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Sample records for cryogenic scintillation module

  1. Performance of scintillation materials at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailik, V B

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of applications of scintillators at low temperatures, particularly in cryogenic experiments searching for rare events, has motivated the investigation of scintillation properties of materials over a wide temperature range. This paper provides an overview of the latest results on the study of luminescence, absorption and scintillation properties of materials selected for rare event searches so far. These include CaWO4, ZnWO4, CdWO4, MgWO4, CaMoO4, CdMoO4, Bi4Ge3O12, CaF2, MgF2, ZnSe and AL2O3-Ti. We discuss the progress achieved in research and development of these scintillators, both in material preparation and in the understanding of scintillation mechanisms, as well as the underlying physics. To understand the origin of the performance limitation of self-activated scintillators we employed a semi-empirical model of conversion of high energy radiation into light and made appropriate provision for effects of temperature and energy transfer. We conclude that the low-temperature value of th...

  2. Optimization of light collection from crystal scintillators for cryogenic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F.A., E-mail: danevich@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, 03056 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mikhailik, V.B. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2014-04-21

    High light collection efficiency is an important requirement in any application of scintillation detectors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility for improving this parameter in cryogenic scintillation bolometers, which can be considered as promising detectors in experiments investigating neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter. Energy resolutions and relative pulse amplitudes of scintillation detectors using ZnWO{sub 4} scintillation crystals of different shapes (cylinder ∅ 20×20 mm and hexagonal prism with diagonal 20 mm and height 20 mm), reflector materials and shapes, optical contact and surface properties (polished and diffused) were measured at room temperature. Propagation of optical photons in these experimental conditions was simulated using Geant4 and ZEMAX codes. The results of the simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other and with direct measurements of the crystals. This could be applied to optimize the geometry of scintillation detectors used in the cryogenic experiments.

  3. A lens-coupled scintillation counter in cryogenic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Stoykov, A; Amato, A; Bartkowiak, M; Konter, J A; Rodriguez, J; Sedlak, K

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present an elegant solution for a scintillation counter to be integrated into a cryogenic system. Its distinguishing feature is the absence of a continuous light guide coupling the scintillation and the photodetector parts, operating at cryogenic and room temperatures respectively. The prototype detector consists of a plastic scintillator with glued-in wavelength-shifting fiber located inside a cryostat, a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) outside the cryostat, and a lens system guiding the scintillation light re-emitted by the fiber to the G-APD through optical windows in the cryostat shields. With a 0.8mm diameter multiclad fiber and a 1mm active area G-APD the coupling efficiency of the "lens light guide" is about 50%. A reliable performance of the detector down to 3K is demonstrated.

  4. A lens-coupled scintillation counter in cryogenic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoykov, A; Scheuermann, R; Amato, A; Bartkowiak, M; Konter, J A; Rodriguez, J; Sedlak, K, E-mail: alexey.stoykov@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-02-01

    In this work we present an elegant solution for a scintillation counter to be integrated into a cryogenic system. Its distinguishing feature is the absence of a continuous light guide coupling the scintillation and the photodetector parts, operating at cryogenic and room temperatures respectively. The prototype detector consists of a plastic scintillator with glued-in wavelength-shifting fiber located inside a cryostat, a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) outside the cryostat, and a lens system guiding the scintillation light re-emitted by the fiber to the G-APD through optical windows in the cryostat shields. With a 0.8 mm diameter multiclad fiber and a 1 mm active area G-APD the coupling efficiency of the 'lens light guide' is about 50%. A reliable performance of the detector down to 3 K is demonstrated.

  5. Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors with PMT readout for rare event search experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.; Mikhailik, V. B.; Kraus, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) for rare event search experiments require reliable, efficient and robust photon detectors that can resolve individual photons in a scintillation event. We report on a cryogenic detector containing a scintillating crystal, equipped with an NTD-Ge phonon sensor and a photon detector based on a low-temperature photomultiplier tube (PMT) that is powered by a Cockcroft-Walton generator. Here we present results from the characterisation of two detector modules, one with CaWO4, the other with CaMoO4 as scintillator. The energy resolutions (FWHM) at 122.1 keV for the scintillation/PMT channel are 19.9% and 29.7% respectively for CaWO4 and CaMoO4 while the energy resolutions (FWHM) for the phonon channels are 2.17 keV (1.8%) and 0.97 keV (0.79%). These characteristics compare favourably with other CPSDs currently used in cryogenic rare-event search experiments. The detection module with PMT readout benefits from the implementation of a well-understood, reliable, and commercially available component and improved time resolution, while retaining the major advantages of conventional CPSD, such as high sensitivity, resolving power and discrimination ability.

  6. Impact of geometry on light collection efficiency of scintillation detectors for cryogenic rare event searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F.A.; Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, 03056 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: vmikhai@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Solsky, I.M. [Scientific Research Company CARAT, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2014-10-01

    Simulations of photon propagation in scintillation detectors were performed with the aim to find the optimal scintillator geometry, surface treatment, and shape of external reflector in order to achieve maximum light collection efficiency for detector configurations that avoid direct optical coupling, a situation that is commonly found in cryogenic scintillating bolometers in experimental searches for double beta decay and dark matter. To evaluate the light collection efficiency of various geometrical configurations we used the ZEMAX ray-tracing software. It was found that scintillators in the shape of a triangular prism with an external mirror shaped as truncated cone gives the highest light collection efficiency. The results of the simulations were confirmed by carrying out measurements of the light collection efficiencies of CaWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators. A comparison of simulated and measured values of light output shows good agreement.

  7. Cryogenic Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Perea-Solano, B

    2004-01-01

    CERN is presently constructing the LHC, which will produce collisions of 7 TeV protons in 4 interaction points at a design luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The radiation dose resulting from the operation at high luminosity will cause a serious deterioration of the silicon tracker performance. The state-of-art silicon microstrip detectors can tolerate a fluence of about 3 1014 cm-2 of hadrons or charged leptons. This is insufficient, however, for long-term operation in the central parts of the LHC trackers, in particular after the possible luminosity upgrade of the LHC. By operating the detectors at cryogenic temperatures the radiation hardness can be improved by a factor 10. This work proposes a cryogenic microstrip detector module concept which has the features required for the microstrip trackers of the upgraded LHC experiments at CERN. The module can hold an edgeless sensor, being a good candidate for improved luminosity and total cross-section measurements in the ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM experiments. The design o...

  8. Sapphire scintillation tests for cryogenic detectors in the Edelweiss dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, M

    2007-07-15

    Identifying the matter in the universe is one of the main challenges of modern cosmology and astrophysics. An important part of this matter seems to be made of non-baryonic particles. Edelweiss is a direct dark matter search using cryogenic germanium bolometers in order to look for particles that interact very weakly with the ordinary matter, generically known as WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles). An important challenge for Edelweiss is the radioactive background and one of the ways to identify it is to use a larger variety of target crystals. Sapphire is a light target which can be complementary to the germanium crystals already in use. Spectroscopic characterization studies have been performed using different sapphire samples in order to find the optimum doping concentration for good low temperature scintillation. Ti doped crystals with weak Ti concentrations have been used for systematic X ray excitation tests both at room temperature and down to 30 K. The tests have shown that the best Ti concentration for optimum room temperature scintillation is 100 ppm and 50 ppm at T = 45 K. All concentrations have been checked by optical absorption and fluorescence. After having shown that sapphire had interesting characteristics for building heat-scintillation detectors, we have tested if using a sapphire detector was feasible within a dark matter search. During the first commissioning tests of Edelweiss-II, we have proved the compatibility between a sapphire heat scintillation detector and the experimental setup. (author)

  9. Performance of ZnMoO4 crystal as cryogenic scintillating bolometer to search for double beta decay of molybdenum

    CERN Document Server

    Gironi, L; Beeman, J W; Cremonesi, O; Danevich, F A; Degoda, V Ya; Ivleva, L I; Nagornaya, L L; Pavan, M; Pessina, G; Pirro, S; Tretyak, V I; Tupitsyna, I A

    2010-01-01

    Zinc molybdate (ZnMoO4) single crystals were grown for the first time by the Czochralski method and their luminescence was measured under X ray excitation in the temperature range 85-400 K. Properties of ZnMoO4 crystal as cryogenic low temperature scintillator were checked for the first time. Radioactive contamination of the ZnMoO4 crystal was estimated as <0.3 mBq/kg (228-Th) and 8 mBq/kg (226-Ra). Thanks to the simultaneous measurement of the scintillation light and the phonon signal, the alpha particles can be discriminated from the gamma/beta interactions, making this compound extremely promising for the search of neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of 100-Mo. We also report on the ability to discriminate the alpha-induced background without the light measurement, thanks to a different shape of the thermal signal that characterizes gamma/beta and alpha particle interactions.

  10. Control Modules for Scintillation Counters in the SPS Experimental Areas

    CERN Document Server

    Baribaud, Guy; Cojan, A; Ferri, G; Fullerton, J; Manarin, A; Spanggaard, J

    2001-01-01

    The hardware used in the SPS Experimental Areas to control the beam instrumentation electronics and mechanics of the particle detectors is based on CAMAC and NIM modules. The maintenance of this hardware now presents very serious problems. The modules used to operate the Experimental Areas are numerous and older than 20 years so many of them cannot be repaired any more and CAMAC is no longer well supported by industry. The fast evolution of technology and a better understanding of the detectors allow a new equipment-oriented approach, which is more favourable for maintenance purposes and presents fewer data handling problems. VME and IP Modules were selected as standard components to implement the new electronics to control and read out the particle detectors. The first application implemented in this way concerns the instrumentation for the Scintillation Counters (formerly referred to as triggers). The fundamental options and the design features will be presented.

  11. Cryogenic detector modules and edgeless silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouby, X. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)]. E-mail: rouby@fynu.ucl.ac.be; Eremin, V. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Grohmann, S. [ILK Dresden, Bertolt-Brecht-Allee 20, D-01309 Dresden (Germany); Haerkoenen, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Li, Z. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Luukka, P. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Militaru, O. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Niinikoski, T. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Nuessle, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Perea Solano, B. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Piotrzkowski, K. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Tuovinen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Verbitskaya, E. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2007-01-11

    We are studying the operation of silicon microstrip detector with readout electronics in the temperature range from 90 to 130K. The sensor can be operated in the current-injection mode which significantly improves its radiation hardness. A first module prototype has been built, with APV25 readout chips and an embedded microtube, providing efficient low-mass cooling of the whole module with a two-phase flow of N{sub 2} or Ar. First pedestal and pulse shape temperature dependencies are presented for this module. We have also built an edgeless test module with two pairs of laser cut sensors, with both angular and parallel cuts with respect to the strips (at 120{mu}m pitch). We are studying the efficiency of the microstrip sensors very close (<200{mu}m) to the physical border of the cut silicon crystal and present here some electrical characteristics.

  12. Low temperature luminescence and charge carrier trapping in a cryogenic scintillator Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spassky, D.A., E-mail: deris2002@mail.ru [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nagirnyi, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Savon, A.E. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kamenskikh, I.A. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Barinova, O.P.; Kirsanova, S.V. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Grigorieva, V.D.; Ivannikova, N.V.; Shlegel, V.N. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Aleksanyan, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); A.Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory, 2 Br. Alikhanyan Str., 0036 Yerevan (Armenia); Yelisseyev, A.P. [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Belsky, A. [Institute of Light and Matter, CNRS, University Lyon1, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2015-10-15

    The luminescence and optical properties of promising cryogenic scintillator Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} were studied in the temperature region of 2–300 K. The data on luminescence spectra and decay characteristics, excitation spectra, thermostimulated luminescence curves and spectra as well as transmission and reflectivity spectra are presented for the single crystals grown by two different procedures, the conventional Czochralski method and the low-temperature gradient Czochralski technique. The bandgap of Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is estimated from the analysis of transmission, luminescence excitation and reflectivity spectra. Up to three luminescence bands with the maxima at 1.98, 2.08 and 2.25 eV are detected in the emission spectra of crystals and their origin is discussed. In the thermoluminescence curves of both studied crystals, two high-intensity peaks were observed at 22 and 42 K, which are ascribed to the thermal release of self-trapped charge carriers. The coexistence of self-trapped electrons and holes allows one to explain the poor scintillation light yield of Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} at low temperatures. - Highlights: • Single crystals of Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} were grown by two methods. • The transparency cutoff (~4.3 eV) and bandgap values (<4.9 eV) are estimated. • The emission 2.08 eV is ascribed to self-trapped excitons and quenches at T>7 K. • Shallow traps considerably influence the energy transfer to emission centres. • Co-existence of self-trapped holes and electrons results in a low light yield.

  13. Extensive studies of MRS APDs for plastic scintillator muon veto detectors of cryogenic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, R., E-mail: falkenst@pit.physik.uni-tuebingen.de [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, L.B. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Freund, K. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Golovin, A.V.; Golovin, V.M. [Centre for Perspective Technology and Apparatus, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grabmayr, P.; Jochum, J. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Lubsandorzhiev, B.K. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lubsandorzhiev, N.B.; Poleshuk, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polyansky, I.N. [Centre for Perspective Technology and Apparatus, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ritter, F.; Sailer, C. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Shaibonov, B.A.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-11

    Low background experiments need active muon veto detectors to shield them from cosmic muons. Plastic scintillator panels with WLS fiber and multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes readout are widely used in such experiments due to their compactness and robustness. In this paper, results from the study of the basic MRS APD parameters, such as breakdown voltages, quenching resistors, internal gain and dark count rates are presented, as well as temperature dependencies of some of these parameters. In a small fraction of the MRS APDs, some strange dips in the I-V curves just preceding the breakdown voltage point have been observed.

  14. Extensive studies of MRS APDs for plastic scintillator muon veto detectors of cryogenic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenstein, R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Freund, K.; Golovin, A. V.; Golovin, V. M.; Grabmayr, P.; Jochum, J.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, N. B.; Poleshuk, R. V.; Polyansky, I. N.; Ritter, F.; Sailer, C.; Shaibonov, B. A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Low background experiments need active muon veto detectors to shield them from cosmic muons. Plastic scintillator panels with WLS fiber and multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes readout are widely used in such experiments due to their compactness and robustness. In this paper, results from the study of the basic MRS APD parameters, such as breakdown voltages, quenching resistors, internal gain and dark count rates are presented, as well as temperature dependencies of some of these parameters. In a small fraction of the MRS APDs, some strange dips in the I-V curves just preceding the breakdown voltage point have been observed.

  15. Experimental investigation of cryogenic flame dynamics under transverse acoustic modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méry, Yoann; Hakim, Layal; Scouflaire, Philippe; Vingert, Lucien; Ducruix, Sébastien; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation is focused on high-frequency combustion instabilities coupled by transverse acoustic modes. This phenomenon has been observed during the development of many liquid rocket engines and other high performance devices. Such instabilities induce an unsteady heat release which leads in many cases to a rapid intensification of heat fluxes to the thrust chamber walls, causing fatal damage and a spectacular destruction of the propulsion system. One central objective of this effort is to observe and understand the physical processes leading the coupling between acoustics and combustion, and resulting in the growth of such instabilities. Experiments carried out on the Mascotte testbed at ONERA serve to identify the main processes involved and bring forth mechanisms taking place when an engine becomes unstable. Hot fire experiments are carried out in a model scale combustor reproducing many of the conditions prevailing in unstable rocket engines. Subcritical and transcritical cryogenic jets are injected in a multiple injector combustion chamber (MIC). This system is fed with LOx and methane through five injection units. The flames formed in this configuration are modulated by an acoustic wave with an amplitude of several bars. This is obtained with a new Very Large Amplitude Modulator (VHAM) capable of generating acoustic mode amplitudes representative of those found in actual engine undergoing HF instabilities. It is shown first that the strength of the acoustic field and the frequency range of oscillation (1 kHz-3.5 kHz) are consistent with rocket instability observations. Conditions where a feedback of the flame on the acoustic field occurs are obtained. High speed diagnostics indicates that the velocity field dramatically enhances the atomization process. The liquid core length is strongly reduced. At moderate amplitudes, the liquid jets are flattened in the spanwise direction and heat release takes place in two sheets neighboring the dense core

  16. Bulk NaI(Tl) scintillation low energy events selection with the ANAIS-0 module

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, C; Cebrián, S; García, E; Ginestra, C; Martínez, M; Oliván, M A; Ortigoza, Y; de Solórzano, A Ortiz; Pobes, C; Puimedón, J; Sarsa, M L; Villar, J A; Villar, P

    2014-01-01

    Dark matter particles scattering off some target nuclei are expected to deposit very small energies in form of nuclear recoils (below 100 keV). Because of the low scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils vs. electron recoils, in most of the scintillating targets considered in the search for dark matter, the region below 10 keVee concentrates most of the expected dark matter signal. For this reason, very low energy threshold (at or below 2 keVee) and very low background are required. This is the case of the ANAIS (Annual modulation with NaI Scintillators) experiment. A good knowledge of the detector response function for real scintillation events, a good characterization of other anomalous or noise event populations contributing in that energy range, and the development of convenient filtering procedures for the latter are mandatory to achieve the required low background at such a low energy. In this work we will present the specific protocols developed to select bulk scintillation events in NaI(Tl), and i...

