallium arsenide in a vertical Bridgman furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegel, Michaela E. K.; Matthiesen, David H.

    2011-10-01

    The Peltier coefficient for gallium arsenide solid in contact with its melt was experimentally determined. Selenium doped gallium arsenide samples were hermetically sealed in a fused quartz ampoule and processed in a vertical Bridgman furnace. During the translation period seven sequences of current-on and current-off periods were processed into the solidifying crystal. An axial slice was mechanochemically polished and then etched. Photomicrographs of the slice were taken with differential interference contrast microscopy and were used to measure the thickness of the current-on and current-off layers. These results were used to calculate growth rates from which the Peltier coefficient was calculated. An average value of 0.107±0.015 V was determined. The values calculated from the different sequences were in excellent agreement with each other even though the sequences had different current densities, current-on durations, and current-on to current-off ratios.

  17. Iron implantation in gadolinium gallium garnet studied by conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Szucs, I; Fetzer, C; Langouche, G

    1998-01-01

    Gadolinium gallium garnet single crystals were implanted with doses of sup 5 sup 7 Fe ions in the range 8x10 sup 1 sup 5 - 6x10 sup 1 sup 6 atoms cm sup - sup 2. Depending on the dose, iron with Fe sup 2 sup + or Fe sup 3 sup + charge states was found to have formed after the implantation. After a subsequent annealing in air, the iron oxidized to Fe sup 3 sup +. The Moessbauer and channelling measurements showed lattice recrystallization taking place at 600 deg. C. After recrystallization, the iron was found to have substituted for gallium ions both at the octahedral and at the tetrahedral positions. The relative concentration of the two types of iron at the two sites shifted towards the equilibrium distribution upon high-temperature annealing. (author)

  18. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy of gallium in bladder tissue following gallium maltolate administration during urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Katherine R; Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L; Blyth, Robert I R; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M; Thompson, Julie

    2013-11-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli.

  19. Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy of Gallium in Bladder Tissue following Gallium Maltolate Administration during Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L.; Blyth, Robert I. R.; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M.; Thompson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:23877680

  20. Synergistic Extraction of Gallium for Sulfate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGTong; HUANGLijuan; 等

    2002-01-01

    A novel extractant mixture, di-2-ethylhexyl phosphate (DEHPA) plus HX, was propose and tested for recovering gallium from sulfate solution.It was found that the extraction capacity of DEPHA for gallium from sulfate solution could be enhanced significantly due to the synergistic effect of acidix extractant HX. Gallium extraction is negligible below pH 0 and highly sensitive to pH of aqueous phase in the range from 0 to 1, and satisfactory extraction can be gained at pH>1. More than 96% Ga extraction was obtained using 15% DEHPA plus 2% HX. Although Fe(Ⅲ) was found to be extracted preferentially to Ga (Ⅲ), effective extraction of Ga (Ⅲ) was possible by reducing ferric to the ferrous state prior to extraction. A loaded organic phase containing 0.48g·L-1 Ga could be produced from solution of 0.12g·L-1 Ga at A/O ratio of 4:1 via three mixer-settler operation stages. Gallium was stripped quantitatively from the loaded organic phase with 1.5mol·L-1 of sulfuric acid.

  1. Bone tissue incorporates in vitro gallium with a local structure similar to gallium-doped brushite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbas, M; Rokita, E; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Ryczek, J

    2004-01-01

    During mineral growth in rat bone-marrow stromal cell cultures, gallium follows calcium pathways. The dominant phase of the cell culture mineral constitutes the poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP). This model system mimics bone mineralization in vivo. The structural characterization of the Ga environment was performed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ga K-edge. These data were compared with Ga-doped synthetic compounds (poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite, amorphous calcium phosphate and brushite) and with strontium-treated bone tissue, obtained from the same culture model. It was found that Sr(2+) substitutes for Ca(2+) in the HAP crystal lattice. In contrast, the replacement by Ga(3+) yielded a much more disordered local environment of the probe atom in all investigated cell culture samples. The coordination of Ga ions in the cell culture minerals was similar to that of Ga(3+), substituted for Ca(2+), in the Ga-doped synthetic brushite (Ga-DCPD). The Ga atoms in the Ga-DCPD were coordinated by four oxygen atoms (1.90 A) of the four phosphate groups and two oxygen atoms at 2.02 A. Interestingly, the local environment of Ga in the cell culture minerals was not dependent on the onset of Ga treatment, the Ga concentration in the medium or the age of the mineral. Thus, it was concluded that Ga ions were incorporated into the precursor phase to the HAP mineral. Substitution for Ca(2+ )with Ga(3+) distorted locally this brushite-like environment, which prevented the transformation of the initially deposited phase into the poorly crystalline HAP.

