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Sample records for cryptography annegret weng

  1. Calculator Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Uses cryptography to demonstrate the importance of algebra and the use of technology as an effective real application of mathematics. Explains simple encoding and decoding of messages for student learning of modular arithmetic. This elementary encounter with cryptography along with its historical and modern background serves to motivate student…

  2. Contemporary cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Oppliger, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Whether you're new to the field or looking to broaden your knowledge of contemporary cryptography, this newly revised edition of an Artech House classic puts all aspects of this important topic into perspective. Delivering an accurate introduction to the current state-of-the-art in modern cryptography, the book offers you an in-depth understanding of essential tools and applications to help you with your daily work. The second edition has been reorganized and expanded, providing mathematical fundamentals and important cryptography principles in the appropriate appendixes, rather than summarize

  3. Conventional Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Marie A.

    1993-01-01

    Cryptography is the science that renders data unintelligible to prevent its unauthorized disclosure or modification. Presents an application of matrices used in linear transformations to illustrate a cryptographic system. An example is provided. (17 references) (MDH)

  4. Quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittel, W.; Brendel, J.; Gissin, N.; Ribordy, G.; Zbinden, H.

    1999-01-01

    The principles of quantum cryptography based on non-local correlations of entanglement photons are outlined. The method of coding and decoding of information and experiments is also described. The prospects of the technique are briefly discussed. (Z.J.)

  5. RSA cryptography and multi prime RSA cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Nur Atiqah Abdul; Kamarulhaili, Hailiza

    2017-08-01

    RSA cryptography is one of the most powerful and popular cryptosystem which is being applied until now. There is one variant of RSA cryptography named Multi Prime RSA (MPRSA) cryptography. MPRSA cryptography is the improved version of RSA cryptography. We only need to modify a few steps in key generation part and apply the Chinese Remainder Theorem (CRT) in the decryption part to get the MPRSA algorithm. The focus of this research is to compare between the standard RSA cryptography and MPRSA cryptography in a few aspects. The research shows that MPRSA cryptography is more efficient than the RSA cryptography. Time complexity using Mathematica software is also conducted and it is proven that MPRSA cryptography has shorter time taken. It also implies the computational time is less than RSA cryptography. Mathematica software version 9.0 and a laptop HP ProBook 4331s are used to check the timing and to implement both algorithms.

  6. Cryptography Basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wattenhofer, Roger; Förster, Klaus-Tycho

    2017-01-01

    Public-key cryptography is one of the biggest scientific achievements of the last century. Two people that never met before can establish a common secret in plain sight? Sounds like pure magic! The idea of this chapter is to reveal some of the tricks of this “crypto magic”. This chapter is not ta......Public-key cryptography is one of the biggest scientific achievements of the last century. Two people that never met before can establish a common secret in plain sight? Sounds like pure magic! The idea of this chapter is to reveal some of the tricks of this “crypto magic”. This chapter...

  7. A NEW ERA OF CRYPTOGRAPHY: QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeepak Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Security is the first priority in today digital world for secure communication between sender and receiver. Various Cryptography techniques are developed time to time for secure communication. Quantum Cryptography is one of the latest and advanced cryptography technique, it is different from all other cryptography technique and more secure. It based on the Quantum of physics since its name which make it more secure from all other cryptography and UN breakable. In this paper about...

  8. Post-Quantum Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauthier Umana, Valérie

    . The public key cryptosystems that can resist these emerging attacks are called quantum resistant or post-quantum cryptosystems. There are mainly four classes of public-key cryptography that are believed to resist classical and quantum attacks: code-based cryptography, hash-based cryptography, lattice......-based cryptography and multivariate public-key cryptography. In this thesis, we focus on the rst two classes. In the rst part, we introduce coding theory and give an overview of code-based cryptography. The main contribution is an attack on two promising variants of McEliece's cryptosystem, based on quasi...

  9. Chocolate Key Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Dale J.; Brown, Ezra A.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptography is the science of hidden or secret writing. More generally, cryptography refers to the science of safeguarding information. Cryptography allows people to use a public medium such as the Internet to transmit private information securely, thus enabling a whole range of conveniences, from online shopping to personally printed movie…

  10. Evaluation of stream discharges measurement using radioisotope and conventional method at Sungai Weng catchment area, Kedah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazrul Hizam Yusoff and Wan Zakaria Wan MuhdTahir

    2006-01-01

    A number of discharge measurements using radioisotope and current metering techniques at selected streams in Sg. Weng Experimental Catchment were conducted by MINT and JPS gauging teams starting from 2003-2005. This study aims to prepare stage-discharge relationships or rating curves of the selected streams during variable flow conditions. The rating curve of the stream is one of the important parameters and usually appraised in certain routine operations of hydrological studies. It may be used in the planning of water resources management and flood control scheme. The radioisotope method employed in this study involved the injection of short-lived radioisotope tracer, that is, technetium-99m ( 99m Tc having its half-life ∼ 6.023 hrs) which was supplied from a high activity technetium generator (55.5 Gbq). Measurement of stream discharges were concurrently undertaken by JPS staff using a current meter type 0TT-C2 mounted on a wading rod at selected gauging stations for comparison purposes. Methodologies from the two methods of discharge measurements, comparison of results and identifying the uncertainties (errors) in performing the measurement during low, medium and high turbulent flows were explained in this paper. Generally, the entire results of streamflow data (2003-2005) measured by both methods during low flows (Q 3 /s) exhibit almost comparable values to each other. However, for moderate flows (1.0 m 3 /s 3 /s), the different in gauging results are slightly higher using radioisotope method ( i.e. Q isotope > Q current meter and may goes up to 40%) , and during high turbulent flows (Q>6.0 m 3 /s) the radioisotope method presented more than 40% higher discharge values as compared to the measurement made by the conventional current-meter. Observation made on site anticipated that inaccurate gauging data measured by conventional means during high flow and turbulent conditions are expected. The average estimated measurement error associated with isotope method

  11. Broadband Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is a rapidly developing field that draws from a number of disciplines, from quantum optics to information theory to electrical engineering. By combining some fundamental quantum mechanical principles of single photons with various aspects of information theory, quantum cryptography represents a fundamental shift in the basis for security from numerical complexity to the fundamental physical nature of the communications channel. As such, it promises the holy grail of data security: theoretically unbreakable encryption. Of course, implementing quantum cryptography in real br

  12. Introduction to modern cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition:""This book is a comprehensive, rigorous introduction to what the authors name 'modern' cryptography. … a novel approach to how cryptography is taught, replacing the older, construction-based approach. … The concepts are clearly stated, both in an intuitive fashion and formally. … I would heartily recommend this book to anyone who is interested in cryptography. … The exercises are challenging and interesting, and can benefit readers of all academic levels.""-IACR Book Reviews, January 2010""Over the past 30 years, cryptography has been transformed from a mysterious

  13. Post-quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Daniel J; Lange, Tanja

    2017-09-13

    Cryptography is essential for the security of online communication, cars and implanted medical devices. However, many commonly used cryptosystems will be completely broken once large quantum computers exist. Post-quantum cryptography is cryptography under the assumption that the attacker has a large quantum computer; post-quantum cryptosystems strive to remain secure even in this scenario. This relatively young research area has seen some successes in identifying mathematical operations for which quantum algorithms offer little advantage in speed, and then building cryptographic systems around those. The central challenge in post-quantum cryptography is to meet demands for cryptographic usability and flexibility without sacrificing confidence.

  14. Post-quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Daniel J.; Lange, Tanja

    2017-09-01

    Cryptography is essential for the security of online communication, cars and implanted medical devices. However, many commonly used cryptosystems will be completely broken once large quantum computers exist. Post-quantum cryptography is cryptography under the assumption that the attacker has a large quantum computer; post-quantum cryptosystems strive to remain secure even in this scenario. This relatively young research area has seen some successes in identifying mathematical operations for which quantum algorithms offer little advantage in speed, and then building cryptographic systems around those. The central challenge in post-quantum cryptography is to meet demands for cryptographic usability and flexibility without sacrificing confidence.

  15. Dohmen, Dieter, Erbes, Annegret, Fuchs, Kathrin & Günzel, Juliane (2008). Was wissen wir über Nachhilfe? Sachstand und Auswertung der Forschungsliteratur zu Angebot, Nachfrage und Wirkungen. Bielefeld: Bertelsmann, 150 S. [Rezension

    OpenAIRE

    Mayr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rezension von Dohmen, Dieter, Erbes, Annegret, Fuchs, Kathrin & Günzel, Juliane (2008). Was wissen wir über Nachhilfe? Sachstand und Auswertung der Forschungsliteratur zu Angebot, Nachfrage und Wirkungen. Bielefeld: Bertelsmann, 150 S. 29,90 EUR, ISBN 978-3763936656

  16. Threshold quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding

  17. Quantum cryptography; Kvantova kryptografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittel, W; Brendel, J; Gissin, N; Ribordy, G; Zbinden, H [GAP-Optique, Universite de Geneve, 20 reu de l' Ecole de Medicine, Genf (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    The principles of quantum cryptography based on non-local correlations of entanglement photons are outlined. The method of coding and decoding of information and experiments is also described. The prospects of the technique are briefly discussed. (Z.J.)

  18. Public Key Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  19. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  20. Quantum cryptography communication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Yu Rak; Jung, Gwang Il; Jung, Jong Eun; Hong, Seok Boong; Koo, In Soo

    2007-09-01

    Quantum cryptography communication based on quantum mechanics provides and unconditional security between two users. Even though huge advance has been done since the 1984, having a complete system is still far away. In the case of real quantum cryptography communication systems, an unconditional security level is lowered by the imperfection of the communication unit. It is important to investigate the unconditional security of quantum communication protocols based on these experimental results and implementation examples for the advanced spread all over the world. The Japanese report, titled, 'Investigation report on the worldwide trends of quantum cryptography communications systems' was translated and summarized in this report. An unconditional security theory of the quantum cryptography and real implementation examples in the domestic area are investigated also. The goal of the report is to make quantum cryptography communication more useful and reliable alternative telecommunication infrastructure as the one of the cyber security program of the class 1-E communication system of nuclear power plant. Also another goal of this report is to provide the quantitative decision basis on the quantum cryptography communication when this secure communication system will be used in class 1-E communication channel of the nuclear power plant

  1. Halftone visual cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Arce, Gonzalo R; Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

    2006-08-01

    Visual cryptography encodes a secret binary image (SI) into n shares of random binary patterns. If the shares are xeroxed onto transparencies, the secret image can be visually decoded by superimposing a qualified subset of transparencies, but no secret information can be obtained from the superposition of a forbidden subset. The binary patterns of the n shares, however, have no visual meaning and hinder the objectives of visual cryptography. Extended visual cryptography [1] was proposed recently to construct meaningful binary images as shares using hypergraph colourings, but the visual quality is poor. In this paper, a novel technique named halftone visual cryptography is proposed to achieve visual cryptography via halftoning. Based on the blue-noise dithering principles, the proposed method utilizes the void and cluster algorithm [2] to encode a secret binary image into n halftone shares (images) carrying significant visual information. The simulation shows that the visual quality of the obtained halftone shares are observably better than that attained by any available visual cryptography method known to date.

  2. Quantum cryptography communication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Yu Rak; Jung, Gwang Il; Jung, Jong Eun; Hong, Seok Boong; Koo, In Soo

    2007-09-15

    Quantum cryptography communication based on quantum mechanics provides and unconditional security between two users. Even though huge advance has been done since the 1984, having a complete system is still far away. In the case of real quantum cryptography communication systems, an unconditional security level is lowered by the imperfection of the communication unit. It is important to investigate the unconditional security of quantum communication protocols based on these experimental results and implementation examples for the advanced spread all over the world. The Japanese report, titled, 'Investigation report on the worldwide trends of quantum cryptography communications systems' was translated and summarized in this report. An unconditional security theory of the quantum cryptography and real implementation examples in the domestic area are investigated also. The goal of the report is to make quantum cryptography communication more useful and reliable alternative telecommunication infrastructure as the one of the cyber security program of the class 1-E communication system of nuclear power plant. Also another goal of this report is to provide the quantitative decision basis on the quantum cryptography communication when this secure communication system will be used in class 1-E communication channel of the nuclear power plant.

  3. Cryptography for Big Data Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-13

    Cryptography for Big Data Security Book Chapter for Big Data: Storage, Sharing, and Security (3S) Distribution A: Public Release Ariel Hamlin1 Nabil...Email: arkady@ll.mit.edu ii Contents 1 Cryptography for Big Data Security 1 1.1 Introduction...48 Chapter 1 Cryptography for Big Data Security 1.1 Introduction With the amount

  4. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  5. Low power cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, P; Koufopavlou, O; Selimis, G; Sklavos, N

    2005-01-01

    Today more and more sensitive data is stored digitally. Bank accounts, medical records and personal emails are some categories that data must keep secure. The science of cryptography tries to encounter the lack of security. Data confidentiality, authentication, non-reputation and data integrity are some of the main parts of cryptography. The evolution of cryptography drove in very complex cryptographic models which they could not be implemented before some years. The use of systems with increasing complexity, which usually are more secure, has as result low throughput rate and more energy consumption. However the evolution of cipher has no practical impact, if it has only theoretical background. Every encryption algorithm should exploit as much as possible the conditions of the specific system without omitting the physical, area and timing limitations. This fact requires new ways in design architectures for secure and reliable crypto systems. A main issue in the design of crypto systems is the reduction of power consumption, especially for portable systems as smart cards. (invited paper)

  6. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-01-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible

  7. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  8. Applied quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmitzer, Christian; Pivk, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Using the quantum properties of single photons to exchange binary keys between two partners for subsequent encryption of secret data is an absolutely novel technology. Only a few years ago quantum cryptography - or better: quantum key distribution - was the domain of basic research laboratories at universities. But during the last few years things changed. QKD left the laboratories and was picked up by more practical oriented teams that worked hard to develop a practically applicable technology out of the astonishing results of basic research. One major milestone towards a QKD technology was a large research and development project funded by the European Commission that aimed at combining quantum physics with complementary technologies that are necessary to create a technical solution: electronics, software, and network components were added within the project SECOQC (Development of a Global Network for Secure Communication based on Quantum Cryptography) that teamed up all expertise on European level to get a technology for future encryption. The practical application of QKD in a standard optical fibre network was demonstrated October 2008 in Vienna, giving a glimpse of the future of secure communication. Although many steps have still to be done in order to achieve a real mature technology, the corner stone for future secure communication is already laid. QKD will not be the Holy Grail of security, it will not be able to solve all problems for evermore. But QKD has the potential to replace one of the weakest parts of symmetric encryption: the exchange of the key. It can be proven that the key exchange process cannot be corrupted and that keys that are generated and exchanged quantum cryptographically will be secure for ever (as long as some additional conditions are kept). This book will show the state of the art of Quantum Cryptography and it will sketch how it can be implemented in standard communication infrastructure. The growing vulnerability of sensitive

  9. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  10. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniewski, Jedrzej

    Special relativity states that information cannot travel faster than the speed of light, which means that communication between agents occupying distinct locations incurs some minimal delay. Alternatively, we can see it as temporary communication constraints between distinct agents and such constraints turn out to be useful for cryptographic purposes. In relativistic cryptography we consider protocols in which interactions occur at distinct locations at well-defined times and we investigate why such a setting allows to implement primitives which would not be possible otherwise. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  11. Focus on Quantum Cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiat, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In our modern era of telecommunications and the Internet, information has become a valuable commodity. Sometimes it must therefore be protected against theft - in this case, loss of secret information to an eavesdropper. Most of today's transactions are protected using encryption unproven to be secure against a computational attack by a classical computer and, in fact, the standardly used encryption algorithms are provably vulnerable to the mind-boggling parallelism of a quantum computer, should one ever be physically realized. Enter quantum cryptography. Underlying nearly all forms of encryption is the necessity for a truly secret key, a random string of zeros and ones; the basic notion of quantum cryptography is to employ single photon transmissions (or the closest attainable approximation to these) to distribute the random key material, while removing the threat of an undetected eavesdropper. Now, nearly twenty years since the seminal quantum cryptography paper by Bennett and Brassard (Bennett C H and Brassard G 1984 Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. on Computers, Systems, and Signal Processing (Bangalore) (New York: IEEE) pp 175-9), we take a look at several state-of-the-art implementations, and glimpse how future quantum cryptosystems might look. We start with papers from three of the world's leading experimental quantum cryptography efforts: Stucki et al and Bethune and Risk describe working systems for quantum key distribution (QKD) over telecommunications fibres (at 1550 nanometres and 1300 nanometres, respectively). The former's achievement of quantum key exchange over 67 kilometres of optical fibre is a world record, as is the experimental demonstration by Hughes et al of daylight free-space QKD over a 10 km atmospheric range. Next, Luetkenhaus and Jahma explore the possible vulnerabilities of such systems (which employ attenuated laser pulses instead of actual single photon states) to conceivable future eavesdropping technologies. Enzer et al have

  12. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-04

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle.

  13. Quantum cryptography: towards realization in realistic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imoto, M; Koashi, M; Shimizu, K [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-01 (Japan); Huttner, B [Universite de Geneve, GAP-optique, 20, Rue de l` Ecole de Medecine CH1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland)

    1997-05-11

    Many of quantum cryptography schemes have been proposed based on some assumptions such as no transmission loss, no measurement error, and an ideal single photon generator. We have been trying to develop a theory of quantum cryptography considering realistic conditions. As such attempts, we propose quantum cryptography with coherent states, quantum cryptography with two-photon interference, and generalization of two-state cryptography to two-mixed-state cases. (author) 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Quantum cryptography: towards realization in realistic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imoto, M.; Koashi, M.; Shimizu, K.; Huttner, B.

    1997-01-01

    Many of quantum cryptography schemes have been proposed based on some assumptions such as no transmission loss, no measurement error, and an ideal single photon generator. We have been trying to develop a theory of quantum cryptography considering realistic conditions. As such attempts, we propose quantum cryptography with coherent states, quantum cryptography with two-photon interference, and generalization of two-state cryptography to two-mixed-state cases. (author)

  15. Lightweight cryptography for constrained devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alippi, Cesare; Bogdanov, Andrey; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Lightweight cryptography is a rapidly evolving research field that responds to the request for security in resource constrained devices. This need arises from crucial pervasive IT applications, such as those based on RFID tags where cost and energy constraints drastically limit the solution...... complexity, with the consequence that traditional cryptography solutions become too costly to be implemented. In this paper, we survey design strategies and techniques suitable for implementing security primitives in constrained devices....

  16. Cryptography Engineering Design Principles and Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, Niels; Kohno, Tadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate guide to cryptography, updated from an author team of the world's top cryptography experts. Cryptography is vital to keeping information safe, in an era when the formula to do so becomes more and more challenging. Written by a team of world-renowned cryptography experts, this essential guide is the definitive introduction to all major areas of cryptography: message security, key negotiation, and key management. You'll learn how to think like a cryptographer. You'll discover techniques for building cryptography into products from the start and you'll examine the many technical chan

  17. Understanding and applying cryptography and data security

    CERN Document Server

    Elbirt, Adam J

    2009-01-01

    Introduction A Brief History of Cryptography and Data Security Cryptography and Data Security in the Modern World Existing Texts Book Organization Symmetric-Key Cryptography Cryptosystem Overview The Modulo Operator Greatest Common Divisor The Ring ZmHomework ProblemsSymmetric-Key Cryptography: Substitution Ciphers Basic Cryptanalysis Shift Ciphers Affine Ciphers Homework ProblemsSymmetric-Key Cryptography: Stream Ciphers Random Numbers The One-Time Pad Key Stream GeneratorsReal-World ApplicationsHomework ProblemsSymmetric-Key Cryptography: Block Ciphers The Data Encryption StandardThe Advance

  18. Introduction to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmann, Johannes A

    2004-01-01

    Cryptography is a key technology in electronic key systems. It is used to keep data secret, digitally sign documents, access control, etc. Therefore, users should not only know how its techniques work, but they must also be able to estimate their efficiency and security. For this new edition, the author has updated the discussion of the security of encryption and signature schemes and recent advances in factoring and computing discrete logarithms. He has also added descriptions of time-memory trade of attacks and algebraic attacks on block ciphers, the Advanced Encryption Standard, the Secure Hash Algorithm, secret sharing schemes, and undeniable and blind signatures. Johannes A. Buchmann is a Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics at the Technical University of Darmstadt, and the Associate Editor of the Journal of Cryptology. In 1985, he received the Feodor Lynen Fellowship of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Furthermore, he has received the most prestigious award in science in Germany, the Leib...

  19. Autocompensating quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethune, Donald S.; Risk, William P.

    2002-01-01

    Quantum cryptographic key distribution (QKD) uses extremely faint light pulses to carry quantum information between two parties (Alice and Bob), allowing them to generate a shared, secret cryptographic key. Autocompensating QKD systems automatically and passively compensate for uncontrolled time-dependent variations of the optical fibre properties by coding the information as a differential phase between orthogonally polarized components of a light pulse sent on a round trip through the fibre, reflected at mid-course using a Faraday mirror. We have built a prototype system based on standard telecom technology that achieves a privacy-amplified bit generation rate of ∼1000 bits s -1 over a 10 km optical fibre link. Quantum cryptography is an example of an application that, by using quantum states of individual particles to represent information, accomplishes a practical task that is impossible using classical means. (author)

  20. Composability in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Quade, Joern; Renner, Renato

    2009-01-01

    If we combine two secure cryptographic systems, is the resulting system still secure? Answering this question is highly nontrivial and has recently sparked a considerable research effort, in particular, in the area of classical cryptography. A central insight was that the answer to the question is yes, but only within a well-specified composability framework and for carefully chosen security definitions. In this article, we review several aspects of composability in the context of quantum cryptography. The first part is devoted to key distribution. We discuss the security criteria that a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol must fulfill to allow its safe use within a larger security application (e.g. for secure message transmission); and we demonstrate-by an explicit example-what can go wrong if conventional (non-composable) security definitions are used. Finally, to illustrate the practical use of composability, we show how to generate a continuous key stream by sequentially composing rounds of a QKD protocol. In the second part, we take a more general point of view, which is necessary for the study of cryptographic situations involving, for example, mutually distrustful parties. We explain the universal composability (UC) framework and state the composition theorem that guarantees that secure protocols can securely be composed to larger applications. We focus on the secure composition of quantum protocols into unconditionally secure classical protocols. However, the resulting security definition is so strict that some tasks become impossible without additional security assumptions. Quantum bit commitment is impossible in the UC framework even with mere computational security. Similar problems arise in the quantum bounded storage model and we observe a trade-off between the UC and the use of the weakest possible security assumptions.

  1. Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Johannes; Stichtenoth, Henning; Tapia-Recillas, Horacio

    Proceedings of anInternational Conference on Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas, held in Guanajuato, Mexico. in april 1998......Proceedings of anInternational Conference on Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas, held in Guanajuato, Mexico. in april 1998...

  2. Theory and practice of chaotic cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, J.M.; Kocarev, L.; Szczepanski, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this Letter we address some basic questions about chaotic cryptography, not least the very definition of chaos in discrete systems. We propose a conceptual framework and illustrate it with different examples from private and public key cryptography. We elaborate also on possible limits of chaotic cryptography

  3. Coding, cryptography and combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Niederreiter, Harald; Xing, Chaoping

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that there are fascinating connections between cod­ ing theory, cryptology, and combinatorics. Therefore it seemed desirable to us to organize a conference that brings together experts from these three areas for a fruitful exchange of ideas. We decided on a venue in the Huang Shan (Yellow Mountain) region, one of the most scenic areas of China, so as to provide the additional inducement of an attractive location. The conference was planned for June 2003 with the official title Workshop on Coding, Cryptography and Combi­ natorics (CCC 2003). Those who are familiar with events in East Asia in the first half of 2003 can guess what happened in the end, namely the conference had to be cancelled in the interest of the health of the participants. The SARS epidemic posed too serious a threat. At the time of the cancellation, the organization of the conference was at an advanced stage: all invited speakers had been selected and all abstracts of contributed talks had been screened by the p...

  4. An introduction to mathematical cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffstein, Jeffrey; Silverman, Joseph H

    2014-01-01

    This self-contained introduction to modern cryptography emphasizes the mathematics behind the theory of public key cryptosystems and digital signature schemes. The book focuses on these key topics while developing the mathematical tools needed for the construction and security analysis of diverse cryptosystems. Only basic linear algebra is required of the reader; techniques from algebra, number theory, and probability are introduced and developed as required. This text provides an ideal introduction for mathematics and computer science students to the mathematical foundations of modern cryptography. The book includes an extensive bibliography and index; supplementary materials are available online. The book covers a variety of topics that are considered central to mathematical cryptography. Key topics include: classical cryptographic constructions, such as Diffie–Hellmann key exchange, discrete logarithm-based cryptosystems, the RSA cryptosystem, and digital signatures; fundamental mathematical tools for cr...

  5. Lightweight Cryptography for Passive RFID Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    were mostly unsatisfactory. As a conclusion, a new branch of cryptography, commonly called Lightweight Cryptography, emerged to address the issues of these tiny ubiquitous devices. This Thesis presents a comprehensive engineering to lightweight cryptography, proposes a classification and explores its...... various ramifications by giving key examples in each of them. We select two of these branches, ultralightweight cryptography and symmetric-key cryptography, and propose a cryptographic primitive in each of them. In the case of symmetric-key cryptography, we propose a stream cipher that has a footprint...... of an integrator for a particular application. Finally, we conclude that the research for finding robust cryptographic primitive in the branch of lightweight cryptography still has some nice days ahead, and that providing a secure cryptosystem for printed electronics RFID tags remains an open research topic....

  6. Mesoscopic quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molotkov, S. N., E-mail: sergei.molotkov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Since a strictly single-photon source is not yet available, in quantum cryptography systems, one uses, as information quantum states, coherent radiation of a laser with an average number of photons of μ ≈ 0.1–0.5 in a pulse, attenuated to the quasi-single-photon level. The linear independence of a set of coherent quasi-single-photon information states leads to the possibility of unambiguous measurements that, in the presence of losses in the line, restrict the transmission range of secret keys. Starting from a certain value of critical loss (the length of the line), the eavesdropper knows the entire key, does not make errors, and is not detected—the distribution of secret keys becomes impossible. This problem is solved by introducing an additional reference state with an average number of photons of μ{sub cl} ≈ 10{sup 3}–10{sup 6}, depending on the length of the communication line. It is shown that the use of a reference state does not allow the eavesdropper to carry out measurements with conclusive outcome while remaining undetected. A reference state guarantees detecting an eavesdropper in a channel with high losses. In this case, information states may contain a mesoscopic average number of photons in the range of μ{sub q} ≈ 0.5–10{sup 2}. The protocol proposed is easy to implement technically, admits flexible adjustment of parameters to the length of the communication line, and is simple and transparent for proving the secrecy of keys.

  7. Cryptography as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmohan

    2008-01-01

    In order to get undergraduates interested in mathematics, it is necessary to motivate them, give them good reasons to spend time on a subject that requires hard work, and, if possible, involve them in undergraduate research. This article discusses how cryptography can be used for all these purposes. In particular, a special topics course on…

  8. Practical free space quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt-Manderbach, T.; Weier, H.; Regner, N.; Kurtsiefer, C.; Weinfurter, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Quantum cryptography, the secure key distribution between two parties, is the first practical application of quantum information technology. By encoding digital information into different polarization states of single photons, a string of key bits can be established between two parties, where laws of quantum mechanics ensure that a possible eavesdropper has negligible knowledge of. Having shown the feasibility of a long distance quantum key distribution scheme, the emphasis of this work is to incorporate the previously developed compact sender and receiver modules into a quantum cryptography system suitable for every-day use in metropolitan areas. The permanent installation with automatic alignment allows to investigate in detail the sensitivity of the free space optical link to weather conditions and air turbulences commonly encountered in urban areas. We report on a successful free space quantum cryptography experiment over a distance of 500 m between the rooftops of two university buildings using the BB84 protocol. The obtained bit error rates in first runs of this experiment using faint coherent pulses with an average photon number ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 was measured to be below 3 percent for experiments carried out during night, leading to average raw key rates (before error correction and privacy amplification) of 50 kBits per second. Thanks to its simplicity of implementation, our experiment brings free space quantum key distribution a big step closer to practical usability in metropolitan networks and on a level with fibre-based quantum cryptography that up to now offers the only ready-to-use systems available. Compact and automated free space hardware is also a prerequisite for a possible earth-satellite quantum key distribution system in order to break the distance limit of about 100 km of current quantum cryptography schemes. (author)

  9. Everyday cryptography fundamental principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Keith M

    2012-01-01

    Cryptography is a vital technology that underpins the security of information in computer networks. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the role that cryptography plays in providing information security for technologies such as the Internet, mobile phones, payment cards, and wireless local area networks. Focusing on the fundamental principles that ground modern cryptography as they arise in modern applications, it avoids both an over-reliance on transient currenttechnologies and over-whelming theoretical research.Everyday Cryptography is a self-contained and widely accessible in

  10. Optical hiding with visual cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yishi; Yang, Xiubo

    2017-11-01

    We propose an optical hiding method based on visual cryptography. In the hiding process, we convert the secret information into a set of fabricated phase-keys, which are completely independent of each other, intensity-detected-proof and image-covered, leading to the high security. During the extraction process, the covered phase-keys are illuminated with laser beams and then incoherently superimposed to extract the hidden information directly by human vision, without complicated optical implementations and any additional computation, resulting in the convenience of extraction. Also, the phase-keys are manufactured as the diffractive optical elements that are robust to the attacks, such as the blocking and the phase-noise. Optical experiments verify that the high security, the easy extraction and the strong robustness are all obtainable in the visual-cryptography-based optical hiding.

  11. Optimization problem in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Howard E

    2003-01-01

    A complete optimization was recently performed, yielding the maximum information gain by a general unitary entangling probe in the four-state protocol of quantum cryptography. A larger set of optimum probe parameters was found than was known previously from an incomplete optimization. In the present work, a detailed comparison is made between the complete and incomplete optimizations. Also, a new set of optimum probe parameters is identified for the four-state protocol

  12. A prototype quantum cryptography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surasak, Chiangga

    1998-07-01

    In this work we have constructed a new secure quantum key distribution system based on the BB84 protocol. Many current state-of-the-art quantum cryptography systems encounter major problems concerning low bit rate, synchronization, and stabilization. Our quantum cryptography system utilizes only laser diodes and standard passive optical components, to enhance the stability and also to decrease the space requirements. The development of this demonstration for a practical quantum key distribution system is a consequence of our previous work on the quantum cryptographic system using optical fiber components for the transmitter and receiver. There we found that the optical fiber couplers should not be used due to the problems with space, stability and alignment. The goal of the synchronization is to use as little transmission capacities as possible. The experimental results of our quantum key distribution system show the feasibility of getting more than 90 % transmission capacities with the approaches developed in this work. Therefore it becomes feasible to securely establish a random key sequence at a rate of 1 to {approx} 5K bit/s by using our stable, compact, cheap, and user-friendly modules for quantum cryptography. (author)

  13. A prototype quantum cryptography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiangga Surasak

    1998-07-01

    In this work we have constructed a new secure quantum key distribution system based on the BB84 protocol. Many current state-of-the-art quantum cryptography systems encounter major problems concerning low bit rate, synchronization, and stabilization. Our quantum cryptography system utilizes only laser diodes and standard passive optical components, to enhance the stability and also to decrease the space requirements. The development of this demonstration for a practical quantum key distribution system is a consequence of our previous work on the quantum cryptographic system using optical fiber components for the transmitter and receiver. There we found that the optical fiber couplers should not be used due to the problems with space, stability and alignment. The goal of the synchronization is to use as little transmission capacities as possible. The experimental results of our quantum key distribution system show the feasibility of getting more than 90 % transmission capacities with the approaches developed in this work. Therefore it becomes feasible to securely establish a random key sequence at a rate of 1 to ∼ 5K bit/s by using our stable, compact, cheap, and user-friendly modules for quantum cryptography. (author)

  14. Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Concerns of the National Security Agency (NSA) that information contained in some articles about cryptography in learned and professional journals and in monographs might be inimical to the national security are addressed. The Public Cryptography Study Group, with one dissenting opinion, recommends that a voluntary system of prior review of…

  15. Security, Privacy, and Applied Cryptography Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Second International Conference on Security, Privacy and Applied Cryptography Engineering held in Chennai, India, in November 2012. The 11 papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 61 submissions. The papers are organized...... and applications, high-performance computing in cryptology and cryptography in ubiquitous devices....

  16. Protocols and plan of quantum cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad S. Markagić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of confidentiality of data and resources, there is a need to develop systems that would provide confidentiality. Currently, the most used systems are classical cryptographic systems and encryption public key systems. However, none of these systems provides a solution for the famous 'catch 22' of cryptography. Owing to the intensive development of quantum mechanics, in the last 30 years emerged an entirely new kind of cryptography-quantum cryptography. Its greatest contribution is a possibility to discover an intercepted communication channel from a third party. The question is: is this really true? The question arises: 'If the quantum cryptography is so good, why is not widely used?' The aim of this paper is, on the one hand, to define the basic mechanisms of quantum cryptography IP, and, on the other hand, to point to the shortcomings, as they related to the opportunities of today's devices and flaws in protocols.

  17. Cryptography in constant parallel time

    CERN Document Server

    Applebaum, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Locally computable (NC0) functions are 'simple' functions for which every bit of the output can be computed by reading a small number of bits of their input. The study of locally computable cryptography attempts to construct cryptographic functions that achieve this strong notion of simplicity and simultaneously provide a high level of security. Such constructions are highly parallelizable and they can be realized by Boolean circuits of constant depth.This book establishes, for the first time, the possibility of local implementations for many basic cryptographic primitives such as one-way func

  18. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Lanir N; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the "majority-flipping attacker," does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker's outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  19. Cryptography and computational number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Shparlinski, Igor; Wang, Huaxiong; Xing, Chaoping; Workshop on Cryptography and Computational Number Theory, CCNT'99

    2001-01-01

    This volume contains the refereed proceedings of the Workshop on Cryptography and Computational Number Theory, CCNT'99, which has been held in Singapore during the week of November 22-26, 1999. The workshop was organized by the Centre for Systems Security of the Na­ tional University of Singapore. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Singapore National Science and Technology Board under the grant num­ ber RP960668/M. The idea for this workshop grew out of the recognition of the recent, rapid development in various areas of cryptography and computational number the­ ory. The event followed the concept of the research programs at such well-known research institutions as the Newton Institute (UK), Oberwolfach and Dagstuhl (Germany), and Luminy (France). Accordingly, there were only invited lectures at the workshop with plenty of time for informal discussions. It was hoped and successfully achieved that the meeting would encourage and stimulate further research in information and computer s...

  20. Key distillation in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, Boris Aron

    1998-11-01

    Quantum cryptography is a technique which permits two parties to communicate over an open channel and establish a shared sequence of bits known only to themselves. This task, provably impossible in classical cryptography, is accomplished by encoding the data on quantum particles and harnessing their unique properties. It is believed that no eavesdropping attack consistent with the laws of quantum theory can compromise the secret data unknowingly to the legitimate users of the channel. Any attempt by a hostile actor to monitor the data carrying particles while in transit reveals itself through transmission errors it must inevitably introduce. Unfortunately, in practice a communication is not free of errors even when no eavesdropping is present. Key distillation is a technique that permits the parties to overcome this difficulty and establish a secret key despite channel defects, under the assumption that every particle is handled independently from other particles by the enemy. In the present work, key distillation is described and its various aspects are studied. A relationship is derived between the average error rate resulting from an eavesdropping attack and the amount of information obtained by the attacker. Formal definition is developed of the security of the final key. The net throughput of secret bits in a quantum cryptosystem employing key distillation is assessed. An overview of quantum cryptographic protocols and related information theoretical results is also given.

  1. Quantum cryptography: The power of independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, Artur

    2018-02-01

    Device-independent quantum cryptography promises unprecedented security, but it is regarded as a theorist's dream and an experimentalist's nightmare. A new mathematical tool has now pushed its experimental demonstration much closer to reality.

  2. Bent functions results and applications to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Tokareva, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Bent Functions: Results and Applications to Cryptography offers a unique survey of the objects of discrete mathematics known as Boolean bent functions. As these maximal, nonlinear Boolean functions and their generalizations have many theoretical and practical applications in combinatorics, coding theory, and cryptography, the text provides a detailed survey of their main results, presenting a systematic overview of their generalizations and applications, and considering open problems in classification and systematization of bent functions. The text is appropriate for novices and advanced

  3. Mathematical Background of Public Key Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Gerhard; Lange, Tanja

    2005-01-01

    The two main systems used for public key cryptography are RSA and protocols based on the discrete logarithm problem in some cyclic group. We focus on the latter problem and state cryptographic protocols and mathematical background material.......The two main systems used for public key cryptography are RSA and protocols based on the discrete logarithm problem in some cyclic group. We focus on the latter problem and state cryptographic protocols and mathematical background material....

  4. Cryptography with chaos using Chua's system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C H; Pizolato, J C Jr

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, chaotic systems have been applied in information security. These systems have a complex and unpredictable behavior, what makes them more attractive for data cryptography applications. In this work, the chaotic behavior of signals generated by Chua's system is combined with the original information in order to obtain a safe cryptographic method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can be used in data cryptography applications.

  5. APPLICATION OF NATURAL TRANSFORM IN CRYPTOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Chindhe, Anil Dhondiram; Kiwne, Sakharam

    2017-01-01

    Abstaract−The newly defined integral transform ”Natural transform” has many application in the field of science and engineering.In this paper we described the application of Natural transform to Cryptography.This provide the algorithm for cryptography in which we use the natural transform of the exponential function for encryption of the plain text and corresponding inverse natural transform for decryption

  6. Cryptography with chaos and shadowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaoui, Nejib; Kanso, Ali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to encrypt a message (a text composed by some alphabets) using chaos and shadowing. First, we generate a numerical chaotic orbit based on the logistic map, and use the shadowing algorithm of Smaoui and Kostelich [Smaoui N, Kostelich E. Using chaos to shadow the quadratic map for all time. Int J Comput Math 1998;70:117-29] to show that there exists a finite number of true orbits that shadow the numerical orbit. Then, the finite number of maps generated is used in Baptista's algorithm [Baptista MS. Cryptography with chaos. Phys Lett A 1998;240:50-4] to encrypt each character of the message. It is shown that the use of chaos and shadowing in the encryption process enhances the security level.

  7. Cryptographie quantique à variables continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, K.; Jankovic, A.; Symul, T.; Levenson, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    Nous avons élaboré un protocole de cryptographie quantique qui permet de générer et de distribuer une clé secrète aléatoire. Le protocole repose sur l'utilisation de paires de champs électromagnétiques dont les quadratures présentent des corrélations quantiques de type Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen. Les fluctuations quantiques instantanése constituent les bits aléatoires de la clé secrète, et la dégradation irréversible des corrélations quantiques des quadratures causée par une tierce personne permet de la détecter et de garantir la sécurité d'échange.

  8. Iris Cryptography for Security Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, Srighakollapu; Balaji Ganesh Kumar, M.; Latha, S.; Samiappan, Dhanalakshmi; Muthu, P.

    2018-04-01

    In today's world, the security became the major issue to every human being. A major issue is hacking as hackers are everywhere, as the technology was developed still there are many issues where the technology fails to meet the security. Engineers, scientists were discovering the new products for security purpose as biometrics sensors like face recognition, pattern recognition, gesture recognition, voice authentication etcetera. But these devices fail to reach the expected results. In this work, we are going to present an approach to generate a unique secure key using the iris template. Here the iris templates are processed using the well-defined processing techniques. Using the encryption and decryption process they are stored, traversed and utilized. As of the work, we can conclude that the iris cryptography gives us the expected results for securing the data from eavesdroppers.

  9. Genetic attack on neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  10. Cheating prevention in visual cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chih-Ming; Tzeng, Wen-Guey

    2007-01-01

    Visual cryptography (VC) is a method of encrypting a secret image into shares such that stacking a sufficient number of shares reveals the secret image. Shares are usually presented in transparencies. Each participant holds a transparency. Most of the previous research work on VC focuses on improving two parameters: pixel expansion and contrast. In this paper, we studied the cheating problem in VC and extended VC. We considered the attacks of malicious adversaries who may deviate from the scheme in any way. We presented three cheating methods and applied them on attacking existent VC or extended VC schemes. We improved one cheat-preventing scheme. We proposed a generic method that converts a VCS to another VCS that has the property of cheating prevention. The overhead of the conversion is near optimal in both contrast degression and pixel expansion.

  11. Combining Cryptography with EEG Biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaševičius, Robertas; Maskeliūnas, Rytis; Kazanavičius, Egidijus; Woźniak, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    Cryptographic frameworks depend on key sharing for ensuring security of data. While the keys in cryptographic frameworks must be correctly reproducible and not unequivocally connected to the identity of a user, in biometric frameworks this is different. Joining cryptography techniques with biometrics can solve these issues. We present a biometric authentication method based on the discrete logarithm problem and Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) codes, perform its security analysis, and demonstrate its security characteristics. We evaluate a biometric cryptosystem using our own dataset of electroencephalography (EEG) data collected from 42 subjects. The experimental results show that the described biometric user authentication system is effective, achieving an Equal Error Rate (ERR) of 0.024.

  12. Genetic attack on neural cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-01-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size

  13. Genetic attack on neural cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  14. Cryptography with chaos and shadowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smaoui, Nejib [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)], E-mail: nsmaoui64@yahoo.com; Kanso, Ali [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)], E-mail: akanso@hotmail.com

    2009-11-30

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to encrypt a message (a text composed by some alphabets) using chaos and shadowing. First, we generate a numerical chaotic orbit based on the logistic map, and use the shadowing algorithm of Smaoui and Kostelich [Smaoui N, Kostelich E. Using chaos to shadow the quadratic map for all time. Int J Comput Math 1998;70:117-29] to show that there exists a finite number of true orbits that shadow the numerical orbit. Then, the finite number of maps generated is used in Baptista's algorithm [Baptista MS. Cryptography with chaos. Phys Lett A 1998;240:50-4] to encrypt each character of the message. It is shown that the use of chaos and shadowing in the encryption process enhances the security level.