  17. Exploratory growth in the Li2MoO4-MoO3 system for the next crystal generation of heat-scintillation cryogenic bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Matias; Veber, Philippe; Moutatouia, Meryem; de Marcillac, Pierre; Giuliani, Andrea; Loaiza, Pia; Denux, Dominique; Decourt, Rodolphe; El Hafid, Hassan; Laubenstein, Matthias; Marnieros, Stefanos; Nones, Claudia; Novati, Valentina; Olivieri, Emiliano; Poda, Denys V.; Zolotarova, Anastasiia S.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we report on the Czochralski growth of Li2MoO4 crystals up to 230 g for heat-scintillation cryogenic bolometers likely to be used in astroparticle physics and neutron spectroscopy. Their transmission properties, radiopurity levels and detector behavior characterizations were carried out in order to validate the crystal growth process. The melting characteristics, the partition coefficients of a broad range of impurities, the thermal expansion (lattice parameters and dilatometry) and specific heat properties of the crystals were measured, over a broad temperature range for the last two, providing new data likely to be used in crystal growth process numerical simulations. We also investigated the crystal growth of Li4Mo5O17 and determined its melting behavior and specific heat. The physical properties directly relevant to heat-scintillation cryogenic bolometers of Li2MoO4 and Li4Mo5O17 are discussed in the context of the current materials developed for such applications.

  18. Status of LUMINEU program to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo with cryogenic ZnMoO{sub 4} scintillating bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F. A., E-mail: danevich@kinr.kiev.ua; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Kobychev, V. V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Bergé, L.; Chapellier, M.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Humbert, V.; Marcillac, P. de; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Olivieri, E.; Plantevin, O.; Tenconi, M. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Coron, N.; Redon, T.; Torres, L. [IAS, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Devoyon, L.; Koskas, F. [CEA, Centre d’Etudes Saclay, Orphée, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2015-10-28

    The LUMTNEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on 0ν2β decay of {sup 100}Mo using radiopure ZnMoO{sub 4} crystals enriched in {sup 100}Mo operated as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. Large volume ZnMoO{sub 4} crystal scintillators (∼ 0.3 kg) were developed and tested showing high performance in terms of radiopurity, energy resolution and α/β particle discrimination capability. Zinc molybdate crystal scintillators enriched in {sup 100}Mo were grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique with a high crystal yield and an acceptable level of enriched molybdenum irrecoverable losses. A background level of ∼ 0.5 counts/(yr keV ton) in the region of interest can be reached in a large detector array thanks to the excellent detectors radiopurity and particle discrimination capability, suppression of randomly coinciding events by pulse-shape analysis, and anticoincidence cut. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMTNEU technology, capable of approachingand exploring the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  19. Bulk NaI(Tl) scintillation low energy events selection with the ANAIS-0 module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta, C. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Canfranc Estacion, Huesca (Spain); University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Amare, J.; Cebrian, S.; Garcia, E.; Ginestra, C.; Olivan, M.A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Solorzano, A.O. de; Puimedon, J.; Sarsa, M.L.; Villar, J.A.; Villar, P. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Canfranc Estacion, Huesca (Spain); Martinez, M. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Canfranc Estacion, Huesca (Spain); Fundacion ARAID, Zaragoza (Spain); Pobes, C. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Canfranc Estacion, Huesca (Spain); Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    Dark matter particles scattering off target nuclei are expected to deposit very small energies in form of nuclear recoils (below 100 keV). Because of the low scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils as compared to electron recoils, in most of the scintillating targets considered in the search for dark matter, the region below 10 keVee (electron equivalent energy) concentrates most of the expected dark matter signal. For this reason, very low energy threshold (at or below 2 keVee) and very low background are required to be competitive in the search for dark matter with such detection technique. This is the case of Annual modulation with NaI Scintillators (ANAIS), which is an experiment to be carried out at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. A good knowledge of the detector response function for real scintillation events in the active volume, a good characterization of other anomalous or noise event populations contributing in that energy range, and the development of convenient filtering procedures for the latter are mandatory in order to achieve the required low background at such a low energy. In this work we present the characteristics of different types of events observed in large size NaI(Tl) detectors, and the event-type identification techniques developed. Such techniques allow distinguishing among events associated with bulk NaI scintillation, and events related to muon interactions in the detectors or shielding, photomultiplier origin events, and analysis event fakes. We describe the specific protocols developed to build bulk scintillation events spectra from the raw data and we apply them to data obtained with one of the ANAIS prototypes, ANAIS-0. Nuclear recoil type events were also explored using data from a neutron calibration; however pulse shape cuts were found not to be effective to discriminate them from electron recoil events. The effect of the filtering procedures developed in this nuclear recoils population has been analyzed in order to

  20. LHCb Scintillating Fibre Tracker Engineering Design Review Report: Fibres, Mats and Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian; Leverington, Blake Dean; Kirn, Thomas; Bachmann, Sebastian; Ekelhof, Robert Jan; Müller, Janine

    2015-01-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb collaboration will replace the current Outer and Inner Tracker by a single tracking detector, based on 2.42m long scintillating fibres with a diameter of 250 $\\mu$m, readout by silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM). The fibers are arranged in mats of 6 fibre-layers with a width of 130.65 mm. Eight fibre mats will form a module and are sandwiched between honeycomb and carbon fibre composite panels to provide stability and support over the module length of 4.85m. At either end of the module are the interfaces to the SiPMs and the front-end electronics. The active detection area of the Scintillating Fiber Tracker (SciFi) of 360m$^2$ will comprise 144 single modules arranged in 12 detection planes. This document summarizes the engineering design of the fibre mats and of the modules including the interfaces to the SiPMs and the mounting to the detector frames. Mechanical and detector properties of several prototype modules are discussed. The production procedure of the fi...

  1. Cryogenic Pressure Calibrator for Wide Temperature Electronically Scanned (ESP) Pressure Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulcon, Nettie D.

    2001-01-01

    Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) modules have been developed that can operate in ambient and in cryogenic environments, particularly Langley's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Because they can operate directly in a cryogenic environment, their use eliminates many of the operational problems associated with using conventional modules at low temperatures. To ensure the accuracy of these new instruments, calibration was conducted in a laboratory simulating the environmental conditions of NTF. This paper discusses the calibration process by means of the simulation laboratory, the system inputs and outputs and the analysis of the calibration data. Calibration results of module M4, a wide temperature ESP module with 16 ports and a pressure range of +/- 4 psid are given.

  2. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF.

  3. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Bednarski, T; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kubicz, E; Moskal, I; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N; Białas, P; Gajos, A; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W

    2014-01-01

    Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this article we report on tests of a single detection module built out from BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5x19x300mm^3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80ps (sigma) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93cm (sigma) for the annihilation quanta...

  4. Alignment of the Near Detector scintillator modules using cosmic ray muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospanov, Rustem; Lang, Karol; /Texas U.

    2008-05-01

    The authors describe the procedures and the results of the first alignment of the Near Detector. Using 15.5 million cosmic ray muon tracks, collected from October, 2004 through early january, 2005, they derive the effective transverse positions of the calorimeter scintillator modules. The residuals from straight line fits indicate that the current alignment has achieved better than 1 mm precision. They estimate the size of the remaining misalignment and using tracks recorded with a magnetic field test the effect of the magnetic field on the alignment.

  5. Modulation of anthraquinones and phloroglucinols biosynthesis in Hypericum spp. by cryogenic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruňáková, Katarína; Čellárová, Eva

    2017-06-10

    Beside the high post-cryogenic recovery rate, a reinstated scale of secondary metabolites in recovered plant tissues represents another inevitable aspect of an effective cryopreservation protocol for medicinal plants. The current study was aimed at evaluation of the elicitation potential of cryogenic treatment on secondary metabolism of some Hypericum species. In agreement with our assumption, the cold stimuli applied during the pre-cryogenic phase increased the tolerance to low temperatures (-196°C) in H. perforatum, H. rumeliacum and H. tetrapterum reaching a maximum of 46% recovery rate in St. John's wort plants. The effect of cryogenic treatment-associated stressors on the spectrum of the profiling secondary metabolites, naphthodianthrones and phloroglucinols, was ambiguous. The content of hypericins in both pre-cultured H. tetrapterum donor plants and H. perforatum shoots regenerated from cryopreserved meristems increased more than 3-times. The highest 38-fold enhancement of phloroglucinols was observed in H. rumeliacum shoots recovered after cryostorage. Our findings indicate that modulated biosynthesis of secondary metabolites represented by naphtodianthrones and phloroglucinols can be considered as a part of overall plant adaptations to stress conditions associated with liquid nitrogen (LN) treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of cryogenic low background detector based on enriched zinc molybdate crystal scintillators to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyak, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    ZnMoO$_4$ scintillators with a mass of $\\sim$ 0.3 kg, as well as Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals enriched in the isotope $^{100}$Mo were produced for the first time by using the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The optical and luminescent properties of the produced crystals were studied to estimate the progress in crystal growth quality. The low-temperature tests with a 313 g ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals were performed aboveground in the Centre de Sciences Nucl\\'eaires et de Sciences de la Mati\\`ere. The low background measurements with a three ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched detectors installed in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane were carried out. To optimize the light collection in ZnMoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers, we have simulated the collection of scintillation photons in a detector module for different geometries by Monte Carlo method using the GEANT4 package. Response to the 2$\

  7. Cryogenic System for the Test Facilities of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Chalifour, M; Haug, F; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1998-01-01

    To perform cold tests on the different modules of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, a cryogenic system has been constructed and is now operated at the CERN North Experimental Area. Three different test cryostats will house the modules, which can also be exposed to particle beams for calibration purposes. The three cryostats share a common liquid argon and liquid nitrogen distribution system. The system is rather complex since it has to allow operations of the three cryostats at the same time. Liquid nitrogen is used as cold source for both the cool-down of the cryostats and for normal operation of the cryostats filled with liquid argon.

  8. Variable-delay Polarization Modulators for Cryogenic Millimeter-wave Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chuss, David T; Fixsen, Dale J; Hinderks, James; Kogut, Alan J; Lazear, Justin; Mirel, Paul; Switzer, Eric; Voellmer, George M; Wollack, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and initial validation of the variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) designed for the PIPER cosmic microwave background polarimeter. The VPM modulates between linear and circular polarization by introducing a phase delay between orthogonal linear polarizations. Each VPM has a diameter of 39 cm and is designed to operate in a cryogenic environment (1.5 K). We describe the mechanical design and performance of the kinematic double-blade flexure and drive mechanism along with the construction of the high precision wire grid polarizers.

  9. Cryogenic Evaluation of an Advanced DC/DC Converter Module for Deep Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard

    2003-01-01

    DC/DC converters are widely used in power management, conditioning, and control of space power systems. Deep space applications require electronics that withstand cryogenic temperature and meet a stringent radiation tolerance. In this work, the performance of an advanced, radiation-hardened (rad-hard) commercial DC/DC converter module was investigated at cryogenic temperatures. The converter was investigated in terms of its steady state and dynamic operations. The output voltage regulation, efficiency, terminal current ripple characteristics, and output voltage response to load changes were determined in the temperature range of 20 to -140 C. These parameters were obtained at various load levels and at different input voltages. The experimental procedures along with the results obtained on the investigated converter are presented and discussed.

  10. Vacuum ultra-violet and ultra-violet scintillation light detection by means of silicon photomultipliers at cryogenic temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcone, A., E-mail: andrea.falcone@pv.infn.it [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bertoni, R. [INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Boffelli, F. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bonesini, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Cervi, T. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Menegolli, A. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Montanari, C.; Prata, M.C.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Simonetta, M. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Spanu, M. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Torti, M. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Zani, A. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    We tested the performance of two types of silicon photomultipliers, AdvanSiD ASD-NUV-SiPM3S-P and Hamamatsu 3×3 MM-50 UM VUV2, both at room (300 K) and at liquid nitrogen (77 K) temperature: breakdown voltage, quenching resistance, signal shape, gain and dark counts rate have been studied as function of temperature. The response of the devices to ultra-violet light is also studied. - Highlights: • We tested 2 SiPMs both at room and at cryogenic temperature. • Breakdown voltage, quenching resistance, gain and dark rate were measured. • Efficiency for VUV light detection was measured.

  11. Annual modulation in IDV of quasar 0917+624 due to Interstellar Scintillation

    CERN Document Server

    Rickett, B J; Kraus, A L; Krichbaum, T P; Qian, S J

    2001-01-01

    The quasar 0917+624 has been one of the best studied intraday variable (IDV) radio sources. However, debate continues as to whether the underlying cause is intrinsic or extrinsic. Much previous work has assumed the IDV to be intrinsic and which implies an extraordinarily compact source for the radio emission; in contrast, an extrinsic variation due to interstellar scintillation (ISS) implies a relatively larger source diameter, though at the smaller end of the range expected for relativistic jet models. Kraus et al. (1999) reported a marked slowing of the IDV at 6cm wavelength in September 1998, and suggested a change in the source was responsible. However, here we show that the slowing is consistent with the annual modulation in scintillation time-scale expected for ISS, under the assumption that the scattering medium moves with the local standard of rest (LSR). The ISS time scale is governed by the ISS spatial scale divided by the Earth's velocity relative to the scattering plasma. It happens that in the di...

  12. Cryogenic optical test planning using the Optical Telescope Element Simulator with the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Timothy A.; Bond, Nicholas A.; Greeley, Bradford W.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Melendez, Marcio; Shiri, Ron; Alves de Oliveira, Catarina; Antonille, Scott R.; Birkmann, Stephan; Davis, Clinton; Dixon, William V.; Martel, André R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Sabatke, Derek; Sullivan, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic infrared space astronomy ( 40 K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SIs), including a guider. The SI and guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a telescope simulator (Optical Telescope Element SIMulator; OSIM). OSIM is a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a 1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are aligned to the flight structure's coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using optomechanical metrology and customized interfaces. OSIM is aligned to the ISIM mechanical coordinate system at the cryogenic operating temperature via internal mechanisms and feedback from alignment sensors and metrology in six degrees of freedom. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear, pupil roll, boresight, wavefront error, and image quality, is evaluated at the operating temperature using OSIM. The comprehensive optical test plans include drafting OSIM source configurations for thousands of exposures ahead of the start of a cryogenic test campaign. We describe how we predicted the performance of OSIM light sources illuminating the ISIM detectors to aide in drafting these optical tests before a test campaign began. We also discuss the actual challenges and successes of those exposure predictions encountered during a test campaign to fulfill the demands of the ISIM optical performance verification.

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of the spatial response (Modulated Transfer Function) of a scintillation flat panel and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Monasor, Paula; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Phosphor screens are commonly used in many X-ray imaging applications. The design and optimization of these detectors can be achieved using Monte Carlo codes to simulate radiation transport in scintillation materials and to improve the spatial response. This work presents an exhaustive procedure to measure the spatial resolution of a scintillation flat panel image and to evaluate the agreement with data obtained by simulation. To evaluate the spatial response we have used the Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) parameter. According to this, we have obtained the Line Spread Function (LSF) of the system since the Fourier Transform (FT) of the LSF gives the MTF. The experimental images were carried out using a medical X-ray tube (Toshiba E7299X) and a flat panel (Hammamatsu C9312SK). Measurements were based on the slit methodology experimental implementation, which measures the response of the system to a line. LSF measurements have been performed using a 0.2 mm wide lead slit superimposed over the flat panel. The detector screen was modelled with MCNP (version 6) Monte Carlo simulation code in order to analyze the effect of the acquisition setup configuration and to compare the response of scintillator screens with the experimental results. MCNP6 offers the possibility of studying the optical physics parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients) that occur in the phosphor screen. The study has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages, from 100 to 140 kV. An acceptable convergence between the MTF results obtained with MCNP6 and the experimental measurements have been obtained.

