WorldWideScience

Sample records for cryogenic turbopump bearing

  1. Application of powder metallurgy technique to produce improved bearing elements for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxson, V. S.; Moracz, D. J.; Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.; Thom, R.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, vacuum melted 440C stainless steel is used for high performance bearings for aerospace cryogenic systems where corrosion due to condensation is a major concern. For the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), however, 440C performance in the high-pressure turbopumps has been marginal. A basic assumption of this study was that powder metallurgy, rather than cast/wrought, processing would provide the finest, most homogeneous bearing alloy structure. Preliminary testing of P/M alloys (hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness) was used to 'de-select' alloys which did perform as well as baseline 440C. Five out of eleven candidate materials (14-4/6V, X-405, MRC-2001, T-440V, and D-5) based on preliminary screening were selected for the actual rolling-sliding five-ball testing. The results of this test were compared with high-performance vacuum-melted M50 bearing steel. The results of the testing indicated outstanding performance of two P/M alloys, X-405 and MRC-2001, which eventually will be further evaluated by full-scale bearing testing.

  2. Bulk-Flow Analysis of Hybrid Thrust Bearings for Advanced Cryogenic Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1998-01-01

    A bulk-flow analysis and computer program for prediction of the static load performance and dynamic force coefficients of angled injection, orifice-compensated hydrostatic/hydrodynamic thrust bearings have been completed. The product of the research is an efficient computational tool for the design of high-speed thrust bearings for cryogenic fluid turbopumps. The study addresses the needs of a growing technology that requires of reliable fluid film bearings to provide the maximum operating life with optimum controllable rotordynamic characteristics at the lowest cost. The motion of a cryogenic fluid on the thin film lands of a thrust bearing is governed by a set of bulk-flow mass and momentum conservation and energy transport equations. Mass flow conservation and a simple model for momentum transport within the hydrostatic bearing recesses are also accounted for. The bulk-flow model includes flow turbulence with fluid inertia advection, Coriolis and centrifugal acceleration effects on the bearing recesses and film lands. The cryogenic fluid properties are obtained from realistic thermophysical equations of state. Turbulent bulk-flow shear parameters are based on Hirs' model with Moody's friction factor equations allowing a simple simulation for machined bearing surface roughness. A perturbation analysis leads to zeroth-order nonlinear equations governing the fluid flow for the thrust bearing operating at a static equilibrium position, and first-order linear equations describing the perturbed fluid flow for small amplitude shaft motions in the axial direction. Numerical solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations renders the bearing flow rate, thrust load, drag torque and power dissipation. Solution to the first-order equations determines the axial stiffness, damping and inertia force coefficients. The computational method uses well established algorithms and generic subprograms available from prior developments. The Fortran9O computer program hydrothrust runs

  3. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  4. Hybrid bearings for LH2 and LO2 turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butner, M. F.; Lee, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid combinations of hydrostatic and ball bearings can improve bearing performance for liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen turbopumps. Analytic studies were conducted to optimize hybrid bearing designs for the SSME-type turbopump conditions. A method to empirically determine damping coefficients was devised. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed, and three were fabricated. Six hybrid and hydrostatic-only bearing configurations will be tested for steady-state and transient performance, and quantification of damping coefficients. The initial tests were conducted with the liquid hydrogen bearing.

  5. Lubrication of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Howard; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle has three main engines that are used for propulsion into orbit. These engines are fed propellants by four turbopumps on each engine. A main element in the turbopump is the bearings supporting the rotor that spins the turbine blades and the pump impeller. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and thrust loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of lubrication. The liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellants flow through the bearings to cool the surfaces. The volatile nature of the propellants excludes any conventional means of lubrication. Lubrication for these bearings is provided by the ball separator inside the bearing. The separator is a composite material that supplies a transfer film of lubrication to the rings and balls. New separator materials and lubrication schemes have been investigated at Marshall Space Flight Center in a bearing test rig with promising results. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls have also been evaluated. The use of hybrid, silicon nitride ball bearings in conjunction -with better separator materials has shown excellent results. The work that Marshall has done is being utilized in turbopumps flying on the space shuttle fleet and will be utilized in future space travel. This result of this work is valuable for all aerospace and commercial applications where high-speed bearings are used.

  6. Bearing technology in turbopumps; Lagerungstechnik fuer Turbopumpen. Eine naehere Betrachtung von Kugel- und Magnetlagerungen und ihre Eigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhardt, Helmut; Ganswindt, Christoph [Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH, Asslar (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    This contribution provides an overview of the development undergone by bearing technology in turbomolecular pumps or, in short, turbopumps. It not only describes which conventional bearing configurations are encountered today, but also explains the pros and cons of the various configurations. The path to using turbopumps with full magnetic bearings was paved with various difficulties in the early nineties. The concluding description of the current state of the art, with the focus on safety, reliability, user-friendliness, maintenance-free design and energy efficiency, illustrates how the development of turbopumps has undergone fundamental changes. (orig.)

  7. NERVA turbopump bearing retainer fabrication on nonmetallic retainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The need for a low-wear, lightweight, high strength bearing retainer material with a radiation degradation threshold of 10 to the 9th power rads (C) prompted development of nonmetallic reinforced polymers of the following types: (1) polybenzimidazole, (2) polyimide, and (3) polyquinoxaline. Retainers were machined from tubular laminates (billets), including reinforcement by either glass or graphite fabric or filament. Fabrication of billets involves hot preimpregnation of the reinforcement fabric or filament with polymer followed by wrapping this prepreg over a heated mandrel to form a tube with the required thickness and length.

  8. High speed cryogenic self-acting, shaft seals for liquid rocket turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Three self acting lift pad liquid oxygen face seals and two self acting gaseous helium circumferential seals for high speed liquid oxygen turbopump were evaluated. The development of a technology for reliable, 10 hour life, multiple start seals for use in high speed liquid oxygen turbopumps is discussed.

  9. Limiting critical speed response on the SSME Alternate High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (ATD HPFTP) with bearing deadband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, David G.; Darden, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Yammamoto (1954) described the influence of bearing deadband on the critical speed response of a rotor-bearing system. Practical application of these concepts to limit critical speed response of turbopump rotors is described. Nonlinear rotordynamic analyses are used to define the effect of bearing deadband and rotor unbalance on the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. Analysis results are used with hot fire test data to verify the presence of a lightly damped critical speed within the operating speed range. With the proper control of rotor unbalance and bearing deadband, the response of this critical speed is reduced to acceptable levels without major design modifications or additional sources of damping.

  10. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  11. Superconducting Meissner effect bearings for cryogenic turbomachines, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Martin, Jerry L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the final report of a Phase 2 SBIR project to develop Meissner effect bearings for miniature cryogenic turbomachines. The bearing system was designed for use in miniature cryogenic turboexpanders in reverse-Brayton-cycle cryocoolers. The cryocoolers are designed to cool sensors on satellites. Existing gas bearings for this application run in a relatively warm state. The heat loss from the bearings into the shaft and into the cold process gas imposes a penalty on the cycle efficiency. By using cold Meissner effect bearings, this heat loss could be minimized, and the input power per unit of cooling for these cryocoolers could be reduced. Two bearing concepts were explored in this project. The first used an all-magnetic passive radial suspension to position the shaft over a range of temperatures from room temperature to 77 K. This bearing concept was proven to be feasible, but impractical for the miniature high-speed turbine application since it lacked the required shaft positioning accuracy. A second bearing concept was then developed. In this concept, the Meissner effect bearings are combined with self-acting gas bearings. The Meissner effect bearing provides the additional stiffness and damping required to stabilize the shaft at low temperature, while the gas bearing provides the necessary accuracy to allow very small turbine tip clearances (5mm) and high speeds (greater than 500,000 rpm).

  12. Analysis of Two-Phase Flow in Damper Seals for Cryogenic Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Grigory L.; SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Cryogenic damper seals operating close to the liquid-vapor region (near the critical point or slightly su-cooled) are likely to present two-phase flow conditions. Under single phase flow conditions the mechanical energy conveyed to the fluid increases its temperature and causes a phase change when the fluid temperature reaches the saturation value. A bulk-flow analysis for the prediction of the dynamic force response of damper seals operating under two-phase conditions is presented as: all-liquid, liquid-vapor, and all-vapor, i.e. a 'continuous vaporization' model. The two phase region is considered as a homogeneous saturated mixture in thermodynamic equilibrium. Th flow in each region is described by continuity, momentum and energy transport equations. The interdependency of fluid temperatures and pressure in the two-phase region (saturated mixture) does not allow the use of an energy equation in terms of fluid temperature. Instead, the energy transport is expressed in terms of fluid enthalpy. Temperature in the single phase regions, or mixture composition in the two phase region are determined based on the fluid enthalpy. The flow is also regarded as adiabatic since the large axial velocities typical of the seal application determine small levels of heat conduction to the walls as compared to the heat carried by fluid advection. Static and dynamic force characteristics for the seal are obtained from a perturbation analysis of the governing equations. The solution expressed in terms of zeroth and first order fields provide the static (leakage, torque, velocity, pressure, temperature, and mixture composition fields) and dynamic (rotordynamic force coefficients) seal parameters. Theoretical predictions show good agreement with experimental leakage pressure profiles, available from a Nitrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Force coefficient predictions for two phase flow conditions show significant fluid compressibility effects, particularly for mixtures with low mass

  13. Dynamics of superconductor bearings in a cryogenic failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Amit [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Amit.Rastogi@avizatechnology.com; Campbell, A.M. [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Coombs, T.A. [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-01

    The dynamics of superconductor bearings in a cryogenic failure scenario have been analyzed. As the superconductor warms up, the rotor goes through multiple resonance frequencies, begins to slow down and finally touches down when the superconductor goes through its transition temperature. The bearing can be modelled as a system of springs with axial, radial and cross stiffness. These springs go through various resonant modes as the temperature of the superconductor begins to rise. We have presented possible explanations for such behaviour.

  14. Electromagnetic dampers for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Dirusso, Eliseo

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic turbomachinery of the type used to pump high-pressure liquid hydrogen at -423 F and liquid oxygen at -297 F to the main engines of the Space Shuttle are subjected to lateral rotor vibrations from unbalance forces and transient loads. Conventional dampers which utilize viscous fluids such as lubricating oil cannot be used in turbopumps because the bearing components are filled with either liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen, which have viscosity comparable to air and, therefore, are not effective in viscous dampers. Electromagentic dampers are currently being explored as a means of providing damping in cryogenic turbopumps because their damping effectiveness increases as temperature decreases and because they are compatible with the liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen in the turbopumps.

  15. Floating Seal For Turbopumps, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic engines for in-space propulsion require innovative technologies to provide long-life, lightweight, and reliable turbopump designs. One area open for...

  16. Evaluation of bearing configurations using the single bearing tester in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, T.; Hall, P.; Thom, R.

    1991-01-01

    Various bearing configurations were tested using the Marshall Space Flight Center single bearing tester with LN2 as the cryogenic coolant. The baseline was one Rocketdyne phase one high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) pump end 45-mm bore bearing. The bearing configurations that were tested included a Salox/M cage configuration, a silicon nitride ball configuration, an elongated cage configuration, and a Bray 601 grease configuration.

  17. Tribo-characteristics of self-lubricating ball bearings for the LE-7 liquid hydrogen rocket-turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, Masataka; Oike, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Masataka; Kamijo, Kenjiro; Tajiri, Masanori

    1993-07-01

    The tribo characteristics of self-lubricating 40-mm-bore ball bearings with a retainer of glass cloth-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) laminate, which has elliptical pockets with a large pocket clearance, were tested under thrust loads at speeds up to 50,000 rpm, 2 million DN, in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and in liquid nitrogen (LN2). During testing, the bearing torque, outer-race temperature, and electric resistance between the inner and outer races were monitored to verify the formation and rupture of a PTFE transfer film. Testing showed that the bearings having the elliptical retainer pockets were superior to the conventional bearings with circular pockets. It was determined that, at the maximum inner race spinning velocity of about 5 m/s, a PTFE transfer film could sustain the maximum Hertz stress, up to about 2000 N/sq mm, in LH2, without severe film rupture resulting in bearing seizure. In LN2, the critical load capacity of PTFE transfer film with bearing seizure was about 2700 N/sq mm.

  18. Cryogenic properties of V-bearing austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    1985-01-01

    A new type austenitic stainless steel which is expected as the cryogenic structural material for superconducting magnets has been developed. This steel is that vanadium was added to SUS 316 stainless steel of low carbon and high nitrogen, which has the sufficient strength and toughness at 4 K, and maintains the stable nonmagnetic state. This is applicable both to the solution state and the state of carrying out age hardening heat treatment for precipitating Nb 3 Sn subsequent to it. Accordingly, this material can be applied to the sheath material for nuclear fusion and the manufacture of superconducting magnets by Wind and React process besides the candidate material of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion. This phenomenon is due to the fact that vanadium carbide precipitates in crystal grains before chrome carbide precipitates at grain boundaries, thus the precipitation of chrome carbide is suppressed. In this experiment, the effect of vanadium addition on the cryogenic properties of SUS 316 stainless steel was examined. The experimental method and the results of the effects of vanadium and nitrogen, solution treatment and precipitation aging, and the measurement of magnetism are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Foil bearing performance in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genge, Gary G.; Saville, Marshall; Gu, Alston

    1993-01-01

    Space transfer vehicles and other power and propulsion systems require long-life turbopumps. Rolling-element bearings used in current turbopumps do not have sufficient life for these applications. Process fluid foil bearings have established long life, with exceptional reliability, over a wide range of temperatures and fluids in many high-speed turbomachinery applications. However, actual data on bearing performance in cryogenic fluids has been minimal. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems and Equipment (ASE) have attempted to characterize the leaf-type compliant foil bearing in oxygen and nitrogen. The work performed under a joint internal research and development program between Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and ASE demonstrated that the foil bearing has load capacities of at least 266 psi in liquid oxygen and 352 psi in liquid nitrogen. In addition, the bearing demonstrated a direct damping coefficient of 40 to 50 lb-sec/in. with a damping ratio of .7 to 1.4 in. liquid nitrogen using a bearing sized for upper-stage turbopumps. With the results from this testing and the years of successful use in air cycle machines and other applications, leaf-type compliant foil bearings are ready for testing in liquid oxygen turbopumps.

  20. Dynamic Stability Study of Static Gas Bearing for Small Cryogenic Turbo-Expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuemin; Zhuang Ming; Zhang Qiyong; Li Shanshan; Fu Bao

    2011-01-01

    An experimental method is presented to analyze the dynamic stability of the gas bearing for small cryogenic turbo-expanders. The rotation imbalance response and the shape of the rotor orbit were obtained for different speeds up to 110,000 rpm, and the critical speed of the rotor-bearing system was determined by a Bode diagram. An FFT signal analytical method was applied to identify the resonance frequency, and the waterfall plot was presented. During the whole process of speeding up to the designed speed of 110,000 rpm, the rotor-bearing works stably with no whirl instability, which is validated in a waterfall plot. Also, the tested rotor-bearing model was analyzed theoretically. It was proved that the experimental results were highly consistent with those of theoretical calculations. Thus the experimental method proposed here to analyze the dynamic stability of the gas bearing is feasible. (fusion engineering)

  1. Parametric studies on floating pad journal bearing for high speed cryogenic turboexpanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.; Jadhav, M. M.; Karimulla, S.; Chakravarty, A.

    2017-12-01

    Most modern medium and large capacity helium liquefaction/refrigeration plants employ high speed cryogenic turboexpanders in their refrigeration/liquefaction cycles as active cooling devices. The operating speed of these turboexpanders is in the range of 3000-5000 Hz and hence specialized types of bearings are required. Floating pad journal bearing, which is a special type of tilting pad journal bearing, where mechanical pivots are absent and pads are fully suspended in gas, can be a good solution for stable operation of these high speed compact rotors. The pads are separated from shaft as well as from housing by fluid film between them, and both these sides of pad are interconnected by a network of feed holes. The work presented in this article aims to characterize floating pad journal bearings through parametric studies. The steady state performance characteristics of the bearing are represented by load capacity, stiffness coefficients and heat generation rate of the bearing. The geometrical parameters such as bearing clearances, preload of pads, etc. are varied and performance characteristics of the floating pad journal bearing are studied and presented. The dependence of stiffness coefficients on rotational speed of shaft is also analyzed.

  2. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkov, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The application of cryogenics in various areas of science and technology is related in a popular way. Utilization of cryogenics in the following production processes is described: separation of air, gas mixtures; production of helium; separation of hydrogen isotopes; production of deuterium. Applications of cryogenics in refrigerating engineering, superconductivity and high-energy physics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, superconducting electric motors and electric energy storages are considered

  3. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenics refers to the coldest area known in nature. This temperature range has an upper limit arbitrarily defined as -100 degrees C (-250 degrees C by some) and a lower limit of absolute zero. These limits separate it from the temperature range generally used in refrigerating engineering. One important application of cryogenics is the separation ad purification of air into its various components (oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and the rare gases). Other important developments have been the large-scale production of liquid hydrogen; helium extraction from natural gas; storage and transport of liquefied gases such as oxygen, argon, nitrogen, helium, neon, xenon, and hydrogen; liquefaction of natural gas for ocean transport and peak shaving; and many new types of cryogenic refrigeration devices. This paper introduces the topic of cryogenic engineering. Cryogenic processes generally range from ambient conditions to the boiling point of the cryogenic fluid. Cryogenic cycles also incorporate two or more pressure levels. These properties must also cover the vapor, vapor-liquid, and sometimes the solid regions. Therefore, the physical properties of fluids over a great range of temperatures and pressures must be known. Solubility of contaminants must be known in order to design for their removal. The main physical properties for design purposes are those usually used in unit operations, such as fluid flow, heat transfer, and the like, in addition to those directly related to the Joule-Thomson effect and expansion work. Properties such as density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, vapor pressure, and vapor-liquid equilibriums are generally obtained in graphical, tabular, or equation form, as a function of temperature and pressure

  4. A study of the transient performance of annular hydrostatic journal bearings in liquid oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharrer, J. K.; Tellier, J. G.; Hibbs, R. I.

    1992-07-01

    A test apparatus was used to simulate a cryogenic turbopump start transient in order to determine the liftoff and touchdown speed and amount of wear of an annular hydrostatic bearing in liquid oxygen. The bearing was made of sterling silver and the journal made of Inconel 718. The target application of this configuration is the pump end bearing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Liquid Oxygen Turbopump. Sixty-one transient cycles were performed in liquid oxygen with an additional three tests in liquid nitrogen to certify the test facility and configuration. The bearing showed no appreciable wear during the testing, and the results indicate that the performance of the bearing was not significantly degraded during the testing.

  5. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V.

    1997-01-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  6. The simulation of the alternate turbopump development high pressure oxygen and fuel turbopumps for the space shuttle main engine using the Shaberth computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Gary H.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is basically comprised of a combustion chamber and nozzle, high and low pressure oxygen turbopumps and high and low pressure fuel turbopumps. In the current configuration, the high pressure fuel (HPTFP) and high pressure oxygen turbopumps (HPOTP) have experienced a history of ball bearing wear. The wear problem can be attributed to numerous factors including the hydrodynamic axial and radial loads caused by the flow of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen through the turbopump impellers and turbine. Also, friction effects between the rolling elements, races, and cage can create thermally induced bearing geometry changes. To alleviate some of the current configuration problems, an alternate turbopump development (ATD) was proposed. However, the ATD HPOTP and HPTFP are constrained to operate interchangeably with the current turbopumps, thus, the operation conditions must be similar. The ATD configuration features a major change in bearings used to support the integrated shaft, impeller, and turbine system. A single ball and single roller will replace the pump-end and turbine and duplex ball bearings. The Shaft-Bearing-Thermal (SHABERTH) computer code was used to model the ATD HPOTP and ATD HPFTP configurations. A two bearing model was used to simulate the HPOTP and HPFTP bearings and shaft geometry. From SHABERTH, a comparison of bearing reaction loads, frictional heat generation rates, and Hertz contact stresses will be attempted with analysis at the 109 percent and 65 percent power levels.

  7. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanandres, Luis

    1994-01-01

    The Phase 2 (1994) Annual Progress Report presents two major report sections describing the thermal analysis of tilting- and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings. A literature review on the subject of two-phase flow in fluid film bearings and part of the proposed work for 1995 are also included. The programs delivered at the end of 1994 are named hydroflext and hydrotran. Both codes are fully compatible with the hydrosealt (1993) program. The new programs retain the same calculating options of hydrosealt plus the added bearing geometries, and unsteady flow and transient forced response. Refer to the hydroflext & hydrotran User's Manual and Tutorial for basic information on the analysis and instructions to run the programs. The Examples Handbook contains the test bearing cases along with comparisons with experimental data or published analytical values. The following major tasks were completed in 1994 (Phase 2): (1) extension of the thermohydrodynamic analysis and development of computer program hydroflext to model various bearing geometries, namely, tilting-pad hydrodynamic journal bearings, flexure-pad cylindrical bearings (hydrostatic and hydrodynamic), and cylindrical pad bearings with a simple elastic matrix (ideal foil bearings); (2) improved thermal model including radial heat transfer through the bearing stator; (3) calculation of the unsteady bulk-flow field in fluid film bearings and the transient response of a point mass rotor supported on bearings; and (4) a literature review on the subject of two-phase flows and homogeneous-mixture flows in thin-film geometries.

  8. Pumps for cryogenic liquids with superconducting magnetic bearings. Final report; Pumpen fuer kryogene Fluessigkeiten mit supraleitenden Magnetlagern. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, G.; Fuchs, G.; Sorber, J.; Brosche, H.; Richter, M.; Frenzel, C.

    2000-07-01

    A liquid nitrogen pump with contactless superconducting magnetic bearings was to be developed on the basis of an available motor with superconducting bearings. Contactless superconducting magnetic bearings require practically no servicing. A high demand for pumps for cryogenic liquids is expected with the impending use of hydrogen as an energy source. The pumping of liquid nitrogen was demonstrated successfully with the new test aggregate. The maximum pumped volume was 17 l/min at a lift of 0.5 m and 6 l/min at a lift of 1 m. In all, 15 hours of operation were registered in the superconducting state of the bearing, which included 2 hours of uninterrupted pump operation. The higher speed range for which magnetic bearings are optimally suited was not reached. Operation at higher frequencies was impossible either because of stronger resonance amplituees or because the power system was too weak. [German] Ziel des Vorhabens war die Entwicklung einer Pumpe fuer fluessigen Stickstoff mit beruehrungslosen supraleitenden Magnetlagern auf der Basis eines vorhandenen supraleitend gelagerten Motors. Die beruehrungslose supraleitende Magnetlager sind praktisch wartungsfrei. Ein Bedarf an Pumpen fuer kryogene Fluessigkeiten entsteht insbesondere durch den in naher Zukunft zu erwartenden Einsatz von Wasserstoff als Energietraeger. Mit dem entworfenen Aggregat wurde das Pumpen von Fluessigstickstoff erfolgreich demonstriert. Der Foerderstrom betrug bei 0,5m Foerderhoehe maximal 17 l/min; beim 1m Foerderhoehe wurden maximal 6 l/min gemessen. Es wurden insgesamt ca. 15 Betriebsstunden in supraleitenden Zustand des Lagers, darunter 2 Stunden ununterbrochener Pumpbetrieb registriert. Der hoehere Drehzahlbereich, fuer den das Magnetlager eigentlich paedestiniert ist, konnte nicht erreicht werden. Ein Betrieb bei hoeheren (Ist-)Frequenzen war nicht moeglich, entweder durch staerkere Resonanzausschlaege oder durch einen zu schwachen Antrieb. (orig.)

  9. Cellular concrete: a potential load-bearing insulation for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, T.G.; Dobogai, J.A.; Gerhardt, T.D.; Young, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    The need for low cost, low thermal conductivity, high strength insulation suitable for cryogenic applications is becoming more evident. An investigation of the potential of cellular concretes to fulfill this function was initiated. A review of the thermal and mechanical characteristics of foamed plastics and cellular concrete is presented along with relative cost comparisons. Test data from preliminary investigations is presented to define the influence of material constituents, density, and temperature on the mechanical and thermal response of cellular concrete. Specimen densities range from 0.64 to 1.44 gr/cc. The influence of temperature variations from 22 0 C to -196 0 C is reported for selected densities

  10. Critical Performance of Turbopump Mechanical Elements for Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Masataka; Sudou, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Fumiya; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Makoto

    It is generally acknowledged that bearings and axial seals have a tendency to go wrong compared with other rocket engine elements. And when those components have malfunction, missions scarcely succeed. However, fundamental performance (maximum rotational speed, minimum flow rate, power loss, durability, etc.) of those components has not been grasped yet. Purpose of this study is to grasp a critical performance of mechanical seal and hybrid ball bearing of turbopump. In this result, it was found that bearing outer race temperature and bearing coolant outlet temperature changed along saturation line of liquid hydrogen when flow rate was decreased under critical pressure. And normal operation of bearing was possible under conditions of more than 70,000 rpm of rotational speed and more than 0.2 liter/s of coolant flow rate. Though friction coefficient of seal surface increased several times of original value after testing, the seal showed a good performance same as before.

  11. A large-diameter hollow-shaft cryogenic motor based on a superconducting magnetic bearing for millimeter-wave polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B R; Columbro, F; Araujo, D; Limon, M; Smiley, B; Jones, G; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B; Miller, A; Gupta, S

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present the design and measured performance of a novel cryogenic motor based on a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB). The motor is tailored for use in millimeter-wave half-wave plate (HWP) polarimeters, where a HWP is rapidly rotated in front of a polarization analyzer or polarization-sensitive detector. This polarimetry technique is commonly used in cosmic microwave background polarization studies. The SMB we use is composed of fourteen yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) disks and a contiguous neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) ring magnet. The motor is a hollow-shaft motor because the HWP is ultimately installed in the rotor. The motor presented here has a 100 mm diameter rotor aperture. However, the design can be scaled up to rotor aperture diameters of approximately 500 mm. Our motor system is composed of four primary subsystems: (i) the rotor assembly, which includes the NdFeB ring magnet, (ii) the stator assembly, which includes the YBCO disks, (iii) an incremental encoder, and (iv) the drive electronics. While the YBCO is cooling through its superconducting transition, the rotor is held above the stator by a novel hold and release mechanism. The encoder subsystem consists of a custom-built encoder disk read out by two fiber optic readout sensors. For the demonstration described in this paper, we ran the motor at 50 K and tested rotation frequencies up to approximately 10 Hz. The feedback system was able to stabilize the rotation speed to approximately 0.4%, and the measured rotor orientation angle uncertainty is less than 0.15°. Lower temperature operation will require additional development activities, which we will discuss.

  12. A large-diameter hollow-shaft cryogenic motor based on a superconducting magnetic bearing for millimeter-wave polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. R.; Columbro, F.; Araujo, D.; Limon, M.; Smiley, B.; Jones, G.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B.; Miller, A.; Gupta, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present the design and measured performance of a novel cryogenic motor based on a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB). The motor is tailored for use in millimeter-wave half-wave plate (HWP) polarimeters, where a HWP is rapidly rotated in front of a polarization analyzer or polarization-sensitive detector. This polarimetry technique is commonly used in cosmic microwave background polarization studies. The SMB we use is composed of fourteen yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) disks and a contiguous neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) ring magnet. The motor is a hollow-shaft motor because the HWP is ultimately installed in the rotor. The motor presented here has a 100 mm diameter rotor aperture. However, the design can be scaled up to rotor aperture diameters of approximately 500 mm. Our motor system is composed of four primary subsystems: (i) the rotor assembly, which includes the NdFeB ring magnet, (ii) the stator assembly, which includes the YBCO disks, (iii) an incremental encoder, and (iv) the drive electronics. While the YBCO is cooling through its superconducting transition, the rotor is held above the stator by a novel hold and release mechanism. The encoder subsystem consists of a custom-built encoder disk read out by two fiber optic readout sensors. For the demonstration described in this paper, we ran the motor at 50 K and tested rotation frequencies up to approximately 10 Hz. The feedback system was able to stabilize the rotation speed to approximately 0.4%, and the measured rotor orientation angle uncertainty is less than 0.15°. Lower temperature operation will require additional development activities, which we will discuss.

  13. Design and development of LH2 cooled rolling element radial bearings for the NERVA engine turbopump. Volume 3: Phase 2: Tests on build-ups 16, 17, and 18 at NRDS, Jackass Flats, Nevada, December 1971 - March 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, J. B.; Koch, D. A.; Reuter, F.

    1972-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrogen to cool the rolling element radial bearings in the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles is discussed. The fifteen hour service life goal was obtained during the tests. The increase in bearing life was also considered to be produced by: (1) improvements in bearing material, (2) bearing retainer configuration and manufacturing changes, and (3) better control of operating parameters.

  14. Balancing low cost with reliable operation in the rotordynamic design of the ALS Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force/NASA Advanced Launch System (ALS) Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump (FTP) has primary design goals of low cost and high reliability, with performance and weight having less importance. This approach is atypical compared with other rocket engine turbopump design efforts, such as on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), which emphasized high performance and low weight. Similar to the SSME turbopumps, the ALS FTP operates supercritically, which implies that stability and bearing loads strongly influence the design. In addition, the use of low cost/high reliability features in the ALS FTP such as hydrostatic bearings, relaxed seal clearances, and unshrouded turbine blades also have a negative influence on rotordynamics. This paper discusses the analysis conducted to achieve a balance between low cost and acceptable rotordynamic behavior, to ensure that the ALS FTP will operate reliably without subsynchronous instabilities or excessive bearing loads.

  15. Investigation of SSME alternate high pressure fuel turbopump lift-off seal fluid and structural dynamic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate turbopump development program (ATD) high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) design utilizes an innovative lift-off seal (LOS) design that is located in close proximity to the turbine end bearing. Cooling flow exiting the bearing passes through the lift-off seal during steady state operation. The potential for fluid excitation of lift-off seal structural resonances is investigated. No fluid excitation of LOS resonances is predicted. However, if predicted LOS natural frequencies are significantly lowered by the presence of the coolant, pressure oscillations caused by synchronous whirl of the HPFTP rotor may excite a resonance.

  16. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  17. Application of powder metallurgy techniques to produce improved bearing elements for liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moracz, D. J.; Shipley, R. J.; Moxson, V. S.; Killman, R. J.; Munson, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to apply powder metallurgy techniques for the production of improved bearing elements, specifically balls and races, for advanced cryogenic turbopump bearings. The materials and fabrication techniques evaluated were judged on the basis of their ability to improve fatigue life, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant bearings over the currently used 440C. An extensive list of candidate bearing alloys in five different categories was considered: tool/die steels, through hardened stainless steels, cobalt-base alloys, and gear steels. Testing of alloys for final consideration included hardness, rolling contact fatigue, cross cylinder wear, elevated temperature wear, room and cryogenic fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking, and five-ball (rolling-sliding element) testing. Results of the program indicated two alloys that showed promise for improved bearing elements. These alloys were MRC-2001 and X-405. 57mm bearings were fabricated from the MRC-2001 alloy for further actual hardware rig testing by NASA-MSFC.

  18. Experimental study on friction and wear behaviour of amorphous carbon coatings for mechanical seals in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlei; Jia, Qian; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shaopeng

    2012-10-01

    The service life and the reliability of contact mechanical seal are directly affected by the wear of seal pairs (rotor vs. stator), especially under the cryogenic environment in liquid rocket engine turbopumps. Because of the lower friction and wear rate, amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings are the promising protective coatings of the seal pairs for contact mechanical seal. In this paper, a-C coatings were deposited on 9Cr18 by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering. The tribological performances of the specimen were tested under three sealed fluid conditions (air, water and liquid nitrogen). The results show that the coatings could endure the cryogenic temperature while the friction coefficients decrease with the increased contact load. Under the same contact condition, the friction coefficient of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen is higher than that in water and that they are in air. The friction coefficients of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen range from 0.10 to 0.15. In the cryogenic environment, the coatings remain their low specific wear rates (0.9 × 10-6 to 1.8 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1). The results provide an important reference for designing a water lubricated bearing or a contact mechanical seal under the cryogenic environment that is both reliable and has longevity.

  19. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Wang, P.; Liu, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  20. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Wang, P. [Beijing Sciample Technology Co., Ltd., Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-01-29

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  1. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shucheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at the NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance parameters of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed

  2. Turbopump options for nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissell, W.R.; Gunn, S.V.

    1992-07-01

    Several turbopump options for delivering liquid nitrogen to nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engines were evaluated and compared. Axial and centrifugal flow pumps were optimized, with and without boost pumps, utilizing current design criteria within the latest turbopump technology limits. Two possible NTR design points were used, a modest pump pressure rise of 1,743 psia and a relatively higher pump pressure rise of 4,480 psia. Both engines utilized the expander cycle to maximize engine performance for the long duration mission. Pump suction performance was evaluated. Turbopumps with conventional cavitating inducers were compared with zero NPSH (saturated liquid in the tanks) pumps over a range of tank saturation pressures, with and without boost pumps. Results indicate that zero NSPH pumps at high tank vapor pressures, 60 psia, are very similar to those with the finite NPSHs. At low vapor pressures efficiencies fall and turbine pressure ratios increase leading to decreased engine chamber pressures and or increased pump pressure discharges and attendant high-pressure component weights. It may be concluded that zero tank NSPH capabilities can be obtained with little penalty to the engine systems but boost pumps are needed if tank vapor pressure drops below 30 psia. Axial pumps have slight advantages in weight and chamber pressure capability while centrifugal pumps have a greater operating range. 10 refs

  3. Computational fluid dynamics analysis in support of the simplex turbopump design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.; Ruf, Joseph H.; Williams, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    Simplex is a turbopump that is being developed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by an in-house team. The turbopump consists of a single-stage centrifugal impeller, vaned-diffuser pump powered by a single-stage, axial, supersonic, partial admission turbine. The turbine is driven by warm gaseous oxygen tapped off of the hybrid motor to which it will be coupled. Rolling element bearings are cooled by the pumping fluid. Details of the configuration and operating conditions are given by Marsh. CFD has been used extensively to verify one-dimensional (1D) predictions, assess aerodynamic and hydrodynamic designs, and to provide flow environments. The complete primary flow path of the pump-end and the hot gas path of the turbine, excluding the inlet torus, have been analyzed. All CFD analyses conducted for the Simplex turbopump employed the pressure based Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code using a standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions. More detailed results are presented by Garcia et. al. To support the team, loading and temperature results for the turbine rotor were provided as inputs to structural and thermal analyses, and blade loadings from the inducer were provided for structural analyses.

  4. Structural stiffness and Coulomb damping in compliant foil journal bearings: Theoretical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, C.-P. Roger; Heshmat, Hooshang

    1994-07-01

    Compliant foil bearings operate on either gas or liquid, which makes them very attractive for use in extreme environments such as in high-temperature aircraft turbine engines and cryogenic turbopumps. However, a lack of analytical models to predict the dynamic characteristics of foil bearings forces the bearing designer to rely on prototype testing, which is time-consuming and expensive. In this paper, the authors present a theoretical model to predict the structural stiffness and damping coefficients of the bump foil strip in a journal bearing or damper. Stiffness is calculated based on the perturbation of the journal center with respect to its static equilibrium position. The equivalent viscous damping coefficients are determined based on the area of a closed hysteresis loop of the journal center motion. The authors found, theoretically, that the energy dissipated from this loop was mostly contributed by the frictional motion between contact surfaces. In addition, the source and mechanism of the nonlinear behavior of the bump foil strips were examined. With the introduction of this enhanced model, the analytical tools are now available for the design of compliant foil bearings.