  15. Neural Network Approach to Locating Cryptography in Object Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-09-01

    Finding and identifying cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, artificial neural networks are used to classify functional blocks from a disassembled program as being either cryptography related or not. The resulting system, referred to as NNLC (Neural Net for Locating Cryptography) is presented and results of applying this system to various libraries are described.

  16. Quantum key distribution and cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleaume, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Originally proposed by classical cryptographers, the ideas behind Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) have attracted considerable interest among the quantum optics community, which has significantly helped bring these ideas to reality. Experimental realizations have quickly evolved from early lab demonstrations to QKD systems that are now deployed in real conditions and targeting commercial applications. Although QKD can be theoretically proven to rely on 'unconditional security proofs' and should thus be able to provide security levels unachievable through computationally-based cryptographic techniques, the debate on the cryptographic applications of QKD remains somehow controversial. It seems that a consensus on that matter cannot be reached without a careful analysis of assumptions and definitions related to security models used in classical or in quantum cryptography. In this talk, we will try to present a comprehensive synthesis on this topic. We have initiated this work as a contribution to the European IP SECOQC project, confronting views and knowledge among experimental and theoretical quantum physicists, as well as classical cryptographers. (author)

  17. Color extended visual cryptography using error diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, InKoo; Arce, Gonzalo R; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Color visual cryptography (VC) encrypts a color secret message into n color halftone image shares. Previous methods in the literature show good results for black and white or gray scale VC schemes, however, they are not sufficient to be applied directly to color shares due to different color structures. Some methods for color visual cryptography are not satisfactory in terms of producing either meaningless shares or meaningful shares with low visual quality, leading to suspicion of encryption. This paper introduces the concept of visual information pixel (VIP) synchronization and error diffusion to attain a color visual cryptography encryption method that produces meaningful color shares with high visual quality. VIP synchronization retains the positions of pixels carrying visual information of original images throughout the color channels and error diffusion generates shares pleasant to human eyes. Comparisons with previous approaches show the superior performance of the new method.

  18. Quantum cryptography approaching the classical limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedbrook, Christian; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Ralph, Timothy C

    2010-09-10

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender's station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as much as 10(4) times greater than the variance of the vacuum mode). We show that, provided the channel transmission losses do not exceed 50%, the security of quantum cryptography is not dependent on the channel transmission, and is therefore incredibly robust against significant amounts of excess preparation noise. We extend these results to consider for the first time quantum cryptography at wavelengths considerably longer than optical and find that regions of security still exist all the way down to the microwave.

  19. Counterfactual quantum cryptography network with untrusted relay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Gu, Xuemei; Jiang, Dong; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2015-07-01

    Counterfactual quantum cryptography allows two remote parties to share a secret key even though a physical particle is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. In order to extend the scope of counterfactual quantum cryptography, we use an untrusted relay to construct a multi-user network. The implementation issues are discussed to show that the scheme can be realized with current technologies. We also prove the practical security advantages of the scheme by eliminating the probability that an eavesdropper can directly access the signal or an untrusted relay can perform false operations.

  20. Practical Leakage-Resilient Symmetric Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faust, Sebastian; Pietrzak, Krzysztof; Schipper, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Leakage resilient cryptography attempts to incorporate side-channel leakage into the black-box security model and designs cryptographic schemes that are provably secure within it. Informally, a scheme is leakage-resilient if it remains secure even if an adversary learns a bounded amount of arbitr......Leakage resilient cryptography attempts to incorporate side-channel leakage into the black-box security model and designs cryptographic schemes that are provably secure within it. Informally, a scheme is leakage-resilient if it remains secure even if an adversary learns a bounded amount...

  1. Coding and cryptography synergy for a robust communication

    CERN Document Server

    Zivic, Natasa

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the benefits of the synergetic effect of the combination of coding and cryptography. It introduces new directions for the interoperability between the components of a communication system. Coding and cryptography are standard components in today's distributed systems. The integration of cryptography into coding aspects is very interesting, as the usage of cryptography will be common use, even in industrial applications. The book is based on new developments of coding and cryptography, which use real numbers to express reliability values of bits instead of binary values 0 and 1. The presented methods are novel and designed for noisy communication, which doesn´t allow the successful use of cryptography. The rate of successful verifications is improved essentially not only for standard or "hard" verification, but even more after the introduction of "soft" verification. A security analysis shows the impact on the security. Information security and cryptography follow the late developments of c...

  2. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation,

  3. Opportunities in white-box cryptography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michiels, W.

    White-box cryptography is the discipline of implementing a cryptographic algorithm in software such that an adversary will have difficulty extracting the cryptographic key. This approach assumes that the adversary has full access to and full control over the implementation's execution. White-box

  4. Privacy-Enhancing Auctions Using Rational Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltersen, Peter Bro; Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Triandopoulos, Nikolaos

    2009-01-01

    show how to use rational cryptography to approximately implement any given ex interim individually strictly rational equilibrium of such an auction without a trusted mediator through a cryptographic protocol that uses only point-to-point authenticated channels between the players. By “ex interim...

  5. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST's position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed.

  6. Harry Potter and the Cryptography with Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Boon Liang

    2006-01-01

    This article describes Cryptography, defined as the science of encrypting and deciphering messages written in secret codes, it has played a vital role in securing information since ancient times. There are several cryptographic techniques and many make extensive use of mathematics to secure information. The author discusses an activity built…

  7. Number Theory and Public-Key Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefton, Phyllis

    1991-01-01

    Described are activities in the study of techniques used to conceal the meanings of messages and data. Some background information and two BASIC programs that illustrate the algorithms used in a new cryptographic system called "public-key cryptography" are included. (CW)

  8. Is Calculus a Failure in Cryptography?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 3. Is Calculus a Failure in Cryptography? P Vanchinathan. General Article Volume 21 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 239-245. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/03/0239-0245. Keywords.

  9. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  10. Towards Practical Whitebox Cryptography: Optimizing Efficiency and Space Hardness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogdanov, Andrey; Isobe, Takanori; Tischhauser, Elmar Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Whitebox cryptography aims to provide security for cryptographic algorithms in an untrusted environment where the adversary has full access to their implementation. Typical security goals for whitebox cryptography include key extraction security and decomposition security: Indeed, it should...... the practical requirements to whitebox cryptography in real-world applications such as DRM or mobile payments. Moreover, we formalize resistance towards decomposition in form of weak and strong space hardness at various security levels. We obtain bounds on space hardness in all those adversarial models...... real-world applications with whitebox cryptography....

  11. Cryptography and the Internet: lessons and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCurley, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    The popularization of the Internet has brought fundamental changes to the world, because it allows a universal method of communication between computers. This carries enormous benefits with it, but also raises many security considerations. Cryptography is a fundamental technology used to provide security of computer networks, and there is currently a widespread engineering effort to incorporate cryptography into various aspects of the Internet. The system-level engineering required to provide security services for the Internet carries some important lessons for researchers whose study is focused on narrowly defined problems. It also offers challenges to the cryptographic research community by raising new questions not adequately addressed by the existing body of knowledge. This paper attempts to summarize some of these lessons and challenges for the cryptographic research community.

  12. Asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiang; Wei, Hengzheng; Zhang, Peng

    2006-12-15

    A system of asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing (ACWS) is proposed for the first time to our knowledge. One of the most significant features of the asymmetric cryptography is that a trapdoor one-way function is required and constructed by analogy to wavefront sensing, in which the public key may be derived from optical parameters, such as the wavelength or the focal length, while the private key may be obtained from a kind of regular point array. The ciphertext is generated by the encoded wavefront and represented with an irregular array. In such an ACWS system, the encryption key is not identical to the decryption key, which is another important feature of an asymmetric cryptographic system. The processes of asymmetric encryption and decryption are formulized mathematically and demonstrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  13. Conditional efficient multiuser quantum cryptography network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Peng; Li Chuanfeng; Guo Guangcan

    2002-01-01

    We propose a conditional quantum key distribution scheme with three nonorthogonal states. Combined with the idea presented by Lo et al. (H.-K. Lo, H. F. Chau, and M. Ardehali, e-print arXiv: quant-ph/0011056), the efficiency of this scheme is increased to tend to 100%. Also, such a refined data analysis guarantees the security of our scheme against the most general eavesdropping strategy. Then, based on the scheme, we present a quantum cryptography network with the addition of a device called ''space optical switch.'' Moreover, we give out a realization of a quantum random number generator. Thus, a feasible experimental scheme of this efficient quantum cryptography network is completely given

  14. Low Cost and Compact Quantum Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Duligall, J. L.; Godfrey, M. S.; Harrison, K. A.; Munro, W. J.; Rarity, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    We present the design of a novel free-space quantum cryptography system, complete with purpose-built software, that can operate in daylight conditions. The transmitter and receiver modules are built using inexpensive off-the-shelf components. Both modules are compact allowing the generation of renewed shared secrets on demand over a short range of a few metres. An analysis of the software is shown as well as results of error rates and therefore shared secret yields at varying background light...

  15. Spectral coherent-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Gabriella; Spiekman, Leo; Wada, Naoya; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2008-11-01

    A novel implementation of quantum-noise optical cryptography is proposed, which is based on a simplified architecture that allows long-haul, high-speed transmission in a fiber optical network. By using a single multiport encoder/decoder and 16 phase shifters, this new approach can provide the same confidentiality as other implementations of Yuen's encryption protocol, which use a larger number of phase or polarization coherent states. Data confidentiality and error probability for authorized and unauthorized receivers are carefully analyzed.

  16. Gröbner Bases, Coding, and Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Massimiliano; Perret, Ludovic

    2009-01-01

    Coding theory and cryptography allow secure and reliable data transmission, which is at the heart of modern communication. This book offers a comprehensive overview on the application of commutative algebra to coding theory and cryptography. It analyzes important properties of algebraic/geometric coding systems individually.

  17. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana

    2015-01-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task - the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction...

  18. Position-based quantum cryptography and catalytic computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, F.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we present several results along two different lines of research. The first part concerns the study of position-based quantum cryptography, a topic in quantum cryptography. By combining quantum mechanics with special relativity theory, new cryptographic tasks can be developed that

  19. Coding theory and cryptography the essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hankerson, DC; Leonard, DA; Phelps, KT; Rodger, CA; Wall, JR; Wall, J R

    2000-01-01

    Containing data on number theory, encryption schemes, and cyclic codes, this highly successful textbook, proven by the authors in a popular two-quarter course, presents coding theory, construction, encoding, and decoding of specific code families in an ""easy-to-use"" manner appropriate for students with only a basic background in mathematics offering revised and updated material on the Berlekamp-Massey decoding algorithm and convolutional codes. Introducing the mathematics as it is needed and providing exercises with solutions, this edition includes an extensive section on cryptography, desig

  20. Cryptography with chaos at the physical level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Romuel F.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Grebogi, C.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we devise a chaos-based secret key cryptography scheme for digital communication where the encryption is realized at the physical level, that is, the encrypting transformations are applied to the wave signal instead to the symbolic sequence. The encryption process consists of transformations applied to a two-dimensional signal composed of the message carrying signal and an encrypting signal that has to be a chaotic one. The secret key, in this case, is related to the number of times the transformations are applied. Furthermore, we show that due to its chaotic nature, the encrypting signal is able to hide the statistics of the original signal

  1. Comment on "Cheating prevention in visual cryptography".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Horng, Gwoboa; Tsai, Du-Shiau

    2012-07-01

    Visual cryptography (VC), proposed by Naor and Shamir, has numerous applications, including visual authentication and identification, steganography, and image encryption. In 2006, Horng showed that cheating is possible in VC, where some participants can deceive the remaining participants by forged transparencies. Since then, designing cheating-prevention visual secret-sharing (CPVSS) schemes has been studied by many researchers. In this paper, we cryptanalyze the Hu-Tzeng CPVSS scheme and show that it is not cheating immune. We also outline an improvement that helps to overcome the problem.

  2. Distinguishability of quantum states and shannon complexity in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbekov, I. M.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-07-01

    The proof of the security of quantum key distribution is a rather complex problem. Security is defined in terms different from the requirements imposed on keys in classical cryptography. In quantum cryptography, the security of keys is expressed in terms of the closeness of the quantum state of an eavesdropper after key distribution to an ideal quantum state that is uncorrelated to the key of legitimate users. A metric of closeness between two quantum states is given by the trace metric. In classical cryptography, the security of keys is understood in terms of, say, the complexity of key search in the presence of side information. In quantum cryptography, side information for the eavesdropper is given by the whole volume of information on keys obtained from both quantum and classical channels. The fact that the mathematical apparatuses used in the proof of key security in classical and quantum cryptography are essentially different leads to misunderstanding and emotional discussions [1]. Therefore, one should be able to answer the question of how different cryptographic robustness criteria are related to each other. In the present study, it is shown that there is a direct relationship between the security criterion in quantum cryptography, which is based on the trace distance determining the distinguishability of quantum states, and the criterion in classical cryptography, which uses guesswork on the determination of a key in the presence of side information.

  3. Event-by-event simulation of quantum cryptography protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.; Raedt, H. De

    We present a new approach to simulate quantum cryptography protocols using event-based processes. The method is validated by simulating the BB84 protocol and the Ekert protocol, both without and with the presence of an eavesdropper.

  4. The 'golden' matrices and a new kind of cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakhov, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a new class of square matrices called the 'golden' matrices. They are a generalization of the classical Fibonacci Q-matrix for continuous domain. The 'golden' matrices can be used for creation of a new kind of cryptography called the 'golden' cryptography. The method is very fast and simple for technical realization and can be used for cryptographic protection of digital signals (telecommunication and measurement systems)

  5. Securing information display by use of visual cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Hayasaki, Yoshio; Nishida, Nobuo

    2003-09-01

    We propose a secure display technique based on visual cryptography. The proposed technique ensures the security of visual information. The display employs a decoding mask based on visual cryptography. Without the decoding mask, the displayed information cannot be viewed. The viewing zone is limited by the decoding mask so that only one person can view the information. We have developed a set of encryption codes to maintain the designed viewing zone and have demonstrated a display that provides a limited viewing zone.

  6. A NOVEL ROLLING BASED DNA CRYPTOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejwana Haque

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA Cryptography can be defined as a hiding data in terms of DNA Sequence. In this paper we propose a new DNA Encryption Technique where three different types of ordering is use to make binary data into cipher text. The main stages of this encryption technique are: Key Analysis, Data and Key Arrangement, Roll in encoding, Secondary Arrangement and Shifting. Decryption process has six main steps to obtain the original binary data from the encrypted data and key. Decryption steps are: Key Analysis, Shifting, Secondary Arrangement, Key Arrangement, Roll-out decoding, Data Arrangement. Here key size is half of binary data and the key is varies from data to data so key are used as one time pad. In this paper we also discuss about the implementation from sample data and security analysis for this given method.

  7. Introduction to number theory with cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, James S

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionDiophantine EquationsModular ArithmeticPrimes and the Distribution of PrimesCryptographyDivisibilityDivisibilityEuclid's Theorem Euclid's Original Proof The Sieve of Eratosthenes The Division Algorithm The Greatest Common Divisor The Euclidean Algorithm Other BasesLinear Diophantine EquationsThe Postage Stamp Problem Fermat and Mersenne Numbers Chapter Highlights Problems Unique FactorizationPreliminary Results The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic Euclid and the Fundamental Theorem of ArithmeticChapter Highlights Problems Applications of Unique Factorization A Puzzle Irrationality Proofs The Rational Root Theorem Pythagorean Triples Differences of Squares Prime Factorization of Factorials The Riemann Zeta Function Chapter Highlights Problems CongruencesDefinitions and Examples Modular Exponentiation Divisibility TestsLinear Congruences The Chinese Remainder TheoremFractions mod m Fermat's Theorem Euler's Theorem Wilson's Theorem Queens on a Chessboard Chapter Highlights Problems Cryptographic App...

  8. Fast, efficient error reconciliation for quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttler, W.T.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Torgerson, J.R.; Nickel, G.H.; Donahue, C.H.; Peterson, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe an error-reconciliation protocol, which we call Winnow, based on the exchange of parity and Hamming's 'syndrome' for N-bit subunits of a large dataset. The Winnow protocol was developed in the context of quantum-key distribution and offers significant advantages and net higher efficiency compared to other widely used protocols within the quantum cryptography community. A detailed mathematical analysis of the Winnow protocol is presented in the context of practical implementations of quantum-key distribution; in particular, the information overhead required for secure implementation is one of the most important criteria in the evaluation of a particular error-reconciliation protocol. The increase in efficiency for the Winnow protocol is largely due to the reduction in authenticated public communication required for its implementation

  9. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  10. Implementation of diffie-Hellman key exchange on wireless sensor using elliptic curve cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajuria, Samant; Tange, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    This work describes a low-cost public key cryptography (PKC) based solution for security services such as authentication as required for wireless sensor networks. We have implemented a software approach using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) over GF (2m) in order to obtain stronger cryptography...

  11. QC-LDPC code-based cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the fundamentals of cryptographic primitives based on quasi-cyclic low-density parity-check (QC-LDPC) codes, with a special focus on the use of these codes in public-key cryptosystems derived from the McEliece and Niederreiter schemes. In the first part of the book, the main characteristics of QC-LDPC codes are reviewed, and several techniques for their design are presented, while tools for assessing the error correction performance of these codes are also described. Some families of QC-LDPC codes that are best suited for use in cryptography are also presented. The second part of the book focuses on the McEliece and Niederreiter cryptosystems, both in their original forms and in some subsequent variants. The applicability of QC-LDPC codes in these frameworks is investigated by means of theoretical analyses and numerical tools, in order to assess their benefits and drawbacks in terms of system efficiency and security. Several examples of QC-LDPC code-based public key cryptosystems are prese...

  12. Handbook of elliptic and hyperelliptic curve cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Henri; Avanzi, Roberto; Doche, Christophe; Lange, Tanja; Nguyen, Kim; Vercauteren, Frederik

    2005-01-01

    … very comprehensive coverage of this vast subject area … a useful and essential treatise for anyone involved in elliptic curve algorithms … this book offers the opportunity to grasp the ECC technology with a diversified and comprehensive perspective. … This book will remain on my shelf for a long time and will land on my desk on many occasions, if only because the coverage of the issues common to factoring and discrete log cryptosystems is excellent.-IACR Book Reviews, June 2011… the book is designed for people who are working in the area and want to learn more about a specific issue. The chapters are written to be relatively independent so that readers can focus on the part of interest for them. Such readers will be grateful for the excellent index and extensive bibliography. … the handbook covers a wide range of topics and will be a valuable reference for researchers in curve-based cryptography. -Steven D. Galbraith, Mathematical Reviews, Issue 2007f.

  13. Practical device-independent quantum cryptography via entropy accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon-Friedman, Rotem; Dupuis, Frédéric; Fawzi, Omar; Renner, Renato; Vidick, Thomas

    2018-01-31

    Device-independent cryptography goes beyond conventional quantum cryptography by providing security that holds independently of the quality of the underlying physical devices. Device-independent protocols are based on the quantum phenomena of non-locality and the violation of Bell inequalities. This high level of security could so far only be established under conditions which are not achievable experimentally. Here we present a property of entropy, termed "entropy accumulation", which asserts that the total amount of entropy of a large system is the sum of its parts. We use this property to prove the security of cryptographic protocols, including device-independent quantum key distribution, while achieving essentially optimal parameters. Recent experimental progress, which enabled loophole-free Bell tests, suggests that the achieved parameters are technologically accessible. Our work hence provides the theoretical groundwork for experimental demonstrations of device-independent cryptography.

  14. Entropy in quantum information theory - Communication and cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian

    in quantum Shannon theory. While immensely more entanglement-consuming, the variant of port based teleportation is interesting for applications like instantaneous non-local computation and attacks on quantum position-based cryptography. Port based teleportation cannot be implemented perfectly......, for vanishing error. As a byproduct, a new lower bound for the size of the program register for an approximate universal programmable quantum processor is derived. Finally, the mix is completed with a result in quantum cryptography. While quantum key distribution is the most well-known quantum cryptographic...... protocol, there has been increased interest in extending the framework of symmetric key cryptography to quantum messages. We give a new denition for information-theoretic quantum non-malleability, strengthening the previous denition by Ambainis et al. We show that quantum non-malleability implies secrecy...

  15. Proposal for founding mistrustful quantum cryptography on coin tossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A significant branch of classical cryptography deals with the problems which arise when mistrustful parties need to generate, process, or exchange information. As Kilian showed a while ago, mistrustful classical cryptography can be founded on a single protocol, oblivious transfer, from which general secure multiparty computations can be built. The scope of mistrustful quantum cryptography is limited by no-go theorems, which rule out, inter alia, unconditionally secure quantum protocols for oblivious transfer or general secure two-party computations. These theorems apply even to protocols which take relativistic signaling constraints into account. The best that can be hoped for, in general, are quantum protocols which are computationally secure against quantum attack. Here a method is described for building a classically certified bit commitment, and hence every other mistrustful cryptographic task, from a secure coin-tossing protocol. No security proof is attempted, but reasons are sketched why these protocols might resist quantum computational attack

  16. Quantum discord as a resource for quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2014-11-07

    Quantum discord is the minimal bipartite resource which is needed for a secure quantum key distribution, being a cryptographic primitive equivalent to non-orthogonality. Its role becomes crucial in device-dependent quantum cryptography, where the presence of preparation and detection noise (inaccessible to all parties) may be so strong to prevent the distribution and distillation of entanglement. The necessity of entanglement is re-affirmed in the stronger scenario of device-independent quantum cryptography, where all sources of noise are ascribed to the eavesdropper.

  17. Generalized logistic map and its application in chaos based cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawnik, M.

    2017-12-01

    The logistic map is commonly used in, for example, chaos based cryptography. However, its properties do not render a safe construction of encryption algorithms. Thus, the scope of the paper is a proposal of generalization of the logistic map by means of a wellrecognized family of chaotic maps. In the next step, an analysis of Lyapunov exponent and the distribution of the iterative variable are studied. The obtained results confirm that the analyzed model can safely and effectively replace a classic logistic map for applications involving chaotic cryptography.

  18. Adaptive Hardware Cryptography Engine Based on FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afify, M.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last two decades, with spread of the real time applications over public networks or communications the need for information security become more important but with very high speed for data processing, to keep up with the real time applications requirements, that is the reason for using FPGA as an implementation platform for the proposed cryptography engine. Hence in this thesis a new S-Box design has been demonstrated and implemented, there is a comparison for the simulation results for proposed S-Box simulation results with respect to different designs for S-Box in DES, Two fish and Rijndael algorithms and another comparison among proposed S-Box with different sizes. The proposed S-Box implemented with 32-bits Input data lines and compared with different designs in the encryption algorithms with the same input lines, the proposed S-Box gives implementation results for the maximum frequency 120 MHz but the DES S-Box gives 34 MHz and Rijndael gives 71 MHz, on the other hand the proposed design gives the best implementation area, hence it gives 50 Configurable logic Block CLB but DES gives 88 CLB. The proposed S-Box implemented in different sizes 64-bits, 128-bits, and 256-bits for input data lines. The implementation carried out by using UniDAq PCI card with FPGA Chip XCV 800, synthesizing carried out for all designs by using Leonardo spectrum and simulation carried out by using model sim simulator program form the FPGA advantage package. Finally the results evaluation and verifications carried out using the UniDAq FPGA PCI card with chip XCV 800. Different cases study have been implemented, data encryption, images encryption, voice encryption, and video encryption. A prototype for Remote Monitoring Control System has been implemented. Finally the proposed design for S-Box has a significant achievement in maximum frequency, implementation area, and encryption strength.

  19. Introduction to public-key cryptography (Chapter 1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avanzi, R.; Lange, T.; Cohen, H.; Frey, G.

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter we introduce the basic building blocks for cryptography based on the discrete logarithm problem that will constitute the main motivation for considering the groups studied in this book. We also briefly introduce the RSA cryptosystem as for use in practice it is still an important

  20. The mathematics of ciphers number theory and RSA cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Coutinho, S C

    1999-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the algorithmic aspects of number theory and its applications to cryptography, with special emphasis on the RSA cryptosys-tem. It covers many of the familiar topics of elementary number theory, all with an algorithmic twist. The text also includes many interesting historical notes.

  1. APE: Authenticated Permutation-Based Encryption for Lightweight Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreeva, Elena; Bilgin, Begül; Bogdanov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    The domain of lightweight cryptography focuses on cryptographic algorithms for extremely constrained devices. It is very costly to avoid nonce reuse in such environments, because this requires either a hardware source of randomness, or non-volatile memory to store a counter. At the same time, a lot...

  2. A "proof-reading" of Some Issues in Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we identify some issues in the interplay between practice and theory in cryptography, issues that have repeatedly appeared in different incarnations over the years. These issues are related to fundamental concepts in the eld, e.g., to what extent we can prove that a system is secure...

  3. Efficient multiuser quantum cryptography network based on entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Kunkun; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-04-04

    We present an efficient quantum key distribution protocol with a certain entangled state to solve a special cryptographic task. Also, we provide a proof of security of this protocol by generalizing the proof of modified of Lo-Chau scheme. Based on this two-user scheme, a quantum cryptography network protocol is proposed without any quantum memory.

  4. A Quantum Cryptography Communication Network Based on Software Defined Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongliang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the Internet, information security has attracted great attention in today’s society, and quantum cryptography communication network based on quantum key distribution (QKD is a very important part of this field, since the quantum key distribution combined with one-time-pad encryption scheme can guarantee the unconditional security of the information. The secret key generated by quantum key distribution protocols is a very valuable resource, so making full use of key resources is particularly important. Software definition network (SDN is a new type of network architecture, and it separates the control plane and the data plane of network devices through OpenFlow technology, thus it realizes the flexible control of the network resources. In this paper, a quantum cryptography communication network model based on SDN is proposed to realize the flexible control of quantum key resources in the whole cryptography communication network. Moreover, we propose a routing algorithm which takes into account both the hops and the end-to-end availible keys, so that the secret key generated by QKD can be used effectively. We also simulate this quantum cryptography communication network, and the result shows that based on SDN and the proposed routing algorithm the performance of this network is improved since the effective use of the quantum key resources.

  5. Enhancing Undergraduate Mathematics Curriculum via Coding Theory and Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nuh

    2009-01-01

    The theory of error-correcting codes and cryptography are two relatively recent applications of mathematics to information and communication systems. The mathematical tools used in these fields generally come from algebra, elementary number theory, and combinatorics, including concepts from computational complexity. It is possible to introduce the…

  6. Steganography and Cryptography Inspired Enhancement of Introductory Programming Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsarts, Yana; Kempner, Yulia

    2015-01-01

    Steganography is the art and science of concealing communication. The goal of steganography is to hide the very existence of information exchange by embedding messages into unsuspicious digital media covers. Cryptography, or secret writing, is the study of the methods of encryption, decryption and their use in communications protocols.…

  7. Fast elliptic-curve cryptography on the Cell Broadband Engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costigan, N.; Schwabe, P.; Preneel, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the first to investigate the power of the Cell Broadband Engine for state-of-the-art public-key cryptography. We present a high-speed implementation of elliptic-curve Diffie-Hellman (ECDH) key exchange for this processor, which needs 697080 cycles on one Synergistic Processor Unit for

  8. Cryptography- An ideal solution to privacy, data integrity and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encryption, hashing and digital signatures are the three primitives of Cryptography and these have been treated in depth and their performances on text data and image data have been studied The most secure algorithms so far in use have been introduced and the respective performance of each primitive 's algorithm on ...

  9. Introduction to Cryptography and the Bitcoin Protocol (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The Bitcoin protocol not only supports an electronic currency, but also has the possibility for being (mis)used in other ways. Topics will include the basic operation of how Bitcoin operates including motivations and also such things as block chaining, bitcoin mining, and how financial transactions operate. A knowledge of the topics covered in the Basic Cryptography lecture will be assumed.

  10. Introduction to Cryptography and the Bitcoin Protocol (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The Bitcoin protocol not only supports an electronic currency, but also has the possibility for being (mis)used in other ways. Topics will include the basic operation of how Bitcoin operates including motivations and also such things as block chaining, bitcoin mining, and how financial transactions operate. A knowledge of the topics covered in the Basic Cryptography lecture will be assumed.

  11. Visual cryptography for image processing and security theory, methods, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    This unique book describes the fundamental concepts, theories and practice of visual cryptography. The design, construction, analysis, and application of visual cryptography schemes (VCSs) are discussed in detail. Original, cutting-edge research is presented on probabilistic, size invariant, threshold, concolorous, and cheating immune VCS. Features: provides a thorough introduction to the field; examines various common problems in visual cryptography, including the alignment, flipping, cheating, distortion, and thin line problems; reviews a range of VCSs, including XOR-based visual cryptograph

  12. Three-Stage Quantum Cryptography Protocol under Collective-Rotation Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Linsen; Chen, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Information security is increasingly important as society migrates to the information age. Classical cryptography widely used nowadays is based on computational complexity, which means that it assumes that solving some particular mathematical problems is hard on a classical computer. With the development of supercomputers and, potentially, quantum computers, classical cryptography has more and more potential risks. Quantum cryptography provides a solution which is based on the Heisenberg unce...

  13. Learning Perfectly Secure Cryptography to Protect Communications with Adversarial Neural Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Coutinho

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Researches in Artificial Intelligence (AI have achieved many important breakthroughs, especially in recent years. In some cases, AI learns alone from scratch and performs human tasks faster and better than humans. With the recent advances in AI, it is natural to wonder whether Artificial Neural Networks will be used to successfully create or break cryptographic algorithms. Bibliographic review shows the main approach to this problem have been addressed throughout complex Neural Networks, but without understanding or proving the security of the generated model. This paper presents an analysis of the security of cryptographic algorithms generated by a new technique called Adversarial Neural Cryptography (ANC. Using the proposed network, we show limitations and directions to improve the current approach of ANC. Training the proposed Artificial Neural Network with the improved model of ANC, we show that artificially intelligent agents can learn the unbreakable One-Time Pad (OTP algorithm, without human knowledge, to communicate securely through an insecure communication channel. This paper shows in which conditions an AI agent can learn a secure encryption scheme. However, it also shows that, without a stronger adversary, it is more likely to obtain an insecure one.

  14. Learning Perfectly Secure Cryptography to Protect Communications with Adversarial Neural Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Murilo; de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; Borges, Fábio; García Villalba, Luis Javier; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2018-04-24

    Researches in Artificial Intelligence (AI) have achieved many important breakthroughs, especially in recent years. In some cases, AI learns alone from scratch and performs human tasks faster and better than humans. With the recent advances in AI, it is natural to wonder whether Artificial Neural Networks will be used to successfully create or break cryptographic algorithms. Bibliographic review shows the main approach to this problem have been addressed throughout complex Neural Networks, but without understanding or proving the security of the generated model. This paper presents an analysis of the security of cryptographic algorithms generated by a new technique called Adversarial Neural Cryptography (ANC). Using the proposed network, we show limitations and directions to improve the current approach of ANC. Training the proposed Artificial Neural Network with the improved model of ANC, we show that artificially intelligent agents can learn the unbreakable One-Time Pad (OTP) algorithm, without human knowledge, to communicate securely through an insecure communication channel. This paper shows in which conditions an AI agent can learn a secure encryption scheme. However, it also shows that, without a stronger adversary, it is more likely to obtain an insecure one.

  15. Electronic Voting Protocol Using Identity-Based Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Gallegos-Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic voting protocols proposed to date meet their properties based on Public Key Cryptography (PKC, which offers high flexibility through key agreement protocols and authentication mechanisms. However, when PKC is used, it is necessary to implement Certification Authority (CA to provide certificates which bind public keys to entities and enable verification of such public key bindings. Consequently, the components of the protocol increase notably. An alternative is to use Identity-Based Encryption (IBE. With this kind of cryptography, it is possible to have all the benefits offered by PKC, without neither the need of certificates nor all the core components of a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI. Considering the aforementioned, in this paper we propose an electronic voting protocol, which meets the privacy and robustness properties by using bilinear maps.

  16. Two-phase hybrid cryptography algorithm for wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawya Rizk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For achieving security in wireless sensor networks (WSNs, cryptography plays an important role. In this paper, a new security algorithm using combination of both symmetric and asymmetric cryptographic techniques is proposed to provide high security with minimized key maintenance. It guarantees three cryptographic primitives, integrity, confidentiality and authentication. Elliptical Curve Cryptography (ECC and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES are combined to provide encryption. XOR-DUAL RSA algorithm is considered for authentication and Message Digest-5 (MD5 for integrity. The results show that the proposed hybrid algorithm gives better performance in terms of computation time, the size of cipher text, and the energy consumption in WSN. It is also robust against different types of attacks in the case of image encryption.

  17. Online Voting System Based on Image Steganography and Visual Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Issac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the implementation of an online voting system based on image steganography and visual cryptography. The system was implemented in Java EE on a web-based interface, with MySQL database server and Glassfish application server as the backend. After considering the requirements of an online voting system, current technologies on electronic voting schemes in published literature were examined. Next, the cryptographic and steganography techniques best suited for the requirements of the voting system were chosen, and the software was implemented. We have incorporated in our system techniques like the password hashed based scheme, visual cryptography, F5 image steganography and threshold decryption cryptosystem. The analysis, design and implementation phase of the software development of the voting system is discussed in detail. We have also used a questionnaire survey and did the user acceptance testing of the system.

  18. Electronic Voting Protocol Using Identity-Based Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Garcia, Gina; Tapia-Recillas, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    Electronic voting protocols proposed to date meet their properties based on Public Key Cryptography (PKC), which offers high flexibility through key agreement protocols and authentication mechanisms. However, when PKC is used, it is necessary to implement Certification Authority (CA) to provide certificates which bind public keys to entities and enable verification of such public key bindings. Consequently, the components of the protocol increase notably. An alternative is to use Identity-Based Encryption (IBE). With this kind of cryptography, it is possible to have all the benefits offered by PKC, without neither the need of certificates nor all the core components of a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI). Considering the aforementioned, in this paper we propose an electronic voting protocol, which meets the privacy and robustness properties by using bilinear maps.

  19. Multivariate Cryptography Based on Clipped Hopfield Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Cheng, Lee-Ming; Su, Tong

    2018-02-01

    Designing secure and efficient multivariate public key cryptosystems [multivariate cryptography (MVC)] to strengthen the security of RSA and ECC in conventional and quantum computational environment continues to be a challenging research in recent years. In this paper, we will describe multivariate public key cryptosystems based on extended Clipped Hopfield Neural Network (CHNN) and implement it using the MVC (CHNN-MVC) framework operated in space. The Diffie-Hellman key exchange algorithm is extended into the matrix field, which illustrates the feasibility of its new applications in both classic and postquantum cryptography. The efficiency and security of our proposed new public key cryptosystem CHNN-MVC are simulated and found to be NP-hard. The proposed algorithm will strengthen multivariate public key cryptosystems and allows hardware realization practicality.

  20. Conference on Algebraic Geometry for Coding Theory and Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Lauter, Kristin; Walker, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Covering topics in algebraic geometry, coding theory, and cryptography, this volume presents interdisciplinary group research completed for the February 2016 conference at the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM) in cooperation with the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM). The conference gathered research communities across disciplines to share ideas and problems in their fields and formed small research groups made up of graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, junior faculty, and group leaders who designed and led the projects. Peer reviewed and revised, each of this volume's five papers achieves the conference’s goal of using algebraic geometry to address a problem in either coding theory or cryptography. Proposed variants of the McEliece cryptosystem based on different constructions of codes, constructions of locally recoverable codes from algebraic curves and surfaces, and algebraic approaches to the multicast network coding problem are only some of the topics covered in this vo...

  1. Modern cryptography and elliptic curves a beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Shemanske, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    This book offers the beginning undergraduate student some of the vista of modern mathematics by developing and presenting the tools needed to gain an understanding of the arithmetic of elliptic curves over finite fields and their applications to modern cryptography. This gradual introduction also makes a significant effort to teach students how to produce or discover a proof by presenting mathematics as an exploration, and at the same time, it provides the necessary mathematical underpinnings to investigate the practical and implementation side of elliptic curve cryptography (ECC). Elements of abstract algebra, number theory, and affine and projective geometry are introduced and developed, and their interplay is exploited. Algebra and geometry combine to characterize congruent numbers via rational points on the unit circle, and group law for the set of points on an elliptic curve arises from geometric intuition provided by Bézout's theorem as well as the construction of projective space. The structure of the...

  2. Principles of the new quantum cryptography protocols building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurochkin, V.; Kurochkin, Yu.

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the quantum cryptography protocols is the maximal secrecy under the conditions of the real experiment. This work presents the result of the new protocol building with the use of the secrecy maximization. While using some well-known approaches this method has allowed one to achieve completely new results in quantum cryptography. The process of the protocol elaboration develops from the standard BB84 protocol upgrading to the building of completely new protocol with arbitrary large bases number. The secrecy proofs of the elaborated protocol appear to be natural continuation of the protocol building process. This approach reveals possibility to reach extremely high parameters of the protocol. It suits both the restrictions of contemporary technologies and requirements for high bit rate while being absolutely secret

  3. Nonlinear laser dynamics from quantum dots to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Lüdge, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    A distinctive discussion of the nonlinear dynamical phenomena of semiconductor lasers. The book combines recent results of quantum dot laser modeling with mathematical details and an analytic understanding of nonlinear phenomena in semiconductor lasers and points out possible applications of lasers in cryptography and chaos control. This interdisciplinary approach makes it a unique and powerful source of knowledge for anyone intending to contribute to this field of research.By presenting both experimental and theoretical results, the distinguished authors consider solitary lase

  4. ID based cryptography for secure cloud data storage

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaniche , Nesrine; Boudguiga , Aymen; Laurent , Maryline

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper addresses the security issues of storing sensitive data in a cloud storage service and the need for users to trust the commercial cloud providers. It proposes a cryptographic scheme for cloud storage, based on an original usage of ID-Based Cryptography. Our solution has several advantages. First, it provides secrecy for encrypted data which are stored in public servers. Second, it offers controlled data access and sharing among users, so that unauthorized us...

  5. Experimental quantum secret sharing and third-man quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ao; Zhang, An-Ning; Zhao, Zhi; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Lu, Chao-Yang; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2005-11-11

    Quantum secret sharing (QSS) and third-man quantum cryptography (TQC) are essential for advanced quantum communication; however, the low intensity and fragility of the multiphoton entanglement source in previous experiments have made their realization an extreme experimental challenge. Here, we develop and exploit an ultrastable high intensity source of four-photon entanglement to report an experimental realization of QSS and TQC. The technology developed in our experiment will be important for future multiparty quantum communication.

  6. An Incomplete Cryptography based Digital Rights Management with DCFF

    OpenAIRE

    Thanh, Ta Minh; Iwakiri, Munetoshi

    2014-01-01

    In general, DRM (Digital Rights Management) system is responsible for the safe distribution of digital content, however, DRM system is achieved with individual function modules of cryptography, watermarking and so on. In this typical system flow, it has a problem that all original digital contents are temporarily disclosed with perfect condition via decryption process. In this paper, we propose the combination of the differential codes and fragile fingerprinting (DCFF) method based on incompl...

  7. Post-Quantum Cryptography: Riemann Primitives and Chrysalis

    OpenAIRE

    Malloy, Ian; Hollenbeck, Dennis

    2018-01-01

    The Chrysalis project is a proposed method for post-quantum cryptography using the Riemann sphere. To this end, Riemann primitives are introduced in addition to a novel implementation of this new method. Chrysalis itself is the first cryptographic scheme to rely on Holomorphic Learning with Errors, which is a complex form of Learning with Errors relying on the Gauss Circle Problem within the Riemann sphere. The principle security reduction proposed by this novel cryptographic scheme applies c...

  8. Evolutionary Algorithms for Boolean Functions in Diverse Domains of Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picek, Stjepan; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain; Miller, Julian F; Jakobovic, Domagoj

    2016-01-01

    The role of Boolean functions is prominent in several areas including cryptography, sequences, and coding theory. Therefore, various methods for the construction of Boolean functions with desired properties are of direct interest. New motivations on the role of Boolean functions in cryptography with attendant new properties have emerged over the years. There are still many combinations of design criteria left unexplored and in this matter evolutionary computation can play a distinct role. This article concentrates on two scenarios for the use of Boolean functions in cryptography. The first uses Boolean functions as the source of the nonlinearity in filter and combiner generators. Although relatively well explored using evolutionary algorithms, it still presents an interesting goal in terms of the practical sizes of Boolean functions. The second scenario appeared rather recently where the objective is to find Boolean functions that have various orders of the correlation immunity and minimal Hamming weight. In both these scenarios we see that evolutionary algorithms are able to find high-quality solutions where genetic programming performs the best.

  9. A Generic Simulation Framework for Non-Entangled based Experimental Quantum Cryptography and Communication: Quantum Cryptography and Communication Simulator (QuCCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhari, Abudhahir; Zukarnain, Zuriati Ahmad; Khalid, Roszelinda; Zakir Dato', Wira Jaafar Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    The applications of quantum information science move towards bigger and better heights for the next generation technology. Especially, in the field of quantum cryptography and quantum computation, the world already witnessed various ground-breaking tangible product and promising results. Quantum cryptography is one of the mature field from quantum mechanics and already available in the markets. The current state of quantum cryptography is still under various researches in order to reach the heights of digital cryptography. The complexity of quantum cryptography is higher due to combination of hardware and software. The lack of effective simulation tool to design and analyze the quantum cryptography experiments delays the reaching distance of the success. In this paper, we propose a framework to achieve an effective non-entanglement based quantum cryptography simulation tool. We applied hybrid simulation technique i.e. discrete event, continuous event and system dynamics. We also highlight the limitations of a commercial photonic simulation tool based experiments. Finally, we discuss ideas for achieving one-stop simulation package for quantum based secure key distribution experiments. All the modules of simulation framework are viewed from the computer science perspective.