  2. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  3. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  4. Double Sided Si(Ge)/Sapphire/III-Nitride Hybrid Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One aspect of the present invention is a double sided hybrid crystal structure including a trigonal Sapphire wafer containing a (0001) C-plane and having front and rear sides. The Sapphire wafer is substantially transparent to light in the visible and infrared spectra, and also provides insulation with respect to electromagnetic radio frequency noise. A layer of crystalline Si material having a cubic diamond structure aligned with the cubic direction on the (0001) C-plane and strained as rhombohedron to thereby enable continuous integration of a selected (SiGe) device onto the rear side of the Sapphire wafer. The double sided hybrid crystal structure further includes an integrated III-Nitride crystalline layer on the front side of the Sapphire wafer that enables continuous integration of a selected III-Nitride device on the front side of the Sapphire wafer.

  5. Effects of Aqueous Vapour Consistence in Nitriding Furnace on the Quality of the Sintered Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZijiang

    1998-01-01

    If the aqueous vapour consistence is too high(>0.7%),it is very disadvantageous to the sintered products in the nitriding furnace,when silcon nitride bonded silicon carbide products are synthesized by nitridation of silicon.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF GALLIUM OXIDE TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Universe" ...................................... 5 Figure 4: MEA Architecture [60...weight. Figure 4: MEA Architecture [60] 2.2 How Does Ga2O3 Compare to Other Semiconductors? We are paying attention to β-Ga2O3 because of its...growth is possible. • Limited crystal orientation have been demonstrated. • Technology base is narrowly located in Japan . Mainstream technology

  7. Electronic structure of spontaneously strained graphene on hexagonal Boron Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    San-Jose, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Ángel; Sturla, Mauricio; Guinea, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride substrates have been shown to dramatically improve the electric properties of graphene. Recently, it has been observed that when the two honeycomb crystals are close to perfect alignment, strong lattice distortions develop in graphene due to the moir\\'e adhesion landscape. Simultaneously a gap opens at the Dirac point. Here we derive a simple low energy model for graphene carriers close to alignment with the substrate, taking into account spontaneous strains at equilib...

  8. Novel nitrogen/gallium precursor [Ga(bdma)H2] for MOVPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzer, E.; Beyer, A.; Nattermann, L.; Schorn, W.; Schlechter, K.; Pulz, S.; Sundermeyer, J.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K.

    2016-11-01

    Dilute nitrogen (N) containing III/V semiconductors are promising candidates for solar cell and laser applications. The N incorporation efficiency of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UMDHy) in metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), however, happens to be only in the one percentage range and below. This leads to an extremely high offer of UDMHy in the MOVPE reactor and, therefore, a drastic change in the growth conditions. Furthermore, the device efficiency of dilute nitride materials is currently hampered by carbon (C) incorporation, which is believed to be incorporated either jointly with the N from the dimethylamine radical of the UMDHy or from short hydrocarbon radicals originating from the decomposition of the other metal organics. Therefore, this work presents a novel N precursor N,N'-Bis(dimethylamino)acetamidinato-galliumdihydride [Ga(bdma)H2], which provides not only N but also gallium (Ga) during MOVPE. The direct N-Ga bond in this molecule might facilitate the N incorporation and hence increase the efficiency. For a systematic N incorporation study Ga(NAs)/GaAs heterostructures were grown by MOVPE. The N content was determined via high resolution X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence (PL) studies. Good structural quality and as grown room temperature PL were obtained. It will be also shown that the N incorporation efficiency in GaAs using [Ga(bdma)H2] is significantly higher than for growths using UDMHy under comparable conditions, making this class of molecules promising candidates for the growth of dilute nitride materials.