  5. SSME Alternate Turbopump Development Program: Design verification specification for high-pressure fuel turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The design and verification requirements are defined which are appropriate to hardware at the detail, subassembly, component, and engine levels and to correlate these requirements to the development demonstrations which provides verification that design objectives are achieved. The high pressure fuel turbopump requirements verification matrix provides correlation between design requirements and the tests required to verify that the requirement have been met.

  6. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  7. Cavitation instabilities and rotordynamic effects in turbopumps and hydroturbines turbopump and inducer cavitation, experiments and design

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a detailed approach to the physics, fluid dynamics, modeling, experimentation and numerical simulation of cavitation phenomena, with special emphasis on cavitation-induced instabilities and their implications on the design and operation of high performance turbopumps and hydraulic turbines. The first part covers the fundamentals (nucleation, dynamics, thermodynamic effects, erosion) and forms of cavitation (attached cavitation, cloud cavitation, supercavitation, vortex cavitation) relevant to hydraulic turbomachinery, illustrates modern experimental techniques for the characterization, visualization and analysis of cavitating flows, and introduces the main aspects of the hydrodynamic design and performance of axial inducers, centrifugal turbopumps and hydo-turbines. The second part focuses on the theoretical modeling, experimental analysis, and practical control of cavitation-induced fluid-dynamic and rotordynamic instabilities of hydraulic turbomachinery, with special emphasis on cavitating...

  8. Design and Development of an Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Minick, A

    1998-01-01

    .... These benefits will be accomplished and demonstrated through design, development, and test of this high speed, high efficiency, two stage hydrogen turbopump capable of supplying 16 lbm/sec (7.3 kg/sec...

  9. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF cryogenic system consists of 3 refrigeration systems: Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), Central Helium Liquefier (CHL), and End Station Refrigerator (ESR). CHL is the main cryogenic system for CEBAF, consisting of a 4.8 kW, 2.0 K refrigerator and transfer line system to supply 2.0 K and 12 kW of 50 K shield refrigeration for the Linac cavity cryostats and 10 g/s of liquid for the end stations. This paper describes the 9-year effort to commission these systems, concentrating on CHL with the cold compressors. The cold compressors are a cold vacuum pump with an inlet temperature of 3 K which use magnetic bearings, thereby eliminating the possibility of air leaks into the subatmospheric He

  10. Applying Additive Manufacturing to a New Liquid Oxygen Turbopump Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neal, T. Derek

    2016-01-01

    A liquid oxygen turbopump has been designed at Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the in-house, Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine (AMDE) project. Additive manufacturing, specifically direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) of Inconel 718, is used for 77% of the parts by mass. These parts include the impeller, turbine components, and housings. This paper discusses the impacts of the DMLS fabrication technique on the design of the turbopump and lessons learned during DMLS hardware fabrication and material testing.

  11. Reusable Rocket Engine Turbopump Health Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surko, Pamela

    1994-01-01

    A health monitoring expert system software architecture has been developed to support condition-based health monitoring of rocket engines. Its first application is in the diagnosis decisions relating to the health of the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The post test diagnostic system runs off-line, using as input the data recorded from hundreds of sensors, each running typically at rates of 25, 50, or .1 Hz. The system is invoked after a test has been completed, and produces an analysis and an organized graphical presentation of the data with important effects highlighted. The overall expert system architecture has been developed and documented so that expert modules analyzing other line replaceable units may easily be added. The architecture emphasizes modularity, reusability, and open system interfaces so that it may be used to analyze other engines as well.

  12. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  13. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  14. Probabilistic structural analysis to quantify uncertainties associated with turbopump blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Vinod K.; Rubinstein, Robert; Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    A probabilistic study of turbopump blades has been in progress at NASA Lewis Research Center for over the last two years. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of uncertainties in geometry and material properties on the structural response of the turbopump blades to evaluate the tolerance limits on the design. A methodology based on probabilistic approach has been developed to quantify the effects of the random uncertainties. The results of this study indicate that only the variations in geometry have significant effects.

  15. On the hydrodynamics of rocket propellant engine inducers and turbopumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, L

    2013-01-01

    The lecture presents an overview of some recent results of the work carried out at Alta on the hydrodynamic design and rotordynamic fluid forces of cavitating turbopumps for liquid propellant feed systems of modern rocket engines. The reduced order models recently developed for preliminary geometric definition and noncavitating performance prediction of tapered-hub axial inducers and centrifugal turbopumps are illustrated. The experimental characterization of the rotordynamic forces acting on a whirling four-bladed, tapered-hub, variable-pitch high-head inducer, under different load and cavitation conditions is presented. Future perspectives of the work to be carried out at Alta in this area of research are briefly illustrated

  16. Correction of Dynamic Characteristics of SAR Cryogenic GTE on Consumption of Gasified Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukin, V. A.; Gimadiev, A. G.; Gangisetty, G.

    2018-01-01

    When the gas turbine engines (GTE) NK-88 were developed for liquid hydrogen and NK-89 for liquefied natural gas, performance of the systems with a turbo-pump unitary was improved and its proved without direct regulation of the flow of a cryogenic fuel, which was supplied by a centrifugal pump of the turbo-pump unit (TPU) Command from the “kerosene” system. Such type of the automatic control system (SAR) has the property of partial “neutralization” of the delay caused by gasification of the fuel. This does not require any measurements in the cryogenic medium, and the failure of the centrifugal cryogenic pump does not lead to engine failure. On the other hand, the system without direct regulation of the flow of cryogenic fuel has complex internal dynamic connections, their properties are determined by the characteristics of the incoming units and assemblies, and it is difficult to maintain accurate the maximum boundary level and minimum fuel consumption due to the influence of a booster pressure change. Direct regulation of the consumption of cryogenic fuel (prior to its gasification) is the preferred solution, since for using traditional liquid and gaseous fuels this is the main and proven method. The scheme of correction of dynamic characteristics of a single-loop SAR GTE for the consumption of a liquefied cryogenic fuel with a flow rate correction in its gasified state, which ensures the dynamic properties of the system is not worse than for NK-88 and NK-89 engines.

  17. Small Scale Turbopump Manufacturing Technology and Material Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Erika; Morgan, Kristin; Wells, Doug; Zimmerman, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As part of an internal research and development project, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing a high specific impulse 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 pump-fed engine testbed with the capability to throttle 10:1. A Fuel Turbopump (FTP) with the ability to operate across a speed range of 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm was developed and analyzed. This small size and flight-like Fuel Turbopump has completed the design and analysis phase and is currently in the manufacturing phase. This paper highlights the manufacturing and processes efforts to fabricate an approximately 20-lb turbopump with small flow passages, intricately bladed components and approximately 3-in diameter impellers. As a result of the small scale and tight tolerances of the hardware on this turbopump, several unique manufacturing and material challenges were encountered. Some of the technologies highlighted in this paper include the use of powder metallurgy technology to manufacture small impellers, electron beam welding of a turbine blisk shroud, and casting challenges. The use of risk reduction efforts such as non-destructive testing (NDT) and evaluation (NDE), fractography, material testing, and component spin testing are also discussed in this paper.

  18. Advanced Simulation Capability for Turbopump Cavitation Dynamics Guided by Experimental Validation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerical cavitation modeling capability is critical in the design of liquid rocket engine turbopumps, feed lines, injector manifolds and engine test facilities....

  19. Design Study for A Low-Cost LH2 Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japikse, David; Baines, Nicholas; Platt, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    A preliminary design study, focusing on potential component selections and design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMAR1) analysis, is presented in this study. The investigation focused on a nominal cost liquid hydrogen turbopump suitable for a private launch class vehicle. Utilizing a "turbocharger-like" design philosophy, preliminary feasibility studies of the basic pump design class, the rotordynamic design class, and the turbine design class were conducted with associated DFMA evaluations. Reasonable cost levels and sensible levels of product assurance have been established.

  20. Performances of Magnetic Fluid Seal and Application to Turbopumps

    OpenAIRE

    北洞, 貴也; 黒川, 淳一; 宮副, 雄貴; 林, 正悦

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic fluid shaft seal can achieve zero-leakage and operate stably against shaft vibration, but the sealing pressure is very low. In order to improve the pressure performance of a magnetic fluid seal and apply it to a turbopump, the seal pressure characteristics are studied theoretically and experimentally. The Poisson equation for magnetic vector potential is solved by FEM, and the seal performances are determined by use of the Bernoulli equation. The validity of the theory is confirmed...

  1. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C; Jimenez D, J; Cejudo A, J; Hernandez M, V [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  2. Cryogenic regenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kush, P.; Joshi, S.C.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1986-01-01

    Importance of regenerators in cryogenic refrigerators is highlighted. Design aspects of regenerator are reviewed and the factors involved in the selection of regenerator material are enumerated. Various methods used to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and regenerator effectiveness are mentioned. Variation of effectiveness with various parameters is calculated by a computer programme using the ideal, Ackermann and Tipler formulae. Results are presented in graphical form. Listing of the computer programme is given in the Appendix. (author)

  3. The J-2X Fuel Turbopump - Design, Development, and Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, James G.; Hawkins, Lakiesha V.; Shinguchi, Brian H.; Marsh, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR), a NASA subcontractor, is executing the design, development, test, and evaluation (DDT&E) of a liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen two hundred ninety four thousand pound thrust rocket engine initially intended for the Upper Stage (US) and Earth Departure Stage (EDS) of the Constellation Program Ares-I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). A key element of the design approach was to base the new J-2X engine on the heritage J-2S engine with the intent of uprating the engine and incorporating SSME and RS-68 lessons learned. The J-2S engine was a design upgrade of the flight proven J-2 configuration used to put American astronauts on the moon. The J-2S Fuel Turbopump (FTP) was the first Rocketdyne-designed liquid hydrogen centrifugal pump and provided many of the early lessons learned for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopumps. This paper will discuss the design trades and analyses performed for the current J-2X FTP to increase turbine life; increase structural margins, facilitate component fabrication; expedite turbopump assembly; and increase rotordynamic stability margins. Risk mitigation tests including inducer water tests, whirligig turbine blade tests, turbine air rig tests, and workhorse gas generator tests characterized operating environments, drove design modifications, or identified performance impact. Engineering design, fabrication, analysis, and assembly activities support FTP readiness for the first J-2X engine test scheduled for July 2011.

  4. Noncontacting device to indicate deflection of turbopump internal rotating parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. B.; Grieser, D. R.; Plummer, A. M.; Ensminger, D.; Saccacio, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Phase 2 (development) which was concluded for the ultrasonic Doppler device and the light-pipe-reflectance device is reported. An ultrasonic Doppler breadboard system was assembled which accurately measured runout in the J-2 LOX pump impeller during operation. The transducer was mounted on the outside of the pump volute using a C-clamp. Vibration was measured by conducting the ultrasonic wave through the volute housing and through the fluid in the volute to the impeller surface. The impeller vibration was also measured accurately using the light-pipe probe mounted in an elastomeric-gland fitting in the pump case. A special epoxy resin developed for cryogenic applications was forced into the end of the fiber-optic probe to retain the fibers. Subsequently, the probe suffered no damage after simultaneous exposure to 2150 psi and 77 F. Preliminary flash X-radiographs were taken of the turbine wheel and the shaft-bearing-seal assembly, using a 2-megavolt X-ray unit. Reasonable resolution and contrast was obtained. A fast-neutron detector was fabricated and sensitivity was measured. The results demonstrated that the technique is feasible for integrated-time measurements requiring, perhaps, 240 revolutions to obtain sufficient exposure at 35,000 rpm. The experimental verification plans are included.

  5. The design of a kerosene turbopump for a South African commercial launch vehicle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snedden, Glen C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A South African turbopump design capability would be critical to any future indigenous commercial launch capacity. This paper describes the initial work being done at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) to design a kerosene turbopump for a...

  6. Cryogenic photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardin, G.

    2000-03-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  7. Cryogenic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, G

    2000-01-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  8. Transient Lift-Off Test Results for an Experimental Hybrid Bearing in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    bearings. The electric motor designed to drive the rotor is a high speed integral motorized spindle unit manufactured by SKF Precision Technologies and...create pressure that supports the rotor ( shaft ) without rotation. The pressure generated by the flow through an orifice gives the hybrid bearing a...Kettering University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dara Childs A hybrid bearing designed for use in a next generation turbo-pump is

  9. LDR cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, T.

    1988-01-01

    A brief summary from the 1985 Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Asilomar 2 workshop of the requirements for LDR cryogenic cooling is presented. The heat rates are simply the sum of the individual heat rates from the instruments. Consideration of duty cycle will have a dramatic effect on cooling requirements. There are many possible combinations of cooling techniques for each of the three temperatures zones. It is clear that much further system study is needed to determine what type of cooling system is required (He-2, hybrid or mechanical) and what size and power is required. As the instruments, along with their duty cycles and heat rates, become better defined it will be possible to better determine the optimum cooling systems.

  10. Carbon-carbon turbopump concept for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, David M.

    1993-06-01

    The U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is placing high priority on maximizing specific impulse (ISP) and thrust-to-weight ratio in the development of a practical high-performance nuclear rocket. The turbopump design is driven by these goals. The liquid hydrogen propellant is pressurized and pumped to the reactor inlet by the turbopump assembly (TPA). Rocket propulsion is from rapid heating of the propellant from 180 R to thousands of degrees in the particle bed reactor (PBR). The exhausted propellant is then expanded through a high-temperature nozzle. A high-performance approach is to use an uncooled carbon-carbon nozzle and duct turbine inlet. Carbon-carbon components are used throughout the TPA hot section to obtain the high-temperature capability. Several carbon-carbon components are in development including structural parts, turbine nozzles/stators, and turbine rotors. The technology spinoff is applicable to conventional liquid propulsion engines and many other turbomachinery applications.

  11. Carbon-carbon turbopump concept for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overholt, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    The U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is placing high priority on maximizing specific impulse (ISP) and thrust-to-weight ratio in the development of a practical high-performance nuclear rocket. The turbopump design is driven by these goals. The liquid hydrogen propellant is pressurized and pumped to the reactor inlet by the turbopump assembly (TPA). Rocket propulsion is from rapid heating of the propellant from 180 R to thousands of degrees in the particle bed reactor (PBR). The exhausted propellant is then expanded through a high-temperature nozzle. A high-performance approach is to use an uncooled carbon-carbon nozzle and duct turbine inlet. Carbon-carbon components are used throughout the TPA hot section to obtain the high-temperature capability. Several carbon-carbon components are in development including structural parts, turbine nozzles/stators, and turbine rotors. The technology spinoff is applicable to conventional liquid propulsion engines and many other turbomachinery applications. 3 refs

  12. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  13. Novel Non-Intrusive Vibration Monitoring System for Turbopumps, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AI Signal Research, Inc. proposes to develop a Non-Intrusive Vibration Measurement System (NI-VMS) for turbopumps which will provide effective on-board/off-board...

  14. Novelty detection methods for online health monitoring and post data analysis of turbopumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hu; Niaoqing, Hu; Xinpeng, Zhang; Fengshou, Gu; Ming, Gao

    2013-01-01

    As novelty detection works when only normal data are available, it is of considerable promise for health monitoring in cases lacking fault samples and prior knowledge. We present two novelty detection methods for health monitoring of turbopumps in large-scale liquid propellant rocket engines. The first method is the adaptive Gaussian threshold model. This method is designed to monitor the vibration of the turbopumps online because it has minimal computational complexity and is easy for implementation in real time. The second method is the one-class support vector machine (OCSVM) which is developed for post analysis of historical vibration signals. Via post analysis the method not only confirms the online monitoring results but also provides diagnostic results so that faults from sensors are separated from those actually from the turbopumps. Both of these two methods are validated to be efficient for health monitoring of the turbopumps.

  15. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  16. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  17. Terry Turbopump Expanded Operating Band Full-Scale Component and Basic Science Detailed Test Plan - Final.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solom, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document details the milestone approach to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) efforts. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  18. Study and Development of Face-Contact, Bellows Mechanical Seal for Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump

    OpenAIRE

    NOSAKA, Masataka; SUZUKI, Mineo; MIYAKAWA, Yukio; KAMIJO, Kenjiro; KIKUCHI, Masataka; MORI, Masahiro; 野坂, 正隆; 鈴木, 峰男; 宮川, 行雄; 上絛, 謙二郎; 菊池, 正孝; 森, 雅裕

    1981-01-01

    The development of a 10-ton thrust liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen (LOX and LH2) rocket engine is under way at the National Space Development Agency. In advance of the development of a liquid hydrogen turbopump, the National Aerospace Laboratory carried out study and development of a face-contact, bellows mechanical seal for a liquid hydrogen turbopump in co-operation with the National Space Development Agency. The present report describes the fundamental experiments of the mechanical seal ...

  19. Terry Turbopump Analytical Modeling Efforts in Fiscal Year 2016 ? Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N

    2018-04-01

    This document details the Fiscal Year 2016 modeling efforts to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) experiments. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  20. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  1. Numerical investigations on unstable direct contact condensation of cryogenic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, K. N.; Arnab, Roy; Parthasarathi, Ghosh

    2017-02-01

    A typical problem of Direct Contact Condensation (DCC) occurs at the liquid oxygen (LOX) booster turbopump exit of oxidiser rich staged combustion cycle based semi-cryogenic rocket engines, where the hot gas mixture (predominantly oxygen and small amounts of combustion products) that runs the turbine mixes with LOX from the pump exit. This complex multiphase phenomena leads to the formation of solid CO2 & H2O, which is undesirable for the functioning of the main LOX turbopump. As a starting point for solving this complex problem, in this study, the hot gas mixture is taken as pure oxygen and hence, DCC of pure oxygen vapour jets in subcooled liquid oxygen is simulated using the commercial CFD package ANSYS CFX®. A two fluid model along with the thermal phase change model is employed for capturing the heat and mass transfer effects. The study mainly focuses on the subsonic DCC bubbling regime, which is reported as unstable with bubble formation, elongation, necking and collapsing effects. The heat transfer coefficients over a period of time have been computed and the various stages of bubbling have been analysed with the help of vapour volume fraction and pressure profiles. The results obtained for DCC of oxygen vapour-liquid mixtures is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results on DCC of steam-water mixtures.

  2. Probabilistic Structural Analysis of SSME Turbopump Blades: Probabilistic Geometry Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, V. K.

    1985-01-01

    A probabilistic study was initiated to evaluate the precisions of the geometric and material properties tolerances on the structural response of turbopump blades. To complete this study, a number of important probabilistic variables were identified which are conceived to affect the structural response of the blade. In addition, a methodology was developed to statistically quantify the influence of these probabilistic variables in an optimized way. The identified variables include random geometric and material properties perturbations, different loadings and a probabilistic combination of these loadings. Influences of these probabilistic variables are planned to be quantified by evaluating the blade structural response. Studies of the geometric perturbations were conducted for a flat plate geometry as well as for a space shuttle main engine blade geometry using a special purpose code which uses the finite element approach. Analyses indicate that the variances of the perturbations about given mean values have significant influence on the response.

  3. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  4. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  5. Failure analysis of superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Amit; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-01

    The dynamics of superconductor bearings in a cryogenic failure scenario have been analyzed. As the superconductor warms up, the rotor goes through multiple resonance frequencies, begins to slow down and finally touches down when the superconductor goes through its transition temperature. The bearing can be modelled as a system of springs with axial, radial and cross stiffness. These springs go through various resonant modes as the temperature of the superconductor begins to rise. We have presented possible explanations for such behavio0008.

  6. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  7. Cryogenics for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Three cryogenic questions of importance to Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are discussed: the primary cooling requirement, the secondary cooling requirement, and the instrument changeout requirement.

  8. High-temperature turbopump assembly for space nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a practical, high-performance nuclear rocket by the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program places high priority on maximizing specific impulse (ISP) and thrust-to-weight ratio. The operating parameters arising from these goals drive the propellant-pump design. The liquid hydrogen propellant is pressurized and pumped to the reactor inlet by the turbopump assembly (TPA). Rocket propulsion is effected by rapid heating of the propellant from 100 K to thousands of degrees in the particle-bed reactor (PBR). The exhausted propellant is then expanded through a high-temperature nozzle. One approach to achieve high performance is to use an uncooled carbon-carbon nozzle and duct turbine inlet. The high-temperature capability is obtained by using carbon-carbon throughout the TPA hot section. Carbon-carbon components in development include structural parts, turbine nozzles/stators, and turbine rotors. The technology spinoff is applicable to conventional liquid propulsion engines plus a wide variety of other turbomachinery applications.

  9. High-temperature turbopump assembly for space nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overholt, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a practical, high-performance nuclear rocket by the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program places high priority on maximizing specific impulse (ISP) and thrust-to-weight ratio. The operating parameters arising from these goals drive the propellant-pump design. The liquid hydrogen propellant is pressurized and pumped to the reactor inlet by the turbopump assembly (TPA). Rocket propulsion is effected by rapid heating of the propellant from 100 K to thousands of degrees in the particle-bed reactor (PBR). The exhausted propellant is then expanded through a high-temperature nozzle. One approach to achieve high performance is to use an uncooled carbon-carbon nozzle and duct turbine inlet. The high-temperature capability is obtained by using carbon-carbon throughout the TPA hot section. Carbon-carbon components in development include structural parts, turbine nozzles/stators, and turbine rotors. The technology spinoff is applicable to conventional liquid propulsion engines plus a wide variety of other turbomachinery applications

  10. Incipient failure detection of space shuttle main engine turbopump bearings using vibration envelope detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The results of an analysis performed on seven successive Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) static test firings, utilizing envelope detection of external accelerometer data are discussed. The results clearly show the great potential for using envelope detection techniques in SSME incipient failure detection.

  11. MOSFET's for Cryogenic Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaye, R.; Ventrice, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Study seeks ways to build transistors that function effectively at liquid-helium temperatures. Report discusses physics of metaloxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) and performances of these devices at cryogenic temperatures. MOSFET's useful in highly sensitive cryogenic preamplifiers for infrared astronomy.

  12. MFTF magnet cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    The prime requirement of the cryogenics of the magnets is to assure a superconducting state for the magnet coils, a large task considering their enormous size. The following presentation addresses the principal topics that have been considered in this cryogenic design

  13. Bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  14. Integrated cryogenic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanarena, D.B.; Rao, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated cryogenic pressure-temperature, level-temperature, and flow-temperature sensors have several advantages over the conventional single parameter sensors. Such integrated sensors were not available until recently. Pressure Systems, Inc. (PSI) of Hampton, Virginia, has introduced precalibrated precision cryogenic pressure sensors at the Los Angeles Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1989. Recently, PSI has successfully completed the development of integrated pressure-temperature and level-temperature sensors for use in the temperature range 1.5-375K. In this paper, performance characteristics of these integrated sensors are presented. Further, the effects of irradiation and magnetic fields on these integrated sensors are also reviewed

  15. Cryogenics will cool LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the investigation into the cryogenic regulating line (QRL) performed by the LHC laboratory are presented. It is projected that eight cryogenic units located in five places around the LHC ring will provide superconducting magnets by liquid helium through eight cryogenic regulating lines of 3.2 km each. All QRL zones remain to be independent. CERN uses three test units with the aim of the certification of chosen constructions and verification of their thermal and mechanical efficiency before starting full-scale production [ru

  16. Fundamentals of cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Mamata

    2014-01-01

    The author, with her vast and varied experience in teaching and allied fields, clearly enunciates the behaviour and various properties of common cryogenic fluids, methods of liquefaction, and separation and applications of cryogens with thermodynamic analysis for process selection. This profusely illustrated study with clear-cut diagrams and process charts, should serve not only as a textbook for students but also as an excellent reference for researchers and practising engineers on design of cryogenic refrigeration, and liquefaction and separation process plants for various applications.

  17. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  18. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  19. Observations on Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge From The Development of the Fastrac Engine Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Thomas F.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of rotating cavitation and cavitation surges on the Fastrac Engine Turbopump are described in a viewgraph presentation format. The bent inducer blade dilemma and observations of unsteady data and oscillation components are discussed. The pump-feed system stability modeling assessment is outlined. Recommendations are made urging further investigation.

  20. Cryogenics theory, processes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Allyson E

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenics is the study of the production of very low temperature (below -150 -C, -238 -F or 123 K) and the behaviour of materials at those temperatures. This book presents current research from across the globe in the study of cryogenics, including the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of light weight alloys; the application of Fiber Bragg grating sensors at cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic grinding; liquid oxygen magnetohydrodynamics; and, genetic engineering techniques used to improve tolerance to cryopreservation.

  1. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  2. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  3. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  4. Terry Turbopump Expanded Operating Band Full-Scale Component and Basic Science Detailed Test Plan-Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solom, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Ross, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.

    2017-08-01

    This document details the milestone approach to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) efforts. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  5. TPC magnet cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.W.

    1980-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) magnet at LBL and its compensation solenoids are adiabatically stable superconducting solenoid magnets. The cryogenic system developed for the TPC magnet is discussed. This system uses forced two-phase tubular cooling with the two cryogens in the system. The liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are delivered through the cooled load by forced tubular flow. The only reservoirs of liquid cryogen exist in the control dewar (for liquid helium) and the conditioner dewar (for liquid nitrogen). The operation o these systems during virtually all phases of system operation are described. Photographs and diagrams of various system components are shown, and cryogenic system data are presented in the following sections: (1) heat leaks into the TPC coil package and the compensation solenoids; (2) heat leaks to various components of the TPC magnet cryogenics system besides the magnets and control dewar; (3) the control dewar and its relationship to the rest of the system; (4) the conditioner system and its role in cooling down the TPC magnet; (5) gas-cooled electrical leads and charging losses; and (6) a summation of the liquid helium and liquid nitrogen requirements for the TPC superconducting magnet system

  6. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  7. Cryogen therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors studied the cure of skin cancer in particular cryogen therapy of skin cancer. They noted that cryogen therapy of skin cancer carried new possibilities and improved results of neoplasms treatment

  8. Cryogenic process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, J.; Johnson, S.

    1994-01-01

    Combining accurate fluid property databases with a commercial equation-solving software package running on a desktop computer allows simulation of cryogenic processes without extensive computer programming. Computer simulation can be a powerful tool for process development or optimization. Most engineering simulations to date have required extensive programming skills in languages such as Fortran, Pascal, etc. Authors of simulation code have also usually been responsible for choosing and writing the particular solution algorithm. This paper describes a method of simulating cryogenic processes with a commercial software package on a desktop personal computer that does not require these traditional programming tasks. Applications include modeling of cryogenic refrigerators, heat exchangers, vapor-cooled power leads, vapor pressure thermometers, and various other engineering problems

  9. MYRRHA cryogenic system study on performances and reliability requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junquera, T.; Chevalier, N.R.; Thermeau, J.P.; Medeiros Romao, L.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2015-01-01

    A precise evaluation of the cryogenic requirements for accelerator-driven system such as the MYRRHA project has been performed. In particular, operation temperature, thermal losses, and required cryogenic power have been evaluated. A preliminary architecture of the cryogenic system including all its major components, as well as the principles for the cryogenic fluids distribution has been proposed. A detailed study on the reliability aspects has also been initiated. This study is based on the reliability of large cryogenic systems used for accelerators like HERA, LHC or SNS Linac. The requirements to guarantee good cryogenic system availability can be summarised as follows: 1) Mean Time Between Maintenance (MTBM) should be > 8 000 hours; 2) Valves, heat exchangers and turbines are particularly sensitive elements to impurities (dust, oil, gases), improvements are necessary to keep a minimal level in these components; 3) Redundancy studies for all elements containing moving/vibrating parts (turbines, compressors, including their respective bearings and seal shafts) are necessary; 4) Periodic maintenance is mandatory: oil checks, control of screw compressors every 10.000-15.000 hours, vibration surveillance programme, etc; 5) Special control and maintenance of utilities equipment (supply of cooling water, compressed air and electrical supply) is necessary; 6) Periodic vacuum checks to identify leakage appearance such as insulation vacuum of transfer lines and distribution boxes are necessary; 7) Easily exchangeable cold compressors are required

  10. Cryogenic support member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is described for restraining a cryogenic system comprising; a rod having a depression at a first end. The rod is made of non-metallic material. The non-metallic material has an effectively low thermal conductivity; a metallic plug; and a metallic sleeve. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod and assembled thereto such that the plug is disposed inside the depression of the rod. The sleeve is disposed over the depression in the rod and the rod is clamped therebetween. The shrink-fit clamping the rod is generated between the metallic plug and the metallic sleeve

  11. Theoretical Analysis of Thermodynamic Effect of Cavitation in Cryogenic Inducer Using Singularity Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watanabe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor production in cavitation extracts the latent heat of evaporation from the surrounding liquid, which decreases the local temperature, and hence the local vapor pressure in the vicinity of cavity. This is called thermodynamic/thermal effect of cavitation and leads to the good suction performance of cryogenic turbopumps. We have already established the simple analysis of partially cavitating flow with the thermodynamic effect, where the latent heat extraction and the heat transfer between the cavity and the ambient fluid are taken into account. In the present study, we carry out the analysis for cavitating inducer and compare it with the experimental data available from literatures using Freon R-114 and liquid nitrogen. It is found that the present analysis can simulate fairly well the thermodynamic effect of cavitation and some modification of the analysis considering the real fluid properties, that is, saturation characteristic, is favorable for more qualitative agreement.

  12. Two-phase flow in the cooling circuit of a cryogenic rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preclik, D.

    1992-07-01

    Transient two-phase flow was investigated for the hydrogen cooling circuit of the HM7 rocket engine. The nuclear reactor code ATHLET/THESEUS was adapted to cryogenics and applied to both principal and prototype experiments for validation and simulation purposes. The cooling circuit two-phase flow simulation focused on the hydrogen prechilling and pump transient phase prior to ignition. Both a single- and a multichannel model were designed and employed for a valve leakage flow, a nominal prechilling flow, and a prechilling with a subsequent pump-transient flow. The latter case was performed in order to evaluate the difference between a nominal and a delayed turbo-pump start-up. It was found that an extension of the nominal prechilling sequence in the order of 1 second is sufficient to finally provide for liquid injection conditions of hydrogen which, as commonly known, is undesirable for smooth ignition and engine starting transients.

  13. Cryogenic vacuum pump design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, A.J.; Lessard, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the problems and tradeoffs involved in cryogenic vacuum pump analysis, design and manufacture. Particular attention is paid to the several issues unique to cryopumps, e.g., radiation loading, adsorption of noncondensible gases, and regeneration. A general algorithm for cryopump design is also proposed. 12 references

  14. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  15. Journal bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  16. Operation of the main feedwater system turbopump following plant trip with total failure of the auxiliary feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas Alvaro, A.M. de; Rosa Martinez, B. de la; Alcaide, F.; Toledano Camara, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Auxiliary Feedwater System (AF) is a safeguard system which has been designed to supply feedwater to the steam generators, cool the primary system and remove decay heat from the reactor when the main feedwater pumps fail due to loss of power or any other reason. Thus, when plant trip occurs, the AF system pumps start up automatically, allowing removal of decay heat from the reactor. However, even though this system (2 motor-driven pumps and 1 turbopump) is highly reliable, injection of water to the steam generators must be ensured when it fails completely. To do this, if plant trip has not been caused by loss of off site power or failure of the Main Feedwater System (FW) turbopumps, one of these turbopumps can be used to achieve removal of decay heat. Since a large amount of steam is consumed by these turbopumps, an analysis has been performed to determine whether one of these pumps can be used and what actions are necessary to inject water into the steam generators. Results show that, for the case in question, a FW turbopump can be used to remove decay heat from the reactor. (author)

  17. GAS BEARING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  18. Grizzly bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.; Feldhamer, G.; Thompson, B.; Chapman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  19. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  20. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament

  1. Cryogenics for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A wide-ranging study of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) structural and cryogenic requirements was made. Concepts and computational methods have been developed for all of the major problems in these areas. Design analyses have been made to provide more detailed information on some items and experimental work has been performed to create data bases in the areas of superfluid heat transfer, superfluid dielectric properties, heat transfer from conductors, and in the thermal and mechanical properties of materials at low temperatures. In most cases optimum solutions have not been made because of the developing nature of the overall study but methodology for optimization has been worked out for essentially all SMES cryogenic and structural elements. The selection of 1.8 K cooling and all aluminum systems in bedrock continues to be the best choice

  2. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  3. Chemiluminescence in cryogenic matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotnik, S. V.; Kazakov, Valeri P.

    1989-04-01

    The literature data on chemiluminescence (CL) in cryogenic matrices have been classified and correlated for the first time. The role of studies on phosphorescence and CL at low temperatures in the development of cryochemistry is shown. The features of low-temperature CL in matrices of nitrogen and inert gases (fine structure of spectra, matrix effects) and the data on the mobility and reactivity of atoms and radicals at very low temperatures are examined. The trends in the development of studies on CL in cryogenic matrices, such as the search for systems involving polyatomic molecules and extending the forms of CL reactions, are followed. The reactions of active nitrogen with hydrocarbons that are accompanied by light emission and CL in the oxidation of carbenes at T >= 77 K are examined. The bibliography includes 112 references.

  4. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  5. Cryogenic high current discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meierovich, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    Z-pinches formed from frozen deuterium fibers by a rapidly rising current have enhanced stability and high neutron yield. The efforts to understand the enhanced stability and neutron yield on the basis of classical picture of Bennett equilibrium of the current channel has not given satisfactory results. The traditional approach does not take into account the essential difference between the frozen deuterium fiber Z-pinches and the usual Z-pinches such as exploding wires or classical gas-puffed Z-pinches. The very low temperature of the fiber atoms (10 K), together with the rapidly rising current, result in the coexistence of a high current channel with unionized fiber atoms for a substantial period of time. This phenomena lasts during the risetime. This approach takes into account the difference of the breakdown in a dielectric deuterium fiber and the breakdown in a metallic wire. This difference is essential to the understanding of specific features of cryogenic high current discharges. Z-pinches in frozen deuterium fibers should be considered as a qualitatively new phenomenon on the boundary of cryogenic and high current physics. It is a start of a new branch in plasma physics: the physics of cryogenic high current discharges

  6. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.; Rode, C.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a standing wave superconducting linear accelerator with a maximum energy of 4 GeV and 200 μA beam current. The 418 Cornell/CEBAF superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are arranged in two 0.5 GeV linacs with magnetic recirculating arcs at each end. These accelerating cavities are arranged in pairs in a cryounit. The ensemble of four cryounits (8 cavities) together with their end caps makes up a complete cryostat called a cryogenic module. The four cryounit helium vessels are cross connected to each other and share a common cryogen supply, radiation shield and insulating vacuum. The cryogenics system for CEBAF consists of a 5kW central helium refrigerator and a transfer line system to supply 2.2 K 2.8 ATM helium to the cavity cryostats, 40 K helium at 3.5 ATM to the radiation shields and 4.5K helium at 2.8 ATM to the superconducting magnetic spectrometers in the experimental halls. Both the 2.2 K and the 4.5 K helium are expanded by Joule-Thompson (JT) valves in the individual cryostats yielding 2.0 K at .031 ATM and 4.4 K at 1.2 ATM respectively. The Central Helium Refrigerator is located in the center of the CEBAF racetrack with the transfer lines located in the linac tunnels

  7. Cryogenics in nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadurai, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cryogenic technology has significantly contributed to the development of several proven techniques for use in the nuclear power industry. A noteworthy feature is the unique role of cryogenics in minimising the release of radioactive and some chemical pollutants to the environment during the operation of various plants associated with this industry. The salient technological features of several cryogenic processes relevant to the nuclear reactor technology are discussed. (author)

  8. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced/Silicon Carbide Turbine Blisk Testing in the SIMPLEX Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genge, Gary G.; Marsh, Matthew W.