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Quantum cryptography, and especially quantum key distribution (QKD), is steadily progressing to become a viable tool for cryptographic services. In recent years we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the secure bit rate of QKD, as well as its extension to ever longer fibre- and air-based links and the emergence of metro-scale trusted networks. In the foreseeable future even global-scale communications may be possible using quantum repeaters or Earth-satellite links. A handful of start-ups and some bigger companies are already active in the field. The launch of an initiative to form industrial standards for QKD, under the auspices of the European Telecommunication Standards Institute, described in the paper by Laenger and Lenhart in this Focus Issue, can be taken as a sign of the growing commercial interest. Recent progress has seen an increase in the secure bit rate of QKD links, by orders of magnitude, to over 1 Mb s-1. This has resulted mainly from an improvement in the detection technology. Here changes in the way conventional semiconductor detectors are gated, as well as the development of novel devices based on non-linear processes and superconducting materials, are leading the way. Additional challenges for QKD at GHz clock rates include the design of high speed electronics, remote synchronization and high rate random number generation. Substantial effort is being devoted to increasing the range of individual links, which is limited by attenuation and other losses in optical fibres and air links. An important advance in the past few years has been the introduction of protocols with the same scaling as an ideal single-photon set-up. The good news is that these schemes use standard optical devices, such as weak laser pulses. Thanks to these new protocols and improvements in the detection technology, the range of a single fibre link can exceed a few hundred km. Outstanding issues include proving the unconditional security of some of the schemes. Much of the

  11. Cryptography in the Cloud Computing: the Current State and Logical Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey Nikolaevich Kyazhin; Andrey Vladimirovich Moiseev

    2013-01-01

    The current state of the cloud computing (CC) information security is analysed and logical problems of storage and data transmission security at CC are allocated. Cryptographic methods of data security in CC, in particular, lightweight cryptography and the cryptography based on bilinear pairings are described.

  12. Cryptography in the Cloud Computing: the Current State and Logical Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Nikolaevich Kyazhin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The current state of the cloud computing (CC information security is analysed and logical problems of storage and data transmission security at CC are allocated. Cryptographic methods of data security in CC, in particular, lightweight cryptography and the cryptography based on bilinear pairings are described.

  13. An application of different dioids in public key cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durcheva, Mariana I., E-mail: mdurcheva66@gmail.com [Technical University of Sofia, Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, 8 Kliment Ohridski St., Sofia 1000 (Bulgaria)

    2014-11-18

    Dioids provide a natural framework for analyzing a broad class of discrete event dynamical systems such as the design and analysis of bus and railway timetables, scheduling of high-throughput industrial processes, solution of combinatorial optimization problems, the analysis and improvement of flow systems in communication networks. They have appeared in several branches of mathematics such as functional analysis, optimization, stochastic systems and dynamic programming, tropical geometry, fuzzy logic. In this paper we show how to involve dioids in public key cryptography. The main goal is to create key – exchange protocols based on dioids. Additionally the digital signature scheme is presented.

  14. Geometry, algebra and applications from mechanics to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Encinas, Luis; Gadea, Pedro; María, Mª

    2016-01-01

    This volume collects contributions written by different experts in honor of Prof. Jaime Muñoz Masqué. It covers a wide variety of research topics, from differential geometry to algebra, but particularly focuses on the geometric formulation of variational calculus; geometric mechanics and field theories; symmetries and conservation laws of differential equations, and pseudo-Riemannian geometry of homogeneous spaces. It also discusses algebraic applications to cryptography and number theory. It offers state-of-the-art contributions in the context of current research trends. The final result is a challenging panoramic view of connecting problems that initially appear distant.

  15. Implementing SSL/TLS using cryptography and PKI

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Hands-on, practical guide to implementing SSL and TLS protocols for Internet security If you are a network professional who knows C programming, this practical book is for you.  Focused on how to implement Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS), this book guides you through all necessary steps, whether or not you have a working knowledge of cryptography. The book covers SSLv2, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.2, including implementations of the relevant cryptographic protocols, secure hashing, certificate parsing, certificate generation, and more.  Coverage includes: Underst

  16. Analysis of limiting information characteristics of quantum-cryptography protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sych, D V; Grishanin, Boris A; Zadkov, Viktor N

    2005-01-01

    The problem of increasing the critical error rate of quantum-cryptography protocols by varying a set of letters in a quantum alphabet for space of a fixed dimensionality is studied. Quantum alphabets forming regular polyhedra on the Bloch sphere and the continual alphabet equally including all the quantum states are considered. It is shown that, in the absence of basis reconciliation, a protocol with the tetrahedral alphabet has the highest critical error rate among the protocols considered, while after the basis reconciliation, a protocol with the continual alphabet possesses the highest critical error rate. (quantum optics and quantum computation)

  17. Deterministic and efficient quantum cryptography based on Bell's theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zengbing; Pan Jianwei; Zhang Qiang; Bao Xiaohui; Schmiedmayer, Joerg

    2006-01-01

    We propose a double-entanglement-based quantum cryptography protocol that is both efficient and deterministic. The proposal uses photon pairs with entanglement both in polarization and in time degrees of freedom; each measurement in which both of the two communicating parties register a photon can establish one and only one perfect correlation, and thus deterministically create a key bit. Eavesdropping can be detected by violation of local realism. A variation of the protocol shows a higher security, similar to the six-state protocol, under individual attacks. Our scheme allows a robust implementation under the current technology

  18. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  19. An application of different dioids in public key cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durcheva, Mariana I.

    2014-01-01

    Dioids provide a natural framework for analyzing a broad class of discrete event dynamical systems such as the design and analysis of bus and railway timetables, scheduling of high-throughput industrial processes, solution of combinatorial optimization problems, the analysis and improvement of flow systems in communication networks. They have appeared in several branches of mathematics such as functional analysis, optimization, stochastic systems and dynamic programming, tropical geometry, fuzzy logic. In this paper we show how to involve dioids in public key cryptography. The main goal is to create key – exchange protocols based on dioids. Additionally the digital signature scheme is presented

  20. Microscale optical cryptography using a subdiffraction-limit optical key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yusuke; Aino, Masahiko; Tanida, Jun

    2018-04-01

    We present microscale optical cryptography using a subdiffraction-limit optical pattern, which is finer than the diffraction-limit size of the decrypting optical system, as a key and a substrate with a reflectance distribution as an encrypted image. Because of the subdiffraction-limit spatial coding, this method enables us to construct a secret image with the diffraction-limit resolution. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, that the secret image becomes recognizable when and only when the substrate is illuminated with the designed key pattern.

  1. One-way entangled-photon autocompensating quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Zachary D.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Saleh, Bahaa E.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2003-06-01

    A quantum cryptography implementation is presented that uses entanglement to combine one-way operation with an autocompensating feature that has hitherto only been available in implementations that require the signal to make a round trip between the users. Using the concept of advanced waves, it is shown that this proposed implementation is related to the round-trip implementation in the same way that Ekert’s two-particle scheme is related to the original one-particle scheme of Bennett and Brassard. The practical advantages and disadvantages of the proposed implementation are discussed in the context of existing schemes.

  2. One-way entangled-photon autocompensating quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, Zachary D.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2003-01-01

    A quantum cryptography implementation is presented that uses entanglement to combine one-way operation with an autocompensating feature that has hitherto only been available in implementations that require the signal to make a round trip between the users. Using the concept of advanced waves, it is shown that this proposed implementation is related to the round-trip implementation in the same way that Ekert's two-particle scheme is related to the original one-particle scheme of Bennett and Brassard. The practical advantages and disadvantages of the proposed implementation are discussed in the context of existing schemes

  3. Cryptanalysis of Application of Laplace Transform for Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gençoğlu Muharrem Tuncay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Laplace Transform is a good application field in the design of cryptosystems, many cryptographic algorithm proposals become unsatisfactory for secure communication. In this cryptanalysis study, one of the significant disadvantages of the proposed algorithm is performed with only statistical test of security analysis. In this study, Explaining what should be considered when performing security analysis of Laplace Transform based encryption systems and using basic mathematical rules, password has broken without knowing secret key. Under the skin; This study is a refutation for the article titled Application of Laplace Transform for Cryptography written by Hiwerakar[3].

  4. Cyber Security for Smart Grid, Cryptography, and Privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Iyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The invention of “smart grid” promises to improve the efficiency and reliability of the power system. As smart grid is turning out to be one of the most promising technologies, its security concerns are becoming more crucial. The grid is susceptible to different types of attacks. This paper will focus on these threats and risks especially relating to cyber security. Cyber security is a vital topic, since the smart grid uses high level of computation like the IT. We will also see cryptography and key management techniques that are required to overcome these attacks. Privacy of consumers is another important security concern that this paper will deal with.

  5. Deterministic and efficient quantum cryptography based on Bell's theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.-B.; Zhang, Q.; Bao, X.-H.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Pan, J.-W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We propose a novel double-entanglement-based quantum cryptography protocol that is both efficient and deterministic. The proposal uses photon pairs with entanglement both in polarization and in time degrees of freedom; each measurement in which both of the two communicating parties register a photon can establish a key bit with the help of classical communications. Eavesdropping can be detected by checking the violation of local realism for the detected events. We also show that our protocol allows a robust implementation under current technology. (author)

  6. An Online Banking System Based on Quantum Cryptography Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ri-gui; Li, Wei; Huan, Tian-tian; Shen, Chen-yi; Li, Hai-sheng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an online banking system has been built. Based on quantum cryptography communication, this system is proved unconditional secure. Two sets of GHZ states are applied, which can ensure the safety of purchase and payment, respectively. In another word, three trading participants in each triplet state group form an interdependent and interactive relationship. In the meantime, trading authorization and blind signature is introduced by means of controllable quantum teleportation. Thus, an effective monitor is practiced on the premise that the privacy of trading partners is guaranteed. If there is a dispute or deceptive behavior, the system will find out the deceiver immediately according to the relationship mentioned above.

  7. A Luggage Control System Based on NFC and Homomorphic Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Álvarez-Díaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an innovative luggage tracking and management system that can be used to secure airport terminal services and reduce the waiting time of passengers during check-in. This addresses an urgent need to streamline and optimize passenger flows at airport terminals and lowers the risk of terrorist threats. The system employs Near Field Communication (NFC technology and homomorphic cryptography (the Paillier cryptosystem to protect wireless communication and stored data. A security analysis and a performance test show the usability and applicability of the proposed system.

  8. Entanglement witnessing and quantum cryptography with nonideal ferromagnetic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłobus, Waldemar; Grudka, Andrzej; Baumgartner, Andreas; Tomaszewski, Damian; Schönenberger, Christian; Martinek, Jan

    2014-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the use of nonideal ferromagnetic contacts as a means to detect quantum entanglement of electron spins in transport experiments. We use a designated entanglement witness and find a minimal spin polarization of η >1/√3 ≈58% required to demonstrate spin entanglement. This is significantly less stringent than the ubiquitous tests of Bell's inequality with η >1/√24 >≈84%. In addition, we discuss the impact of decoherence and noise on entanglement detection and apply the presented framework to a simple quantum cryptography protocol. Our results are directly applicable to a large variety of experiments.

  9. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-01-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as key material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). The authors have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. The authors have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of ∼1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, they examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD

  10. Fourier-based automatic alignment for improved Visual Cryptography schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machizaud, Jacques; Chavel, Pierre; Fournel, Thierry

    2011-11-07

    In Visual Cryptography, several images, called "shadow images", that separately contain no information, are overlapped to reveal a shared secret message. We develop a method to digitally register one printed shadow image acquired by a camera with a purely digital shadow image, stored in memory. Using Fourier techniques derived from Fourier Optics concepts, the idea is to enhance and exploit the quasi periodicity of the shadow images, composed by a random distribution of black and white patterns on a periodic sampling grid. The advantage is to speed up the security control or the access time to the message, in particular in the cases of a small pixel size or of large numbers of pixels. Furthermore, the interest of visual cryptography can be increased by embedding the initial message in two shadow images that do not have identical mathematical supports, making manual registration impractical. Experimental results demonstrate the successful operation of the method, including the possibility to directly project the result onto the printed shadow image.

  11. Architecture for the Secret-Key BC3 Cryptography Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Sasongko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptography is a very important aspect in data security. The focus of research in this field is shifting from merely security aspect to consider as well the implementation aspect. This paper aims to introduce BC3 algorithm with focus on its hardware implementation. It proposes architecture for the hardware implementation for this algorithm. BC3 algorithm is a secret-key cryptography algorithm developed with two considerations: robustness and implementation efficiency. This algorithm has been implemented on software and has good performance compared to AES algorithm. BC3 is improvement of BC2 and AE cryptographic algorithm and it is expected to have the same level of robustness and to gain competitive advantages in the implementation aspect. The development of the architecture gives much attention on (1 resource sharing and (2 having single clock for each round. It exploits regularity of the algorithm. This architecture is then implemented on an FPGA. This implementation is three times smaller area than AES, but about five times faster. Furthermore, this BC3 hardware implementation has better performance compared to BC3 software both in key expansion stage and randomizing stage. For the future, the security of this implementation must be reviewed especially against side channel attack.

  12. Number Theory and Applications : Proceedings of the International Conferences on Number Theory and Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, B

    2009-01-01

    This collection of articles contains the proceedings of the two international conferences (on Number Theory and Cryptography) held at the Harish - Chandra Research Institute. In recent years the interest in number theory has increased due to its applications in areas like error-correcting codes and cryptography. These proceedings contain papers in various areas of number theory, such as combinatorial, algebraic, analytic and transcendental aspects, arithmetic algebraic geometry, as well as graph theory and cryptography. While some papers do contain new results, several of the papers are expository articles that mention open questions, which will be useful to young researchers.

  13. Non-commutative cryptography and complexity of group-theoretic problems

    CERN Document Server

    Myasnikov, Alexei; Ushakov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This book is about relations between three different areas of mathematics and theoretical computer science: combinatorial group theory, cryptography, and complexity theory. It explores how non-commutative (infinite) groups, which are typically studied in combinatorial group theory, can be used in public-key cryptography. It also shows that there is remarkable feedback from cryptography to combinatorial group theory because some of the problems motivated by cryptography appear to be new to group theory, and they open many interesting research avenues within group theory. In particular, a lot of emphasis in the book is put on studying search problems, as compared to decision problems traditionally studied in combinatorial group theory. Then, complexity theory, notably generic-case complexity of algorithms, is employed for cryptanalysis of various cryptographic protocols based on infinite groups, and the ideas and machinery from the theory of generic-case complexity are used to study asymptotically dominant prop...

  14. Three-Stage Quantum Cryptography Protocol under Collective-Rotation Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsen Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Information security is increasingly important as society migrates to the information age. Classical cryptography widely used nowadays is based on computational complexity, which means that it assumes that solving some particular mathematical problems is hard on a classical computer. With the development of supercomputers and, potentially, quantum computers, classical cryptography has more and more potential risks. Quantum cryptography provides a solution which is based on the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and no-cloning theorem. While BB84-based quantum protocols are only secure when a single photon is used in communication, the three-stage quantum protocol is multi-photon tolerant. However, existing analyses assume perfect noiseless channels. In this paper, a multi-photon analysis is performed for the three-stage quantum protocol under the collective-rotation noise model. The analysis provides insights into the impact of the noise level on a three-stage quantum cryptography system.

  15. Image communication scheme based on dynamic visual cryptography and computer generated holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2015-01-01

    Computer generated holograms are often exploited to implement optical encryption schemes. This paper proposes the integration of dynamic visual cryptography (an optical technique based on the interplay of visual cryptography and time-averaging geometric moiré) with Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. A stochastic moiré grating is used to embed the secret into a single cover image. The secret can be visually decoded by a naked eye if only the amplitude of harmonic oscillations corresponds to an accurately preselected value. The proposed visual image encryption scheme is based on computer generated holography, optical time-averaging moiré and principles of dynamic visual cryptography. Dynamic visual cryptography is used both for the initial encryption of the secret image and for the final decryption. Phase data of the encrypted image are computed by using Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. The optical image is decrypted using the computationally reconstructed field of amplitudes.

  16. A key distribution scheme using elliptic curve cryptography in wireless sensor networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have become increasingly popular in many applications across a broad range of fields. Securing WSNs poses unique challenges mainly due to their resource constraints. Traditional public key cryptography (PKC...

  17. Device-independence for two-party cryptography and position verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Jeremy; Thinh, Le Phuc; Kaniewski, Jedrzej

    Quantum communication has demonstrated its usefulness for quantum cryptography far beyond quantum key distribution. One domain is two-party cryptography, whose goal is to allow two parties who may not trust each other to solve joint tasks. Another interesting application is position......-based cryptography whose goal is to use the geographical location of an entity as its only identifying credential. Unfortunately, security of these protocols is not possible against an all powerful adversary. However, if we impose some realistic physical constraints on the adversary, there exist protocols for which...... security can be proven, but these so far relied on the knowledge of the quantum operations performed during the protocols. In this work we give device-independent security proofs of two-party cryptography and Position Verification for memoryless devices under different physical constraints on the adversary...

  18. Code-Based Cryptography: New Security Solutions Against a Quantum Adversary

    OpenAIRE

    Sendrier , Nicolas; Tillich , Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Cryptography is one of the key tools for providing security in our quickly evolving technological society. An adversary with the ability to use a quantum computer would defeat most of the cryptographic solutions that are deployed today to secure our communications. We do not know when quantum computing will become available, but nevertheless, the cryptographic research community must get ready for it now. Code-based cryptography is among the few cryptographic technique...

  19. Implementation of multiplexing in a subcarrier-wave quantum cryptography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakov, V V; Gleim, A V; Egorov, V I; Nazarov, Yu V

    2014-01-01

    Quantum cryptography allows distributing secure keys in a way that any eavesdropping in the channel is inevitably detected. This work is dedicated to introducing wavelength division multiplexing in a subcarrier-wave quantum cryptography system. Compared to other existing schemes, the resulting device is able to achieve higher bitrates (up to 2.26 Mbit/s at 20 km), is robust against external conditions and compatible with standard telecommunication fibres in multi-user environment

  20. No information flow using statistical fluctuations and quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2004-04-01

    The communication protocol of Home and Whitaker [Phys. Rev. A 67, 022306 (2003)] is examined in some detail, and found to work equally well using a separable state. The protocol is in fact completely classical, based on postselection of suitable experimental runs. The quantum-cryptography protocol proposed in the same publication is also examined, and this protocol uses entanglement, a strictly quantum property of the system. An individual eavesdropping attack on each qubit pair would be detected by the security test proposed in the mentioned paper. However, the key is provided by groups of qubits, and there exists a coherent attack, internal to these groups, that will go unnoticed in that security test. A modified test is proposed here that will ensure security, even against such a coherent attack.

  1. No information flow using statistical fluctuations and quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Jan-Aake

    2004-01-01

    The communication protocol of Home and Whitaker [Phys. Rev. A 67, 022306 (2003)] is examined in some detail, and found to work equally well using a separable state. The protocol is in fact completely classical, based on postselection of suitable experimental runs. The quantum-cryptography protocol proposed in the same publication is also examined, and this protocol uses entanglement, a strictly quantum property of the system. An individual eavesdropping attack on each qubit pair would be detected by the security test proposed in the mentioned paper. However, the key is provided by groups of qubits, and there exists a coherent attack, internal to these groups, that will go unnoticed in that security test. A modified test is proposed here that will ensure security, even against such a coherent attack

  2. Dynamic visual cryptography on deformable finite element grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksiene, S.; Vaidelys, M.; Aleksa, A.; Ragulskis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Dynamic visual cryptography scheme based on time averaged moiré fringes on deformable finite element grids is introduced in this paper. A predefined Eigenshape function is used for the selection of the pitch of the moiré grating. The relationship between the pitch of moiré grating, the roots of the zero order Bessel function of the first kind and the amplitude of harmonic oscillations is derived and validated by computational experiments. Phase regularization algorithm is used in the entire area of the cover image in order to embed the secret image and to avoid large fluctuations of the moiré grating. Computational simulations are used to demonstrate the efficiency and the applicability of the proposed image hiding technique.

  3. Position-based quantum cryptography over untrusted networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose quantum position verification (QPV) schemes where all the channels are untrusted except the position of the prover and distant reference stations of verifiers. We review and analyze the existing QPV schemes containing some pre-shared data between the prover and verifiers. Most of these schemes are based on non-cryptographic assumptions, i.e. quantum/classical channels between the verifiers are secure. It seems impractical in an environment fully controlled by adversaries and would lead to security compromise in practical implementations. However, our proposed formula for QPV is more robust, secure and according to the standard assumptions of cryptography. Furthermore, once the position of the prover is verified, our schemes establish secret keys in parallel and can be used for authentication and secret communication between the prover and verifiers. (paper)

  4. Postselection technique for quantum channels with applications to quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christandl, Matthias; König, Robert; Renner, Renato

    2009-01-16

    We propose a general method for studying properties of quantum channels acting on an n-partite system, whose action is invariant under permutations of the subsystems. Our main result is that, in order to prove that a certain property holds for an arbitrary input, it is sufficient to consider the case where the input is a particular de Finetti-type state, i.e., a state which consists of n identical and independent copies of an (unknown) state on a single subsystem. Our technique can be applied to the analysis of information-theoretic problems. For example, in quantum cryptography, we get a simple proof for the fact that security of a discrete-variable quantum key distribution protocol against collective attacks implies security of the protocol against the most general attacks. The resulting security bounds are tighter than previously known bounds obtained with help of the exponential de Finetti theorem.

  5. Tight finite-key analysis for quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomamichel, Marco; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Gisin, Nicolas; Renner, Renato

    2012-01-17

    Despite enormous theoretical and experimental progress in quantum cryptography, the security of most current implementations of quantum key distribution is still not rigorously established. One significant problem is that the security of the final key strongly depends on the number, M, of signals exchanged between the legitimate parties. Yet, existing security proofs are often only valid asymptotically, for unrealistically large values of M. Another challenge is that most security proofs are very sensitive to small differences between the physical devices used by the protocol and the theoretical model used to describe them. Here we show that these gaps between theory and experiment can be simultaneously overcome by using a recently developed proof technique based on the uncertainty relation for smooth entropies.

  6. Finite automata over magmas: models and some applications in Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr V. Skobelev

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the families of finite semi-automata and reversible finite Mealy and Moore automata over finite magmas are defined and analyzed in detail. On the base of these models it is established that the set of finite quasigroups is the most acceptable subset of the set of finite magmas at resolving model problems in Cryptography, such as design of iterated hash functions and stream ciphers. Defined families of finite semi-automata and reversible finite automata over finite $T$-quasigroups are investigated in detail. It is established that in this case models time and space complexity for simulation of the functioning during one instant of automaton time can be much lower than in general case.

  7. Step to improve neural cryptography against flipping attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiantao; Xu, Qinzhen; Pei, Wenjiang; He, Zhenya; Szu, Harold

    2004-12-01

    Synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning has been demonstrated to be possible for constructing key exchange protocol over public channel. However, the neural cryptography schemes presented so far are not the securest under regular flipping attack (RFA) and are completely insecure under majority flipping attack (MFA). We propose a scheme by splitting the mutual information and the training process to improve the security of neural cryptosystem against flipping attacks. Both analytical and simulation results show that the success probability of RFA on the proposed scheme can be decreased to the level of brute force attack (BFA) and the success probability of MFA still decays exponentially with the weights' level L. The synchronization time of the parties also remains polynomial with L. Moreover, we analyze the security under an advanced flipping attack.

  8. Why cryptography should not rely on physical attack complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    This book presents two practical physical attacks. It shows how attackers can reveal the secret key of symmetric as well as asymmetric cryptographic algorithms based on these attacks, and presents countermeasures on the software and the hardware level that can help to prevent them in the future. Though their theory has been known for several years now, since neither attack has yet been successfully implemented in practice, they have generally not been considered a serious threat. In short, their physical attack complexity has been overestimated and the implied security threat has been underestimated. First, the book introduces the photonic side channel, which offers not only temporal resolution, but also the highest possible spatial resolution. Due to the high cost of its initial implementation, it has not been taken seriously. The work shows both simple and differential photonic side channel analyses. Then, it presents a fault attack against pairing-based cryptography. Due to the need for at least two indepe...

  9. Architecture for the Secret-Key BC3 Cryptography Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Sasongko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cryptography is a very important aspect in data security. The focus of research in this field is shifting from merely security aspect to consider as well the  implementation  aspect.  This  paper  aims  to  introduce  BC3  algorithm  with focus  on  its  hardware  implementation.  It  proposes  an  architecture  for  the hardware  implementation  for  this  algorithm.  BC3  algorithm  is  a  secret-key cryptography  algorithm  developed  with  two  considerations:  robustness  and implementation  efficiency.  This  algorithm  has  been  implemented  on  software and has good performance compared to AES algorithm. BC3 is improvement of BC2 and AE cryptographic algorithm and it is expected to have the same level of robustness and to gain competitive advantages in the implementation aspect. The development of the architecture gives much attention on (1 resource sharing and (2  having  single  clock  for  each  round.  It  exploits  regularity  of  the  algorithm. This architecture is then implemented on an FPGA. This implementation is three times smaller area than AES, but about five times faster. Furthermore, this BC3 hardware  implementation  has  better  performance  compared  to  BC3  software both in key expansion stage and randomizing stage. For the future, the security of this implementation must be reviewed especially against side channel attack.

  10. Fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography with error detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hong; Luo, Ming-Xing; Pieprzyk, Josef; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Lei; Li, Shudong; Orgun, Mehmet A.

    2017-04-01

    Quantum cryptography is commonly used to generate fresh secure keys with quantum signal transmission for instant use between two parties. However, research shows that the relatively low key generation rate hinders its practical use where a symmetric cryptography component consumes the shared key. That is, the security of the symmetric cryptography demands frequent rate of key updates, which leads to a higher consumption of the internal one-time-pad communication bandwidth, since it requires the length of the key to be as long as that of the secret. In order to alleviate these issues, we develop a matrix algorithm for fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography. Our scheme can achieve secure private communication with fresh keys generated from Fibonacci- and Lucas- valued orbital angular momentum (OAM) states for the seed to construct recursive Fibonacci and Lucas matrices. Moreover, the proposed matrix algorithm for quantum cryptography can ultimately be simplified to matrix multiplication, which is implemented and optimized in modern computers. Most importantly, considerably information capacity can be improved effectively and efficiently by the recursive property of Fibonacci and Lucas matrices, thereby avoiding the restriction of physical conditions, such as the communication bandwidth.

  11. Approach to design neural cryptography: a generalized architecture and a heuristic rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  12. Fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography with error detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hong; Luo, Ming-Xing; Pieprzyk, Josef; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Lei; Li, Shudong; Orgun, Mehmet A

    2017-04-13

    Quantum cryptography is commonly used to generate fresh secure keys with quantum signal transmission for instant use between two parties. However, research shows that the relatively low key generation rate hinders its practical use where a symmetric cryptography component consumes the shared key. That is, the security of the symmetric cryptography demands frequent rate of key updates, which leads to a higher consumption of the internal one-time-pad communication bandwidth, since it requires the length of the key to be as long as that of the secret. In order to alleviate these issues, we develop a matrix algorithm for fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography. Our scheme can achieve secure private communication with fresh keys generated from Fibonacci- and Lucas- valued orbital angular momentum (OAM) states for the seed to construct recursive Fibonacci and Lucas matrices. Moreover, the proposed matrix algorithm for quantum cryptography can ultimately be simplified to matrix multiplication, which is implemented and optimized in modern computers. Most importantly, considerably information capacity can be improved effectively and efficiently by the recursive property of Fibonacci and Lucas matrices, thereby avoiding the restriction of physical conditions, such as the communication bandwidth.

  13. Optical cryptography with biometrics for multi-depth objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aimin; Wei, Yang; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Tsang, Peter Wai Ming; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2017-10-11

    We propose an optical cryptosystem for encrypting images of multi-depth objects based on the combination of optical heterodyne technique and fingerprint keys. Optical heterodyning requires two optical beams to be mixed. For encryption, each optical beam is modulated by an optical mask containing either the fingerprint of the person who is sending, or receiving the image. The pair of optical masks are taken as the encryption keys. Subsequently, the two beams are used to scan over a multi-depth 3-D object to obtain an encrypted hologram. During the decryption process, each sectional image of the 3-D object is recovered by convolving its encrypted hologram (through numerical computation) with the encrypted hologram of a pinhole image that is positioned at the same depth as the sectional image. Our proposed method has three major advantages. First, the lost-key situation can be avoided with the use of fingerprints as the encryption keys. Second, the method can be applied to encrypt 3-D images for subsequent decrypted sectional images. Third, since optical heterodyning scanning is employed to encrypt a 3-D object, the optical system is incoherent, resulting in negligible amount of speckle noise upon decryption. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time optical cryptography of 3-D object images has been demonstrated in an incoherent optical system with biometric keys.

  14. Application of visual cryptography for learning in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Avikarsha; Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In the age data digitalization, important applications of optics and photonics based sensors and technology lie in the field of biometrics and image processing. Protecting user data in a safe and secure way is an essential task in this area. However, traditional cryptographic protocols rely heavily on computer aided computation. Secure protocols which rely only on human interactions are usually simpler to understand. In many scenarios development of such protocols are also important for ease of implementation and deployment. Visual cryptography (VC) is an encryption technique on images (or text) in which decryption is done by human visual system. In this technique, an image is encrypted into number of pieces (known as shares). When the printed shares are physically superimposed together, the image can be decrypted with human vision. Modern digital watermarking technologies can be combined with VC for image copyright protection where the shares can be watermarks (small identification) embedded in the image. Similarly, VC can be used for improving security of biometric authentication. This paper presents about design and implementation of a practical laboratory experiment based on the concept of VC for a course in media engineering. Specifically, our contribution deals with integration of VC in different schemes for applications like digital watermarking and biometric authentication in the field of optics and photonics. We describe theoretical concepts and propose our infrastructure for the experiment. Finally, we will evaluate the learning outcome of the experiment, performed by the students.

  15. A neural-network approach for visual cryptography and authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tai-Wen; Chiang, Suchen

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a neural-network approach for visual authorization, which is an application of visual cryptography (VC). The scheme contains a key-share and a set of user-shares. The administrator owns the key-share, and each user owns a user-share issued by the administrator from the user-share set. The shares in the user-share set are visually indistinguishable, i.e. they have the same pictorial meaning. However, the stacking of the key-share with different user-shares will reveal significantly different images. Therefore, the administrator (in fact, only the administrator) can visually recognize the authority assigned to a particular user by viewing the information appearing in the superposed image of key-share and user-share. This approach is completely different from traditional VC approaches. The salient features include: (i) the access schemes are described using a set of graytone images, and (ii) the codebooks to fulfil them are not required; and (iii) the size of share images is the same as the size of target image.

  16. Decoding chaotic cryptography without access to the superkey

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidya, P G

    2003-01-01

    Some chaotic systems can be synchronized by sending only a part of the state space information. This property is used to create keys for cryptography using the unsent state spaces. This idea was first used in connection with the Lorenz equation. It has been assumed for that equation that access to the unsent information is impossible without knowing the three parameters of the equation. This is why the values of these parameters are collectively known as the 'superkey'. The exhaustive search for this key from the existing data is time consuming and can easily be countered by changing the key. We show in this paper how the superkey can be found in a very rapid manner from the synchronizing signal. We achieve this by first transforming the Lorenz equation to a canonical form. Then we use our recently developed method to find highly accurate derivatives from data. Next we transform a nonlinear equation for the superkey to a linear form by embedding it in four dimensions. The final equations are solved by using t...

  17. Decoding chaotic cryptography without access to the superkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, P.G.; Angadi, Savita

    2003-01-01

    Some chaotic systems can be synchronized by sending only a part of the state space information. This property is used to create keys for cryptography using the unsent state spaces. This idea was first used in connection with the Lorenz equation. It has been assumed for that equation that access to the unsent information is impossible without knowing the three parameters of the equation. This is why the values of these parameters are collectively known as the 'superkey'. The exhaustive search for this key from the existing data is time consuming and can easily be countered by changing the key. We show in this paper how the superkey can be found in a very rapid manner from the synchronizing signal. We achieve this by first transforming the Lorenz equation to a canonical form. Then we use our recently developed method to find highly accurate derivatives from data. Next we transform a nonlinear equation for the superkey to a linear form by embedding it in four dimensions. The final equations are solved by using the generalized inverse

  18. Strengthen Cloud Computing Security with Federal Identity Management Using Hierarchical Identity-Based Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Rong, Chunming; Zhao, Gansen

    More and more companies begin to provide different kinds of cloud computing services for Internet users at the same time these services also bring some security problems. Currently the majority of cloud computing systems provide digital identity for users to access their services, this will bring some inconvenience for a hybrid cloud that includes multiple private clouds and/or public clouds. Today most cloud computing system use asymmetric and traditional public key cryptography to provide data security and mutual authentication. Identity-based cryptography has some attraction characteristics that seem to fit well the requirements of cloud computing. In this paper, by adopting federated identity management together with hierarchical identity-based cryptography (HIBC), not only the key distribution but also the mutual authentication can be simplified in the cloud.

  19. AUDIO CRYPTANALYSIS- AN APPLICATION OF SYMMETRIC KEY CRYPTOGRAPHY AND AUDIO STEGANOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Paira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the recent trend of network and technology, “Cryptography” and “Steganography” have emerged out as the essential elements of providing network security. Although Cryptography plays a major role in the fabrication and modification of the secret message into an encrypted version yet it has certain drawbacks. Steganography is the art that meets one of the basic limitations of Cryptography. In this paper, a new algorithm has been proposed based on both Symmetric Key Cryptography and Audio Steganography. The combination of a randomly generated Symmetric Key along with LSB technique of Audio Steganography sends a secret message unrecognizable through an insecure medium. The Stego File generated is almost lossless giving a 100 percent recovery of the original message. This paper also presents a detailed experimental analysis of the algorithm with a brief comparison with other existing algorithms and a future scope. The experimental verification and security issues are promising.

  20. Security proof of counterfactual quantum cryptography against general intercept-resend attacks and its vulnerability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Sheng; Wang Jian; Tang Chao-Jing

    2012-01-01

    Counterfactual quantum cryptography, recently proposed by Noh, is featured with no transmission of signal particles. This exhibits evident security advantages, such as its immunity to the well-known photon-number-splitting attack. In this paper, the theoretical security of counterfactual quantum cryptography protocol against the general intercept-resend attacks is proved by bounding the information of an eavesdropper Eve more tightly than in Yin's proposal [Phys. Rev. A 82 042335 (2010)]. It is also shown that practical counterfactual quantum cryptography implementations may be vulnerable when equipped with imperfect apparatuses, by proving that a negative key rate can be achieved when Eve launches a time-shift attack based on imperfect detector efficiency. (general)

  1. Device-independent two-party cryptography secure against sequential attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaniewski, Jedrzej; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of two-party cryptography is to enable two parties, Alice and Bob, to solve common tasks without the need for mutual trust. Examples of such tasks are private access to a database, and secure identification. Quantum communication enables security for all of these problems in the noisy......-storage model by sending more signals than the adversary can store in a certain time frame. Here, we initiate the study of device-independent (DI) protocols for two-party cryptography in the noisy-storage model. Specifically, we present a relatively easy to implement protocol for a cryptographic building block...... known as weak string erasure and prove its security even if the devices used in the protocol are prepared by the dishonest party. DI two-party cryptography is made challenging by the fact that Alice and Bob do not trust each other, which requires new techniques to establish security. We fully analyse...

  2. Two-out-of-two color matching based visual cryptography schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machizaud, Jacques; Fournel, Thierry

    2012-09-24

    Visual cryptography which consists in sharing a secret message between transparencies has been extended to color prints. In this paper, we propose a new visual cryptography scheme based on color matching. The stacked printed media reveal a uniformly colored message decoded by the human visual system. In contrast with the previous color visual cryptography schemes, the proposed one enables to share images without pixel expansion and to detect a forgery as the color of the message is kept secret. In order to correctly print the colors on the media and to increase the security of the scheme, we use spectral models developed for color reproduction describing printed colors from an optical point of view.

  3. Special Issue on Entropy-Based Applied Cryptography and Enhanced Security for Ubiquitous Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James (Jong Hyuk Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Entropy is a basic and important concept in information theory. It is also often used as a measure of the unpredictability of a cryptographic key in cryptography research areas. Ubiquitous computing (Ubi-comp has emerged rapidly as an exciting new paradigm. In this special issue, we mainly selected and discussed papers related with ore theories based on the graph theory to solve computational problems on cryptography and security, practical technologies; applications and services for Ubi-comp including secure encryption techniques, identity and authentication; credential cloning attacks and countermeasures; switching generator with resistance against the algebraic and side channel attacks; entropy-based network anomaly detection; applied cryptography using chaos function, information hiding and watermark, secret sharing, message authentication, detection and modeling of cyber attacks with Petri Nets, and quantum flows for secret key distribution, etc.

  4. Security improvement by using a modified coherent state for quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.J.; Zhu, Luobei; Ou, Z.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Weak coherent states as a photon source for quantum cryptography have a limit in secure data rate and transmission distance because of the presence of multiphoton events and loss in transmission line. Two-photon events in a coherent state can be taken out by a two-photon interference scheme. We investigate the security issue of utilizing this modified coherent state in quantum cryptography. A 4-dB improvement in the secure data rate or a nearly twofold increase in transmission distance over the coherent state are found. With a recently proposed and improved encoding strategy, further improvement is possible

  5. Decoy state method for quantum cryptography based on phase coding into faint laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-12-01

    We discuss the photon number splitting attack (PNS) in systems of quantum cryptography with phase coding. It is shown that this attack, as well as the structural equations for the PNS attack for phase encoding, differs physically from the analogous attack applied to the polarization coding. As far as we know, in practice, in all works to date processing of experimental data has been done for phase coding, but using formulas for polarization coding. This can lead to inadequate results for the length of the secret key. These calculations are important for the correct interpretation of the results, especially if it concerns the criterion of secrecy in quantum cryptography.

  6. The Design and Evaluation of a Cryptography Teaching Strategy for Software Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, T.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a cryptography module for final-year software engineering students. The emphasis is on implementation architectures and practical cryptanalysis rather than a standard mathematical approach. The competitive continuous assessment process reflects this approach and rewards…

  7. One-time pad, complexity of verification of keys, and practical security of quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molotkov, S. N., E-mail: sergei.molotkov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    A direct relation between the complexity of the complete verification of keys, which is one of the main criteria of security in classical systems, and a trace distance used in quantum cryptography is demonstrated. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of verification steps required to determine the actual key are obtained.

  8. Cryptography from quantum uncertainty in the presence of quantum side information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Niek Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The thesis starts with a high-level introduction into cryptography and quantum mechanics. Chapter 2 gives a theoretical foundation by introducing probability theory, information theory, functional analysis, quantum mechanics and quantum information theory. Chapter 3, 4 and 5 are editions of work

  9. Device independence for two-party cryptography and position verification with memoryless devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jérémy; Thinh, Le Phuc; Kaniewski, Jedrzej; Helsen, Jonas; Wehner, Stephanie

    2018-06-01

    Quantum communication has demonstrated its usefulness for quantum cryptography far beyond quantum key distribution. One domain is two-party cryptography, whose goal is to allow two parties who may not trust each other to solve joint tasks. Another interesting application is position-based cryptography whose goal is to use the geographical location of an entity as its only identifying credential. Unfortunately, security of these protocols is not possible against an all powerful adversary. However, if we impose some realistic physical constraints on the adversary, there exist protocols for which security can be proven, but these so far relied on the knowledge of the quantum operations performed during the protocols. In this work we improve the device-independent security proofs of Kaniewski and Wehner [New J. Phys. 18, 055004 (2016), 10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/055004] for two-party cryptography (with memoryless devices) and we add a security proof for device-independent position verification (also memoryless devices) under different physical constraints on the adversary. We assess the quality of the devices by observing a Bell violation, and, as for Kaniewski and Wehner [New J. Phys. 18, 055004 (2016), 10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/055004], security can be attained for any violation of the Clauser-Holt-Shimony-Horne inequality.

  10. Characterization of collective Gaussian attacks and security of coherent-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Braunstein, Samuel L; Lloyd, Seth

    2008-11-14

    We provide a simple description of the most general collective Gaussian attack in continuous-variable quantum cryptography. In the scenario of such general attacks, we analyze the asymptotic secret-key rates which are achievable with coherent states, joint measurements of the quadratures and one-way classical communication.

  11. Cryptographic Research and NSA: Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davida, George I.

    1981-01-01

    The Public Cryptography Study Group accepted the claim made by the National Security Agency that some information in some publications concerning cryptology could be inimical to national security, and is allowing the establishment of a voluntary mechanism, on an experimental basis, for NSA to review cryptology manuscripts. (MLW)

  12. An Application-Independent Cryptography Model That Is Easy to Use for All Level Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielson, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptography libraries are inflexible and difficult for developers to integrate with their applications. These difficulties are often encountered by applications, like PGP, which are non-intuitive for end-users and are often used improperly or not at all. This thesis discusses the negative impact of the current prevailing poor usability on…

  13. An Anti-Cheating Visual Cryptography Scheme Based on Chaotic Encryption System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanyan; Xu, Zhuolin; Ge, Xiaonan; He, Wencai

    By chaotic encryption system and introducing the trusted third party (TTP), in this paper, an anti-cheating visual cryptography scheme (VCS) is proposed. The scheme solved the problem of dishonest participants and improved the security of chaotic encryption system. Simulation results and analysis show that the recovery image is acceptable, the system can detect the cheating in participants effectively and with high security.