  14. Studies for the LHCb SciFi tracker. Development of modules from scintillating fibres and tests of their radiation hardness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelhof, Robert Jan

    2016-05-18

    The LHCb detector will see a major upgrade in the LHC long shutdown 2, which is planned for 2019/20. Among others, the tracking stations, currently realised as silicon strip and drift tube detectors, will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker is based on scintillating fibres with a diameter of 250 μm, read out by multichannel silicon photomultipliers. The two major challenges related to the fibres are the radiation damage of the light guidance and the production of precise multi-layer fibre mats. This thesis presents radiation hardness studies performed with protons at the tandem accelerator at Forschungszentrum Garching and in situ in the LHCb cavern. The obtained results are combined with additional data of the LHCb SciFi group and two different wavelength dependent models of the radiation induced attenuation are determined. These are used to simulate the relative light yield, for both models it drops to 83% on average at the end of the nominal lifetime of the SciFi Tracker. A machine and techniques to produce multi-layer fibre mats were developed and optimised. Procedures for the production and alignment are described. These are implemented in the serial production of the SciFi modules which will start in the second quarter 2016.

  15. Development and Design of a Single-Stage Cryogenic Modulator for Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2016-05-17

    A new liquid nitrogen-based single-stage cryogenic modulator was developed and characterized. In addition, a dedicated liquid nitrogen delivery system was developed. A well-defined restriction placed inside a deactivated fused silica capillary was used to increase the cooling surface area and provide very efficient trapping. At the same time, it enabled modulation of the carrier gas flow owing to changes in gas viscosity with temperature. Gas flow is almost unimpeded at the trapping temperature but reduced to nearly zero at the desorption temperature, which prevents analyte breakthrough. Peak widths for n-alkanes of 30-40 ms at half height were obtained. Most importantly, even the solvent peak could be modulated, which is not feasible with any commercially available thermal modulator. Evaluation of the newly developed system in two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) separations of some real samples such as regular gasoline and diesel fuel showed that the analytical performance of this single-stage modulator is fully competitive to those of the more complicated dual-stage modulators.

  16. 3.6-W cryogenic Tm,Ho:YLF laser pumped by fiber-coupled diodes module

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoquan Yao; Youlun Ju; Yuezhu Wang; Wanjun He; Yufeng Li

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we report a high power cryogenic cooling Tm(6 at.-%),Ho(0.5 at.-%):YLF laser end-pumped by a 19-fiber-coupled-diodes module with the central wavelength of 792 nm at 20°. The highest continuouswave power of 3.6 W at 2.051 μm is attained under pumping power of 13.6 W, corresponding to opticaloptical conversion efficiency of 26%, and the slope efficiency is larger than 30%. The threshold power is only about 0.16 W because of the long lifetime, large effective emission cross section, and low re-absorption in Tm,Ho:YLF crystal.

  17. Investigation of high resolution compact gamma camera module based on a continuous scintillation crystal using a novel charge division readout method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiu-Sheng; Zhao, Cui-Lan; Zhang, Hua-Lin; Qi, Yu-Jin

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate a high performance and lower cost compact gamma camera module for a multi-head small animal SPECT system. A compact camera module was developed using a thin Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal slice coupled to a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). A two-stage charge division readout board based on a novel sub-tractive resistive readout with a truncated center-of-gravity (TCOG) positioning method was developed for the camera. The performance of the camera was evaluated using a flood 99mTc source with a four-quadrant bar-mask phantom. The preliminary experimental results show that the image shrinkage problem associated with the conventional resistive readout can be effectively overcome by the novel subtractive resistive readout with an appropriate fraction subtraction factor. The response output area (ROA) of the camera shown in the flood image was improved up to 34%, and an intrinsic spatial resolution better than 2 mm of detector was achieved. In conclusion, the utilization of a continuous scintillation crystal and a flat-panel PSPMT equipped with a novel subtractive resistive readout is a feasible approach for developing a high performance and lower cost compact gamma camera.

  18. Cryogenic MEMS Technology for Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of cryogenic microwave components, such as focal plane polarization modulators, first requires an RF MEMS switching technology that operates...

  19. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  20. Analytical method of Kr-85 determination, using cryogenic concentration and separation and liquid scintillation counting; Desarrollo del metodo de concentracion y se paracion criogenica cromatografica y medida radiactiva por centelleo liquido de Kr-85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras, M. C.; Perez, M. M.; Grau, A.

    1983-07-01

    The method used in the Laboratory of the JEN for the determination of Kr-85 levels in gaseous effluents of nuclear power and in the atmosphere is described. Samples of air, collected in metallic cylinders, are introduced into a gas-solid chromatographic separation system which resolves Kr from the other air components. The separated Kr ia dissolved in a toluene based scintillation cocktail, and the Kr-85 content is determined by liquid scintillation counting. (Author)

  1. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  2. Studies for the LHCb SciFi Tracker - Development of Modules from Scintillating Fibres and Tests of their Radiation Hardness

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341158

    The LHCb detector will see a major upgrade in the LHC long shutdown 2, which is planned for 2019/20. Among others, the tracking stations, currently realised as silicon strip and drift tube detectors, will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker is based on scintillating fibres with a diameter of $\\text 250 \\mu m$, read out by multichannel silicon photomultipliers. The two major challenges related to the fibres are the radiation damage of the light guidance and the production of precise multi-layer fibre mats. This thesis presents radiation hardness studies performed with protons at the tandem accelerator at Forschungszentrum Garching and in situ in the LHCb cavern. The obtained results are combined with additional data of the LHCb SciFi group and two different wavelength dependent models of the radiation induced attenuation are determined. These are used to simulate the relative light yield, for both models it drops to $83 \\%$ on average at the end of the nominal lifetime of ...

  3. In-Situ Performance Characterization of CRESST Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, M; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Iachellini, N Ferreiro; Gorla, P; Gütlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Sivers, M v; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wüstrich, M; Zöller, A

    2015-01-01

    The CRESST experiment (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) searches for dark matter via the phonon and light signal of elastic scattering processes in scintillating crystals. The discrimination between a possible dark matter signal and background requires good energy resolution of the light detector, therefore a high light yield is important. In this article, we present a method for understanding the light yield measured with entire detector modules in terms of the efficiencies of light production and detection. Based on data taken during a dark matter search phase, it considers the entire process of conversion of deposited energy into scintillation light as well as transport and collection of the light that occur in a detector module. We can confirm the results by using a cross-check method with different systematic uncertainties. We found that with the detectors operated in CRESST-II phase 1, about 20% of the produced scintillation light is detected. A part of the light loss is li...

  4. Studies of scintillation properties of CaMoO{sub 4} at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.; Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mikhailik, V. B., E-mail: vmikhai@hotmail.com [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Application of CaMoO{sub 4} as a scintillation target in cryogenic rare event searches relies on the understanding of scintillation properties of the material at the temperatures at which these detectors operate. We devised and implemented a detection module with a low-temperature photomultiplier from Hamamatsu (model R8520-06) powered by a Cockcroft-Walton generator. The detector module containing the CaMoO{sub 4} crystal was placed in a {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator and used to measure scintillation characteristics of CaMoO{sub 4} in the millikelvin temperature range. At the lowest temperature achieved, the energy resolution of CaMoO{sub 4} for 122 keV γ from a {sup 57}Co source is found to be 30%, and the fast and slow decay constants are 40.6 ± 0.8 μs and 3410 ± 50 μs, respectively. The temperature variation of the CaMoO{sub 4} decay kinetics is discussed in terms of a three-level model of the emission center.

  5. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mefodiev, A. V., E-mail: Mefodiev@inr.ru; Kudenko, Yu. G. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  6. Photomultiplier Tubes at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Nathan

    2016-09-01

    Liquid noble gas scintillators are widely used in experiments searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) working at cryogenic temperatures have been developed as the primary light readout device in those experiments. Three PMTs from Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (R6041, R11065, and R8520) have been systematically characterized at liquid nitrogen temperature. The high voltage dividing circuits for two of the PMTs were custom-built to make sure there is similar performance at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Their dark count rates at both temperatures were measured. Also measured were their single photoelectron responses at both temperatures using 300, 340, 370, and 420 nm LEDs. The intention is to couple these PMTs directly with inorganic scintillators at liquid nitrogen temperature to achieve high light yeilds for rare-event searches.

  7. Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoyama, Kenji

    2002-02-01

    In this lecture we discuss the principle of method of cooling to a very low temperature, i.e. cryogenic. The "gas molecular model" will be introduced to explain the mechanism cooling by the expansion engine and the Joule-Thomson expansion valve. These two expansion processes are normally used in helium refrigeration systems to cool the process gas to cryogenic temperature. The reverse Carnot cycle will be discussed in detail as an ideal refrigeration cycle. First the fundamental process of liquefaction and refrigeration cycles will be discussed, and then the practical helium refrigeration system. The process flow of the system and the key components; -compressor, expander, and heat exchanger- will be discussed. As an example of an actual refrigeration system, we will use the cryogenic system for the KEKB superconducting RF cavity. We will also discuss the liquid helium distribution system, which is very important, especially for the cryogenic systems used in accelerator applications. 1 Principles of Cooling and Fundamental Cooling Cycle 2 Expansion engine, Joule-Thomson expansion, kinetic molecular theory, and enthalpy 3 Liquefaction Systems 4 Refrigeration Systems 5 Practical helium liquefier/refrigeration system 6 Cryogenic System for TRISTAN Superconducting RF Cavity

  8. In-situ study of light production and transport in phonon/light detector modules for dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, M., E-mail: kiefer@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München (Germany); Angloher, G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München (Germany); Bento, A. [CIUC, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P3004 516 Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (Italy); Erb, A. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Walther-Meißner-Institut für Tieftemperaturforschung, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ferreiro Iachellini, N. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München (Germany); Gorla, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (Italy); Gütlein, A. [Institut für Hochenergiephysik der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, A-1050 Wien (Austria); Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, A-1020 Wien (Austria); Hauff, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München (Germany); Jochum, J. [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany); and others

    2016-06-11

    The CRESST experiment (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) searches for dark matter via the phonon and light signals of elastic scattering processes in scintillating crystals. The discrimination between a possible dark matter signal and background is based on the light yield. We present a new method for evaluating the two characteristics of a phonon/light detector module that determine how much of the deposited energy is converted to scintillation light and how efficiently a module detects the produced light. In contrast to former approaches with dedicated setups, we developed a method which allows us to use data taken with the cryogenic setup, during a dark matter search phase. In this way, we accounted for the entire process that occurs in a detector module, and obtained information on the light emission of the crystal as well as information on the performance of the module (light transport and detection). We found that with the detectors operated in CRESST-II phase 1, about 20% of the produced scintillation light is detected. A part of the light is likely absorbed by creating meta-stable excitations in the scintillating crystals. The light not detected is not absorbed entirely, as an additional light detector can help to increase the fraction of detected light.

  9. High-pressure modulation of the structure of the bacterial photochemical reaction center at physiological and cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpmann, Kõu; Kangur, Liina; Lõhmus, Ants; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-07-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence response to external high pressure of the reaction center membrane chromoprotein complex from the wild-type non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using the native pigment cofactors as local molecular probes of the reaction center structure at physiological (ambient) and cryogenic (79 K) temperatures. In detergent-purified complexes at ambient temperature, abrupt blue shift and accompanied broadening of the special pair band was observed at about 265 MPa. These reversible in pressure features were assigned to a pressure-induced rupture of a lone hydrogen bond that binds the photo-chemically active L-branch primary electron donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactor to the surrounding protein scaffold. In native membrane-protected complexes the hydrogen bond rupture appeared significantly restricted and occurred close to about 500 MPa. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the special pair hydrogen bond in isolate complexes was estimated to be equal to about 12 kJ mol-1. In frozen samples at cryogenic temperatures the hydrogen bond remained apparently intact up to the maximum utilized pressure of 600 MPa. In this case, however, heterogeneous spectral response of the cofactors from the L-and M-branches was observed due to anisotropic build-up of the protein structure. While in solid phase, the special pair fluorescence as a function of pressure exactly followed the respective absorption spectrum at a constant Stokes shift, at ambient temperature, the two paths began to deviate strongly from one other at the hydrogen bond rupture pressure. This effect was tentatively interpreted by different emission properties of hydrogen-bound and hydrogen-unbound special pair exciton states.

  10. Cryogenic Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goloborod' ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  11. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  12. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  13. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  14. Cryogenic technology for tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Granata, V; Watts, S; Borer, K; Janos, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Dezillie, B; Li, Z; Casagrande, L; Collins, P; Grohmann, S; Heijne, Erik H M; Lourenço, C; Niinikoski, T O; Palmieri, V G; Sonderegger, P; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Pirollo, S; Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Grigoriev, E; Bell, W; Devine, S R H; O'Shea, V; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Berglund, P; de Boer, Wim; Hauler, F; Heising, S; Jungermann, L; Abreu, M C; Rato-Mendes, P; Sousa, P; Cindro, V; Mikuz, M; Zavrtanik, M; Esposito, A P; Konorov, I; Paul, S; Buontempo, S; D'Ambrosio, D; Pagano, S; Eremin, V V; Verbitskaya, E

    2001-01-01

    A low-mass cryogenic cooling technique for silicon sensor modules has been developed in the framework of the RD39 Collaboration at CERN. A prototype low-mass beam tracker cryostat has been designed, constructed and tested for applications in fixed target experiments. We shall report here briefly the main features and results of the system. (2 refs).

  15. Construction of an X-ray detecting module and its application to relative-sensitivity measurement using a silicon PIN diode in conjunction with short-decay-time scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihei, Shinichi [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Sato, Eiichi, E-mail: dresato@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Hamaya, Tatsuki; Numahata, Wataru; Kogita, Hayato; Kami, Syouta; Arakawa, Yumeka; Oda, Yasuyuki [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya [Department of Surgery, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan)

    2014-12-11

    To detect low-dose-rate X-rays, we have developed an X-ray-detecting module for semiconductor diodes. The module consists of a current–voltage (I–V) amplifier, a voltage–voltage (V–V) amplifier, and an alternating-current adopter with a smoothing circuit. The photocurrents flowing through a diode are converted into voltages and amplified using the I–V and V–V amplifiers. To measure relative sensitivities, we used three silicon PIN diodes (Si-PIN), a cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite [YAP(Ce)] crystal, and a Lu{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4})O [LSO] crystal. Three detectors are as follows: an Si-PIN, a YAP(Ce)–Si-PIN, and an LSO–Si-PIN. Using the three detectors, the amplifier output voltages were in proportion to the tube current at a constant tube voltage of 70 kV. Using a multichannel analyzer, the event-pulse-height spectra were measured to analyze X-ray-electric conversion effect in the three detectors. The output voltage of the Si-PIN was approximately twice as high as those obtained using the YAP(Ce)–Si-PIN and the LSO–Si-PIN at the measurement conditions. - Highlights: • X-ray detecting module was developed to measure relative sensitivities of detectors. • Event-pulse-height spectra were measured to analyze X-ray-electric conversion effect. • Total photon number substantially decreased using scintillation detectors. • Scintillation effects using YAP(Ce) and LSO were quite low. • Si-PIN sensitivity without scintillators was quite high.

  16. Scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, L M

    1999-01-01

    A method to evaluate the scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators to different heavy ionizing particles is suggested. A function describing the rate of the energy consumed as fluorescence emission is derived, i.e., the differential response with respect to time. This function is then integrated for each ion and scintillator (anthracene, stilbene and CsI(Tl)) to determine scintillation response. The resulting scintillation responses are compared to the previously reported measured responses. Agreement to within 2.5% is observed when these data are normalized to each other. In addition, conclusions regarding the quenching parameter kB dependence on the type of the particle and the computed values of kB for certain ions are included. (author)

  17. The COSINUS project: Development of new NaI-based cryogenic detectors for direct dark matter search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütlein, A.; Angloher, G.; Gotti, C.; Hauff, D.; Maino, M.; Nagorny, S. S.; Pagnanini, L.; Pessina, G.; Petricca, F.; Pirro, S.; Pröbst, F.; Reindl, F.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Seidel, W.