    1999-01-01

    A program designed to implement a ceramic matrix composite integrally bladed disk (blisk) into rocket engine style turbomachinery has successfully completed testing. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) program, utilizing the MSFC turbomachinery design, analysis, and testing capabilities along with materials development capabilities from both Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC, has tested two carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide blisks in the Simplex Turbopump at MSFC's Test Stand 500. One blisk contained a polar woven fiber preform, while the second blisk tested utilized a quasi-isotropic preform. Vhile earlier papers have chronicled the program's design, material testing, and torque testing efforts, this paper focuses on the testing of the blisks in the Simplex turbopump. Emphasis will be placed on the actual condition of the blisks before and after the testing test program design methodology, and conclusions that can be drawn from the test data and blisk final conditions. The program performed three separate test series. The first series was needed to validate that the Simplex turbopump was correctly re-built following a major incident to the turbopump. The turbopump had two major differences from the original design. The most obvious difference was the sleeve required throughout the bore of the main housing. The second major difference was modifications to the pump diffuser to improve performance. Several areas were burnt during the incident and were either repaired by weld repair (pump inlet housing) or simply smoothed out (turbine nozzle discharge). The test series was designed to weed out any turbopump design and manufacturing flaws or fatigue issues prior to putting the C/SiC blisks into it. The second and third series were the C/SiC blisk test series. The primary goal of these series was to expose the blisks to as much fatigue causing dynamic stress as possible to examine the material's capability. Initially, the test plan was to put equal time on

  10. Overview of Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge in the Fastrac Engine LOX Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Thomas; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations regarding rotating cavitation and cavitation surge experienced during the development of the Fastrac 60 Klbf engine turbopump are discussed. Detailed observations from the analysis of both water flow and liquid oxygen test data are offered. Scaling and general comparison of rotating cavitation between water flow and liquid oxygen testing are discussed. Complex data features linking the localized rotating cavitation mechanism of the inducer to system surge components are described in detail. Finally a description of a simple lumped-parameter hydraulic system model developed to better understand observed data is given.

  11. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegley, Jeff; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature Si02 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  12. Cryogenic implications for DT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souers, P.C.

    1977-10-01

    Cryogenic hydrogen data is being compiled for magnetic fusion engineering. Many physical properties of DT can be extrapolated from H 2 and D 2 values. The phase diagram properties of the D 2 -DT-T 2 mixture are being measured. Three properties which will be greatly affected by tritium should be measured. In order of their perceived importance, they are: (1) solid thermal conductivity, (2) solid mechanical strength, and (3) gaseous electrical conductivity. The most apparent need for DT data is in Tokomak fuel pellet injection. Cryopumping and distillation applications are also considered

  13. Kodak AMSD Cryogenic Test Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary; Hammon, John; Barrett, David; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NGST will be an IR based optical system that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. As part of the AMSD program, Kodak must demonstrate the ability of our system to perform at these very cold temperatures. Kodak will discuss the test approach that will be used for cryogenic testing at MSFC's XRCF.

  14. Cryogenic forced convection refrigerating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klee, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the method of refrigerating products by contact with a refrigerating gas which comprises introducing product into a refrigeration zone, contacting the product with the refrigerating gas for a sufficient time to refrigerate it to the appropriate extent and removing the refrigerated product. The improvement for producing the refrigeration gas from a liquid cryogen such that essentially all of the liquid cryogen is fully vaporized before contacting the product comprises: (a) introducing the liquid cryogen, selected from the group consisting of liquid air and liquid nitrogen, at elevated pressure into an ejector as the motive fluid to accelerate a portion of a warm refrigerating gas through the ejector while mixing the cryogen and gas to effect complete vaporization of the liquid cryogen and substantial cooling of the portion of the refrigerating gas resulting in a cold discharge gas which is above the liquefaction temperature of the cryogen; (b) introducing the cold discharge gas into a forced circulation pathway of refrigerating gas and producing a cold refrigerating gas which contacts and refrigerates product and is then at least partially recirculated; (c) sensing the temperature of the refrigerating gas in the forced circulation pathway and controlling the introduction of liquid cryogen with regard to the sensed temperature to maintain the temperature of the discharge gas above the liquefacton temperature of the cryogen utilized

  15. Cryogenics in CEBAF HMS dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogensberger, P.; Ramsauer, F.; Brindza, P.; Wines, R.; Koefler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The paper will report upon the final design, manufacturing and tests of CEBAF's HMS Dipole cryogenic equipment. The liquid nitrogen circuits, the helium circuits and thermal insulation of the magnet will be addressed. The cryogenic reservoir and control module as an integral part of the HMS Dipole magnet will be presented. The construction, manufacturing, tests and final performance of the HMS Dipole cryogenic system will be reported. The LN 2 circuit and the He circuit are tied together by the control system for cool down, normal operation and standby. This system monitors proper temperature differences between both circuits and controls the cryogenic supply to meet the constraints. Implementation of the control features for the cryogenic system into the control system will be reported

  16. Cryogenic Scan Mechanism for Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasunas, John C.; Francis, John L.

    2011-01-01

    A compact and lightweight mechanism has been developed to accurately move a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) scan mirror (a cube corner) in a near-linear fashion with near constant speed at cryogenic temperatures. This innovation includes a slide mechanism to restrict motion to one dimension, an actuator to drive the motion, and a linear velocity transducer (LVT) to measure the speed. The cube corner mirror is double-passed in one arm of the FTS; double-passing is required to compensate for optical beam shear resulting from tilting of the moving cube corner. The slide, actuator, and LVT are off-the-shelf components that are capable of cryogenic vacuum operation. The actuator drives the slide for the required travel of 2.5 cm. The LVT measures translation speed. A proportional feedback loop compares the LVT voltage with the set voltage (speed) to derive an error signal to drive the actuator and achieve near constant speed. When the end of the scan is reached, a personal computer reverses the set voltage. The actuator and LVT have no moving parts in contact, and have magnetic properties consistent with cryogenic operation. The unlubricated slide restricts motion to linear travel, using crossed roller bearings consistent with 100-million- stroke operation. The mechanism tilts several arc seconds during transport of the FTS mirror, which would compromise optical fringe efficiency when using a flat mirror. Consequently, a cube corner mirror is used, which converts a tilt into a shear. The sheared beam strikes (at normal incidence) a flat mirror at the end of the FTS arm with the moving mechanism, thereby returning upon itself and compensating for the shear

  17. Development of turbopump cavitation performance test facility and the test of inducer performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Dong Kee; Kim, Chun Tak; Yoon, Min Soo; Cha, Bong Jun; Kim, Jin Han; Yang, Soo Seok

    2001-01-01

    A performance test facility for turbopump inducer cavitation was developed and the inducer cavitation performance tests were performed. Major components of the performance test facility are driving unit, test section, piping, water tank, and data acquisition and control system. The maximum of testing capability of this facility are as follows: flow rate - 30kg/s; pressure - 13 bar, rotational speed - 10,000rpm. This cavitation test facility is characterized by the booster pump installed at the outlet of the pump that extends the flow rate range, and by the pressure control system that makes the line pressure down to vapor pressure. The vacuum pump is used for removing the dissolved air in the water as well as the line pressure. Performance tests were carried out and preliminary data of test model inducer were obtained. The cavitation performance test and cavitation bubble flow visualization were also made. This facility is originally designed for turbopump inducer performance test and cavitation test. However it can be applied to the pump impeller performance test in the future with little modification

  18. An overview of the turbopump development programme in the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s aerospace systems research group

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smyth, J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Smyth_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2974 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Smyth_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 An Overview of the Turbopump...

  19. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions

  20. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...

  1. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-05-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  2. Centrifuge advances using HTS magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Flögel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Wippich, D.; Riedel, T.

    2001-05-01

    Passive magnetic bearings are of increasing technical interest. We performed experiments with centrifugal rotors to analyze gyroscopic forces in terms imbalance, rotor elasticity and damping. Centrifuge rotors need to be operated soft and stable without whirling the sediments. In order to evaluate optimal parameters critical and resonance behaviors are investigated. Eccentricities up 2 mm are safely passed by accelerating test wheels. In a simple model we describe the effect of passing critical rotational speeds. Measurements of bearing properties and wheel performance are presented. We have constructed a first prototype centrifuge designed with a HTS double bearing which operates a titanium rotor safely up to 30 000 rpm. A 15 W Stirling cooler serves cryogenics of the YBCO stators. From the experiments design guidelines for centrifugal applications with HTS bearings are given.

  3. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  4. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  5. Operation and design selection of high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, F N; Floegel-Delor, U; Riedel, T; Rothfeld, R; Wippich, D; Goebel, B

    2004-01-01

    Axial and radial high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic bearings are evaluated by their parameters. Journal bearings possess advantages over thrust bearings. High magnetic gradients in a multi-pole permanent magnet (PM) configuration, the surrounding melt textured YBCO stator and adequate designs are the key features for increasing the overall bearing stiffness. The gap distance between rotor and stator determines the specific forces and has a strong impact on the PM rotor design. We report on the designing, building and measuring of a 200 mm prototype 100 kg HTS bearing with an encapsulated and thermally insulated melt textured YBCO ring stator. The encapsulation requires a magnetically large-gap (4-5 mm) operation but reduces the cryogenic effort substantially. The bearing requires 3 l of LN 2 for cooling down, and about 0.2 l LN 2 h -1 under operation. This is a dramatic improvement of the efficiency and in the practical usage of HTS magnetic bearings

  6. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping

  7. Advantage of superconducting bearing in a commercial flywheel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viznichenko, R; Velichko, A V; Hong, Z; Coombs, T A [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: tac1000@cam.ac.uk

    2008-02-01

    The use of a superconducting magnetic bearing in an Urenco Power Technologies (UPT) 100kW flywheel is being studied. The dynamics of a conventional flywheel energy storage system have been studied at low frequencies. We show that the main design consideration is overcoming drag friction losses and parasitic resonances. We propose an original superconducting magnetic bearing design and improved cryogenic motor cooling to increase stability and decrease energy losses in the system.

  8. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Flight Demonstration development has been canceled in favor of a ground test bed development for of passive/active cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and...

  9. Hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the rheological models and the equations of lubrication. It also presents the numerical approaches used to solve the above equations by finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements methods.

  10. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  11. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  12. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  13. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  14. Heat transfer and pressure measurements for the SSME fuel-side turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    A measurement program is currently underway at the Calspan-UB Research Center (CUBRC) which utilizes the Rocketdyne two-state fuel-side turbine with the engine geometric configuration reproduced. This is a full two-state turbine for which the vane rows and the blades are the engine hardware currently used on the Space Shuttle turbopump. A status report is provided for the experimental program and a description of the instrumentation and the measurements to be performed. The specific items that will be illustrated and described are as follows: (1) the gas flow path, (2) the heat-flux instrumentation, (3) the surface-pressure instrumentation, (4) the experimental conditions for which data will be obtained, and (5) the specific measurements that will be performed.

  15. A model for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump shaft seal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    A model of the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) shaft seal system on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is described. The model predicts the fluid properties and flow rates throughout this system for a number of conditions simulating failed seals. The results agree well with qualitative expectations and redline values but cannot be verified with actual data due to the lack thereof. The results indicate that each failure mode results in a unique distribution of properties throughout the seal system and can therefore be individually identified given the proper instrumentation. Furthermore, the detection process can be built on the principle of qualitative reasoning without the use of exact fluid property values. A simplified implementation of the model which does not include the slinger/labyrinth seal combination has been developed and will be useful for inclusion in a real-time diagnostic system.

  16. Cryogenic aspects of the mirror fusion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, W.H.; Nelson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper covers the design and construction of the MFTF cryogenic system and a description of the operating procedures throughout the many functional modes. The coils and the cryopanels for maintaining the high vacuum environment weigh 417,000 kg (920,000 lb) and must be cooled from room temperature to 4.5 k. The cryogenic system for MFTF consists of a closed-loop helium system with a 3000-W helium refrigerator that uses gas-bearing expansion turbines and oil-flooded screw compressors. In addition, liquid helium storage facilities have adequate capacity for standby operation, and a complete helium-purification plant is capable of processing 17 m 3 /min (600 scfm). An open-loop liquid nitrogen system (with provision for later addition of a nitrogen recondenser) provides the required refrigeration for the radiation shields that must be maintained at 85 K

  17. A cryogenic axial-centrifugal compressor for superfluid helium refrigeration

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, L; Schustr, P; Vins, M; Brunovsky, I; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L

    1997-01-01

    CERN's new project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will use superfluid helium as coolant for its high-field superconducting magnets and therefore require large capacity refrigeration at 1.8 K. This may only be achieved by subatmospheric compression of gaseous helium at cryogenic temperature. To stimulate development of this technology, CERN has procured from industry prototype Cold Compressor Units (CCU). This unit is based on a cryogenic axial-centrifugal compressor, running on ceramic ball bearings and driven by a variable-frequency electrical motor operating under low-pressure helium at ambient temperature. The machine has been commissioned and is now in operation. After describing basic constructional features of the compressor, we report on measured performance.

  18. Operational Experience with a Cryogenic Axial-Centrifugal Compressor

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, L; Löhlein, K; Purtschert, W; Ziegler, B L; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Brunovsky, I; Tucek, L

    1998-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, requires large refrigeration capacity at 1.8 K. Compression of gaseous helium at cryogenic temperatures is therefore inevitable. Together with subcontractors, Linde Kryotechnik has developed a prototype machine. This unit is based on a cryogenic axial-centrifugal compressor, running on ceramic ball bearings and driven by a variable-frequency electrical motor operating at ambient temperature. Integrated in a test facility for superconducting magnets the machine has been commissioned without major problems and successfully gone through the acceptance test in autumn 1995. Subsequent steps were initiated to improve efficiency of this prototype. This paper describes operating experience gained so far and reports on measured performance prior to and after constructional modifications.

  19. Bearing structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.S.; Preece, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing for the lower end of the vertical shaft of a sodium pump comprises a support shell encircling the shaft and a bush located between the shell and shaft. Liquid sodium is fed from the pump outlet to the bush/shaft and bush/shell interfaces to provide hydrostatic support. The bush outer surface and the shell inner surface are of complementary part-spherical shape and the bush floats relative to the shaft so that the bush can align itself with the shaft axis. Monitoring of the relative rotational speed of the bush with respect to the shaft (such rotation being induced by the viscous drag forces present) is also performed for the purposes of detecting abnormal operation of the bearing or partial seizure, at least one magnet is rotatable with the bush, and a magnetic sensor provides an output having a frequency related to the speed of the bush. (author)

  20. Journal Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Brancati

    1999-01-01

    determined after acquiring and analysing the orbits described by the journal axis for assigned unbalance values in different operating conditions. Analysis of the results shows some particular operating features that were not entirely predicted by the theoretical model and which may give rise to malfunctions in the rotor-tilting pad bearings system. The tests were carried out in the rotor dynamics laboratory of the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica per l'Energetica at the University of Naples.

  1. Camshaft bearing arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoi, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1986-06-10

    A bearing arrangement is described for the camshaft of an internal combustion engine or the like which camshaft is formed along its length in axial order with a first bearing surface, a first cam lobe, a second bearing surface, a second cam lobe, a third bearing surface, a third cam lobe and a fourth bearing surface, the improvement comprising first bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the first bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface, second bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the second bearing surface and journaling the second bearing surface, third bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the third bearing surface and journaling the third bearing surface, and fourth bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the fourth bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface.

  2. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  3. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  4. CEBAF cryogenic system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.; Brindza, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a standing wave superconducting linear accelerator with a maximum energy of 4 GeV and 200 μA beam current. The 418 Cornell/CEBAF superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are arranged in two 0.5 GeV linacs with magnetic recirculating arcs at each end. There is one recirculating arc for each energy beam that is circulating and any three of the four correlated energies may be supplied to any of the three experimental halls. The cryogenics system for CEBAF consists of a 5kW central helium refrigerator and a transfer line system to supply 2.2 K 2.8 ATM helium to the cavity cryostats, 40 K helium at 3.5 ATM to the radiation shields and 4.5K helium at 2.8 ATM to the superconducting magnetic spectrometers in the experimental halls. Both the 2.2K and the 4.5K helium are expanded by Joule-Thompson (JT) valves in the individual cryostats yielding 2.0K at .031 ATM and 4.4K at 1.2 ATM respectively. The Central Helium Refrigerator is located in the center of the CEBAF racetrack with the transfer lines located in the linac tunnels

  5. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a main feedwater turbopump trip transient in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-12-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos (ANV) have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); a load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); a load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); and, a feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the feedwater turbopump trip transient simulation. This transient actually occurred in the plant on June 19, 1989

  6. Cold flow testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine alternate turbopump development high pressure fuel turbine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.; Hudson, Susan T.; Johnson, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has established a cold airflow turbine test program to experimentally determine the performance of liquid rocket engine turbopump drive turbines. Testing of the SSME alternate turbopump development (ATD) fuel turbine was conducted for back-to-back comparisons with the baseline SSME fuel turbine results obtained in the first quarter of 1991. Turbine performance, Reynolds number effects, and turbine diagnostics, such as stage reactions and exit swirl angles, were investigated at the turbine design point and at off-design conditions. The test data showed that the ATD fuel turbine test article was approximately 1.4 percent higher in efficiency and flowed 5.3 percent more than the baseline fuel turbine test article. This paper describes the method and results used to validate the ATD fuel turbine aerodynamic design. The results are being used to determine the ATD high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine performance over its operating range, anchor the SSME ATD steady-state performance model, and validate various prediction and design analyses.

  7. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  8. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Kunyu, E-mail: zhaokunyu.kmust@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yang, Maosheng [Department of Structural Materials, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature.

  9. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun; Zhao, Kunyu; Yang, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature

  10. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  11. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  12. Thermal stratification in LH2 tank of cryogenic propulsion stage tested in ISRO facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, M.; Raj, R. Edwin; Narayanan, V.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are used as oxidizer and fuel respectively in cryogenic propulsion system. These liquids are stored in foam insulated tanks of cryogenic propulsion system and are pressurized using warm pressurant gas supplied for tank pressure maintenance during cryogenic engine operation. Heat leak to cryogenic propellant tank causes buoyancy driven liquid stratification resulting in formation of warm liquid stratum at liquid free surface. This warm stratum is further heated by the admission of warm pressurant gas for tank pressurization during engine operation. Since stratified layer temperature has direct bearing on the cavitation free operation of turbo pumps integrated in cryogenic engine, it is necessary to model the thermal stratification for predicting stratified layer temperature and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation. These inputs are required for estimating the minimum pressure to be maintained by tank pressurization system. This paper describes configuration of cryogenic stage for ground qualification test, stage hot test sequence, a thermal model and its results for a foam insulated LH2 tank subjected to heat leak and pressurization with hydrogen gas at 200 K during liquid outflow at 38 lps for engine operation. The above model considers buoyancy flow in free convection boundary layer caused by heat flux from tank wall and energy transfer from warm pressurant gas etc. to predict temperature of liquid stratum and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation in stage qualification tests carried out in ISRO facility.

  13. Numerical Fracture Analysis of Cryogenically Treated Alloy Steel Weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool Mohideen, S; Thamizhmanii, S; Muhammed Abdul Fatah, M.M; Saidin, W. Najmuddin W.

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic treatment is being used commercially in the industries in the last two decades for improving the life of many engineering component such as bearings and cutting tools. Though their influence in improving the wear resistance of tool materials is well established, the effect of treatment on weldments is not much investigated. In the present work, a two dimensional finite element analysis was carried out on the compact tension specimen model for simulating the treatment process and to study the fracture behaviour. The weldments were modelled by thermo- mechanical coupled field analysis for simulating he temperature distribution in the model during weld pool cooling and introducing thermal stresses due to uneven contraction and cooling. The model was subjected to cryogenic treatment by adopting radiation effect. The fracture analysis was carried out using Rice's J- Integral approach. The analysis produced a similar outcome of experimental results i.e. Increase in the fracture toughness of the specimen after cryogenic treatment in the heat affected zone of weldment. (paper)

  14. A High Reliability Gas-driven Helium Cryogenic Centrifugal Compressor

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneton, M; Gistau-Baguer, Guy M; Turcat, F; Viennot, P

    1998-01-01

    A helium cryogenic compressor was developed and tested in real conditions in 1996. The achieved objective was to compress 0.018 kg/s Helium at 4 K @ 1000 Pa (10 mbar) up to 3000 Pa (30 mbar). This project was an opportunity to develop and test an interesting new concept in view of future needs. The main features of this new specific technology are described. Particular attention is paid to the gas bearing supported rotor and to the pneumatic driver. Trade off between existing technologies and the present work are presented with special stress on the bearing system and the driver. The advantages are discussed, essentially focused on life time and high reliability without maintenance as well as non pollution characteristic. Practical operational modes are also described together with the experimental performances of the compressor. The article concludes with a brief outlook of future work.

  15. Heat switch technology for cryogenic thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q. S.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review is given of development of novel heat switches at cryogenic temperatures that alternatively provide high thermal connection or ideal thermal isolation to the cold mass. These cryogenic heat switches are widely applied in a variety of unique superconducting systems and critical space applications. The following types of heat switch devices are discussed: 1) magnetic levitation suspension, 2) shape memory alloys, 3) differential thermal expansion, 4) helium or hydrogen gap-gap, 5) superconducting, 6) piezoelectric, 7) cryogenic diode, 8) magneto-resistive, and 9) mechanical demountable connections. Advantages and limitations of different cryogenic heat switches are examined along with the outlook for future thermal management solutions in materials and cryogenic designs.

  16. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 70 papers in these workshop proceeedings. Topics covered include: superconducting accelerator magnet research and development; superconductor development; electrical measurements; magnet design and construction methods; field correction methods; power schemes and quench protection; cryogenic systems; and magnet measurements

  17. Operation of large cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.H.; Ferry, B.; Fowler, W.B.; Makara, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.; Walker, R.

    1985-06-01

    This report is based on the past 12 years of experiments on R and D and operation of the 27 kW Fermilab Tevatron Cryogenic System. In general the comments are applicable for all helium plants larger than 1000W (400 l/hr) and non mass-produced nitrogen plants larger than 50 tons per day. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Radiation hard cryogenic silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, L.; Abreu, M.C.; Bell, W.H.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieuri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently observed that heavily irradiated silicon detectors, no longer functional at room temperature, 'resuscitate' when operated at temperatures below 130 K. This is often referred to as the 'Lazarus effect'. The results presented here show that cryogenic operation represents a new and reliable solution to the problem of radiation tolerance of silicon detectors

  19. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  20. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  1. Cryogenic detectors for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1988-11-01

    A comprehensive introduction to cryogenic detector developments for particle physics is presented, covering conventional detectors cooled to low temperature (scintillators and semiconductors), superconductive and thermal sensitive devices, as well as the basics of cold electronics. After giving a critical overview of current work, we elaborate on possible new ways for further improvements and briefly evaluate the feasibility of the main proposed applications

  2. Progress in development of high capacity magnetic HTS bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummeth, P.; Nick, W.; Neumueller, H.-W.

    2005-01-01

    HTS magnetic bearings are inherently stable without an active feedback system. They provide low frictional losses, no wear and allow operation at high rotational speed without lubrication. So they are very promising for use in motors, generators and turbines. We designed and constructed an HTS radial bearing for use with a 400 kW HTS motor. It consists of alternating axially magnetized permanent magnet rings on the rotor and a segmented YBCO stator. Stator cooling is performed by liquid nitrogen, the temperature of the stator can be adjusted by varying the pressure in the cryogenic vessel. At 68 K maximum radial forces of more than 3.7 kN were found. These results range within the highest radial bearing capacities reported worldwide. The encouraging results lead us to develop a large heavy load HTS radial bearing. Currently a high magnetic gradient HTS bearing for a 4 MVA synchronous HTS generator is under construction

  3. Development of Cryogenic Engine for GSLV MkIII: Technological Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, RS; Jayan, N.; Bijukumar, KS; Jayaprakash, J.; Narayanan, V.; Ayyappan, G.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic engine capable of delivering 200 kN thrust is being developed for the first time in the country by ISRO for powering the upper stage of GSLV Mk-III, the next generation launch vehicle of ISRO capable of launching four tonne class satellites to Geo-synchronous Transfer Orbit(GTO). Development of this engine started a decade ago when various sub-systems development and testing were taken up. Starting with injector element development, the design, realization and testing of the major sub-systems viz the gas generator, turbopumps, start-up system and thrust chamber have been successfully done in a phased manner before conducting a series of developmental tests in the integrated engine mode. Apart from the major sub-systems, many critical components like the igniter, control components etc were independently developed and qualified. During the development program many challenges were faced in almost all areas of propulsion engineering. Systems engineering of the engine was another key challenge in the realization. This paper gives an outlook on various technological challenges faced in the key areas related to the engine development, insight to the solutions and measures taken to overcome the challenges.

  4. Cryogenic systems for detectors and particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    It's been one hundred years since the first successful experiments were carried out leading to the liquefaction of oxygen which birthed the field of cryogenics and about sixty years since cryogenics went commercial. Originally, cryogenics referred to the technology and art of producing low temperatures but today the definition adopted by the XII Congress of the International Institute of Refrigeration describes cryogenics as the study of phenomena, techniques, and concepts occurring at our pertaining to temperatures below 120 K. Modern acceptance of the importance and use of cryogenic fluids continues to grow. By far, the bulk of cryogenic products are utilized by industry for metal making, agriculture, medicine, food processing and as efficient storage of fuels. Cryogenics has found many uses in the scientific community as well, enabling the development of ultra low noise amplifiers, fast cold electronics, cryopumped ultra high vacuums, the production of intense magnetic fields and low loss power transmission through the sue of cryogenically cooled superconductors. High energy physic research has been and continues to use cryogenic hardware to produce liquids used as detector targets and to produce refrigeration necessary to cool superconducting magnets to design temperature for particle accelerator applications. In fact, today's super accelerators achieve energies that would be impossible to reach with conventional copper magnets, demonstrating that cryogenics has become an indispensable ingredient in today's scientific endeavors

  5. Application of the probabilistic approximate analysis method to a turbopump blade analysis. [for Space Shuttle Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, B. H.; Mcclung, R. C.; Millwater, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    An eigenvalue analysis of a typical space propulsion system turbopump blade is presented using an approximate probabilistic analysis methodology. The methodology was developed originally to investigate the feasibility of computing probabilistic structural response using closed-form approximate models. This paper extends the methodology to structures for which simple closed-form solutions do not exist. The finite element method will be used for this demonstration, but the concepts apply to any numerical method. The results agree with detailed analysis results and indicate the usefulness of using a probabilistic approximate analysis in determining efficient solution strategies.

  6. Automatic regulation of the feedwater turbo-pump capacity for the single-turbine 1000 MW NPP unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlysh, O.N.; Garbuzov, I.P.; Reukov, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    A schematic of the flow regulators (FR) of feedwater turbo-pumps (FTP) for the single-turbine 1000 MW NPP unit is presented. The FR operate in response to feedwoter signals from FTP or in response to FTP rotor rotational speed and control automatic speed governars. The FR automatic regulation ensures limitation of FTP rotor maximum rotational speed at a feedwater flow rate excess equal to 3600 T/h. The transients in the automatic regulation system are considered. Production tests of FTP FR confirmed the FR operation reliability and the right choice of the regulator concept and structure

  7. Sub-scale Waterflow Cavitation and Dynamic Transfer Function Testing of an Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Combined Inducer and Impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karon, D. M.; Patel, S. K.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009 and 2010, Concepts NREC prepared for and performed a series of tests on a 52% scale of a version of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X Oxidizer Turbopump under a Phase III SBIR with NASA MSFC. The test article was a combined inducer and impeller, tested as a unit. This paper presents an overview of the test rig and facility, instrumentation, signal conditioning, data acquisition systems, testing approach, measurement developments, and lessons learned. Results from these tests were presented in the form of two papers at the previous JANNAF joint propulsion conference, in December of 2011.

  8. Cryogenic moderator simulations: confronting reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities

  9. COOLING STAGES OF CRYOGENIC SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Троценко, А. В.

    2011-01-01

    The formalized definition for cooling stage of low temperature system is done. Based on existing information about the known cryogenic unit cycles the possible types of cooling stages are single out. From analyses of these stages their classification by various characteristics is suggested. The results of thermodynamic optimization of final throttle stage of cooling, which are used as working fluids helium, hydrogen and nitrogen, are shown.

  10. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  11. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castles, S.H.; Schein, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is described for use in craft such as launch, orbital and space vehicles subject to changes in orientation and conditions of vibration and weightlessness comprising: an insulated tank; a porous open celled sponge-like material disposed substantially throughout the contained volume of the insulated tank; a cryogenic fluid disposed within the sponge-like material; a cooling finger immersed in the cryogenic fluid, the finger extending from inside the insulated tank externally to an outside source such as an instrument detector for the purpose of transmitting heat from the outside source into the cryogenic fluid; means for filling the insulated tank with cryogenic fluid; and means for venting vaporized cryogenic fluid from the insulated tank

  12. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  13. Operational present status and reliability analysis of the upgraded EAST cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z. W.; Y Zhang, Q.; Lu, X. F.; Hu, L. B.; Zhu, P.

    2017-12-01

    Since the first commissioning in 2005, the cryogenic system for EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) has been cooled down and warmed up for thirteen experimental campaigns. In order to promote the refrigeration efficiencies and reliability, the EAST cryogenic system was upgraded gradually with new helium screw compressors and new dynamic gas bearing helium turbine expanders with eddy current brake to improve the original poor mechanical and operational performance from 2012 to 2015. Then the totally upgraded cryogenic system was put into operation in the eleventh cool-down experiment, and has been operated for the latest several experimental campaigns. The upgraded system has successfully coped with various normal operational modes during cool-down and 4.5 K steady-state operation under pulsed heat load from the tokamak as well as the abnormal fault modes including turbines protection stop. In this paper, the upgraded EAST cryogenic system including its functional analysis and new cryogenic control networks will be presented in detail. Also, its operational present status in the latest cool-down experiments will be presented and the system reliability will be analyzed, which shows a high reliability and low fault rate after upgrade. In the end, some future necessary work to meet the higher reliability requirement for future uninterrupted long-term experimental operation will also be proposed.

  14. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation

  15. The cryogenic control system of EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L.B.; Zhow, Z.W.; Xia, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A reliable and flexible duplex control system is required for cryogenic system. ► The cryogenic control system is based on Delta-V DCS. ► It has been proved to be an effective way to control cryogenic process. ► It will provide useful experience and inspiration for the development in the cryogenic control engineering. - Abstract: A large scale helium cryogenic system is one of the key components for the EAST tokamak device for the cooling of PF and TF coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines, current leads and cryopumps. Since the cooling scheme of the EAST cryogenic system is fairly complicated, a reliable and flexible control system is required for cryogenic system. The cryogenic control system is based on DeltaV DCS which is the process control software developed by Emerson Company. The EAST cryogenic system has been in operation for four years and has been proved to be safe, stable and energy saving by the past 7 experiments. This paper describes the redundant control network, hardware configuration, software structure, auxiliary system and the new development in the future.

  16. A generic pump/compressor design for circulation of cryogenic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinski, T.; Honkonen, S.C.; Sixsmith, H.; Stacy, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a second-generation centrifugal circulator for cryogenic fluids. The circulator is designed to operate over a wide range of flow rate and pressure rise and can be used for the pumping of liquid and compression of vapor at temperatures down to liquid helium (4 K). The machine incorporates self-acting gas journal bearings, a permanent magnet axial thrust bearing, and a variable speed induction motor drive to provide for reliable, maintenance-free operation. The paper provides design details of the pump. Calculated performance characteristics are also presented along with a general discussion regarding limitations of the present system

  17. A Cryogenic High-Power-Density Bearingless Motor for Future Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin; Siebert, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a high-power-density switched-reluctance cryogenic motor for all-electric and pollution-free flight. However, cryogenic operation at higher rotational speeds markedly shortens the life of mechanical rolling element bearings. Thus, to demonstrate the practical feasibility of using this motor for future flights, a non-contact rotor-bearing system is a crucial technology to circumvent poor bearing life that ordinarily accompanies cryogenic operation. In this paper, a bearingless motor control technology for a 12-8 (12 poles in the stator and 8 poles in the rotor) switched-reluctance motor operating in liquid nitrogen (boiling point, 77 K (-196 C or -321 F)) was presented. We pushed previous disciplinary limits of electromagnetic controller technique by extending the state-of-the-art bearingless motor operating at liquid nitrogen for high-specific-power applications. The motor was levitated even in its nonlinear region of magnetic saturation, which is believed to be a world first for the motor type. Also we used only motoring coils to generate motoring torque and levitation force, which is an important feature for developing a high specific power motor.

  18. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  19. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  20. Cryogenic test of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worden, P.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The weak equivalence principle is the hypothesis that the ratio of internal and passive gravitational mass is the same for all bodies. A greatly improved test of this principle is possible in an orbiting satellite. The most promising experiments for an orbital test are adaptations of the Galilean free-fall experiment and the Eotvos balance. Sensitivity to gravity gradient noise, both from the earth and from the spacecraft, defines a limit to the sensitivity in each case. This limit is generally much worse for an Eotvos balance than for a properly designed free-fall experiment. The difference is related to the difficulty of making a balance sufficiently isoinertial. Cryogenic technology is desirable to take full advantage of the potential sensitivity, but tides in the liquid helium refrigerant may produce a gravity gradient that seriously degrades the ultimate sensitivity. The Eotvos balance appears to have a limiting sensitivity to relative difference of rate of fall of about 2 x 10 -14 in orbit. The free-fall experiment is limited by helium tide to about 10 -15 ; if the tide can be controlled or eliminated the limit may approach 10 -18 . Other limitations to equivalence principle experiments are discussed. An experimental test of some of the concepts involved in the orbital free-fall experiment is continuing. The experiment consists in comparing the motions of test masses levitated in a superconducting magnetic bearing, and is itself a sensitive test of the equivalence principle. At present the levitation magnets, position monitors and control coils have been tested and major noise sources identified. A measurement of the equivalence principle is postponed pending development of a system for digitizing data. The experiment and preliminary results are described

  1. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  2. The Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR

    OpenAIRE

    von Hahn, Robert; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; Fadil, Hisham; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth A.; Heber, Oded; Herwig, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion a...