  9. Negative Refraction with High Transmission in Graphene-hBN Hyper Crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Mahdy, Mahdy Rahman Chowdhury; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md. Saifur

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we have theoretically investigated the performance of graphene-hexagonal Boron Nitride hyper crystals to demonstrate all angle negative refraction.Hexagonal Boron Nitride, the latest natural hyperbolic material; can be a very strong contender to form a hyper crystal with graphene due to its excellence as a graphene-compatible substrate. Although bare hexagonal Boron Nitride can exhibit negative refraction, the transmission is generally low due to its high reflective nature. O...

  10. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  11. Method for the preparation of inorganic single crystal and polycrystalline electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, W. O. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    Large area, semiconductor crystals selected from group 3-5 compounds and alloys are provided for semiconductor device fabrication by the use of a selective etching operation which completely removes the substrate on which the desired crystal was deposited. The substrate, selected from the same group as the single crystal, has a higher solution rate than the epitaxial single crystal which is essentially unaffected by the etching solution. The preparation of gallium phosphide single crystals using a gallium arsenide substrate and a concentrated nitric acid etching solution is described.

  12. Investigations on the structural and optical properties of sphere-shaped indium nitride (InN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagavath, C.; Kumar, J. [Anna University, Crystal Growth Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nasi, L. [IMEM-CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    Indium nitride (InN) sphere-shaped micro crystals and nano crystals were made using sol-gel method. The crystalline size of the samples were calculated using X-ray diffraction, which were found to increase with the increase of nitridation temperature and time. High resolution-transmission electron microscopy images exhibited the distinct sphere shape of InN with different size of micro and nanometers. The calculated band gap of InN spheres using photo luminescence and UV-visible absorption spectra, was found to be 1.2 eV. Optical phonon modes of InN were determined from micro-Raman studies. (orig.)

  13. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  14. Hemocompatibility of titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, I; Baquey, C; Candelon, B; Monties, J R

    1992-10-01

    The left ventricular assist device is based on the principle of the Maillard-Wenkel rotative pump. The materials which make up the pump must present particular mechanical, tribological, thermal and chemical properties. Titanium nitride (TiN) because of its surface properties and graphite because of its bulk characteristics have been chosen. The present study evaluated the in vitro hemocompatibility of TiN coating deposited by the chemical vapor deposition process. Protein adsorption, platelet retention and hemolysis tests have been carried out. In spite of some disparities, the TiN behavior towards albumin and fibrinogen is interesting, compared with the one of a reference medical grade elastomer. The platelet retention test gives similar results as those achieved with the same elastomer. The hemolysis percentage is near to zero. TiN shows interesting characteristics, as far as mechanical and tribological problems are concerned, and presents very encouraging blood tolerability properties.

  15. Systematic hardness measurements on some rare earth garnet crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D B Sirdeshmukh; L Sirdeshmukh; K G Subhadra; K Kishan Rao; S Bal Laxman

    2001-10-01

    Microhardness measurements were undertaken on twelve rare earth garnet crystals. In yttrium aluminium garnet and gadolinium gallium garnet, there was no measurable difference in the hardness values of pure and nominally Nd-doped crystals. The hardness values were correlated with the lattice and elastic constants. An analysis of hardness data in terms of the interatomic binding indicated a high degree of covalency.

  16. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  17. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  18. New High-Pressure Gallium Borate Ga2B3O7(OH) with Photocatalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum, Daniela; Schauperl, Michael; Strabler, Christof M; Brüggeller, Peter; Liedl, Klaus R; Griesser, Ulrich J; Huppertz, Hubert

    2016-01-19

    The new high-pressure gallium borate Ga2B3O7(OH) was synthesized in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 10.5 GPa and 700 °C. For the system Ga-B-O-H, it is only the second known compound next to Ga9B18O33(OH)15·H3B3O6·H3BO3. The crystal structure of Ga2B3O7(OH) was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature. Ga2B3O7(OH) crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmce (Z = 8) with the lattice parameters a = 1050.7(2) pm, b = 743.6(2) pm, c = 1077.3(2) pm, and V = 0.8417(3) nm(3). Vibrational spectroscopic methods (Raman and IR) were performed to confirm the presence of the hydroxyl group. Furthermore, the band gap of Ga2B3O7(OH) was estimated via quantum-mechanical density functional theory calculations. These results led to the assumption that our gallium borate could be a suitable substance to split water photocatalytically, which was tested experimentally.