    2017-02-01

    The current results of direct dark matter searches are controversial. The long-standing dark-matter claim from the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration is excluded by null-results of several other experiments. However, a comparison of the results by experiments with different detector materials introduces model dependencies. The R&D project COSINUS (Cryogenic Observatory for SIgnatures seen in Next-generation Underground Searches) aims to develop cryogenic detectors based on (hygroscopic) sodium iodide (NaI). If successful, such detectors could be used in future experiments to investigate the origin of the annual modulation signal seen by the NaI-based scintillation detectors of the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. COSINUS detectors should be able to simultaneously detect phonons and scintillation light produced by a particle interaction inside the NaI crystal. This technique allows for an active suppression of β/γ backgrounds as well as detailed studies of a large variety of dark-matter models predicting nuclear interactions. For such kind of studies only moderate exposures of ≲ 100 kg-days are needed. In addition to the projected sensitivities of COSINUS detectors, we also show the result of first tests using (only mildly hygroscopic) caesium iodide (CsI) crystals as target material. For this measurement we achieved an energy threshold of ∼4.7 keV for nuclear recoils.

  18. CRYOGENIC DEWAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, W.H.; Maseck, H.E.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a dewar for storing cryogenic gase and is of the type having aii inner flask surrounded by a vacuum jacket and having a vent spout through which evaporating gas escapes. Heretofore substantial gas loss has resulted from the radiation of heat towards the flask from the warmer outer elements of the dewar. In this invention, the mask is surrounded by a thermally conducting shield which is disposed in the vacuum space between the flask and the outer elements of the dewar. The shield contacts only the vent spout, which is cooled by the evaporating gas, and thus is maintained at a temperature very close to that of the flask itself. Accordingly, heat radiated toward the flask is intercepted and conducted to the evaporating gas rather than being re-radiated towards the hask. In a liquid helium dewar of typical configniration the mention reduces the boil-off rate by approximately one-half.(AEC)

  19. Subnanosecond Scintillation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Hennessy, John (Inventor); Hitlin, David (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A scintillation detector, including a scintillator that emits scintillation; a semiconductor photodetector having a surface area for receiving the scintillation, wherein the surface area has a passivation layer configured to provide a peak quantum efficiency greater than 40% for a first component of the scintillation, and the semiconductor photodetector has built in gain through avalanche multiplication; a coating on the surface area, wherein the coating acts as a bandpass filter that transmits light within a range of wavelengths corresponding to the first component of the scintillation and suppresses transmission of light with wavelengths outside said range of wavelengths; and wherein the surface area, the passivation layer, and the coating are controlled to increase the temporal resolution of the semiconductor photodetector.

  20. Thermal conductivity of the cryoprotective cocktail DP6 in cryogenic temperatures, in the presence and absence of synthetic ice modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lili E; Malen, Jonathan A; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of the cryoprotective agent (CPA) cocktail DP6 in combination with synthetic ice modulators (SIMs) is measured in this study, using a transient hot-wire method. DP6 is a mixture of 3 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 3 M propylene glycol, which received significant attention in the cryobiology community in recent years. Tested SIMs include 6% 1,3Cyclohexanediol, 6% 2,3Butanediol, and 12% PEG400 (percentage by volume). This study integrates the scanning cryomacroscope for visual verification of crystallization and vitrification events. It is demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of the vitrifying CPA cocktail decreases monotonically with the decreasing temperature down to -180 °C. By contrast, the thermal conductivity of the crystalline material increases with decreasing temperature in the same temperature range. Results of this study demonstrate that the thermal conductivity may vary by three fold between the amorphous and crystalline phases of DP6 below the glass transition temperature of DP6 (Tg = -119 °C). The selected SIMs demonstrate the ability to inhibit crystallization in DP6, even at subcritical cooling rates. An additional ice suppression capability is observed by the Euro-Collins as a vehicle solution, disproportionate to its volume ratio in the cocktail. The implication of the observed thermal conductivity differences between the amorphous and crystalline phases of the same cocktail on cryopreservation simulations is significant in some cases and must be taken into account in thermal analyses of cryopreservation protocols.

  1. Nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodyuk, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    A scintillator is a transparent material that emits a flash of light when it absorbs a γ-ray photon or an energetic particle. Scintillation crystals are widely used as spectroscopic detectors of ionizing radiation in nuclear science, space exploration, medical imaging, homeland security, etc. This t

  2. Anticoincidence scintillation counter

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    This anticoincidence scintillation counter will be mounted in a hydrogen target vessel to be used in a measurement of the .beta. parameter in the .LAMBDA0. decay. The geometry of the counter optimizes light collection in the central part where a scintillation disk of variable thickness can be fitted.

  3. Investigation of Neganov-Luke amplified cryogenic light-detectors for CRESST and EURECA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl, Andreas; Guetlein, Achim; Lanfranchi, Jean-Come; Muenster, Andrea; Potzel, Walter; Roth, Sabine; Simon, Daniel; Scholl, Stephan; Sivers, Moritz von; Strauss, Raimund; Wawoczny, Stephan; Willers, Michael; Wuestrich, Marc; Zoeller, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Experiments for the direct detection of dark matter which employ the phonon-light technique like CRESST and the planned experiment EURECA rely heavily on the separation of the different nuclear-recoil bands at low energies for their background suppression. The CRESST experiment uses scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals as a target in the search for coherent WIMP-nucleon scattering. In the case of electron recoils, about 1% of the energy deposited in a CaWO{sub 4} crystal is detected as scintillation light in a separate cryogenic light-detector. For nuclear recoils the scintillation light is further quenched which motivates the need for very sensitive light-detectors. Neganov-Luke amplified cryogenic light-detectors offer a promising way to increase the sensitivity of cryogenic light-detectors by drifting photon induced electrons and holes in an applied electric field and thus amplifying the resulting phonon signal.

  4. Development of a Cryogenic Thermal Distortion Measurement Facility for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope Instrument Support Integration Module 2-D Test Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin; Bagdanove, paul; Blake, Peter; Canavan, Ed; Cofie, Emmanuel; Crane, J. Allen; Dominquez, Kareny; Hagopian, John; Johnston, John; Madison, Tim; Miller, Dave; Oaks, Darrell; Williams, Pat; Young, Dan; Zukowski, Barbara; Zukowski, Tim

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Instrument Support Integration Module (ISIM) is being designed and developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The ISM Thermal Distortion Testing (ITDT) program was started with the primary objective to validate the ISM mechanical design process. The ITDT effort seeks to establish confidence and demonstrate the ability to predict thermal distortion in composite structures at cryogenic temperatures using solid element models. This-program's goal is to better ensure that ISIM meets all the mechanical and structural requirements by using test results to verify or improve structural modeling techniques. The first step to accomplish the ITDT objectives was to design, and then construct solid element models of a series 2-D test assemblies that represent critical building blocks of the ISIM structure. Second, the actual test assemblies consisting of composite tubes and invar end fittings were fabricated and tested for thermal distortion. This paper presents the development of the GSFC Cryo Distortion Measurement Facility (CDMF) to meet the requirements of the ISIM 2-D test. assemblies, and other future ISIM testing needs. The CDMF provides efficient cooling with both a single, and two-stage cryo-cooler. Temperature uniformity of the test assemblies during thermal transients and at steady state is accomplished by using sapphire windows for all of the optical ports on the radiation shields and by using .thermal straps to cool the test assemblies. Numerical thermal models of the test assemblies were used to predict the temperature uniformity of the parts during cooldown and at steady state. Results of these models are compared to actual temperature data from the tests. Temperature sensors with a 0.25K precision were used to insure that test assembly gradients did not exceed 2K lateral, and 4K axially. The thermal distortions of two assemblies were measured during six thermal cycles from 320K to 35K using laser interferometers. The standard

  5. Cryogenic Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The storage of cryogenic propellants is challenging because heat leaks into the cryogenic storage tanks no matter how good the insulation, resulting in a necessity...

  6. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  7. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  8. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  9. Low-Temperature Scintillation Properties of CaWO4 Crystals for Rare-Event Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Sivers, M v; Di Stefano, P C F; Erb, A; Gütlein, A; Lanfranchi, J -C; Münster, A; Nadeau, P; Piquemal, M; Potzel, W; Roth, S; Schreiner, K; Strauss, R; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Zöller, A

    2015-01-01

    In prospect of its application in cryogenic rare-event searches, we have investigated the low-temperature scintillation properties of CaWO4 crystals down to 3.4 K under {\\alpha} and {\\gamma} excitation. Concerning the scintillation decay times, we observe a long component in the ms range which significantly contributes to the light yield below 40K. For the first time we have measured the temperature dependence of the {\\alpha}/{\\gamma}- ratio of the light yield. This parameter which can be used to discriminate {\\alpha} and {\\gamma} events in scintillating bolometers is found to be about 8-15% smaller at low temperatures compared to room temperature.

  10. SR study of scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailin, V V

    2000-01-01

    The technique and the models developed recently in Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Laboratory of Moscow University for the investigation of energy transfer processes in insulators can be applied for a detailed study of scintillator's properties. The experiments with SR in VUV and XUV regions allow to separate various processes and stages of energy transfer and help to indicate the dominating process on each stage. Thus, we can find the way to improve the properties, essential for the particular application of the scintillator: conversion efficiency, decay time, afterglow, radiation hardness, etc. The results of such a study can be used for the testing procedures in scintillator production.

  11. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  12. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  13. BL LAC PKSB1144-379 an extreme scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, R J; Shabala, S S; Blanchard, J; Lovell, J E J; McCallum, J N; Cimo, G

    2012-01-01

    Rapid variability in the radio flux density of the BL Lac object PKSB1144-379 has been observed at four frequencies, ranging from 1.5 to 15 GHz, with the VLA and the University of Tasmania's Ceduna antenna. Intrinsic and line of sight effects were examined as possible causes of this variability, with interstellar scintillation best explaining the frequency dependence of the variability timescales and modulation indices. This scintillation is consistent with a compact source 20-40 microarcseconds, or 0.15-0.3 pc in size. The inferred brightness temperature for PKSB1144-379 (assuming that the observed variations are due to scintillation) is 6.2e12 K at 4.9 GHz, with approximately 10 percent of the total flux in the scintillating component. We show that scintillation surveys aimed at identifying variability timescales of days to weeks are an effective way to identify the AGN with the highest brightness temperatures.

  14. A breath of fresh air for cryogenics training

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    Whether you work full-time in a cryogenic installation or are required to handle cryogenic substances temporarily, you need to have followed the appropriate safety training.   Photo: Christoph Balle. Two new training courses are now available in English and French at CERN: “Cryogenic Safety – Fundamentals” (at the Prévessin Training Centre) and “Cryogenic Safety – Helium Transfer” (at the Cryolab). The first covers the content of levels 1 and 2 of the old “Cryogenic Safety” course. The second is a completely new course for CERN: it covers specific aspects of the transfer of liquid helium, such as the evaporation process of helium and the associated risks to human health (asphyxia due to displacement of oxygen), the colour code for gas bottles, etc. These training modules have been rewritten in response to the increase in the number of projects involving cryogenics and following various related incident...

  15. Scintillating properties of frozen new liquid scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Britvich, G I; Golovkin, S V; Martellotti, G; Medvedkov, A M; Penso, G; Soloviev, A S; Vasilchenko, V G

    1999-01-01

    The light emission from scintillators which are liquid at room temperature was studied in the interval between $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C and $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C, where the phase transition from liquid to solid takes place. The light yield measured at $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C is about twice as much as that observed at $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C. By cooling the scintillator from $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C to $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C and then heating it from $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C to $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C, the light yield varies in steps at well defined temperatures, which are different for the cooling and heating processes. These hysteresis phenomena appear to be related to the solvent rather than to the dopant. The decay time of scintillation light was measured at $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C and $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C. Whilst at room temperature most of the light is emitted with a decay time of 6--8 ns, at $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C a slower component, with a decay time of 25--35 ns, becomes important.

  16. The COSINUS project: perspectives of a NaI scintillating calorimeter for dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angloher, G.; Hauff, D.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Gironi, L. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); Guetlein, A.; Schieck, J. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Nagorny, S.S.; Pagnanini, L. [GSSI-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Pirro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Schaeffner, K. [GSSI-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    The R and D project COSINUS (Cryogenic Observatory for SIgnatures seen in Next-generation Underground Searches) aims to develop a cryogenic scintillating calorimeter using an undoped NaI-crystal as target for direct dark matter search. Dark matter particles interacting with the detector material generate both a phonon signal and scintillation light. While the phonon signal provides a precise determination of the deposited energy, the simultaneously measured scintillation light allows for particle identification on an event-by-event basis, a powerful tool to study material-dependent interactions, and to suppress backgrounds. Using the same target material as the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration, the COSINUS technique may offer a unique possibility to investigate and contribute information to the presently controversial situation in the dark matter sector. We report on the dedicated design planned for the NaI proof-of-principle detector and the objectives of using this detection technique in the light of direct dark matter detection. (orig.)

  17. The COSINUS project - perspectives of a NaI scintillating calorimeter for dark matter search

    CERN Document Server

    Angloher, G; Gironi, L; Gotti, C; Pessina, G; Gütlein, A; Maino, M; Nagorny, S S; Pagnanini, L; Petricca, F; Pirro, S; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Seidel, W

    2016-01-01

    The R&D project COSINUS (Cryogenic Observatory for SIgnatures seen in Next-generation Underground Searches) aims to develop a cryogenic scintillating calorimeter using NaI as target crystal for direct darkmatter search. Dark matter particles interacting with the detector material generate both a phonon signal and scintillation light. While the phonon signal provides a precise determination of the deposited energy, the simultaneously measured scintillation light allows for a particle identification on an event-by-event basis, a powerful tool to study material-dependent interactions, and to suppress backgrounds. Using the same target material as the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration, the COSINUS technique may offer a unique possibility to investigate and contribute information to the presently controversial situation in the dark matter sector. We report on the dedicated design planned for the NaI proof-of-principle detector and the objectives of using this detection technique in the light of direct dark matter detec...

  18. Design and Lessons Learned on the Development of a Cryogenic Pupil Select Mechanism Used in the Testing and Calibration of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alissa; Capon, Thomas; Guzek, Jeffrey; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Koca, Corina

    2014-01-01

    Calibration and testing of the instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being performed by the use of a cryogenic, full-field, optical simulator that was constructed for this purpose. The Pupil Select Mechanism (PSM) assembly is one of several mechanisms and optical elements that compose the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator, or OSIM. The PSM allows for several optical elements to be inserted into the optical plane of OSIM, introducing a variety of aberrations, distortions, obscurations, and other calibration states into the pupil plane. The following discussion focuses on the details of the design evolution, analysis, build, and test of this mechanism along with the challenges associated with creating a sub arc-minute positioning mechanism operating in an extreme cryogenic environment. In addition, difficult challenges in the control system design will be discussed including the incorporation of closed-loop feedback control into a system that was designed to operate in an open-loop fashion.

  19. Large liquid-scintillator trackers for neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Benussi, L; D'Ambrosio, N; Déclais, Y; Dupraz, J P; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Fanti, V; Forton, E; Frekers, D; Frenkel, A; Girerd, C; Golovkin, S V; Grégoire, G; Harrison, K; Jonkmans, G; Jonsson, P; Katsanevas, S; Kreslo, I; Marteau, J; Martellotti, G; Martínez, S; Medvedkov, A M; Moret, G; Niwa, K; Novikov, V; Van Beek, G; Penso, G; Vasilchenko, V G; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Zucchelli, P; Kreslo, I E

    2002-01-01

    Results are given on tests of large particle trackers for the detection of neutrino interactions in long-baseline experiments. Module prototypes have been assembled using TiO$_2$-doped polycarbonate panels. These were subdivided into cells of $\\sim 1$~cm$^2$ cross section and 6~m length, filled with liquid scintillator. A wavelength-shifting fibre inserted in each cell captured a part of the scintillation light emitted when a cell was traversed by an ionizing particle. Two different fibre-readout systems have been tested: an optoelectronic chain comprising an image intensifier and an Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD); and a hybrid photodiode~(HPD). New, low-cost liquid scintillators have been investigated for applications in large underground detectors. Testbeam studies have been performed using a commercially available liquid scintillator. The number of detected photoelectrons for minimum-ionizing particles crossing a module at different distances from the fibre readout end was 6 to 12 with the EBCCD chain and ...