  3. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  4. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlig, K

    2012-01-01

    We review briefly our first cryogen-free dilution refrigerator (CF-DR) which was precooled by a GM cryocooler. We then show how today's dry DRs with pulse tube precooling have developed. A few examples of commercial DRs are explained and noteworthy features pointed out. Thereby we describe the general advantages of cryogen-free DRs, but also show where improvements are still desirable. At present, our dry DR has a base temperature of 10 mK and a cooling capacity of 700 μW at a mixing chamber temperature of 100 mK. In our cryostat, in most recent work, an additional refrigeration loop was added to the dilution circuit. This 4 He circuit has a lowest temperature of about 1 K and a refrigeration capacity of up to 100 mW at temperatures slightly above 1 K; the dilution circuit and the 4 He circuit can be run separately or together. The purpose of this additional loop is to increase the cooling capacity for experiments where the cooling power of the still of the DR is not sufficient to cool cold amplifiers and cables, e.g. in studies on superconducting quantum circuits or astrophysical applications.

  5. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, K.

    2012-12-01

    We review briefly our first cryogen-free dilution refrigerator (CF-DR) which was precooled by a GM cryocooler. We then show how today's dry DRs with pulse tube precooling have developed. A few examples of commercial DRs are explained and noteworthy features pointed out. Thereby we describe the general advantages of cryogen-free DRs, but also show where improvements are still desirable. At present, our dry DR has a base temperature of 10 mK and a cooling capacity of 700 μW at a mixing chamber temperature of 100 mK. In our cryostat, in most recent work, an additional refrigeration loop was added to the dilution circuit. This 4He circuit has a lowest temperature of about 1 K and a refrigeration capacity of up to 100 mW at temperatures slightly above 1 K; the dilution circuit and the 4He circuit can be run separately or together. The purpose of this additional loop is to increase the cooling capacity for experiments where the cooling power of the still of the DR is not sufficient to cool cold amplifiers and cables, e.g. in studies on superconducting quantum circuits or astrophysical applications.

  6. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  7. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  8. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  9. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. von; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2016-06-15

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm{sup −3} is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10{sup −14} mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  10. Improvement of the cooldown time of LSF 9599 flexure bearing SADA cooler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullié, J.; Groep, van der W.; Bruins, P.; Benschop, T.; Koning, de A.; Dam, J.A.M.; Andresen, B.F.; Fulop, G.F.; Norton, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    Thales Cryogenics has presented the LSF 9599 SADA II flexure cooler in 2005. Based on Thales' well-known moving magnet flexure technology, the LSF 9599 complies with the SADA II specification with respect to performance, envelope and mass. Being the first manufacturer offering a full flexure-bearing

  11. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic refrigeration or cryocooling. Design, development, testing, and evaluation of cryogenic cooling systems are discussed. Design applications in spacecraft, magnet cooling, superconductors, liquid fuel storage, radioastronomy, and medicine are presented. Material properties at cryogenic temperatures and cryogenic rocket propellants are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Teddy Bear Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults...... bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized....

  13. High-Pressure Hot-Gas Self-Acting Floating Ring Shaft Seal for Liquid Rocket Turbopumps. [tapered bore seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, R. E.; Diamond, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    Design analysis, detail design, fabrication, and experimental evaluation was performed on two self acting floating ring shaft seals for a rocket engine turbopump high pressure 24132500 n/sq m (3500 psig) hot gas 533 K 9500 F) high speed 3142 rad/sec (30000 rmp) turbine. The initial design used Rayleigh step hydrodynamic lift pads to assist in centering the seal ring with minimum rubbing contact. The final design used a convergent tapered bore to provide hydrostatic centering force. The Rayleigh step design was tested for 107 starts and 4.52 hours total. The leakage was satisfactory; however, the design was not acceptable due to excessive wear caused by inadequate centering force and failure of the sealing dam caused by erosion damage. The tapered bore design was tested for 370 starts and 15.93 hours total. Satisfactory performance for the required life of 7.5 hours per seal was successfully demonstrated.

  14. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Yuuji; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Ishimaru, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A cryogenic system consisting of a helium refrigerator (4 kW at 4.4 K) and a liquid helium distribution transfer system for TRISTAN 508 MHz 32 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities was designed and constructed. After the performance test of the cryogenic system, 16 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities in 8 cryostats were installed in underground TRISTAN electron-positron collider and connected to the helium refrigerator on the ground level through the transfer line (total length about 330 m) and cooled by liquid helium pool boiling in parallel. The cryogenic system and its operation experience are described. (author)

  15. Cryogenic polarized target facility: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.; Nash, H.K.; Roberson, N.; Schneider, M.; Seagondollar, W.; Soderstrum, J.

    1985-01-01

    The TUNL cryogenically polarized target facility consists of a 3 He- 4 He dilution refrigerator and a superconducting magnet, together capable of maintaining samples at between 10 and 20 mK in magnetic fields up to 7 Tesla. At these temperatures and magnetic fields brute-force nuclear orientation occurs. Polarizations from 20 to 60% are attainable in about twenty nonzero spin nuclei. Most are metals, ranging in mass from 6 Li to 209 Bi, but the nuclei 1 H and 3 He are also polarizable via this method. The main effort is directed towards a better determination of the effective spin-spin force in nuclei. These experiments are briefly described and the beam stabilization system, cryostat and polarized 3 He targets are discussed

  16. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  17. [Application of in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy to analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Lin, Cheng-yan; Yu, Wen-quan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ai-guo

    2010-01-01

    Identification of salts is a principal problem for analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. The fluid inclusions from deep natural gas reservoirs in Minfeng sub-sag were analyzed by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The type of fluid inclusions was identified by Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The Raman spectra show that the inclusions contain methane-bearing brine aqueous liquids. The fluid inclusions were analyzed at -180 degrees C by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The spectra show that inclusions contain three salts, namely NaCl2, CaCl2 and MgCl2. Sodium chloride is most salt component, coexisting with small calcium chloride and little magnesium chloride. The origin of fluids in inclusions was explained by analysis of the process of sedimentation and diagenesis. The mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs was also given in this paper. The results of this study indicate that in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy is an available method to get the composition of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. Based on the analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy with combination of the history of sedimentation and diagenesis, the authors can give important evidence for the type and mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs.

  18. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions

  19. Cryogenic Safety Rules and Guidelines at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN defines and implements a Safety Policy that sets out the general principles governing safety at CERN. As an intergovernmental organisation, CERN further establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In this process, it takes into account the laws and regulation of the Host States (France and Switzerland), EU regulations and directives, as well as international regulations, standards and directives. For the safety of cryogenic equipment, this is primarily covered by the Safety Regulation for Mechanical Equipment and the General Safety Instruction for Cryogenic Equipment. In addition, CERN has also developed Safety Guidelines to support the implementation of these safety rules, covering cryogenic equipment and oxygen deficiency hazard assessment and mitigation. An overview of the cryogenic safety rules and these safety guidelines will be presented.

  20. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  1. The cryogenic control system of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; WANG Ke-Xiang; ZHAO Ji-Jiu; YUE Ke-Juan; DAI Ming-Sui; HUANG Yi-Ling; JIANG Bo

    2008-01-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade Project(BEPCⅡ).The system consists of a Siemens PLC(ST-PLC,Programmable Logic Controller)for the compressor control,an Allen Bradley(AB)PLC for the cryogenic equipments,and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System(EPICS)that integrates the PLCs.The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control,PID(Proportional-Integral-Differential)control loops,real-time data access and data storage,alarm handler and human machine interface.It is capable of automatic recovery as well.This paper describes the BEPCⅡ cryogenic control system,data communication between ST-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers(IOCs),and the integration of the flow control,the low level interlock,the AB-PLC,and EPICS.

  2. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of...

  3. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Bremer, J; Delany, M; Diaz, A; Doubnik, R; Haaf, K; Henstchel, S; Norris, B; Voirin, E

    2017-01-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  4. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets, are described. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member

  5. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  6. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, D.; Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Delaney, M.; Diaz, A.; Doubnik, R.; Haaf, K.; Hentschel, S.; Norris, B.; Voirin, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  7. Below-Ambient and Cryogenic Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems operating in below-ambient temperature conditions are inherently susceptible to moisture intrusion and vapor drive toward the cold side. The subsequent effects may include condensation, icing, cracking, corrosion, and other problems. Methods and apparatus for real-world thermal performance testing of below-ambient systems have been developed based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry. New ASTM International standards on cryogenic testing and their extension to future standards for below-ambient testing of pipe insulation are reviewed.

  8. Neutron detection with cryogenics and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Zane W.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.; Lamberti, V.E.; Burger, Arnold; Woodfield, Brian F.; Niedermayr, Thomas; Dragos Hau, I.; Labov, Simon E.; Friedrich, Stephan; Geoffrey West, W.; Pohl, Kenneth R.; Berg, Lodewijk van den

    2005-01-01

    The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI 2 for direct detection of neutrons. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Fundamental of cryogenics (for superconducting RF technology)

    CERN Document Server

    Pierini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This review briefly illustrates a few fundamental concepts of cryogenic engineering, the technological practice that allows reaching and maintaining the low-temperature operating conditions of the superconducting devices needed in particle accelerators. To limit the scope of the task, and not to duplicate coverage of cryogenic engineering concepts particularly relevant to superconducting magnets that can be found in previous CAS editions, the overview presented in this course focuses on superconducting radio-frequency cavities.

  10. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Stephen H. (Inventor); Schein, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is provided for use in craft such as launch, orbital, and space vehicles subject to substantial vibration, changes in orientation, and weightlessness. The cooler contains a small pore, large free volume, low density material to restrain a cryogen through surface tension effects during launch and zero-g operations and maintains instrumentation within the temperature range of 10 to 140 K. The cooler operation is completely passive, with no inherent vibration or power requirements.

  11. A hall for assembly and cryogenic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaunier, J.; Buhler, S.; Caruette, A.; Chevrollier, R.; Junquera, T.; Le Scornet, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Cryodrome, an assembly hall and the testing ground for cryogenic equipment and R and D experiments for the superconducting cavities is going to be transformed for its future missions. The cryogenic utilities, especially the He low pressure pumping capacity, was rearranged and extended to a new area. Space was provided to install CRYHOLAB, a new horizontal cryostat for cavity testing. Automatic control and supervision of the utilities and the experimental area are rebuilt and updated. (authors)

  12. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, huge detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world’s largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. Monday 5.12.2005 Introduction: From History to Modern Refrigeration Cycles (Goran Perinic) Tuesday 6.12.2005 Refrigerants, Standard Cryostats, Cryogenic Des...

  13. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. From history to modern refrigeration cycles (1/5) Refrigerants, standard cryostats, cryogenic design (2/5) Heat transfer and insulation (3/5) Safety in cryoge...

  14. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to

  15. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stirling, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Polar bears are the largest of the eight species of bears found worldwide and are covered in a pigment-free fur giving them the appearance of being white. They are the most carnivorous of bear species consuming a high-fat diet, primarily of ice-associated seals and other marine mammals. They range throughout the circumpolar Arctic to the southernmost extent of seasonal pack ice.

  16. Device for delivering cryogen to rotary super-conducting winding of cryogen-cooled electrical machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, I.F.; Gorbunov, G.S.; Khutoretsky, G.M.; Popov, J.S.; Skachkov, J.V.; Vinokurov, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A device is disclosed for delivering cryogen to a superconducting winding of a cryogen-cooled electrical machine comprising a pipe articulated along the axis of the electrical machine and intended to deliver cryogen. One end of said pipe is located in a rotary chamber which communicates through channels with the space of the electrical machine, and said space accommodating its superconducting winding. The said chamber accommodates a needle installed along the chamber axis, and the length of said needle is of sufficient length such that in the advanced position of said cryogen delivering pipe said needle reaches the end of the pipe. The layout of the electrical machine increases the reliability and effectiveness of the device for delivering cryogen to the superconducting winding, simplifies the design of the device and raises the efficiency of the electrical machine

  17. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  18. Cryogenic Deflashing for Rubber Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deflashing is the process of removal of excess flashes from the rubber products. Initially deflashing was a manual operation where dozen of workers, seated at small work stations would take each part and trim the excess rubber off with scissors, knives or by grinding. Still the same method is employed in most of the rubber industry. The drawbacks of this method are demand inconsistent and repeatable quality. Work done by hand is often inconsistent. There are commercially available cryogenic deflashing machine but they are too expensive hence cost effectiveness is also a prime factor. The objective of this paper is to develop a technique, to identify the media through which the flashes can be removed easily and effectively. Based on the test results obtained from testing of five different types of media, ABCUT Steel media gave best results. The testing of the ABCUT Steel media on rubber samples like O-rings, grommet tail door, bottom bush etc. shows good results.

  19. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  20. A cryogenic infrared calibration target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R ⩽ 0.003, from 800 to 4800 cm-1 (12 - 2 μm). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10 000 cm-1 (25 - 1 μm) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R ⩽ 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to ˜4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials—Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder—are characterized and presented.

  1. EcoBears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nick; Pedersen, Sandra Bleuenn; Sørensen, Jens Ager

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the EcoBears concept that aims to augment household appliances with functional and aesthetic features to promote their "use'' and "longevity of use'' to prevent their disposal. The EcoBears also aim to support the communication of environmental issues in the home setting....... We present our initial design and implementation of the EcoBears that consist of two bear modules (a mother and her cub). We also present our preliminary concept validations and lessons learned to be considered for future directions....

  2. Bearing restoration by grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  3. Polar bears at risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, S.; Rosentrater, L.; Eid, P.M. [WWF International Arctic Programme, Oslo (Norway)

    2002-05-01

    Polar bears, the world's largest terrestrial carnivore, spend much of their lives on the arctic sea ice. This is where they hunt and move between feeding, denning, and resting areas. The world population, estimated at 22,000 bears, is made up of 20 relatively distinct populations varying in size from a few hundred to a few thousand animals. About 60 per cent of all polar bears are found in Canada. In general, the status of this species is stable, although there are pronounced differences between populations. Reductions in the extent and thickness of sea ice has lead the IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group to describe climate change as one of the major threats facing polar bears today. Though the long-term effects of climate change will vary in different areas of the Arctic, impacts on the condition and reproductive success of polar bears and their prey are likely to be negative. Longer ice-free periods resulting from earlier break-up of sea ice in the spring and later formation in the fall is already impacting polar bears in the southern portions of their range. In Canada's Hudson Bay, for example, bears hunt on the ice through the winter and into early summer, after which the ice melts completely, forcing bears ashore to fast on stored fat until freeze-up in the fall. The time bears have on the ice to hunt and build up their body condition is cut short when the ice melts early. Studies from Hudson Bay show that for every week earlier that ice break-up occurs, bears will come ashore 10 kg lighter and in poorer condition. It is likely that populations of polar bears dividing their time between land and sea will be severely reduced and local extinctions may occur as greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise and sea ice melts. Expected changes in regional weather patterns will also impact polar bears. Rain in the late winter can cause maternity dens to collapse before females and cubs have departed, thus exposing occupants to the elements and to predators. Such

  4. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  5. The Future with Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    The applications of cryogenic systems have expanded over the past 50 years into many areas of our lives. During this time, the impact of the common features of Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics, CryoFD, on the economic design of these cryogenic systems, has grown out of a long series of experimental studies carried out by teams of postgraduate students at Southampton University.These studies have sought to understand the heat transfer and convective behavior of cryogenic liquids and vapors, but they have only skimmed over the many findings made, on the strong convective motions of fluids at low temperatures. The convection takes place in temperature gradients up to 10,000 K per meter, and density gradients of 1000% per meter and more, with rapid temperature and spatially dependent changes in physical properties like viscosity and surface tension, making software development and empirical correlations almost impossible to achieve. These temperature and density gradients are far larger than those met in other convecting systems at ambient temperatures, and there is little similarity. The paper will discuss the likely impact of CryoFD on future cryogenic systems, and hopefully inspire further research to support and expand the use of existing findings, and to improve the economy of present-day systems even more effectively. Particular examples to be mentioned include the following. Doubling the cooling power of cryo-coolers by a simple use of CryoFD. Reducing the boil-off rate of liquid helium stored at the South Pole, such that liquid helium availability is now all-the-year-round. Helping to develop the 15 kA current leads for the LHC superconducting magnets at CERN, with much reduced refrigeration loads. Improving the heat transfer capability of boiling heat transfer surfaces by 10 to 100 fold. This paper is an edited text of an invited plenary presentation at ICEC25/ICMC2014 by Professor Scurlock on the occasion of his being presented with the ICEC Mendelssohn Award for his

  6. Cryogenic systems for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatain, D.; Perin, J.P.; Bonnay, P.; Bouleau, E.; Chichoux, M.; Communal, D.; Manzagol, J.; Viargues, F.; Brisset, D.; Lamaison, V.; Paquignon, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Low Temperatures Laboratory of CEA/Grenoble (France) is involved in the development of cryogenic systems for inertial fusion since a ten of years. A conceptual design for the cryogenic infrastructure of the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility has been proposed. Several prototypes have been designed, built and tested like for example the 1500 bars cryo-compressor for the targets filling, the target positioner and the thermal shroud remover. The HIPER project will necessitate the development of such equipments. The main difference is that this time, the cryogenic targets are direct drive targets. The first phase of HIPER experiments is a single shot period. Based oil the experience gained the last years, not only by our laboratory but also by Omega and G.A teams, we could design the new HIPER equipments for this phase. Some experimental results obtained with the prototypes of the LMJ cryogenic system are given and a first conceptual design for the HIPER single shot cryogenic system is shown. (authors)

  7. Status of the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; Goullon, Johannes; Grieser, Manfred; Krantz, Claude; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Repnow, Roland; Schornikov, Andrey; Hahn, Robert von; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A novel cryogenic storage ring is currently under construction at the MPIK. By electrostatic ion optical elements, the 35 m circumference Cryogenic Storage Ring will be able to store ions at energies of up to 300 keV per charge unit without any mass limitations. The CSR consists of a cryogenic ({proportional_to}5 K) beam pipe surrounded by two radiation shields (40 and 80 K) in a large outer, thermal insulation vacuum. Extreme vacuum (density {proportional_to}10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) will be achieved by 2 K cryopumping as demonstrated in a prototype ion beam trap. The ion optics was completely assembled within the precision cryogenic mounting and shielding structure of the first corner. There, cooldown tests to {proportional_to}40 K were performed which confirmed the required sub-millimeter accuracy of the specially designed electrode positioning under large temperature changes. The high-voltage connections to the cryogenic electrodes were installed and breakdown tests will be reported. Based on the test results the beam pipe, electrode mounting and shielding structures are under final construction for mounting during 2012.

  8. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  9. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-01-01

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 → V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 μm. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of ∼12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved ∼14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at ∼ 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 μm with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 → V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 μm. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than ±10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  10. A Reference Guide for Cryogenic Properties of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisend, John G

    2003-09-16

    A thorough knowledge of the behavior of materials at cryogenic temperatures is critical for the design of successful cryogenic systems. Over the past 50 years, a tremendous amount of material properties at cryogenic temperatures have been measured and published. This guide lists resources for finding these properties. It covers online databases, computer codes, conference proceedings, journals, handbooks, overviews and monographs. It includes references for finding reports issued by government laboratories and agencies. Most common solids and fluids used in cryogenics are covered.

  11. Long-term cryogenic space storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Chronic, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the design, fabrication and testing of a 225-cu ft spherical cryogenic storage system for long-term subcritical applications under zero-g conditions in storing subcritical cryogens for space vehicle propulsion systems. The insulation system design, the analytical methods used, and the correlation between the performance test results and analytical predictions are described. The best available multilayer insulation materials and state-of-the-art thermal protection concepts were applied in the design, providing a boiloff rate of 0.152 lb/hr, or 0.032% per day, and an overall heat flux of 0.066 Btu/sq ft hr based on a 200 sq ft surface area. A six to eighteen month cryogenic storage is provided by this system for space applications.

  12. Cryogenic Thermometer Calibration Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Thermeau, J P

    1998-01-01

    A cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and is being commissioned in preparation for the very stringent requirements on the temperature control of the LHC superconducting magnets. The temperature is traceable in the 1.5 to 30 K range to standards maintained in a national metrological laboratory by using a set of Rhodium-Iron temperature sensors of metrological quality. The calibration facility is designed for calibrating simultaneously 60 industrial cryogenic thermometers in the 1.5 K to 300 K temperature range, a thermometer being a device that includes both a temperature sensor and the wires heat-intercept. The thermometers can be calibrated in good and degraded vacuum or immersed in the surrounding fluid and at different Joule self-heating conditions that match those imposed by signal conditioners used in large cryogenic machinery. The calibration facility can be operated in an automatic mode and all the control and safety routines are handled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)...

  13. The Management of Cryogens at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio; Serio, L; Tavian, L

    2005-01-01

    CERN is a large user of industrially procured cryogens essentially liquid helium and nitrogen. Recent contracts have been placed by the Organization for the delivery of quantities up to 280 tons of liquid helium over four years and up to 50000 tons of liquid nitrogen over three years. Main users are the very large cryogenic system of the LHC accelerator complex, the physics experiments using superconducting magnets and liquefied gases and all the related test facilities whether industrial or laboratory scale. With the commissioning of LHC, the need of cryogens at CERN will considerably increase and the procurement policy must be adapted accordingly. In this paper, we discuss procurement strategy for liquid helium and nitrogen, including delivery rates, distribution methods and adopted safety standards. Global turnover, on site re-liquefaction capacity, operational consumption, accidental losses, purification means and storage capacity will be described. Finally, the short to medium term evolution of the Orga...

  14. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  15. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  16. Designs of pulsed power cryogenic transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Heyne, C.J.; Hackowrth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has completed designs of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These transformers will be configured to transfer their stored energy sequentially to an electro-magnetic launcher and form a three-stage power supply. The pulse transformers will act as two winding energy storage solenoids which provide a high current and energy pulse compression by transforming a 50 kA power supply into a megamp level power supply more appropriate for the electromagnetic launcher duty. This system differs from more traditional transformer applications in that significant current levels do not exists simultaneously in the two windings of the pulse transformer. This paper describes the designs of the pulsed power cryogenic transformers

  17. Cryogenic cooling system for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru [Taiyo Nippon Sanso, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, Research and development activity of HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power application is very progressive worldwide. Especially, HTS cable system and HTSFCL (HTS Fault current limiter) system are proceeding to practical stages. In such system and equipment, cryogenic cooling system, which makes HTS equipment cooled lower than critical temperature, is one of crucial components. In this article, cryogenic cooling system for HTS application, mainly cable, is reviewed. Cryogenic cooling system can be categorized into conduction cooling system and immersion cooling system. In practical HTS power application area, immersion cooling system with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is preferred. The immersion cooling system is besides grouped into open cycle system and closed cycle system. Turbo-Brayton refrigerator is a key component for closed cycle system. Those two cooling systems are focused in this article. And, each design and component of the cooling system is explained.

  18. Cryogenics for Particle Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Vandoni, Giovanna; Wagner, U

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenics has become a key ancillary technology of particle accelerators and detectors, contributing to their sustained development over the last fifty years. Conversely, this development has produced new challenges and markets for cryogenics, resulting in a fruitful symbiotic relation which materialized in significant technology transfer and technical progress. This began with the use of liquid hydrogen and deuterium in the targets and bubble chambers of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. It developed more recently with increasing amounts of liquefied noble gases - mainly argon, but also krypton and even today xenon - in calorimeters. In parallel with these applications, the availability of practical type II superconductors from the early 1960s triggered the use of superconductivity in large spectrometer magnets - mostly driven by considerations of energy savings - and the corresponding development of helium cryogenics. It is however the generalized application of superconductivity in particle accelerators - RF ac...

  19. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  20. Experimental Determination of the Dynamic Hydraulic Transfer Function for the J-2X Oxidizer Turbopump. Part One; Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Tom; Patel, Sandeep; Lee, Erik; Karon, Dave

    2011-01-01

    An advanced methodology for extracting the hydraulic dynamic pump transfer matrix (Yp) for a cavitating liquid rocket engine turbopump inducer+impeller has been developed. The transfer function is required for integrated vehicle pogo stability analysis as well as optimization of local inducer pumping stability. Laboratory pulsed subscale waterflow test of the J-2X oxygen turbo pump is introduced and our new extraction method applied to the data collected. From accurate measures of pump inlet and discharge perturbational mass flows and pressures, and one-dimensional flow models that represents complete waterflow loop physics, we are able to derive Yp and hence extract the characteristic pump parameters: compliance, pump gain, impedance, mass flow gain. Detailed modeling is necessary to accurately translate instrument plane measurements to the pump inlet and discharge and extract Yp. We present the MSFC Dynamic Lump Parameter Fluid Model Framework and describe critical dynamic component details. We report on fit minimization techniques, cost (fitness) function derivation, and resulting model fits to our experimental data are presented. Comparisons are made to alternate techniques for spatially translating measurement stations to actual pump inlet and discharge.

  1. 49 CFR 173.316 - Cryogenic liquids in cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... filling density for hydrogen, cryogenic liquid is defined as the percent ratio of the weight of lading in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. 173.316 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.316 Cryogenic liquids in...

  2. Characterization of a cryogenic ion guide at IGISOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Penttila, H.; Perajarvi, K.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small volume cryogenic ion guide has been characterized at the IGISOL facility, Jyvaskyla, as a prototype to verify whether there are any major obstacles to the use of high-density cryogenic helium gas for the stopping and extraction of high-energy ions from a large volume cryogenic ion catcher.

  3. Cryogenic propulsion for lunar and Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Future missions to the moon and Mars have been investigated with regard to propulsion system selection. The results of this analysis show that near state-of-the-art LO2/LH2 propulsion technology provides a feasible means of performing lunar missions and trans-Mars injections. In other words, existing cryogenic space engines with certain modifications and product improvements would be suitable for these missions. In addition, present day cryogenic system tankage and structural weights appear to scale reasonably when sizing for large payload and high energy missions such as sending men to Mars.

  4. Computer automation of a dilution cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogues, C.

    1992-09-01

    This study has been realized in the framework of studies on developing new technic for low temperature detectors for neutrinos and dark matter. The principles of low temperature physics and helium 4 and dilution cryostats, are first reviewed. The cryogenic system used and the technic for low temperature thermometry and regulation systems are then described. The computer automation of the dilution cryogenic system involves: numerical measurement of the parameter set (pressure, temperature, flow rate); computer assisted operating of the cryostat and the pump bench; numerical regulation of pressure and temperature; operation sequence full automation allowing the system to evolve from a state to another (temperature descent for example)

  5. Cryogenic test facility at VECC, Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Amit; Bhunia, Uttam; Pradhan, J.; Sur, A.; Bhandari, R.K.; Ranganathan, R.

    2003-01-01

    In view of proposed K-500 superconducting cyclotron project, cryogenic test facility has been set up at the centre. The facility can broadly be categorized into two- a small scale test facility and a large scale test facility. This facility has been utilized for the calibration of liquid helium level probe, cryogenic temperature probe, and I-B plot for a 7 T superconducting magnet. Spiral-shaped superconducting short sample with specific dimension and specially designed stainless steel sample holder has already been developed for the electrical characterisation. The 1/5 th model superconducting coil along with its quench detection circuit and dump resistor has also been developed

  6. Compact insert design for cryogenic pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias Rigoberto; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Petitpas, Guillaume; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2017-06-14

    A pressure vessel apparatus for cryogenic capable storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure includes an insert with a parallel inlet duct, a perpendicular inlet duct connected to the parallel inlet. The perpendicular inlet duct and the parallel inlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components. The insert also includes a parallel outlet duct and a perpendicular outlet duct connected to the parallel outlet duct. The perpendicular outlet duct and the parallel outlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components.

  7. Cryogenic system for liquid hydrogen polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Chiba, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishii, T.; Kato, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been constructed for a liquid hydrogen polarimeter in order to measure polarization of high energy proton at the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. The system principally consists of a cryogenerator with a cryogenic transfer line, a liquid hydrogen cryostat, and a 14.5 l target container of thin aluminum alloy where liquid hydrogen is served for the experiment. The refrigeration capacity is about 54 W at 20.4 K without a target container. (author)

  8. Ultra-precision bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Wardle, F

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-precision bearings can achieve extreme accuracy of rotation, making them ideal for use in numerous applications across a variety of fields, including hard disk drives, roundness measuring machines and optical scanners. Ultraprecision Bearings provides a detailed review of the different types of bearing and their properties, as well as an analysis of the factors that influence motion error, stiffness and damping. Following an introduction to basic principles of motion error, each chapter of the book is then devoted to the basic principles and properties of a specific type of bearin

  9. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  10. Roller bearing geometry design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M.; Pinkston, B. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is extended and applied to the design of cylindrical roller bearings. The kinematic stabilization mechanism puts a reverse skew into the rolling elements by changing the roller taper. Twelve basic bearing modification designs are identified amd modeled. Four have single transverse convex curvature in their rollers while eight have rollers which have compound transverse curvature made up of a central cylindrical band surrounded by symmetric bands with slope and transverse curvature. The bearing designs are modeled for restoring torque per unit axial displacement, contact stress capacity, and contact area including dynamic loading, misalignment sensitivity and roller proportion. Design programs are available which size the single transverse curvature roller designs for a series of roller slopes and load separations and which design the compound roller bearings for a series of slopes and transverse radii of curvature. The compound rollers are proportioned to have equal contact stresses and minimum size. Design examples are also given.

  11. DW_BEAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Subset of BEAR (Bi-Weekly Examination Analysis and Reporting) data used for financial audit remediation reporting within the Coast Guard Business Intelligence (CGBI)...

  12. Rolling bearing analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Tedric A

    2001-01-01

    One of the most well-known experts in the field brings cutting-edge research to practitioners in the new edition of this important reference. Covers the improved mathematical calculations for rolling bearing endurance developed by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Lubrication and Tribology Engineers. Updated with new material on Condition-Based Maintenance, new testing methods, and new bearing materials.

  13. Gear bearing drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor); Weinberg, Brian (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  14. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires

  15. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  16. Nuclear heat sources for cryogenic refrigerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, B.; Schock, A.; King, W.G.; Kline, T.; Russo, F.A.

    1975-01-01

    Spacecraft cryogenic refrigerators require thermal inputs on the order of 1000 W. First, the characteristics of solar-electric and radioisotope heat source systems for supplying this thermal input are compared. Then the design of a 238 Pu heat source for this application is described, and equipment for shipping and handling the heat source is discussed. (LCL)

  17. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  18. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M.; Pernau, H.-F.; Strunk, C.; Scheer, E.; Pietsch, T.

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  19. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M; Pernau, H-F; Strunk, C; Scheer, E; Pietsch, T

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  20. Cryogenic refrigeration for cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gistau-Baguer, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Neutron moderation by means of a fluid at cryogenic temperature is a very interesting way to obtain cold neutrons. Today, a number of nuclear research reactors are using this technology. This paper deals with thermodynamics and technology which are used for cooling Cold Neutron Sources

  1. Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Donald

    1999-01-01

    One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

  2. Cryogenic Filters for RFI Mitigation in Radioastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Tuccari, G.; Caddemi, A.; Barbarino, S.; Nicotra, G.; Consoli, F.; Schilliro, F.; Catalfamo, F.

    2005-01-01

    RFI mitigation in Radioastronomy can be achieved adopting cryogenic filters in appropriate typologies. A study has been conducted in L, C and X band with the evaluation of the filter architecture in copper, with theoretical estimation, computer simulations, prototypes realization, laboratory measurements. Such work has been preliminary to the realization of HTS samples with the purpose of a similar complete characterization approach.

  3. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  4. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  5. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  6. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Casas, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Perin, A; Perinic, G; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the overcapacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the "cannibalization" of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of ...

  7. High-frequency data observations from space shuttle main engine low pressure fuel turbopump discharge duct flex joint tripod failure investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, T. F.; Farr, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Observations made by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers during their participation in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) low pressure fuel turbopump discharge duct flex joint tripod failure investigation are summarized. New signal processing techniques used by the Component Assessment Branch and the Induced Environments Branch during the failure investigation are described in detail. Moreover, nonlinear correlations between frequently encountered anomalous frequencies found in SSME dynamic data are discussed. A recommendation is made to continue low pressure fuel (LPF) duct testing through laboratory flow simulations and MSFC-managed technology test bed SSME testing.

  8. Automatic PID Control Loops Design for Performance Improvement of Cryogenic Turboexpander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, D.M.; Patel, H.K.; Shah, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenics field involves temperature below 123 K which is much less than ambient temperature. In addition, many industrially important physical processes—from fulfilling the needs of National Thermonuclear Fusion programs, superconducting magnets to treatment of cutting tools and preservation of blood cells, require extreme low temperature. The low temperature required for liquefaction of common gases can be obtained by several processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Helium liquefier is used for the liquefaction process of helium gas. In general, the Helium Refrigerator/Liquefier (HRL) needs turboexpander as expansion machine to produce cooling effect which is further used for the production of liquid helium. Turboexpanders, a high speed device that is supported on gas bearings, are the most critical component in many helium refrigeration systems. A very minor fault in the operation and manufacturing or impurities in the helium gas can destroy the turboexpander. However, since the performance of expanders is dependent on a number of operating parameters and the relations between them are quite complex, the instrumentation and control system design for turboexpander needs special attention. The inefficiency of manual control leads to the need of designing automatic control loops for turboexpander. Proper design and implementation of the control loops plays an important role in the successful operation of the cryogenic turboexpander. The PID control loops has to be implemented with accurate interlocks and logic to enhance the performance of the cryogenic turboexpander. For different normal and off-normal operations, speeds will be different and hence a proper control method for critical rotational speed avoidance is must. This paper presents the design of PID control loops needed for the

  9. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  10. Watchable Wildlife: The Black Bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn L. Rogers

    1992-01-01

    Black bears are the bears people most often encounter. Black bears live in forests over much of North America, unlike grizzlies that live only in Alaska, northern and western Canada, and the northern Rocky Mountains. This brochure presents the latest information on black bear life and how this species responds to an ever-increasing number of campers, hikers, and...

  11. Tribology of alternative bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin; Tipper, Joanne; Stone, Martin; Ingham, Eileen

    2006-12-01

    The tribological performance and biological activity of the wear debris produced has been compared for highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and modified metal bearings in a series of in vitro studies from a single laboratory. The functional lifetime demand of young and active patients is 10-fold greater than the estimated functional lifetime of traditional polyethylene. There is considerable interest in using larger diameter heads in these high demand patients. Highly cross-linked polyethylene show a four-fold reduction in functional biological activity. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have the lowest wear rates and least reactive wear debris. The functional biological activity is 20-fold lower than with highly cross-linked polyethylene. Hence, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings address the tribological lifetime demand of highly active patients. Metal-on-metal bearings have substantially lower wear rates than highly cross-linked polyethylene and wear decreases with head diameter. Bedding in wear is also lower with reduced radial clearance. Differential hardness ceramic-on-metal bearings and the application of ceramic-like coatings reduce metal wear and ion levels.