  14. McBits: fast constant-time code-based cryptography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, D.J.; Chou, T.; Schwabe, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents extremely fast algorithms for code-based public-key cryptography, including full protection against timing attacks. For example, at a 2^128 security level, this paper achieves a reciprocal decryption throughput of just 60493 cycles (plus cipher cost etc.) on a single Ivy Bridge

  15. Quantum cryptography using a photon source based on postselection from entangled two-photon states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina ml., Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Soubusta, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 64, - (2001), s. 052305-1-152305-13 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : quantum cryptography * photon number squeezing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.810, year: 2001

  16. One-time pad, complexity of verification of keys, and practical security of quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    A direct relation between the complexity of the complete verification of keys, which is one of the main criteria of security in classical systems, and a trace distance used in quantum cryptography is demonstrated. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of verification steps required to determine the actual key are obtained.

  17. Quantum-tomographic cryptography with a semiconductor single-photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszlikowski, D.; Yang, L.J.; Yong, L.S.; Willeboordse, F.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the security of so-called quantum-tomographic cryptography with the source producing entangled photons via an experimental scheme proposed by Fattal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 37903 (2004)]. We determine the range of the experimental parameters for which the protocol is secure against the most general incoherent attacks

  18. Elliptic Curve Cryptography with Security System in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Sharma, Dharmendra

    2010-10-01

    The rapid progress of wireless communications and embedded micro-electro-system technologies has made wireless sensor networks (WSN) very popular and even become part of our daily life. WSNs design are generally application driven, namely a particular application's requirements will determine how the network behaves. However, the natures of WSN have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to its linear scalability, a small software footprint, low hardware implementation cost, low bandwidth requirement, and high device performance. It is noted that today's software applications are mainly characterized by their component-based structures which are usually heterogeneous and distributed, including the WSNs. But WSNs typically need to configure themselves automatically and support as hoc routing. Agent technology provides a method for handling increasing software complexity and supporting rapid and accurate decision making. This paper based on our previous works [1, 2], three contributions have made, namely (a) fuzzy controller for dynamic slide window size to improve the performance of running ECC (b) first presented a hidden generation point for protection from man-in-the middle attack and (c) we first investigates multi-agent applying for key exchange together. Security systems have been drawing great attentions as cryptographic algorithms have gained popularity due to the natures that make them suitable for use in constrained environment such as mobile sensor information applications, where computing resources and power availability are limited. Elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) is one of high potential candidates for WSNs, which requires less computational power, communication bandwidth, and memory in comparison with other cryptosystem. For saving pre-computing storages recently there is a trend for the sensor networks that the sensor group leaders rather than sensors communicate to the end database, which highlighted the needs to prevent from the man

  19. Quantum cryptography using coherent states: Randomized encryption and key generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corndorf, Eric

    With the advent of the global optical-telecommunications infrastructure, an increasing number of individuals, companies, and agencies communicate information with one another over public networks or physically-insecure private networks. While the majority of the traffic flowing through these networks requires little or no assurance of secrecy, the same cannot be said for certain communications between banks, between government agencies, within the military, and between corporations. In these arenas, the need to specify some level of secrecy in communications is a high priority. While the current approaches to securing sensitive information (namely the public-key-cryptography infrastructure and deterministic private-key ciphers like AES and 3DES) seem to be cryptographically strong based on empirical evidence, there exist no mathematical proofs of secrecy for any widely deployed cryptosystem. As an example, the ubiquitous public-key cryptosystems infer all of their secrecy from the assumption that factoring of the product of two large primes is necessarily time consuming---something which has not, and perhaps cannot, be proven. Since the 1980s, the possibility of using quantum-mechanical features of light as a physical mechanism for satisfying particular cryptographic objectives has been explored. This research has been fueled by the hopes that cryptosystems based on quantum systems may provide provable levels of secrecy which are at least as valid as quantum mechanics itself. Unfortunately, the most widely considered quantum-cryptographic protocols (BB84 and the Ekert protocol) have serious implementation problems. Specifically, they require quantum-mechanical states which are not readily available, and they rely on unproven relations between intrusion-level detection and the information available to an attacker. As a result, the secrecy level provided by these experimental implementations is entirely unspecified. In an effort to provably satisfy the cryptographic

  20. On a two-pass scheme without a faraday mirror for free-space relativistic quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, K. S.; Radchenko, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Korol' kov, A. V. [Academy of Cryptography (Russian Federation); Kulik, S. P., E-mail: sergei.kulik@gmail.com [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Molotkov, S. N., E-mail: sergei.molotkov@gmail.com [Academy of Cryptography (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The stability of destructive interference independent of the input polarization and the state of a quantum communication channel in fiber optic systems used in quantum cryptography plays a principal role in providing the security of communicated keys. A novel optical scheme is proposed that can be used both in relativistic quantum cryptography for communicating keys in open space and for communicating them over fiber optic lines. The scheme ensures stability of destructive interference and admits simple automatic balancing of a fiber interferometer.

  1. On a two-pass scheme without a faraday mirror for free-space relativistic quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, K. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Korol’kov, A. V.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of destructive interference independent of the input polarization and the state of a quantum communication channel in fiber optic systems used in quantum cryptography plays a principal role in providing the security of communicated keys. A novel optical scheme is proposed that can be used both in relativistic quantum cryptography for communicating keys in open space and for communicating them over fiber optic lines. The scheme ensures stability of destructive interference and admits simple automatic balancing of a fiber interferometer.

  2. Optical cryptography topology based on a three-dimensional particle-like distribution and diffractive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-05-09

    In recent years, coherent diffractive imaging has been considered as a promising alternative for information retrieval instead of conventional interference methods. Coherent diffractive imaging using the X-ray light source has opened up a new research perspective for the measurement of non-crystalline and biological specimens, and can achieve unprecedentedly high resolutions. In this paper, we show how a three-dimensional (3D) particle-like distribution and coherent diffractive imaging can be applied for a study of optical cryptography. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding approach is used, and the plaintext is considered as a series of particles distributed in a 3D space. A topology concept is also introduced into the proposed optical cryptosystem. During image decryption, a retrieval algorithm is developed to extract the plaintext from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed optical cryptography topology are also analyzed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  3. File Cryptography with AES and RSA for Mobile Based on Android

    Science.gov (United States)

    laia, Yonata; Nababan, Marlince; Sihombing, Oloan; Aisyah, Siti; Sitanggang, Delima; Parsaoran, Saut; Zendato, Niskarto

    2018-04-01

    The users of mobile based on android were increasing currently even now mobile was almost the same computer one of which could be used to be done by every users mobile was save the individual important data.Saving the data on mobile was very risk because become hackers’ target. That was the reason of researchers want to add cryptography which the combination between Advance Encryption System (AES) dan Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir dan Len Adleman (RSA). The result of the second method above could do cryptography data on mobile. With different encryption time where the file size; 25.44 KB, encryption time 4 second, 200 KB, 5 second, 600 KB 7 second, 2.29 MB, 10 second. Where decryption 25.44 KB, encryption 2 second, 200 KB, 1.5 second, 600 KB 2.5 second, 2.29 MB, 2.7 second.

  4. Analysis of Multiple Data Hiding Combined Coloured Visual Cryptography and LSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Halim; Rahman Syahputra, Edy

    2017-12-01

    Currently the level of data security becoming a major factor in data transfer. As we know every process of sending data through any medium the risk of that data gets hacked will still be there. Some techniques for securing data such as steganography and cryptography also often used as a solution for securing data. But it does not last long because it has been found out the weaknesses of the algorithm so that the security be assured. So, in need of variety of new algorithms to be able to protect the data so that data security can be guaranteed. In this study tries to combine two visual algorithms that steganography and cryptography. Where in these experiments will try to secure two pieces of data type that is the type of image data and text data where both the data is regarded as a message so to obtain the correct information receiver should get that two types of data.

  5. Cryptographic robustness of practical quantum cryptography: BB84 key distribution protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2008-01-01

    In real fiber-optic quantum cryptography systems, the avalanche photodiodes are not perfect, the source of quantum states is not a single-photon one, and the communication channel is lossy. For these reasons, key distribution is impossible under certain conditions for the system parameters. A simple analysis is performed to find relations between the parameters of real cryptography systems and the length of the quantum channel that guarantee secure quantum key distribution when the eavesdropper's capabilities are limited only by fundamental laws of quantum mechanics while the devices employed by the legitimate users are based on current technologies. Critical values are determined for the rate of secure real-time key generation that can be reached under the current technology level. Calculations show that the upper bound on channel length can be as high as 300 km for imperfect photodetectors (avalanche photodiodes) with present-day quantum efficiency (η ∼ 20%) and dark count probability (p dark ∼ 10 -7 )

  6. Insecurity of position-based quantum-cryptography protocols against entanglement attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-01-01

    Recently, position-based quantum cryptography has been claimed to be unconditionally secure. On the contrary, here we show that the existing proposals for position-based quantum cryptography are, in fact, insecure if entanglement is shared among two adversaries. Specifically, we demonstrate how the adversaries can incorporate ideas of quantum teleportation and quantum secret sharing to compromise the security with certainty. The common flaw to all current protocols is that the Pauli operators always map a codeword to a codeword (up to an irrelevant overall phase). We propose a modified scheme lacking this property in which the same cheating strategy used to undermine the previous protocols can succeed with a rate of at most 85%. We prove the modified protocol is secure when the shared quantum resource between the adversaries is a two- or three-level system.

  7. AUTHENTICATION ARCHITECTURE USING THRESHOLD CRYPTOGRAPHY IN KERBEROS FOR MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadj Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of wireless technologies is gradually increasing and risks related to the use of these technologies are considerable. Due to their dynamically changing topology and open environment without a centralized policy control of a traditional network, a mobile ad hoc network (MANET is vulnerable to the presence of malicious nodes and attacks. The ideal solution to overcome a myriad of security concerns in MANET’s is the use of reliable authentication architecture. In this paper we propose a new key management scheme based on threshold cryptography in kerberos for MANET’s, the proposed scheme uses the elliptic curve cryptography method that consumes fewer resources well adapted to the wireless environment. Our approach shows a strength and effectiveness against attacks.

  8. Secure Programming Cookbook for C and C++ Recipes for Cryptography, Authentication, Input Validation & More

    CERN Document Server

    Viega, John

    2009-01-01

    Secure Programming Cookbook for C and C++ is an important new resource for developers serious about writing secure code for Unix® (including Linux®) and Windows® environments. This essential code companion covers a wide range of topics, including safe initialization, access control, input validation, symmetric and public key cryptography, cryptographic hashes and MACs, authentication and key exchange, PKI, random numbers, and anti-tampering.

  9. Breaking the Unbreakable : Exploiting Loopholes in Bell’s Theorem to Hack Quantum Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Jogenfors, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis we study device-independent quantum key distribution based on energy-time entanglement. This is a method for cryptography that promises not only perfect secrecy, but also to be a practical method for quantum key distribution thanks to the reduced complexity when compared to other quantum key distribution protocols. However, there still exist a number of loopholes that must be understood and eliminated in order to rule out eavesdroppers. We study several relevant loopholes and s...

  10. SURVEY ON CLOUD SECURITY BY DATA ENCRYPTION USING ELLIPTIC CURVE CRYPTOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Akanksha Tomar*, Jamwant Kumbhre

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is one of the latest technology trend of the IT trade for business area. Cloud computing security converged into a demanding topic in the sector of information technology and computer science research programs. Cloud Computing is a conceptual service based technology which is used by many companies widely these days. Elliptical Curve Cryptography based algorithm provides a highly secure communication, data integrity and authentication, along with the non-repudiation communicat...

  11. Comment on 'Two-way protocols for quantum cryptography with a nonmaximally entangled qubit pair'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Sujuan; Gao Fei; Wen Qiaoyan; Guo Fenzhuo

    2010-01-01

    Three protocols of quantum cryptography with a nonmaximally entangled qubit pair [Phys. Rev. A 80, 022323 (2009)] were recently proposed by Shimizu, Tamaki, and Fukasaka. The security of these protocols is based on the quantum-mechanical constraint for a state transformation between nonmaximally entangled states. However, we find that the second protocol is vulnerable under the correlation-elicitation attack. An eavesdropper can obtain the encoded bit M although she has no knowledge about the random bit R.

  12. Entropy-as-a-Service: Unlocking the Full Potential of Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Apostol; Staples, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Securing the Internet requires strong cryptography, which depends on the availability of good entropy for generating unpredictable keys and accurate clocks. Attacks abusing weak keys or old inputs portend challenges for the Internet. EaaS is a novel architecture providing entropy and timestamps from a decentralized root of trust, scaling gracefully across diverse geopolitical locales and remaining trustworthy unless much of the collective is compromised.

  13. A Novel Basis Splitting Eavesdropping Scheme in Quantum Cryptography Based on the BB84 Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Nan; Zhu Chang-Hua; Quan Dong-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel strategy named basis-splitting scheme to split the intercepted quanta into several portions based on different bases, for eavesdropping in the process of quantum cryptography. Compared with intercept-resend strategy, our simulation results of the basis-splitting scheme under the non-ideal condition show a greater performance, especially with the increase of the length of shifted bits. Consequently our scheme can aid eavesdropper to gather much more useful information. (paper)

  14. Device-independent two-party cryptography secure against sequential attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniewski, Jędrzej; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    The goal of two-party cryptography is to enable two parties, Alice and Bob, to solve common tasks without the need for mutual trust. Examples of such tasks are private access to a database, and secure identification. Quantum communication enables security for all of these problems in the noisy-storage model by sending more signals than the adversary can store in a certain time frame. Here, we initiate the study of device-independent (DI) protocols for two-party cryptography in the noisy-storage model. Specifically, we present a relatively easy to implement protocol for a cryptographic building block known as weak string erasure and prove its security even if the devices used in the protocol are prepared by the dishonest party. DI two-party cryptography is made challenging by the fact that Alice and Bob do not trust each other, which requires new techniques to establish security. We fully analyse the case of memoryless devices (for which sequential attacks are optimal) and the case of sequential attacks for arbitrary devices. The key ingredient of the proof, which might be of independent interest, is an explicit (and tight) relation between the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality observed by Alice and Bob and uncertainty generated by Alice against Bob who is forced to measure his system before finding out Alice’s setting (guessing with postmeasurement information). In particular, we show that security is possible for arbitrarily small violation.

  15. Device-independent two-party cryptography secure against sequential attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniewski, Jędrzej; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of two-party cryptography is to enable two parties, Alice and Bob, to solve common tasks without the need for mutual trust. Examples of such tasks are private access to a database, and secure identification. Quantum communication enables security for all of these problems in the noisy-storage model by sending more signals than the adversary can store in a certain time frame. Here, we initiate the study of device-independent (DI) protocols for two-party cryptography in the noisy-storage model. Specifically, we present a relatively easy to implement protocol for a cryptographic building block known as weak string erasure and prove its security even if the devices used in the protocol are prepared by the dishonest party. DI two-party cryptography is made challenging by the fact that Alice and Bob do not trust each other, which requires new techniques to establish security. We fully analyse the case of memoryless devices (for which sequential attacks are optimal) and the case of sequential attacks for arbitrary devices. The key ingredient of the proof, which might be of independent interest, is an explicit (and tight) relation between the violation of the Clauser–Horne–Shimony–Holt inequality observed by Alice and Bob and uncertainty generated by Alice against Bob who is forced to measure his system before finding out Alice’s setting (guessing with postmeasurement information). In particular, we show that security is possible for arbitrarily small violation. (paper)

  16. A copyright protection scheme for digital images based on shuffled singular value decomposition and visual cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, B Pushpa; Singh, Kh Manglem; Roy, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new watermarking algorithm based on the shuffled singular value decomposition and the visual cryptography for copyright protection of digital images. It generates the ownership and identification shares of the image based on visual cryptography. It decomposes the image into low and high frequency sub-bands. The low frequency sub-band is further divided into blocks of same size after shuffling it and then the singular value decomposition is applied to each randomly selected block. Shares are generated by comparing one of the elements in the first column of the left orthogonal matrix with its corresponding element in the right orthogonal matrix of the singular value decomposition of the block of the low frequency sub-band. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme clearly verifies the copyright of the digital images, and is robust to withstand several image processing attacks. Comparison with the other related visual cryptography-based algorithms reveals that the proposed method gives better performance. The proposed method is especially resilient against the rotation attack.

  17. Design of an Elliptic Curve Cryptography processor for RFID tag chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zilong; Liu, Dongsheng; Zou, Xuecheng; Lin, Hui; Cheng, Jian

    2014-09-26

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an important technique for wireless sensor networks and the Internet of Things. Recently, considerable research has been performed in the combination of public key cryptography and RFID. In this paper, an efficient architecture of Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) Processor for RFID tag chip is presented. We adopt a new inversion algorithm which requires fewer registers to store variables than the traditional schemes. A new method for coordinate swapping is proposed, which can reduce the complexity of the controller and shorten the time of iterative calculation effectively. A modified circular shift register architecture is presented in this paper, which is an effective way to reduce the area of register files. Clock gating and asynchronous counter are exploited to reduce the power consumption. The simulation and synthesis results show that the time needed for one elliptic curve scalar point multiplication over GF(2163) is 176.7 K clock cycles and the gate area is 13.8 K with UMC 0.13 μm Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Moreover, the low power and low cost consumption make the Elliptic Curve Cryptography Processor (ECP) a prospective candidate for application in the RFID tag chip.

  18. DNA Cryptography and Deep Learning using Genetic Algorithm with NW algorithm for Key Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Shruti; Kaur, Harleen; Chang, Victor

    2017-12-05

    Cryptography is not only a science of applying complex mathematics and logic to design strong methods to hide data called as encryption, but also to retrieve the original data back, called decryption. The purpose of cryptography is to transmit a message between a sender and receiver such that an eavesdropper is unable to comprehend it. To accomplish this, not only we need a strong algorithm, but a strong key and a strong concept for encryption and decryption process. We have introduced a concept of DNA Deep Learning Cryptography which is defined as a technique of concealing data in terms of DNA sequence and deep learning. In the cryptographic technique, each alphabet of a letter is converted into a different combination of the four bases, namely; Adenine (A), Cytosine (C), Guanine (G) and Thymine (T), which make up the human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Actual implementations with the DNA don't exceed laboratory level and are expensive. To bring DNA computing on a digital level, easy and effective algorithms are proposed in this paper. In proposed work we have introduced firstly, a method and its implementation for key generation based on the theory of natural selection using Genetic Algorithm with Needleman-Wunsch (NW) algorithm and Secondly, a method for implementation of encryption and decryption based on DNA computing using biological operations Transcription, Translation, DNA Sequencing and Deep Learning.

  19. Implementation Cryptography Data Encryption Standard (DES) and Triple Data Encryption Standard (3DES) Method in Communication System Based Near Field Communication (NFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnadewi; Pramono Adhie, Roy; Hutama, Yonatan; Saleh Ahmar, A.; Setiawan, M. I.

    2018-01-01

    Cryptography is a method used to create secure communication by manipulating sent messages during the communication occurred so only intended party that can know the content of that messages. Some of the most commonly used cryptography methods to protect sent messages, especially in the form of text, are DES and 3DES cryptography method. This research will explain the DES and 3DES cryptography method and its use for stored data security in smart cards that working in the NFC-based communication system. Several things that will be explained in this research is the ways of working of DES and 3DES cryptography method in doing the protection process of a data and software engineering through the creation of application using C++ programming language to realize and test the performance of DES and 3DES cryptography method in encrypted data writing process to smart cards and decrypted data reading process from smart cards. The execution time of the entering and the reading process data using a smart card DES cryptography method is faster than using 3DES cryptography.

  20. Geospatial cryptography: enabling researchers to access private, spatially referenced, human subjects data for cancer control and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Essex, Aleksander; Curtis, Andrew; Kohler, Betsy; Sherman, Recinda; Emam, Khaled El; Shi, Chen; Kaufmann, Andy; Beale, Linda; Cusick, Thomas; Goldberg, Daniel; Goovaerts, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    As the volume, accuracy and precision of digital geographic information have increased, concerns regarding individual privacy and confidentiality have come to the forefront. Not only do these challenge a basic tenet underlying the advancement of science by posing substantial obstacles to the sharing of data to validate research results, but they are obstacles to conducting certain research projects in the first place. Geospatial cryptography involves the specification, design, implementation and application of cryptographic techniques to address privacy, confidentiality and security concerns for geographically referenced data. This article defines geospatial cryptography and demonstrates its application in cancer control and surveillance. Four use cases are considered: (1) national-level de-duplication among state or province-based cancer registries; (2) sharing of confidential data across cancer registries to support case aggregation across administrative geographies; (3) secure data linkage; and (4) cancer cluster investigation and surveillance. A secure multi-party system for geospatial cryptography is developed. Solutions under geospatial cryptography are presented and computation time is calculated. As services provided by cancer registries to the research community, de-duplication, case aggregation across administrative geographies and secure data linkage are often time-consuming and in some instances precluded by confidentiality and security concerns. Geospatial cryptography provides secure solutions that hold significant promise for addressing these concerns and for accelerating the pace of research with human subjects data residing in our nation's cancer registries. Pursuit of the research directions posed herein conceivably would lead to a geospatially encrypted geographic information system (GEGIS) designed specifically to promote the sharing and spatial analysis of confidential data. Geospatial cryptography holds substantial promise for accelerating the

  1. Invisible transmission in quantum cryptography using continuous variables: A proof of Eve's vulnerability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navez, Patrick; Gatti, Alessandra; Lugiato, Luigi A.

    2002-01-01

    By analogy to classical cryptography, we develop a quantum cryptographic scheme in which the two public and private keys consist in each of two entangled beams of squeezed light. An analog secret information is encrypted by modulating the phase of the beam sent in public. The knowledge of the degree of nonclassical correlation between the beam quadratures measured in private and in public allows only the receiver to decrypt the secret information. Finally, in a view towards absolute security, we formally prove that any external intervention of an eavesdropper makes him vulnerable to any subsequent detection

  2. Disorder generated by interacting neural networks: application to econophysics and cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2003-01-01

    When neural networks are trained on their own output signals they generate disordered time series. In particular, when two neural networks are trained on their mutual output they can synchronize; they relax to a time-dependent state with identical synaptic weights. Two applications of this phenomenon are discussed for (a) econophysics and (b) cryptography. (a) When agents competing in a closed market (minority game) are using neural networks to make their decisions, the total system relaxes to a state of good performance. (b) Two partners communicating over a public channel can find a common secret key

  3. Quantum cryptography with a predetermined key, using continuous-variable Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. D.

    2000-12-01

    Correlations of the type discussed by EPR in their original 1935 paradox for continuous variables exist for the quadrature phase amplitudes of two spatially separated fields. These correlations were first experimentally reported in 1992. We propose to use such EPR beams in quantum cryptography, to transmit with high efficiency messages in such a way that the receiver and sender may later determine whether eavesdropping has occurred. The merit of the new proposal is in the possibility of transmitting a reasonably secure yet predetermined key. This would allow relay of a cryptographic key over long distances in the presence of lossy channels.

  4. Implementation of Pollard Rho attack on elliptic curve cryptography over binary fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienardo, Yuliawan, Fajar; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan; Rahardjo, Budi

    2015-09-01

    Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) is a public key cryptosystem with a security level determined by discrete logarithm problem called Elliptic Curve Discrete Logarithm Problem (ECDLP). John M. Pollard proposed an algorithm for discrete logarithm problem based on Monte Carlo method and known as Pollard Rho algorithm. The best current brute-force attack for ECC is Pollard Rho algorithm. In this research we implement modified Pollard Rho algorithm on ECC over GF (241). As the result, the runtime of Pollard Rho algorithm increases exponentially with the increase of the ECC key length. This work also presents the estimated runtime of Pollard Rho attack on ECC over longer bits.

  5. A secure RFID mutual authentication protocol for healthcare environments using elliptic curve cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunhua; Xu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Jining

    2015-03-01

    Radio Frequency Identification(RFID) is an automatic identification technology, which can be widely used in healthcare environments to locate and track staff, equipment and patients. However, potential security and privacy problems in RFID system remain a challenge. In this paper, we design a mutual authentication protocol for RFID based on elliptic curve cryptography(ECC). We use pre-computing method within tag's communication, so that our protocol can get better efficiency. In terms of security, our protocol can achieve confidentiality, unforgeability, mutual authentication, tag's anonymity, availability and forward security. Our protocol also can overcome the weakness in the existing protocols. Therefore, our protocol is suitable for healthcare environments.

  6. Optical double-image cryptography based on diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we propose a method using structured-illumination-based diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating for optical double-image cryptography. An optical cryptosystem is designed, and multiple random phase-only masks are placed in the optical path. When a phase grating is laterally translated just before the plaintexts, several diffraction intensity patterns (i.e., ciphertexts) can be correspondingly obtained. During image decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is developed to extract plaintexts from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed method are analyzed. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical simulation results. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Perspectives on Entangled Nuclear Particle Pairs Generation and Manipulation in Quantum Communication and Cryptography Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Dănilă

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Entanglement between two quantum elements is a phenomenon which presents a broad application spectrum, being used largely in quantum cryptography schemes and in physical characterisation of the universe. Commonly known entangled states have been obtained with photons and electrons, but other quantum elements such as quarks, leptons, and neutrinos have shown their informational potential. In this paper, we present the perspective of exploiting the phenomenon of entanglement that appears in nuclear particle interactions as a resource for quantum key distribution protocols.

  8. Information hiding based on double random-phase encoding and public-key cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yuan; Xin, Zhou; Alam, Mohammed S; Xi, Lu; Xiao-Feng, Li

    2009-03-02

    A novel information hiding method based on double random-phase encoding (DRPE) and Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA) public-key cryptosystem is proposed. In the proposed technique, the inherent diffusion property of DRPE is cleverly utilized to make up the diffusion insufficiency of RSA public-key cryptography, while the RSA cryptosystem is utilized for simultaneous transmission of the cipher text and the two phase-masks, which is not possible under the DRPE technique. This technique combines the complementary advantages of the DPRE and RSA encryption techniques and brings security and convenience for efficient information transmission. Extensive numerical simulation results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed technique.

  9. Femtosecond Laser--Pumped Source of Entangled Photons for Quantum Cryptography Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, D.; Donaldson, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental setup for generation of entangled-photon pairs via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, based on the femtosecond-pulsed laser. Our entangled-photon source utilizes a 76-MHz-repetition-rate, 100-fs-pulse-width, mode-locked, ultrafast femtosecond laser, which can produce, on average, more photon pairs than a cw laser of an equal pump power. The resulting entangled pairs are counted by a pair of high-quantum-efficiency, single-photon, silicon avalanche photodiodes. Our apparatus s intended as an efficient source/receiver system for the quantum communications and quantum cryptography applications

  10. General Theory of Decoy-State Quantum Cryptography with Dark Count Rate Fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Gao; Shi-Hai, Sun; Lin-Mei, Liang

    2009-01-01

    The existing theory of decoy-state quantum cryptography assumes that the dark count rate is a constant, but in practice there exists fluctuation. We develop a new scheme of the decoy state, achieve a more practical key generation rate in the presence of fluctuation of the dark count rate, and compare the result with the result of the decoy-state without fluctuation. It is found that the key generation rate and maximal secure distance will be decreased under the influence of the fluctuation of the dark count rate

  11. Field test of a practical secure communication network with decoy-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teng-Yun; Liang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Cai, Wen-Qi; Ju, Lei; Liu, Wei-Yue; Wang, Jian; Yin, Hao; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2009-04-13

    We present a secure network communication system that operated with decoy-state quantum cryptography in a real-world application scenario. The full key exchange and application protocols were performed in real time among three nodes, in which two adjacent nodes were connected by approximate 20 km of commercial telecom optical fiber. The generated quantum keys were immediately employed and demonstrated for communication applications, including unbreakable real-time voice telephone between any two of the three communication nodes, or a broadcast from one node to the other two nodes by using one-time pad encryption.

  12. Reduced randomness in quantum cryptography with sequences of qubits encoded in the same basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoureux, L.-P.; Cerf, N. J.; Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.; Gisin, N.; Macchiavello, C.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the cloning of sequences of qubits prepared in the states used in the BB84 or six-state quantum cryptography protocol, and show that the single-qubit fidelity is unaffected even if entire sequences of qubits are prepared in the same basis. This result is only valid provided that the sequences are much shorter than the total key. It is of great importance for practical quantum cryptosystems because it reduces the need for high-speed random number generation without impairing on the security against finite-size cloning attacks

  13. Authentication in insecure environments using visual cryptography and non-transferable credentials in practise

    CERN Document Server

    Pape, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Sebastian Pape discusses two different scenarios for authentication. On the one hand, users cannot trust their devices and nevertheless want to be able to do secure authentication. On the other hand, users may not want to be tracked while their service provider does not want them to share their credentials. Many users may not be able to determine whether their device is trustworthy, i.e. it might contain malware. One solution is to use visual cryptography for authentication. The author generalizes this concept to human decipherable encryption schemes and establishes a relationship to CAPTCHAS.

  14. Optical asymmetric cryptography using a three-dimensional space-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present optical asymmetric cryptography combined with a three-dimensional (3D) space-based model. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding system is developed in the Fresnel domain, and one random phase-only mask and the plaintext are combined as a series of particles. Subsequently, the series of particles is translated along an axial direction, and is distributed in a 3D space. During image decryption, the robustness and security of the proposed method are further analyzed. Numerical simulation results are presented to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed optical image encryption method

  15. Development of the polarization tracking scheme for free-space quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Kunimori, Hiroo; Takeoka, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide

    2008-04-01

    Quantum cryptography is a new technique for transmitting quantum information. The information is securely transmitted due to the laws of physics. In such systems, the vehicle that transfers quantum information is a single photon. The problem with using photons is that the transmission distance is limited by the absorption of the photons by the optical fiber along which they pass. The maximum demonstrated range so far is approximately 100 km. Using free-space quantum cryptography between a ground station and a satellite is a possible way of sending quantum information farther than is possible with optical fibers. This is because there is no birefringence effect in the atmosphere. However, there is a complication in that the directions of the polarization basis between the transmitter and the receiver must coincide with each other. This polarization changes because the mobile terminals for free-space transmission continuously change their attitudes. If the transmission protocol is based on polarization, it is necessary to compensate for the change in attitude between the mobile terminals. We are developing a scheme to track the polarization basis between the transceivers. The preliminary result is presented.

  16. Implementation and Analysis Audio Steganography Used Parity Coding for Symmetric Cryptography Key Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afany Zeinata Firdaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In today's era of communication, online data transactions is increasing. Various information even more accessible, both upload and download. Because it takes a capable security system. Blowfish cryptographic equipped with Audio Steganography is one way to secure the data so that the data can not be accessed by unauthorized parties. In this study Audio Steganography technique is implemented using parity coding method that is used to send the key cryptography blowfish in e-commerce applications based on Android. The results obtained for the average computation time on stage insertion (embedding the secret message is shorter than the average computation time making phase (extracting the secret message. From the test results can also be seen that the more the number of characters pasted the greater the noise received, where the highest SNR is obtained when a character is inserted as many as 506 characters is equal to 11.9905 dB, while the lowest SNR obtained when a character is inserted as many as 2006 characters at 5,6897 dB . Keywords: audio steganograph, parity coding, embedding, extractin, cryptography blowfih.

  17. On the improvement of neural cryptography using erroneous transmitted information with error prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Ahmed M; Abbas, Hazem M

    2010-12-01

    Neural cryptography deals with the problem of "key exchange" between two neural networks using the mutual learning concept. The two networks exchange their outputs (in bits) and the key between the two communicating parties is eventually represented in the final learned weights, when the two networks are said to be synchronized. Security of neural synchronization is put at risk if an attacker is capable of synchronizing with any of the two parties during the training process. Therefore, diminishing the probability of such a threat improves the reliability of exchanging the output bits through a public channel. The synchronization with feedback algorithm is one of the existing algorithms that enhances the security of neural cryptography. This paper proposes three new algorithms to enhance the mutual learning process. They mainly depend on disrupting the attacker confidence in the exchanged outputs and input patterns during training. The first algorithm is called "Do not Trust My Partner" (DTMP), which relies on one party sending erroneous output bits, with the other party being capable of predicting and correcting this error. The second algorithm is called "Synchronization with Common Secret Feedback" (SCSFB), where inputs are kept partially secret and the attacker has to train its network on input patterns that are different from the training sets used by the communicating parties. The third algorithm is a hybrid technique combining the features of the DTMP and SCSFB. The proposed approaches are shown to outperform the synchronization with feedback algorithm in the time needed for the parties to synchronize.

  18. Authentication and Encryption Using Modified Elliptic Curve Cryptography with Particle Swarm Optimization and Cuckoo Search Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Sujatha; Padmanabhuni, Venkata Nageswara Rao; Budda, Kishor; K, Sruthi

    2018-05-01

    Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) uses two keys private key and public key and is considered as a public key cryptographic algorithm that is used for both authentication of a person and confidentiality of data. Either one of the keys is used in encryption and other in decryption depending on usage. Private key is used in encryption by the user and public key is used to identify user in the case of authentication. Similarly, the sender encrypts with the private key and the public key is used to decrypt the message in case of confidentiality. Choosing the private key is always an issue in all public key Cryptographic Algorithms such as RSA, ECC. If tiny values are chosen in random the security of the complete algorithm becomes an issue. Since the Public key is computed based on the Private Key, if they are not chosen optimally they generate infinity values. The proposed Modified Elliptic Curve Cryptography uses selection in either of the choices; the first option is by using Particle Swarm Optimization and the second option is by using Cuckoo Search Algorithm for randomly choosing the values. The proposed algorithms are developed and tested using sample database and both are found to be secured and reliable. The test results prove that the private key is chosen optimally not repetitive or tiny and the computations in public key will not reach infinity.

  19. VLSI IMPLEMENTATION OF NOVEL ROUND KEYS GENERATION SCHEME FOR CRYPTOGRAPHY APPLICATIONS BY ERROR CONTROL ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. SENTHILKUMAR

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel implementation of code based cryptography (Cryptocoding technique for multi-layer key distribution scheme is presented. VLSI chip is designed for storing information on generation of round keys. New algorithm is developed for reduced key size with optimal performance. Error Control Algorithm is employed for both generation of round keys and diffusion of non-linearity among them. Two new functions for bit inversion and its reversal are developed for cryptocoding. Probability of retrieving original key from any other round keys is reduced by diffusing nonlinear selective bit inversions on round keys. Randomized selective bit inversions are done on equal length of key bits by Round Constant Feedback Shift Register within the error correction limits of chosen code. Complexity of retrieving the original key from any other round keys is increased by optimal hardware usage. Proposed design is simulated and synthesized using VHDL coding for Spartan3E FPGA and results are shown. Comparative analysis is done between 128 bit Advanced Encryption Standard round keys and proposed round keys for showing security strength of proposed algorithm. This paper concludes that chip based multi-layer key distribution of proposed algorithm is an enhanced solution to the existing threats on cryptography algorithms.

  20. Design of secure digital communication systems using chaotic modulation, cryptography and chaotic synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, T.-I.; Liao, T.-L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a secure digital communication system based on chaotic modulation, cryptography, and chaotic synchronization techniques. The proposed system consists of a Chaotic Modulator (CM), a Chaotic Secure Transmitter (CST), a Chaotic Secure Receiver (CSR) and a Chaotic Demodulator (CDM). The CM module incorporates a chaotic system and a novel Chaotic Differential Peaks Keying (CDPK) modulation scheme to generate analog patterns corresponding to the input digital bits. The CST and CSR modules are designed such that a single scalar signal is transmitted in the public channel. Furthermore, by giving certain structural conditions of a particular class of chaotic system, the CST and the nonlinear observer-based CSR with an appropriate observer gain are constructed to synchronize with each other. These two slave systems are driven simultaneously by the transmitted signal and are designed to synchronize and generate appropriate cryptography keys for encryption and decryption purposes. In the CDM module, a nonlinear observer is designed to estimate the chaotic modulating system in the CM. A demodulation mechanism is then applied to decode the transmitted input digital bits. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is demonstrated through the numerical simulation of an illustrative communication system. Synchronization between the chaotic circuits of the transmitter and receiver modules is guaranteed through the Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, the security features of the proposed system in the event of attack by an intruder in either the time domain or the frequency domain are discussed

  1. Encrypted Objects and Decryption Processes: Problem-Solving with Functions in a Learning Environment Based on Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Tobin

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces an applied problem-solving task, set in the context of cryptography and embedded in a network of computer-based tools. This designed learning environment engaged students in a series of collaborative problem-solving activities intended to introduce the topic of functions through a set of linked representations. In a…

  2. Trichocyanines: a Red-Hair-Inspired Modular Platform for Dye-Based One-Time-Pad Molecular Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Loredana; Pezzella, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Orlando; Napolitano, Alessandra; Barone, Vincenzo; d'Ischia, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Current molecular cryptography (MoCryp) systems are almost exclusively based on DNA chemistry and reports of cryptography technologies based on other less complex chemical systems are lacking. We describe herein, as proof of concept, the prototype of the first asymmetric MoCryp system, based on an 8-compound set of a novel bioinspired class of cyanine-type dyes called trichocyanines. These novel acidichromic cyanine-type dyes inspired by red hair pigments were synthesized and characterized with the aid of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Trichocyanines consist of a modular scaffold easily accessible via an expedient condensation of 3-phenyl- or 3-methyl-2H-1,4-benzothiazines with N-dimethyl- or o-methoxyhydroxy-substituted benzaldehyde or cinnamaldehyde derivatives. The eight representative members synthesized herein can be classified as belonging to two three-state systems tunable through four different control points. This versatile dye platform can generate an expandable palette of colors and appears to be specifically suited to implement an unprecedented single-use asymmetric molecular cryptography system. With this system, we intend to pioneer the translation of digital public-key cryptography into a chemical-coding one-time-pad-like system.

  3. Hardening CISCO Devices based on Cryptography and Security Protocols - Part One: Background Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Waheed

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Network Security is a vital part of any corporate and enterprise network. Network attacks greatly compromise not only the sensitive data of the consumers but also cause outages to these networks. Thus inadequately protected networks need to be “hardened”. The hardening of network devices refers to the hardware and software components, device operating system’s features, management controls, access-list restrictions, operational configurations and above all making sure that the data and credentials are not stored or transferred in ‘plaintext’ over the network. This article investigates the use of cryptography and network protocols based on encryption, to meet the need for essential security requirements. Use of non-secure protocols, underrating and misconfigurations of management protection are reasons behind network devices not properly being hardened; hence leaving vulnerabilities for the intruders. The gap identified after conducting intense search and review of past work is used as the foundation to present solutions. When performing cryptography techniques by encrypting packets using tunnelling and security protocols, management level credentials are encrypted. These include password encryption and exceptional analysis of the emulated IOS (Internetwork Operating System. Necessary testing is carried out to evaluate an acceptable level of protection of these devices. In a virtual testing environment, security flaws are found mainly in the emulated IOS. The discoveries does not depend on the hardware or chassis of a networking device. Since routers primarily rely on its Operating System (OS, attackers focus on manipulating the command line configuration before initiating an attack. Substantial work is devoted to implementation and testing of a router based on Cryptography and Security Protocols in the border router. This is deployed at the core layer and acts as the first point of entry of any trusted and untrusted traffic. A step

  4. True random number generation from mobile telephone photo based on chaotic cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Liang; Liao Xiaofeng; Xiao Di; Xiang Tao; Zhou Qing; Duan Shukai

    2009-01-01

    A cheap, convenient and universal TRNG based on mobile telephone photo for producing random bit sequence is proposed. To settle the problem of sequential pixels and comparability, three chaos-based approaches are applied to post-process the generated binary image. The random numbers produced by three users are tested using US NIST RNG statistical test software. The experimental results indicate that the Arnold cat map is the fastest way to generate a random bit sequence and can be accepted on general PC. The 'MASK' algorithm also performs well. Finally, comparing with the TRNG of Hu et al. [Hu Y, Liao X, Wong KW, Zhou Q. A true random number generator based on mouse movement and chaotic cryptography. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2007. doi: 10.1016/j.chaos.2007.10.022] which is presented by Hu et al., many merits of the proposed TRNG in this paper has been found.

  5. A Novel Image Steganography Technique for Secured Online Transaction Using DWT and Visual Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha Devi, M. D.; ShivaKumar, K. B.

    2017-08-01

    Online payment eco system is the main target especially for cyber frauds. Therefore end to end encryption is very much needed in order to maintain the integrity of secret information related to transactions carried online. With access to payment related sensitive information, which enables lot of money transactions every day, the payment infrastructure is a major target for hackers. The proposed system highlights, an ideal approach for secure online transaction for fund transfer with a unique combination of visual cryptography and Haar based discrete wavelet transform steganography technique. This combination of data hiding technique reduces the amount of information shared between consumer and online merchant needed for successful online transaction along with providing enhanced security to customer’s account details and thereby increasing customer’s confidence preventing “Identity theft” and “Phishing”. To evaluate the effectiveness of proposed algorithm Root mean square error, Peak signal to noise ratio have been used as evaluation parameters

  6. Image encryption using fingerprint as key based on phase retrieval algorithm and public key cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tieyu; Ran, Qiwen; Yuan, Lin; Chi, Yingying; Ma, Jing

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a novel image encryption system with fingerprint used as a secret key is proposed based on the phase retrieval algorithm and RSA public key algorithm. In the system, the encryption keys include the fingerprint and the public key of RSA algorithm, while the decryption keys are the fingerprint and the private key of RSA algorithm. If the users share the fingerprint, then the system will meet the basic agreement of asymmetric cryptography. The system is also applicable for the information authentication. The fingerprint as secret key is used in both the encryption and decryption processes so that the receiver can identify the authenticity of the ciphertext by using the fingerprint in decryption process. Finally, the simulation results show the validity of the encryption scheme and the high robustness against attacks based on the phase retrieval technique.