  20. A cryogenic test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  1. Development of a Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) Based, High Throughput Screening Feasible Method for the Identification of PDE12 Activity Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Samuel; Bucher, Hannes; Nickolaus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology has been widely used to establish high throughput screens (HTS) for a range of targets in the pharmaceutical industry. PDE12 (aka. 2'- phosphodiesterase) has been published to participate in the degradation of oligoadenylates that are involved in the establishment of an antiviral state via the activation of ribonuclease L (RNAse-L). Degradation of oligoadenylates by PDE12 terminates these antiviral activities, leading to decreased resistance of cells for a variety of viral pathogens. Therefore inhibitors of PDE12 are discussed as antiviral therapy. Here we describe the use of the yttrium silicate SPA bead technology to assess inhibitory activity of compounds against PDE12 in a homogeneous, robust HTS feasible assay using tritiated adenosine-P-adenylate ([3H]ApA) as substrate. We found that the used [3H]ApA educt, was not able to bind to SPA beads, whereas the product [3H]AMP, as known before, was able to bind to SPA beads. This enables the measurement of PDE12 activity on [3H]ApA as a substrate using a wallac microbeta counter. This method describes a robust and high throughput capable format in terms of specificity, commonly used compound solvents, ease of detection and assay matrices. The method could facilitate the search for PDE12 inhibitors as antiviral compounds.

  2. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  3. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of cryogens in spacecraft propellant...

  4. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  5. Scintillation properties of acrylate based plastic scintillator by photoploymerization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Il [Dept. of of Radiology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, we prepared and characterized a acrylate based UV-curable plastic scintillator. It was used co-polymers TMPTA, DHPA and Ultima GoldTM LLT organic scintillator. The emission spectrum of the plastic scintillator was located in the range of 380⁓520 nm, peaking at 423 nm. And the scintillator is more than 50% transparent in the range of 400⁓ 800 nm. The emission spectrum is well match to the quantum efficiency of photo-multiplier tube and the fast decay time of the scintillation is 12 ns, approximately. This scintillation material provides the possibility of combining 3D printing technology, and then the applications of the plastic scintillator may be expected in human dosimetry etc.

  6. Bright and ultra-fast scintillation from a semiconductor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, Stephen E., E-mail: sederenzo@lbl.gov; Bourret-Courshesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor scintillators are worth studying because they include both the highest luminosities and shortest decay times of all known scintillators. Moreover, many semiconductors have the heaviest stable elements (Tl, Hg, Pb, and Bi) as a major constituent and a high ion pair yield that is proportional to the energy deposited. We review the scintillation properties of semiconductors activated by native defects, isoelectronic impurities, donors and acceptors with special emphasis on those that have exceptionally high luminosities (e.g. ZnO:Zn; ZnS:Ag, Cl; CdS:Ag, Cl) and those that have ultra-fast decay times (e.g. ZnO:Ga; CdS:In). We discuss underlying mechanisms that are consistent with these properties and the possibilities for achieving (1) 200,000 photons/MeV and 1% fwhm energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays, (2) ultra-fast (ns) decay times and coincident resolving times of 30 ps fwhm for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, and (3) both a high luminosity and an ultra-fast decay time from the same scintillator at cryogenic temperatures.

  7. Bright and ultra-fast scintillation from a semiconductor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Bourret-Courshesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor scintillators are worth studying because they include both the highest luminosities and shortest decay times of all known scintillators. Moreover, many semiconductors have the heaviest stable elements (Tl, Hg, Pb, Bi) as a major constituent and a high ion pair yield that is proportional to the energy deposited. We review the scintillation properties of semiconductors activated by native defects, isoelectronic impurities, donors and acceptors with special emphasis on those that have exceptionally high luminosities (e.g. ZnO:Zn, ZnS:Ag,Cl, CdS:Ag,Cl) and those that have ultra-fast decay times (e.g. ZnO:Ga; CdS:In). We discuss underlying mechanisms that are consistent with these properties and the possibilities for achieving (1) 200,000 photons/MeV and 1% fwhm energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays, (2) ultra-fast (ns) decay times and coincident resolving times of 30 ps fwhm for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, and (3) both a high luminosity and an ultra-fast decay time from the same scintillator at cryogenic temperatures.

  8. Advanced Devices for Cryogenic Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, D.; Stouffer, C.; Garzon, J.; Beres, M.; Gilchrist, A.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes six advanced cryogenic thermal management devices/subsystems developed by Swales Aerospace for ground/space-based applications of interest to NASA, DoD, and the commercial sector. The devices/subsystems described herein include the following: (a) a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE-CTSW) constructed with high purity aluminum end-pieces and an Ultem support rod for the 6 K Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) (b) a quad-redundant DTE-CTSW assembly for the 35 K science instruments (NIRCam, NIRSpec, and FGS) mounted on the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) (c) a cryogenic diode heat pipe (CDHP) thermal switching system using methane as the working fluid for the 100 K CRISM hyperspectral mapping instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and (d) three additional devices/subsystems developed during the AFRL-sponsored CRYOTOOL program, which include a dual DTE-CTSW/dual cryocooler test bed, a miniaturized neon cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini-CLHP), and an across gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS). For the first three devices/subsystems mentioned above, this paper describes key aspects of the development efforts including concept definition, design, fabrication, and testing. For the latter three, this paper provides brief overview descriptions as key details are provided in a related paper.

  9. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  10. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  11. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  12. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  13. Fundamentals of cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Mamata

    2014-01-01

    The author, with her vast and varied experience in teaching and allied fields, clearly enunciates the behaviour and various properties of common cryogenic fluids, methods of liquefaction, and separation and applications of cryogens with thermodynamic analysis for process selection. This profusely illustrated study with clear-cut diagrams and process charts, should serve not only as a textbook for students but also as an excellent reference for researchers and practising engineers on design of cryogenic refrigeration, and liquefaction and separation process plants for various applications.

  14. Liquid Scintillation Counting

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Sten

    1993-01-01

    In liquid scintillation counting (LSC) we use the process of luminescense to detect ionising radiation emit$ed from a radionuclide. Luminescense is emission of visible light of nonthermal origin. 1t was early found that certain organic molecules have luminescent properties and such molecules are used in LSC. Today LSC is the mostwidespread method to detect pure beta-ernitters like tritium and carbon-14. 1t has unique properties in its efficient counting geometry, deteetability and the lack of...

  15. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  16. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  17. Characterization of 1.2×1.2 mm2 silicon photomultipliers with Ce:LYSO, Ce:GAGG, and Pr:LuAG scintillation crystals as detector modules for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, N.; Sharma, R.; Ganka, T. R.; Schneider, F. R.; Paul, S.; Ziegler, S. I.

    2017-04-01

    The design of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is specially challenging since it should not compromise high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, high count-rate capability, and good energy and time resolution. The geometrical design of the system alongside the characteristics of the individual PET detector modules contributes to the overall performance of the scanner. The detector performance is mainly influenced by the characteristics of the photo-detector and the scintillation crystal. Although silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have already proven to be promising photo-detectors for PET, their performance is highly influenced by micro-cell structure and production technology. Therefore, five types of SiPMs produced by KETEK with an active area size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm2 were characterized in this study. The SiPMs differed in the production technology and had micro-cell sizes of 25, 50, 75, and 100 μm. Performance of the SiPMs was evaluated in terms of their breakdown voltage, temperature sensitivity, dark count rate, and correlated noise probability. Subsequently, energy resolution and coincidence time resolution (CTR) of the SiPMs were measured with five types of crystals, including two Ce:LYSO, two Ce:GAGG, and one Pr:LuAG. Two crystals with a geometry of 1.5 × 1.5 × 6 mm3 were available from each type. The best CTR achieved was ~ 240 ps, which was obtained with the Ce:LYSO crystals coupled to the 50 μm SiPM produced with the trench technology. The best energy resolution for the 511 keV photo-peak was ~ 11% and was obtained with the same SiPM coupled to the Ce:GAGG crystals.

  18. PLASTIC SCINTILLATOR FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yewon; Yoo, Hyunjun; Kim, Chankyu; Lim, Kyung Taek; Moon, Myungkook; Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong

    2016-09-01

    Inorganic scintillators, composed of high-atomic-number materials such as the CsI(Tl) scintillator, are commonly used in commercially available a silicon diode and a scintillator embedded indirect-type electronic personal dosimeters because the light yield of the inorganic scintillator is higher than that of an organic scintillator. However, when it comes to tissue-equivalent dose measurements, a plastic scintillator such as polyvinyl toluene (PVT) is a more appropriate material than an inorganic scintillator because of the mass energy absorption coefficient. To verify the difference in the absorbed doses for each scintillator, absorbed doses from the energy spectrum and the calculated absorbed dose were compared. From the results, the absorbed dose of the plastic scintillator was almost the same as that of the tissue for the overall photon energy. However, in the case of CsI, it was similar to that of the tissue only for a photon energy from 500 to 4000 keV. Thus, the values and tendency of the mass energy absorption coefficient of the PVT are much more similar to those of human tissue than those of the CsI. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Installation of a new cryogenic infrastructure at SM18

    CERN Multimedia

    MS18

    2013-01-01

    Part of the SM18 Hall is devoted to tests on radiofrequency (RF) cavities and cryomodules used for beam acceleration in various CERN experiments and accelerators. This movie presents the installation of the new cryogenic infrastructure in this area. It consists of a cryogenic line and six service modules, which will supply each of the six test stations. Almost 50 m of line, from the helium tank to the last test station, have been replaced.

  20. The refrigeration and cryogenic distribution system for the shortpulse x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.; Corlett, John N.

    2002-10-20

    This report describes the essential elements of the cryogenic system. The cryogenic distribution system starts at the level of the linac superconducting RF cavities [1] and moves out through the cryogenic piping to the liquid helium refrigeration plant that will be used to cool the RF cavities and the undulator magnets. For this report, the cryogenic distribution system and cryogenic refrigerator includes the following elements: (1) The piping within the linac cryogenic modules will influence the heat transfer through the super-fluid helium from the outer surface of the TESLA niobium cavity and the liquid to gas interface within the horizontal header pipe where the superfluid helium boils. This piping determines the final design of the linac cryogenic module. (2) The acceptable pressure drops determine the supply and return piping dimensions. (3) The helium distribution system is determined by the need to cool down and warm up the various elements in the light source. (4) The size of the cryogenic plant is determined by the heat loads and the probable margin of error on those heat loads. Since the final heat loads are determined by the acceleration gradient in the cavities, a linac with five cryogenic modules will be compared to a linac with only four cryogenic modules. The design assumes that all cryogenic elements in the facility will be cooled using a common cryogenic plant. To minimize vibration effects on the beam lines, this plant is assumed to be located some distance from the synchrotron light beam lines. All of the cryogenic elements in the facility will be attached to the helium refrigeration system through cryogenic transfer lines. The largest single cryogenic load is the main linac, which consists of four or five cryogenic modules depending on the design gradient for the cavities in the linac section. The second largest heat load comes from the cryogenic modules that contain the transverse deflecting RF cavities. The injector linac is the third largest

  1. POSSuMUS: a position sensitive scintillating muon SiPM detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ruschke, Alexander

    The development of a modular designed large scale scintillation detector with a two-dimensional position sensitivity is presented in this thesis. This novel POsition Sensitive Scintillating MUon SiPM Detector is named POSSuMUS. The POSSuMUS detector is capable to determine the particle’s position in two space dimensions with a fast trigger capability. Each module is constructed from two trapezoidal shaped plastic scintillators to form one rectangular shaped detector module. Both trapezoids are optically insulated against each other. In both trapezoids the scintillation light is collected by plastic fibers and guided towards silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPMs are light sensors which are capable to detect even smallest amounts of light. By combining several detector modules, position sensitive areas from 100 cm2 to few m2 are achievable with few readout channels. Therefore, POSSuMUS provides a cost effective detector concept. The position sensitivity along the trapezoidal geometry of one detector module ...

  2. An active electron polarized scintillating GSO target for neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiboussinov, B. [INFN, Sez. di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Braggio, C., E-mail: braggio@pd.infn.it [INFN, Sez. di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Cardini, A. [INFN, Sez. di Cagliari, S.P. per Sestu Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Carugno, G. [INFN, Sez. di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Congiu, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Cagliari, S.P. per Sestu Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Gain, S. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251 St. Petersburg, Polytekhnicheskaya 29 (Russian Federation); Galeazzi, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell Universita, 2 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Lai, A. [INFN, Sez. di Cagliari, S.P. per Sestu Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Lehman, A.; Mocci, P.; Mura, A.; Quochi, F.; Saba, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Cagliari, S.P. per Sestu Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Saitta, B. [INFN, Sez. di Cagliari, S.P. per Sestu Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Cagliari, S.P. per Sestu Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Sartori, G. [INFN, Sez. di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of an electron-polarized, active target to be used as detector in neutrino scattering experiments, suggested by several theoretical papers, has been investigated. We report on the properties of the paramagnetic crystal Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO), in which 7.7% of the total number of electrons present can be polarized by lowering the temperature and applying an intense external magnetic field. The material magnetic susceptibility has been measured down to cryogenic temperatures showing that for H=5 T and T=4 K about 80% of the maximum allowed magnetization can be attained. Also the spectral and time response of the crystal have been characterized and the scintillation process has been studied using a photomultiplier to measure the response to gamma rays irradiation and cosmic rays operating the GSO crystal at 13.5 K. An avalanche photodiode (APD) readout of the scintillation signal from the GSO crystal has also been performed, since the magnetic field-independent response of this device allows it to be placed close to the crystal in the cryogenic environment.

  3. GPS Scintillation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE...Depletions from 1 October 1994 2 3. GPS data from Agua Verde, Chile on the night of 1 October 1994 3 4. PL-SCINDA display of GPS ionospheric...comparison of GPS measurements with GOES8 L-band scintillation data, are discussed. 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE, CHILE As

  4. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  5. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  6. Development of Radiation Hard Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Tiras, Emrah; Bilki, Burak; Winn, David; Onel, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    Modern high-energy physics experiments are in ever increasing need for radiation hard scintillators and detectors. In this regard, we have studied various radiation-hard scintillating materials such as Polyethylene Naphthalate (PEN), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), our prototype material Scintillator X (SX) and Eljen (EJ). Scintillation and transmission properties of these scintillators are studied using stimulated emission from a 334 nm wavelength UV laser with PMT before and after certain amount of radiation exposure. Recovery from radiation damage is studied over time. While the primary goal of this study is geared for LHC detector upgrades, these new technologies could easily be used for future experiments such as the FCC and ILC. Here we discuss the physics motivation, recent developments and laboratory measurements of these materials.

  7. Scintillator Non-Proportionality and Gamma Quenching in CaWO4

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, R F; Bauer, M; Bavykina, I; Bento, A; Brown, A; Bucci, C; Ciemniak, C; Coppi, C; Deuter, G; Von Feilitzsch, F; Hauff, D; Henry, S; Huff, P; Imber, J; Ingleby, S; Isaila, C; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kimmerle, M; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Malek, M; McGowan, R; Mikhailik, V B; Pantic, E; Petricca, F; Pfister, S; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schmaler, J; Scholl, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Tolhurst, A J B; Usherov, I; Westphal, W

    2009-01-01

    We measure and explain scintillator non-proportionality and gamma quenching of CaWO4 at low energies and low temperatures. Phonons that are created following an interaction in the scintillating crystal at temperatures of 15mK are used for a calorimetric measurement of the deposited energy, and the scintillation light is measured with a separate cryogenic light detector. Making use of radioactivity intrinsic to the scintillating crystal, the scintillator non-proportionality is mapped out to electron energies <5keV. The observed behavior is in agreement with a simple model based on Birks' law and the stopping power dE/dx for electrons. We find for Birks' constant $k_B=(18.5\\pm0.7)$nm/keV in CaWO4. Gamma lines allow a measurement of the reduced light yield of photons with respect to electrons, as expected in the presence of scintillator non-proportionality. In particular, we show that gamma-induced events in CaWO4 give only about 90 percent of the light yield of electrons, at energies between 40keV and 80keV.