  12. Modelling and construction of a compact 500 kg HTS magnetic bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, F N; Floegel-Delor, U; Rothfeld, R; Goebel, B; Wippich, D; Riedel, T

    2005-01-01

    The progress of heavy-load HTS bearings depends on improvements in design, material quality and reliable cooling. We have constructed, manufactured and tested a 200 mm HTS journal bearing with a thermally encapsulated YBCO ring. For maximum force the larger gap due to the bearing cryostat (>4 mm) requires adjustment of the magnetic excitation pole distance and the Fe collector shim thickness. HTS material progress is obtained by top-seeded single- or multiple-grain growth which increases the averaged trapped magnetic flux density. Successful YBCO ring growth with radial c axis distribution by seeding the inner ring surface has been performed. The encapsulation ensures a substantially reduced cryogenic effort and stabilizes bearing operation at 78-79 K

  13. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  14. Development of cryogenic permanent magnet undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Shirasawa, Katsutoshi; Kitamura, Hideo; Bizen, Teruhiko; Seike, Takamitsu; Marechal, Xavier; Tsuru, Rieko; Iwaki, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    A short period undulator increases not only the photon energy of undulator radiation, but also the brilliance due to its increased number of undulator periods. As a result, brilliant undulator radiation becomes available in the photon energy range, which is currently covered by wigglers. In order to develop a short period undulator, high performance magnets are indispensable and superconductive undulators have been actively investigated in recent years. In this paper, however, we propose a new approach, so called a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator using NdFeB magnets at the temperatures around 150 K. The current status of this cryogenic permanent magnet undulator development at SPring-8 is presented including the results of the magnetic field measurements on a prototype undulator. (author)

  15. ODH, oxygen deficiency hazard cryogenic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustynowicz, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    An oxygen deficiency exists when the concentration of oxygen, by volume, drops to a level at which atmosphere supplying respiratory protection must be provided. Since liquid cryogens can expand by factors of 700 (LN 2 ) to 850 (LH e ), the uncontrolled release into an enclosed space can easily cause an oxygen-deficient condition. An oxygen deficiency hazard (ODH) fatality rate per hour (OE) is defined as: OE = Σ N i P i F i , where N i = number of components, P i = probability of failure or operator error, and F i = fatality factor. ODHs range from open-quotes unclassifiedclose quotes (OE -9 1/h) to class 4, which is the most hazardous (OE>10 -1 1/h). For Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) buildings where cryogenic systems exist, failure rate, fatality factor, reduced oxygen ratio, and fresh air circulation are examined

  16. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  17. The Cryogenic Supervision System in NSRRC

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hsing-Chieh; Chiou, Wen-Song; Hsiao, Feng-Zone; Tsai, Zong-Da

    2005-01-01

    The helium cryogenic system in NSRRC is a fully automatic PLC system using the Siemens SIMATIC 300 controller. Modularization in both hardware and software makes it easy in the program reading, the system modification and the problem debug. Based on the Laview program we had developed a supervision system taking advantage of the Internet technology to get system's real-time information in any place. The functions of this supervision system include the real-time data accessing with more than 300 digital/analog signals, the data restore, the history trend display, and the human machine interface. The data is accessed via a Profibus line connecting the PLC system and the supervision system with a maximum baud rate 1.5 Mbit/s. Due to this supervision system, it is easy to master the status of the cryogenic system within a short time and diagnose the problem.

  18. Characterization of titanium alloys for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reytier, M.; Kircher, F.; Levesy, B.

    2002-01-01

    Titanium alloys are employed in the design of superconducting magnet support systems for their high mechanical strength associated with their low thermal conductivity. But their use requires a careful attention to their crack tolerance at cryogenic temperature. Measurements have been performed on two extra low interstitial materials (Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Ti-6Al-4V ELI) with different thickness and manufacturing process. The investigation includes the tensile properties at room and liquid helium temperatures using smooth and notched samples. Moreover, the fracture toughness has been determined at 4.2 K using Compact Tension specimens. The microstructure of the different alloys and the various fracture surfaces have also been studied. After a detailed description of the experimental procedures, practical engineering characteristics are given and a comparison of the different titanium alloys is proposed for cryogenic applications

  19. Hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Nobuo; Mitsui, Jin

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation in fusion fuel cycle and tritium recovery from heavy water reactor are very important, and therefore the early establishment of these separation techniques are desired. The cryogenic distillation method in particular is promising for the separation of hydrogen isotope and the recovery of high concentrated tritium. The studies of hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method have been carried out by using the experimental apparatus made for the first time in Japan. The separation of three components (H 2 -HD-D 2 ) under total reflux conditions was got by using the packing tower of 500 mm height. It was confirmed that the Height Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) was 20 - 30 mm for the vapor's line velocity of 20 - 80 mm/s. (author)

  20. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of foam insulation materials was performed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and LeTourneau University. The initial focus was ambient pressure cryogenic boil off testing using the Cryostat-400 flat-plate instrument. Completion of a test facility at LETU has enabled direct, comparative testing, using identical cryostat instruments and methods, and the production of standard thermal data sets for a number of materials under sub-ambient conditions. The two sets of measurements were analyzed and indicate there is reasonable agreement between the two laboratories. Based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry, new equipment and methods for testing thermal insulation systems have been successfully developed. These boiloff instruments (or cryostats) include both flat plate and cylindrical models and are applicable to a wide range of different materials under a wide range of test conditions. Test measurements are generally made at large temperature difference (boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K are typical) and include the full vacuum pressure range. Results are generally reported in effective thermal conductivity (ke) and mean heat flux (q) through the insulation system. The new cryostat instruments provide an effective and reliable way to characterize the thermal performance of materials under subambient conditions. Proven in through thousands of tests of hundreds of material systems, they have supported a wide range of aerospace, industry, and research projects. Boiloff testing technology is not just for cryogenic testing but is a cost effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system for applications at sub-ambient temperatures. This technology, when adequately coupled with a technical standards basis, can provide a cost-effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system

  1. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  2. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds

  3. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  4. Uses of cryogenics in power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungnickel, H

    1975-05-01

    A review of the present and possible future uses of cryogenic engineering and applied superconductivity. The applications discussed cover: transport of natural gas, superconducting N/sub 2/-filled cable for 275 kV. Cable with Ni/Ti conductor, homopolar machines with dix-type superconducting field coils, and superconducting magnetic propulsion. Important references to original works from different countries describing the latest developments are given.

  5. Experiments with a cryogenic torsion balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The torsion balance is a remarkably capable instrument for the measurement of slowly varying exceedingly small forces; indeed its potential abilities are still largely untapped. The author outlines some of the virtues (and limitations) of the torsion balance, and presents a menu of gravitation-related experiments to which it may be applied. He discusses plans for developing torsion balances operating at cryogenic temperatures, and describes an experiment to search for anomalous long-range interactions associated with intrinsic spin. (Auth.)

  6. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  7. A breath of fresh air for cryogenics training

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    Whether you work full-time in a cryogenic installation or are required to handle cryogenic substances temporarily, you need to have followed the appropriate safety training.   Photo: Christoph Balle. Two new training courses are now available in English and French at CERN: “Cryogenic Safety – Fundamentals” (at the Prévessin Training Centre) and “Cryogenic Safety – Helium Transfer” (at the Cryolab). The first covers the content of levels 1 and 2 of the old “Cryogenic Safety” course. The second is a completely new course for CERN: it covers specific aspects of the transfer of liquid helium, such as the evaporation process of helium and the associated risks to human health (asphyxia due to displacement of oxygen), the colour code for gas bottles, etc. These training modules have been rewritten in response to the increase in the number of projects involving cryogenics and following various related incident...

  8. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Matsumoto, K.

    1993-01-01

    A large cryogenic system has been designed, constructed and operated in the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at KEK for 508 MHz, 32x5-cell superconducting RF cavities. A 6.5 kW, 4.4 K helium refrigerator with 5 turbo-expanders on the ground level supplies liquid helium in parallel to the 16 cryostats in the TRISTAN tunnel through about 250 m long multichannel transfer line. Two 5-cell cavities are coupled together, enclosed in a cryostat and cooled by about 830 L pool boiling liquid helium. A liquid nitrogen circulation system with a turbo-expander has been adopted for 80 K radiation shields in the multichannel transfer line and the cryostats to reduce liquid nitrogen consumption and to increase the operation stability of the system. The cryogenic system has a total of about 18 000 hours of operating time from the first cool down test in August 1988 to November 1991. The design principle and outline of the cryogenic system and the operational experience are presented. (orig.)

  9. Influence of Thermal Cycling on Cryogenic Thermometers

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Suraci, A; Togny, F; Vauthier, N

    1999-01-01

    The stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), impose that the cryogenic temperature sensors meet compelling demands such as long-term stability, radiation hardness, readout accuracy better than 5 mK at 1.8 K and compatibility with industrial control equipment. This paper presents the results concerning long-term stability of resistance temperature sensors submitted to cryogenic thermal cycles. For this task a simple test facility has been designed, constructed and put into operation for cycling simultaneously 115 cryogenic thermometers between 300 K and 4.2 K. A thermal cycle is set to last 71/4 hours: 3 hours for either cooling down or warming up the sensors and 1 respectively 1/4 hour at steady temperature conditions at each end of the temperature cycle. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) drives automatically this operation by reading 2 thermometers and actuating on 3 valves and 1 heater. The first thermal cycle was accomplished in a...

  10. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  11. Cryogenic characterization of LEDs for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Jérôme; Philippon, Anne; How, Lip Sun; Delbergue, Audrey; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Cillierre, David; Danto, Pascale; Boutillier, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    In the frame of EUCLID project, the Calibration Unit of the VIS (VISible Imager) instrument must provide an accurate and well characterized light source for in-flight instrument calibration without noise when it is switched off. The Calibration Unit consists of a set of LEDs emitting at various wavelengths in the visible towards an integrating sphere. The sphere's output provides a uniform illumination over the entire focal plane. Nine references of LEDs from different manufacturers were selected, screened and qualified under cryogenic conditions. Testing this large quantity of samples led to the implementation of automated testing equipment with complete in-situ monitoring of optoelectronic parameters as well as temperature and vacuum values. All the electrical and optical parameters of the LED have been monitored and recorded at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. These results have been compiled in order to show the total deviation of the LED electrical and electro-optical properties in the whole mission and to select the best suitable LED references for the mission. This qualification has demonstrated the robustness of COTS LEDs to operate at low cryogenic temperatures and in the space environment. Then 6 wavelengths were selected and submitted to an EMC sensitivity test at room and cold temperature by counting the number of photons when LEDs drivers are OFF. Characterizations were conducted in the full frequency spectrum in order to implement solutions at system level to suppress the emission of photons when the LED drivers are OFF. LEDs impedance was also characterized at room temperature and cold temperature.

  12. Properties of strain gages at cryogenic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Nobuo; Fujiyoshi, Toshimitsu.

    1978-01-01

    At the time of developing superconduction generators, the stress measurement for rotor parts is required to grasp the safety and performance of the rotor at cryogenic temperature, which is cooled with liquid helium. In case of carrying out the stress measurement with strain gages, the problems are as follows. The strain gages and lead wires are exposed to cryogenic temperature from 4 to 10 K and strong magnetic field of about 3T, and subjected to high centrifugal acceleration of about 500G. In order to establish the techniques of the stress measurement under such conditions, the adhesives and damp-proof coatings for strain gages and strain gages themselves in Japan and foreign countries were examined on the properties at cryogenic temperature. As for the properties of strain gages, mainly the apparent strain owing to temperature change was investigated, and the change of the gage factors was studies only at liquid nitrogen temperature. The stress measurement with strain gages at low temperature had been studied in detail down to liquid nitrogen temperature concerning LNG tanks. The experimental apparatus, the samples, the testing methods and the test results of cooling tests on adhesives and damp-proof coatings, and the temperature characteristics of strain gages are reported. The usable adhesives and coatings were found, and correction by accurate temperature measurement is required for apparent strain. (Kako, I.)

  13. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  14. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Anindya [Fermilab; Rane, Tejas [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-07-06

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation has been listed out. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS have also been discussed. Simulation study has been carried out to compute the supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation have also been made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.

  15. Cryogenic Safety HSE Seminar | 21 - 23 September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the LHC being the world’s largest superconducting installation, it’s not surprising that CERN is a world leader in cryogenic safety. On 21 and 22 September, over 100 experts in cryogenic safety will be coming to CERN to take part in CERN’s first Cryogenic Safety Seminar, which aims to stimulate collaboration and further the state of the art in this increasingly important field.  

  16. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  17. Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirov, R.H.; Asinovsky, E.I.; Samoilov, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures was experimentally examined. The average ozone concentration in the volume of the discharge tube was less at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperatures. The production of condensed ozone have been determined by measuring the ozone concentration when the walls was heated and ozone evaporated. The energy yield of ozone generation at cryogenic temperatures has been calculated. The maximum value was 200 g/kWh

  18. The DFBX cryogenic distribution boxes for the LHC straight sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, Jon P.; Corradi, Carol A.; Green, Michael A.; Kajiyama, Y.; Knolls, Michael J.; LaMantia, Roberto F.; Rasson, Joseph E.; Reavill, Dulie; Turner, William C.

    2002-01-01

    The DFBX distribution boxes are designed to connect the LHC cryogenic distribution system to the interaction region quadrupoles [1] and dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DFBX distribution boxes also have the current leads for the superconducting interaction region magnets and the LHC interaction region correction coils. The DFBX boxes also connect the magnet and cryogenic instrumentation to the CERN data collection system. The DFBX boxes serve as the cryogenic circulation center and the nerve center for four of the LHC straight sections. This report describes primarily the cryogenic function of the DFBXs

  19. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; CERN; Ronayette, L.; GHMFL, Grenoble; Rabehl, R.; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test

  20. Thermal Stabilization of Cryogenic System in Superconducting Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Jae; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hyung Hee; Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joon Sun; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Radiology has some useful applications for medical purpose. For cancer therapy, the superconducting cyclotron should generate heavy ion beams. It radiates heavy ion beams to cancer patients. In order to make cyclotron system stable, the cryogenic system which makes superconducting state should work constantly. However, radiation heat transfer of cryogenic system should be considered because liquid helium's boiling point is extremely low and there is huge temperature difference between the cryogenic system and ambient temperature. Accordingly, thermal analysis should be carried out. In this paper, the numerical analysis of the cryogenic system in practical superconducting cyclotron show temperature distribution and suggest the number of coolers using ANSYS Workbench program

  1. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  2. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  3. Actuators for Active Magnetic Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Maslen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The literature of active magnetic bearing (AMB technology dates back to at least 1937 when the earliest work that clearly describes an active magnetic bearing system was published by Jesse Beams [...

  4. Delayed child-bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jo-Ann; Tough, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    To provide an overview of delayed child-bearing and to describe the implications for women and health care providers. Delayed child-bearing, which has increased greatly in recent decades, is associated with an increased risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, and adverse pregnancy outcome. This guideline provides information that will optimize the counselling and care of Canadian women with respect to their reproductive choices. Maternal age is the most important determinant of fertility, and obstetric and perinatal risks increase with maternal age. Many women are unaware of the success rates or limitations of assisted reproductive technology and of the increased medical risks of delayed child-bearing, including multiple births, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and Caesarean section. This guideline provides a framework to address these issues. Studies published between 2000 and August 2010 were retrieved through searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library using appropriate key words (delayed child-bearing, deferred pregnancy, maternal age, assisted reproductive technology, infertility, and multiple births) and MeSH terms (maternal age, reproductive behaviour, fertility). The Internet was also searched using similar key words, and national and international medical specialty societies were searched for clinical practice guidelines and position statements. Data were extracted based on the aims, sample, authors, year, and results. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Women who delay child-bearing are at increased risk of infertility. Prospective parents, especially women, should know that their fecundity and fertility begin to decline significantly after 32 years of age. Prospective parents should know that assisted reproductive technologies cannot guarantee a live birth or completely

  5. Government Risk-Bearing

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The u.s. government bulks large in the nation's financial markets. The huge volume of government-issued and -sponsored debt affects the pricing and volume ofprivate debt and, consequently, resource allocation between competing alternatives. What is often not fully appreciated is the substantial influence the federal government wields overresource allocation through its provisionofcreditandrisk-bearing services to the private economy. Because peopleand firms generally seekto avoid risk, atsomeprice they are willing to pay another party to assume the risk they would otherwise face. Insurance companies are a class of private-sector firms one commonly thinks of as providing these services. As the federal government has expanded its presence in the U.S. economy during this century, it has increasingly developed programs aimed at bearing risks that the private sector either would not take on at any price, or would take on but atapricethoughtto besogreatthatmostpotentialbeneficiarieswouldnotpurchase the coverage. To...

  6. Passive magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  7. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines

  8. Radium bearing waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A.; Schofield, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach

  9. Proceedings of the 26th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference - International Cryogenic Material Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, T. S.; Sharma, R. G.; Kar, S.

    2017-02-01

    International Conference ICEC 26 - ICMC 2016 was organized at New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016. Previous conference ICEC25-ICMC 2014 was held at the University of Twente, The Netherlands in July 2014. Next Conference ICEC 27- ICMC 2018 will be held at Oxford, UK during September 3-7, 2018 1. Introduction This is a biennial international conference on cryogenic engineering and cryogenics materials organized by the International Cryogenic Engineering Committee and the International Cryogenic Material Committee. For some years, the host country has been alternating between Europe and Asia. The present conference was held at the Manekshaw Convention Centre, New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016 and hosted jointly by the Indian Cryogenics Council (ICC) and the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Put all together as many as 547 persons participated in the conference. Out of these 218 were foreign delegates coming from 25 countries and the rest from India. 2. Inaugural Session & Course Lectures The pre conference short course lectures on “Cryocoolers” and “Superconducting Materials for Power Applications” were organized on 7th March. Cryocooler course was given jointly by Dr. Chao Wang from M/s. Cryomech, USA and Prof. Milind Atrey from IIT Bombay, India. The Course on Superconducting Materials was given by Prof. Venkat Selvamanickam from the University of Houston, USA. The conference was inaugurated in the morning of March 8th in a typical Indian tradition and in the presence of the Chief Guest, Dr. R Chidambaram (Principle Scientific Adviser to Govt. of India), Guest of Honour, Prof. H Devaraj (Vice Chairman University Grant Commission), Prof Marcel ter Brake ( Chair, ICEC Board), Prof. Wilfried Goldacker (Chair, ICMC board), Dr. D Kanjilal (Director IUAC), Dr R K Bhandari, (President, Indian Cryogenic Council ). Dr. T S Datta, Chair Local Organizing Committee coordinated the proceedings of the inaugural function. 3. Technical

  10. Large Cryogenic Infrastructure for LHC Superconducting Magnet and Cryogenic Component Tests: Layout, Commissioning and Operational Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzas, C.; Chanat, D.; Knoops, S.; Sanmarti, M.; Serio, L.

    2004-01-01

    The largest cryogenic test facility at CERN, located at Zone 18, is used to validate and to test all main components working at cryogenic temperature in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) before final installation in the machine tunnel. In total about 1300 main dipoles, 400 main quadrupoles, 5 RF-modules, eight 1.8 K refrigeration units will be tested in the coming years.The test facility has been improved and upgraded over the last few years and the first 18 kW refrigerator for the LHC machine has been added to boost the cryogenic capacity for the area via a 25,000 liter liquid helium dewar. The existing 6 kW refrigerator, used for the LHC Test String experiments, will also be employed to commission LHC cryogenic components.We report on the design and layout of the test facility as well as the commissioning and the first 10,000 hours operational experience of the test facility and the 18 kW LHC refrigerator

  11. Magnetic translator bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockney, Richard L. (Inventor); Downer, James R. (Inventor); Eisenhaure, David B. (Inventor); Hawkey, Timothy J. (Inventor); Johnson, Bruce G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system for enabling translational motion includes a carriage and a shaft for movably supporting the carriage; a first magnetic bearing fixed to one of the carriage and shaft and slidably received in a first channel of the other of the carriage and shaft. The first channel is generally U shaped with two side walls and a back wall. The magnetic bearing includes a pair of spaced magnetic pole pieces, each pole piece having a pair of electromagnetic coils mounted on poles on opposite ends of the pole piece proximate the side walls, and a third electromagnetic coil mounted on a pole of the pole piece proximate the backwall; a motion sensor for sensing translational motion along two axes and rotationally about three axes of the carriage and shaft relative to each other; and a correction circuit responsive to the sensor for generating a correction signal to drive the coils to compensate for any misalignment sensed between the carriage and the shaft.

  12. Automatic control of cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, S.

    1989-01-01

    Inadequate Reynolds number similarity in testing of scaled models affects the quality of aerodynamic data from wind tunnels. This is due to scale effects of boundary-layer shock wave interaction which is likely to be severe at transonic speeds. The idea of operation of wind tunnels using test gas cooled to cryogenic temperatures has yielded a quantrum jump in the ability to realize full scale Reynolds number flow similarity in small transonic tunnels. In such tunnels, the basic flow control problem consists of obtaining and maintaining the desired test section flow parameters. Mach number, Reynolds number, and dynamic pressure are the three flow parameters that are usually required to be kept constant during the period of model aerodynamic data acquisition. The series of activity involved in modeling, control law development, mechanization of the control laws on a microcomputer, and the performance of a globally stable automatic control system for the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) are discussed. A lumped multi-variable nonlinear dynamic model of the cryogenic tunnel, generation of a set of linear control laws for small perturbation, and nonlinear control strategy for large set point changes including tunnel trajectory control are described. The details of mechanization of the control laws on a 16 bit microcomputer system, the software features, operator interface, the display and safety are discussed. The controller is shown to provide globally stable and reliable temperature control to + or - 0.2 K, pressure to + or - 0.07 psi and Mach number to + or - 0.002 of the set point value. This performance is obtained both during large set point commands as for a tunnel cooldown, and during aerodynamic data acquisition with intrusive activity like geometrical changes in the test section such as angle of attack changes, drag rake movements, wall adaptation and sidewall boundary-layer removal. Feasibility of the use of an automatic Reynolds number control mode with

  13. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (2 um), or 6 nT / Hz1 / 2 per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly one-hundred points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT / Hz1 / 2 each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner would measure these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly two orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10- 6 Phi0 / Hz1 / 2) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are for the first time carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns and done so using samples that may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge transport images at temperatures from room to \\x9D4K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  14. Cryogen spray cooling during laser tissue welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, N M; Walsh, J T

    2000-03-01

    Cryogen cooling during laser tissue welding was explored as a means of reducing lateral thermal damage near the tissue surface and shortening operative time. Two centimetre long full-thickness incisions were made on the epilated backs of guinea pigs, in vivo. India ink was applied to the incision edges then clamps were used to appose the edges. A 4 mm diameter beam of 16 W, continuous-wave, 1.06 microm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing approximately 100 ms pulses. There was a delay of 2 s between scans. The total irradiation time was varied from 1-2 min. Cryogen was delivered to the weld site through a solenoid valve in spurt durations of 20, 60 and 100 ms. The time between spurts was either 2 or 4 s, corresponding to one spurt every one or two laser scans. Histology and tensile strength measurements were used to evaluate laser welds. Total irradiation times were reduced from 10 min without surface cooling to under 1 min with surface cooling. The thermal denaturation profile showed less denaturation in the papillary dermis than in the mid-dermis. Welds created using optimized irradiation and cooling parameters had significantly higher tensile strengths (1.7 +/- 0.4 kg cm(-2)) than measured in the control studies without cryogen cooling (1.0 +/- 0.2 kg cm(-2)) (p laser welding results in increased weld strengths while reducing thermal damage and operative times. Long-term studies will be necessary to determine weld strengths and the amount of scarring during wound healing.

  15. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  16. Piezoresistive silicon pressure sensors in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Seun K.; Chapman, John J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents data on low-temperature measurements of silicon pressure sensors. It was found that both the piezoresistance coefficients and the charge-carrier mobility increase with decreasing temperature. For lightly doped semiconductor materials, the density of free charge carriers decreases with temperature and can freeze out eventually. However, the effect of carrier freeze-out can be minimized by increasing the impurity content to higher levels, at which the temperature dependency of piezoresistance coefficients is reduced. An impurity density of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm was found to be optimal for cryogenic applications of pressure sensor dies.

  17. SPICA sub-Kelvin cryogenic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duband, L.; Duval, J. M.; Luchier, N.; Prouve, T.

    2012-04-01

    SPICA, a Japanese led mission, is part of the JAXA future science program and is planned for launch in 2018. SPICA will perform imaging and spectroscopic observations in the mid- and far-IR waveband, and is developing instrumentation spanning the 5-400 μm range. The SPICA payload features several candidate instruments, some of them requiring temperature down to 50 mK. This is currently the case for SAFARI, a core instrument developed by a European-based consortium, and BLISS proposed by CALTECH/JPL in the US. SPICA's distinctive feature is to actively cool its telescope to below 6 K. In addition, SPICA is a liquid cryogen free satellite and all the cooling will be provided by radiative cooling (L2 orbit) down to 30 K and by mechanical coolers for lower temperatures. The satellite will launch warm and slowly equilibrate to its operating temperatures once in orbit. This warm launch approach makes it possible to eliminate a large liquid cryogen tank and to use the mass saved to launch a large diameter telescope (3.2 m). This 4 K cooled telescope significantly reduces its own thermal radiation, offering superior sensitivity in the infrared region. The cryogenic system that enables this warm launch/cooled telescope concept is a key issue of the mission. This cryogenic chain features a number of cooling stages comprising passive radiators, Stirling coolers and several Joule Thomson loops, offering cooling powers at typically 20, 4.5, 2.5 and 1.7 K. The SAFARI and BLISS detectors require cooling to temperatures as low as 50 mK. The instrument coolers will be operated from these heat sinks. They are composed of a small demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) pre cooled by either a single or a double sorption cooler, respectively for SAFARI and BLISS. The BLISS cooler maintains continuous cooling at 300 mK and thus suppresses the thermal equilibrium time constant of the large focal plane. These hybrid architectures allow designing low weight coolers able to reach 50 mK. Because

  18. Ferromagnetic Josephson Junctions for Cryogenic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Gingrich, Eric C.; Khasawneh, Mazin A.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2015-03-01

    Josephson junctions containing ferromagnetic materials are of interest for both scientific and technological purposes. In principle, either the amplitude of the critical current or superconducting phase shift across the junction can be controlled by the relative magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers in the junction. Our approach concentrates on phase control utilizing two junctions in a SQUID geometry. We will report on efforts to control the phase of junctions carrying either spin-singlet or spin-triplet supercurrent for cryogenic memory applications. Supported by Northorp Grumman Corporation and by IARPA under SPAWAR Contract N66001-12-C-2017.

  19. Cryogenic semiconductor high-intensity radiation monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.G.; Bell, W.H.; Borer, K.; Casagrande, L.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.R.H.; Dezillie, B.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Hauler, F.; Jungermann, L.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Shea, V. O'; Ruggiero, G.; Sonderegger, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel technique to monitor high-intensity particle beams by means of a semiconductor detector. It consists of cooling a semiconductor detector down to cryogenic temperature to suppress the thermally generated leakage current and to precisely measure the integrated ionization signal. It will be shown that such a device provides very good linearity and a dynamic range wider than is possible with existing techniques. Moreover, thanks to the Lazarus effect, extreme radiation hardness can be achieved providing in turn absolute intensity measurements against precise calibration of the device at low beam flux

  20. The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, I.N.; Pavlov, V.N.; Sidorin, A.O.; Yakovenko, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons based on the 22 Na isotope has been designed and constructed at JINR. Positrons emitted from radioactive source 22 Na have a very broad energy spectrum up to 0.5 MeV. To generate monochromatic beam of slow positrons the solid neon is used as a moderator. The solid neon allows forming slow positron beam of the energy of 1.2 eV at the spectrum width of 1 eV. The efficiency of moderation is 1 % of total positron flux

  1. ngVLA Cryogenic Subsystem Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootten, Al; Urbain, Denis; Grammer, Wes; Durand, S.

    2018-01-01

    The VLA’s success over 35 years of operations stems in part from dramatically upgraded components over the years. The time has come to build a new array to lead the radio astronomical science into its next 40 years. To accomplish that, a next generation VLA (ngVLA) is envisioned to have 214 antennas with diameters of 18m. The core of the array will be centered at the current VLA location, but the arms will extend out to 1000km.The VLA cryogenic subsystem equipment and technology have remained virtually unchanged since the early 1980s. While adequate for a 27-antenna array, scaling the current system for an array of 214 antennas would be prohibitively expensive in terms of operating cost and maintenance. The overall goal is to limit operating cost to within three times the current level, despite having 8 times the number of antennas. To help realize this goal, broadband receivers and compact feeds will be utilized to reduce both the size and number of cryostats required. The current baseline front end concept calls for just two moderately-sized cryostats for the entire 1.2-116 GHz frequency range, as opposed to 8 in the VLA.For the ngVLA cryogenics, our objective is a well-optimized and efficient system that uses state-of-the-art technology to minimize per-antenna power consumption and maximize reliability. Application of modern technologies, such as variable-speed operation for the scroll compressors and cryocooler motor drives, allow the cooling capacity of the system to be dynamically matched to thermal loading in each cryostat. Significantly, power savings may be realized while the maintenance interval of the cryocoolers is also extended.Finally, a receiver designed to minimize thermal loading can produce savings directly translating to lower operating cost when variable-speed drives are used. Multi-layer insulation (MLI) on radiation shields and improved IR filters on feed windows can significantly reduce heat loading.Measurements done on existing cryogenic

  2. Cryogenic transimpedance amplifier for micromechanical capacitive sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, D; Pastoriza, H; Julián, P; Mandolesi, P

    2008-08-01

    We developed a cryogenic transimpedance amplifier that works at a broad range of temperatures, from room temperature down to 4 K. The device was realized with a standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor 1.5 mum process. Measurements of current-voltage characteristics, open-loop gain, input referred noise current, and power consumption are presented as a function of temperature. The transimpedance amplifier has been successfully applied to sense the motion of a polysilicon micromechanical oscillator at low temperatures. The whole device is intended to serve as a magnetometer for microscopic superconducting samples.

  3. Renovation of the Sissi cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    SISSI (high current superconductor secondary ion source) involved a cryo-generator operating in a close circuit when the whole system was put in service in 1994. Since then the cryo-generator has proved to be insufficiently reliable. A new cryogenic system based on an external liquid helium supply has been designed. The helium transfer lines are surrounded by a shield at liquid nitrogen temperature and numerous layers of super-insulators in order to have minimum thermal losses. The installation was integrated to SISSI in summer 1998 and after the first operating period some improvements concerning the cooling procedure have to be considered. (A.C.)

  4. Thin Cryogenic X-ray Windows

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Davenport, M; Elias, N; Aune, S; Franz, J

    2009-01-01

    We describe the construction and tests of cryogenic X-ray windows of 47 mm diameter made of 15 ìm thick polypropylene foil glued on a UHV flange and supported with a strongback mesh machined by electro-erosion. These hermetic windows of the solar axion telescope of the CAST experiment at CERN withstand the static and dynamic pressures of the buffer gas that are normally below 130 mbar, but may reach 1.2 bar when the magnet quenches. They were tested at 60 K up to 3.5 bar static pressure without permanent deformation.

  5. Simple Spreadsheet Thermal Models for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Alfred

    1995-01-01

    Self consistent circuit analog thermal models that can be run in commercial spreadsheet programs on personal computers have been created to calculate the cooldown and steady state performance of cryogen cooled Dewars. The models include temperature dependent conduction and radiation effects. The outputs of the models provide temperature distribution and Dewar performance information. these models have been used to analyze the SIRTF Telescope Test Facility (STTF). The facility has been brought on line for its first user, the Infrared Telescope Technology Testbed (ITTT), for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) at JPL. The model algorithm as well as a comparison between the models' predictions and actual performance of this facility will be presented.

  6. Explosive Boiling of Superheated Cryogenic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Baidakov, V G

    2007-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the description of the kinetics of spontaneous boiling of superheated liquefied gases and their solutions. Experimental results are given on the temperature of accessible superheating, the limits of tensile strength of liquids due to processes of cavitation and the rates of nucleation of classical and quantum liquids. The kinetics of evolution of the gas phase is studied in detail for solutions of cryogenic liquids and gas-saturated fluids. The properties of the critical clusters (bubbles of critical sizes) of the newly evolving gas phase are analyzed for initial st

  7. Cryogen free low temperature sample environment for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichek, O; Evans, B E; Down, R B E; Bowden, Z A

    2009-01-01

    Recent increase in liquid helium cost caused by global helium supply problems rose significant concern about affordability of conventional cryogenic equipment. Luckily the progress in cryo-cooler technology offers a new generation of cryogenic systems with significantly reduced consumption and in some cases nearly complete elimination of cryogens. These cryogen-free systems also offer the advantage of operational simplicity and require less space than conventional cryogen-cooled systems. The ISIS facility carries on an internal development program intended to substitute gradually all conventional cryogenic systems with cryogen free systems preferably based on pulse tube refrigerators. A unique feature of this cryo-cooler is the absence of cold moving parts. This considerably reduces vibrations and increases the reliability of the cold head. The program includes few development projects which are aiming to deliver range of cryogen free equipment including top-loading cryostat, superconducting magnets and dilution refrigerators. Here we are going to describe the design of these systems and discuss the results of prototypes testing.

  8. Cryogenic storage tank with built-in pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwick, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A cryogenic storage tank with a built-in pump for pumping cryogen directly from the primary storage container consistent with low boil-off losses of cryogen has an outer vessel, an inner vessel and an evacuated insulation space therebetween. A pump mounting tube assembly extends into the interior of the inner vessel and includes an inner pump mounting tube and an outer pump mounting tube joined at their lower rims to define an insulating jacket between the two tubes. The inner pump mounting tube is affixed at its upper end to the outer vessel while the outer pump mounting tube is affixed at its upper end to the inner vessel. The inner pump mounting tube defines a relatively long heat path into the cryogenic container and is itself insulated from the liquid cryogen by a pocket of trapped gas formed within the inner pump mounting tube by heated cryogen. A pump may be introduced through the inner pump mounting tube and is also insulated against contact with liquid cryogen by the trapped gas such that only the lowermost end of the pump is immersed in cryogen thereby minimizing heat leakage into the tank

  9. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, J.; Brodzinski, K.; Casas, J.; Claudet, S.; Delikaris, D.; Delruelle, N.; Ferlin, G.; Fluder, C.; Perin, A.; Perinic, G.; Pezzetti, M.; Pirotte, O.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the over-capacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the 'cannibalization' of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of interventions (e.g. cryo-magnet removal) which can be done without affecting the operating conditions of the adjacent sector. This creates additional constrains and possible extra down-time in the schedule of the shutdowns including the hardware commissioning. This presentation focuses on the consolidation plan foreseen during the LS1 to improve the performance of the LHC cryogenic system in terms of availability and sectorization. (authors)

  10. Commissioning of cryogenic system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bin; He, Chongchao; Li, Na; Ding, Meiying; Wang, Yaqiong; Yu, Zhang; He, Kun

    2017-12-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source(CSNS) cryogenic system provides supercritical cryogenic hydrogen to neutron moderators, including a helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop and hydrogen safety equipment. The helium refrigerator is provided by Linde with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K. Hydrogen loop system mainly includes cryogenic hydrogen pipes, hydrogen circulator cold-box and accumulator cold-box. Cryogenic hydrogen pump, ortho-para convertor, helium-hydrogen heat-exchanger, hydrogen heater and accumulator are integrated in hydrogen circulation cold-box, and accumulator cold-box. Hydrogen safety equipment includes safety valves, rupture disk, hydrogen sensor, flame detector and other equipment to ensure that cryogenic system in dangerous situations will go down, vents, or takes other measures. The cryogenic system commissioning work includes four steps. First, in order to test the refrigerating capacity of refrigerator, when acceptance testing, refrigerator internal heater was used as thermal load. Second, using simulation load as heat load of moderator, hydrogen loop use helium instead of hydrogen, and cooled down to 20 K, then re-warming and test the leak detection of hydrogen loop system. Third, base on the step 2, using hydrogen as working medium, and optimized the control logic. Forth, cryogenic system with the moderators joint commissioning. Now, cryogenic system is connected with the moderators, and the forth step will be carried out in the near future.