  7. Algebra for applications cryptography, secret sharing, error-correcting, fingerprinting, compression

    CERN Document Server

    Slinko, Arkadii

    2015-01-01

    This book examines the relationship between mathematics and data in the modern world. Indeed, modern societies are awash with data which must be manipulated in many different ways: encrypted, compressed, shared between users in a prescribed manner, protected from an unauthorised access and transmitted over unreliable channels. All of these operations can be understood only by a person with knowledge of basics in algebra and number theory. This book provides the necessary background in arithmetic, polynomials, groups, fields and elliptic curves that is sufficient to understand such real-life applications as cryptography, secret sharing, error-correcting, fingerprinting and compression of information. It is the first to cover many recent developments in these topics. Based on a lecture course given to third-year undergraduates, it is self-contained with numerous worked examples and exercises provided to test understanding. It can additionally be used for self-study.

  8. Robust Public Key Cryptography — A New Cryptosystem Surviving Private Key Compromise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Cheman

    A weakness of the present-day public key cryptosystems is that these cryptosystems do not survive private-key compromise attacks resulting from an internal breach of trust. In a competitive business environment, private key compromise is a common incident that voids the strength of public key cryptosystems such as RSA and ECC. Bribing corporate employees to disclose their secret keys and inadvertently disclosing secret information are among a plethora of practical attacks that occur at the implementation level. Once a breach of trust takes place and subsequently the private key is revealed, any public key cryptosystem fails to secure electronic data in Internet communications. The revealed key may be used by an attacker to decipher the intercepted data at an intermediary router. This weakness of public key cryptography calls for an additional security measure that enables encryptions to survive private key compromise attacks.

  9. Real Time MODBUS Transmissions and Cryptography Security Designs and Enhancements of Protocol Sensitive Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Shahzad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Information technology (IT security has become a major concern due to the growing demand for information and massive development of client/server applications for various types of applications running on modern IT infrastructure. How has security been taken into account and which paradigms are necessary to minimize security issues while increasing efficiency, reducing the influence on transmissions, ensuring protocol independency and achieving substantial performance? We have found cryptography to be an absolute security mechanism for client/server architectures, and in this study, a new security design was developed with the MODBUS protocol, which is considered to offer phenomenal performance for future development and enhancement of real IT infrastructure. This study is also considered to be a complete development because security is tested in almost all ways of MODBUS communication. The computed measurements are evaluated to validate the overall development, and the results indicate a substantial improvement in security that is differentiated from conventional methods.

  10. A User Authentication Scheme Based on Elliptic Curves Cryptography for Wireless Ad Hoc Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huifang; Ge, Linlin; Xie, Lei

    2015-07-14

    The feature of non-infrastructure support in a wireless ad hoc network (WANET) makes it suffer from various attacks. Moreover, user authentication is the first safety barrier in a network. A mutual trust is achieved by a protocol which enables communicating parties to authenticate each other at the same time and to exchange session keys. For the resource-constrained WANET, an efficient and lightweight user authentication scheme is necessary. In this paper, we propose a user authentication scheme based on the self-certified public key system and elliptic curves cryptography for a WANET. Using the proposed scheme, an efficient two-way user authentication and secure session key agreement can be achieved. Security analysis shows that our proposed scheme is resilient to common known attacks. In addition, the performance analysis shows that our proposed scheme performs similar or better compared with some existing user authentication schemes.

  11. Image size invariant visual cryptography for general access structures subject to display quality constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai-Hui; Chiu, Pei-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Conventional visual cryptography (VC) suffers from a pixel-expansion problem, or an uncontrollable display quality problem for recovered images, and lacks a general approach to construct visual secret sharing schemes for general access structures. We propose a general and systematic approach to address these issues without sophisticated codebook design. This approach can be used for binary secret images in non-computer-aided decryption environments. To avoid pixel expansion, we design a set of column vectors to encrypt secret pixels rather than using the conventional VC-based approach. We begin by formulating a mathematic model for the VC construction problem to find the column vectors for the optimal VC construction, after which we develop a simulated-annealing-based algorithm to solve the problem. The experimental results show that the display quality of the recovered image is superior to that of previous papers.

  12. Optical asymmetric cryptography based on elliptical polarized light linear truncation and a numerical reconstruction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Shen, Xueju; Wang, Zhisong; Zhao, Cheng

    2014-06-20

    We demonstrate a novel optical asymmetric cryptosystem based on the principle of elliptical polarized light linear truncation and a numerical reconstruction technique. The device of an array of linear polarizers is introduced to achieve linear truncation on the spatially resolved elliptical polarization distribution during image encryption. This encoding process can be characterized as confusion-based optical cryptography that involves no Fourier lens and diffusion operation. Based on the Jones matrix formalism, the intensity transmittance for this truncation is deduced to perform elliptical polarized light reconstruction based on two intensity measurements. Use of a quick response code makes the proposed cryptosystem practical, with versatile key sensitivity and fault tolerance. Both simulation and preliminary experimental results that support theoretical analysis are presented. An analysis of the resistance of the proposed method on a known public key attack is also provided.

  13. Full-field implementation of a perfect eavesdropper on a quantum cryptography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Skaar, Johannes; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim

    2011-06-14

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two remote parties to grow a shared secret key. Its security is founded on the principles of quantum mechanics, but in reality it significantly relies on the physical implementation. Technological imperfections of QKD systems have been previously explored, but no attack on an established QKD connection has been realized so far. Here we show the first full-field implementation of a complete attack on a running QKD connection. An installed eavesdropper obtains the entire 'secret' key, while none of the parameters monitored by the legitimate parties indicate a security breach. This confirms that non-idealities in physical implementations of QKD can be fully practically exploitable, and must be given increased scrutiny if quantum cryptography is to become highly secure.

  14. An efficient RFID authentication protocol to enhance patient medication safety using elliptic curve cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zezhong; Qi, Qingqing

    2014-05-01

    Medication errors are very dangerous even fatal since it could cause serious even fatal harm to patients. In order to reduce medication errors, automated patient medication systems using the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology have been used in many hospitals. The data transmitted in those medication systems is very important and sensitive. In the past decade, many security protocols have been proposed to ensure its secure transition attracted wide attention. Due to providing mutual authentication between the medication server and the tag, the RFID authentication protocol is considered as the most important security protocols in those systems. In this paper, we propose a RFID authentication protocol to enhance patient medication safety using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC). The analysis shows the proposed protocol could overcome security weaknesses in previous protocols and has better performance. Therefore, the proposed protocol is very suitable for automated patient medication systems.

  15. Synchronization of random bit generators based on coupled chaotic lasers and application to cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Ido; Butkovski, Maria; Peleg, Yitzhak; Zigzag, Meital; Aviad, Yaara; Reidler, Igor; Rosenbluh, Michael; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2010-08-16

    Random bit generators (RBGs) constitute an important tool in cryptography, stochastic simulations and secure communications. The later in particular has some difficult requirements: high generation rate of unpredictable bit strings and secure key-exchange protocols over public channels. Deterministic algorithms generate pseudo-random number sequences at high rates, however, their unpredictability is limited by the very nature of their deterministic origin. Recently, physical RBGs based on chaotic semiconductor lasers were shown to exceed Gbit/s rates. Whether secure synchronization of two high rate physical RBGs is possible remains an open question. Here we propose a method, whereby two fast RBGs based on mutually coupled chaotic lasers, are synchronized. Using information theoretic analysis we demonstrate security against a powerful computational eavesdropper, capable of noiseless amplification, where all parameters are publicly known. The method is also extended to secure synchronization of a small network of three RBGs.

  16. Upper bounds for the security of two distributed-phase reference protocols of quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branciard, Cyril; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    The differential-phase-shift (DPS) and the coherent-one-way (COW) are among the most practical protocols for quantum cryptography, and are therefore the object of fast-paced experimental developments. The assessment of their security is also a challenge for theorists: the existing tools, that allow to prove security against the most general attacks, do not apply to these two protocols in any straightforward way. We present new upper bounds for their security in the limit of large distances (d∼>50 km with typical values in optical fibers) by considering a large class of collective attacks, namely those in which the adversary attaches ancillary quantum systems to each pulse or to each pair of pulses. We introduce also two modified versions of the COW protocol, which may prove more robust than the original one

  17. A fully automated entanglement-based quantum cryptography system for telecom fiber networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treiber, Alexander; Ferrini, Daniele; Huebel, Hannes; Zeilinger, Anton; Poppe, Andreas; Loruenser, Thomas; Querasser, Edwin; Matyus, Thomas; Hentschel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We present in this paper a quantum key distribution (QKD) system based on polarization entanglement for use in telecom fibers. A QKD exchange up to 50 km was demonstrated in the laboratory with a secure key rate of 550 bits s -1 . The system is compact and portable with a fully automated start-up, and stabilization modules for polarization, synchronization and photon coupling allow hands-off operation. Stable and reliable key exchange in a deployed optical fiber of 16 km length was demonstrated. In this fiber network, we achieved over 2 weeks an automatic key generation with an average key rate of 2000 bits s -1 without manual intervention. During this period, the system had an average entanglement visibility of 93%, highlighting the technical level and stability achieved for entanglement-based quantum cryptography.

  18. Optical asymmetric cryptography based on amplitude reconstruction of elliptically polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jianjun; Shen, Xueju; Lei, Ming

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel optical asymmetric image encryption method based on amplitude reconstruction of elliptically polarized light, which is free from silhouette problem. The original image is analytically separated into two phase-only masks firstly, and then the two masks are encoded into amplitudes of the orthogonal polarization components of an elliptically polarized light. Finally, the elliptically polarized light propagates through a linear polarizer, and the output intensity distribution is recorded by a CCD camera to obtain the ciphertext. The whole encryption procedure could be implemented by using commonly used optical elements, and it combines diffusion process and confusion process. As a result, the proposed method achieves high robustness against iterative-algorithm-based attacks. Simulation results are presented to prove the validity of the proposed cryptography.

  19. Effect of imperfect Faraday mirrors on the security of a Faraday–Michelson quantum cryptography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei-Long; Gao, Ming; Ma, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The one-way Faraday–Michelson system is a very useful practical quantum cryptography system where Faraday mirrors (FMs) play an important role. In this paper we analyze the security of this system against imperfect FMs. We consider the security loophole caused by imperfect FMs in Alice’s and Bob’s security zones. Then we implement a passive FM attack in this system. By changing the values of the imperfection parameters of Alice’s FMs, we calculate the quantum bit error rate between Alice and Bob induced by Eve and the probability that Eve obtains outcomes successfully. It is shown that the imperfection of one of Alice’s two FMs makes the system sensitive to an attack. Finally we give a modified key rate as a function of the FM imperfections. The security analysis indicates that both Alice’s and Bob’s imperfect FMs can compromise the secure key. (paper)

  20. Separable Reversible Data Hiding in Encrypted Signals with Public Key Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Liang Tai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose separable reversible data hiding in an encrypted signal with public key cryptography. In our separable framework, the image owner encrypts the original image by using a public key. On receipt of the encrypted signal, the data-hider embeds data in it by using a data-hiding key. The image decryption and data extraction are independent and separable at the receiver side. Even though the receiver, who has only the data-hiding key, does not learn about the decrypted content, he can extract data from the received marked encrypted signal. However, the receiver who has only the private key cannot extract the embedded data, but he can directly decrypt the received marked encrypted signal to obtain the original image without any error. Compared with other schemes using a cipher stream to encrypt the image, the proposed scheme is more appropriate for cloud services without degrading the security level.

  1. All-optical cryptography of M-QAM formats by using two-dimensional spectrally sliced keys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbade, Marcelo L F; Cvijetic, Milorad; Messani, Carlos A; Alves, Cleiton J; Tenenbaum, Stefan

    2015-05-10

    There has been an increased interest in enhancing the security of optical communications systems and networks. All-optical cryptography methods have been considered as an alternative to electronic data encryption. In this paper we propose and verify the use of a novel all-optical scheme based on cryptographic keys applied on the spectral signal for encryption of the M-QAM modulated data with bit rates of up to 200 gigabits per second.

  2. Wigner representation for experiments on quantum cryptography using two-photon polarization entanglement produced in parametric down-conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, A; Guerra, S; Placido, J

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the theory of parametric down-conversion in the Wigner representation is applied to Ekert's quantum cryptography protocol. We analyse the relation between two-photon entanglement and (non-secure) quantum key distribution within the Wigner framework in the Heisenberg picture. Experiments using two-qubit polarization entanglement generated in nonlinear crystals are analysed in this formalism, along with the effects of eavesdropping attacks in the case of projective measurements

  3. Wigner representation for experiments on quantum cryptography using two-photon polarization entanglement produced in parametric down-conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado, A [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Guerra, S [Centro Asociado de la Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Placido, J [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)], E-mail: acasado@us.es

    2008-02-28

    In this paper, the theory of parametric down-conversion in the Wigner representation is applied to Ekert's quantum cryptography protocol. We analyse the relation between two-photon entanglement and (non-secure) quantum key distribution within the Wigner framework in the Heisenberg picture. Experiments using two-qubit polarization entanglement generated in nonlinear crystals are analysed in this formalism, along with the effects of eavesdropping attacks in the case of projective measurements.

  4. Quantum Information, computation and cryptography. An introductory survey of theory, technology and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benatti, Fabio; Fannes, Mark; Floreanini, Roberto; Petritis, Dimitri

    2010-01-01

    This multi-authored textbook addresses graduate students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science. No research experience is necessary. Consequently, rather than comprehensively reviewing the vast body of knowledge and literature gathered in the past twenty years, this book concentrates on a number of carefully selected aspects of quantum information theory and technology. Given the highly interdisciplinary nature of the subject, the multi-authored approach brings together different points of view from various renowned experts, providing a coherent picture of the subject matter. The book consists of ten chapters and includes examples, problems, and exercises. The first five present the mathematical tools required for a full comprehension of various aspects of quantum mechanics, classical information, and coding theory. Chapter 6 deals with the manipulation and transmission of information in the quantum realm. Chapters 7 and 8 discuss experimental implementations of quantum information ideas using photons and atoms. Finally, chapters 9 and 10 address ground-breaking applications in cryptography and computation. (orig.)

  5. Application of AVK and selective encryption in improving performance of quantum cryptography and networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhunia, C.T.

    2006-07-01

    The subject of quantum cryptography has emerged as an important area of research. Reported theoretical and practical investigations have conclusively established the reliable quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols with a higher level of security. For perfect security, the implementation of a time variant key is essential. The nature of cost and operation involved in quantum key distribution to distribute a time variant key from session to session/message to message has yet to be addressed from an implementation angle, yet it is understood to be hard with current available technology. Besides, the disadvantages of the subject quantum cryptanalysis, in the name of 'quantum cheating' and quantum error are demonstrated in the literature. This calls for an investigation for an affordable hybrid solution using QKD with conventional classical methods of key distribution to implement a time variant key. The paper proposes a hybrid solution towards this investigation. The solutions suggested will improve the performance of computer networks for secure transport of data in general. (author)

  6. Improved Image Encryption for Real-Time Application over Wireless Communication Networks using Hybrid Cryptography Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem B. Adedeji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in communication networks have enabled organization to send confidential data such as digital images over wireless networks. However, the broadcast nature of wireless communication channel has made it vulnerable to attack from eavesdroppers. We have developed a hybrid cryptography technique, and we present its application to digital images as a means of improving the security of digital image for transmission over wireless communication networks. The hybrid technique uses a combination of a symmetric (Data Encryption Standard and asymmetric (Rivest Shamir Adleman cryptographic algorithms to secure data to be transmitted between different nodes of a wireless network. Three different image samples of type jpeg, png and jpg were tested using this technique. The results obtained showed that the hybrid system encrypt the images with minimal simulation time, and high throughput. More importantly, there is no relation or information between the original images and their encrypted form, according to Shannon’s definition of perfect security, thereby making the system much more secure.

  7. Clipper Meets Apple vs. FBI—A Comparison of the Cryptography Discourses from 1993 and 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schulze

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes two cryptography discourses dealing with the question of whether governments should be able to monitor secure and encrypted communication, for example via security vulnerabilities in cryptographic systems. The Clipper chip debate of 1993 and the FBI vs. Apple case of 2016 are analyzed to infer whether these discourses show similarities in their arguments and to draw lessons from them. The study is based on the securitization framework and analyzes the social construction of security threats in political discourses. The findings are that the arguments made by the proponents of exceptional access show major continuities between the two cases. In contrast, the arguments of the critics are more diverse. The critical arguments for stronger encryption remain highly relevant, especially in the context of the Snowden revelations. The article concludes that we need to adopt a more general cyber security perspective, considering the threat of cyber crime and state hacking, when debating whether the government should be able to weaken encryption.

  8. Security Enhanced User Authentication Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks Using Elliptic Curves Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younsung Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs consist of sensors, gateways and users. Sensors are widely distributed to monitor various conditions, such as temperature, sound, speed and pressure but they have limited computational ability and energy. To reduce the resource use of sensors and enhance the security of WSNs, various user authentication protocols have been proposed. In 2011, Yeh et al. first proposed a user authentication protocol based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC for WSNs. However, it turned out that Yeh et al.’s protocol does not provide mutual authentication, perfect forward secrecy, and key agreement between the user and sensor. Later in 2013, Shi et al. proposed a new user authentication protocol that improves both security and efficiency of Yeh et al.’s protocol. However, Shi et al.’s improvement introduces other security weaknesses. In this paper, we show that Shi et al.’s improved protocol is vulnerable to session key attack, stolen smart card attack, and sensor energy exhausting attack. In addition, we propose a new, security-enhanced user authentication protocol using ECC for WSNs.

  9. Security enhanced user authentication protocol for wireless sensor networks using elliptic curves cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Younsung; Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Jiye; Jung, Jaewook; Nam, Junghyun; Won, Dongho

    2014-06-10

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) consist of sensors, gateways and users. Sensors are widely distributed to monitor various conditions, such as temperature, sound, speed and pressure but they have limited computational ability and energy. To reduce the resource use of sensors and enhance the security of WSNs, various user authentication protocols have been proposed. In 2011, Yeh et al. first proposed a user authentication protocol based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) for WSNs. However, it turned out that Yeh et al.'s protocol does not provide mutual authentication, perfect forward secrecy, and key agreement between the user and sensor. Later in 2013, Shi et al. proposed a new user authentication protocol that improves both security and efficiency of Yeh et al.'s protocol. However, Shi et al.'s improvement introduces other security weaknesses. In this paper, we show that Shi et al.'s improved protocol is vulnerable to session key attack, stolen smart card attack, and sensor energy exhausting attack. In addition, we propose a new, security-enhanced user authentication protocol using ECC for WSNs.

  10. Generalized optical angular momentum sorter and its application to high-dimensional quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Hugo; Gagnon-Bischoff, Jérémie; Mortimer, Dominic; Zhang, Yingwen; Bouchard, Frédéric; Upham, Jeremy; Grillo, Vincenzo; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-08-21

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) carried by optical beams is a useful quantity for encoding information. This form of encoding has been incorporated into various works ranging from telecommunications to quantum cryptography, most of which require methods that can rapidly process the OAM content of a beam. Among current state-of-the-art schemes that can readily acquire this information are so-called OAM sorters, which consist of devices that spatially separate the OAM components of a beam. Such devices have found numerous applications in optical communications, a field that is in constant demand for additional degrees of freedom, such as polarization and wavelength, into which information can also be encoded. Here, we report the implementation of a device capable of sorting a beam based on its OAM and polarization content, which could be of use in works employing both of these degrees of freedom as information channels. After characterizing our fabricated device, we demonstrate how it can be used for quantum communications via a quantum key distribution protocol.

  11. Deciphering the language of nature: cryptography, secrecy, and alterity in Francis Bacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clody, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    The essay argues that Francis Bacon's considerations of parables and cryptography reflect larger interpretative concerns of his natural philosophic project. Bacon describes nature as having a language distinct from those of God and man, and, in so doing, establishes a central problem of his natural philosophy—namely, how can the language of nature be accessed through scientific representation? Ultimately, Bacon's solution relies on a theory of differential and duplicitous signs that conceal within them the hidden voice of nature, which is best recognized in the natural forms of efficient causality. The "alphabet of nature"—those tables of natural occurrences—consequently plays a central role in his program, as it renders nature's language susceptible to a process and decryption that mirrors the model of the bilateral cipher. It is argued that while the writing of Bacon's natural philosophy strives for literality, its investigative process preserves a space for alterity within scientific representation, that is made accessible to those with the interpretative key.

  12. Elliptic Curve Cryptography-Based Authentication with Identity Protection for Smart Grids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhang

    Full Text Available In a smart grid, the power service provider enables the expected power generation amount to be measured according to current power consumption, thus stabilizing the power system. However, the data transmitted over smart grids are not protected, and then suffer from several types of security threats and attacks. Thus, a robust and efficient authentication protocol should be provided to strength the security of smart grid networks. As the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system provides the security protection between the control center and substations in most smart grid environments, we focus on how to secure the communications between the substations and smart appliances. Existing security approaches fail to address the performance-security balance. In this study, we suggest a mitigation authentication protocol based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography with privacy protection by using a tamper-resistant device at the smart appliance side to achieve a delicate balance between performance and security of smart grids. The proposed protocol provides some attractive features such as identity protection, mutual authentication and key agreement. Finally, we demonstrate the completeness of the proposed protocol using the Gong-Needham-Yahalom logic.

  13. Elliptic Curve Cryptography-Based Authentication with Identity Protection for Smart Grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Tang, Shanyu; Luo, He

    2016-01-01

    In a smart grid, the power service provider enables the expected power generation amount to be measured according to current power consumption, thus stabilizing the power system. However, the data transmitted over smart grids are not protected, and then suffer from several types of security threats and attacks. Thus, a robust and efficient authentication protocol should be provided to strength the security of smart grid networks. As the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system provides the security protection between the control center and substations in most smart grid environments, we focus on how to secure the communications between the substations and smart appliances. Existing security approaches fail to address the performance-security balance. In this study, we suggest a mitigation authentication protocol based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography with privacy protection by using a tamper-resistant device at the smart appliance side to achieve a delicate balance between performance and security of smart grids. The proposed protocol provides some attractive features such as identity protection, mutual authentication and key agreement. Finally, we demonstrate the completeness of the proposed protocol using the Gong-Needham-Yahalom logic.

  14. System Level Design of Reconfigurable Server Farms Using Elliptic Curve Cryptography Processor Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangook Moon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As today’s hardware architecture becomes more and more complicated, it is getting harder to modify or improve the microarchitecture of a design in register transfer level (RTL. Consequently, traditional methods we have used to develop a design are not capable of coping with complex designs. In this paper, we suggest a way of designing complex digital logic circuits with a soft and advanced type of SystemVerilog at an electronic system level. We apply the concept of design-and-reuse with a high level of abstraction to implement elliptic curve crypto-processor server farms. With the concept of the superior level of abstraction to the RTL used with the traditional HDL design, we successfully achieved the soft implementation of the crypto-processor server farms as well as robust test bench code with trivial effort in the same simulation environment. Otherwise, it could have required error-prone Verilog simulations for the hardware IPs and other time-consuming jobs such as C/SystemC verification for the software, sacrificing more time and effort. In the design of the elliptic curve cryptography processor engine, we propose a 3X faster GF(2m serial multiplication architecture.

  15. An Interoperability Consideration in Selecting Domain Parameters for Elliptic Curve Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Will (Technical Monitor); Eddy, Wesley M.

    2005-01-01

    Elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) will be an important technology for electronic privacy and authentication in the near future. There are many published specifications for elliptic curve cryptosystems, most of which contain detailed descriptions of the process for the selection of domain parameters. Selecting strong domain parameters ensures that the cryptosystem is robust to attacks. Due to a limitation in several published algorithms for doubling points on elliptic curves, some ECC implementations may produce incorrect, inconsistent, and incompatible results if domain parameters are not carefully chosen under a criterion that we describe. Few documents specify the addition or doubling of points in such a manner as to avoid this problematic situation. The safety criterion we present is not listed in any ECC specification we are aware of, although several other guidelines for domain selection are discussed in the literature. We provide a simple example of how a set of domain parameters not meeting this criterion can produce catastrophic results, and outline a simple means of testing curve parameters for interoperable safety over doubling.

  16. Compilation Techniques Specific for a Hardware Cryptography-Embedded Multimedia Mobile Processor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masa-aki FUKASE

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of single chip VLSI processors is the key technology of ever growing pervasive computing to answer overall demands for usability, mobility, speed, security, etc. We have so far developed a hardware cryptography-embedded multimedia mobile processor architecture, HCgorilla. Since HCgorilla integrates a wide range of techniques from architectures to applications and languages, one-sided design approach is not always useful. HCgorilla needs more complicated strategy, that is, hardware/software (H/S codesign. Thus, we exploit the software support of HCgorilla composed of a Java interface and parallelizing compilers. They are assumed to be installed in servers in order to reduce the load and increase the performance of HCgorilla-embedded clients. Since compilers are the essence of software's responsibility, we focus in this article on our recent results about the design, specifications, and prototyping of parallelizing compilers for HCgorilla. The parallelizing compilers are composed of a multicore compiler and a LIW compiler. They are specified to abstract parallelism from executable serial codes or the Java interface output and output the codes executable in parallel by HCgorilla. The prototyping compilers are written in Java. The evaluation by using an arithmetic test program shows the reasonability of the prototyping compilers compared with hand compilers.

  17. Composite Field Multiplier based on Look-Up Table for Elliptic Curve Cryptography Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa W. Paryasto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Implementing a secure cryptosystem requires operations involving hundreds of bits. One of the most recommended algorithm is Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC. The complexity of elliptic curve algorithms and parameters with hundreds of bits requires specific design and implementation strategy. The design architecture must be customized according to security requirement, available resources and parameter choices. In this work we propose the use of composite field to implement finite field multiplication for ECC implementation. We use 299-bit keylength represented in GF((21323 instead of in GF(2299. Composite field multiplier can be implemented using different multiplier for ground-field and for extension field. In this paper, LUT is used for multiplication in the ground-field and classic multiplieris used for the extension field multiplication. A generic architecture for the multiplier is presented. Implementation is done with VHDL with the target device Altera DE2. The work in this paper uses the simplest algorithm to confirm the idea that by dividing field into composite, use different multiplier for base and extension field would give better trade-off for time and area. This work will be the beginning of our more advanced further research that implements composite-field using Mastrovito Hybrid, KOA and LUT.

  18. Composite Field Multiplier based on Look-Up Table for Elliptic Curve Cryptography Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa W. Paryasto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Implementing a secure cryptosystem requires operations involving hundreds of bits. One of the most recommended algorithm is Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC. The complexity of elliptic curve algorithms and parameters with hundreds of bits requires specific design and implementation strategy. The design architecture must be customized according to security requirement, available resources and parameter choices. In this work we propose the use of composite field to implement finite field multiplication for ECC implementation. We use 299-bit keylength represented in GF((21323 instead of in GF(2299. Composite field multiplier can be implemented using different multiplier for ground-field and for extension field. In this paper, LUT is used for multiplication in the ground-field and classic multiplieris used for the extension field multiplication. A generic architecture for the multiplier is presented. Implementation is done with VHDL with the target device Altera DE2. The work in this paper uses the simplest algorithm to confirm the idea that by dividing field into composite, use different multiplier for base and extension field would give better trade-off for time and area. This work will be the beginning of our more advanced further research that implements composite-field using Mastrovito Hybrid, KOA and LUT.

  19. Multiple Schemes for Mobile Payment Authentication Using QR Code and Visual Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available QR code (quick response code is used due to its beneficial properties, especially in the mobile payment field. However, there exists an inevitable risk in the transaction process. It is not easily perceived that the attacker tampers with or replaces the QR code that contains merchant’s beneficiary account. Thus, it is of great urgency to conduct authentication of QR code. In this study, we propose a novel mechanism based on visual cryptography scheme (VCS and aesthetic QR code, which contains three primary schemes for different concealment levels. The main steps of these schemes are as follows. Firstly, one original QR code is split into two shadows using VC multiple rules; secondly, the two shadows are embedded into the same background image, respectively, and the embedded results are fused with the same carrier QR code, respectively, using XOR mechanism of RS and QR code error correction mechanism. Finally, the two aesthetic QR codes can be stacked precisely and the original QR code is restored according to the defined VCS. Experiments corresponding to three proposed schemes are conducted and demonstrate the feasibility and security of the mobile payment authentication, the significant improvement of the concealment for the shadows in QR code, and the diversity of mobile payment authentication.

  20. Lightweight Data Aggregation Scheme against Internal Attackers in Smart Grid Using Elliptic Curve Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debiao He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances of Internet and microelectronics technologies have led to the concept of smart grid which has been a widespread concern for industry, governments, and academia. The openness of communications in the smart grid environment makes the system vulnerable to different types of attacks. The implementation of secure communication and the protection of consumers’ privacy have become challenging issues. The data aggregation scheme is an important technique for preserving consumers’ privacy because it can stop the leakage of a specific consumer’s data. To satisfy the security requirements of practical applications, a lot of data aggregation schemes were presented over the last several years. However, most of them suffer from security weaknesses or have poor performances. To reduce computation cost and achieve better security, we construct a lightweight data aggregation scheme against internal attackers in the smart grid environment using Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC. Security analysis of our proposed approach shows that it is provably secure and can provide confidentiality, authentication, and integrity. Performance analysis of the proposed scheme demonstrates that both computation and communication costs of the proposed scheme are much lower than the three previous schemes. As a result of these aforementioned benefits, the proposed lightweight data aggregation scheme is more practical for deployment in the smart grid environment.

  1. A Distributed Public Key Infrastructure Based on Threshold Cryptography for the HiiMap Next Generation Internet Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Hanka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a security extension for the HiiMap Next Generation Internet Architecture is presented. We regard a public key infrastructure which is integrated into the mapping infrastructure of the locator/identifier-split addressing scheme. The security approach is based on Threshold Cryptography which enables a sharing of keys among the mapping servers. Hence, a more trustworthy and fair approach for a Next Generation Internet Architecture as compared to the state of the art approach is fostered. Additionally, we give an evaluation based on IETF AAA recommendations for security-related systems.

  2. Quantum cryptography: Theoretical protocols for quantum key distribution and tests of selected commercial QKD systems in commercial fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacak, Monika; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Piotr; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz

    2016-06-01

    The overview of the current status of quantum cryptography is given in regard to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, implemented both on nonentangled and entangled flying qubits. Two commercial R&D platforms of QKD systems are described (the Clavis II platform by idQuantique implemented on nonentangled photons and the EPR S405 Quelle platform by AIT based on entangled photons) and tested for feasibility of their usage in commercial TELECOM fiber metropolitan networks. The comparison of systems efficiency, stability and resistivity against noise and hacker attacks is given with some suggestion toward system improvement, along with assessment of two models of QKD.

  3. Examination of China's performance and thematic evolution in quantum cryptography research using quantitative and computational techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas V Olijnyk

    Full Text Available This study performed two phases of analysis to shed light on the performance and thematic evolution of China's quantum cryptography (QC research. First, large-scale research publication metadata derived from QC research published from 2001-2017 was used to examine the research performance of China relative to that of global peers using established quantitative and qualitative measures. Second, this study identified the thematic evolution of China's QC research using co-word cluster network analysis, a computational science mapping technique. The results from the first phase indicate that over the past 17 years, China's performance has evolved dramatically, placing it in a leading position. Among the most significant findings is the exponential rate at which all of China's performance indicators (i.e., Publication Frequency, citation score, H-index are growing. China's H-index (a normalized indicator has surpassed all other countries' over the last several years. The second phase of analysis shows how China's main research focus has shifted among several QC themes, including quantum-key-distribution, photon-optical communication, network protocols, and quantum entanglement with an emphasis on applied research. Several themes were observed across time periods (e.g., photons, quantum-key-distribution, secret-messages, quantum-optics, quantum-signatures; some themes disappeared over time (e.g., computer-networks, attack-strategies, bell-state, polarization-state, while others emerged more recently (e.g., quantum-entanglement, decoy-state, unitary-operation. Findings from the first phase of analysis provide empirical evidence that China has emerged as the global driving force in QC. Considering China is the premier driving force in global QC research, findings from the second phase of analysis provide an understanding of China's QC research themes, which can provide clarity into how QC technologies might take shape. QC and science and technology

  4. Examination of China's performance and thematic evolution in quantum cryptography research using quantitative and computational techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijnyk, Nicholas V

    2018-01-01

    This study performed two phases of analysis to shed light on the performance and thematic evolution of China's quantum cryptography (QC) research. First, large-scale research publication metadata derived from QC research published from 2001-2017 was used to examine the research performance of China relative to that of global peers using established quantitative and qualitative measures. Second, this study identified the thematic evolution of China's QC research using co-word cluster network analysis, a computational science mapping technique. The results from the first phase indicate that over the past 17 years, China's performance has evolved dramatically, placing it in a leading position. Among the most significant findings is the exponential rate at which all of China's performance indicators (i.e., Publication Frequency, citation score, H-index) are growing. China's H-index (a normalized indicator) has surpassed all other countries' over the last several years. The second phase of analysis shows how China's main research focus has shifted among several QC themes, including quantum-key-distribution, photon-optical communication, network protocols, and quantum entanglement with an emphasis on applied research. Several themes were observed across time periods (e.g., photons, quantum-key-distribution, secret-messages, quantum-optics, quantum-signatures); some themes disappeared over time (e.g., computer-networks, attack-strategies, bell-state, polarization-state), while others emerged more recently (e.g., quantum-entanglement, decoy-state, unitary-operation). Findings from the first phase of analysis provide empirical evidence that China has emerged as the global driving force in QC. Considering China is the premier driving force in global QC research, findings from the second phase of analysis provide an understanding of China's QC research themes, which can provide clarity into how QC technologies might take shape. QC and science and technology policy researchers

  5. Selected Areas in Cryptography - SAC 2013 : 20th International Conference, Burnaby BC, Canada, August 14-16, 2013 : Revised Selected Papers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, T.; Lauter, K.; Lisonek, P.

    2014-01-01

    This book constitutes the proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Selected Areas in Cryptography, SAC 2013, held in Burnaby, Canada, in August 2013. The 26 papers presented in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 98 submissions. They are organized in topical sections

  6. Number Theory in Science and Communication With Applications in Cryptography, Physics, Digital Information, Computing, and Self-Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    "Number Theory in Science and Communication" is a well-known introduction for non-mathematicians to this fascinating and useful branch of applied mathematics . It stresses intuitive understanding rather than abstract theory and highlights important concepts such as continued fractions, the golden ratio, quadratic residues and Chinese remainders, trapdoor functions, pseudoprimes and primitive elements. Their applications to problems in the real world are one of the main themes of the book. This revised fifth edition is augmented by recent advances in coding theory, permutations and derangements and a chapter in quantum cryptography. From reviews of earlier editions – "I continue to find [Schroeder’s] Number Theory a goldmine of valuable information. It is a marvellous book, in touch with the most recent applications of number theory and written with great clarity and humor.’ Philip Morrison (Scientific American) "A light-hearted and readable volume with a wide range of applications to which the author ha...

  7. Information verification cryptosystem using one-time keys based on double random phase encoding and public-key cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tieyu; Ran, Qiwen; Yuan, Lin; Chi, Yingying; Ma, Jing

    2016-08-01

    A novel image encryption system based on double random phase encoding (DRPE) and RSA public-key algorithm is proposed. The main characteristic of the system is that each encryption process produces a new decryption key (even for the same plaintext), thus the encryption system conforms to the feature of the one-time pad (OTP) cryptography. The other characteristic of the system is the use of fingerprint key. Only with the rightful authorization will the true decryption be obtained, otherwise the decryption will result in noisy images. So the proposed system can be used to determine whether the ciphertext is falsified by attackers. In addition, the system conforms to the basic agreement of asymmetric cryptosystem (ACS) due to the combination with the RSA public-key algorithm. The simulation results show that the encryption scheme has high robustness against the existing attacks.

  8. Analysis of the width-w non-adjacent form in conjunction with hyperelliptic curve cryptography and with lattices☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this work the number of occurrences of a fixed non-zero digit in the width-w non-adjacent forms of all elements of a lattice in some region (e.g. a ball) is analysed. As bases, expanding endomorphisms with eigenvalues of the same absolute value are allowed. Applications of the main result are on numeral systems with an algebraic integer as base. Those come from efficient scalar multiplication methods (Frobenius-and-add methods) in hyperelliptic curves cryptography, and the result is needed for analysing the running time of such algorithms. The counting result itself is an asymptotic formula, where its main term coincides with the full block length analysis. In its second order term a periodic fluctuation is exhibited. The proof follows Delange’s method. PMID:23805020

  9. An Advanced Encryption Standard Powered Mutual Authentication Protocol Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography for RFID, Proven on WISP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaauldin Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Information in patients’ medical histories is subject to various security and privacy concerns. Meanwhile, any modification or error in a patient’s medical data may cause serious or even fatal harm. To protect and transfer this valuable and sensitive information in a secure manner, radio-frequency identification (RFID technology has been widely adopted in healthcare systems and is being deployed in many hospitals. In this paper, we propose a mutual authentication protocol for RFID tags based on elliptic curve cryptography and advanced encryption standard. Unlike existing authentication protocols, which only send the tag ID securely, the proposed protocol could also send the valuable data stored in the tag in an encrypted pattern. The proposed protocol is not simply a theoretical construct; it has been coded and tested on an experimental RFID tag. The proposed scheme achieves mutual authentication in just two steps and satisfies all the essential security requirements of RFID-based healthcare systems.

  10. An Enhanced Biometric Based Authentication with Key-Agreement Protocol for Multi-Server Architecture Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavalapati Goutham Reddy

    Full Text Available Biometric based authentication protocols for multi-server architectures have gained momentum in recent times due to advancements in wireless technologies and associated constraints. Lu et al. recently proposed a robust biometric based authentication with key agreement protocol for a multi-server environment using smart cards. They claimed that their protocol is efficient and resistant to prominent security attacks. The careful investigation of this paper proves that Lu et al.'s protocol does not provide user anonymity, perfect forward secrecy and is susceptible to server and user impersonation attacks, man-in-middle attacks and clock synchronization problems. In addition, this paper proposes an enhanced biometric based authentication with key-agreement protocol for multi-server architecture based on elliptic curve cryptography using smartcards. We proved that the proposed protocol achieves mutual authentication using Burrows-Abadi-Needham (BAN logic. The formal security of the proposed protocol is verified using the AVISPA (Automated Validation of Internet Security Protocols and Applications tool to show that our protocol can withstand active and passive attacks. The formal and informal security analyses and performance analysis demonstrates that the proposed protocol is robust and efficient compared to Lu et al.'s protocol and existing similar protocols.

  11. An Enhanced Biometric Based Authentication with Key-Agreement Protocol for Multi-Server Architecture Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Alavalapati Goutham; Das, Ashok Kumar; Odelu, Vanga; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2016-01-01

    Biometric based authentication protocols for multi-server architectures have gained momentum in recent times due to advancements in wireless technologies and associated constraints. Lu et al. recently proposed a robust biometric based authentication with key agreement protocol for a multi-server environment using smart cards. They claimed that their protocol is efficient and resistant to prominent security attacks. The careful investigation of this paper proves that Lu et al.’s protocol does not provide user anonymity, perfect forward secrecy and is susceptible to server and user impersonation attacks, man-in-middle attacks and clock synchronization problems. In addition, this paper proposes an enhanced biometric based authentication with key-agreement protocol for multi-server architecture based on elliptic curve cryptography using smartcards. We proved that the proposed protocol achieves mutual authentication using Burrows-Abadi-Needham (BAN) logic. The formal security of the proposed protocol is verified using the AVISPA (Automated Validation of Internet Security Protocols and Applications) tool to show that our protocol can withstand active and passive attacks. The formal and informal security analyses and performance analysis demonstrates that the proposed protocol is robust and efficient compared to Lu et al.’s protocol and existing similar protocols. PMID:27163786

  12. Provable Secure and Efficient Digital Rights Management Authentication Scheme Using Smart Card Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of ubiquitous computing is firstly proposed by Mark Weiser, its connotation has been extending and expanding by many scholars. In pervasive computing application environment, many kinds of small devices containing smart cart are used to communicate with others. In 2013, Yang et al. proposed an enhanced authentication scheme using smart card for digital rights management. They demonstrated that their scheme is secure enough. However, Mishra et al. pointed out that Yang et al.’s scheme suffers from the password guessing attack and the denial of service attack. Moreover, they also demonstrated that Yang et al.’s scheme is not efficient enough when the user inputs an incorrect password. In this paper, we analyze Yang et al.’s scheme again, and find that their scheme is vulnerable to the session key attack. And, there are some mistakes in their scheme. To surmount the weakness of Yang et al.’s scheme, we propose a more efficient and provable secure digital rights management authentication scheme using smart card based on elliptic curve cryptography.

  13. An Enhanced Biometric Based Authentication with Key-Agreement Protocol for Multi-Server Architecture Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Alavalapati Goutham; Das, Ashok Kumar; Odelu, Vanga; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2016-01-01

    Biometric based authentication protocols for multi-server architectures have gained momentum in recent times due to advancements in wireless technologies and associated constraints. Lu et al. recently proposed a robust biometric based authentication with key agreement protocol for a multi-server environment using smart cards. They claimed that their protocol is efficient and resistant to prominent security attacks. The careful investigation of this paper proves that Lu et al.'s protocol does not provide user anonymity, perfect forward secrecy and is susceptible to server and user impersonation attacks, man-in-middle attacks and clock synchronization problems. In addition, this paper proposes an enhanced biometric based authentication with key-agreement protocol for multi-server architecture based on elliptic curve cryptography using smartcards. We proved that the proposed protocol achieves mutual authentication using Burrows-Abadi-Needham (BAN) logic. The formal security of the proposed protocol is verified using the AVISPA (Automated Validation of Internet Security Protocols and Applications) tool to show that our protocol can withstand active and passive attacks. The formal and informal security analyses and performance analysis demonstrates that the proposed protocol is robust and efficient compared to Lu et al.'s protocol and existing similar protocols.