  19. Structure and physical properties of gallium selenide laser-intercalated with nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokladok, N. T.; Grygorchak, I. I.; Lukiyanets, B. A.; Popovich, D. I.

    2007-04-01

    Intercalated crystals of indium and gallium selenide are prepared. It is shown that laser intercalation of nickel into GaSe samples leads to a giant magnetoresistive effect whose magnitude and sign depend on the concentration of the guest component. The giant magnetoresistive effect in the InSe intercalation compounds is considerably weaker and does not exceed 5%. The experimental data obtained are explained in terms of magnetic delocalization (localization) of charge carriers with the participation of states of intercalated magnetically active atoms in the vicinity of the Fermi level.

  20. Applying bacterial metallophores to mobilize gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Ringo; Obst, Britta; Mehnert, Marika; Tischler, Dirk; Wiche, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Metallophores are produced by many organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants in order to mobilize metals, especially iron (Greek: "siderophore" = iron carrier), to overcome limitations or stress. Respectively, it is well known these compounds loaded with relevant metal ions are used not only by the producing organism but also by others. Thus metallophores as metal carriers are relevant for many processes at various habitats (e.g. metal acquisition, pathogenic factors, antimicrobial activity, sensing). However, metallophores do also mobilize metals of industrial interest which have no critical role in the living world. Here we focused on gallium as industrial relevant metal and compared it to iron which is important for all organisms. The herein described mobilization of valuable metals such as gallium from soils provides first hints towards alternative strategies, such as phytomining, sensor development, or solvent extraction based on metallophores. Two produced metallophore preparations of soil bacteria (Gordonia rubripertincta CWB2 and Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222) and the commercially available metallophore desferrioxamine B were analyzed for iron binding activity by means of a standard chromazurol S assay and equal iron binding activities were employed to treat a soil sample. The pH was set constant to 6 in order to avoid pH related effects. Therefore, the metallophore was prepared in a special medium and control of water and medium were also applied onto the soil. The soil was washed and incubated with the mentioned preparations. The mobilization of iron and gallium was determined prior and after the treatment by means of ICP-MS. Water showed no effect and medium only a little on metal mobilization which is related to its ionic strength. All metallophores mobilized iron at a similar strength but showed significant differences in case of gallium. Here the metallophore mix produced by strain CWB2 showed best results and allowed to mobilize gallium 3-times

  1. Sensor of hydrostatic pressure based on gallium antimonide microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, silicon and germanium, the most common materials in the production of discrete semiconductor devices and integrated circuits, do not always meet all the requirements to the sensing elements of mechanical quantities sensors. Therefore, it is logical to research the properties of other semiconductor materials that could be used as sensing elements in such sensors. A3B5 semiconductor compounds seem promising for such purpose. Effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 5000 bar on the resistance of n-type antimonide gallium whiskers doped by Se or Te was studied. Coefficient of hydrostatic pressure for this crystals was determined, it equals Kh = (16,5—20,0•10–5 bar–1 at 20°N. Temperature dependence of resistance and coefficient Kh for this crystals in the temperature range ±60°N was studied. Design of the developed hydrostatic pressure sensor based on GaSb whiskers and its characteristics are presented. The possibility to decrease the temperature dependence of sensitive element resistance by mounting GaSb whiskers on the substrates fabricated from materials with different temperature coefficient of expansion was examined. It was shown that mounting of GaSb crystals on Cu substrate gives the optimal result, in this case the temperature coefficient decrease to 0,05%•°N–1, that leads to decrease of output temperature dependence. The main advantages of developed pressure sensor are: the simplified design in comparison with pressure sensors with strain gauges mounted on spring elements; the high sensitivity to pressure that is constant in the wide pressure range; the improvement of sensors metrological characteristics owing to hysteresis absence. The possible application fields of developed sensors are measuring of high and extremely high pressure, chemical and oil industries, measuring of pressure in oil bore-holes, investigation of explosive processes.