  8. Preliminary Thermal Design of Cryogenic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Mustafi, Shuvo; Boutte, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation Shielding (CHRS) is the most mass efficient material radiation shielding strategy for human spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Future human space flight, mission beyond LEO could exceed one year in duration. Previous radiation studies showed that in order to protect the astronauts from space radiation with an annual allowable radiation dose less than 500 mSv, 140 kgm2 of polyethylene is necessary. For a typical crew module that is 4 meter in diameter and 8 meter in length. The mass of polyethylene radiation shielding required would be more than 17,500 kg. The same radiation study found that the required hydrogen shielding for the same allowable radiation dose is 40 kgm2, and the mass of hydrogen required would be 5, 000 kg. Cryogenic hydrogen has higher densities and can be stored in relatively small containment vessels. However, the CHRS system needs a sophisticated thermal system which prevents the cryogenic hydrogen from evaporating during the mission. This study designed a cryogenic thermal system that protects the CHRS from hydrogen evaporation for one to up to three year mission. The design also includes a ground based cooling system that can subcool and freeze liquid hydrogen. The final results show that the CHRS with its required thermal protection system is nearly half of the mass of polyethylene radiation shielding.

  9. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  10. Cryogenic regenerative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Robert A

    1997-01-01

    An in-depth survey of regenerative heat exchangers, this book chronicles the development and recent commercialization of regenerative devices for cryogenic applications. Chapters cover historical background, concepts, practical applications, design data, and numerical solutions, providing the latest information for engineers to develop advanced cryogenic machines. The discussions include insights into the operation of a regenerator; descriptions of the cyclic and fluid temperature distributions in a regenerator; data for various matrix geometries and materials, including coarse and fine bronze, stainless steel-woven wire mesh screens, and lead spheres; and unique operating features of cryocoolers that produce deviations from ideal regenerator theory.

  11. A Directional Gamma-Ray Detector Based on Scintillator Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D; Boyle, P; MacLeod, A M L

    2015-01-01

    A simple device for determining the azimuthal location of a source of gamma radiation, using ideas from astrophysical gamma-ray burst detection, is described. A compact and robust detector built from eight identical modules, each comprising a plate of CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, can locate a point source of gamma rays with degree-scale precision by comparing the count rates in the different modules. Sensitivity to uniform environmental background is minimal.

  12. The Successful Operation of Hole-type Gaseous Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Pereiale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Francke, T; Lund-Jensen, B; Pavlopoulos, P; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Tokanai, F

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated that hole-type gaseous detectors, GEMs and capillary plates, can operate up to 77 K. For example, a single capillary plate can operate at gains of above 10E3 in the entire temperature interval between 300 until 77 K. The same capillary plate combined with CsI photocathodes could operate perfectly well at gains (depending on gas mixtures) of 100-1000. Obtained results may open new fields of applications for capillary plates as detectors of UV light and charge particles at cryogenic temperatures: noble liquid TPCs, WIMP detectors or LXe scintillating calorimeters and cryogenic PETs.

  13. Liquid Helium and Liquid Neon - Sensitive, Low Background Scintillation Media For the Detection of Low Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    McKinsey, D N

    1999-01-01

    The use of liquid helium and neon as scintillators for neutrino detection is investigated. Several unique properties of these cryogens make them promising candidates for real-time solar neutrino spectroscopy: large ultraviolet scintillation yields from ionizing radiation, transparency to their own scintillation light, and low levels of radioactive impurities. When neutrinos scatter from electrons in liquid helium or neon, ultraviolet light is emitted. The ultraviolet scintillation light can be efficiently converted to the visible with wavelength shifting films. In this way the neutrino-electron scattering events can be detected by photomultiplier tubes at room temperature. We conclude that the solar neutrino flux from the $\\rm p+p\\to e^{+}+d+\

  14. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  15. ATLAS ALFA—measuring absolute luminosity with scintillating fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, S

    2009-01-01

    ALFA is a high-precision scintillating fibre tracking detector under construction for the absolute determination of the LHC luminosity at the ATLAS interaction point. This detector, mounted in so-called Roman Pots, will track protons elastically scattered under μrad angles at IP1.In total there are four pairs of vertically arranged detector modules which approach the LHC beam axis to mm distance. Each detector module consists of ten layers of two times 64 scintillating fibres each (U and V planes). The fibres are coupled to 64 channels Multi-Anodes PhotoMultipliers Tubes read out by compact front-end electronics. Each detector module is complemented by so-called overlap detectors: Three layers of two times 30 scintillating fibres which will be used to measure the relative positioning of two vertically arranged main detectors. The total number of channels is about 15000. Conventional plastic scintillator tiles are mounted in front of the fibre detectors and will serve as trigger counter. The extremely restric...

  16. Seals For Cryogenic Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Tam, L. T.; Braun, M. J.; Vlcek, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis considers effects of seals on stability. Report presents method of calculation of flows of cryogenic fluids through shaft seals. Key to stability is local average velocity in seal. Local average velocity strongly influenced by effects of inlet and outlet and injection of fluid.

  17. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  18. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  19. ATLAS Rewards Russian Supplier for Scintillating Tile Production

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At a ceremony held at CERN on 30 July, the ATLAS collaboration awarded Russian firm SIA Luch from Podolsk in the Moscow region an ATLAS Suppliers Award. This follows delivery by the company of the final batch of scintillating tiles for the collaboration's Tile Calorimeter some six months ahead of schedule.   Representatives of Russian firm Luch Podolsk received the ATLAS Suppliers Award in the collaboration's Tile Calorimeter instrumentation plant at CERN on 30 July. In front of one Tile Calorimeter module instrumented by scintillating tiles are (left to right) IHEP physicists Evgueni Startchenko and Andrei Karioukhine, Luch Podolsk representatives Igor Karetnikov and Yuri Zaitsev, Tile Calorimeter Project Leader Rupert Leitner, ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni, and CERN Tile Calorimeter group leader Ana Henriques-Correia. Scintillating tiles form the active part of the ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter, which will measure the energy and direction of particles produced in LHC collisions. They are emb...

  20. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  1. Development of a reference liquid scintillation cocktail

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyn Gaardt, WM

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available of a scintillator dissolved in an organic solvent. The so-called scintillator solute is a material which emits a weak light flash or scintillation upon interaction with a certain quanta of radiation – the intensity of this scintillation being a... to prepare preliminary liquid scintillation cocktails. Figure 3: Maximum deviations observed between repeat measurements of the same source, displayed in red for Ultima Gold, green for XP, yellow for XI and blue for XPI. Figure 4: The counting...

  2. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sótér, A; Todoroki, K; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horváth, D; Hori, M

    2014-02-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 × 1 mm(2). The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ≈ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen at high annihilation rates of the antiprotons.

  3. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  4. Tungsten Scintillating Fibers Electromagnetic Calorimeters for sPHENIX upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyang; Loggins, Vera; Phipps, Michael; Sickles, Anne

    2015-10-01

    sPHENIX, a planned new detector at RHIC, features electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry that covers | η| design is optimized for the study of jets in heavy ion collisions. The design includes a tungsten fiber EmCal that is made out of a tower array of plastic scintillating fiber embedded inside a mixture of tungsten powder and epoxy. For this calorimeter, silicon photomultipliers will be attached at the end of the module to convert scintillated optical photons into electrical signals. The sPHENIX group at Illinois is currently making samples of these modules to study the production process and achievable density. In addition, we have set up a silicon photomultiplier read out test system which will be used to evaluate the module performance. sPHENIX collaboration and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  5. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  6. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  7. Novel method of producing nanoparticles for gadolinium-scintillator-based digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Park, Sung Kwang; Shin, Jung Wook; Oh, Kyung Min; Heo, Seung Uk; Cho, Gyu Seok; Kim, Jin Young; Nam, Sang Hee

    2013-10-01

    Radiation image sensor properties affect the dose of radiation that patients are exposed to in a clinical setting. Numerous radiation imaging systems use scintillators as materials that absorb radiation. Rare-earth scintillators produced from elements such as gadolinium, yttrium, lutetium, and lanthanum have been investigated to improve the properties of radiation imaging systems. Although such rare-earth scintillators are manufactured with a bulk structure, they exhibit low resolution and low efficiency when they are used as conversion devices. Nanoscintillators have been proposed and researched as a possible solution to these problems. According to the research, the optical properties and size of fine scintillators are affected by the sintering temperature used to produce nanoscintillators instead of the existing bulk-structured scintillators. Therefore, the main purpose of this research is to develop radiation-imaging sensors based on nanoscintillators in order to evaluate the quantitative properties of various scintillators produced under various conditions such as sintering temperature. This is accomplished by measuring acquired phantom images, and modulation transfer functions (MTFs) for complementary-symmetry metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors under the same X-ray conditions. Low-temperature solution combustion was used to produce fine scintillators consisting of 5 wt% of europium as an activator dopant in a Gd2O3 scintillator host. Variations in the characteristics of the fine scintillators were investigated. The characteristics of fine scintillators produced at various sintering temperatures (i.e., 600, 800, or 1000 degrees C) and with a europium concentration of 0.5 wt% were also analyzed to determine the optimal conditions for synthesizing the fine scintillators.

  8. James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Calibration and Verification of High-Accuracy Instrumentation to Measure Heat Flow in Cryogenic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Brian; Glazer, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an upcoming flagship observatory mission scheduled to be launched in 2018. Three of the four science instruments are passively cooled to their operational temperature range of 36K to 40K, and the fourth instrument is actively cooled to its operational temperature of approximately 6K. The requirement for multiple thermal zoned results in the instruments being thermally connected to five external radiators via individual high purity aluminum heat straps. Thermal-vacuum and thermal balance testing of the flight instruments at the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element level will take place within a newly constructed shroud cooled by gaseous helium inside Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Space environment Simulator (SES). The flight external radiators are not available during ISIM-level thermal vacuum/thermal testing, so they will be replaced in test with stable and adjustable thermal boundaries with identical physical interfaces to the flight radiators. Those boundaries are provided by specially designed test hardware which also measures the heat flow within each of the five heat straps to an accuracy of less than 2 mW, which is less than 5% of the minimum predicted heat flow values. Measurement of the heat loads to this accuracy is essential to ISIM thermal model correlation, since thermal models are more accurately correlated when temperature data is supplemented by accurate knowledge of heat flows. It also provides direct verification by test of several high-level thermal requirements. Devices that measure heat flow in this manner have historically been referred to a "Q-meters". Perhaps the most important feature of the design of the JWST Q-meters is that it does not depend on the absolute accuracy of its temperature sensors, but rather on knowledge of precise heater power required to maintain a constant temperature difference between sensors on two stages, for which a table is empirically developed during a

  9. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  10. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  11. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Nurge, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Johnson, Wesley

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) program has been funding work at KSC on a novel coating that should allow cryogenic materials to be stored in deep space. The NIAC Symposium will be the last week of September and it is a requirement that the funded material be presented both orally and at a poster session. This DAA submission is requesting approval to go public with both the presentation and the poster.

  12. Cryogenic Test Technology 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    aircraft configuration Pathfinder II (Figure 16) made of Vascomax 200, a set of six bodies of revolution (Figure 17) made from 6061 aluminium alloy, a...iron and aluminium alloys appear to be viable candidates. AS loads increase the number of avail- able alloys is severely constrained by toughness...using A-286 screws in four steels and one aluminium alloy. In the absence of loads cryogenic cycling gene- rally produced decreases in breakaway

  13. Study of infrared scintillations in gaseous and liquid argon - Part II: light yield and possible applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, A; Dolgov, A; Grebenuk, A; Peleganchuk, S; Shekhtman, V Porosev L; Shemyakina, E; Sokolov, A

    2012-01-01

    We present here a comprehensive study of the light yield of primary and secondary scintillations produced in gaseous and liquid Ar in the near infrared (NIR) and visible region, at cryogenic temperatures. The measurements were performed using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) and pulsed X-ray irradiation. The primary scintillation yield of the fast emission component in gaseous Ar was found to be independent of temperature in the range of 87-160 K; it amounted to 17000+/-3000 photon/MeV in the NIR in the range of 690-1000 nm. In liquid Ar at 87 K, the primary scintillation yield of the fast component was considerably reduced, amounting to 510+/-90 photon/MeV, in the range of 400-1000 nm. Proportional NIR scintillations (electroluminescence) in gaseous Ar were also observed; their amplification parameter at 160 K was measured to be 13 photons per drifting electron per kV. No proportional scintillations were observed in liquid Ar up to the electric fields of 30 kV/cm. The applications of NIR scintillati...

  14. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  15. Physics Based Model for Cryogenic Chilldown and Loading. Part IV: Code Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinsky, D. G.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Brown, B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the fourth report in a series of technical reports that describe separated two-phase flow model application to the cryogenic loading operation. In this report we present the structure of the code. The code consists of five major modules: (1) geometry module; (2) solver; (3) material properties; (4) correlations; and finally (5) stability control module. The two key modules - solver and correlations - are further divided into a number of submodules. Most of the physics and knowledge databases related to the properties of cryogenic two-phase flow are included into the cryogenic correlations module. The functional form of those correlations is not well established and is a subject of extensive research. Multiple parametric forms for various correlations are currently available. Some of them are included into correlations module as will be described in details in a separate technical report. Here we describe the overall structure of the code and focus on the details of the solver and stability control modules.

  16. The theory and practice of scintillation counting

    CERN Document Server

    Birks, John Bettely

    1964-01-01

    The Theory and Practice of Scintillation Counting is a comprehensive account of the theory and practice of scintillation counting. This text covers the study of the scintillation process, which is concerned with the interactions of radiation and matter; the design of the scintillation counter; and the wide range of applications of scintillation counters in pure and applied science. The book is easy to read despite the complex nature of the subject it attempts to discuss. It is organized such that the first five chapters illustrate the fundamental concepts of scintillation counting. Chapters 6

  17. Aperture-averaging effects for weak to strong scintillations in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixin Zhang(张逸新); Tuo Zhu(朱拓); Chunkan Tao(陶纯堪)

    2004-01-01

    Under the approximations of (1) the received irradiance fluctuations of an optical wave caused by small scale turbulent eddies are multiplicatively modulated by the fluctuations caused by large scale turbulent eddies;(2) the scintillations caused by small- and large-scale eddies, respectively, are statistically independent; (3)the Rytov method for optical scintillation collected by the finite-diameter receiving aperture is valid for light wave propagation under weak to saturation fluctuation regime, we develop the applicable apertureaveraging analytic formulas in the week-to-strong-fluctuation for the scintillations of plane and spherical waves, which include the outer- and inner-scale rules of turbulence.

  18. Characterization of photo-multiplier tubes for the Cryogenic Avalanche Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, A; Dolgov, A; Nosov, V; Shekhtman, L; Sokolov, A

    2015-01-01

    New Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with ultimate sensitivity, that will be able to detect one primary electron released in the cryogenic liquid, is under development in the Laboratory of Cosmology and Particle Physics of the Novosibirsk State University jointly with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The CRAD will use two sets of cryogenic PMTs in order to get trigger signal either from primary scintillations in liquid Ar or from secondary scintillations in high field gap above the liquid. Two types of cryogenic PMTs produced by Hamamatsu Photonics were tested and the results are presented in this paper. Low background 3 inch PMT R11065- 10 demonstrated excellent performance according to its specifications provided by the producer. The gain measured with single electron response (SER) in liquid Ar reached 10^7, dark count rate rate did not exceed 300 Hz and pulse height resolution of single electron signals was close to 50%(FWHM). However, two R11065-10 PMTs out of 7 tested stopped functioning afte...

  19. Novel design of an all-cryogenic RF pound circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basu, Ronni; Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design, construction and test of a new all-cryogenic RF Pound circuit used to stabilize a 100 MHz VCXO. Here, all active and passive RF components used to accomplish the phase modulation and detect a PM to AM conversion have been installed into the cryogenic environment. In conju......We report on the design, construction and test of a new all-cryogenic RF Pound circuit used to stabilize a 100 MHz VCXO. Here, all active and passive RF components used to accomplish the phase modulation and detect a PM to AM conversion have been installed into the cryogenic environment....... In conjunction with a high-Q cryogenic sapphire resonator a Pound discriminator sensitivity of 0.1 mV/Hz was seen experimentally. Based on this sensitivity and the noise properties of the pre-amplifier of the Pound signal, we calculate a limit of the oscillator's Allan deviation as low as 4middot10-16/radictau...