  14. About approximation of integer factorization problem by the combination fixed-point iteration method and Bayesian rounding for quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, Yuri; Khachay, Michael; Pljonkin, Anton

    2018-04-01

    We describe the possibility of employing the special case of the 3-SAT problem stemming from the well known integer factorization problem for the quantum cryptography. It is known, that for every instance of our 3-SAT setting the given 3-CNF is satisfiable by a unique truth assignment, and the goal is to find this assignment. Since the complexity status of the factorization problem is still undefined, development of approximation algorithms and heuristics adopts interest of numerous researchers. One of promising approaches to construction of approximation techniques is based on real-valued relaxation of the given 3-CNF followed by minimizing of the appropriate differentiable loss function, and subsequent rounding of the fractional minimizer obtained. Actually, algorithms developed this way differ by the rounding scheme applied on their final stage. We propose a new rounding scheme based on Bayesian learning. The article shows that the proposed method can be used to determine the security in quantum key distribution systems. In the quantum distribution the Shannon rules is applied and the factorization problem is paramount when decrypting secret keys.

  15. Distinct galactofuranose antigens in the cell wall and culture supernatants as a means to differentiate Fusarium from AspergillusspeciesAnnegret

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiedemann, Annegret; Kakoschke, Tamara Katharina; Speth, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    tDetection of carbohydrate antigens is an important means for diagnosis of invasive fungal infections. Fordiagnosis of systemic Aspergillus infections, galactomannan is commonly used, the core antigenic struc-ture of which consists of chains of several galactofuranose moieties. In this study, we ....... fumigatus and Fusar-ium hyphae in immunohistology. Moreover, since Fusarium releases the AB135-8 antigen, it appears tobe a promising target antigen for a serological detection of Fusarium infections....

  16. Examination of China’s performance and thematic evolution in quantum cryptography research using quantitative and computational techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This study performed two phases of analysis to shed light on the performance and thematic evolution of China’s quantum cryptography (QC) research. First, large-scale research publication metadata derived from QC research published from 2001–2017 was used to examine the research performance of China relative to that of global peers using established quantitative and qualitative measures. Second, this study identified the thematic evolution of China’s QC research using co-word cluster network analysis, a computational science mapping technique. The results from the first phase indicate that over the past 17 years, China’s performance has evolved dramatically, placing it in a leading position. Among the most significant findings is the exponential rate at which all of China’s performance indicators (i.e., Publication Frequency, citation score, H-index) are growing. China’s H-index (a normalized indicator) has surpassed all other countries’ over the last several years. The second phase of analysis shows how China’s main research focus has shifted among several QC themes, including quantum-key-distribution, photon-optical communication, network protocols, and quantum entanglement with an emphasis on applied research. Several themes were observed across time periods (e.g., photons, quantum-key-distribution, secret-messages, quantum-optics, quantum-signatures); some themes disappeared over time (e.g., computer-networks, attack-strategies, bell-state, polarization-state), while others emerged more recently (e.g., quantum-entanglement, decoy-state, unitary-operation). Findings from the first phase of analysis provide empirical evidence that China has emerged as the global driving force in QC. Considering China is the premier driving force in global QC research, findings from the second phase of analysis provide an understanding of China’s QC research themes, which can provide clarity into how QC technologies might take shape. QC and science and technology

  17. Analysis of the width-[Formula: see text] non-adjacent form in conjunction with hyperelliptic curve cryptography and with lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Daniel

    2013-06-17

    In this work the number of occurrences of a fixed non-zero digit in the width-[Formula: see text] non-adjacent forms of all elements of a lattice in some region (e.g. a ball) is analysed. As bases, expanding endomorphisms with eigenvalues of the same absolute value are allowed. Applications of the main result are on numeral systems with an algebraic integer as base. Those come from efficient scalar multiplication methods (Frobenius-and-add methods) in hyperelliptic curves cryptography, and the result is needed for analysing the running time of such algorithms. The counting result itself is an asymptotic formula, where its main term coincides with the full block length analysis. In its second order term a periodic fluctuation is exhibited. The proof follows Delange's method.

  18. A Theoretical and Experimental Comparison of One Time Pad Cryptography using Key and Plaintext Insertion and Transposition (KPIT and Key Coloumnar Transposition (KCT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryo Utomo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One Time Pad (OTP is a cryptographic algorithm that is quite easy to be implemented. This algorithm works by converting plaintext and key into decimal then converting into binary number and calculating Exclusive-OR logic. In this paper, the authors try to make the comparison of OTP cryptography using KPI and KCT so that the ciphertext will be generated more difficult to be known. In the Key and Plaintext Insertion (KPI Method, we modify the OTP algorithm by adding the key insertion in the plaintext that has been splitted. Meanwhile in the Key Coloumnar Transposition (KCT Method, we modify the OTP algorithm by dividing the key into some parts in matrix of rows and coloumns. Implementation of the algorithms using PHP programming language.

  19. An Improved Digital Signature Protocol to Multi-User Broadcast Authentication Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Bashirpour

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks (WSNs, users can use broadcast authentication mechanisms to connect to the target network and disseminate their messages within the network. Since data transfer for sensor networks is wireless, as a result, attackers can easily eavesdrop deployed sensor nodes and the data sent between them or modify the content of eavesdropped data and inject false data into the sensor network. Hence, the implementation of the message authentication mechanisms (in order to avoid changes and injecting messages into the network of wireless sensor networks is essential. In this paper, we present an improved protocol based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC to accelerate authentication of multi-user message broadcasting. In comparison with previous ECC-based schemes, complexity and computational overhead of proposed scheme is significantly decreased. Also, the proposed scheme supports user anonymity, which is an important property in broadcast authentication schemes for WSNs to preserve user privacy and user untracking.

  20. Fault Analysis in Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Joye, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s researchers noticed that radioactive particles produced by elements naturally present in packaging material could cause bits to flip in sensitive areas of electronic chips. Research into the effect of cosmic rays on semiconductors, an area of particular interest in the aerospace industry, led to methods of hardening electronic devices designed for harsh environments. Ultimately various mechanisms for fault creation and propagation were discovered, and in particular it was noted that many cryptographic algorithms succumb to so-called fault attacks. Preventing fault attacks without

  1. Small circuits for cryptography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Draelos, Timothy John; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Miller, Russell D.; Anderson, William Erik

    2005-10-01

    This report examines a number of hardware circuit design issues associated with implementing certain functions in FPGA and ASIC technologies. Here we show circuit designs for AES and SHA-1 that have an extremely small hardware footprint, yet show reasonably good performance characteristics as compared to the state of the art designs found in the literature. Our AES performance numbers are fueled by an optimized composite field S-box design for the Stratix chipset. Our SHA-1 designs use register packing and feedback functionalities of the Stratix LE, which reduce the logic element usage by as much as 72% as compared to other SHA-1 designs.

  2. Cryptography with chaotic mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Luiz P.L. de; Sobottka, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    We propose a cryptosystem based on one-dimensional chaotic maps of the form H p (x)=r p -1 0G0r p (x) defined in the interval [0, 10 p ) for a positive integer parameter p, where G(x)=10x(mod10) and r p (x)= p √(x), which is a topological conjugacy between G and the shift map σ on the space Σ of the sequences with 10 symbols. There are three advantages in comparison with the recently proposed cryptosystem based on chaotic logistic maps F μ (x)=μx(1-x) with 3 p is always chaotic for all parameters p, (b) the knowledge of an ergodic measure allows assignments of the alphabetic symbols to equiprobable sites of H p 's domain and (c) for each p, the security of the cryptosystem is manageable against brute force attacks

  3. Optical digital chaos cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Pingarrón, Álvaro; González-Marcos, Ana P.; Rivas-Moscoso, José M.; Martín-Pereda, José A.

    2007-10-01

    In this work we present a new way to mask the data in a one-user communication system when direct sequence - code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) techniques are used. The code is generated by a digital chaotic generator, originally proposed by us and previously reported for a chaos cryptographic system. It is demonstrated that if the user's data signal is encoded with a bipolar phase-shift keying (BPSK) technique, usual in DS-CDMA, it can be easily recovered from a time-frequency domain representation. To avoid this situation, a new system is presented in which a previous dispersive stage is applied to the data signal. A time-frequency domain analysis is performed, and the devices required at the transmitter and receiver end, both user-independent, are presented for the optical domain.

  4. Quantum-chaotic cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, G. L.; Ramos, R. V.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, it is presented an optical scheme for quantum key distribution employing two synchronized optoelectronic oscillators (OEO) working in the chaotic regime. The produced key depends on the chaotic dynamic, and the synchronization between Alice's and Bob's OEOs uses quantum states. An attack on the synchronization signals will disturb the synchronization of the chaotic systems increasing the error rate in the final key.

  5. Algebraic curves and cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Murty, V Kumar

    2010-01-01

    It is by now a well-known paradigm that public-key cryptosystems can be built using finite Abelian groups and that algebraic geometry provides a supply of such groups through Abelian varieties over finite fields. Of special interest are the Abelian varieties that are Jacobians of algebraic curves. All of the articles in this volume are centered on the theme of point counting and explicit arithmetic on the Jacobians of curves over finite fields. The topics covered include Schoof's \\ell-adic point counting algorithm, the p-adic algorithms of Kedlaya and Denef-Vercauteren, explicit arithmetic on

  6. Cryptography from noisy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Stephanie; Schaffner, Christian; Terhal, Barbara M

    2008-06-06

    We show how to implement cryptographic primitives based on the realistic assumption that quantum storage of qubits is noisy. We thereby consider individual-storage attacks; i.e., the dishonest party attempts to store each incoming qubit separately. Our model is similar to the model of bounded-quantum storage; however, we consider an explicit noise model inspired by present-day technology. To illustrate the power of this new model, we show that a protocol for oblivious transfer is secure for any amount of quantum-storage noise, as long as honest players can perform perfect quantum operations. Our model also allows us to show the security of protocols that cope with noise in the operations of the honest players and achieve more advanced tasks such as secure identification.

  7. Cryptography: Cracking Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerscough, Don; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an activity whose objectives are to encode and decode messages using linear functions and their inverses; to use modular arithmetic, including use of the reciprocal for simple equation solving; to analyze patterns and make and test conjectures; to communicate procedures and algorithms; and to use problem-solving strategies. (ASK)

  8. Neural Synchronization and Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    Neural networks can synchronize by learning from each other. In the case of discrete weights full synchronization is achieved in a finite number of steps. Additional networks can be trained by using the inputs and outputs generated during this process as examples. Several learning rules for both tasks are presented and analyzed. In the case of Tree Parity Machines synchronization is much faster than learning. Scaling laws for the number of steps needed for full synchronization and successful learning are derived using analytical models. They indicate that the difference between both processes can be controlled by changing the synaptic depth. In the case of bidirectional interaction the synchronization time increases proportional to the square of this parameter, but it grows exponentially, if information is transmitted in one direction only. Because of this effect neural synchronization can be used to construct a cryptographic key-exchange protocol. Here the partners benefit from mutual interaction, so that a passive attacker is usually unable to learn the generated key in time. The success probabilities of different attack methods are determined by numerical simulations and scaling laws are derived from the data. They show that the partners can reach any desired level of security by just increasing the synaptic depth. Then the complexity of a successful attack grows exponentially, but there is only a polynomial increase of the effort needed to generate a key. Further improvements of security are possible by replacing the random inputs with queries generated by the partners.

  9. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, I V; Kravtsov, K S; Kulik, S P; Molotkov, S N

    2014-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a concept of secret key exchange supported by fundamentals of quantum physics. Its perfect realization offers unconditional key security, however, known practical schemes are potentially vulnerable if the quantum channel loss exceeds a certain realization-specific bound. This discrepancy is caused by the fact that any practical photon source has a non-zero probability of emitting two or more photons at a time, while theory needs exactly one. We report an essentially different QKD scheme based on both quantum physics and theory of relativity. It works flawlessly with practical photon sources at arbitrary large channel loss. Our scheme is naturally tailored for free-space optical channels, and may be used in ground-to-satellite communications, where losses are prohibitively large and unpredictable for conventional QKD. (letters)

  10. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  11. Simple Electromagnetic Analysis in Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenek Martinasek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main principle and methods of simple electromagnetic analysis and thus provides an overview of simple electromagnetic analysis.The introductions chapters describe specific SPA attack used visual inspection of EM traces, template based attack and collision attack.After reading the article, the reader is sufficiently informed of any context of SEMA.Another aim of the article is the practical realization of SEMA which is focused on AES implementation.The visual inspection of EM trace of AES is performed step by step and the result is the determination of secret key Hamming weight.On the resulting EM trace, the Hamming weight of the secret key 1 to 8 was clearly visible.This method allows reduction from the number of possible keys for following brute force attack.

  12. Computation, cryptography, and network security

    CERN Document Server

    Rassias, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Analysis, assessment, and data management are core competencies for operation research analysts. This volume addresses a number of issues and developed methods for improving those skills. It is an outgrowth of a conference held in April 2013 at the Hellenic Military Academy, and brings together a broad variety of mathematical methods and theories with several applications. It discusses directions and pursuits of scientists that pertain to engineering sciences. It is also presents the theoretical background required for algorithms and techniques applied to a large variety of concrete problems. A number of open questions as well as new future areas are also highlighted.   This book will appeal to operations research analysts, engineers, community decision makers, academics, the military community, practitioners sharing the current “state-of-the-art,” and analysts from coalition partners. Topics covered include Operations Research, Games and Control Theory, Computational Number Theory and Information Securi...

  13. Experimental quantum cryptography with qutrits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröblacher, Simon; Jennewein, Thomas; Vaziri, Alipasha; Weihs, Gregor; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-05-01

    We produce two identical keys using, for the first time, entangled trinary quantum systems (qutrits) for quantum key distribution. The advantage of qutrits over the normally used binary quantum systems is an increased coding density and a higher security margin. The qutrits are encoded into the orbital angular momentum of photons, namely Laguerre Gaussian modes with azimuthal index l + 1, 0 and -1, respectively. The orbital angular momentum is controlled with phase holograms. In an Ekert-type protocol the violation of a three-dimensional Bell inequality verifies the security of the generated keys. A key is obtained with a qutrit error rate of approximately 10%.

  14. Practical Computer Security through Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, David; Twetev, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The core protocols upon which the Internet was built are insecure. Weak authentication and the lack of low level encryption services introduce vulnerabilities that propagate upwards in the network stack. Using statistics based on CERT/CC Internet security incident reports, the relative likelihood of attacks via these vulnerabilities is analyzed. The primary conclusion is that the standard UNIX BSD-based authentication system is by far the most commonly exploited weakness. Encryption of Sensitive password data and the adoption of cryptographically-based authentication protocols can greatly reduce these vulnerabilities. Basic cryptographic terminology and techniques are presented, with attention focused on the ways in which technology such as encryption and digital signatures can be used to protect against the most commonly exploited vulnerabilities. A survey of contemporary security software demonstrates that tools based on cryptographic techniques, such as Kerberos, ssh, and PGP, are readily available and effectively close many of the most serious security holes. Nine practical recommendations for improving security are described.

  15. Elliptic Curve Cryptography with Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Richard E.; Sigmon, Neil P.

    2005-01-01

    The use of the computer, and specifically the mathematics software package Maple, has played a central role in the authors' abstract algebra course because it provides their students with a way to see realistic examples of the topics they discuss without having to struggle with extensive computations. However, Maple does not provide the computer…

  16. BIOMETRIC CRYPTOGRAPHY AND NETWORK AUTHENTICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonimir Kišasondi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will present some schemes for strengthening network authentification over insecure channels with biometric concepts or how to securely transfer or use biometric characteristics as cryptographic keys. We will show why some current authentification schemes are insufficient and we will present our concepts of biometric hashes and authentification that rely on unimodal and multimodal biometrics. Our concept can be applied on any biometric authentification scheme and is universal for all systems.

  17. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  18. Secure Distributed Databases Using Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Ion IVAN; Cristian TOMA

    2006-01-01

    The computational encryption is used intensively by different databases management systems for ensuring privacy and integrity of information that are physically stored in files. Also, the information is sent over network and is replicated on different distributed systems. It is proved that a satisfying level of security is achieved if the rows and columns of tables are encrypted independently of table or computer that sustains the data. Also, it is very important that the SQL - Structured Que...

  19. Secure Distributed Databases Using Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational encryption is used intensively by different databases management systems for ensuring privacy and integrity of information that are physically stored in files. Also, the information is sent over network and is replicated on different distributed systems. It is proved that a satisfying level of security is achieved if the rows and columns of tables are encrypted independently of table or computer that sustains the data. Also, it is very important that the SQL - Structured Query Language query requests and responses to be encrypted over the network connection between the client and databases server. All this techniques and methods must be implemented by the databases administrators, designer and developers in a consistent security policy.

  20. Quantum cryptography and quantification of quantum correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koashi, M

    2008-01-01

    Study of the security of quantum key distribution protocols has provided us a deeper understanding about the trade-off between the amount of information extracted from a quantum system and the disturbance left in the system as a result of the extraction process. Here we discuss how such a new development helps us to understand the quantum correlations in a quantitative way. A detailed analysis of the information-disturbance trade-off for the zero-disturbance cases leads to a simple structure theorem, and the theorem can be used to derive an exact formula for the compressibility of quantum signals, which is a measure of quantum correlations in terms of the cost to preserve them. The analysis including the nonzero disturbance cases has a very close connection to the theory of entanglement. While the distillable key is regarded as a measure of entanglement, it does not coincide with either of the two operational measures of entanglement, the distillable entanglement and the entanglement cost. We discuss the physical meaning of the difference between these three measures of entanglement by providing each of them with an alternative operational definition

  1. A Foundational Proof Framework for Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    uniformly-distributed natural numbers in [0, ) is shown in Listing 7. RndNat_h is a helper function that samples a natural number with the appro...expect that a skilled Coq developer could complete such a proof in a matter of days (though he may require the help of a cryptographer to develop the

  2. Finite key analysis in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T.

    2007-01-01

    In view of experimental realization of quantum key distribution schemes, the study of their efficiency becomes as important as the proof of their security. The latter is the subject of most of the theoretical work about quantum key distribution, and many important results such as the proof of unconditional security have been obtained. The efficiency and also the robustness of quantum key distribution protocols against noise can be measured by figures of merit such as the secret key rate (the fraction of input signals that make it into the key) and the threshold quantum bit error rate (the maximal error rate such that one can still create a secret key). It is important to determine these quantities because they tell us whether a certain quantum key distribution scheme can be used at all in a given situation and if so, how many secret key bits it can generate in a given time. However, these figures of merit are usually derived under the ''infinite key limit'' assumption, that is, one assumes that an infinite number of quantum states are send and that all sub-protocols of the scheme (in particular privacy amplification) are carried out on these infinitely large blocks. Such an assumption usually eases the analysis, but also leads to (potentially) too optimistic values for the quantities in question. In this thesis, we are explicitly avoiding the infinite key limit for the analysis of the privacy amplification step, which plays the most important role in a quantum key distribution scheme. We still assume that an optimal error correction code is applied and we do not take into account any statistical errors that might occur in the parameter estimation step. Renner and coworkers derived an explicit formula for the obtainable key rate in terms of Renyi entropies of the quantum states describing Alice's, Bob's, and Eve's systems. This results serves as a starting point for our analysis, and we derive an algorithm that efficiently computes the obtainable key rate for any finite number of input signals, without making any approximations. As an application, we investigate the so-called ''Tomographic Protocol'', which is based on the Six-State Protocol and where Alice and Bob can obtain the additional information which quantum state they share after the distribution step of the protocol. We calculate the obtainable secret key rate under the assumption that the eavesdropper only conducts collective attacks and give a detailed analysis of the dependence of the key rate on various parameters: The number of input signals (the block size), the error rate in the sifted key (the QBER), and the security parameter. Furthermore, we study the influence of multi-photon events which naturally occur in a realistic implementation (orig.)

  3. The influence of omniscient technology on cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weihong; Li, Jian

    2009-07-01

    Scholars agree that concurrent algorithms are an interesting new topic in the field of cyberinformatics, and hackers worldwide concur. In fact, few end-users would disagree with the evaluation of architecture. We propose a Bayesian tool for harnessing massive multiplayer online role-playing games (FIRER), which we use to prove that the well-known ubiquitous algorithm for the improvement of wide-area networks by Karthik Lakshminarayanan is in Co-NP.

  4. Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiyuan

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) enables two legitimate parties to share a secret key even in the presence of an eavesdropper. The unconditional security of QKD is based on the fundamental laws of quantum physics. Original security proofs of QKD are based on a few assumptions, e.g., perfect single photon sources and perfect single-photon detectors. However, practical implementations of QKD systems do not fully comply with such assumptions due to technical limitations. The gap between theory and implementations leads to security loopholes in most QKD systems, and several attacks have been launched on sophisticated QKD systems. Particularly, the detectors have been found to be the most vulnerable part of QKD. Much effort has been put to build side-channel-free QKD systems. Solutions such as security patches and device-independent QKD have been proposed. However, the former are normally ad-hoc, and cannot close unidentified loopholes. The latter, while having the advantages of removing all assumptions on devices, is impractical to implement today. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDI-QKD) turns out to be a promising solution to the security problem of QKD. In MDI-QKD, all security loopholes, including those yet-to-be discovered, have been removed from the detectors, the most critical part in QKD. In this thesis, we investigate issues related to the practical implementation and security of MDI-QKD. We first present a demonstration of polarization-encoding MDI-QKD. Taking finite key effect into account, we achieve a secret key rate of 0.005 bit per second (bps) over 10 km spooled telecom fiber, and a 1600-bit key is distributed. This work, together with other demonstrations, shows the practicality of MDI-QKD. Next we investigate a critical assumption of MDI-QKD: perfect state preparation. We apply the loss-tolerant QKD protocol and adapt it to MDI-QKD to quantify information leakage due to imperfect state preparation. We then present an experimental demonstration of MDI-QKD over 10 km and 40 km of spooled fiber, which for the first time considers the impact of inaccurate polarization state preparation on the secret key rate. This would not have been possible under previous security proofs, given the same amount of state preparation flaws.

  5. High-speed cryptography and cryptanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, P.

    2011-01-01

    Modern digital communication relies heavily on cryptographic protection to ensure data integrity and privacy. In order to deploy state-of-the art cryptographic primitives and protocols in real-world scenarios, one needs to highly optimize software for both speed and security. This requires careful

  6. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenneker, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  7. Vector Boolean Functions: applications in symmetric cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Cubero, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Esta tesis establece los fundamentos teóricos y diseña una colección abierta de clases C++ denominada VBF (Vector Boolean Functions) para analizar funciones booleanas vectoriales (funciones que asocian un vector booleano a otro vector booleano) desde una perspectiva criptográfica. Esta nueva implementación emplea la librería NTL de Victor Shoup, incorporando nuevos módulos que complementan a las funciones de NTL, adecuándolas para el análisis criptográfico. La clase fundamental que representa...

  8. Public key cryptography from weaker assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zottarel, Angela

    This dissertation is focused on the construction of public key cryptographic primitives and on the relative security analysis in a meaningful theoretic model. This work takes two orthogonal directions. In the first part, we study cryptographic constructions preserving their security properties also...... in the case the adversary is granted access to partial information about the secret state of the primitive. To do so, we work in an extension of the standard black-box model, a new framework where possible leakage from the secret state is taken into account. In particular, we give the first construction...

  9. RFID security : cryptography and physics perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guajardo, J.; Tuyls, P.T.; Bird, N.; Conrado, C.; Maubach, S.; Schrijen, G.J.; Skoric, B.; Tombeur, A.M.H.; Thueringer, P.; Kitsos, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of mechanisms that are cheap to implement or integrate into RFID tags and that at the same time enhance their security and privacy properties. We emphasize solutions that make use of existing (or expected) functionality on the tag or that are inherently cheap

  10. Next generation DRM: cryptography or forensics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Arnaud

    2009-02-01

    Current content protection systems rely primarily on applied cryptographic techniques but there is an increased use of forensic solutions in images, music and video distribution alike. The two approaches differ significantly, both in terms of technology and in terms of strategy, and thus it begs the question: will one approach take over in the long run, and if so which one? Discussing the evolution of both cryptographic and forensic solutions, we conclude that neither approach is ideal for all constituents, and that in the video space at least they will continue to co-exist for the foreseeable future - even if this may not be the case for other media types. We also analyze shortcomings of these approaches, and suggest that new solutions are necessary in this still emerging marketplace.

  11. Security of quantum cryptography with realistic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, N.

    1999-01-01

    The interest in practical implementations of quantum key distribution is steadily growing. However, there is still a need to give a precise security statement which adapts to realistic implementation. In this paper I give the effective key rate we can obtain in a practical setting within scenario of security against individual attacks by an eavesdropper. It illustrates previous results that high losses together with detector dark counts can make secure quantum key distribution impossible. (Author)

  12. Applications of Fast Truncated Multiplication in Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo Hars

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Truncated multiplications compute truncated products, contiguous subsequences of the digits of integer products. For an n-digit multiplication algorithm of time complexity O(nα, with 1<α≤2, there is a truncated multiplication algorithm, which is constant times faster when computing a short enough truncated product. Applying these fast truncated multiplications, several cryptographic long integer arithmetic algorithms are improved, including integer reciprocals, divisions, Barrett and Montgomery multiplications, 2n-digit modular multiplication on hardware for n-digit half products. For example, Montgomery multiplication is performed in 2.6 Karatsuba multiplication time.

  13. Introducing Summer Camp Students to Modern Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    For countries to remain competitive in the global economy, it is important to cultivate the next generation of native mathematicians. However, this goal has been increasingly challenging in the United States where, despite the tremendous increase in university enrollment during recent decades, the number of students studying mathematics has…

  14. Quantum cryptography as a retrodiction problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, A H; Franz, T; Werner, R F

    2009-11-27

    We propose a quantum key distribution protocol based on a quantum retrodiction protocol, known as the Mean King problem. The protocol uses a two way quantum channel. We show security against coherent attacks in a transmission-error free scenario, even if Eve is allowed to attack both transmissions. This establishes a connection between retrodiction and key distribution.

  15. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-01

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  16. Quantum cryptography with an ideal local relay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spedalieri, Gaetana; Ottaviani, Carlo; Braunstein, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    We consider two remote parties connected to a relay by two quantum channels. To generate a secret key, they transmit coherent states to the relay, where the states are subject to a continuous-variable (CV) Bell detection. We study the ideal case where Alice's channel is lossless, i.e., the relay ...

  17. Fundamental problems in provable security and cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Alexander W

    2006-12-15

    This paper examines methods for formally proving the security of cryptographic schemes. We show that, despite many years of active research and dozens of significant results, there are fundamental problems which have yet to be solved. We also present a new approach to one of the more controversial aspects of provable security, the random oracle model.

  18. Some conservative estimates in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2006-01-01

    Relationship is established between the security of the BB84 quantum key distribution protocol and the forward and converse coding theorems for quantum communication channels. The upper bound Q c ∼ 11% on the bit error rate compatible with secure key distribution is determined by solving the transcendental equation H(Q c )=C-bar(ρ)/2, where ρ is the density matrix of the input ensemble, C-bar(ρ) is the classical capacity of a noiseless quantum channel, and H(Q) is the capacity of a classical binary symmetric channel with error rate Q

  19. Security of quantum cryptography with realistic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutkenhaus, N [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 9, 00014 Helsingin yliopisto (Finland)

    1999-08-01

    The interest in practical implementations of quantum key distribution is steadily growing. However, there is still a need to give a precise security statement which adapts to realistic implementation. In this paper I give the effective key rate we can obtain in a practical setting within scenario of security against individual attacks by an eavesdropper. It illustrates previous results that high losses together with detector dark counts can make secure quantum key distribution impossible. (Author)

  20. Cryptography Would Reveal Alterations In Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    Public-key decryption method proposed to guarantee authenticity of photographic images represented in form of digital files. In method, digital camera generates original data from image in standard public format; also produces coded signature to verify standard-format image data. Scheme also helps protect against other forms of lying, such as attaching false captions.

  1. Applications of Maple To Algebraic Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Neil P.

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of technology to enhance the appreciation of applications involving abstract algebra. The symbolic manipulator Maple can perform computations required for a linear cryptosystem. One major benefit of this process is that students can encipher and decipher messages using a linear cryptosystem without becoming confused and…

  2. Motivating the Concept of Eigenvectors via Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siap, Irfan

    2008-01-01

    New methods of teaching linear algebra in the undergraduate curriculum have attracted much interest lately. Most of this work is focused on evaluating and discussing the integration of special computer software into the Linear Algebra curriculum. In this article, I discuss my approach on introducing the concept of eigenvectors and eigenvalues,…

  3. Leakage-resilient cryptography from minimal assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazay, Carmit; López-Alt, Adriana; Wee, Hoeteck

    2013-01-01

    We present new constructions of leakage-resilient cryptosystems, which remain provably secure even if the attacker learns some arbitrary partial information about their internal secret key. For any polynomial ℓ, we can instantiate these schemes so as to tolerate up to ℓ bits of leakage. While the...

  4. Low-Power Public Key Cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEAVER,CHERYL L.; DRAELOS,TIMOTHY J.; HAMILTON,VICTORIA A.; SCHROEPPEL,RICHARD C.; GONZALES,RITA A.; MILLER,RUSSELL D.; THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    2000-11-01

    This report presents research on public key, digital signature algorithms for cryptographic authentication in low-powered, low-computation environments. We assessed algorithms for suitability based on their signature size, and computation and storage requirements. We evaluated a variety of general purpose and special purpose computing platforms to address issues such as memory, voltage requirements, and special functionality for low-powered applications. In addition, we examined custom design platforms. We found that a custom design offers the most flexibility and can be optimized for specific algorithms. Furthermore, the entire platform can exist on a single Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) or can be integrated with commercially available components to produce the desired computing platform.

  5. The Singapore protocol [for quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, B.

    2005-01-01

    The qubit protocol for quantum key distribution presented in this talk is fully tomographic and more efficient than other tomographic protocols. Under ideal circumstances the efficiency is log 2 (4/3) = 0.415 key bits per qubit sent, which is 25% more than the efficiency of 1/3 = 0.333 for the standard 6-state protocol. One can extract 0.4 key bits per qubit by a simple two-way communication scheme, and can so get close to the information-theoretical limit. The noise thresholds for secure key bit generation in the presence of unbiased noise will be reported and discussed. (author)

  6. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  7. Quantum information. Teleporation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test house, quantum teleportation, 100 years of quantum theory, the reality of quanta, interactionless quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view into the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  8. Tamper Resilient Cryptography Without Self-Destruct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    We initiate a general study of schemes resilient to both tampering an d leakage attacks. Tamper- ing attacks are powerful cryptanalytic attacks where an advers ary can change the secret state and observes the effect of such changes at the output. Our cont ributions are outlined below: 1. We propose...... a general construction showing that any cryptographic primitive where the secret key can be chosen as a uniformly random string can be made s ecure against bounded tampering and leakage. This holds in a restricted model where the ta mpering functions must be chosen from a set of bounded size after...... arbitrarily tamper with the prover’s state a bounded number of times and/or obtain some bounded amount of leakage. Interestingly, for the Okamoto scheme we can allow also independent tampering with the public parameters. 3. We show a bounded tamper and leakage resilient CCA secure public key cryptosystem...

  9. Cryptography based on neural networks - analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    The mutual learning process between two parity feed-forward networks with discrete and continuous weights is studied analytically, and we find that the number of steps required to achieve full synchronization between the two networks in the case of discrete weights is finite. The synchronization process is shown to be non-self-averaging and the analytical solution is based on random auxiliary variables. The learning time of an attacker that is trying to imitate one of the networks is examined analytically and is found to be much longer than the synchronization time. Analytical results are found to be in agreement with simulations. (letter to the editor)

  10. Finite key analysis in quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T.

    2007-10-31

    In view of experimental realization of quantum key distribution schemes, the study of their efficiency becomes as important as the proof of their security. The latter is the subject of most of the theoretical work about quantum key distribution, and many important results such as the proof of unconditional security have been obtained. The efficiency and also the robustness of quantum key distribution protocols against noise can be measured by figures of merit such as the secret key rate (the fraction of input signals that make it into the key) and the threshold quantum bit error rate (the maximal error rate such that one can still create a secret key). It is important to determine these quantities because they tell us whether a certain quantum key distribution scheme can be used at all in a given situation and if so, how many secret key bits it can generate in a given time. However, these figures of merit are usually derived under the ''infinite key limit'' assumption, that is, one assumes that an infinite number of quantum states are send and that all sub-protocols of the scheme (in particular privacy amplification) are carried out on these infinitely large blocks. Such an assumption usually eases the analysis, but also leads to (potentially) too optimistic values for the quantities in question. In this thesis, we are explicitly avoiding the infinite key limit for the analysis of the privacy amplification step, which plays the most important role in a quantum key distribution scheme. We still assume that an optimal error correction code is applied and we do not take into account any statistical errors that might occur in the parameter estimation step. Renner and coworkers derived an explicit formula for the obtainable key rate in terms of Renyi entropies of the quantum states describing Alice's, Bob's, and Eve's systems. This results serves as a starting point for our analysis, and we derive an algorithm that efficiently computes the obtainable key rate for any finite number of input signals, without making any approximations. As an application, we investigate the so-called ''Tomographic Protocol'', which is based on the Six-State Protocol and where Alice and Bob can obtain the additional information which quantum state they share after the distribution step of the protocol. We calculate the obtainable secret key rate under the assumption that the eavesdropper only conducts collective attacks and give a detailed analysis of the dependence of the key rate on various parameters: The number of input signals (the block size), the error rate in the sifted key (the QBER), and the security parameter. Furthermore, we study the influence of multi-photon events which naturally occur in a realistic implementation (orig.)

  11. Hyper-and-elliptic-curve cryptography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, D.J.; Lange, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces ‘hyper-and-elliptic-curve cryptography’, in which a single high-security group supports fast genus-2-hyperelliptic-curve formulas for variable-base-point single-scalar multiplication (for example, Diffie–Hellman shared-secret computation) and at the same time supports fast

  12. National Workshop on Coding Theory and Cryptography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    commerce and other interdisciplinary aspects of the theme. Participants. Research scholars/teachers from Academic Institutions and those from Software Development. Centres, National Laboratories and other Research and Development ...

  13. Applications of tripled chaotic maps in cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnia, S.; Akhshani, A.; Akhavan, A.; Mahmodi, H.

    2009-01-01

    Security of information has become a major issue during the last decades. New algorithms based on chaotic maps were suggested for protection of different types of multimedia data, especially digital images and videos in this period. However, many of them fundamentally were flawed by a lack of robustness and security. For getting higher security and higher complexity, in the current paper, we introduce a new kind of symmetric key block cipher algorithm that is based on tripled chaotic maps. In this algorithm, the utilization of two coupling parameters, as well as the increased complexity of the cryptosystem, make a contribution to the development of cryptosystem with higher security. In order to increase the security of the proposed algorithm, the size of key space and the computational complexity of the coupling parameters should be increased as well. Both the theoretical and experimental results state that the proposed algorithm has many capabilities such as acceptable speed and complexity in the algorithm due to the existence of two coupling parameters and high security. Note that the ciphertext has a flat distribution and has the same size as the plaintext. Therefore, it is suitable for practical use in secure communications.

  14. Analysis and prediction of area- and energy-consumption of optimized polynomial multipliers in hardware for arbitrary GF(2{sup n}) for elliptic curve cryptography; Analyse und Vorhersage des Flaechen- und Energieverbrauches-optimaler Hardware Polynom-Multiplizierer fuer GF(2{sup n}) fuer elliptische Kurven Kryptographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyka, Zoya

    2012-04-13

    During recent years elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) has gained significant attention especially for devices with scarce resources such as wireless sensor nodes. Hardware implementations are considered to be the key enabler for using ECC on this class of devices. Out of the operations needed to execute ECC the polynomial multiplication is the one which is investigated most since it is one of the most complex field operations and executed very often. The majority of research papers focuses on reducing the number of partial- multiplications while neglecting the increased effort for additions of the partial products. This thesis investigates how the latter can be optimized. A reduction of additions can be achieved by using pre-defined processing sequences for summing up partial products. In this work a method to find the optimized processing sequence is presented. It is applied to 10 multiplication methods of polynomials over GF(2{sup n}). For example when applied to the generalized Karatsuba multiplication [18] the optimized processing sequence saves up to 39 per cent of XOR-gates in average for polynomials with a length up to 600 bits. In addition it is known that combining different multiplication methods reduced the total complexity of the multiplier. For example using the classical MM for calculation of small partial products in combination with other MMs can improve chip-parameters of the resulting multipliers. An optimal combination of several multiplication approaches for which the optimized processing sequence of XOR-operations is used reduces the area and energy consumption of the resulting multiplier significantly. This work presents an algorithm to determine the optimal combination of multiplication methods with pre-defined processing sequences for hardware implementation of an highly efficient polynomial multiplier in GF(2{sup n}). The combinations determined by this algorithm save in average 12 % of the chip-area for polynomials with a length up to 600

  15. Cryptography: It’s Not Just For Electronic Mail Anymore

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    David Chaum . Security without identification: Transaction systems to make big brother obsolete. Communications of the ACM, 28(10): 1030-1044, Oc- tober...Jeannette Wing, Maurice Herlihy, Stewart Clamen, David Detlefs, Karen Kietzke, Richard Lerner, and Su-Yuen Ling. The Avalon language: A tutorial

  16. Quantum foundations in the light of quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassard, G.; Fuchs, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Consider the two great physical theories of the twentieth century: relativity and quantum mechanics. Einstein derived relativity from very simple principles such as: 'The speed of light in empty space is independent of the speed of its source' and 'Physics should appear the same in all inertial reference frames'. By contrast, the foundation of quantum mechanics is built on a set of rather strange, disjointed and ad hoc axioms. Why is that? Must quantum mechanics be inherently less elegant than relativity? Or is it rather that the current axioms of quantum mechanics reflect at best the history that led to its discovery by too many people (compared to one person for relativity), over too long a period of time? The purpose of this talk is to argue that a better foundation for quantum mechanics lies within the teachings of quantum information science. We postulate that the truly fundamental laws of nature concern information, not waves or particles. For example, it has been proven, from the current axioms of quantum mechanics, that 'nature allows for the unconditionally secure transmission of confidential information', but 'nature does not allow for unconditionally secure bit commitment' (these are standard classical cryptographic primitives). We propose to turn the table around, start from these two theorems and possibly a few others, upgrade them as axioms, and ask how much of quantum mechanics they can derive. This provocative talk is meant as an eye-opener: we shall ask far more questions than we shall resolve. (author)

  17. Topics in quantum cryptography, quantum error correction, and channel simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhicheng

    In this thesis, we mainly investigate four different topics: efficiently implementable codes for quantum key expansion [51], quantum error-correcting codes based on privacy amplification [48], private classical capacity of quantum channels [44], and classical channel simulation with quantum side information [49, 50]. For the first topic, we propose an efficiently implementable quantum key expansion protocol, capable of increasing the size of a pre-shared secret key by a constant factor. Previously, the Shor-Preskill proof [64] of the security of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) [6] quantum key distribution protocol relied on the theoretical existence of good classical error-correcting codes with the "dual-containing" property. But the explicit and efficiently decodable construction of such codes is unknown. We show that we can lift the dual-containing constraint by employing the non-dual-containing codes with excellent performance and efficient decoding algorithms. For the second topic, we propose a construction of Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) [19, 68] quantum error-correcting codes, which are originally based on pairs of mutually dual-containing classical codes, by combining a classical code with a two-universal hash function. We show, using the results of Renner and Koenig [57], that the communication rates of such codes approach the hashing bound on tensor powers of Pauli channels in the limit of large block-length. For the third topic, we prove a regularized formula for the secret key assisted capacity region of a quantum channel for transmitting private classical information. This result parallels the work of Devetak on entanglement assisted quantum communication capacity. This formula provides a new family protocol, the private father protocol, under the resource inequality framework that includes the private classical communication without the assisted secret keys as a child protocol. For the fourth topic, we study and solve the problem of classical channel simulation with quantum side information at the receiver. Our main theorem has two important corollaries: rate-distortion theory with quantum side information and common randomness distillation. Simple proofs of achievability of classical multi-terminal source coding problems can be made via a unified approach using the channel simulation theorem as building blocks. The fully quantum generalization of the problem is also conjectured with outer and inner bounds on the achievable rate pairs.

  18. Hacking commercial quantum cryptography systems by tailored bright illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-10-01

    The peculiar properties of quantum mechanics allow two remote parties to communicate a private, secret key, which is protected from eavesdropping by the laws of physics. So-called quantum key distribution (QKD) implementations always rely on detectors to measure the relevant quantum property of single photons. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the detectors in two commercially available QKD systems can be fully remote-controlled using specially tailored bright illumination. This makes it possible to tracelessly acquire the full secret key; we propose an eavesdropping apparatus built from off-the-shelf components. The loophole is likely to be present in most QKD systems using avalanche photodiodes to detect single photons. We believe that our findings are crucial for strengthening the security of practical QKD, by identifying and patching technological deficiencies.