  2. Active layer identification of photonic crystal waveguide biosensor chip for the detection of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painam, Balveer; Kaler, Rajinder S.; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-07-01

    This work represents experimental and simulation analysis of photonic crystal waveguide (PCW)-based biosensor structures, which is used for detection of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell. A method is adopted for E. coli culture to measure length, diameter, and refractive index to finalize the structural design and to verify the suitability of PCW as a biosensor. This method is tested using DH5α strains of E. coli. The typical precisions of measurements are varied in ranges from 1.132 to 1.825 μm and from 0.447 to 0.66 μm for pathogen's length and diameter, respectively. The measured distribution of samples over length and diameter are in correlation with the measurements performed by scanning electron microscope. After obtaining average length and diameter of cylindrical shaped E. coli cell, we consider these values for simulation analysis of designed PCW biosensor. E. coli cell is trapped in the middle of the PCW biosensor having three different types of waveguides, i.e., gallium arsenide/silicon dioxide (GaAs/SiO2), silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2), or silicon nitride/silicon dioxide (Si3N4/SiO2) to observe the maximum resonance shift and sensitivity. It is observed from the simulation data analysis that GaAs/SiO2 is the preferred PCW biosensor for the identification of E. coli.

  3. Ultraviolet optomechanical crystal cavities with ultrasmall modal mass and high optomechanical coupling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Yu, Zejie; Ma, Jingwen; Zhu, Bingqing; Tsang, Hon Ki; Sun, Xiankai

    2016-11-01

    Optomechanical crystal (OMC) cavities which exploit the simultaneous photonic and phononic bandgaps in periodic nanostructures have been utilized to colocalize, couple, and transduce optical and mechanical resonances for nonlinear interactions and precision measurements. The development of near-infrared OMC cavities has difficulty in maintaining a high optomechanical coupling rate when scaling to smaller mechanical modal mass because of the reduction of the spatial overlap between the optical and mechanical modes. Here, we explore OMC nanobeam cavities in gallium nitride operating at the ultraviolet wavelengths to overcome this problem. With a novel optimization strategy, we have successfully designed an OMC cavity, with a size of 3.83 × 0.17 × 0.13 μm3 and the mechanical modal mass of 22.83 fg, which possesses an optical mode resonating at the wavelength of 393.03 nm and the fundamental mechanical mode vibrating at 14.97 GHz. The radiation-limited optical Q factor, mechanical Q factor, and optomechanical coupling rate are 2.26 × 107, 1.30 × 104, and 1.26 MHz, respectively. Our design and optimization approach can also serve as the general guidelines for future development of OMC cavities with improved device performance.

  4. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  5. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  6. Myopericarditis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosed by gallium scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cregler, L.L.; Sosa, I.; Ducey, S.; Abbey, L. (Bronx VA Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Myocarditis is among the cardiac complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and, yet, is often not discovered until autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy has been employed in diagnosing this entity, but few data are available about its diagnostic accuracy and value. Here, the authors report two cases of myopericarditis as diagnosed by gallium scan.

  7. Two octanuclear gallium metallamacrocycles of topologically different connectivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mira; John, Rohith P; Moon, Dohyun; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2007-12-14

    Two topologically different metallamacrocycles--S8 symmetric octanuclear gallium(III) metalladiazamacrocycle and pseudo-D4 symmetric octanuclear gallium(III) metalladiazamacrocycle--could be prepared using two similar heteroditopic bridging ligands having asymmetrical tridentate-bidentate binding residues.

  8. Benchmarking of Evaluated Neutron Data for Gallium Sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN; Rui; NIE; Yang-bo; RUAN; Xi-chao; BAO; Jie; REN; Jie; HUANG; Han-xiong; LI; Xia; ZHANG; Kai; ZHOU; Zu-ying

    2013-01-01

    Gallium(Ga)is a kind of target material and an important fission product.It has the characteristics of low melting point and high boiling point.The integral experimental study on Gallium data is an important issue.It has an important application for design of reactors and ADS(Accelerator Driven System)

  9. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,R.R.M.; de Araújo, F. O.; J. A. P. da Costa; Brandim,A.S.; R. A. de Brito; C. Alves

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  10. Magnetic and Mechanical Properties of Deformed Iron Nitride γ′-Fe4N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hsiang Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at magnetic and mechanical properties of iron nitride (γ′-Fe4N with elastic deformation. Electronic structure and thermal properties of the iron nitride are also studied to have a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of γ′-Fe4N. This study is focused on the variation of the magnetic and the mechanical properties of iron nitride with a change in crystal size represented by lattice constant. As the lattice constant is altered with deformation, magnetic moment of Fe-II atoms is appreciably elevated, while that of Fe-I atoms is nearly unchanged. Dependence of the magnetic moment and the bulk modulus on the lattice constant is examined. Meanwhile, chemical bonds between Fe atoms and N atoms formed across the crystal have been visualized by delocalization of atomic charge density in electron density map, and thermodynamic properties, including entropy, enthalpy, free energy, and heat capacity, are evaluated.