  11. Bearing for liquid metal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, R.J.; Pennell, W.E.; Wasko, J.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid metal pump bearing support comprises a series of tangentially oriented spokes that connect the bearing cylinder to the pump internals structure. The spokes may be arranged in a plurality of planes extending from the bearing cylinder to the pump internals with the spokes in one plane being arranged alternately with those in the next plane. The bearing support structure provides the pump with sufficient lateral support for the bearing structure together with the capability of accommodating differential thermal expansion without adversely affecting pump performance

  12. Research of the cold shield in cryogenic liquid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. B.; Zheng, J. P.; Wu, X. L.; Cui, C.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    To realize zero boil-off storage of cryogenic liquids, a cryocooler that can achieve a temperature below the boiling point temperature of the cryogenic liquid is generally needed. Taking into account that the efficiency of the cryocooler will be higher at a higher operating temperature, a novel thermal insulation system using a sandwich container filled with cryogenic liquid with a higher boiling point as a cold radiation shield between the cryogenic tank and the vacuum shield in room temperature is proposed to reduce the electricity power consumption. A two-stage cryocooler or two separate cryocoolers are adopted to condense the evaporated gas from the cold shield and the cryogenic tank. The calculation result of a 55 liter liquid hydrogen tank with a liquid nitrogen shield shows that only 14.4 W of electrical power is needed to make all the evaporated gas condensation while 121.7 W will be needed without the liquid nitrogen shield.

  13. Infrared detectors and test technology of cryogenic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaole; Liu, Xingxin; Xing, Mailing; Ling, Long

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic camera which is widely used in deep space detection cools down optical system and support structure by cryogenic refrigeration technology, thereby improving the sensitivity. Discussing the characteristics and design points of infrared detector combined with camera's characteristics. At the same time, cryogenic background test systems of chip and detector assembly are established. Chip test system is based on variable cryogenic and multilayer Dewar, and assembly test system is based on target and background simulator in the thermal vacuum environment. The core of test is to establish cryogenic background. Non-uniformity, ratio of dead pixels and noise of test result are given finally. The establishment of test system supports for the design and calculation of infrared systems.

  14. Bearing construction for refrigeration compresssor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Marc G.; Nelson, Richard T.

    1988-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor has a cylinder block and a crankshaft rotatable about a vertical axis to reciprocate a piston in a cylinder on the cylinder block. A separate bearing housing is secured to the central portion of the cylinder block and extends vertically along the crankshaft, where it carries a pair of roller bearings to journal the crankshaft. The crankshaft has a radially extending flange which is journaled by a thrust-type roller bearing above the bearing housing to absorb the vertical forces on the crankshaft so that all three of the roller bearings are between the crankshaft and the bearing housing to maintain and control the close tolerances required by such bearings.

  15. 77 FR 70423 - Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC; Notice of..., 2012, Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC, sole licensee (transferor) and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC (transferees) filed an application for the partial the transfer of licenses...

  16. Basic methodology of tomographic imaging by filtered inverse projection at a turbo-pump. Project report; Methodische Grundlagen fuer die Tomographie durch gefilterte Rueckprojektion an einer Axialpumpe. Projektbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, D.

    2000-11-01

    A two-phase medium consisting of a fluid containing gas is transported in a turbo-pump via an impeller. The interaction between the gaseous phase and the impeller is to be examined by tomography with gamma rays. Reconstruction of the image of the object is to be made by way of filtered inverse projection. The methodology of using this principle in the given system (geometry and measuring conditions) is explained. (orig./CB) [German] Ein zweiphasiges, aus einer gashaltigen Fluessigkeit bestehendes Medium wird in einer Axialpumpe von einem propellerartigen Laufrad senkrecht zur Drehachse dieses Laufrades transportiert. Die Wechselwirkung zwischen der Gasphase und dem Laufrad soll unter Verwendung von Gamma-Strahlung mittels Tomographie untersucht werden. Dabei ist fuer die Rekonstruktion des Objektbildes das Prinzip der sogenannten gefilterten Rueckprojektion vorgesehen. Die methodischen Grundlagen fuer die Nutzung dieses Prinzips unter von vorgesehenen geometrischen und messtechnischen Bedingungen sind Gegenstand dieser Arbeit. (orig.)

  17. Experimental Waterflow Determination of the Dynamic Hydraulic Transfer Function for the J-2X Oxidizer Turbopump. Part Two; Results and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Tom; Patel, Sandeep; Lee, Erik; Karon, Dave

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results describing the hydraulic dynamic pump transfer matrix (Yp) for a cavitating J-2X oxidizer turbopump inducer+impeller tested in subscale waterflow are presented. The transfer function is required for integrated vehicle pogo stability analysis as well as optimization of local inducer pumping stability. Dynamic transfer functions across widely varying pump hydrodynamic inlet conditions are extracted from measured data in conjunction with 1D-model based corrections. Derived Dynamic transfer functions are initially interpreted relative to traditional Pogo pump equations. Water-to-liquid oxygen scaling of measured cavitation characteristics are discussed. Comparison of key dynamic transfer matrix terms derived from waterflow testing are made with those implemented in preliminary Ares Upper Stage Pogo stability modeling. Alternate cavitating pump hydraulic dynamic equations are suggested which better reflect frequency dependencies of measured transfer matrices.

  18. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology for Moon and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gaby, Joseph D.; Salerno, Louis J.; Sutherlin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy, focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are being conducted by the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project. Cryogenic Fluid Management Project objectives are to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens to support high performance demands of lunar, and ultimately, Mars missions in the application areas of propulsion, surface systems, and Earth-based ground operations. The targeted use of cryogens and cryogenic technologies for these application areas is anticipated to significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, to reduce and even eliminate storage tank boil-off losses for long term missions, to economize ground pad storage and transfer operations, and to expand operational and architectural operations at destination. This paper organizes Cryogenic Fluid Management Project technology efforts according to Exploration Architecture target areas, and discusses the scope of trade studies, analytical modeling, and test efforts presently underway, as well as future plans, to address those target areas. The target areas are: liquid methane/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Ascent Stage, liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Descent Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage, liquefaction, zero boil-off, and propellant scavenging for Lunar Surface Systems, cold helium and zero boil-off technologies for Earth-Based Ground Operations, and architecture definition studies for long term storage and on-orbit transfer and pressurization of LH2, cryogenic Mars landing and ascent vehicles, and cryogenic production via in situ resource utilization on Mars.

  20. Cryogenic refractive index of Heraeus homosil glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.34—3.16 μm and temperature range of 120—335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a fieldwidened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitive performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) and dispersion relation (dn/dλ) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in the literature.

  1. Cryogenic Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Perea-Solano, B

    2004-01-01

    CERN is presently constructing the LHC, which will produce collisions of 7 TeV protons in 4 interaction points at a design luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The radiation dose resulting from the operation at high luminosity will cause a serious deterioration of the silicon tracker performance. The state-of-art silicon microstrip detectors can tolerate a fluence of about 3 1014 cm-2 of hadrons or charged leptons. This is insufficient, however, for long-term operation in the central parts of the LHC trackers, in particular after the possible luminosity upgrade of the LHC. By operating the detectors at cryogenic temperatures the radiation hardness can be improved by a factor 10. This work proposes a cryogenic microstrip detector module concept which has the features required for the microstrip trackers of the upgraded LHC experiments at CERN. The module can hold an edgeless sensor, being a good candidate for improved luminosity and total cross-section measurements in the ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM experiments. The design o...

  2. SiPM properties at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biroth, Maik; Achenbach, Patrick; Thomas, Andreas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Downie, Evangeline [George Washington University, DC (United States); Collaboration: A2-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    At the electron accelerator Mainzer Mikrotron (MAMI) an active target build of polarizable scintillators will be operated at approximately 25 mK. To read out the scintillation light, the photodetectors have to withstand cryogenic temperatures of 4 K and high count rates. Therefore the properties of different types of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were studied at cryogenic temperatures. In liquid nitrogen at 77 K, problems with quenching in Hamamatsu SiPMs and with the protective epoxy layer covering Zecotek SiPMs were observed. Tests with one Zecotek SiPM were successful after removal of the epoxy layer in liquid helium at 4 K and no after-pulses could be observed. Fundamental parameters like break-down voltage, single-pixel gain, crosstalk probability and the dark-count rate were measured and compared to room temperature. The photon detection efficiency was estimated by SiPMs response to short LED pulses. All these parameters were extracted by curve-fitting of SiPM charge spectra with a new analytical function.

  3. Neutron Detection with a Cryogenic Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W; Cristy, S S; Lamberti, V E

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic calorimeters are used for x-ray detection because of their exquisite energy resolution and have found application in x-ray astronomy, and the search for dark matter. These devices operate by detecting the heat pulse produced by ionization in an absorber cooled to temperatures below 1 K. Such temperatures are needed to lower the absorber's heat capacity to the point that the deposition of even a few eV results in a measurable temperature excursion. Typical absorbers for dark matter measurements are massive Si or Ge crystals, and, with Ge, have achieved a resolution of 650 eV at 10 keV. Chow, et al., report the measurement of the 60 keV emission from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am with 230 eV resolution using a superconducting tin absorber. Cunningham, et al., also using a superconducting tin absorber, have recently reported a four-fold improvement over Chow. With such results being reported from the x- and gamma-ray world it is natural to examine the possibilities for cryogenic neutron spectroscopy. Such a det...

  4. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  5. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40 Ca + and 88 Sr + ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40 Ca + is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10 -15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40 Ca + ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  6. Experimental investigation of cryogenic oscillating heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, A.J.; Ma, H.B.; Critser, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    A novel cryogenic heat pipe, oscillating heat pipe (OHP), which consists of an 4 × 18.5 cm evaporator, a 6 × 18.5 cm condenser, and 10 cm length of adiabatic section, has been developed and experimental characterization conducted. Experimental results show that the maximum heat transport capability of the OHP reached 380W with average temperature difference of 49 °C between the evaporator and condenser when the cryogenic OHP was charged with liquid nitrogen at 48% (v/v) and operated in a horizontal direction. The thermal resistance decreased from 0.256 to 0.112 while the heat load increased from 22.5 to 321.8 W. When the OHP was operated at a steady state and an incremental heat load was added to it, the OHP operation changed from a steady state to an unsteady state until a new steady state was reached. This process can be divided into three regions: (I) unsteady state; (II) transient state; and (III) new steady state. In the steady state, the amplitude of temperature change in the evaporator is smaller than that of the condenser while the temperature response keeps the same frequency both in the evaporator and the condenser. The experimental results also showed that the amplitude of temperature difference between the evaporator and the condenser decreased when the heat load increased. PMID:20585410

  7. Modelling and control of large cryogenic refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript is concern with both the modeling and the derivation of control schemes for large cryogenic refrigerators. The particular case of those which are submitted to highly variable pulsed heat load is studied. A model of each object that normally compose a large cryo-refrigerator is proposed. The methodology to gather objects model into the model of a subsystem is presented. The manuscript also shows how to obtain a linear equivalent model of the subsystem. Based on the derived models, advances control scheme are proposed. Precisely, a linear quadratic controller for warm compression station working with both two and three pressures state is derived, and a predictive constrained one for the cold-box is obtained. The particularity of those control schemes is that they fit the computing and data storage capabilities of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) with are well used in industry. The open loop model prediction capability is assessed using experimental data. Developed control schemes are validated in simulation and experimentally on the 400W1.8K SBT's cryogenic test facility and on the CERN's LHC warm compression station. (author) [fr

  8. The DAΦNE cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modena, M.

    1997-12-01

    The DAΦNE Project utilises superconductivity technology for a total of six superconducting magnets: the two Experiment magnets (KLOE and FINUDA) and the four Compensator Solenoid magnets needed to compensate the magnetic effect of the Experiment magnets on the electron and positron beams. This effect, on beams of 510 MeV (nominal DAΦNE Energy), is expected to be relevant, especially with the aim of achieving a very high luminosity, which is the main target of the Project. The KLOE superconducting magnet has two possible working positions: the first in the DAΦNE Hall, when the Experiment will be in operation, and the second one in the KLOE Assembly Hall. This second position is the first to be utilised for the KLOE magnet Acceptance Test and magnetic field mapping, prior to the mounting of all the experimental apparatus inside the magnet. This note intends to present the DAΦNE Cryogenic System and how the authors have converged to the definition of a common Cryogenic System compatible with all the six superconducting magnets

  9. Self lubricating fluid bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapich, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns self lubricating fluid bearings, which are used in a shaft sealed system extending two regions. These regions contain fluids, which have to be isolated. A first seal is fluid tight for the first region between the carter shaft and the shaft. The second seal is fluid tight between the carter and the shaft, it communicates with the second region. The first fluid region is the environment surrounding the shaft carter. The second fluid region is a part of a nuclear reactor which contains the cooling fluid. The shaft is conceived to drive a reactor circulating and cooling fluid [fr

  10. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 27 - Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, San Diego, CA, August 11-14, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, R. W.

    Applications of superconductivity are considered, taking into account MHD and fusion, generators, transformers, transmission lines, magnets for physics, cryogenic techniques, electrtronics, and aspects of magnet stability. Advances related to heat transfer in He I are discussed along with subjects related to theat transfer in He II, refrigeration of superconducting systems, refrigeration and liquefaction, dilution and magnetic refrigerators, refrigerators for space applications, mass transfer and flow phenomena, and the properties of fluids. Developments related to cryogenic applications are also explored, giving attention to bulk storage and transfer of cryogenic fluids, liquefied natural gas operations, space science and technology, and cryopumping. Topics related to cryogenic instrumentation and controls include the production and use of high grade silicon diode temperature sensors, the choice of strain gages for use in a large superconducting alternator, microprocessor control of cryogenic pressure, and instrumentation, data acquisition and reduction for a large spaceborne helium dewar. For individual items see A83-43221 to A83-43250

  11. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, A.T.W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    θ-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The θ-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  12. Superconducting bearings in flywheels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, T.A.; Campbell, A.M.; Ganney, I.; Lo, W. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Superconductivity (IRC); Twardowski, T. [International Energy Systems, Chester High Road, Neston, South Wirral (United Kingdom); Dawson, B. [British Nuclear Fuels, Capenhurst, South Wirral (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01

    Investigations are being carried out into the use of superconducting magnetic bearings to levitate energy storage flywheels. In a planned program of work, Cambridge University are aiming to produce a practical bearing system for Pirouette(TM). The Pirouette(TM) system is designed to provide 5 kWh of recoverable energy which is currently recoverable at a rate of 5 kW (future revisions will provide up to 50 kW). IES (a British Nuclear Fuels subsidiary) the owners of the Pirouette(TM) machine have supplied Cambridge with a flywheel. This flywheel weighs >40 kg and is being levitated using an Evershed-type arrangement in which the superconductor is being used to stabilize the interaction between two magnets. To date we have demonstrated stable levitation in static and low speed tests in a rig designed for low speeds of rotation in air. A second rig which is currently under construction at BNFL will run in vacuum at speeds of up to 50 (orig.) 5 refs.

  13. Cooling pipeline disposing structure for large-scaled cryogenic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns an electromagnetic force supporting structure for superconductive coils. As the size of a cryogenic structure is increased, since it takes much cooling time, temperature difference between cooling pipelines and the cryogenic structure is increased over a wide range, and difference of heat shrinkage is increased to increase thermal stresses. Then, in the cooling pipelines for a large scaled cryogenic structure, the cooling pipelines and the structure are connected by way of a thin metal plate made of a material having a heat conductivity higher than that of the material of the structure by one digit or more, and the thin metal plate is bent. The displacement between the cryogenic structure and the cooling pipelines caused by heat shrinkage is absorbed by the elongation/shrinkage of the bent structure of the thin metal plate, and the thermal stresses due to the displacement is reduced. In addition, the heat of the cryogenic structures is transferred by way of the thin metal plate. Then, the cooling pipelines can be secured to the cryogenic structure such that cooling by heat transfer is enabled by absorbing a great deviation or three dimensional displacement due to the difference of the temperature distribution between the cryogenic structure enlarged in the scale and put into the three dimensional shape, and the cooling pipelines. (N.H.)

  14. Process simulations for the LCLS-II cryogenic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, V.; Bai, H.; Heloin, V.; Fauve, E.; Pflueckhahn, D.; Peterson, T.; Arenius, D.; Bevins, M.; Scanlon, C.; Than, R.; Hays, G.; Ross, M.

    2017-12-01

    Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II), a 4 GeV continuous-wave (CW) superconducting electron linear accelerator, is to be constructed in the existing two mile Linac facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first light from the new facility is scheduled to be in 2020. The LCLS-II Linac consists of thirty-five 1.3 GHz and two 3.9 GHz superconducting cryomodules. The Linac cryomodules require cryogenic cooling for the super-conducting niobium cavities at 2.0 K, low temperature thermal intercept at 5.5-7.5 K, and a thermal shield at 35-55 K. The equivalent 4.5 K refrigeration capacity needed for the Linac operations range from a minimum of 11 kW to a maximum of 24 kW. Two cryogenic plants with 18 kW of equivalent 4.5 K refrigeration capacity will be used for supporting the Linac cryogenic cooling requirements. The cryogenic plants are based on the Jefferson Lab’s CHL-II cryogenic plant design which uses the “Floating Pressure” design to support a wide variation in the cooling load. In this paper, the cryogenic process for the integrated LCLS-II cryogenic system and the process simulation for a 4.5 K cryoplant in combination with a 2 K cold compressor box, and the Linac cryomodules are described.

  15. Commissioning of the Cryogenic Plant for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at Heidelberg

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, R; Grieser, M; Haberstroh, C; Kaiser, D; Lange, M; Laux, F; Menk, S; Orlov, D A; Repnow, R; Sieber, T; Quack, H; Varju, J; Wolf A

    2009-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg a next generation electrostatic storage ring for low velocity atomic and molecular ion beams is under construction. In contrast to existing electrostatic storage rings, the Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR will be cooled down to temperatures below 2 K. Thus acting as a large cryopump it will provide long storage times and, in addition, open a new field of quantum state controlled molecular physics due to a low heat radiation background from space-like environment. A concept for cooling the storage ring has been developed and is presently tested by means of a linear trap as a prototype with a length of 1/10 of the planned ring. A commercial refrigerator with 21 W at 2 K has been successfully commissioned and was connected to the prototype. This paper presents the status of the cryogenic plant after the commissioning and one year of operation.

  16. Computational design of rolling bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen-Schäfer, Hung

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively presents the computational design of rolling bearings dealing with many interdisciplinary difficult working fields. They encompass elastohydrodynamics (EHD), Hertzian contact theory, oil-film thickness in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL), bearing dynamics, tribology of surface textures, fatigue failure mechanisms, fatigue lifetimes of rolling bearings and lubricating greases, Weibull distribution, rotor balancing, and airborne noises (NVH) in the rolling bearings. Furthermore, the readers are provided with hands-on essential formulas based on the up-to-date DIN ISO norms and helpful examples for computational design of rolling bearings. The topics are intended for undergraduate and graduate students in mechanical and material engineering, research scientists, and practicing engineers who want to understand the interactions between these working fields and to know how to design the rolling bearings for automotive industry and many other industries.

  17. Cold atoms in a cryogenic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslinger, S.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of quantum information processing attracts increasingly interest, where a complex collection of quantum objects and quantum bits are employed to find the ideal building blocks for quantum information systems. Hybrid quantum systems are therefore promising objects as they countervail the particular drawbacks of single quantum objects. Based on superconducting resonator technology, microwave coplanar waveguides provide a well suited interconnection for photons and solid-state quantum bits (qubits), extensively investigated in recent years. Since a quantum memory is presently missing in those electrical accessible circuit cavity quantum devices, connecting the fast processing in a solid sate device to the exceptional long coherence times in atomic ensembles, the presented work is focused to establish the technological foundations for the hybridization of such quantum systems. The microwave photons stored in a superconducting high finesse microwave resonator are therefore an ideal connection between the atom and the solid state quantum world. In the last decade, the miniaturization and integration of quantum optics and atomic physics manipulation techniques on to a single chip was successfully established. Such atom chips are capable of detailed quantum manipulation of ultra-cold atoms and provide a versatile platform to combine the manipulation techniques from atomic physics with the capability of nano-fabrication. In recent years several experiments succeeded in realization of superconducting atom chips in cryogenic environments which opens the road for integrating super-conductive microwave resonators to magnetically couple an atomic ensemble to photons stored in the coplanar high finesse cavity. This thesis presents the concept, design and experimental setup of two approaches to establish an atomic ensemble of rubidium atoms inside a cryogenic environment, based on an Electron beam driven alkali metal atom source for loading a magneto optical trap in a

  18. Characterizing Dissolved Gases in Cryogenic Liquid Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian A.

    Pressure-Density-Temperature-Composition (PrhoT-x) measurements of cryogenic fuel mixtures are a historical challenge due to the difficulties of maintaining cryogenic temperatures and precision isolation of a mixture sample. For decades NASA has used helium to pressurize liquid hydrogen propellant tanks to maintain tank pressure and reduce boil off. This process causes helium gas to dissolve into liquid hydrogen creating a cryogenic mixture with thermodynamic properties that vary from pure liquid hydrogen. This can lead to inefficiencies in fuel storage and instabilities in fluid flow. As NASA plans for longer missions to Mars and beyond, small inefficiencies such as dissolved helium in liquid propellant become significant. Traditional NASA models are unable to account for dissolved helium due to a lack of fundamental property measurements necessary for the development of a mixture Equation Of State (EOS). The first PrhoT-x measurements of helium-hydrogen mixtures using a retrofitted single-sinker densimeter, magnetic suspension microbalance, and calibrated gas chromatograph are presented in this research. These measurements were used to develop the first multi-phase EOS for helium-hydrogen mixtures which was implemented into NASA's Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) to determine the significance of mixture non-idealities. It was revealed that having dissolved helium in the propellant does not have a significant effect on the tank pressurization rate but does affect the rate at which the propellant temperature rises. PrhoT-x measurements are conducted on methane-ethane mixtures with dissolved nitrogen gas to simulate the conditions of the hydrocarbon seas of Saturn's moon Titan. Titan is the only known celestial body in the solar system besides Earth with stable liquid seas accessible on the surface. The PrhoT-x measurements are used to develop solubility models to aid in the design of the Titan Submarine. NASA is currently designing the submarine

  19. Evacuation apparatus with cryogenic pump and trap assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahl, G.

    1980-01-01

    An evacuation apparatus comprising a vessel defining a vacuum chamber therein, vacuumizing means communicating with an opening to said vacuum chamber for selectively drawing a vacuum therein comprising cryogenic pump means disposed closely adjacent to said opening and defined by substantial cryogenically cooled trap surfaces for freezing-out water vapor from air evacuated from said vacuum chamber, said opening being common to said vacuum chamber and to said cryogenic pump means, valve means for selectively opening or closing the opening to said vacuum chamber and movable from a first position within said cryogenic pump means closing said opening to a second position within said cryogenic pump means directly exposing said vacuum chamber to said cryogenic pump means, through said opening, baffle means disposed closely adjacent to the opening to said vacuum chamber for providing substantial open communication to said vacuum chamber and for substantially preventing ingress of contaminants into said vacuum chamber, said baffle means being positioned to provide an optically dense view of said opening when viewed from a downstream side of said baffle means, and a plurality of longitudinally spaced and cryogenically cooled fins mounted in nested relationship within said baffle means and disposed in out-of-contact relationship therewith, said fins being positioned to provide an optically dense view of the downstream side of said baffle means when viewed from said openings. The cryogenic pump is adapted for use in an evacuation apparatus comprising a housing defining an opening to a vacuum chamber, a plurality of metallic plates defining a first chamber therein communicating with said vacuum chamber through said opening and further defining a second chamber at least partially surrounding said first chamber and adapted to be at least partially filled with a cryogenic liqui.d

  20. Grease lubrication in rolling bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Lugt, Piet M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive book on the science of grease lubrication for roller and needle bearings in industrial and vehicle engineering. Grease Lubrication in Rolling Bearings provides an overview of the existing knowledge on the various aspects of grease lubrication (including lubrication systems) and the state of the art models that exist today. The book reviews the physical and chemical aspects of grease lubrication, primarily directed towards lubrication of rolling bearings. The first part of the book covers grease composition, properties and rheology, including thermal

  1. Hydrostatic and hybrid bearing design

    CERN Document Server

    Rowe, W B

    1983-01-01

    Hydrostatic and Hybrid Bearing Design is a 15-chapter book that focuses on the bearing design and testing. This book first describes the application of hydrostatic bearings, as well as the device pressure, flow, force, power, and temperature. Subsequent chapters discuss the load and flow rate of thrust pads; circuit design, flow control, load, and stiffness; and the basis of the design procedures and selection of tolerances. The specific types of bearings, their design, dynamics, and experimental methods and testing are also shown. This book will be very valuable to students of engineering des

  2. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design

  3. Status of the Cryogenic System Commissioning at SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Casagrande, Fabio; Campisi, Isidoro E; Creel, Jonathan; Dixon, Kelly; Ganni, Venkatarao; Gurd, Pamela; Hatfield, Daniel; Howell, Matthew; Knudsen, Peter; Stout, Daniel; Strong, William

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 Watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning strategy and status will be presented.

  4. Performance of Magnetic-Superconductor Non-Contact Harmonic Drive for Cryogenic Space Applications: Speed, Torque and Efficiency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis; Diez-Jimenez, Efren; Valiente-Blanco, Ignacio; Cristache, Cristian; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco-Antonio; Sanchez-Garcia-Casarrubios, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic Drives are widely used in space mainly because of their compactness, large reduction ratio ad zero backlash. However, their use in extreme environments like in cryogenic temperatures is still a challenge. Lubrication, lifetime and fatigue are still issues under these conditions.The MAGDRIVE project, funded by the EU Space FP7 was devoted to test a new concept of harmonic drive reducer. By using the magnetic distance force interactions of magnets and ferromagnetic materials, all the conventional mechanical elements of a Harmonic Drives (teeth, flexspline and ball bearings) are substituted by contactless mechanical components (magnetic gear and superconducting magnetic bearings). The absence of contact between any moving parts prevents wear, lubricants are no longer required and the operational life time is greatly increased. As the magnetic transmission is continuous there is no backlash in the reduction. MAG SOAR Company is already providing contactless mechanical components for space applications able to operate in a wide range of temperatures.In this paper the tests results of a -1:20 ratio MAGDRIVE prototype are reported. In these tests successful operation at 40 K and 10-3 Pa was demonstrated for more than 1.5 million input cycles. A maximum torque of 3 Nm and efficiency higher than 75% at 3000 rpm were demonstrated. The maximum tested input speed was 3000 rpm -six times the previous existing record for harmonic drives at cryogenic temperature.

  5. Cryogenic air separation: the last twenty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, M.; Petit, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the last 20 years cryogenic air separation plant sizes have increased from 150 tons per day to 2800 tons per day. Progressively reversing heat exchangers have replaced regenerators. However, with this arrangement, the quantity of pure product output is limited to about 50% of the air input. With the appearance on the market of molecular sieve, another arrangement was developed, which allows one to produce a combined pure product flow equivalent to 85% of the air input. Recently, there has been a strong tendency for the reversing exchangers to be superseded by this arrangement. Due to the ever increasing cost of energy, optimization studies are today pushed much further than they used to be; as a consequence there have been major changes in the size of equipment, improvements in the machinery, and simultaneous developments in instrumentation

  6. CALDER: High-sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casali, N.; Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.

    2017-01-01

    The current bolometric experiments searching for rare processes such as neutrinoless double-beta decay or dark matter interaction demand for cryogenic light detectors with high sensitivity, large active area and excellent scalability and radio-purity in order to reduce their background budget. The CALDER project aims to develop such kind of light detectors implementing phonon-mediated Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs). The goal for this project is the realization of a 5 × 5 cm"2 light detector working between 10 and 100mK with a baseline resolution RMS below 20 eV. In this work the characteristics and the performances of the prototype detectors developed in the first project phase will be shown.

  7. Rotary bayonets for cryogenic and vacuum service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.A.; Dixon, K.D.; Krasa, R.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Trotter, G.R.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Rotary bayonets were designed, tested, and installed for liquid nitrogen, liquid argon, and vacuum service. This paper will present the design, testing, and service record for two sizes of vacuum jacketed cryogenic rotary bayonets and two sizes of vacuum service rotary bayonets. Materials used in construction provide electrical isolation across the bayonet joint. The joint permits 360 degrees of rotation between the male and female pipe sections while maintaining integrity of service. Assemblies using three such joints were built to allow end connection points to be translated through at least 1 meter of horizontal travel while kept in service. Vacuum jacketed sizes built in-house at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are 1-1/2 in. inner pipe size, 3 in. vacuum jacket, and 4 in. inner pipe size, 6 in. vacuum jacket The single wall vacuum service bayonets are in 4 in. and 6 in. pipe sizes. The bayonets have successfully been in active service for over one year

  8. Cryogenically enhanced magneto-Archimedes levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherall, A T; Lopez-Alcaraz, P; Benedict, K A; King, P J; Eaves, L [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-01

    The application of both a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient to a diamagnetic body can produce a vertical force which is sufficient to counteract its weight due to gravity. By immersing the body in a paramagnetic fluid, an additional adjustable magneto-buoyancy force is generated which enhances the levitation effect. Here we show that cryogenic oxygen and oxygen-nitrogen mixtures in both gaseous and liquid form provide sufficient buoyancy to permit the levitation and flotation of a wide range of materials. These fluids may provide an alternative to synthetic ferrofluids for the separation of minerals. We also report the dynamics of corrugation instabilities on the surface of magnetized liquid oxygen.

  9. Cryogenically enhanced magneto-Archimedes levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catherall, A T; Lopez-Alcaraz, P; Benedict, K A; King, P J; Eaves, L

    2005-01-01

    The application of both a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient to a diamagnetic body can produce a vertical force which is sufficient to counteract its weight due to gravity. By immersing the body in a paramagnetic fluid, an additional adjustable magneto-buoyancy force is generated which enhances the levitation effect. Here we show that cryogenic oxygen and oxygen-nitrogen mixtures in both gaseous and liquid form provide sufficient buoyancy to permit the levitation and flotation of a wide range of materials. These fluids may provide an alternative to synthetic ferrofluids for the separation of minerals. We also report the dynamics of corrugation instabilities on the surface of magnetized liquid oxygen

  10. Cryogenically assisted abrasive jet micromachining of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getu, H; Papini, M; Spelt, J K

    2008-01-01

    The abrasive jet micromachining (AJM) of elastomers and polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for use in micro-fluidic devices was found to be very slow or impossible at room temperature. To enhance the material removal rate in such materials, a stream of liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) was injected into the abrasive jet, cooling the target to cryogenic temperatures. Erosion rate measurements on the three polymeric materials (PDMS, ABS and PTFE) with and without the use of LN 2 were compared along with the profiles of micromachined channels and holes. It was found that the use of LN 2 cooling caused brittle erosion in PDMS, allowing it to be micromachined successfully. An erosion rate increase was also observed in PTFE and ABS at high and intermediate impact angles. The use of LN 2 also was found to reduce particle embedding

  11. Cryogenic system for a superconducting spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.

    1983-03-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable, pool boiling design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. This paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration, gas management, liquid nitrogen system, and the overall control strategy. The system normally operates with a 4 K heat load of 150 watts; the LN 2 circuits absorb an additional 4000 watts. 80K intercept control is by an LSI 11 computer. Total available refrigeration at 4K is 400 watts using reciprocating expanders at the 20K and 4K level. The minicomputer has the capability of optimizing overall utility input cost by varying operating points. A hybrid of pneumatic, analog, and digital control is successful in providing full time unattended operation. The 7m diameter magnet/cryostat assembly is rotatable through 180 degrees to provide a variety of spectrometer orientations

  12. Helium Inventory Management For LHC Cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Pyarali, Maisam

    2017-01-01

    The LHC is a 26.7 km circumference ring lined with superconducting magnets that operate at 1.9 K. These magnets are used to control the trajectory of beams of protons traveling in opposite directions and collide them at various experimental sites across the LHC where their debris is analyzed. The focus of this paper is the cryogenic system that allows the magnets to operate in their superconducting states. It aims to highlight the operating principles of helium refrigeration and liquefaction, with and without nitrogen pre-cooling; discuss the various refrigerators and liquefiers used at CERN for both LHC and Non-LHC applications, with their liquefaction capacities and purposes; and finally to deliberate the management of the LHC inventory and how it contributes to the strategic decision CERN makes regarding the inventory management during the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS), Extended Year-End Technical Stop (EYETS) and long shutdowns.

  13. Hermeticity of three cryogenic calorimeter geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strovink, M.; Wormersley, W.J.; Forden, G.E.

    1989-04-01

    We calculate the effect of cracks and dead material on resolution in three simplified cryogenic calorimeter geometries, using a crude approximation that neglects transverse shower spreading and considers only a small set of incident angles. For each dead region, we estimate the average unseen energy using a shower parametrization, and relate it to resolution broadening using a simple approximation that agrees with experimental data. Making reasonable and consistent assumptions on cryostat wall thicknesses, we find that the effects of cracks and dead material dominate the expected resolution in the region where separate ''barrel'' and ''end'' cryostats meet. This is particularly true for one geometry in which the end calorimeter caps the barrel and also protrudes into the hole within it. We also find that carefully designed auxiliary ''crack filler'' detectors can substantially reduce the loss of resolution in these areas. 6 figs

  14. Cryogenic laboratory (80 K - 4 K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brad, Sebastian; Steflea, Dumitru

    2002-01-01

    The technology of low temperature at the beginning of this century, developed for the production of oxygen, nitrogen and rare gases, was the basis for setting up the cryogenic technology in all the companies with these activity fields. The cryogenics section of today comprises engineering and construction of cryogenic plants for science, research and development, space technology, nuclear power techniques. Linde has designed and built a reliable small scale Helium liquefier. This fully automatic cryoliquefier operates for purification, liquefaction as well as re-liquefaction of Helium-gas, evaporated in cryostat systems. The basic equipment of the Linde L5 are the liquefier apparatus, transfer line, medium pressure buffer vessel, automatic purifier, compressor with mechanical oil separation unit, oil adsorber, electrical control unit. The accessories of the Linde L5 are the liquid helium storage tank, high-pressure gas supply, helium recovery unit, and cryocomponents. The cycle compressor C 101 designed as a single stage screw compressor supplies the liquefaction process with approx. 10 g/s of helium at a pressure of 10 to 12 bar and a temperature of approx. 300 K. In the first plate heat exchanger E 201 the gas is cooled down to approx. 70 K. Then the He high-pressure flow is divided: about 7 g/s reach the turbine X 201 via valve 203 (turbine entry) and are expanded there to approx. 4.6 bar, the gas cooling down to 64 K. After further cooling in the heat exchanger E 203 to about 16 K, another power-consuming expansion to 1.2 bar takes place. The implied cooling of the gas results in a temperature of 12 K at the outlet of the turbine X 202. This gas is then transferred to the low-pressure side of the heat exchanger E 204. The smaller part of the He high-pressure gas flow (approx. 3 g/s) is cooled down in the heat exchanger E 202 - E 205 to about 7 K. One part of the cold helium gas (approx. 0.17 g/s) is used in the purifier to cool down the feed gas to air

  15. Stainless steels for cryogenic bolts and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, F.; Rabbe, P.; Odin, G.