  19. SHAMROCK: A Synthesizable High Assurance Cryptography and Key Management Coprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    cryptographic functions such as Advanced Encryption Standard ( AES ) [5] to produce keywraps to orchestrate key exchanges between groups of devices. These...Storage (MPMS). This is done for two reasons: first, the mission package is encrypted using AES keywrap mode with the CEK [7], which is a special version...Zone 1) denoting ephemeral secrets such as dynamic keys. AES encryption is employed as a one-way function leading from the ephemeral Zone 1 to the

  20. Quantum Cryptography Based on the Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao; Farouk, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Recently, secure quantum key distribution based on Deutsch's algorithm using the Bell state is reported (Nagata and Nakamura, Int. J. Theor. Phys. doi: 10.1007/s10773-017-3352-4, 2017). Our aim is of extending the result to a multipartite system. In this paper, we propose a highly speedy key distribution protocol. We present sequre quantum key distribution based on a special Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. Bob has promised to use a function f which is of one of two kinds; either the value of f( x) is constant for all values of x, or else the value of f( x) is balanced, that is, equal to 1 for exactly half of the possible x, and 0 for the other half. Here, we introduce an additional condition to the function when it is balanced. Our quantum key distribution overcomes a classical counterpart by a factor O(2 N ).

  1. Computer Security: Cryptography and authentication (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Remi Mollon studied computer security at University and he first worked on Grids, with the EGEE project, for a French Bioinformatics institute. Information security being crucial in that field, he developed an encrypted file management system on top of Grid middleware, and he contributed in integrating legacy applications with Grids. Then, he was hired by CERN as a Grid Data Management developer, and he joined the Grid Operational Security Coordination Team. Remi has now moved to CERN Computer Security Team. Remi is involved in the daily security operations, in addition to be responsible to design Team's computer infrastructure, and to participate to several projects, like multi-factor authentication at CERN. With the prevalence of modern information technologies and its increasing integration into our daily live, digital systems become more and more playground for evil people. While in the past, attacks were driven by fame& kudos, nowadays money is the motivating factor. Just the recent months have s...

  2. A Secured Authentication Protocol for SIP Using Elliptic Curves Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tien-Ho; Yeh, Hsiu-Lien; Liu, Pin-Chuan; Hsiang, Han-Chen; Shih, Wei-Kuan

    Session initiation protocol (SIP) is a technology regularly performed in Internet Telephony, and Hyper Text Transport Protocol (HTTP) as digest authentication is one of the major methods for SIP authentication mechanism. In 2005, Yang et al. pointed out that HTTP could not resist server spoofing attack and off-line guessing attack and proposed a secret authentication with Diffie-Hellman concept. In 2009, Tsai proposed a nonce based authentication protocol for SIP. In this paper, we demonstrate that their protocol could not resist the password guessing attack and insider attack. Furthermore, we propose an ECC-based authentication mechanism to solve their issues and present security analysis of our protocol to show that ours is suitable for applications with higher security requirement.

  3. Network security with openSSL cryptography for secure communications

    CERN Document Server

    Viega, John; Chandra, Pravir

    2002-01-01

    Most applications these days are at least somewhat network aware, but how do you protect those applications against common network security threats? Many developers are turning to OpenSSL, an open source version of SSL/TLS, which is the most widely used protocol for secure network communications.The OpenSSL library is seeing widespread adoption for web sites that require cryptographic functions to protect a broad range of sensitive information, such as credit card numbers and other financial transactions. The library is the only free, full-featured SSL implementation for C and C++, and it can be used programmatically or from the command line to secure most TCP-based network protocols.Network Security with OpenSSL enables developers to use this protocol much more effectively. Traditionally, getting something simple done in OpenSSL could easily take weeks. This concise book gives you the guidance you need to avoid pitfalls, while allowing you to take advantage of the library?s advanced features. And, inst...

  4. Cryptography for a High-Assurance Web-Based Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    construction for TLS , and a non-standard pseudorandom function for SSL . The key information and certificates necessary for TLS are handled in the...in motion are encrypted and transported using Transport Layer Security ( TLS ) with mutual authentication [5a]. End-to-end encryption is used for...do so is the algorithms for encrypt and decrypt are faster using symmetric keys than similar algorithms for asymmetric keys. 1) TLS Mutual

  5. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer; Quanteninformation. Teleportation - Kryptografie - Quantencomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenneker, Carsten (comp.)

    2012-11-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  6. Cryptography, statistics and pseudo-randomness (Part 1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, S.; Gill, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    In the classical approach to pseudo-random number generators, a generator is considered to perform well if its output sequences pass a battery of statistical tests that has become standard. In recent years, it has turned out that this approach is not satisfactory. Many generators have turned out to

  7. Gaps between equations and experiments in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, John M; Madjid, F Hadi

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods of cryptographic key distribution rest on judgments about an attacker. With the advent of quantum key distribution (QKD) came proofs of security for the mathematical models that define the protocols BB84 and B92; however, applying such proofs to actual transmitting and receiving devices has been questioned. Proofs of QKD security are propositions about models written in the mathematical language of quantum mechanics, and the issue is the linking of such models to actual devices in an experiment on security. To explore this issue, we adapt Wittgenstein's method of language games to view quantum language in its application to experimental activity involving transmitting and receiving devices. We sketch concepts with which to think about models in relation to experiments, without assuming the experiments accord with any model; included is a concept of one quantum mechanical model enveloping another. For any model that agrees with given experimental results and implies the security of a key, there is an enveloping model that agrees with the same results while denying that security. As a result there is a gap between equations and the behaviour recorded from devices in an experiment, a gap bridged only by resort to something beyond the reach of logic and measured data, well named by the word guesswork. While this recognition of guesswork encourages eavesdropping, a related recognition of guesswork in the design of feedback loops can help a transmitter and receiver to reduce their vulnerability to eavesdropping

  8. Secured Data Transmission Using Wavelet Based Steganography and cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    K.Ravindra Reddy; Ms Shaik Taj Mahaboob

    2014-01-01

    Steganography and cryptographic methods are used together with wavelets to increase the security of the data while transmitting through networks. Another technology, the digital watermarking is the process of embedding information into a digital (image) signal. Before embedding the plain text into the image, the plain text is encrypted by using Data Encryption Standard (DES) algorithm. The encrypted text is embedded into the LL sub band of the wavelet decomposed image using Le...

  9. A chaotic cryptography scheme for generating short ciphertext

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Kwok-Wo; Ho, Sun-Wah; Yung, Ching-Ki

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a chaotic cryptographic scheme based on iterating the logistic map and updating the look-up table dynamically. The encryption and decryption processes become faster as the number of iterations required is reduced. However, the length of the ciphertext is still at least twice that of the original message. This may result in huge ciphertext files and hence long transmission time when encrypting large multimedia files. In this Letter, we modify the chaotic cryptographic scheme proposed previously so as to reduce the length of the ciphertext to the level slightly longer than that of the original message. Moreover, a session key is introduced in the cryptographic scheme so that the ciphertext length for a given message is not fixed

  10. Another way of doing RSA cryptography in hardware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batina, L.; Bruin - Muurling, G.; Honary, B.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we describe an efficient and secure hardware implementation of the RSA cryptosystem. Modular exponentiation is based on Montgomery’s method without any modular reduction achieving the optimal bound. The presented systolic array architecture is scalable in severalparameters which makes

  11. Securing the Data in Clouds with Hyperelliptic Curve Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Debajyoti; Shirwadkar, Ashay; Gaikar, Pratik; Agrawal, Tanmay

    2014-01-01

    In todays world, Cloud computing has attracted research communities as it provides services in reduced cost due to virtualizing all the necessary resources. Even modern business architecture depends upon Cloud computing .As it is a internet based utility, which provides various services over a network, it is prone to network based attacks. Hence security in clouds is the most important in case of cloud computing. Cloud Security concerns the customer to fully rely on storing data on clouds. Th...

  12. Optimality of Gaussian attacks in continuous-variable quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navascués, Miguel; Grosshans, Frédéric; Acín, Antonio

    2006-11-10

    We analyze the asymptotic security of the family of Gaussian modulated quantum key distribution protocols for continuous-variables systems. We prove that the Gaussian unitary attack is optimal for all the considered bounds on the key rate when the first and second momenta of the canonical variables involved are known by the honest parties.

  13. Public channel cryptography: chaos synchronization and Hilbert's tenth problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Ido; Kopelowitz, Evi; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2008-08-22

    The synchronization process of two mutually delayed coupled deterministic chaotic maps is demonstrated both analytically and numerically. The synchronization is preserved when the mutually transmitted signals are concealed by two commutative private filters, a convolution of the truncated time-delayed output signals or some powers of the delayed output signals. The task of a passive attacker is mapped onto Hilbert's tenth problem, solving a set of nonlinear Diophantine equations, which was proven to be in the class of NP-complete problems [problems that are both NP (verifiable in nondeterministic polynomial time) and NP-hard (any NP problem can be translated into this problem)]. This bridge between nonlinear dynamics and NP-complete problems opens a horizon for new types of secure public-channel protocols.

  14. Low photon count based digital holography for quadratic phase cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, Inbarasan; Guo, Changliang; Malallah, Ra'ed; Ryle, James P; Healy, John J; Lee, Byung-Geun; Sheridan, John T

    2017-07-15

    Recently, the vulnerability of the linear canonical transform-based double random phase encryption system to attack has been demonstrated. To alleviate this, we present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a method for securing a two-dimensional scene using a quadratic phase encoding system operating in the photon-counted imaging (PCI) regime. Position-phase-shifting digital holography is applied to record the photon-limited encrypted complex samples. The reconstruction of the complex wavefront involves four sparse (undersampled) dataset intensity measurements (interferograms) at two different positions. Computer simulations validate that the photon-limited sparse-encrypted data has adequate information to authenticate the original data set. Finally, security analysis, employing iterative phase retrieval attacks, has been performed.

  15. High-Rate Strong-Signal Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1996-01-01

    Several quantum cryptosystems utilizing different kinds of nonclassical lights, which can accommodate high intensity fields and high data rate, are described. However, they are all sensitive to loss and both the high rate and the strong-signal character rapidly disappear. A squeezed light homodyne detection scheme is proposed which, with present-day technology, leads to more than two orders of magnitude data rate improvement over other current experimental systems for moderate loss.

  16. Memory attacks on device-independent quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-04

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party).

  17. High-dimensional quantum cryptography with twisted light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; O’Sullivan, Malcolm N; Rodenburg, Brandon; Malik, Mehul; Boyd, Robert W; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) systems often rely on polarization of light for encoding, thus limiting the amount of information that can be sent per photon and placing tight bounds on the error rates that such a system can tolerate. Here we describe a proof-of-principle experiment that indicates the feasibility of high-dimensional QKD based on the transverse structure of the light field allowing for the transfer of more than 1 bit per photon. Our implementation uses the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons and the corresponding mutually unbiased basis of angular position (ANG). Our experiment uses a digital micro-mirror device for the rapid generation of OAM and ANG modes at 4 kHz, and a mode sorter capable of sorting single photons based on their OAM and ANG content with a separation efficiency of 93%. Through the use of a seven-dimensional alphabet encoded in the OAM and ANG bases, we achieve a channel capacity of 2.05 bits per sifted photon. Our experiment demonstrates that, in addition to having an increased information capacity, multilevel QKD systems based on spatial-mode encoding can be more resilient against intercept-resend eavesdropping attacks. (paper)

  18. Enhanced Security for Online Exams Using Group Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, I. Y.; Yeom, H. Y.

    2009-01-01

    While development of the Internet has contributed to the spread of online education, online exams have not been widely adopted. An online exam is defined here as one that takes place over the insecure Internet, and where no proctor is in the same location as the examinees. This paper proposes an enhanced secure online exam management environment…

  19. From Greeks to Today: Cipher Trees and Computer Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, M. Tim; Brumbaugh, Doug

    1988-01-01

    Explores the use of computers for teaching mathematical models of transposition ciphers. Illustrates the ideas, includes activities and extensions, provides a mathematical model and includes computer programs to implement these topics. (MVL)

  20. Efficient Cryptography for the Next Generation Secure Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupcu, Alptekin

    2010-01-01

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems, and client-server type storage and computation outsourcing constitute some of the major applications that the next generation cloud schemes will address. Since these applications are just emerging, it is the perfect time to design them with security and privacy in mind. Furthermore, considering the high-churn…

  1. Laser damage helps the eavesdropper in quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-21

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ∼1  W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ∼1.5  W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  2. Successful attack on permutation-parity-machine-based neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Luís F; Ruttor, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    An algorithm is presented which implements a probabilistic attack on the key-exchange protocol based on permutation parity machines. Instead of imitating the synchronization of the communicating partners, the strategy consists of a Monte Carlo method to sample the space of possible weights during inner rounds and an analytic approach to convey the extracted information from one outer round to the next one. The results show that the protocol under attack fails to synchronize faster than an eavesdropper using this algorithm.

  3. Codes, Ciphers, and Cryptography--An Honors Colloquium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karls, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    At the suggestion of a colleague, I read "The Code Book", [32], by Simon Singh to get a basic introduction to the RSA encryption scheme. Inspired by Singh's book, I designed a Ball State University Honors Colloquium in Mathematics for both majors and non-majors, with material coming from "The Code Book" and many other sources. This course became…

  4. Unconditionally secure commitment in position-based quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-10-27

    A new commitment scheme based on position-verification and non-local quantum correlations is presented here for the first time in literature. The only credential for unconditional security is the position of committer and non-local correlations generated; neither receiver has any pre-shared data with the committer nor does receiver require trusted and authenticated quantum/classical channels between him and the committer. In the proposed scheme, receiver trusts the commitment only if the scheme itself verifies position of the committer and validates her commitment through non-local quantum correlations in a single round. The position-based commitment scheme bounds committer to reveal valid commitment within allocated time and guarantees that the receiver will not be able to get information about commitment unless committer reveals. The scheme works for the commitment of both bits and qubits and is equally secure against committer/receiver as well as against any third party who may have interests in destroying the commitment. Our proposed scheme is unconditionally secure in general and evades Mayers and Lo-Chau attacks in particular.

  5. Leakage-Resilient Cryptography from the Inner-Product Extractor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziembowski, Stefan; Faust, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    We present a generic method to secure various widely-used cryptosystems against arbitrary side-channel leakage, as long as the leakage adheres three restrictions: first, it is bounded per observation but in total can be arbitrary large. Second, memory parts leak independently, and, third, the ran...

  6. Medical image security using modified chaos-based cryptography approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib Gatta, Methaq; Al-latief, Shahad Thamear Abd

    2018-05-01

    The progressive development in telecommunication and networking technologies have led to the increased popularity of telemedicine usage which involve storage and transfer of medical images and related information so security concern is emerged. This paper presents a method to provide the security to the medical images since its play a major role in people healthcare organizations. The main idea in this work based on the chaotic sequence in order to provide efficient encryption method that allows reconstructing the original image from the encrypted image with high quality and minimum distortion in its content and doesn’t effect in human treatment and diagnosing. Experimental results prove the efficiency of the proposed method using some of statistical measures and robust correlation between original image and decrypted image.

  7. Cryptography In The Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Salvail, Louis; Schaffner, Christian

    2005-01-01

    We initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary's quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no quantum memory...

  8. COALA-System for Visual Representation of Cryptography Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisavljevic, Zarko; Stanisavljevic, Jelena; Vuletic, Pavle; Jovanovic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Educational software systems have an increasingly significant presence in engineering sciences. They aim to improve students' attitudes and knowledge acquisition typically through visual representation and simulation of complex algorithms and mechanisms or hardware systems that are often not available to the educational institutions. This paper…

  9. ECG-cryptography and authentication in body area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Honggang; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Fang, Hua

    2012-11-01

    Wireless body area networks (BANs) have drawn much attention from research community and industry in recent years. Multimedia healthcare services provided by BANs can be available to anyone, anywhere, and anytime seamlessly. A critical issue in BANs is how to preserve the integrity and privacy of a person's medical data over wireless environments in a resource efficient manner. This paper presents a novel key agreement scheme that allows neighboring nodes in BANs to share a common key generated by electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. The improved Jules Sudan (IJS) algorithm is proposed to set up the key agreement for the message authentication. The proposed ECG-IJS key agreement can secure data communications over BANs in a plug-n-play manner without any key distribution overheads. Both the simulation and experimental results are presented, which demonstrate that the proposed ECG-IJS scheme can achieve better security performance in terms of serval performance metrics such as false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) than other existing approaches. In addition, the power consumption analysis also shows that the proposed ECG-IJS scheme can achieve energy efficiency for BANs.

  10. Cryptography in the Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Serge, Fehr; Schaffner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary's quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no quantum memory...

  11. Probability on groups and an application to cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidoine Djimnaibeye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In her thesis, Mosina introduced the concept of {\\it mean-set of random (graph- group-variables} and generalized Strong Law of Large Numbers (SLLN to (graphs groups, which she used for cryptanalysis of authentication schemes. This attack called the {\\it mean-set attack} is presented here. It allows to break the Sibert authentication scheme on braid groups without solving the underlined difficult problem. We propose an amelioration to this attack and its implementation on the platform CRAG. We carry some experiments and we present the results. These results are discussed and they confirm those obtained by Mosina and Ushakov with a considerable gain of time.

  12. Secure communications with low-orbit spacecraft using quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, Charles G.; Simmons, Charles M.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for secure communication between an earth station and spacecraft. A laser outputs single pulses that are split into preceding bright pulses and delayed attenuated pulses, and polarized. A Pockels cell changes the polarization of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses according to a string of random numbers, a first polarization representing a "1," and a second polarization representing a "0." At the receiving station, a beamsplitter randomly directs the preceding bright pulses and the polarized delayed attenuated pulses onto longer and shorter paths, both terminating in a beamsplitter which directs the preceding bright pulses and a first portion of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses to a first detector, and a second portion of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses to a second detector to generate a key for secure communication between the earth station and the spacecraft.

  13. Thermal blinding of gated detectors in quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-12-20

    It has previously been shown that the gated detectors of two commercially available quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are blindable and controllable by an eavesdropper using continuous-wave illumination and short bright trigger pulses, manipulating voltages in the circuit [Nat. Photonics 4, 686 (2010)]. This allows for an attack eavesdropping the full raw and secret key without increasing the quantum bit error rate (QBER). Here we show how thermal effects in detectors under bright illumination can lead to the same outcome. We demonstrate that the detectors in a commercial QKD system Clavis2 can be blinded by heating the avalanche photo diodes (APDs) using bright illumination, so-called thermal blinding. Further, the detectors can be triggered using short bright pulses once they are blind. For systems with pauses between packet transmission such as the plug-and-play systems, thermal inertia enables Eve to apply the bright blinding illumination before eavesdropping, making her more difficult to catch.

  14. Advanced active quenching circuit for ultra-fast quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipčević, Mario; Christensen, Bradley G; Kwiat, Paul G; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2017-09-04

    Commercial photon-counting modules based on actively quenched solid-state avalanche photodiode sensors are used in a wide variety of applications. Manufacturers characterize their detectors by specifying a small set of parameters, such as detection efficiency, dead time, dark counts rate, afterpulsing probability and single-photon arrival-time resolution (jitter). However, they usually do not specify the range of conditions over which these parameters are constant or present a sufficient description of the characterization process. In this work, we perform a few novel tests on two commercial detectors and identify an additional set of imperfections that must be specified to sufficiently characterize their behavior. These include rate-dependence of the dead time and jitter, detection delay shift, and "twilighting". We find that these additional non-ideal behaviors can lead to unexpected effects or strong deterioration of the performance of a system using these devices. We explain their origin by an in-depth analysis of the active quenching process. To mitigate the effects of these imperfections, a custom-built detection system is designed using a novel active quenching circuit. Its performance is compared against two commercial detectors in a fast quantum key distribution system with hyper-entangled photons and a random number generator.

  15. Public-channel cryptography based on mutual chaos pass filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Einat; Gross, Noam; Kopelowitz, Evi; Rosenbluh, Michael; Khaykovich, Lev; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2006-10-01

    We study the mutual coupling of chaotic lasers and observe both experimentally and in numeric simulations that there exists a regime of parameters for which two mutually coupled chaotic lasers establish isochronal synchronization, while a third laser coupled unidirectionally to one of the pair does not synchronize. We then propose a cryptographic scheme, based on the advantage of mutual coupling over unidirectional coupling, where all the parameters of the system are public knowledge. We numerically demonstrate that in such a scheme the two communicating lasers can add a message signal (compressed binary message) to the transmitted coupling signal and recover the message in both directions with high fidelity by using a mutual chaos pass filter procedure. An attacker, however, fails to recover an errorless message even if he amplifies the coupling signal.

  16. Quantum cryptography to satellites for global secure key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarity, John G.; Gorman, Philip M.; Knight, Paul; Wallace, Kotska; Tapster, Paul R.

    2017-11-01

    We have designed and built a free space secure key exchange system using weak laser pulses with polarisation modulation by acousto-optic switching. We have used this system to exchange keys over a 1.2km ground range with absolute security. Building from this initial result we analyse the feasibility of exchanging keys to a low earth orbit satellite.

  17. Cryptography Based E-Commerce Security: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Shazia Yasin; Khalid Haseeb; Rashid Jalal Qureshi

    2012-01-01

    E-commerce is a powerful tool for business transformation that allows companies to enhance their supply-chain operation, reach new markets, and improve services for customers as well as for providers. Implementing the E-commerce applications that provide these benefits may be impossible without a coherent, consistent approach to E-commerce security. E-commerce has presented a new way of doing transactions all over the world using internet. Organizations have changed their way of doing busines...

  18. Gaps between equations and experiments in quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, John M [Gordon McKay Laboratory, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madjid, F Hadi [82 Powers Road, Concord, MA 01742 (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Traditional methods of cryptographic key distribution rest on judgments about an attacker. With the advent of quantum key distribution (QKD) came proofs of security for the mathematical models that define the protocols BB84 and B92; however, applying such proofs to actual transmitting and receiving devices has been questioned. Proofs of QKD security are propositions about models written in the mathematical language of quantum mechanics, and the issue is the linking of such models to actual devices in an experiment on security. To explore this issue, we adapt Wittgenstein's method of language games to view quantum language in its application to experimental activity involving transmitting and receiving devices. We sketch concepts with which to think about models in relation to experiments, without assuming the experiments accord with any model; included is a concept of one quantum mechanical model enveloping another. For any model that agrees with given experimental results and implies the security of a key, there is an enveloping model that agrees with the same results while denying that security. As a result there is a gap between equations and the behaviour recorded from devices in an experiment, a gap bridged only by resort to something beyond the reach of logic and measured data, well named by the word guesswork. While this recognition of guesswork encourages eavesdropping, a related recognition of guesswork in the design of feedback loops can help a transmitter and receiver to reduce their vulnerability to eavesdropping.

  19. Application of elliptic curve cryptography on data encryption over a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science World Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 4 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. Information Secrecy And Public-Key Cryptography | Mekuria | Zede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The subject and need of information secrecy with emphasis to the choice of fully using an already established public channel is to be discussed. Related histories and current achievements made in the area of information hiding, notable persons who changed the course of its progress from ancient times to this last ...

  1. Incremental cryptography and security of public hash functions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation of incremental algorithms for crytographic functions was initiated. The problem, for collision-free hashing, is to design a scheme for which there exists an efficient “update” algorithm: this algorithm is given the hash function H, the hash h = H(M) of message M and the “replacement request” (j, m), and outputs ...

  2. Cloud Computing Cryptography "State-of-the-Art"

    OpenAIRE

    Omer K. Jasim; Safia Abbas; El-Sayed M. El-Horbaty; Abdel-Badeeh M. Salem

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing technology is very useful in present day to day life, it uses the internet and the central remote servers to provide and maintain data as well as applications. Such applications in turn can be used by the end users via the cloud communications without any installation. Moreover, the end users’ data files can be accessed and manipulated from any other computer using the internet services. Despite the flexibility of data and application accessing and usage that cloud computing e...

  3. Free space relativistic quantum cryptography with faint laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S N; Potapova, T A

    2013-01-01

    A new protocol for quantum key distribution through empty space is proposed. Apart from the quantum mechanical restrictions on distinguishability of non-orthogonal states, the protocol employs additional restrictions imposed by special relativity. The protocol ensures generation of a secure key even for the source generating non-strictly single-photon quantum states and for arbitrary losses in quantum communication channel. (letter)

  4. On lattices, learning with errors, cryptography, and quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regev, O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Our main result is a reduction from worst-case lattice problems such as SVP and SIVP to a certain learning problem. This learning problem is a natural extension of the 'learning from parity with error' problem to higher moduli. It can also be viewed as the problem of decoding from a random linear code. This, we believe, gives a strong indication that these problems are hard. Our reduction, however, is quantum. Hence, an efficient solution to the learning problem implies a quantum algorithm for SVP and SIVP. A main open question is whether this reduction can be made classical. Using the main result, we obtain a public-key cryptosystem whose hardness is based on the worst-case quantum hardness of SVP and SIVP. Previous lattice-based public-key cryptosystems such as the one by Ajtai and Dwork were only based on unique-SVP, a special case of SVP. The new cryptosystem is much more efficient than previous cryptosystems: the public key is of size Ο((n 2 ) and encrypting a message increases its size by Ο((n) (in previous cryptosystems these values are Ο((n 4 ) and Ο(n 2 ), respectively)

  5. Cryptanalysis of Application of Laplace Transform for Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Gençoğlu Muharrem Tuncay

    2017-01-01

    Although Laplace Transform is a good application field in the design of cryptosystems, many cryptographic algorithm proposals become unsatisfactory for secure communication. In this cryptanalysis study, one of the significant disadvantages of the proposed algorithm is performed with only statistical test of security analysis. In this study, Explaining what should be considered when performing security analysis of Laplace Transform based encryption systems and using basic mathematical rules, p...

  6. Attacks to Cryptography Protocols of Wireless Industrial Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Ondrasina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with problems of safety and security principles within wireless industrial communication systems. First safety requirements to wireless industrial communication system, summarisation of attack methods and the available measures for risks elimination are described with orientation to safety critical applications. The mainly part is oriented to identification of risks and summarisation of defensive methods of wireless communication based on cryptographic techniques. Practical part the cryptoanalytic’s attacks to COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf wireless communications are mentioned based on the IEEE 802.11 standards.

  7. Entanglement-based Free Space Quantum Cryptography in Daylight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Peloso, Matthew P.; Ho, Caleb; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2009-05-01

    In quantum key distribution (QKD) two families of protocols are established: One, based on preparing and sending approximations of single photons, the other based on measurements on entangled photon pairs, which allow to establish a secret key using less assumptions on the size of a Hilbert space. The larger optical bandwidth of photon pairs in comparison with light used for the first family makes establishing a free space link challenging. We present a complete entanglement based QKD system following the BBM92 protocol, which generates a secure key continuously 24 hours a day between distant parties. Spectral, spatial and temporal filtering schemes were introduced to a previous setup, suppressing more than 30,B of background. We are able to establish the link during daytime, and have developed an algorithm to start and maintain time synchronization with simple crystal oscillators.

  8. A sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodambashi, Siavash; Zakerolhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a sessional blind signature protocol whose security is guaranteed by fundamental principles of quantum physics. It allows a message owner to get his message signed by an authorized signatory. However, the signatory is not capable of reading the message contents and everyone can verify authenticity of the message. For this purpose, we took advantage of a sessional signature as well as quantum entangled pairs which are generated with respect to it in our proposed protocol. We describe our proposed blind signature through an example and briefly discuss about its unconditional security. Due to the feasibility of the protocol, it can be widely employed for e-payment, e-government, e-business and etc.

  9. Improved security proofs and constructions for public-key cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Jiaxin (M. Sc.)

    2016-01-01

    Diese Arbeit verbessert die Sicherheitsanalyse und Konstruktierbarkeit von Public-Key-Kryptographie: Der erste Teil der Arbeit schlägt einen vereinfachten Sicherheitsbeweis für digitale Signaturverfahren von kanonischen Identifikationsschemata über die klassischen Fiat-Shamir-Transformation im Random Oracle Modell vor. Der zweite Teil der Arbeit schlägt eine neue Variante der Message Authentication Codes (MACs) vor, die sogenannten affinen MACs. Außerdem wird eine generische Transform...

  10. Entanglement witnessing and quantum cryptography with nonideal ferromagnetic detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Kłobus, Waldemar; Grudka, Andrzej; Baumgartner, Andreas; Tomaszewski, Damian; Schönenberger, Christian; Martinek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the use of non-ideal ferromagnetic contacts as a mean to detect quantum entanglement of electron spins in transport experiments. We use a designated entanglement witness and find a minimal spin polarization of $\\eta > 1/\\sqrt{3} \\approx 58 %$ required to demonstrate spin entanglement. This is significantly less stringent than the ubiquitous tests of Bell's inequality with $\\eta > 1/\\sqrt[4]{2}\\approx 84%$. In addition, we discuss the impact of decoherence and nois...

  11. Intermediate states in quantum cryptography and Bell inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.; Gisin, N.

    2003-01-01

    Intermediate states are known from intercept/resend eavesdropping in the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum cryptographic protocol. But they also play fundamental roles in the optimal eavesdropping strategy on the BB84 protocol and in the CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt) inequality. We generalize the intermediate states to an arbitrary dimension and consider intercept/resend eavesdropping, optimal eavesdropping on the generalized BB84 protocol and present a generalized Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality for two entangled qudits based on these states

  12. Number theoretic methods in cryptography complexity lower bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Shparlinski, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The book introduces new techniques which imply rigorous lower bounds on the complexity of some number theoretic and cryptographic problems. These methods and techniques are based on bounds of character sums and numbers of solutions of some polynomial equations over finite fields and residue rings. It also contains a number of open problems and proposals for further research. We obtain several lower bounds, exponential in terms of logp, on the de­ grees and orders of • polynomials; • algebraic functions; • Boolean functions; • linear recurring sequences; coinciding with values of the discrete logarithm modulo a prime p at suf­ ficiently many points (the number of points can be as small as pI/He). These functions are considered over the residue ring modulo p and over the residue ring modulo an arbitrary divisor d of p - 1. The case of d = 2 is of special interest since it corresponds to the representation of the right­ most bit of the discrete logarithm and defines whether the argument is a quadratic...

  13. Enhanced Catalogue Records Positively Impact Circulation but Are Not Used to Their Potential in Patron Searching. A Review of: Tosaka, Y., & Weng, C. (2011. Reexamining content-enriched access: Its effect on usage and discovery. College & Research Libraries, 72(5, 412-427.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari Merkley

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine how contentenrichedcatalogue records impact thecirculation rates of print resources in foursubject areas, and to investigate how thisadditional metadata influences OPACsearching and item retrieval.Design – Analysis of circulation data,bibliographic records, and OPAC search logs.Setting – A library at a four-yearundergraduate residential college in theNorth-eastern United States.Subjects – Bibliographic records for 88,538titles; data from 7,782 circulation transactions;and 130 OPAC search strings and relatedcirculation data.Methods – In the first part of the study,bibliographic records for print items publishedsince 1990 were extracted from the library’sintegrated library system (ILS in the followingLibrary of Congress (LC classes: D, E, F, H, J,L, P, Q, R, S, and T. It is assumed thatelectronic books were excluded from thisstudy because their usage is not tracked in theILS. These LC classes were chosen tocorrespond to the subject areas targeted by theresearchers for comparison – “history, socialsciences, language and literature, and scienceand technology” (p. 416. The data fileincluded the publication date of the title, aswell as values for the MARC fields identified by the researchers as containing content-enriched data. These fields were MARC 505 (an item’s table of contents or list of works included, MARC 520 (summaries or annotations, and MARC 856 (URL to electronic location of related material or electronic copy (p. 416; Library of Congress Network Development and MARC Standards Office, 2003, 2008a, 2008b. The authors analyzed records for 88,538 titles and determined the total number of records containing each of the MARC fields either singly or in combination.Data relating to circulation transactions for items located in these LC classes from January to May 2009 was also identified. Like the bibliographic records, circulation data was pulled for print items only. The researchers identified 7,782 circulation transactions that met the study criteria for the period in question.In the second part of the study, circulation data for September 22, 2009 was obtained and sorted into the four subject categories identified in Part I of the study. The authors indicate that this date was chosen at random, but do not specify how. Researchers compared the records of the 133 titles borrowed that day from the LC classes studied to the OPAC search logs from September 16-22, 2009 to determine which searches led to the circulation of these items. The authors felt that searches resulting in checkouts on the day in question may have begun earlier in the week. The searches that led to borrowing were recorded and categorized as keyword, title, author, or other searches. If a user entered a title or author name into the keyword field, these were classed as known item searches in the appropriate categories. The authors identified and analyzed 130 searches relating to circulated items.Main Results – In the first part of the study, the number of catalogue records that contained MARC 505, 520, and/or 856 fields significantly increased for titles published between 1990 and 2007, with a slight decrease in 2008. MARC 505 was the most common content-enriched field until 2000, after which the presence of MARC 856 grew significantly. The MARC 520 field was used least often, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions about its impact on circulation.The incidence of enhanced records was very low among older books in the study. Only 14.3% of items published between 1990 and 1994, and 19.3% of items published between 1995 and 1999, had records that contained MARC 505, 520, or 856 fields. In contrast, the percentage of enhanced records was very high (80.9% for items published between 2005 and 2008. The authors acknowledged that these stark imbalances created skewed comparison data for items published in these date ranges. As such, they suggested that the data for titles published between 2000 and 2004 offered the most balanced comparison because the numbers of enhanced and non-enhanced records were almost equal. The overall circulation of items with enhanced records published between 2000 and 2004 was 2.9% higher than for items with non-enhanced records, constituting a relative percentage difference of 30.7%. The relative percentage difference in this period was higher for books in science and technology (36.9%, followed by history (34%, language and literature (30.6%, and social sciences (25.7%. Enhanced records also had a positive impact on circulation for items published between 1990 and 2000 over their non-enhanced counterparts; however, this positive growth levelled off for items published between 2005 and 2008, with almost equal circulation rates between items with enhanced and non-enhanced records during this period. The impact of the three MARC fields was examined, and the presence of the MARC 505 field was most associated with increased circulation rates, in part because it was the most commonly used field of the three for the period in question. The number of records with MARC 520 and 856 fields was not sufficient to draw firm conclusions about their impact on circulation. While not the focus of the study, the circulation data also suggested a preference for current titles among all four subject areas, most significantly among the social sciences and science and technology. The second part of the study found that keyword searching was the most common strategy employed by patrons, with 49.6% of the 130 searches examined falling into this category. Keyword searches most commonly led to the borrowing of items from the history LC classes, while title searches were most common in science and technology. Known item searches (title or author accounted for 45.9% of the overall searches analyzed. However, in most cases, the search terms used that led to a title circulating were found in the title and subject fields, rather than in a content-enriched MARC field. The researchers suggested that this may be due to the appearance of search results in the OPAC (brief rather than full record and the way relevancy sorting was calculated, as contents notes were not given a high weighting in the OPAC’s formula.Conclusion – The study found that enhanced catalogue records led to higher circulation rates in the four subject areas studied. The increased proportion of content-enriched records in the overall catalogue in recent years suggested that their value had been recognized by the library. The limited role these enhanced fields played in the September 22, 2009 searches suggested that further work on improving how this information is displayed to users in the OPAC and sorted is needed. The researchers identified areas for future research including the role of the publication date and the impact of improvements to the display of content fields in the OPAC on the circulation of items with content-enriched records.

  14. Revision of the subfamily Opiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae from Hunan (China, including thirty-six new species and two new genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xi-Ying

    2013-02-01

    postpectalis sp. n. are described. All species are illustrated and keyed. In total 30 species of Opiinae are sequenced and the cladograms are presented. Neopius Gahan, 1917, Opiognathus Fischer, 1972, Opiostomus Fischer, 1972, and Rhogadopsis Brèthes, 1913, are treated as a valid genera based on molecular and morphological differences. Opius vittata Chen & Weng, 2005 (not Opius vittatus Ruschka, 1915, O. ambiguus Weng & Chen, 2005 (not Wesmael, 1835 and O. mitis Chen & Weng, 2005 (not Fischer, 1963 are primary homonyms and are renamed into Phaedrotoma depressa Li & van Achterberg, nom. n., Opius cheni Li & van Achterberg, nom. n. and O. wengi Li & van Achterberg, nom. n., respectively. Phaedrotoma terga (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead, 1905 and Biosteres pavitita Chen & Weng, 2005, are reported new for Hunan, Opiostomus aureliae (Fischer, 1957 comb. n. is new for China and Hunan; Xynobius maculipennis (Enderlein, 1912 comb. n. is new for Hunan and continental China and Rhogadopsis longuria (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n. is new for Hunan. The following new combinations are given: Apodesmia puncta (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., A. tracta (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., Areotetes laevigatus (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., Phaedrotoma dimidia (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., P. improcera (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., P. amputata (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., P. larga (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., P. osculas (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., P. postuma (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., P. rugulosa (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., P. tabularis (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., Rhogadopsis apii (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., R. dimidia (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., R. diutia (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., R. longuria (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., R. pratellae (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., R. pratensis (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., R. sculpta (Chen & Weng, 2005 comb. n., R. sulcifer (Fischer, 1975 comb. n., R. tabidula (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n., Xynobius complexus (Weng & Chen, 2005 comb. n

  15. Põlvkonnaromaan saksa nooremas kirjanduses / Peeter Helme

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Helme, Peeter, 1978-

    2006-01-01

    Ülevaade järgmistest teostest: Christian Krachti "Faserland" (1995), Florian Illiesi ""Golfi" generatsioon" (2001), Annegret Kunkeli (tegel. Sophie Dannenberg) "Revolutsiooni pleekinud süda", Uwe Tellkampi "Jäälind", Karen Duve "See ei ole armastuslaul", Andreas Maieri "Kirillov"

  16. Organizational Career Growth, Affective Occupational Commitment and Turnover Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qingxiong; McElroy, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Survey data, collected from the People's Republic of China, were used to test Weng's (2010) four facet model of career growth and to examine its effect on occupational commitment and turnover intentions. Weng conceptualized career growth as consisting of four factors: career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed, and…

  17. Design and implementation of an ASIP-based cryptography processor for AES, IDEA, and MD5

    OpenAIRE

    Karim Shahbazi; Mohammad Eshghi; Reza Faghih Mirzaee

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new 32-bit ASIP-based crypto processor for AES, IDEA, and MD5 is designed. The instruction-set consists of both general purpose and specific instructions for the above cryptographic algorithms. The proposed architecture has nine function units and two data buses. It has also two types of 32-bit instruction formats for executing Memory Reference (M.R.), Register Reference (R.R.), and Input/Output Reference (I/O R.) instructions. The maximum achieved frequency is 166.916 MHz. T...

  18. Design and implementation of an ASIP-based cryptography processor for AES, IDEA, and MD5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Shahbazi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new 32-bit ASIP-based crypto processor for AES, IDEA, and MD5 is designed. The instruction-set consists of both general purpose and specific instructions for the above cryptographic algorithms. The proposed architecture has nine function units and two data buses. It has also two types of 32-bit instruction formats for executing Memory Reference (M.R., Register Reference (R.R., and Input/Output Reference (I/O R. instructions. The maximum achieved frequency is 166.916 MHz. The encoded output results of the encryption process of a 128-bit input block are obtained after 122, 146 and 170 clock cycles for AES-128, AES-192, and AES-256, respectively. Moreover, it takes 95 clock cycles to encrypt or decrypt a 64-bit input block by using IDEA. Finally, the MD5 hash algorithm requires 469 clock cycles to generate the coded outputs for a block of 512 bits. The performance of the proposed processor is compared to some previous and state-of-the-art implementations in terms of speed, latency, throughput, and flexibility.

  19. Bio-Cryptography Based Secured Data Replication Management in Cloud Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Elango Pitchai

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is new way of economical and efficient storage. The single data mart storage system is a less secure because data remain under a single data mart. This can lead to data loss due to different causes like hacking, server failure etc. If an attacker chooses to attack a specific client, then he can aim at a fixed cloud provider, try to have access to the client’s information. This makes an easy job of the attackers, both inside and outside attackers get the benefit of ...

  20. A true random number generator based on mouse movement and chaotic cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yue; Liao Xiaofeng; Wong, Kwok-wo; Zhou Qing

    2009-01-01

    True random number generators are in general more secure than pseudo random number generators. In this paper, we propose a novel true random number generator which generates a 256-bit random number by computer mouse movement. It is cheap, convenient and universal for personal computers. To eliminate the effect of similar movement patterns generated by the same user, three chaos-based approaches, namely, discretized 2D chaotic map permutation, spatiotemporal chaos and 'MASK' algorithm, are adopted to post-process the captured mouse movements. Random bits generated by three users are tested using NIST statistical tests. Both the spatiotemporal chaos approach and the 'MASK' algorithm pass the tests successfully. However, the latter has a better performance in terms of efficiency and effectiveness and so is more practical for common personal computer applications.

  1. Secured Communication for Business Process Outsourcing Using Optimized Arithmetic Cryptography Protocol Based on Virtual Parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    Within a span of over a decade, India has become one of the most favored destinations across the world for Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) operations. India has rapidly achieved the status of being the most preferred destination for BPO for companies located in the US and Europe. Security and privacy are the two major issues needed to be addressed by the Indian software industry to have an increased and long-term outsourcing contract from the US. Another important issue is about sharing employee’s information to ensure that data and vital information of an outsourcing company is secured and protected. To ensure that the confidentiality of a client’s information is maintained, BPOs need to implement some data security measures. In this paper, we propose a new protocol for specifically for BPO Secure Multi-Party Computation (SMC). As there are many computations and surveys which involve confidential data from many parties or organizations and the concerned data is property of the organization, preservation and security of this data is of prime importance for such type of computations. Although the computation requires data from all the parties, but none of the associated parties would want to reveal their data to the other parties. We have proposed a new efficient and scalable protocol to perform computation on encrypted information. The information is encrypted in a manner that it does not affect the result of the computation. It uses modifier tokens which are distributed among virtual parties, and finally used in the computation. The computation function uses the acquired data and modifier tokens to compute right result from the encrypted data. Thus without revealing the data, right result can be computed and privacy of the parties is maintained. We have given a probabilistic security analysis of hacking the protocol and shown how zero hacking security can be achieved. Also we have analyzed the specific case of Indian BPO.