  11. Nitridation of Nb surface by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ozkendir, Osman Murat [Tarsus Technology Faculty, Mersin University, Tarsus 33480 (Turkey); Koroglu, Ulas; Ufuktepe, Yüksel [Department of Physics, Cukurova University, Adana 01330 (Turkey); Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Laser nitridation of niobium is performed with nanosecond and femtosecond pulses. • Formation of NbN{sub x} with mixed α, β and δ phases was observed. • For femtosecond laser processed samples, laser induced ripple patterns oriented parallel to the beam polarization were formed. • X-ray absorption near edge structure show formation of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the surface of the samples. - Abstract: Niobium nitride samples were prepared by laser nitridation in a reactive nitrogen gas environment at room temperature using a Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser and a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser. The effects of laser fluence on the formed phase, surface morphology, and electronic properties of the NbN{sub x} were investigated. The samples were prepared at different nanosecond laser fluences up to 5.0 ± 0.8 J/cm{sup 2} at fixed nitrogen pressure of ∼2.7 × 10{sup 4} Pa formed NbN{sub x} with mainly the cubic δ-NbN phase. Femtosecond laser nitrided samples were prepared using laser fluences up to 1.3 ± 0.3 mJ/cm{sup 2} at ∼4.0 × 10{sup 4} Pa nitrogen pressure. Laser induced ripple patterns oriented parallel to the beam polarization were formed with spacing that increases with the laser fluence. To achieve a laser-nitrided surface with desired crystal orientation the laser fulence is an important parameter that needs to be properly adjusted.

  12. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Devès, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  13. Gallium-containing hydroxyapatite for potential use in orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, P., E-mail: petrmelnikov@yahoo.com [Department of Clinical Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Teixeira, A.R.; Malzac, A. [Department of Clinical Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Coelho, M. de B. [Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - EMBRAPA (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    A novel material that may be recommended for grafts and implants stimulating bone growth has been obtained by introducing gallium ions (up to 11.0 mass%) into crystalline lattice of hydroxyapatite. The doping was carried out using gallium nitrate and sodium gallate solutions. In both cases, lattice parameters of gallium-doped hydroxyapatite are identical to those of pure synthetic hydroxyapatite. Gallium does not replace calcium as a result of heterovalent substitution and consequently produces no distortions in the framework of hydroxyapatite matrix. It remains strongly fixed in the form of solid solution of intercalation. According to scanning electron microscopy images gallium insertion does not cause any morphological alterations in hydroxyapatite structure and the product developed meets physico-chemical criteria for biomaterial to be employed in orthopedic practice and local handling of traumatic injuries. Its future usage opens the opportunity to enhance osteosynthesis and calcium retention in loco.

  14. Performance characterization of gallium nitride HEMT cascode switch for power conditioning applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Po-Chien; Cheng, Stone, E-mail: stonecheng@mail.nctu.edu.tw

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop TO-257 cascoded GaN switch configuration in power conversion applications. • The normally-off cascode circuit provides 14.6 A/600 V characteristics. • Analysis of resistive and inductive switching performances shown in loaded circuits. • A 48-to-96 V boost converter is used to evaluate the benefit of GaN cascode switches. - Abstract: A hybrid cascoded GaN switch configuration is demonstrated in power conversion applications. A novel metal package is proposed for the packaging of a D-mode GaN MIS-HEMT cascoded with an integrated power MOSFET and a SBD. The normally-off cascode circuit provides a maximum drain current of 14.6 A and a blocking capability of 600 V. Analysis of 200 V/1 A power conversion characteristics are discussed and show the excellent switching performance in load circuits. Switching characteristics of the integral SiC SBD are also demonstrated. Finally, a 48-to-96 V boost converter is used to evaluate the benefit of GaN cascode switches. These results show that high-voltage GaN-HEMTs can be switching devices for an ultralow-loss converter circuit.