    1975-01-01

    Stainless steel for cryogenic applications are generally austenitic steels which, under the effect of cold-drawing, can or cannot undergo a partial martensitic transformation according to their composition. It has been shown that very high ductility and endurance characteristics at low temperatures, together with very high yield strength and resistances values, can be attained with grades of nitrogenous steels of types Z2CN18-10N and Z3CMN18-8-6N. Optimum ductility values are obtained by employing to the best possible, the martensitic transformations which develop during cold-drawing. From the plotting of the rational traction curves, it is possible to analyse very simply the influence of the composition on the martensitic transformations [fr

  16. First Experience with the LHC Cryogenic Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Vauthier, N; Balle, Ch; Casas-Cubillos, J; Ciechanowski, M; Fernandez-Penacoba, G; Fortescue-Beck, E; Gomes, P; Jeanmonod, N; Lopez-Lorente, A; Suraci, A

    2008-01-01

    The LHC under commissioning at CERN will be the world's largest superconducting accelerator and therefore makes extensive use of cryogenic instruments. These instruments are installed in the tunnel and therefore have to withstand the LHC environment that imposes radiation-tolerant design and construction. Most of the instruments require individual calibration; some of them exhibit several variants as concerns measuring span; all relevant data are therefore stored in an Oracle® database. Those data are used for the various quality assurance procedures defined for installation and commissioning, as well as for generating tables used by the control system to configure automatically the input/output channels. This paper describes the commissioning of the sensors and the corresponding electronics, the first measurement results during the cool-down of one machine sector; it discusses the different encountered problems and their corresponding solutions.

  17. Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Models. Design and Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. P., Jr. (Compiler); Gloss, B. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The principal motivating factor was the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Since the NTF can achieve significantly higher Reynolds numbers at transonic speeds than other wind tunnels in the world, and will therefore occupy a unique position among ground test facilities, every effort is being made to ensure that model design and fabrication technology exists to allow researchers to take advantage of this high Reynolds number capability. Since a great deal of experience in designing and fabricating cryogenic wind tunnel models does not exist, and since the experience that does exist is scattered over a number of organizations, there is a need to bring existing experience in these areas together and share it among all interested parties. Representatives from government, the airframe industry, and universities are included.

  18. Rotary bayonets for cryogenic and vacuum service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.A.; Dixon, K.D.; Krasa, R.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Trotter, G.R.; Urbin, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Rotary bayonets were designed, tested, and installed for liquid nitrogen, liquid argon, and vacuum service. This paper will present the design, testing, and service record for two sizes of vacuum jacketed cryogenic rotary bayonets and two sizes of vacuum service rotary bayonets. Materials used in construction provide electrical isolation across the bayonet joint. The joint permits 360 degrees of rotation between the male and female pipe sections while maintaining integrity of service. Assemblies using three such joints were built to allow end connection points to be translated through at least 1 meter of horizontal travel while kept in service. Vacuum jacketed sizes built in-house at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are 1 1/2 inches inner pipe size, 3 inches vacuum jacket, and 4 inches inner pipe size, 6 inches vacuum jacket. The single wall vacuum service bayonets are in 4 inch and 6 inch pipe sizes. The bayonets have successfully been in active service for over one year

  19. A cryogenic multichannel electronically scanned pressure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.; Adcock, Edward E.; Kahng, Seun K.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a cryogenic multichannel electronically scanned pressure (ESP) module developed and tested over an extended temperature span from -184 to +50 C and a pressure range of 0 to 5 psig. The ESP module consists of 32 pressure sensor dice, four analog 8 differential-input multiplexers, and an amplifier circuit, all of which are packaged in a physical volume of 2 x 1 x 5/8 in with 32 pressure and two reference ports. Maximum nonrepeatability is measured at 0.21 percent of full-scale output. The ESP modules have performed consistently well over 15 times over the above temperature range and continue to work without any sign of degradation. These sensors are also immune to repeated thermal shock tests over a temperature change of 220 C/sec.

  20. Initial performance of upgraded Tevatron cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab began operating a re-designed satellite refrigerator systems in November 1993. Upgrades were installed to operate the Tevatron at a magnet temperature of 3.5 K, approximately 1K lower than the original design. Refrigerator upgrades included new valve boxes, larger reciprocating expanders, the installation of cold vapor compressors, new sub-atmospheric instrumentation and an entirely new distributed controls system. Cryogenic system reliability data for Colliding Physics Run 1B is presented emphasizing a failure analysis for each aspect of the upgrade. Comparison to data for Colliding Physics Run 1A (previous to upgrade) is presented to show the impact of a major system overhaul. New operational problems and their solutions are presented in detail

  1. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Affordable Development Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Glen E.; Gerrish, H. P.; Kenny, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of nuclear power for space use in nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems will involve significant expenditures of funds and require major technology development efforts. The development effort must be economically viable yet sufficient to validate the systems designed. Efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Project (NCPS) to study what a viable program would entail. The study will produce an integrated schedule, cost estimate and technology development plan. This will include the evaluation of various options for test facilities, types of testing and use of the engine, components, and technology developed. A "Human Rating" approach will also be developed and factored into the schedule, budget and technology development approach.

  2. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  3. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft 3 of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a ''cold test pit'' that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 x 9 x 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub's proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed

  4. The DIII-D cryogenic system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaubel, K.M.; Laughon, G.J.; Campbell, G.L.; Langhorn, A.R.; Stevens, N.C.; Tupper, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    The original DIII-D cryogenic system was commissioned in 1981 and was used to cool the cryopanel arrays for three hydrogen neutral beam injectors. Since then, new demands for liquid helium have arisen including: a fourth neutral beam injector, ten superconducting magnets for the electron cyclotron heating gyrotrons, and more recently, the advanced diverter cryopump which resides inside the tokamak vacuum vessel. The original cryosystem could not meet these demands. Consequently, the cryosystem was upgraded in several phases to increase capacity, improve reliability, and reduce maintenance. The majority of the original system has been replaced with superior equipment. The capacity now exists to support present as well as future demands for liquid helium at DIII-D including a hydrogen pellet injector, which is being constructed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Upgrades to the cryosystem include: a recently commissioned 150 ell/hr helium liquefier, two 55 g/sec helium screw compressors, a fully automated 20-valve cryogen distribution box, a high efficiency helium wet expander, and the conversion of equipment from manual or pneumatic to programmable logic controller (PLC) control. The distribution box was designed and constructed for compactness due to limited space availability. Overall system efficiency was significantly improved by replacing the existing neutral beam reliquefier Joule-Thomson valve with a reciprocating wet expander. The implementation of a PLC-based automatic control system has resulted in increased efficiency and reliability. This paper will describe the cryosystem design with emphasis on newly added equipment. In addition, performance and operational experience will be discussed

  5. Field Testing of Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayre, Aaron [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Frankman, Dave [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Andrew [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Stitt, Kyler [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Larry [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-07-17

    Sustainable Energy Solutions has been developing Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ (CCC) since 2008. In that time two processes have been developed, the External Cooling Loop and Compressed Flue Gas Cryogenic Carbon Capture processes (CCC ECL™ and CCC CFG™ respectively). The CCC ECL™ process has been scaled up to a 1TPD CO2 system. In this process the flue gas is cooled by an external refrigerant loop. SES has tested CCC ECL™ on real flue gas slip streams from subbituminous coal, bituminous coal, biomass, natural gas, shredded tires, and municipal waste fuels at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, cement kilns, and pilot-scale research reactors. The CO2 concentrations from these tests ranged from 5 to 22% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at a modest rate. The CCC CFG™ process has been scaled up to a .25 ton per day system. This system has been tested on real flue gas streams including subbituminous coal, bituminous coal and natural gas at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, and pilot-scale research reactors. CO2 concentrations for these tests ranged from 5 to 15% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at 90+%. Hg capture was also verified and the resulting effluent from CCC CFG™ was below a 1ppt concentration. This paper will focus on discussion of the capabilities of CCC, the results of field testing and the future steps surrounding the development of this technology.

  6. The DIII-D cryogenic system upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubel, K.M.; Laughon, G.J.; Campbell, G.L.; Langhorn, A.R.; Stevens, N.C.; Tupper, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    The original DIII-D cryogenic system was commissioned in 1981 and was used to cool the cryopanel arrays for three hydrogen neutral beam injectors. Since then, new demands for liquid helium have arisen including: a fourth neutral beam injector, ten superconducting magnets for the electron cyclotron heating gyrotrons, and more recently, the advanced diverter cryopump which resides inside the tokamak vacuum vessel. The original cryosystem could not meet these demands. Consequently, the cryosystem was upgraded in several phases to increase capacity, improve reliability, and reduce maintenance. The majority of the original system has been replaced with superior equipment. The capacity now exists to support present as well as future demands for liquid helium at DIII-D including a hydrogen pellet injector, which is being constructed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Upgrades to the cryosystem include: a recently commissioned 150 {ell}/hr helium liquefier, two 55 g/sec helium screw compressors, a fully automated 20-valve cryogen distribution box, a high efficiency helium wet expander, and the conversion of equipment from manual or pneumatic to programmable logic controller (PLC) control. The distribution box was designed and constructed for compactness due to limited space availability. Overall system efficiency was significantly improved by replacing the existing neutral beam reliquefier Joule-Thomson valve with a reciprocating wet expander. The implementation of a PLC-based automatic control system has resulted in increased efficiency and reliability. This paper will describe the cryosystem design with emphasis on newly added equipment. In addition, performance and operational experience will be discussed.

  7. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft{sup 3} of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a ``cold test pit`` that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 {times} 9 {times} 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub`s proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed.

  8. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft[sup 3] of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a cold test pit'' that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 [times] 9 [times] 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub's proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were

  9. High energy particle detectors utilizing cryogenic charge storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coon, D; Engels, E Jr; Plants, D; Shepard, P F; Yang, Y [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA); Sopira, M; Papania, R [Westinghouse Research and Development Labs., Monroeville, PA (USA)

    1984-09-15

    The mechanism of cryogenic charge storage as a method of particle detection is reviewed. A description of a simple multielement strip detector operated in this mode is given, and partial results on its operating characteristics presented.

  10. Advanced Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the NASA solicitation Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9-01, "Long Term Cryogenic...

  11. High Effectiveness Heat Exchanger for Cryogenic Refrigerators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an innovative high performance cryogenic heat exchanger manufactured of titanium by photo-etching and diffusion bonding. This is a parallel plate design...

  12. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks (STICT) is a thermal management system applied by either an automated or manual spraying process with less...

  13. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation addressed in this proposal is Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, or STICT. This novel system could be applied in either an automated or...

  14. Overview of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility cryogenic system

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, David; Bremer, Johan; Delaney, Michael; Aurelien, Diaz; Doubnik, Roza; Haaf, Kevin; Hentschel, Steve; Norris, Barry; Voirin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration is developing a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located one mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, detectors will be located inside four cryostats filled with a total of 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon, at the level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) is developing the conventional facilities and cryogenics infrastructure supporting this experiment. The cryogenics system is composed of several sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity, and Internal cryogenics. It will be engineered, manufactured, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution highlights the main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. It presents its performance, functional requirements and modes of operations. It also details the status of the design, ...

  15. Advanced Insulation Techniques for Cryogenic Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to store large amounts of cryogenic fluids for long durations has a profound effect on the success of many future space programs using these fluids for...

  16. Small Scroll Pump for Cryogenic Liquids, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a compact, reliable, light weight, electrically driven pump capable of pumping cryogenic liquids, based on scroll pump technology. This pump will...

  17. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Prieto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic–plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  18. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Germán; Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D; Tuckart, Walter R; Broitman, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic-plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  19. The European Graduate Course in Cryogenics hosted at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Tavian

    2010-01-01

    The “liquid helium” week of the European Graduate Course in Cryogenics was held at CERN from 30 August to 3 September 2010. This course scheduled annually since 2008 is a common teaching project of the Universities of Technology of Dresden, Wroclaw and Trondheim. It is focused on liquid natural gas, hydrogen and helium cryogenics. Attending students were carefully selected, and will take an examination giving ECTS credits for their academic curriculum.   This year, as Wroclaw University of Technology was already heavily involved in organising the International Cryogenic Engineering Conference (ICEC), it requested that the “liquid helium” week to be exceptionally held at CERN. While this is certainly a good choice from the point of view of large cryogenic helium systems, with the large cryoplants cooling the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments, CERN has only acted as host laboratory organizing the course classes and visits, and the teaching and i...

  20. Cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) is a program presently underway to design a next-generation tokamak reactor. The cryogenic system for this reactor must meet unusual and new requirements. Unusually high heat loads (100 kW at 4.5 K) must be handled because neutron shielding has been limited to save space in the reactor core. Also, large variations in the cryogenics loads occur over short periods of time because of the pulsed nature of some of the operating scenarios. This paper describes a workable cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor such as ITER. A design analysis is presented dealing with a system that handles transient loads, coil quenches, reactor cool-down and the effect of variations in helium-supply temperatures on the cryogenic stability of the coils. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Spinning-Scroll Pump for Cryogenic Feed System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is an efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable, electric-driven, cryogenic spinning scroll pump (CSSP) capable of pumping liquid methane or oxygen at...

  2. ISO and EIGA standards for cryogenic vessels and accessories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The EIGA/WG 6’s scope is cryogenic vessels and accessories, including their design, material compatibility, operational requirements and periodical inspection. The specific responsibilities include monitoring international standardization (ISO, CEN) and regulations (UN, TPED, PED...

  3. Cryogenic systems for large superconducting accelerators/storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Particle accelerators and storage rings which utilize superconducting magnets have presented cryogenic system designers, as well as magnet designers, with many new challenges. When such accelerators were first proposed, little operational experience existed to guide the design. Two superconducting accelerators, complete with cryogenic systems, have been designed and are now under construction. These are the Fermilab Doubler Project and the Brookhaven National Laboratory ISABELLE Project. The cryogenic systems which developed at these two laboratories share many common characteristics, especially as compared to earlier cryogenic systems. Because of this commonality, these characteristics can be reasonably taken as also being representative of future systems. There are other areas in which the two systems are dissimilar. In those areas, it is not possible to state which, if either, will be chosen by future designers. Some of the design parameters for the two systems are given

  4. Cryogenic Minerals in Caves of the Vizhay River (Northern Urals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Bazarova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available New information on the cryogenic mineral formations at the two Vizhay River caves (Northern Urals is given.   Calcite with the insignificant gypsum admixture predominates in the cryogenic material composition from both caves. In addition, the metastable phases of calcite, such as monohydrocalcite and ikaite were found. In the Saksofon Cave, calcite forms both spherulites and complanate grains. In Lednikovaya Cave, the major part of cryomaterial is presented by spherulites, which may suggests the significant supersaturation of solution. In Lednikovaya Сave, the distinct concentric structure with the growth zones denotes the cryogenic material formation in a thin water film under the partial thawing of upper part of long-term ice mound in summer. In Saksofon Cave the growth zones in crystals are poorly developed that probably caused by the seasonal glaciation in the cave and cryogenic minerals are younger than those in the Lednikovaya Cave.

  5. Use of PROFIBUS for cryogenic instrumentation at XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckmann, T.; Bolte, J.; Bozhko, Y.; Clausen, M.; Escherich, K.; Korth, O.; Penning, J.; Rickens, H.; Schnautz, T.; Schoeneburg, B.; Zhirnov, A.

    2017-12-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) is a research facility and since December 2016 under commissioning at DESY in Hamburg. The XFEL superconducting accelerator is 1.5 km long and contains 96 superconducting accelerator modules. The control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the XFEL cryogenic system consisting of the XFEL refrigerator, cryogenic distribution systems and the XFEL accelerator. The PROFIBUS fieldbus technology is the key technology of the cryogenic instrumentation and the link to the control system. More than 650 PROFIBUS nodes are implemented in the different parts of the XFEL cryogenic facilities. The presentation will give an overview of PROFIBUS installation in these facilities regarding engineering, possibilities of diagnostics, commissioning and the first operating experience.

  6. High-Speed Thermal Characterization of Cryogenic Flows, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna proposes to continue development on a high-speed fiber optic sensor and readout system for cryogenic temperature measurements in liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid...

  7. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2001-05-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found on the applications of superconducting bearings in flywheels. (au)

  8. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found onthe applications of superconducting bearings...

  9. Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy Applied to Positron Moderatioin in Cryogenic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Current Positron Applications • 2-γ decay exploited in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners. • Positrons localize & annihilate preferentially at...Air Force  Eglin Air Force Base AFRL-RW-EG-TP-2011-024 Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy Applied to Positron Moderation in Cryogenic Solids Distribution... Spectroscopy Applied to Positron Moderation in Cryogenic Solids 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 62602F 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  10. Negative thermal expansion of lithium aluminosilicate ceramics at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moreno, Olga; Fernandez, Adolfo; Khainakov, Sergei; Torrecillas, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Five lithium aluminosilicate compositions of the LAS system have been synthesized and sintered. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the sintered samples has been studied down to cryogenic conditions. The data presented here under cryogenic conditions will be of value in the future design of new composite materials with very low thermal expansion values. The variation in thermal expansion properties with composition and sintering temperature was studied and is discussed in relation to composition and crystal structure.

  11. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Development Unit Hydrogen Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project has been a long-running program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate to enhance the knowledge and technology related to handling cryogenic propellants, specifically liquid hydrogen. This particular effort, the CPST engineering development unit (EDU), was a proof of manufacturability effort in support of a flight article. The EDU was built to find and overcome issues related to manufacturability and collect data to anchor the thermal models for use on the flight design.

  12. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  13. The LHC cryogenic operation for first collisions and physics run

    CERN Document Server

    Brodzinski, K; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Casas-Cubillos, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Ferlin, G; Fernandez Penacoba, G; Perin, A; Pirotte, O; Soubiran, M; Tavian, L; van Weelderen, R; Wagner, U

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryogenic system was progressively and successfully run for the LHC accelerator operation period starting from autumn 2009. The paper recalls the cryogenic system architecture and main operation principles. The system stability during magnets powering and availability periods for high energy beams with first collisions at 3.5 TeV are presented. Treatment of typical problems, weak points of the system and foreseen future consolidations will be discussed.

  14. Commissioning of cryogen delivery system for superconducting cyclotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, G.; Nandi, C.; Bhattacharyya, T.K.; Chaudhuri, J.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    A K-500 superconducting cyclotron is being constructed at VECC Kolkata. The cryogen delivery system distributes liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to the superconducting cyclotron. Liquid helium is required to cool the cyclotron magnet and cryopanels. Liquid nitrogen is used to reduce the capacity of the helium liquefier. This paper describes the system, the current status and the commissioning experiences of cryogen delivery system for cyclotron magnet. (author)

  15. Hybrid Cryogenic Tank Construction and Method of Manufacture Therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A lightweight, high-pressure cryogenic tank construction includes an inner layer comprising a matrix of fiber and resin suitable for cryogenic use. An outer layer in intimate contact with the inner layer provides support of the inner layer, and is made of resin composite. The tank is made by placing a fiber preform on a mandrel and infusing the preform with the resin. The infused preform is then encapsulated within the outer layer.

  16. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  17. Flywheel Challenge: HTS Magnetic Bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, F N; Floegel-Delor, U; Riedel, T; Rothfeld, R; Wippich, D; Goebel, B

    2006-01-01

    A 200 mm cylindrical engineering prototype high temperature superconducting (HTS) was designed and fabricated. Measurements show that the 17 kg PM rotor can suspend safely 1000 kg in axial direction and 470 kg radially. The rationale for the bearing performance is to stabilize a 400 kg rotor of a new compact 5 kWh/280 kW flywheel energy storage system (COM - FESS). Measurements of the magnetic bearing force, stiffness and drag-torque are presented indicated the successful targeting a milestone in the HTS bearing technology. The influence of the PM configuration and the YBCO temperature on the bearing performance was experimentally studied, providing high-force or high-stiffness behaviour. The axial stiffness 5 kN/mm at 0.5 mm displacement is the highest value of a HTS bearing we know

  18. Journal bearing impedance descriptions for rotordynamic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Childs, D.W.; Moes, H.; Leeuwen, van H.J.

    1977-01-01

    Bearing impedance vectors are introduced for plain journal bearings which define the bearing reaction force components as a function of the bearing motion. Impedance descriptions are developed directly for the approximate Ocvirk (short) and Sommerfeld (long) bearing solutions. The impedance vector

  19. Study of Hydrogen Pumping through Condensed Argon in Cryogenic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K A; Bhatt, S B

    2012-01-01

    In ultra high vacuum (UHV) range, hydrogen is a dominant residual gas in vacuum chamber. Hydrogen, being light gas, pumping of hydrogen in this vacuum range is limited with widely used UHV pumps, viz. turbo molecular pump and cryogenic pump. Pre condensed argon layers in cryogenic pump create porous structure on the surface of the pump, which traps hydrogen gas at a temperature less than 20° K. Additional argon gas injection in the cryogenic pump, at lowest temperature, generates multiple layers of condensed argon as a porous frost with 10 to 100 A° diameters pores, which increase the pumping capacity of hydrogen gas. This pumping mechanism of hydrogen is more effective, to pump more hydrogen gas in UHV range applicable in accelerator, space simulation etc. and where hydrogen is used as fuel gas like tokamak. For this experiment, the cryogenic pump with a closed loop refrigerator using helium gas is used to produce the minimum cryogenic temperature as ∼ 14° K. In this paper, effect of cryosorption of hydrogen is presented with different levels of argon gas and hydrogen gas in cryogenic pump chamber.

  20. Recent Advances and Applications in Cryogenic Propellant Densification Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to review several historical cryogenic test programs that were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio over the past fifty years. More recently these technology programs were intended to study new and improved denser forms of liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) cryogenic rocket fuels. Of particular interest are subcooled cryogenic propellants. This is due to the fact that they have a significantly higher density (eg. triple-point hydrogen, slush etc.), a lower vapor pressure and improved cooling capacity over the normal boiling point cryogen. This paper, which is intended to be a historical technology overview, will trace the past and recent development and testing of small and large-scale propellant densification production systems. Densifier units in the current GRC fuels program, were designed and are capable of processing subcooled LH2 and L02 propellant at the X33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) scale. One final objective of this technical briefing is to discuss some of the potential benefits and application which propellant densification technology may offer the industrial cryogenics production and end-user community. Density enhancements to cryogenic propellants (LH2, LO2, CH4) in rocket propulsion and aerospace application have provided the opportunity to either increase performance of existing launch vehicles or to reduce the overall size, mass and cost of a new vehicle system.

  1. Feasibility Study of Cryogenic Cutting Technology by Using a Computer Simulation and Manufacture of Main Components for Cryogenic Cutting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyun; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Song, Oh Seop

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenic cutting technology is one of the most suitable technologies for dismantling nuclear facilities due to the fact that a secondary waste is not generated during the cutting process. In this paper, the feasibility of cryogenic cutting technology was investigated by using a computer simulation. In the computer simulation, a hybrid method combined with the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) method and the FE (finite element) method was used. And also, a penetration depth equation, for the design of the cryogenic cutting system, was used and the design variables and operation conditions to cut a 10 mm thickness for steel were determined. Finally, the main components of the cryogenic cutting system were manufactures on the basis of the obtained design variables and operation conditions.

  2. A Scalable Superconductor Bearing System For Lunar Telescopes And Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, D.; Van Steenberg, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a new concept for a telescope mount on the Moon based on high temperature superconductors (HTS). Lunar nights are long (15 days), and temperatures range from 100 K to 30 K inside shadowed craters. Telescopes on the Moon therefore require bearing systems that can position and track precisely under cryogenic conditions, over long time periods, preferably with no maintenance, and preferably do not fail with loss of power. HTS bearings, consisting of permanent magnets levitated over bulk superconductors, are well suited to the task. The components do not make physical contact, hence there is no wear. The levitation is passive and stable; no power is required to maintain position. We report on the design and laboratory demonstration of a prototype two-axis pointing system. Unlike previous designs, this new configuration is simple and easy to implement. Most importantly, it can be scaled to accommodate instruments ranging in size from decimeters (laser communication systems) to meters (solar panels, communication dishes, optical telescopes, optical interferometers) to decameters and beyond (VLA-type radio interferometer elements).

  3. Eastern slopes grizzly bear project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    The cumulative effects of human activities on the grizzly bears in the central Canadian Rockies are not well known. As a result, a project was initiated in 1994 to address the urgent requirement for accurate scientific information on the habitat and populations of grizzly bears in the area of the Banff National Park and Kananaskis Country. This area is probably the most heavily used and developed area where the grizzly still survives. The information gathered throughout the course of this study will be used to better protect and manage the bears and other sensitive carnivores in the region. Using telemetry, researchers are monitoring 25 grizzly bears which were radio-collared in a 22,000 square-kilometer area in the upper Bow Valley drainage of the eastern Alberta slopes. The researchers involved in the project are working with representatives from Husky Oil and Talisman Energy on the sound development of the Moose Mountain oil and gas field without adversely affecting the grizzly bear population. Information collected over seven years indicated that the grizzly bears have few and infrequent offspring. Using the information gathered so far, the location of the Moose Mountain to Jumping Pound pipeline was carefully selected, since the bears recover very slowly from high mortality, and also considering that the food and cover had already been compromised by the high number of roads, trails and other human activities in the area. The status of the population and habitat of the grizzly bear will be assessed upon the conclusion of the field research phase in 2001. Models will be updated using the data obtained during eight years and will assist in the understanding of complex variables that affect grizzly bears.

  4. EFFECT OF BEARING MACROGEOMETRY ON BEARING PERFORMANCE IN ELASTOHYDRODYNAMIC LUBRICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin GÜLLÜ

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available During manufacturing, ideal dimension and mutual positioning of machine elements proposed in project desing can be achieved only within certain range of tolerances. These tolerances, being classified in two groups, related to micro and macro geometry of machine elements, don't have to effect the functioning of these elements. So, as for all machine elements, investigation of the effects of macro and micro tolerances for journal bearings is important. In this study, we have investigated the effect of macro geometric irregularities of journal bearings on performance characteristics. In this regard, we have studied the change of bearing performance in respect to deviation from ideal circle for an elliptic shaft with small ovality rolling in circular journal bearing.

  5. Non-contacting "snubber bearing" for passive magnetic bearing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F

    2017-08-22

    A new non-contacting magnetic "snubber" bearing is provided for application to rotating systems such as vehicular electromechanical battery systems subject to frequent accelerations. The design is such that in the equilibrium position the drag force of the snubber is very small (milliwatts). However in a typical case, if the rotor is displaced by as little as 2 millimeters a large restoring force is generated without any physical contact between the stationary and rotating parts of the snubber bearing.

  6. Bears, Big and Little. Young Discovery Library Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Pierre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume describes: (1) the eight species of bears, including black bear, brown bear, grizzly bear, spectacled bear, sun bear, sloth bear, polar bear, and giant panda; (2) geographical habitats of bears; (3)…

  7. FRIB Cryogenic Distribution System and Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Yang, Shuo [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Nellis, Timothy [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Jones, S. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The MSU-FRIB cryogenic distribution system supports the 2 K primary, 4 K primary, and 35 - 55 K shield operation of more than 70 loads in the accelerator and the experimental areas. It is based on JLab and SNS experience with bayonet-type disconnects between the loads and the distribution system for phased commissioning and maintenance. The linac transfer line, which features three separate transfer line segments for additional independence during phased commissioning at 4 K and 2 K, connects the folded arrangement of 49 cryomodules and 4 superconducting dipole magnets and a fourth transfer line supports the separator area cryo loads. The pressure reliefs for the transfer line process lines, located in the refrigeration room outside the tunnel/accelerator area, are piped to be vented outdoors. The transfer line designs integrate supply and return flow paths into a combined vacuum space. The main linac distribution segments are produced in a small number of standard configurations; a prototype of one such configuration has been fabricated at Jefferson Lab and has been installed at MSU to support testing of a prototype FRIB cryomodule.

  8. Cryogenic readout techniques for germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benato, G. [University of Zurich, (Switzerland); Cattadori, C. [INFN - Milano Bicocca, (Italy); Di Vacri, A. [INFN LNGS, (Italy); Ferri, E. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy); D' Andrea, V.; Macolino, C. [GSSI/INFN LNGS, (Italy); Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano/INFN Milano, (Italy); Salamida, F. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    High Purity Germanium detectors are used in many applications, from nuclear and astro-particle physics, to homeland security or environment protection. Although quite standard configurations are often used, with cryostats, charge sensitive amplifiers and analog or digital acquisition systems all commercially available, it might be the case that a few specific applications, e.g. satellites, portable devices, cryogenic physics experiments, etc. also require the development of a few additional or complementary techniques. An interesting case is for sure GERDA, the Germanium Detector Array experiment, searching for neutrino-less double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN - Italy. In GERDA the entire detector array, composed of semi-coaxial and BEGe naked crystals, is operated suspended inside a cryostat filled with liquid argon, that acts not only as cooling medium and but also as an active shield, thanks to its scintillation properties. These peculiar circumstances, together with the additional requirement of a very low radioactive background from all the materials adjacent to the detectors, clearly introduce significant constraints on the design of the Ge front-end readout electronics. All the Ge readout solutions developed within the framework of the GERDA collaboration, for both Phase I and Phase II, will be briefly reviewed, with their relative strength and weakness compared together and with respect to ideal Ge readout. Finally, the digital processing techniques developed by the GERDA collaboration for energy estimation of Ge detector signals will be recalled. (authors)

  9. Effects of cryogenic irradiation on temperature sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courts, S.S.; Holmes, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Several types of commercially available cryogenic temperature sensors were calibrated, irradiated at 4.2 K by a gamma or neutron source, and recalibrated in-situ to determine their suitability for thermometry in radiation environments. Comparisons were made between pre- and post-irradiation calibrations with the equivalent temperature shift calculated for each sensor at various temperature in the 4.2 K to 330 K range. Four post-irradiation calibrations were performed with annealing steps performed at 20 K, 80 K, and 330 K. Temperature sensors which were gamma irradiated were given a total dose of 10,000 Gy. Temperature sensors which were neutron irradiated were irradiated to a total fluence of 2 x 10 12 n/cm 2 . In general, for gamma radiation environments, diodes are unsuitable for use. Both carbon glass and germanium resistance sensors performed well at lower temperature, while platinum resistance sensors performed best above 30 K. Thin-film rhodium and Cernox trademark resistance sensors both performed well over the 4.2 K to 330 K range. Only thin-film rhodium and Cernox trademark resistance temperature sensors were neutron irradiated and they both performed well over the 4.2 K to 330 K range

  10. Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m/sup 3/ static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for nonisothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressor...

  11. Calibration of Cryogenic Thermometers for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, Ch; Vauthier, N; Thermeau, JP

    2008-01-01

    6000 cryogenic temperature sensors of resistive type covering the range from room temperature down to 1.6 K are installed on the LHC machine. In order to meet the stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets, each single sensor needs to be calibrated individually. In the framework of a special contribution, IPN (Institut de Physique Nucléaire) in Orsay, France built and operated a calibration facility with a throughput of 80 thermometers per week. After reception from the manufacturer, the thermometer is first assembled onto a support specific to the measurement environment, and then thermally cycled ten times and calibrated at least once from 1.6 to 300 K. The procedure for each of these interventions includes various measurements and the acquired data is recorded in an ORACLE®-database. Furthermore random calibrations on some samples are executed at CERN to crosscheck the coherence between the approximation data obtained by both IPN and CERN. In the range of 1.5 K to 30 K...

  12. Submersible fans and pumps for cryogenic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Submersible electric motor driven fans of three sizes have been designed, built and operated at 21 0 K at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The largest is a 100-mm diameter, 2 stage vaneaxial fan with a nominal capacity of 6 L/s at 2 m head. It is driven by a 4 pole, 3 phase induction motor that runs at 1750 rpm. The next smaller one is an 85-mm diameter centrifugal pump. It pumps 3 L/s at a head of 5 m. The third is a 75-mm single stage vaneaxial fan with a nominal capacity is 3 L/s at a head of 2 m. The 85-mm pump and the 75-mm fan are driven by 2 pole, 3 phase induction motors running at 3550 rpm. The motors were modified to operate submerged in the cryogenic fluid. The pumps have been operated in liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, and pressurized helium gas at 21 0 K. They can also operate with denser fluids such as liquid nitrogen, but rotational speed, capacity, and head will be reduced. They have been operated while submerged in liquid helium

  13. Cryogenic Liquid Sample Acquisition System for Remote Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Trainer, Melissa; Wegel, Don; Hawk, Douglas; Melek, Tony; Johnson, Christopher; Amato, Michael; Galloway, John

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to acquire autonomously cryogenic hydrocarbon liquid sample from remote planetary locations such as the lakes of Titan for instruments such as mass spectrometers. There are several problems that had to be solved relative to collecting the right amount of cryogenic liquid sample into a warmer spacecraft, such as not allowing the sample to boil off or fractionate too early; controlling the intermediate and final pressures within carefully designed volumes; designing for various particulates and viscosities; designing to thermal, mass, and power-limited spacecraft interfaces; and reducing risk. Prior art inlets for similar instruments in spaceflight were designed primarily for atmospheric gas sampling and are not useful for this front-end application. These cryogenic liquid sample acquisition system designs for remote space applications allow for remote, autonomous, controlled sample collections of a range of challenging cryogenic sample types. The design can control the size of the sample, prevent fractionation, control pressures at various stages, and allow for various liquid sample levels. It is capable of collecting repeated samples autonomously in difficult lowtemperature conditions often found in planetary missions. It is capable of collecting samples for use by instruments from difficult sample types such as cryogenic hydrocarbon (methane, ethane, and propane) mixtures with solid particulates such as found on Titan. The design with a warm actuated valve is compatible with various spacecraft thermal and structural interfaces. The design uses controlled volumes, heaters, inlet and vent tubes, a cryogenic valve seat, inlet screens, temperature and cryogenic liquid sensors, seals, and vents to accomplish its task.