  2. A novel authentication protocol based on biometric and identity-based cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Aljeaid, D

    2015-01-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been devoted to distributed systems. It has become obvious that a high security level should be a fundamental prerequisite for organisations' processes, both in the commercial and public sectors. A crucial foundation for securing a network is the ability to reliably authenticate ommunication parties. However, these systems face some critical security risks and challenges when they attempt to stabilise between security, efficiency and functionality. Develop...

  3. Gaussian elimination in split unitary groups with an application to public-key cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Mahalanobis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gaussian elimination is used in special linear groups to solve the word problem. In this paper, we extend Gaussian elimination to split unitary groups. These algorithms have an application in building a public-key cryptosystem, we demonstrate that.

  4. Secure Multi-party Computation Protocol for Defense Applications in Military Operations Using Virtual Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    With the advent into the 20th century whole world has been facing the common dilemma of Terrorism. The suicide attacks on US twin towers 11 Sept. 2001, Train bombings in Madrid Spain 11 Mar. 2004, London bombings 7 Jul. 2005 and Mumbai attack 26 Nov. 2008 were some of the most disturbing, destructive and evil acts by terrorists in the last decade which has clearly shown their evil intent that they can go to any extent to accomplish their goals. Many terrorist organizations such as al Quaida, Harakat ul-Mujahidin, Hezbollah, Jaish-e-Mohammed, Lashkar-e-Toiba, etc. are carrying out training camps and terrorist operations which are accompanied with latest technology and high tech arsenal. To counter such terrorism our military is in need of advanced defense technology. One of the major issues of concern is secure communication. It has to be made sure that communication between different military forces is secure so that critical information is not leaked to the adversary. Military forces need secure communication to shield their confidential data from terrorist forces. Leakage of concerned data can prove hazardous, thus preservation and security is of prime importance. There may be a need to perform computations that require data from many military forces, but in some cases the associated forces would not want to reveal their data to other forces. In such situations Secure Multi-party Computations find their application. In this paper, we propose a new highly scalable Secure Multi-party Computation (SMC) protocol and algorithm for Defense applications which can be used to perform computation on encrypted data. Every party encrypts their data in accordance with a particular scheme. This encrypted data is distributed among some created virtual parties. These Virtual parties send their data to the TTP through an Anonymizer layer. TTP performs computation on encrypted data and announces the result. As the data sent was encrypted its actual value can’t be known by TTP and with the use of Anonymizers we have covered the identity of true source of data. Modifier tokens are generated along encryption of data which are distributed among virtual parties, then sent to TTP and finally used in the computation. Thus without revealing the data, right result can be computed and privacy of the parties is maintained. We have also given a probabilistic security analysis of hacking the protocol and shown how zero hacking security can be achieved.

  5. Cryptanalysis of a computer cryptography scheme based on a filter bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, David; Li Chengqing; Li Shujun; Alvarez, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the security of a recently-proposed signal encryption scheme based on a filter bank. A very critical weakness of this new signal encryption procedure is exploited in order to successfully recover the associated secret key.

  6. Randomized dynamical decoupling strategies and improved one-way key rates for quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, Oliver

    2009-05-25

    The present thesis deals with various methods of quantum error correction. It is divided into two parts. In the first part, dynamical decoupling methods are considered which have the task of suppressing the influence of residual imperfections in a quantum memory. Such imperfections might be given by couplings between the finite dimensional quantum systems (qudits) constituting the quantum memory, for instance. The suppression is achieved by altering the dynamics of an imperfect quantum memory with the help of a sequence of local unitary operations applied to the qudits. Whereas up to now the operations of such decoupling sequences have been constructed in a deterministic fashion, strategies are developed in this thesis which construct the operations by random selection from a suitable set. Formulas are derived which estimate the average performance of such strategies. As it turns out, randomized decoupling strategies offer advantages and disadvantages over deterministic ones. It is possible to benefit from the advantages of both kind of strategies by designing combined strategies. Furthermore, it is investigated if and how the discussed decoupling strategies can be employed to protect a quantum computation running on the quantum memory. It is shown that a purely randomized decoupling strategy may be used by applying the decoupling operations and adjusted gates of the quantum algorithm in an alternating fashion. Again this method can be enhanced by the means of deterministic methods in order to obtain a combined decoupling method for quantum computations analogously to the combining strategies for quantum memories. The second part of the thesis deals with quantum error-correcting codes and protocols for quantum key distribution. The focus is on the BB84 and the 6-state protocol making use of only one-way communication during the error correction and privacy amplification steps. It is shown that by adding additional errors to the preliminary key (a process called noisy preprocessing) followed by the use of a structured block code, higher secure key rates may be obtained. For the BB84 protocol it is shown that iterating the combined preprocessing leads to an even higher gain. In order to speed up the numerical evaluation of the key rates, results of representation theory come into play. If a coherent version of the protocol is considered, the block code used in the preprocessing stage becomes a concatenated stabilizer code which is obtained by concatenating an outer random code with an inner deterministic one. This concatenated stabilizer code is used to compute an improved lower bound on the quantum capacity of a certain quantum channel (the so-called qubit depolarizing channel). (orig.)

  7. Randomized dynamical decoupling strategies and improved one-way key rates for quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The present thesis deals with various methods of quantum error correction. It is divided into two parts. In the first part, dynamical decoupling methods are considered which have the task of suppressing the influence of residual imperfections in a quantum memory. Such imperfections might be given by couplings between the finite dimensional quantum systems (qudits) constituting the quantum memory, for instance. The suppression is achieved by altering the dynamics of an imperfect quantum memory with the help of a sequence of local unitary operations applied to the qudits. Whereas up to now the operations of such decoupling sequences have been constructed in a deterministic fashion, strategies are developed in this thesis which construct the operations by random selection from a suitable set. Formulas are derived which estimate the average performance of such strategies. As it turns out, randomized decoupling strategies offer advantages and disadvantages over deterministic ones. It is possible to benefit from the advantages of both kind of strategies by designing combined strategies. Furthermore, it is investigated if and how the discussed decoupling strategies can be employed to protect a quantum computation running on the quantum memory. It is shown that a purely randomized decoupling strategy may be used by applying the decoupling operations and adjusted gates of the quantum algorithm in an alternating fashion. Again this method can be enhanced by the means of deterministic methods in order to obtain a combined decoupling method for quantum computations analogously to the combining strategies for quantum memories. The second part of the thesis deals with quantum error-correcting codes and protocols for quantum key distribution. The focus is on the BB84 and the 6-state protocol making use of only one-way communication during the error correction and privacy amplification steps. It is shown that by adding additional errors to the preliminary key (a process called noisy preprocessing) followed by the use of a structured block code, higher secure key rates may be obtained. For the BB84 protocol it is shown that iterating the combined preprocessing leads to an even higher gain. In order to speed up the numerical evaluation of the key rates, results of representation theory come into play. If a coherent version of the protocol is considered, the block code used in the preprocessing stage becomes a concatenated stabilizer code which is obtained by concatenating an outer random code with an inner deterministic one. This concatenated stabilizer code is used to compute an improved lower bound on the quantum capacity of a certain quantum channel (the so-called qubit depolarizing channel). (orig.)

  8. Image encryption based on nonlinear encryption system and public-key cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tieyu; Ran, Qiwen; Chi, Yingying

    2015-03-01

    Recently, optical asymmetric cryptosystem (OACS) has became the focus of discussion and concern of researchers. Some researchers pointed out that OACS was not tenable because of misunderstanding the concept of asymmetric cryptosystem (ACS). We propose an improved cryptosystem using RSA public-key algorithm based on existing OACS and the new system conforms to the basic agreement of public key cryptosystem. At the beginning of the encryption process, the system will produce an independent phase matrix and allocate the input image, which also conforms to one-time pad cryptosystem. The simulation results show that the validity of the improved cryptosystem and the high robustness against attack scheme using phase retrieval technique.

  9. Shor's factoring algorithm and modern cryptography. An illustration of the capabilities inherent in quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerjuoy, Edward

    2005-06-01

    The security of messages encoded via the widely used RSA public key encryption system rests on the enormous computational effort required to find the prime factors of a large number N using classical (conventional) computers. In 1994 Peter Shor showed that for sufficiently large N, a quantum computer could perform the factoring with much less computational effort. This paper endeavors to explain, in a fashion comprehensible to the nonexpert, the RSA encryption protocol; the various quantum computer manipulations constituting the Shor algorithm; how the Shor algorithm performs the factoring; and the precise sense in which a quantum computer employing Shor's algorithm can be said to accomplish the factoring of very large numbers with less computational effort than a classical computer. It is made apparent that factoring N generally requires many successive runs of the algorithm. Our analysis reveals that the probability of achieving a successful factorization on a single run is about twice as large as commonly quoted in the literature.

  10. One-Sided Device Independent QKD and Position-Based Cryptography from Monogamy Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Tomamichel; S. Fehr (Serge); J. Kaniewski; S.D.C. Wehner (Stephanie); T. Johansson; P.Q. Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractA serious concern with quantum key distribution (QKD) schemes is that, when under attack, the quantum devices in a real-life implementation may behave differently than modeled in the security proof. This can lead to real-life attacks against provably secure QKD schemes. In this work,

  11. A monogamy-of-entanglement game with applications to device-independent quantum cryptography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Tomamichel; S. Fehr (Serge); J. Kaniewski; S.D.C. Wehner (Stephanie); T. Johansson; P.Q. Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractWe consider a game in which two separate laboratories collaborate to prepare a quantum system and are then asked to guess the outcome of a measurement performed by a third party in a random basis on that system. Intuitively, by the uncertainty principle and the monogamy of entanglement,

  12. Achieving Higher-Fidelity Conjunction Analyses Using Cryptography to Improve Information Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Bookstore Make a charitable contribution Limited Electronic Distribution Rights This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by...coupled with the high price for cheating, serves to prevent participants from deviating from the protocol. The fully malicious model prevents cheating...xn )) f a b ! (x)dx " #x 3 ( f (x0 ) + f (xn )) + 4#x 3 f i=1 n /2 $ (x2i%1) + 2#x 3 f i=1 n /2 $ (x2i ). 41 Bibliography Adida , Ben, “Helios: Web

  13. Synchronization of time-delayed systems with chaotic modulation and cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Santo

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method of synchronization between two time-delayed systems where the delay times are modulated by a common chaotic signal of the driving system. The technique is well applied to two identical autonomous continuous-time-delayed systems with numerical simulations. Finally, a new method of encryption is generated for digital messages. This method is illustrated with two different encryption processes for text as well as picture messages.

  14. A monogamy-of-entanglement game with applications to device-independent quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomamichel, Marco; Kaniewski, Jędrzej; Wehner, Stephanie; Fehr, Serge

    2013-01-01

    We consider a game in which two separate laboratories collaborate to prepare a quantum system and are then asked to guess the outcome of a measurement performed by a third party in a random basis on that system. Intuitively, by the uncertainty principle and the monogamy of entanglement, the probability that both players simultaneously succeed in guessing the outcome correctly is bounded. We are interested in the question of how the success probability scales when many such games are performed in parallel. We show that any strategy that maximizes the probability to win every game individually is also optimal for the parallel repetition of the game. Our result implies that the optimal guessing probability can be achieved without the use of entanglement. We explore several applications of this result. Firstly, we show that it implies security for standard BB84 quantum key distribution when the receiving party uses fully untrusted measurement devices, i.e. we show that BB84 is one-sided device independent. Secondly, we show how our result can be used to prove security of a one-round position-verification scheme. Finally, we generalize a well-known uncertainty relation for the guessing probability to quantum side information. (paper)

  15. Mutual learning in a tree parity machine and its application to cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Klein, Einat; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Mutual learning of a pair of tree parity machines with continuous and discrete weight vectors is studied analytically. The analysis is based on a mapping procedure that maps the mutual learning in tree parity machines onto mutual learning in noisy perceptrons. The stationary solution of the mutual learning in the case of continuous tree parity machines depends on the learning rate where a phase transition from partial to full synchronization is observed. In the discrete case the learning process is based on a finite increment and a full synchronized state is achieved in a finite number of steps. The synchronization of discrete parity machines is introduced in order to construct an ephemeral key-exchange protocol. The dynamic learning of a third tree parity machine (an attacker) that tries to imitate one of the two machines while the two still update their weight vectors is also analyzed. In particular, the synchronization times of the naive attacker and the flipping attacker recently introduced in Ref. 9 are analyzed. All analytical results are found to be in good agreement with simulation results

  16. Heterogeneous Gpu&Cpu Cluster For High Performance Computing In Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Marks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses issues associated with distributed computing systems andthe application of mixed GPU&CPU technology to data encryption and decryptionalgorithms. We describe a heterogenous cluster HGCC formed by twotypes of nodes: Intel processor with NVIDIA graphics processing unit and AMDprocessor with AMD graphics processing unit (formerly ATI, and a novel softwareframework that hides the heterogeneity of our cluster and provides toolsfor solving complex scientific and engineering problems. Finally, we present theresults of numerical experiments. The considered case study is concerned withparallel implementations of selected cryptanalysis algorithms. The main goal ofthe paper is to show the wide applicability of the GPU&CPU technology tolarge scale computation and data processing.

  17. Aspects of Pairing Based Cryptography on Jacobians of Genus Two Curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnshøj, Christian Robenhagen

    The thesis concerns properties of Jacobians of genus two curves defined over a finite field. Such Jacobians have a wide range of applications in data security; e.g. netbanking and digital signature. New properties of the Jacobians are proved; here, a description of the embedding of -torsion point...

  18. Semiconductor lasers driven by self-sustained chaotic electronic oscillators and applications to optical chaos cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingni, Sifeu Takougang; Mbé, Jimmi Hervé Talla; Woafo, Paul

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we numerically study the dynamics of vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) firstly when it is driven by Chua's oscillator, secondly in case where it is driven by a broad frequency spectral bandwidth chaotic oscillator developed by Nana et al. [Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 14, 2266 (2009)]. We demonstrated that the VCSEL generated robust chaotic dynamics compared to the ones found in VCSEL subject to a sinusoidally modulated current and therefore it is more suitable for chaos encryption techniques. The synchronization characteristics and the communication performances of unidirectional coupled VCSEL driven by the broad frequency spectral bandwidth chaotic oscillators are investigated numerically. The results show that high-quality synchronization and transmission of messages can be realized for suitable system parameters. Chaos shift keying method is successfully applied to encrypt a message at a high bitrate.

  19. IBE-Lite: a lightweight identity-based cryptography for body sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chiu C; Wang, Haodong; Zhong, Sheng; Li, Qun

    2009-11-01

    A body sensor network (BSN) is a network of sensors deployed on a person's body for health care monitoring. Since the sensors collect personal medical data, security and privacy are important components in a BSN. In this paper, we developed IBE-Lite, a lightweight identity-based encryption suitable for sensors in a BSN. We present protocols based on IBE-Lite that balance security and privacy with accessibility and perform evaluation using experiments conducted on commercially available sensors.

  20. A Visual Cryptography Based Watermark Technology for Individual and Group Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzam Sleit

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The ease by which digital information can be duplicated and distributed has led to the need for effective copyright protection tools. Various techniques including watermarking have been introduced in attempt to address these growing concerns. Most watermarking algorithms call for a piece of information to be hidden directly in media content, in such a way that it is imperceptible to a human observer, but detectable by a computer. This paper presents an improved cryptographic watermark method based on Hwang and Naor-Shamir [1, 2] approaches. The technique does not require that the watermark pattern to be embedded in to the original digital image. Verification information is generated and used to validate the ownership of the image or a group of images. The watermark pattern can be any bitmap image. Experimental results show that the proposed method can recover the watermark pattern from the marked image (or group of images even if major changes are reflected on the original digital image or any member of the image group such as rotation, scaling and distortion.

  1. A secured authentication protocol for wireless sensor networks using elliptic curves cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsiu-Lien; Chen, Tien-Ho; Liu, Pin-Chuan; Kim, Tai-Hoo; Wei, Hsin-Wen

    2011-01-01

    User authentication is a crucial service in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) that is becoming increasingly common in WSNs because wireless sensor nodes are typically deployed in an unattended environment, leaving them open to possible hostile network attack. Because wireless sensor nodes are limited in computing power, data storage and communication capabilities, any user authentication protocol must be designed to operate efficiently in a resource constrained environment. In this paper, we review several proposed WSN user authentication protocols, with a detailed review of the M.L Das protocol and a cryptanalysis of Das' protocol that shows several security weaknesses. Furthermore, this paper proposes an ECC-based user authentication protocol that resolves these weaknesses. According to our analysis of security of the ECC-based protocol, it is suitable for applications with higher security requirements. Finally, we present a comparison of security, computation, and communication costs and performances for the proposed protocols. The ECC-based protocol is shown to be suitable for higher security WSNs.

  2. Experimental fault-tolerant quantum cryptography in a decoherence-free subspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiang; Pan Jianwei; Yin Juan; Chen Tengyun; Lu Shan; Zhang Jun; Li Xiaoqiang; Yang Tao; Wang Xiangbin

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally implement a fault-tolerant quantum key distribution protocol with two photons in a decoherence-free subspace [Phys. Rev. A 72, 050304(R) (2005)]. It is demonstrated that our protocol can yield a good key rate even with a large bit-flip error rate caused by collective rotation, while the usual realization of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol cannot produce any secure final key given the same channel. Since the experiment is performed in polarization space and does not need the calibration of a reference frame, important applications in free-space quantum communication are expected. Moreover, our method can also be used to robustly transmit an arbitrary two-level quantum state in a type of decoherence-free subspace

  3. Pairing based threshold cryptography improving on Libert-Quisquater and Baek-Zheng

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desmedt, Yvo; Lange, Tanja

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply techniques from secret sharing and threshold decryption to show how to properly design an ID-based threshold system in which one assumes no trust in any party. In our scheme: We avoid that any single machine ever knew the master secret s of the trusted authority (TA). Inste...

  4. General immunity and superadditivity of two-way Gaussian quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We consider two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution, studying its security against general eavesdropping strategies. Assuming the asymptotic limit of many signals exchanged, we prove that two-way Gaussian protocols are immune to coherent attacks. More precisely we show the general superadditivity of the two-way security thresholds, which are proven to be higher than the corresponding one-way counterparts in all cases. We perform the security analysis first reducing the general eavesdropping to a two-mode coherent Gaussian attack, and then showing that the superadditivity is achieved by exploiting the random on/off switching of the two-way quantum communication. This allows the parties to choose the appropriate communication instances to prepare the key, accordingly to the tomography of the quantum channel. The random opening and closing of the circuit represents, in fact, an additional degree of freedom allowing the parties to convert, a posteriori, the two-mode correlations of the eavesdropping into noise. The eavesdropper is assumed to have no access to the on/off switching and, indeed, cannot adapt her attack. We explicitly prove that this mechanism enhances the security performance, no matter if the eavesdropper performs collective or coherent attacks.

  5. De Finetti representation theorem for infinite-dimensional quantum systems and applications to quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, R; Cirac, J I

    2009-03-20

    We show that the quantum de Finetti theorem holds for states on infinite-dimensional systems, provided they satisfy certain experimentally verifiable conditions. This result can be applied to prove the security of quantum key distribution based on weak coherent states or other continuous variable states against general attacks.

  6. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R; Firth, Andrew E; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-09-06

    Genetic decoding is not 'frozen' as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational 'correction' of problem or 'savior' indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5' or 3' of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3' from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Deficiencies of the cryptography based on multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Qiwen; Zhang, Haiying; Zhang, Jin; Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing

    2009-06-01

    Methods of image encryption based on fractional Fourier transform have an incipient flaw in security. We show that the schemes have the deficiency that one group of encryption keys has many groups of keys to decrypt the encrypted image correctly for several reasons. In some schemes, many factors result in the deficiencies, such as the encryption scheme based on multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform [Opt. Lett.33, 581 (2008)]. A modified method is proposed to avoid all the deficiencies. Security and reliability are greatly improved without increasing the complexity of the encryption process. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America.

  8. Application of Elliptic Curve Cryptography in ZigBee Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An encryption algorithm is the core of network security, but for ZigBee wireless sensor network (WSN, the complexity of this algorithm directly affects the cost and energy consumption in MCU hardware storage resources, which results in confliction between data protection and overhead. In this paper, a contradiction simple elliptic curve cryptosystem (ECC is proposed to use for terminal nodes and host computer for data encryption and authentication, the purpose is to save the hardware cost and enhanced data security.

  9. Characterization of polarization-independent phase modulation method for practical plug and play quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Osung; Lee, Min-Soo; Woo, Min Ki; Park, Byung Kwon; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Yong-Su; Han, Sang-Wook; Moon, Sung

    2015-01-01

    We characterized a polarization-independent phase modulation method, called double phase modulation, for a practical plug and play quantum key distribution (QKD) system. Following investigation of theoretical backgrounds, we applied the method to the practical QKD system and characterized the performance through comparing single phase modulation (SPM) and double phase modulation. Consequently, we obtained repeatable and accurate phase modulation confirmed by high visibility single photon interference even for input signals with arbitrary polarization. Further, the results show that only 80% of the bias voltage required in the case of single phase modulation is needed to obtain the target amount of phase modulation. (paper)

  10. Dakota - hashing from a combination of modular arithmetic and symmetric cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Thomsen, Søren Steffen

    In this paper a cryptographic hash function is proposed, where collision resistance is based upon an assumption that involves squaring modulo an RSA modulus in combination with a one-way function that does not compress its input, and may therefore be constructed from standard techniques and assum...

  11. Dakota – Hashing from a Combination of Modular Arithmetic and Symmetric Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Thomsen, Søren Steffen

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a cryptographic hash function is proposed, where collision resistance is based upon an assumption that involves squaring modulo an RSA modulus in combination with a one-way function that does not compress its input, and may therefore be constructed from standard techniques and assum...

  12. A Multiserver Biometric Authentication Scheme for TMIS using Elliptic Curve Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Shehzad Ashraf; Khan, Muhammad Tawab; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Shon, Taeshik

    2016-11-01

    Recently several authentication schemes are proposed for telecare medicine information system (TMIS). Many of such schemes are proved to have weaknesses against known attacks. Furthermore, numerous such schemes cannot be used in real time scenarios. Because they assume a single server for authentication across the globe. Very recently, Amin et al. (J. Med. Syst. 39(11):180, 2015) designed an authentication scheme for secure communication between a patient and a medical practitioner using a trusted central medical server. They claimed their scheme to extend all security requirements and emphasized the efficiency of their scheme. However, the analysis in this article proves that the scheme designed by Amin et al. is vulnerable to stolen smart card and stolen verifier attacks. Furthermore, their scheme is having scalability issues along with inefficient password change and password recovery phases. Then we propose an improved scheme. The proposed scheme is more practical, secure and lightweight than Amin et al.'s scheme. The security of proposed scheme is proved using the popular automated tool ProVerif.

  13. Quantum-Secure Symmetric-Key Cryptography Based on Hidden Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alagic, Gorjan; Russell, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Recent results of Kaplan et al., building on work by Kuwakado and Morii, have shown that a wide variety of classically-secure symmetric-key cryptosystems can be completely broken by quantum chosen-plaintext attacks (qCPA). In such an attack, the quantum adversary has the ability to query the cryp...

  14. An android PGP manager: towards bridging end-user cryptography to smart phones

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Benjamin; Tejedor-Gonzalez, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a key management and an encryption application for the Android operating system, which can be used to secure the privacy of messages exchanged among applications and Web services when accessed from mobile devices. In addition to the management of PGP keys, the application uses PGP encryption to secure the clipboard communication channel on the Android OS, which is widely used to exchange messages especially in the context of social networking and other Web-based services.

  15. Performance costs of cryptography in securing new-generation Internet of Energy endpoint devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ledwaba, Lehlogonolo PI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available cryptographic services on wireless sensor nodes have resulted in high power consumptions, long operating times and the depletion of memory resources. Over the last decade, however, processors for the IoT and IoE have improved; with increased operating power...

  16. 2D non-separable linear canonical transform (2D-NS-LCT) based cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Healy, John J.; Malallah, Ra'ed; Cui, Xiao-Guang; Ryle, James P.; Sheridan, John T.

    2017-05-01

    The 2D non-separable linear canonical transform (2D-NS-LCT) can describe a variety of paraxial optical systems. Digital algorithms to numerically evaluate the 2D-NS-LCTs are not only important in modeling the light field propagations but also of interest in various signal processing based applications, for instance optical encryption. Therefore, in this paper, for the first time, a 2D-NS-LCT based optical Double-random- Phase-Encryption (DRPE) system is proposed which offers encrypting information in multiple degrees of freedom. Compared with the traditional systems, i.e. (i) Fourier transform (FT); (ii) Fresnel transform (FST); (iii) Fractional Fourier transform (FRT); and (iv) Linear Canonical transform (LCT), based DRPE systems, the proposed system is more secure and robust as it encrypts the data with more degrees of freedom with an augmented key-space.

  17. A simple coherent attack and practical security of differential phase shift quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronberg, D A

    2014-01-01

    The differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol reveals good security against such powerful attacks as unambiguous state discrimination and beam splitting attacks. Its complete security analysis is complex due to high dimensions of the supposed spaces and density operators. In this paper, we consider a particular and conceptually simple coherent attack, available in practical implementations. The main condition for this attack is the length of used coherent state tuples of order 8–12. We show that under this condition, no high level of practical distance between legitimate users can be achieved. (paper)

  18. Quantum Privacy Amplification and the Security of Quantum Cryptography over Noisy Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, D.; Ekert, A.; Jozsa, R.; Macchiavello, C.; Popescu, S.; Sanpera, A.

    1996-01-01

    Existing quantum cryptographic schemes are not, as they stand, operable in the presence of noise on the quantum communication channel. Although they become operable if they are supplemented by classical privacy-amplification techniques, the resulting schemes are difficult to analyze and have not been proved secure. We introduce the concept of quantum privacy amplification and a cryptographic scheme incorporating it which is provably secure over a noisy channel. The scheme uses an open-quote open-quote entanglement purification close-quote close-quote procedure which, because it requires only a few quantum controlled-not and single-qubit operations, could be implemented using technology that is currently being developed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. Threshold Cryptography-based Group Authentication (TCGA) Scheme for the Internet of Things (IoT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahalle, Parikshit N.; Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Internet of things (IoT) is an emerging paradigm where the devices around us (persistent and non-persistent) are connected to each other to provide seamless communication, and contextual services. In the IoT, each device cannot be authenticated in the short time due to unbounded number of devices...

  20. Hybrid ququart-encoded quantum cryptography protected by Kochen-Specker contextuality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabello, Adan; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Nagali, Eleonora; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Quantum cryptographic protocols based on complementarity are not secure against attacks in which complementarity is imitated with classical resources. The Kochen-Specker (KS) theorem provides protection against these attacks, without requiring entanglement or spatially separated composite systems. We analyze the maximum tolerated noise to guarantee the security of a KS-protected cryptographic scheme against these attacks and describe a photonic realization of this scheme using hybrid ququarts defined by the polarization and orbital angular momentum of single photons.

  1. Quantum cryptography: individual eavesdropping with the knowledge of the error-correcting protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horoshko, D B

    2007-01-01

    The quantum key distribution protocol BB84 combined with the repetition protocol for error correction is analysed from the point of view of its security against individual eavesdropping relying on quantum memory. It is shown that the mere knowledge of the error-correcting protocol changes the optimal attack and provides the eavesdropper with additional information on the distributed key. (fifth seminar in memory of d.n. klyshko)

  2. Coherent eavesdropping attacks in tomographic quantum cryptography: Nonequivalence of quantum and classical key distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Lim, J.Y.; Englert, Berthold-Georg; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    The security of a cryptographic key that is generated by communication through a noisy quantum channel relies on the ability to distill a shorter secure key sequence from a longer insecure one. We show that - for protocols that use quantum channels of any dimension and completely characterize them by state tomography - the noise threshold for classical advantage distillation of a specific kind is substantially lower than the threshold for quantum entanglement distillation if the eavesdropper can perform powerful coherent attacks. In marked contrast, earlier investigations had shown that the thresholds are identical for incoherent attacks on the same classical distillation scheme. It remains an open question whether other schemes for classical advantage distillation have higher thresholds for coherent eavesdropping attacks

  3. Single-photon counting in the 1550-nm wavelength region for quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chul-Woo; Park, Jun-Bum; Park, Young-Soo; Lee, Seung-Hun; Shin, Hyun-Jun; Bae, Byung-Seong; Moon, Sung; Han, Sang-Kook

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report the measured performance of an InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD) Module fabricated for single-photon counting. We measured the dark current noise, the after-pulse noise, and the quantum efficiency of the single- photon detector for different temperatures. We then examined our single-photon source and detection system by measuring the coincident probability. From our measurement, we observed that the after-pulse effect of the APD at temperatures below 105 .deg. C caused cascade noise build-up on the succeeding electrical signals.

  4. Improvement of two-way continuous variable quantum cryptography by using additional noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Minjie; Pan Wei

    2010-01-01

    The performance of quantum key distribution such as one-way continuous variable protocols, can be increased by adding some noise on the reference side of error correction in the error-correction phase. For this reason, we here study this possibility in the case of two-way continuous variable system. Finally, the numerical results show that the using of additional noise gives two-way schemes better security performance in terms of secret key rates and resistance to channel excess noise.

  5. Security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography using coherent states: Decline of postselection advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Ryo; Hirano, Takuya

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the security of continuous-variable (CV) quantum key distribution (QKD) using coherent states in the presence of quadrature excess noise. We consider an eavesdropping attack that uses a linear amplifier and a beam splitter. This attack makes a link between the beam-splitting attack and the intercept-resend attack (classical teleportation attack). We also show how postselection loses its efficiency in a realistic channel

  6. Cryptographic robustness of a quantum cryptography system using phase-time coding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2008-01-01

    A cryptographic analysis is presented of a new quantum key distribution protocol using phase-time coding. An upper bound is obtained for the error rate that guarantees secure key distribution. It is shown that the maximum tolerable error rate for this protocol depends on the counting rate in the control time slot. When no counts are detected in the control time slot, the protocol guarantees secure key distribution if the bit error rate in the sifted key does not exceed 50%. This protocol partially discriminates between errors due to system defects (e.g., imbalance of a fiber-optic interferometer) and eavesdropping. In the absence of eavesdropping, the counts detected in the control time slot are not caused by interferometer imbalance, which reduces the requirements for interferometer stability.

  7. Security in software-defined wireless sensor networks: threats, challenges and potential solutions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pritchard, SW

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available have focused on low resource cryptography methods to secure the network [27] - [29], [33]. Cryptography methods are separated into symmetric cryptography and asymmetric cryptography. While symmetric cryptography solutions are preferred due to low... implementation cost and efficiency [5], they present many problems when managing large networks and attempts to improve this cryptography for WSNs [11] have resulted in the cost of resources. Symmetric cryptography is also difficult to implement in software...

  8. Revision of the subfamily Opiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) from Hunan (China), including thirty-six new species and two new genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi-Ying; van Achterberg, Cornelis; Tan, Ji-Cai

    2013-01-01

    van Achterberg & Li, gen. n. (type species: Areotetes carinuliferus sp. n.) and Coleopioides van Achterberg & Li, gen. n. (type species: Coleopioides postpectalis sp. n. are described. All species are illustrated and keyed. In total 30 species of Opiinae are sequenced and the cladograms are presented. Neopius Gahan, 1917, Opiognathus Fischer, 1972, Opiostomus Fischer, 1972, and Rhogadopsis Brèthes, 1913, are treated as a valid genera based on molecular and morphological differences. Opius vittata Chen & Weng, 2005 (not Opius vittatus Ruschka, 1915), Opius ambiguus Weng & Chen, 2005 (not Wesmael, 1835) and Opius mitis Chen & Weng, 2005 (not Fischer, 1963) are primary homonymsandarerenamed into Phaedrotoma depressa Li & van Achterberg, nom. n., Opius cheni Li & van Achterberg, nom. n. andOpius wengi Li & van Achterberg, nom. n., respectively. Phaedrotoma terga (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n.,Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead, 1905) and Biosteres pavitita Chen & Weng, 2005, are reported new for Hunan, Opiostomus aureliae (Fischer, 1957) comb. n. is new for China and Hunan; Xynobius maculipennis(Enderlein, 1912) comb. n. is new for Hunan and continental China and Rhogadopsis longuria (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n. is new for Hunan. The following new combinations are given: Apodesmia puncta (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Apodesmia tracta (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Areotetes laevigatus (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma dimidia (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma improcera (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma amputata (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma larga (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma osculas (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma postuma (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma rugulosa (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n., Phaedrotoma tabularis (Weng & Chen, 2005) comb. n., Rhogadopsis apii (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n., Rhogadopsis dimidia (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n., Rhogadopsis diutia (Chen & Weng, 2005) comb. n., Rhogadopsis

  9. A Look over the Fence - The Psychology of Religion

    OpenAIRE

    Böhmer, Annegret

    2010-01-01

    Psychological Theories in the Discussion on Instruction in Ethics A Look over the Fence - The Psychology of Religion Annegret Böhmer Children and adolescents are supposed to be given the opportunity in school not only to acquire knowledge and skills, but also to develop their identity and receive assistance in leading a successful life. In the Federal Republic of Germany it long remained an undisputed fact that religious instruction was responsible for the latter. According to Ar...

  10. Number Theory in Science and Communication With Applications in Cryptography, Physics, Digital Information, Computing, and Self-Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Manfred R

    2006-01-01

    "Number Theory in Science and Communication" is a well-known introduction for non-mathematicians to this fascinating and useful branch of applied mathematics . It stresses intuitive understanding rather than abstract theory and highlights important concepts such as continued fractions, the golden ratio, quadratic residues and Chinese remainders, trapdoor functions, pseudoprimes and primitive elements. Their applications to problems in the real world are one of the main themes of the book. This revised fourth edition is augmented by recent advances in primes in progressions, twin primes, prime triplets, prime quadruplets and quintruplets, factoring with elliptic curves, quantum factoring, Golomb rulers and "baroque" integers. From reviews of earlier editions – "I continue to find [Schroeder’s] Number Theory a goldmine of valuable information. It is a marvellous book, in touch with the most recent applications of number theory and written with great clarity and humor.’ Philip Morrison (Scientific American...

  11. Entropy uncertainty relations and stability of phase-temporal quantum cryptography with finite-length transmitted strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molotkov, S. N., E-mail: sergei.molotkov@gmail.com [Russian Federation, Academy of Cryptography (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15

    Any key-generation session contains a finite number of quantum-state messages, and it is there-fore important to understand the fundamental restrictions imposed on the minimal length of a string required to obtain a secret key with a specified length. The entropy uncertainty relations for smooth min and max entropies considerably simplify and shorten the proof of security. A proof of security of quantum key distribution with phase-temporal encryption is presented. This protocol provides the maximum critical error compared to other protocols up to which secure key distribution is guaranteed. In addition, unlike other basic protocols (of the BB84 type), which are vulnerable with respect to an attack by 'blinding' of avalanche photodetectors, this protocol is stable with respect to such an attack and guarantees key security.

  12. A contribution to quantum cryptography in finite-dimensional systems including further results from the field of quantum information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, Kedar S.

    2009-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with quantum-cryptographic protocols which allow general finite-dimensional quantum systems (qudits) as carriers of information in contrast to the predominantly used two-dimensional quantum systems (qubits). The main focus of investigations is the maximum tolerable error rate of such protocols and its behaviour as a function of the dimension of the information carriers. For this purpose, several concepts are introduced which allow the treatment of this problem. In particular, protocols are presented which work up to a maximum tolerate error rate, and it is shown that a wide class of protocols cannot be used for higher error rates. Among other things, it turns out that the maximum tolerable error rate for two-basis protocols increases up to 50% for high dimensions. Apart from the above-mentioned main subjects of this thesis, some other results from the field of quantum information theory are given, which were achieved during this PhD project. (orig.)

  13. Quantum cryptography with finite resources: unconditional security bound for discrete-variable protocols with one-way postprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarani, Valerio; Renner, Renato

    2008-05-23

    We derive a bound for the security of quantum key distribution with finite resources under one-way postprocessing, based on a definition of security that is composable and has an operational meaning. While our proof relies on the assumption of collective attacks, unconditional security follows immediately for standard protocols such as Bennett-Brassard 1984 and six-states protocol. For single-qubit implementations of such protocols, we find that the secret key rate becomes positive when at least N approximately 10(5) signals are exchanged and processed. For any other discrete-variable protocol, unconditional security can be obtained using the exponential de Finetti theorem, but the additional overhead leads to very pessimistic estimates.

  14. An Efficient and Practical Smart Card Based Anonymity Preserving User Authentication Scheme for TMIS using Elliptic Curve Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ruhul; Islam, S K Hafizul; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Kumar, Neeraj

    2015-11-01

    In the last few years, numerous remote user authentication and session key agreement schemes have been put forwarded for Telecare Medical Information System, where the patient and medical server exchange medical information using Internet. We have found that most of the schemes are not usable for practical applications due to known security weaknesses. It is also worth to note that unrestricted number of patients login to the single medical server across the globe. Therefore, the computation and maintenance overhead would be high and the server may fail to provide services. In this article, we have designed a medical system architecture and a standard mutual authentication scheme for single medical server, where the patient can securely exchange medical data with the doctor(s) via trusted central medical server over any insecure network. We then explored the security of the scheme with its resilience to attacks. Moreover, we formally validated the proposed scheme through the simulation using Automated Validation of Internet Security Schemes and Applications software whose outcomes confirm that the scheme is protected against active and passive attacks. The performance comparison demonstrated that the proposed scheme has lower communication cost than the existing schemes in literature. In addition, the computation cost of the proposed scheme is nearly equal to the exiting schemes. The proposed scheme not only efficient in terms of different security attacks, but it also provides an efficient login, mutual authentication, session key agreement and verification and password update phases along with password recovery.

  15. An Improved and Secure Biometric Authentication Scheme for Telecare Medicine Information Systems Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Shehzad Ashraf; Mahmood, Khalid; Naqvi, Husnain; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2015-11-01

    Telecare medicine information system (TMIS) offers the patients convenient and expedite healthcare services remotely anywhere. Patient security and privacy has emerged as key issues during remote access because of underlying open architecture. An authentication scheme can verify patient's as well as TMIS server's legitimacy during remote healthcare services. To achieve security and privacy a number of authentication schemes have been proposed. Very recently Lu et al. (J. Med. Syst. 39(3):1-8, 2015) proposed a biometric based three factor authentication scheme for TMIS to confiscate the vulnerabilities of Arshad et al.'s (J. Med. Syst. 38(12):136, 2014) scheme. Further, they emphasized the robustness of their scheme against several attacks. However, in this paper we establish that Lu et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to numerous attacks including (1) Patient anonymity violation attack, (2) Patient impersonation attack, and (3) TMIS server impersonation attack. Furthermore, their scheme does not provide patient untraceability. We then, propose an improvement of Lu et al.'s scheme. We have analyzed the security of improved scheme using popular automated tool ProVerif. The proposed scheme while retaining the plusses of Lu et al.'s scheme is also robust against known attacks.

  16. Data security in genomics: A review of Australian privacy requirements and their relation to cryptography in data storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosberg, Arran

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) brings with it a need to manage large volumes of patient data in a manner that is compliant with both privacy laws and long-term archival needs. Outside of the realm of genomics there is a need in the broader medical community to store data, and although radiology aside the volume may be less than that of NGS, the concepts discussed herein are similarly relevant. The relation of so-called "privacy principles" to data protection and cryptographic techniques is explored with regards to the archival and backup storage of health data in Australia, and an example implementation of secure management of genomic archives is proposed with regards to this relation. Readers are presented with sufficient detail to have informed discussions - when implementing laboratory data protocols - with experts in the fields.

  17. Quantum Cryptography II: How to re-use a one-time pad safely even if P=NP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles H; Brassard, Gilles; Breidbart, Seth

    2014-01-01

    When elementary quantum systems, such as polarized photons, are used to transmit digital information, the uncertainty principle gives rise to novel cryptographic phenomena unachievable with traditional transmission media, e.g. a communications channel on which it is impossible in principle to eavesdrop without a high probability of being detected. With such a channel, a one-time pad can safely be reused many times as long as no eavesdrop is detected, and, planning ahead, part of the capacity of these uncompromised transmissions can be used to send fresh random bits with which to replace the one-time pad when an eavesdrop finally is detected. Unlike other schemes for stretching a one-time pad, this scheme does not depend on complexity-theoretic assumptions such as the difficulty of factoring.

  18. Home and Clinical Cardiovascular Care Center (H4C): a Framework for Integrating Body Sensor Networks and QTRU Cryptography System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerolhosseini, Ali; Sokouti, Massoud; Pezeshkian, Massoud

    2013-01-01

    Quick responds to heart attack patients before arriving to hospital is a very important factor. In this paper, a combined model of Body Sensor Network and Personal Digital Access using QTRU cipher algorithm in Wifi networks is presented to efficiently overcome these life threatening attacks. The algorithm for optimizing the routing paths between sensor nodes and an algorithm for reducing the power consumption are also applied for achieving the best performance by this model. This system is consumes low power and has encrypting and decrypting processes. It also has an efficient routing path in a fast manner.

  19. The cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum as a random bit generator for symmetric- and asymmetric-key cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey S; Cleaver, Gerald B

    2017-10-01

    In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n × n) random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established.

  20. The cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum as a random bit generator for symmetric- and asymmetric-key cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n × n random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established. Keywords: Particle physics, Computer science, Mathematics, Astrophysics