  20. Optically read out GEM-based TPC operation and preliminary scintillation studies

    CERN Document Server

    Galgoczi, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to realise the reconstruction of tracks in an optically read out GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) based Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Secondary goal was to initialise a series of systematic studies on the scintillation of particles in Ar/CF4 (80-20%) mixture. Track reconstruction is needed for primary scintillation studies as only tracks fully contained can be considered. A vetoing and trigerring logic was built for the TPC from NIM modules.

  1. Cherenkov and Scintillation Light Separation in Organic Liquid Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Caravaca, J; Land, B J; Yeh, M; Gann, G D Orebi

    2016-01-01

    The CHErenkov / Scintillation Separation experiment (CHESS) has been used to demonstrate the separation of Cherenkov and scintillation light in both linear alkylbenzene (LAB) and LAB with 2g/L of PPO as a fluor (LAB/PPO). This is the first such demonstration for the more challenging LAB/PPO cocktail and improves on previous results for LAB. A time resolution of 338 +/- 12 ps FWHM results in an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov photons in LAB/PPO of 70 +/- 3% and 63 +/- 8% for time- and charge-based separation, respectively, with scintillation contamination of 36 +/- 5% and 38 +/- 4%. LAB/PPO data is consistent with a rise time of 0.75 +/- 0.25 ns.

  2. Molecular origins of scintillation in organic scintillators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Myllenbeck, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Organic-based scintillators are indispensable materials for radiation detection owing to their high sensitivity to fast neutrons, low cost, and tailorable properties. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in organic scintillators due to exciting discoveries related to neutron discrimination and gamma-ray spectroscopy, which represent capabilities previously thought not possible in these materials. I will discuss our development of crystalline and polymer-based scintillators for these applications. Structure-property relationships related to intermolecular interactions and host-guest electronic exchange will be discussed in the context of energy-transfer pathways relevant to scintillation. An emphasis will be placed on the rational design of these materials, as guided by first principles and DFT calculations. Two related topics will be discussed: 1) Incorporation of organometallic triplet-harvesting additives to plastic scintillator matrices to confer a 'two-state' (singlet and triplet) luminescence signature to different types of ionizing radiation. This approach relies upon energetic and spatial overlap between the donor and acceptor excited states for efficient electronic exchange. Key considerations also include synthetic modification of the luminescence spectra and kinetics, as well as the addition of secondary additives to increase the recombination efficiency. 2) Design of organotin-containing plastic scintillators as a route towards gamma-ray spectroscopy. Organometallic compounds were selected on the basis of distance-dependent quenching relationships, phase compatibility with the polymer matrix, and the gamma-ray cross sections. This approach is guided by molecular modeling and radiation transport modeling to achieve the highest possible detection sensitivity luminescence intensity.

  3. Aerogel Insulation to Support Cryogenic Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking a high performance thermal insulation material for cryogenic applications in space launch development. Many of the components in cryogenic...

  4. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer project will demonstrate the capability to safely and efficiently store, transfer and measure cryogenic propellants,...

  5. Characterization of SiPM for cryogenic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervi, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Bonesini, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Milano (Italy); Falcone, A.; Menegolli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Simonetta, M. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Torti, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The development of detectors based on liquefied noble gas (LAr, LXe) is mandatory for experiments dedicated to study physics beyond the Standard Model. For this purpose, it is fundamental to detect the Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) scintillation light, produced after the passage of ionizing particles inside the detector sensitive volume, to be used for trigger, timing and calorimetric purposes. Besides the traditional cryogenic Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMTs), one possibility is to adopt Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs). We present a comparison of the performance of a SiPM (mod. ASD-NUV3S-P Low Afterpulse) at various cryogenic temperatures, from 60 K up to room temperature, with particular emphasis on the LAr and LXe temperatures. SiPM were characterized in terms of breakdown voltage, gain, pulse shape response, dark count rate and correlated noise. - Highlights: • SiPM characterization at cryogenic temperature. • Breakdown voltage, pulse shape, gain and noise of a SiPM. • Gain measurement at different temperatures.

  6. Test beam results of LHCb scintillating fibre tracker prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Sebastian; Comerma, Albert; Gerick, David; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Kecke, Matthieu; Leverington, Blake; Mazorra de Cos, Jose; Mitzel, Dominik; Neuner, Max; Uwer, Ulrich; Han, Xiaoxue [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb detector will undergo a major upgrade to meet the challenges of running at a higher luminosity. The current Inner and Outer Tracking system will not be sufficient to deal with the envisaged increased detector occupancy and higher radiation levels and will be replaced by a single tracking detector based on 0.250 mm diameter plastic scintillating fibres. The fibres are wound to multilayer ribbons 2.4 m long and read out by 128 channel silicon photomultiplier arrays. The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) tracker will cover a total active area of 360 m{sup 2}, arranged in 12 layers. The performances of prototype modules having 6 and 8 layers of fibre have been tested at the SPS at CERN. This talk focuses on basic properties of the prototype modules such as spatial resolution, single hit efficiency and light yield measured during the test beam campaigns in 2015.

  7. A Scintillating Fiber Tracker With SiPM Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Yearwood, G Roper; Chung, Ch -H; Doetinchem, Ph v; Gast, H; Greim, R; Kirn, T; Schael, S; Zimmermann, N; Nakada, T; Ambrosi, G; Azzarello, P; Battiston, R; Piemonte, C

    2008-01-01

    We present a prototype for the first tracking detector consisting of 250 micron thin scintillating fibers and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. The detector has a modular design, each module consists of a mechanical support structure of 10mm Rohacell foam between two 100 micron thin carbon fiber skins. Five layers of scintillating fibers are glued to both top and bottom of the support structure. SiPM arrays with a channel pitch of 250 micron are placed in front of the fibers. We show the results of the first module prototype using multiclad fibers of types Bicron BCF-20 and Kuraray SCSF-81M that were read out by novel 32-channel SiPM arrays from FBK-irst/INFN Perugia as well as 32-channel SiPM arrays produced by Hamamatsu. A spatial resolution of 88 micron +/- 6 micron at an average yield of 10 detected photons per minimal ionizig particle has been achieved.

  8. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosero, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Yeh, Minfang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  9. New halide scintillators for gamma ray detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alekhin, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Scintillators are used for the detection of ionizing radiation. Despite decades of intensive search and numerous compounds discovered, there is still a need for materials with improved properties. Recently, several new scintillators with excellent light yield, energy resolution, and proportionality

  10. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  11. Ionospheric precursors to scintillation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.J. Spencer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillation is the rapid fluctuation of both phase and amplitude of trans-ionospheric radio waves due to small scale electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Prediction of the occurrence of scintillation at L band frequencies is needed to mitigate the disruption of space-based communication and navigation systems. The purpose of this paper is to present a method of using tomographic inversions of the ionospheric electron density obtained from ground-based GPS data to infer the location and strength of the post-sunset plasma drift vortex. This vortex is related to the pre-reversal enhancement in the eastwards electric field which has been correlated to the subsequent occurrence of scintillation.

  12. Scintillation detectors in computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1984-07-01

    A new scintillator, Bi/sub 4/Ge/sub 3/O/sub 12/ (BGO), was tested for use in the detection part of computerized tomographs. In comparison with the NaI(Tl) scintillator it has a three-fold mass stopping power and allows the detection of medium and high energy gamma radiation with a higher detection efficiency, i.e., for the same detection efficiency its size is much smaller. Some other mechanical, physical and optical parameters of the BGO scintillator are given. BGO is prospective for use in high energy spectrometry and may replace NaI(Tl) wherever the following parameters are significant: crystal size, detection efficiency for gamma radiation, and good spatial resolution.

  13. A Measurement of the Absorption of Liquid Argon Scintillation Light by Dissolved Nitrogen at the Part-Per-Million Level

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, B. J. P.; Chiu, C. S.; J. M. Conrad; Ignarra, C. M.; Katori, T.; Toups, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that n...

  14. Characterization of liquid scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, D; Böttger, R; Klein, H; Lebreton, L; Neumann, S; Nolte, R; Pichenot, G

    2002-01-01

    Five scintillation detectors of different scintillator size and type were characterized. The pulse height scale was calibrated in terms of electron light output units using photon sources. The response functions for time-of-flight (TOF)-selected monoenergetic neutrons were experimentally determined and also simulated with the NRESP code over a wide energy range. A comparison of the measured and calculated response functions allows individual characteristics of the detectors to be determined and the response matrix to be reliably derived. Various applications are discussed.

  15. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  16. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  17. Cryogenic readout techniques for germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benato, G. [University of Zurich, (Switzerland); Cattadori, C. [INFN - Milano Bicocca, (Italy); Di Vacri, A. [INFN LNGS, (Italy); Ferri, E. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy); D' Andrea, V.; Macolino, C. [GSSI/INFN LNGS, (Italy); Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano/INFN Milano, (Italy); Salamida, F. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    High Purity Germanium detectors are used in many applications, from nuclear and astro-particle physics, to homeland security or environment protection. Although quite standard configurations are often used, with cryostats, charge sensitive amplifiers and analog or digital acquisition systems all commercially available, it might be the case that a few specific applications, e.g. satellites, portable devices, cryogenic physics experiments, etc. also require the development of a few additional or complementary techniques. An interesting case is for sure GERDA, the Germanium Detector Array experiment, searching for neutrino-less double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN - Italy. In GERDA the entire detector array, composed of semi-coaxial and BEGe naked crystals, is operated suspended inside a cryostat filled with liquid argon, that acts not only as cooling medium and but also as an active shield, thanks to its scintillation properties. These peculiar circumstances, together with the additional requirement of a very low radioactive background from all the materials adjacent to the detectors, clearly introduce significant constraints on the design of the Ge front-end readout electronics. All the Ge readout solutions developed within the framework of the GERDA collaboration, for both Phase I and Phase II, will be briefly reviewed, with their relative strength and weakness compared together and with respect to ideal Ge readout. Finally, the digital processing techniques developed by the GERDA collaboration for energy estimation of Ge detector signals will be recalled. (authors)

  18. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  19. Scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals for the CRESST-II and EURECA dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivers, Moritz v.; Ertl, Andreas; Guetlein, Achim; Lanfranchi, Jean-Come; Muenster, Andrea; Neumann, Felix; Potzel, Walter; Roth, Sabine; Schoenert, Stefan; Wawozcny, Stephan; Willers, Michael; Zoeller, Andreas [Physik Department, E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Erb, Andreas [Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperatur Forschung, 85748 Garching (Germany); Strauss, Raimund; Wuestrich, Marc [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The CRESST-II experiment for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter uses scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals that are operated as low-temperature detectors. EURECA is a joint collaboration of existing cryogenic direct dark matter searches to develop a future multi-material experiment with a target mass of up to one ton. While in the past crystals were obtained from external suppliers, we recently started producing CaWO{sub 4} single crystals with a dedicated Czochralski furnace at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen to have a direct influence on the radiopurity and scintillation properties. We present here an overview of the growth process as well as measurements of the crystals' scintillation properties and radiopurity.

  20. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  1. New Scintillation Detectors for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on new detection technologies that can be used in advancing nuclear medicine modalities, particularly positron emission tomography (PET). Several detection technologies are covered in this thesis. First, new Ce3+ doped rare earth trihalide scintillators that can be used

  2. New Scintillation Detectors for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on new detection technologies that can be used in advancing nuclear medicine modalities, particularly positron emission tomography (PET). Several detection technologies are covered in this thesis. First, new Ce3+ doped rare earth trihalide scintillators that can be used i

  3. Complex Dynamics of Equatorial Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Mirko; Materassi, Massimo; Forte, Biagio; Cicone, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Radio power scintillation, namely highly irregular fluctuations of the power of trans-ionospheric GNSS signals, is the effect of ionospheric plasma turbulence. The scintillation patterns on radio signals crossing the medium inherit the ionospheric turbulence characteristics of inter-scale coupling, local randomness and large time variability. On this basis, the remote sensing of local features of the turbulent plasma is feasible by studying radio scintillation induced by the ionosphere. The distinctive character of intermittent turbulent media depends on the fluctuations on the space- and time-scale statistical properties of the medium. Hence, assessing how the signal fluctuation properties vary under different Helio-Geophysical conditions will help to understand the corresponding dynamics of the turbulent medium crossed by the signal. Data analysis tools, provided by complex system science, appear to be best fitting to study the response of a turbulent medium, as the Earth's equatorial ionosphere, to the non-linear forcing exerted by the Solar Wind (SW). In particular we used the Adaptive Local Iterative Filtering, the Wavelet analysis and the Information theory data analysis tool. We have analysed the radio scintillation and ionospheric fluctuation data at low latitude focusing on the time and space multi-scale variability and on the causal relationship between forcing factors from the SW environment and the ionospheric response.

  4. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moszyński, M., E-mail: M.Moszynski@ncbj.gov.pl; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczyński, P.; Szczęśniak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (δ-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  5. Advantages of GSO Scintillator in Imaging and Law Level Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharaf, J

    2002-01-01

    The single GSO crystal is an excellent scintillation material featuring a high light yield and short decay time for gamma-ray detection. Its performance characteristics were investigated and directly compared to those of BGO. For this purpose, the two scintillators are cut into small crystals of approximately 4*4*10 mm sup 3 and mounted on a PMT. Energy resolution, detection efficiency and counting precision have been measured for various photon energies. In addition to this spectroscopic characterization, the imaging performance of GSO was studied using a scanning rig. The modulation transfer function was calculated and the spatial resolution evaluated by measurements of the detector's point spread function. It is shown that there exists some source intensity for which the two scintillators yield identical precision for identical count time. Below this intensity, the GSO is superior to the BGO detector. The presented properties of GSO suggest potential applications of this scintillator in gamma-ray spectrosc...

  6. Scalability, scintillation readout and charge drift in a kilogram scale solid xenon particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2014-01-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  7. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  8. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukosi, Eric; Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min; Wiggins, Brenden; Trtik, Pavel; Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen; Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina; Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu; Stowe, Ashley C.

    2016-09-01

    Lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 μm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 μm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 μm thick LISe (27 μm) outperforms a commercial 50 μm thick ZnS(Cu):6LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the 6Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of 115In and its long-lived 116In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  9. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukosi, Eric, E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Brenden [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trtik, Pavel [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu [Fisk University, Nashville, TN (United States); Stowe, Ashley C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-11

    Lithium indium diselenide, {sup 6}LiInSe{sub 2} or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 µm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 µm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 µm thick LISe (27 µm) outperforms a commercial 50 µm thick ZnS(Cu):{sup 6}LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the {sup 6}Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of {sup 115}In and its long-lived {sup 116}In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  10. Nanodielectrics for Cryogenic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Pace, Marshall O [ORNL; More, Karren [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Woodward, Jonathan [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the recent advances in nanodielectrics that were developed and tested for cryogenic dielectric applications. The systems studied are composed of nanometer size particles. Particles were produced using either an ex-situ or in-situ technique. It is observed that there are clear differences in the structural properties of materials produced using these two approaches. Either no significant degradation or improvement in the electrical insulation properties were observed for ex-situ nano-particle samples processed with an ultrasonic processor and in-situ nano-particle samples. Nanodielectrics have the potential to be tailored with better thermal and mechanical properties without losing their electrical insulation characteristics.

  11. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  12. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  13. Characterization of the scintillation anisotropy in crystalline stilbene scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline melt-grown and solution-grown stilbene to incident DT and DD neutrons. These measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature for melt-grown stilbene and providing the first measurements for solution-grown stilbene. In similar measurements of liquid and plastic detectors, no directional dependence was observed, confirming the hypothesis that the anisotropy in stilbene and other organic crystal scintillators is a result of internal effects due to the molecular or crystal structure and not an external effect on the measurement system.

  14. Quenching factor for alpha particles in ZnSe scintillating bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagorny, S.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Dafinei, I.; Pagnanini, L.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Schaeffner, K.

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the CUPID-0 experiment, a numbers of ZnSe single crystals were produced and subjected to different thermal treatments, and later tested as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. We have found that a specific thermal treatment (24 hours under argon atmosphere at 900 °C) has a strong impact on some properties of ZnSe crystals (amplitude of signal, light yield, specific resistivity) and most interestingly, changes the quenching factor for alpha particles from values > 1 to values < 1. Thus such thermal treatment opens the possibility to modify this experimental parameter for a various applications.