  15. Investigating Enhancement Mode Gallium Nitride Power FETs in High Voltage, High Frequency Soft Switching Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour, Yasser; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2016-01-01

    An increased attention has been detected to develop smaller and lighter high voltage power converters in the range of 50V to 400V domain. The main applications for these converters are mainly focused for Power over Ethernet (PoE), LED lighting and AC adapters. This work will discuss a study...

  16. Growth kinetics and characterizations of gallium nitride thin films by remote PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. W.; Bachmann, K. J.; Lucovsky, G.

    1993-01-01

    Thin films of GaN have been deposited at relatively low growth temperatures by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (RPECVD), using a plasma excited NH3, and trimethylgallium (TMG), injected downstream from the plasma. The activation energy for GaN growth has been tentatively assigned to the dissociation of NH groups as the primary N-atom precursors in the surface reaction with adsorbed TMG, or TMG fragments. At high He flow rates, an abrupt increase in the growth rate is observed and corresponds to a change in the reaction mechanism attributed to the formation of atomic N. XRD reveals an increased tendency to ordered growth in the (0001) direction with increasing growth temperature, He flow rate, and RF plasma power. IR spectra show the fundamental lattice mode of GaN at 530 cm without evidence for vibrational modes of hydrocarbon groups.

  17. Surface passivation of gallium nitride by ultrathin RF-magnetron sputtered Al2O3 gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Hock Jin; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2013-08-14

    An ultrathin RF-magnetron sputtered Al2O3 gate on GaN subjected to postdeposition annealing at 800 °C in O2 ambient was systematically investigated. A cross-sectional energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy revealed formation of crystalline Al2O3 gate, which was supported by X-ray diffraction analysis. Various current conduction mechanisms contributing to leakage current of the investigated sample were discussed and correlated with metal-oxide-semiconductor characteristics of this sample.

  18. Characterization of Cross-Sectioned Gallium Nitride High-Electron-Mobility Transistors with In Situ Biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, A. M.; Brown, J. L.; Moore, E. A.; Hoelscher, J. A.; Heller, E. R.; Dorsey, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) were characterized in cross-section by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) during in situ biasing. The HEMTs used in this study were specially designed to maintain full and representative transistor functionality after cross-sectioning perpendicular to the gate width dimension to expose the active channel from source to drain. A cross-sectioning procedure was established that produces samples with high-quality surfaces and minimal degradation in initial transistor performance. A detailed description of the cross-sectioning procedure is provided. Samples were characterized by KPFM, effectively mapping the surface potential of the device in two-dimensional cross-section, including under metallization layers (i.e., gate, field plates, and ohmic contacts). Under the gate and field plate layers are where electric field, temperature, and temperature gradients are all most commonly predicted to have peak values, and where degradation and failure are most likely, and so this is where direct measurements are most critical. In this work, the surface potential of the operating device was mapped in cross-section by KPFM. Charge redistribution was observed during and after biasing, and the surface potential was seen to decay with time back to the prebias condition. This work is a first step toward directly mapping and localizing the steady-state and transient charge distribution due to point defects (traps) before, during, and after device operation, including normally inaccessible regions such as under metallization layers. Such measurements have not previously been demonstrated for GaN HEMT technology.

  19. Modeling and Simulation of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) Betavoltaic Energy Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    technologies, nuclear materials detection, accelerator shielding, and dose/energy deposition in materials for medical therapies . An electron beam with...semiconductor devices have the potential to improve the efficiency of direct energy conversion and indirect energy conversion isotope batteries, making...offering higher- energy-conversion efficiency than 2-dimensional geometries. 15. SUBJECT TERMS GaN, betavoltaic, device simulation, isotope power source

  20. Gallium Nitride Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit Designs Using 0.25-micro m Qorvo Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    250-µm-wide mesa resistor was used for the 100- ohm isolation resistor. Since GaN-on-SiC is an excellent thermal conductor, the isolation resistor...characteristic impedance of 70.7 ohm and an electrical length of 90° at the design frequency plus a 100- ohm isolation resistor between the 2 equal power split