  14. Insulation design of cryogenic bushing for superconducting electric power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, J.Y., E-mail: koojy@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electronics, Electrical, Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y.J.; Shin, W.J.; Kim, Y.H. [Department of Electronics, Electrical, Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.T. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Daejin University, Pocheon 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.W. [Department of Electronics, Electrical, Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.H., E-mail: k720lsh@kins.re.kr [Expert Group Electric and Control Department, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► In this paper, design factors of cryogenic bushings were discussed and test results of specimen were introduced in detail. ► We focused on the comparative study of breakdown characteristics of different electrode materials. ► Puncture and creepage breakdown characteristics were analyzed based on the withstand voltage. ► We obtained the basic design factors of extra high voltage condenser bushing. ► We obtained the basic design factors of extra high voltage condenser bushing, which could be used in cryogenic environment. -- Abstract: Recently, the superconductivity projects to develop commercial superconducting devices for extra high voltage transmission lines have been undergoing in many countries. One of the critical components to be developed for high voltage superconducting devices, including superconducting transformers, cables, and fault current limiters, is a high voltage bushing, to supply high current to devices without insulating difficulties, that is designed for cryogenic environments. Unfortunately, suitable bushings for HTS equipment were not fully developed for some cryogenic insulation issues. Such high voltage bushings would need to provide electrical insulation capabilities from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, design factors of cryogenic bushings were discussed and test results of specimen were introduced in detail. First, the dielectric strength of three kinds of metals has been measured with uniform and non-uniform electrodes by withstand voltage of impulse and AC breakdown test in LN{sub 2}. Second, puncture breakdown voltage of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) plates has been analyzed with non-uniform electrodes. Finally, creepage discharge voltages were measured according to the configuration of non-uniform and uniform electrode on the FRP plate. From the test results, we obtained the basic design factors of extra high voltage condenser bushing, which could be used in cryogenic

  15. Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Inducer Dynamic Environment Characterization through Water Model and Hot-Fire Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Patrick; Patton, Marc; Schwartz, Alan; Stanton, David

    2006-01-01

    The Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (LPOTP) inducer on the Block II configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) experienced blade leading edge ripples during hot firing. This undesirable condition led to a minor redesign of the inducer blades. This resulted in the need to evaluate the performance and the dynamic environment of the redesign, relative to the current configuration, as part of the design acceptance process. Sub-scale water model tests of the two inducer configurations were performed, with emphasis on the dynamic environment due to cavitation induced vibrations. Water model tests were performed over a wide range of inlet flow coefficient and pressure conditions, representative of the scaled operating envelope of the Block II SSME, both in flight and in ground hot-fire tests, including all power levels. The water test hardware, facility set-up, type and placement of instrumentation, the scope of the test program, specific test objectives, data evaluation process and water test results that characterize and compare the two SSME LPOTP inducers are discussed. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the two water models were compared to hot fire data from specially instrumented ground tests. In general, good agreement between the water model and hot fire data was found, which confirms the value of water model testing for dynamic characterization of rocket engine turbomachinery.

  16. Water-bearing explosive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, G M

    1970-12-21

    An explosive water-bearing composition, with high detonation velocity, comprises a mixture of (1) an inorganic oxidizer salt; (2) nitroglycerine; (3) nitrocellulose; (4) water; and (5) a water thickening agent. (11 claims)

  17. Superconducting composite for magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, T.K. II.

    1995-01-01

    A composite includes granules of Type II superconducting material and granules of rare-earth permanent magnets that are distributed in a binder. The composite is a two-phase structure that combines the properties of the superconductor and magnets with the flexibility and toughness of a polymeric material. A bearing made from this composite has the load capacity and stiffness of a permanent magnet bearing with added stability from a Type II superconducting material. 7 figs

  18. Ricor's anniversary of 50 innovative years in cryogenic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filis, Avishai; Segal, Victor; Pundak, Nachman; Bar Haim, Zvi; Danziger, Menachem

    2017-05-01

    Ricor cryogenics was founded in 1967 and since then it has focused on innovative technologies in the cryogenic field. The paper reviews the initial research and development efforts invested in various technologies that have yielded products such as Cryostats for Mossbauer Effect measurement, Liquid gas Dewar containers, Liquid helium vacuum transfer tubes, Cryosurgery and other innovative products. The major registered patents that matured to products such as a magnetic vacuum valve operator, pumped out safety valve and other innovations are reviewed here. As a result of continuous R and D investment, over the years a new generation of innovative Stirling cryogenic products has developed. This development began with massive split slip-on coolers and has progressed as far as miniature IDDCA coolers mainly for IR applications. The accumulated experience in Stirling technology is used also as a platform for developing self-contained water vapor pumps known as MicroStar and NanoStar. These products are also used in collaboration with a research institute in the field of High Temperature Superconductors. The continuous growth in the cryogenic products range and the need to meet market demands have motivated the expansion, of Ricor's manufacturing facility enabling it to become a world leader in the cryocooler field. To date Ricor has manufactured more than 120,000 cryocoolers. The actual cryogenic development efforts and challenges are also reviewed, mainly in the field of long life cryocoolers, ruggedized products, miniaturization and products for space applications.

  19. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands

  20. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-01-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands

  1. Electric breakdown of high polymer insulating materials at cryogenic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sanhyon; Yoshino, Katsumi

    1985-01-01

    Cryogenic properties : temperature dependence of E sub(b) and effects of media upon E sub(b) were investigated on several high polymers. Temperature conditions were provided by liquid He (4.2 K), liquid N 2 (77 K) and cryogen (dry ice-methyl alcohol, 194 K). Silicone oil was used also at ambient temperature and elevated temperature. Polymer film coated with gold by vacuum evaporation was placed in cryostat, and high tension from pulse generator was applied to the film. Dielectric breakdowns were detected by oscilloscope and observed visually. The results of experiment are summerized as follow. (1) E sub(b) of film in He is affected by medium remarkably, and covering with 3-methyl pentane is effective for increasing E sub(b). (2) Temperature dependence of E sub(b) was not recognized in cryogenic temperature below liquid N 2 . (3) Temperature characteristic of E sub(b) changes considerably at the critical temperature T sub(c), and T sub(c) is dependent on material. (4) Strength against dielectric breakdown under cryogenic temperature is not affected by bridging caused by irradiation of electron beam. (5) Dielectric breakdown is thought to be caused by electronic process such as electron avalanche. Consequently, for designing insulation for the temperature below liquid He, insulation design for liquid N 2 is thought to be sufficient. However, the degradation and breakdown by mechanical stress under cryogenic temperature must be taken into consideration. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  2. Production and Innovative Applications of Cryogenic Solid Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Milora, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    For over two decades Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing cryogenic pellet injectors for fueling hot, magnetic fusion plasmas. Cryogenic solid pellets of all three hydrogen isotopes have been produced in a size range of 1- to 10-mm diameter and accelerated to speeds from <100 to ∼3000 m/s. The pellets have been formed discretely by cryocondensation in gun barrels and also by extrusion of cryogenic solids at mass flow rates up to ∼0.26 g/s and production rates up to ten pellets per second. The pellets traverse the hot plasma in a fraction of a millisecond and continuously ablate, providing fresh hydrogenic fuel to the interior of the plasma. From this initial application, uses of this technology have expanded to include (1) cryogenic xenon drops or solids for use as a debris-less target in a laser plasma source of X-rays for advanced lithography systems, (2) solid argon and carbon dioxide pellets for surface cleaning or decontamination, and (3) methane pellets in a liquid hydrogen bath for use as an innovative moderator of cold neutrons. Methods of production and acceleration/transport of these cryogenic solids will be described, and examples will be given of their use in prototype systems

  3. Radiation Requirements and Testing of Cryogenic Thermometers for the Ilc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, T.; Filippov, Yu. P.; Filippova, E. Yu.; Mokhov, N. V.; Nakao, N.; Klebaner, A. L.; Korenev, S. A.; Theilacker, J. C.; Trenikhina, J.; Vaziri, K.

    2008-03-01

    Large quantity of cryogenic temperature sensors will be used for operation of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Most of them will be subject to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. Understanding of particle energy spectra, accumulated radiation dose in thermometers and its impact on performance are vital in establishing technical specification of cryogenic thermometry for the ILC. Realistic MARS15 computer simulations were performed to understand the ILC radiation environment. Simulation results were used to establish radiation dose requirements for commercially available cryogenic thermometers. Two types of thermometers, Cernox® and TVO, were calibrated prior to irradiation using different technique. The sensors were subjected then to up to 200 kGy electron beam irradiation with kinetic energy of 5 MeV, a representative of the situation at the ILC operation. A post-irradiation behavior of the sensors was studied. The paper describes the MARS15 model, simulation results, cryogenic test set-up, irradiation tests, and cryogenic test results.

  4. Radiation requirements and testing of cryogenic thermometers for the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.; Filippov, Yu.P.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nakao, N.; Klebaner, A.L.; Korenev, S.A.; Theilacker, J.C.; Trenikhina, J.; Vaziri, K.

    2007-01-01

    Large quantity of cryogenic temperature sensors will be used for operation of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Most of them will be subject to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. Understanding of particle energy spectra, accumulated radiation dose in thermometers and its impact on performance are vital in establishing technical specification of cryogenic thermometry for the ILC. Realistic MARS15 computer simulations were performed to understand the ILC radiation environment. Simulation results were used to establish radiation dose requirements for commercially available cryogenic thermometers. Two types of thermometers, Cernox(reg s ign) and TVO, were calibrated prior to irradiation using different technique. The sensors were subjected then to up to 200 kGy electron beam irradiation with kinetic energy of 5 MeV, a representative of the situation at the ILC operation. A post-irradiation behavior of the sensors was studied. The paper describes the MARS15 model, simulation results, cryogenic test set-up, irradiation tests, and cryogenic test results

  5. A word from the DG: A cryogenic success

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The beginning of this month saw the start of a new phase in the LHC project, with its first inauguration, for the LHC cryogenics. This was marked with a symposium in the Globe attended by 178 representatives of the industrial partners and research institutes involved. It also coincided with stable low-temperature operation of the cryogenic plant for sector 7-8, the first sector of the LHC to be cooled down. A look at the LHC web site (http://lhc.web.cern.ch/lhc/) shows this steady operation. The cryogenic system for the LHC is the largest and most complex ever built, involving many large devices on an industrial scale, where reliability is of paramount importance. The LHC’s energy of 7 TeV required a high magnetic field provided by niobium-titanium coils operating at 1.9 K. This is a new temperature regime for large-scale cryogenics, chosen to make use of the excellent heat-transfer properties of helium in its superfluid state. The final design for the LHC cryogenics had to incorporate both newly ordered ...

  6. Cryogenic Moisture Uptake in Foam Insulation for Space Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.; ScholtensCoffman, Brekke E.; Sass, Jared P.; Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Meneghelli, Barrry J.

    2008-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams and rigid polyisocyanurate foams (spray-on foam insulation), like those flown on Shuttle, Delta IV, and will be flown on Ares-I and Ares-V, can gain an extraordinary amount of water when under cryogenic conditions for several hours. These foams, when exposed for eight hours to launch pad environments on one side and cryogenic temperature on the other, increase their weight from 35 to 80 percent depending on the duration of weathering or aging. This effect translates into several thousand pounds of additional weight for space vehicles at lift-off. A new cryogenic moisture uptake apparatus was designed to determine the amount of water/ice taken into the specimen under actual-use propellant loading conditions. This experimental study included the measurement of the amount of moisture uptake within different foam materials. Results of testing using both aged specimens and weathered specimens are presented. To better understand cryogenic foam insulation performance, cryogenic moisture testing is shown to be essential. The implications for future launch vehicle thermal protection system design and flight performance are discussed.

  7. Interfacing ultracold atoms and cryogenic micromechanical oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Andreas

    2015-02-06

    Why is it that our world, which consists of many microscopic quantum systems, can be described in terms of classical physics? This fundamental question about the transition between these two diametrically opposed theories is an unsolved problem of modern physics. In recent years, tremendous progress in the field of optomechanics paved the way for the observation of a large variety of quantum phenomena far beyond the microcosmos. Additional possibilities arise from the skillful combination of different quantum systems to create a so-called hybrid quantum system. In these systems, new possibilities to prepare and detect non-classical states in macroscopic systems arise. In this thesis the setup of a new hybrid quantum system is described that consists of two entirely different systems. The first building block is a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) - an ideal realization of a many-body ground state. The second building block is an optomechanical system in a cryogenic environment, a membrane in an optical cavity (membrane in the middle - MiM). Both systems are coupled over a macroscopic distance via a light field. In this particular case, the MiM system is realized using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membrane in a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity. In the course of this thesis, an asymmetric cavity with high reflectivity on resonance was identified as the ideal candidate. Such a system has not yet been reported in the literature, but allows for a strong coupling between the two constituents of the hybrid quantum system. Additionally, fibers are ideally suited to bring light into cryogenic environments due to their low thermal conductivity. In the cryostat, they will be mounted in novel five-axis goniometers. The key parameters for an asymmetric fiber-based cavity is the mode overlap between the cavity mode and the fiber mode. Due to an interference effect, a small change in the mode match already results in a massive amount of light loss of the reflected cavity mode in the

  8. Modeling Dynamic Fracture of Cryogenic Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This work is part of an investigation with the long-range objective of predicting the size distribution function and velocity dispersion of shattered pellet fragments after a large cryogenic pellet impacts a solid surface at high velocity. The study is vitally important for the shattered pellet injection (SPI) technique, one of the leading technologies being implemented at ORNL for the mitigation of disruption damage on current tokamaks and ITER. The report contains three parts that are somewhat interwoven. In Part I we formulated a self-similar model for the expansion dynamics and velocity dispersion of the debris cloud following pellet impact against a thick (rigid) target plate. Also presented in Part I is an analytical fracture model that predicts the nominal or mean size of the fragments in the debris cloud and agrees well with known SPI data. The aim of Part II is to gain an understanding of the pellet fracturing process when a pellet is shattered inside a miter tube with a sharp bend. Because miter tubes have a thin stainless steel (SS) wall a permanent deformation (dishing) of the wall is produced at the site of the impact. A review of the literature indicates that most projectile impact on thin plates are those for which the target is deformed and the projectile is perfectly rigid. Such impacts result in “projectile embedding” where the projectile speed is reduced to zero during the interaction so that all the kinetic energy (KE) of the projectile goes into the energy stored in plastic deformation. Much of the literature deals with perforation of the target. The problem here is quite different; the softer pellet easily undergoes complete material failure causing only a small transfer of KE to stored energy of wall deformation. For the real miter tube, we derived a strain energy function for the wall deflection using a non-linear (plastic) stress-strain relation for 304 SS. Using a dishing profile identical to the linear Kirchkoff-Love profile (for lack

  9. Innovative Ultra-High Efficiency Cryogenic Actuators for Rocket Test Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SBIR Phase I project will develop advanced ultra-high efficiency cryogenic actuators for NASA cryogenic fluid transfer application. The actuator will have low...

  10. LV-IMLI: Integrated MLI/Aeroshell for Cryogenic Launch Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants have the highest energy density of any rocket fuel, and are used in most NASA and commercial launch vehicles to power their ascent. Cryogenic...

  11. Laboratory facility for production of cryogenic targets for hot plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.; Szydlowski, A.; Jakubowski, L.; Cwiek, E.

    1990-10-01

    Results of preliminary operational tests of the cryogenic stand designed for the production of small droplets of liquid hydrogen or deuterium are presented. Such cryogenic micro-targets are needed for nuclear and thermonuclear experiments. (author)

  12. The Fast Alternative Cryogenic Experiment Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Alfred; Holmes, Warren

    2000-01-01

    One of the challenges in the area of cryogenics for space exploration in the next millennium is providing the capability for inexpensive, frequent, access to space. Faced with this challenge during the International Space Station (ISS) build era, when other Space Shuttle manifesting opportunities are unavailable, a "proof of concept" cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier. The Hitchhiker siderail carrier is available on a "mass available" basis during the ISS build era. In fact, several hitchhiker payloads flew with the deployment of the Unity module. Hitchhiker siderail carrier payloads have historically flown an average of about four times a year. A hybrid Solid Neon - Superfluid Helium cryostat has been developed with Janis Research Company to accommodate instruments of 16.5 cm diameter and 30 cm. length. This hybrid approach was taken in part to provide adequate on-orbit lifetime for instruments with high (conducted) heat loads from the instrumentation wiring. Mass, volume, lifetime and the launch hold scenario were all design drivers. In addition, with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, a multichannel VME architecture Germanium Resistance Thermometer (GRT) readout and heater control servo system has been developed. In a flight system, the cryostat and electronics payloads would be umbilically attached in a paired Hitchhiker siderail mount, and permit on-orbit command and telemetry capability. The results of performance tests of both the cryostat, and a helium sample instrument will be presented. The instrument features a self contained, miniaturized, nano-Kelvin resolution High Resolution Thermometer (HRT). This high level of thermal resolution is achieved through the utilization of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Although developed for the Low Temperature Microgravity Fundamental Physics

  13. LASERS: A cryogenic slab CO laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionin, Andrei A.; Kozlov, A. Yu; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2009-03-01

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 → V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 μm. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of ~12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved ~14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at ~ 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 μm with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 → V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 μm. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than ±10 %) was stable for more than an hour.

  14. Coupled Cryogenic Thermal and Electrical Models for Transient Analysis of Superconducting Power Devices with Integrated Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, S.; Indrakanti, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, C.; Pamidi, S.

    2017-12-01

    Benefits of an integrated high temperature superconducting (HTS) power system and the associated cryogenic systems on board an electric ship or aircraft are discussed. A versatile modelling methodology developed to assess the cryogenic thermal behavior of the integrated system with multiple HTS devices and the various potential configurations are introduced. The utility and effectiveness of the developed modelling methodology is demonstrated using a case study involving a hypothetical system including an HTS propulsion motor, an HTS generator and an HTS power cable cooled by an integrated cryogenic helium circulation system. Using the methodology, multiple configurations are studied. The required total cooling power and the ability to maintain each HTS device at the required operating temperatures are considered for each configuration and the trade-offs are discussed for each configuration. Transient analysis of temperature evolution in the cryogenic helium circulation loop in case of a system failure is carried out to arrive at the required critical response time. The analysis was also performed for a similar liquid nitrogen circulation for an isobaric condition and the cooling capacity ratio is used to compare the relative merits of the two cryogens.

  15. Advanced monitoring, fault diagnostics, and maintenance of cryogenic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Girone, Mario; Pezzetti, Marco

    In this Thesis, advanced methods and techniques of monitoring, fault diagnostics, and predictive maintenance for cryogenic processes and systems are described. In particular, in Chapter 1, mainstreams in research on measurement systems for cryogenic processes are reviewed with the aim of dening key current trends and possible future evolutions. Then, in Chapter 2, several innovative methods are proposed. A transducer based on a virtual ow meter is presented for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators [1]. Furthermore, a comprehensive metrological analysis of the proposed transducer for verifying the metrological performance and pointing out most critical uncertainty sources is described [2]. A model-based method for fault detection and early-stage isolation, able to work with few records of Frequency Response Function (FRF) on an unfaulty compressor, is then proposed [3]. To enrich the proposal, a distributed diagnostic procedure, based on a micro-genetic...

  16. Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab

  17. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Montanari, D; Nessi, M; Norris, B

    2015-01-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these...

  18. Mechanical Properties of Low Density Alloys at Cryogenic Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, X. D.; Liu, H. J.; Li, L. F.; Yang, K.

    2006-01-01

    Low-density alloys include aluminum alloys, titanium alloys and magnesium alloys. Aluminum alloys and titanium alloys have been widely investigated and used as structural materials for cryogenic applications because of their light weight and good low-temperature mechanical properties.For aerospace applications, persistent efforts are being devoted to reducing weight and improving performance. Magnesium alloys are the lightest structural alloys among those mentioned above. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to magnesium alloys and to investigate their behaviors at cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, we have investigated the mechanical properties and microstructures of some magnesium alloys at cryogenic temperatures. Experimental results on both titanium and magnesium alloys are taken into account in considering these materials for space application

  19. Numerical study of emergency cryogenics gas relief into confined spaces

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The presented work focuses on the risk analysis and the consequences of the unexpected leak to the tunnel of cryogenics gases. Formation of the gas mixture and its propagation along tunnels is an important issue for the safe operation of cryogenic machines, including superconducting accelerators or free electron lasers. As the cryogenics gas the helium and argon will be considered. A minimal numerical model will be presented and discussed. Series of numerical results related to emergency helium relief to the CERN tunnel and related to unexpected leak of the argon to an underground tunnel, will be shown. The numerical results will show temperature distribution, oxygen deficiency and gas cloud propagation in function of intensity of the leak and intensity of the ventilation.

  20. Cryogenic system options for a superconducting aircraft propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, F; Dodds, Graham; Palmer, J; Bertola, L; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a perceived need in the future for a move away from traditional aircraft designs in order to meet ambitious emissions and fuel burn targets. High temperature superconducting distributed propulsion may be an enabler for aircraft designs that have better propulsive efficiency and lower drag. There has been significant work considering the electrical systems required, but less on the cryogenics to enable it. This paper discusses some of the major choices to be faced in cryocooling for aircraft. The likely need for a disposable cryogen to reduce power demand is explained. A set of cryocooling methods are considered in a sensitivity study, which shows that the feasibility of the cryogenic system will depend strongly on the superconducting technology and the aircraft platform. It is argued that all three aspects must be researched and designed in close collaboration to reach a viable solution. (paper)

  1. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  2. Cryogenic Q-factor measurement of optical substrate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, S; Nawrodt, R; Zimmer, A; Thuerk, M; Vodel, W; Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-03-02

    Upcoming generations of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are likely to be operated at cryogenic temperatures because one of the sensitivity limiting factors of the present generation is the thermal noise of optical components (e.g. end mirrors, cavity couplers, beam splitters). The main contributions to this noise are due to the substrate, the optical coating, and the suspension. The thermal noise can be reduced by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. In addition the overall mechanical quality factor should preferable increase at low temperatures. The experimental details of a new cryogenic apparatus for investigations of the temperature dependency of the Q-factor of several substrate materials in the range of 5 to 300 K are presented. To perform a ring down recording an electrostatic mode excitation of the samples and an interferometric read-out of the amplitude of the vibrations was used.

  3. Cryogenic system for the HERA magnet measurement facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, H.R. Jr.; Clausen, M.; Kebler, G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the design for a helium, cryogenic distribution system that allows independent operation and testing of superconducting magnets of the HERA project before they are installed in the 6-km ring tunnel. The 820-GeV proton storage ring of HERA will contain approximately 650 magnets having superconducting coils which are clamped by aluminum/stainless-steel collars and surrounded by a yoke of magnetic iron at liquid helium temperature. When the magnets arive at DESY from the manufacture, each magnet will be individually tested at helium operating conditions in the magnet measurement facility to insure the quality of the magnetic characteristics and the cryogenic performance. The capabilities of the cryogenic system and the schedule for magnet testing are discussed

  4. Applied superconductivity and cryogenic research activities in NIFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, T.; Sagara, A.; Imagawa, S.; Yamada, S.; Takahata, K.; Yanagi, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Maekawa, R.; Iwamoto, A.; Hamaguchi, S.; Sato, M.; Noda, N.; Yamauchi, K.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.

    2006-01-01

    Since the foundation of National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in 1989, the primary mission of the applied superconductivity and cryogenic researches has been focused on the development of the large helical device (LHD): the largest fusion experimental apparatus exclusively utilizing superconducting technologies. The applied superconductivity and cryogenics group in NIFS was organized to be responsible for this activity. As a result of extensive research activities, the construction of LHD was completed in 1997. Since then, the LHD superconducting system has been demonstrating high availability of more than 97% during eight years operation and it keeps proving high reliability of large-scale superconducting systems. This paper describes the extensive activities of the applied superconductivity and cryogenic researches in NIFS during and after the development of LHD and the fundamental researches that aim at realizing a helical-type fusion reactor

  5. Beam screen cryogenic control improvements for the LHC run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068353; Rogez, Edouard; Blanco Vinuela, Enrique; Ferlin, Gerard; Tovar-Gonzalez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the improvements made on the cryogenic control system for the LHC beam screens. The regulation objective is to maintain an acceptable temperature range around 20 K which simultaneously ensures a good LHC beam vacuum and limits cryogenic heat loads. In total, through the 27 km of the LHC machine, there are 485 regulation loops affected by beam disturbances. Due to the increase of the LHC performance during Run 2, standard PID controllers cannot keeps the temperature transients of the beam screens within desired limits. Several alternative control techniques have been studied and validated using dynamic simulation and then deployed on the LHC cryogenic control system in 2015. The main contribution is the addition of a feed-forward control in order to compensate the beam effects on the beam screen temperature based on the main beam parameters of the machine in real time.

  6. Strategy for conformity of non-standard cryogenic equipment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN as an intergovernmental organization establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In particular, the CERN General Safety Instruction for cryogenic equipment requires that cryogenic pressure equipment at CERN shall comply with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED). However, due to the particular features of some of the cryogenic equipment required for the accelerators, as well as the existence of international collaborations with in-kind contributions from non-EU countries, full compliance with the PED may not always be achieved. This situation is foreseen in the Safety Rules, where CERN HSE will define the Safety requirements applicable to such equipment as well as any eventual additional compensatory measure as to ensure a commensurate level of Safety for our pressure equipment. Where compliance with PED may not be achieved, CERN HSE will become the de facto Notified Body and therefore be in charge of the assessment of the conformity of the equipment to the applica...

  7. A cryogenic optical feedthrough using polarization maintaining fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M J; Collins, C J; Speake, C C

    2016-03-01

    Polarization maintaining optical fibers can be used to transmit linearly polarized light over long distances but their use in cryogenic environments has been limited by their sensitivity to temperature changes and associated mechanical stress. We investigate experimentally how thermal stresses affect the polarization maintaining fibers and model the observations with Jones matrices. We describe the design, construction, and testing of a feedthrough and fiber termination assembly that uses polarization maintaining fiber to transmit light from a 633 nm HeNe laser at room temperature to a homodyne polarization-based interferometer in a cryogenic vacuum. We report on the efficiency of the polarization maintaining properties of the feedthrough assembly. We also report that, at cryogenic temperatures, the interferometer can achieve a sensitivity of 8 × 10(-10) rad/√Hz at 0.05 Hz using this feedthrough.

  8. Cryogenic treatment of steel: from concept to metallurgical understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    , the metallurgical understanding of the microstructural changes involved in cryogenic treatment of steel has remained poor. It is believed that the improvement in wear resistance is promoted by an enhanced precipitation of carbides during tempering, but no explanation has been given as to how this enhanced......Subjecting steel to cryogenic treatment to improve its properties was conceived in the 30ies of the previous century. The proof of concept that properties, in particular wear resistance, can indeed be improved importantly, was reported in the next decades. Despite many investigations...... precipitation can be obtained. In the last six years, the authors have applied in situ magnetometry, synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction and dilatometry to enlighten the phase transitions occurring in steels at cryogenic temperatures and to point out the connection between different treatment parameters...

  9. Performance evaluation of various cryogenic energy storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Rodrigo F.; Pedro, Hugo T.C.; Koury, Ricardo N.N.; Machado, Luiz; Coimbra, Carlos F.M.; Porto, Matheus P.

    2015-01-01

    This work compares various CES (cryogenic energy storage) systems as possible candidates to store energy from renewable sources. Mitigating solar and wind power variability and its direct effect on local grid stability are already a substantial technological bottleneck for increasing market penetration of these technologies. In this context, CES systems represent low-cost solutions for variability that can be used to set critical power ramp rates. We investigate the different thermodynamic and engineering constraints that affect the design of CES systems, presenting theoretical simulations, indicating that optimization is also needed to improve the cryogenic plant performance. - Highlights: • We assessed the performance of cryogenic energy storage systems. • We re-evaluated the Linde–Hampson cycle proposed by Chen. • We proposed the Claude and Collins cycles as alternatives for the Linde–Hampson cycle. • We concluded that Claude cycle is the best alternative for the simulated conditions.

  10. Specification of the 2nd cryogenic plant for RAON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Ki, T.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, Y.; Jo, H. C.; Kim, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    RAON is a rare isotope beam facility being built at Daejeon, South Korea. The RAON consists of three linear accelerators, SCL1 (1st SuperConducting LINAC), SCL2, and SCL3. Each LINAC has its own cryogenic plant. The cryogenic plant for SCL2 will provide the cooling for cryomodules, low temperature SC magnets, high temperature SC magnets, and a cryogenic distribution system. This paper describes the specification of the plant including cooling capacity, steady state and transient operation modes, and cooling strategies. In order to reduce CAPEX with the specification, two suppliers will consider no liquid nitrogen pre-cooling, one integrated cold box, and one back-up HP compressor. The detail design of the plant will be started at the end of this year.

  11. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run in...

  12. Improvement of cooldown time of LSF9599 flexure-bearing SADA cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullié, Jeroen; vd Groep, Willem; Bruins, Peter; Benschop, Tonny; de Koning, Arjan; Dam, Jacques

    2006-05-01

    Thales Cryogenics has presented the LSF 9599 SADA II flexure cooler in 2005. Based on Thales' well-known moving magnet flexure technology, the LSF 9599 complies with the SADA II specification with respect to performance, envelope and mass. Being the first manufacturer offering a full flexure-bearing supported cooler that fits within the SADA II envelope, Thales Cryogenics has been selected in several new (military) programs with their LSF coolers. For many of these new programs, the cooldown time requirements are more stringent than in the past, whereas at the same time size, complexity and thus thermal mass of the infrared sensor tends to increase. In order to respond to the need created by the combination of these trends, Thales Cryogenics started a development program to optimize cryogenic performance of the LSF 9599 cooler. The main goal for the development program is to reduce the cooldown time, while maintaining the SADA II compatible interface, and maintaining the robustness and proven reliability of the cooler. Within these constraints, the regenerator was further optimized using among others the experience with mixed-gauze regenerators obtained from our pulse tube research. Using the mixed gauze approach, the heat storage capacity of the regenerator is adapted as a function of the temperature profile over the regenerator, thus giving the optimum balance between heat storage capacity and pressure drop. A novel way of constructing the regenerator further decreases shuttle heat losses and other thermal losses in the regenerator. This paper describes the first results of the trade-offs and gives an overview of impact on cooldown times and efficiency figures achieved after the regenerator and displacer optimization.

  13. Cryogen spray cooling: Effects of droplet size and spray density on heat removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkula, B M; Torres, J H; Tunnell, J W; Anvari, B

    2001-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective method to reduce or eliminate non-specific injury to the epidermis during laser treatment of various dermatological disorders. In previous CSC investigations, fuel injectors have been used to deliver the cryogen onto the skin surface. The objective of this study was to examine cryogen atomization and heat removal characteristics of various cryogen delivery devices. Various cryogen delivery device types including fuel injectors, atomizers, and a device currently used in clinical settings were investigated. Cryogen mass was measured at the delivery device output orifice. Cryogen droplet size profiling for various cryogen delivery devices was estimated by optically imaging the droplets in flight. Heat removal for various cryogen delivery devices was estimated over a range of spraying distances by temperature measurements in an skin phantom used in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction model. A substantial range of mass outputs were measured for the cryogen delivery devices while heat removal varied by less than a factor of two. Droplet profiling demonstrated differences in droplet size and spray density. Results of this study show that variation in heat removal by different cryogen delivery devices is modest despite the relatively large difference in cryogen mass output and droplet size. A non-linear relationship between heat removal by various devices and droplet size and spray density was observed. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Publications and services of the Cryogenics Division, National Bureau of Standards, 1953--1977. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizen, D.J.; Mendenhall, J.R.

    1978-04-01

    This NBS Technical Note catalogs the publications of the Cryogenics Division, along with author and subject indexes, for the period 1953 through 1977. It also contains a listing of available thermodynamic properties charts, bibliographies, and miscellaneous reports of cryogenic interest. A resume of the activities of and services provided by the Cryogenics Division is also included

  15. Cryogenic systems for the HEB accelerator of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovich, S.; Yuecel, A.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics related to the Superconducting Super Collider: Cryogenic system -- general requirements; cryogenic system components; heat load budgets and refrigeration plant capacities; flow and thermal characteristics; process descriptions; cryogenic control instrumentation and value engineering trade-offs

  16. Effect of cryogenic treatment on distribution of residual stress in case carburized En 353 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensely, A.; Venkatesh, S.; Mohan Lal, D.; Nagarajan, G.; Rajadurai, A.; Junik, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The effect of cryogenic treatment on the distribution of residual stress in the case carburized steel (En 353) was studied using X-ray diffraction technique. Two types of cryogenic treatment: shallow cryogenic treatment (193 K) and deep cryogenic treatment (77 K) were adopted, as a supplement to conventional heat treatment. The amount of retained austenite in conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples was found to be 28%, 22% and 14%, respectively. The conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples in untempered condition had a surface residual stress of -125 MPa, -115 MPa and -235 MPa, respectively. After tempering the conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples had a surface residual stress of -150 MPa, -80 MPa and -80 MPa, respectively. A comparative study of the three treatments revealed that there was an increase in the compressive residual stress in steel that was subjected to cryogenic treatment prior to tempering. The experimental investigation revealed that deep cryogenically treated steel when subjected to tempering has undergone a reduction in compressive residual stress. Such stress relieving behaviour was mainly due to the increased precipitation of fine carbides in specimens subjected to DCT with tempering

  17. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, A. N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Graças, 50 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Li, M. S. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Ave. Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, 13565-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  18. Superconductor bearings, flywheels and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, F N; Floegel-Delor, U; Rothfeld, R; Riedel, T; Goebel, B; Wippich, D; Schirrmeister, P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of high temperature superconductors (HTS) and of bulk superconducting magnet devices, their use in bearings, in flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) and linear transport magnetic levitation (Maglev) systems. We report and review the concepts of multi-seeded REBCO bulk superconductor fabrication. The multi-grain bulks increase the averaged trapped magnetic flux density up to 40% compared to single-grain assembly in large-scale applications. HTS magnetic bearings with permanent magnet (PM) excitation were studied and scaled up to maximum forces of 10 kN axially and 4.5 kN radially. We examine the technology of the high-gradient magnetic bearing concept and verify it experimentally. A large HTS bearing is tested for stabilizing a 600 kg rotor of a 5 kWh/250 kW flywheel system. The flywheel rotor tests show the requirement for additional damping. Our compact flywheel system is compared with similar HTS–FESS projects. A small-scale compact YBCO bearing with in situ Stirling cryocooler is constructed and investigated for mobile applications. Next we show a successfully developed modular linear Maglev system for magnetic train operation. Each module levitates 0.25t at 10 mm distance during one-day operation without refilling LN 2 . More than 30 vacuum cryostats containing multi-seeded YBCO blocks are fabricated and are tested now in Germany, China and Brazil.

  19. 136 Xe enrichment through cryogenic distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Henning O.; Bottenus, Daniel R.; Clayton, Christopher K.; Stephenson, David E.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2017-09-01

    The next generation of 136Xe neutrinoless double beta decay experiments will require on the order of 5 tons of enriched 136Xe. By estimating the relative volatilities of the xenon isotopes and using standard chemical engineering techniques we explore the feasibility of using cryogenic distillation to produce 5 tons of 80% enriched 136Xe in 5-6 years. With current state-of-the-art distillation column packing materials we can estimate the total height of a traditional cryogenic distillation column. We also, report on how Micro Channel Distillation may reduce the overall size of a distillation system for 136Xe production.

  20. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel-Soto, Veronica; Leandro, Daniel; Lopez-Aldaba, Aitor; Beato-López, Juan Jesus; Pérez-Landazábal, José Ignacio; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Jamier, Raphael; Roy, Philippe; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2017-11-30

    In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG), and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.