  15. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the success of the phase I effort, Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of...

  16. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  17. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  18. Lightweight Inflatable Cryogenic Tank Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of an inflatable and lightweight polymer-fabric structured pressure vessel designed for the containment of cryogenic fluids....

  19. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report defines, investigates, and experimentally evaluates the key elements of a representative crogenic turborefrigerator subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system.

  20. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  1. ATLAS rewards Russian supplier for scintillating tile production

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has awarded Russian firm SIA Luch from Podolsk in the Moscow region an ATLAS Supplier Award. This follows delivery by the company of the final batch of scintillating tiles for the collaboration's tile calorimeter some six months ahead of schedule. Representatives of the firm are seen here receiving the award at a ceremony held in the collaboration's tile calorimeter instrumentation plant at CERN on 30 July. In front of one tile calorimeter module instrumented by scintillating tiles are (left to right) IHEP physicists Evgueni Startchenko and Andrei Karioukhine, Luch Podolsk representatives Igor Karetnikov and Yuri Zaitsev, tile calorimeter project leader Rupert Leitner, ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni, and CERN tile calorimeter group leader Ana Henriques-Correia.

  2. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  3. Time resolved cryogenic cooling analysis of the Cornell Injector Cryomodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, R.; Markham, S.; Smith, E.; Quigley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Managing parallel cryogenic flows has become a key challenge in designing efficient and smart cryo-modules for particle accelerators. In analysing the heating dynamics of the Cornell high current injector module a computational tool has been set-up allowing time resolved analysis and optimization. We describe the computational methods and data sets we have used, report the results and compare them to measured data from the module being in good agreement. Mitigation strategies developed on basis of this model have helped us in pushing the operational limitations.

  4. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  5. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  6. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Tobin@epfl.ch

    2016-07-11

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  7. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  8. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  9. Characterization of a new plastic scintillation material and comparison with liquid BC-501A scintillator

    OpenAIRE

    Poleshchuk, Oleksii

    2015-01-01

    In this work the capability of various scintillation materials to discriminate gamma rays and neutrons were studied. Also such basic properties of scintillators as light emission spectrum and light output were determined. The studied materials were BC-501A liquid scintillator and a plastic scintillator provided by CEA. An experimental setup consisting of detector shielding, analog and digital electronics and data acquisition system was built to study the neutron-gamma discrimination propertie...

  10. Scintillation in the Circinus Galaxy water megamasers

    CERN Document Server

    McCallum, J N

    2004-01-01

    We present observations of the 22 GHz water vapor megamasers in the Circinus galaxy made with the Tidbinbilla 70m telescope. These observations confirm the rapid variability seen earlier by Greenhill et al (1997). We show that this rapid variability can be explained by interstellar scintillation, based on what is now known of the interstellar scintillation seen in a significant number of flat spectrum AGN. The observed variability cannot be fully described by a simple model of either weak or diffractive scintillation.

  11. Corotating structures in the solar wind from 111-MHz observations of interplanetary scintillations at large elongations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyantsev, A. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.; Potapova, L. B.

    2017-03-01

    Results of continuous 111 MHz observations of interplanetary scintillations of the strong radio source 3C 48 at elongations larger than 80° out on the Large Phased Array (LPA) of the Lebedev Physical Institute are reported. The data were taken during a four-year interval, from 2012 to 2015, near the maximum of the 24th solar-activity cycle. The averaged elongation dependence of the scintillation index and similar dependences for individual years during the approach and recession phases suggest the presence of a periodic modulation with a 26-day period, which is masked by day-to-day variations. This periodic modulation can be explained by the existence of a long-lived region of enhanced plasma density adjacent to the solar equator during the solar-activity maximum. It is shown that the scintillation timescale increases in the transition to elongations exceeding 90°.

  12. General optical scintillation in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruizhong Rao

    2008-01-01

    A general expression of the scintillation index is proposed for optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere under arbitrary fluctuation conditions. The expression depends on extreme behaviors of the scintillation indices under both weak and strong fluctuations. The maximum scintillation index in the onset region and the corresponding Rytov index can be evaluated from the general expression. Plane and spherical waves in the cases of zero and non-zero turbulence inner scale are given as examples for illustration of the general behaviors of scintillation indices.

  13. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2017-07-18

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  14. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2017-09-05

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  15. Designing an optimally proportional inorganic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai, E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia); Koblov, Alexander [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2012-09-01

    The nonproportionality observed in the light yield of inorganic scintillators is studied theoretically as a function of the rates of bimolecular and Auger quenching processes occurring within the electron track initiated by a gamma- or X-ray photon incident on a scintillator. Assuming a cylindrical track, the influence of the track radius and concentration of excitations created within the track on the scintillator light yield is also studied. Analysing the calculated light yield a guideline for inventing an optimally proportional scintillator with optimal energy resolution is presented.

  16. Cryogenic holographic distortion testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, David G.

    1994-06-01

    Hughes cryogenic holographic test facility allows for the rapid characterization of optical components and mechanical structures at elevated and reduced temperatures. The facility consists of a 1.6 meter diameter thermal vacuum chamber, vibration isolated experiment test platform, and a holographic camera assembly. Temperatures as low as 12 Kelvin and as high as 350 Kelvin have been demonstrated. Complex aspheric mirrors are tested without the need for auxiliary null lenses and may be tested in either the polished or unpolished state. Structural elements such as optical benches, solar array panels, and spacecraft antennas have been tested. Types of materials tested include beryllium, silicon carbide, aluminum, graphite epoxy, silicon/aluminum matrix material and injection molded plastics. Sizes have ranged from 7 cm X 15 cm to 825 cm X 1125 cm and have weighed as little as 0.2 Kg and as much as 130 Kg. Surface figure changes as little as (lambda) /10 peak-to-valley ((lambda) equals .514 micrometers ) are routinely measured.

  17. Dual Cryogenic Capacitive Density Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Cox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A dual cryogenic capacitive density sensor has been developed. The device contains capacitive sensors that monitor two-phase cryogenic flow density to within 1% accuracy, which, if temperature were known, could be used to determine the ratio of liquid to gas in the line. Two of these density sensors, located a known distance apart, comprise the sensor, providing some information on the velocity of the flow. This sensor was constructed as a proposed mass flowmeter with high data acquisition rates. Without moving parts, this device is capable of detecting the density change within a two-phase cryogenic flow more than 100 times a second. Detection is enabled by a series of two sets of five parallel plates with stainless steel, cryogenically rated tubing. The parallel plates form the two capacitive sensors, which are measured by electrically isolated digital electronics. These capacitors monitor the dielectric of the flow essentially the density of the flow and can be used to determine (along with temperature) the ratio of cryogenic liquid to gas. Combining this information with the velocity of the flow can, with care, be used to approximate the total two-phase mass flow. The sensor can be operated at moderately high pressures and can be lowered into a cryogenic bath. The electronics have been substantially improved over the older sensors, incorporating a better microprocessor, elaborate ground loop protection and noise limiting circuitry, and reduced temperature sensitivity. At the time of this writing, this design has been bench tested at room temperature, but actual cryogenic tests are pending

  18. Power control electronics for cryogenic instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Myers, Ira T.

    1995-01-01

    In order to achieve a high-efficiency high-density cryogenic instrumentation system, the power processing electronics should be placed in the cold environment along with the sensors and signal-processing electronics. The typical instrumentation system requires low voltage dc usually obtained from processing line frequency ac power. Switch-mode power conversion topologies such as forward, flyback, push-pull, and half-bridge are used for high-efficiency power processing using pulse-width modulation (PWM) or resonant control. This paper presents several PWM and multiresonant power control circuits, implemented using commercially available CMOS and BiCMOS integrated circuits, and their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature (77 K) as compared to their room temperature (300 K) performance. The operation of integrated circuits at cryogenic temperatures results in an improved performance in terms of increased speed, reduced latch-up susceptibility, reduced leakage current, and reduced thermal noise. However, the switching noise increased at 77 K compared to 300 K. The power control circuits tested in the laboratory did successfully restart at 77 K.

  19. Verification of the predictive capabilities of the 4C code cryogenic circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanino, R.; Bonifetto, R.; Hoa, C.; Richard, L. Savoldi

    2014-01-01

    The 4C code was developed to model thermal-hydraulics in superconducting magnet systems and related cryogenic circuits. It consists of three coupled modules: a quasi-3D thermal-hydraulic model of the winding; a quasi-3D model of heat conduction in the magnet structures; an object-oriented a-causal model of the cryogenic circuit. In the last couple of years the code and its different modules have undergone a series of validation exercises against experimental data, including also data coming from the supercritical He loop HELIOS at CEA Grenoble. However, all this analysis work was done each time after the experiments had been performed. In this paper a first demonstration is given of the predictive capabilities of the 4C code cryogenic circuit module. To do that, a set of ad-hoc experimental scenarios have been designed, including different heating and control strategies. Simulations with the cryogenic circuit module of 4C have then been performed before the experiment. The comparison presented here between the code predictions and the results of the HELIOS measurements gives the first proof of the excellent predictive capability of the 4C code cryogenic circuit module.

  20. Performance degradation of Geiger-mode APDs at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, A; Dolgov, A; Shekhtman, L; Shemyakina, E; Sokolov, A; Breskin, A; Thers, D

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) with THGEM multipliers, optically read out with Geiger-mode APDs (GAPDs), were proposed as potential technique for charge recording in rare-event experiments. In this work we report on the degradation of the GAPD performance at cryogenic temperatures revealed in the course of the study of two-phase CRAD in Ar, with combined THGEM/GAPD-matrix multiplier; the GAPDs recorded secondary scintillation photons from the THGEM holes in the Near Infrared. The degradation effect, namely the loss of the GAPD pulse amplitude, depended on the incident X-ray photon flux. The critical counting rate of photoelectrons produced at the 4.4 mm2 GAPD, degrading its performance at 87 K, was estimated as 10000 per second. This effect was shown to result from the considerable increase of the pixel quenching resistor of this CPTA-made GAPD type. Though not affecting low-rate rare-event experiments, the observed effect may impose some limitations on the performance of CRADs with GAPD-base...

  1. Countering beam divergence effects with focused segmented scintillators for high DQE megavoltage active matrix imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Jiang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The imaging performance of active matrix flat-panel imagers designed for megavoltage imaging (MV AMFPIs) is severely constrained by relatively low x-ray detection efficiency, which leads to a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of only ∼1%. Previous theoretical and empirical studies by our group have demonstrated the potential for addressing this constraint through the utilization of thick, two-dimensional, segmented scintillators with optically isolated crystals. However, this strategy is constrained by the degradation of high-frequency DQE resulting from spatial resolution loss at locations away from the central beam axis due to oblique incidence of radiation. To address this challenge, segmented scintillators constructed so that the crystals are individually focused toward the radiation source are proposed and theoretically investigated. The study was performed using Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport to examine the modulation transfer function and DQE of focused segmented scintillators with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 60 mm. The results demonstrate that, independent of scintillator thickness, the introduction of focusing largely restores spatial resolution and DQE performance otherwise lost in thick, unfocused segmented scintillators. For the case of a 60 mm thick BGO scintillator and at a location 20 cm off the central beam axis, use of focusing improves DQE by up to a factor of ∼130 at non-zero spatial frequencies. The results also indicate relatively robust tolerance of such scintillators to positional displacements, of up to 10 cm in the source-to-detector direction and 2 cm in the lateral direction, from their optimal focusing position, which could potentially enhance practical clinical use of focused segmented scintillators in MV AMFPIs.

  2. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  3. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Cryogenic engineering fifty years of progress

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic Engineering: Fifty Years of Progress is a benchmark reference work which chronicles the major developments in the field. Starting with an historical background dating to the 1850s, this book reviews the development of data resources now available for cryogenic fields and properties of materials. The advances in cryogenic fundamentals are covered by reviews of cryogenic principles, cryogenic insulation, low-loss storage systems, modern liquefaction processes, helium cryogenics and low-temperature thermometry. Several well-established applications resulting from cryogenic advances include aerospace cryocoolers and refrigerators, use of LTS and HTS systems in electrical applications, and recent changes in cryopreservation. Extensive references are provided for the readers interested in the details of these cryogenic engineering advances.

  5. Modular design of long narrow scintillating cells for ILC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Maloney, J.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.; Schellpfeffer, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm{sup 2} are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting fibers with the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed. The cell performance was tested using the radioactive source by measuring the PMT current and a single rate after amplifier and discrimination with threshold at about three photo electrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). This result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems, i.e. module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector because cell effective area can be smoothly enlarged or reduced (to 4 cm{sup 2} definitely).

  6. Radioluminescence dosimetry by scintillating fiber optics: the open challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Ivan; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiodini, Norberto; De Mattia, Cristina; Fasoli, Mauro; Mones, Eleonora; Vedda, Anna

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade, the interest in scintillating fiber optics for ionizing radiation monitoring is constantly increasing. Among the fields of possible applications of these sensors, radiation therapy represents a driving force for the research and development of new devices. In fact, the small dimensions of fiber optics based detectors, together with their realtime response, make these systems extremely promising both in quality assurance measurements of intensity modulated radiotherapy beams, and in in-vivo dosimetry. On the other hand, two specific aspects might represent limiting factors: (i) the "stem effect", that is the spurious luminescence originating as a consequence of the irradiation of the light guide, and (ii) the "memory effect", that is the radioluminescence sensitivity increase during prolonged exposition to ionizing radiation, typical of many scintillating materials. These two issues, representing the main challenges to face for the effective use of scintillating fiber as dosimeters in radiotherapy, were studied considering amorphous silica matrices prepared by sol-gel method and doped with europium. The origin of the stem effect was investigated by means of spectral measurements of the doped fibers irradiated with Xrays and electrons of different energies, field sizes and orientations. New approaches for removing the stem effect on the basis of the radioluminescent spectral analysis are presented and discussed. Furthermore, the causes and phenomenology of the memory effect are described, considering also the effect of dose accumulation with different dose rates and energies of ionizing radiation.

  7. Cryogenic magnet test facility for fair

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, C; Marzouki, F; Stafiniac, A; Floch, E; Schnizer, P; Moritz, G; Xiang, Y; Kauschke, M; Meier, J; Hess, G ,

    2009-01-01

    For testing fast-pulsed superconducting model and pre-series magnets for FAIR (Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research), a cryogenic magnet test facility was built up at GSI. The facility is able to cool either cold masses in a universal cryostat or complete magnets in their own cryo-module. It is possible to operate bath cooled, 2 phase cooled, and supercritical cooled magnets with a maximum current up to 11 kA and a ramp rate up to 14 kA/s. Measurements of magnet heat loss, with calorimetric and a V-I methods, are available, as are quench and magnetic field measurements. Design and functionality of the test facility will be described. Results of measurements with a supercritical cooled magnet and with a 2 phase cooled SIS100 model magnet will be shown.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  9. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  10. Cryogenic needs for future tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheder, H.

    The ITER tokamak is a machine using superconducting magnets. The windings of these magnets will be subjected to high heat loads resulting from a combination of nuclear energy absorption and AC-losses. It is estimated that about 100 kW at 4.5 K are needed. The total cooling mass flow rate will be around 10 - 15 kg/s. In addition to the large cryogenic power required for the superconducting magnets cryogenic power is also needed for refrigerated radiation shield, various cryopumps, fuel processing and test beds. A general description of the overall layout and the envisaged refrigerator cycle, necessary cold pumps and ancillary equipment is given. The basic cryogenic layout for the ITER tokakmak design, as developed during the conceptual design phase and a short overview about existing tokamak designs using superconducting magnets is given.

  11. Scintillation reduction in pseudo Multi-Gaussian Schell Model beams in the maritime environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, C.; Avramov-Zamurovic, S.; Korotkova, O.; Guth, S.; Malek-Madani, R.

    2016-04-01

    Irradiance fluctuations of a pseudo Multi-Gaussian Schell Model beam propagating in the maritime environment is explored as a function of spatial light modulator cycling rate and estimated atmospheric turnover rate. Analysis of the data demonstrates a strong negative correlation between the scintillation index of received optical intensity and cycling speed for the estimated atmospheric turnover rate.

  12. Photodetectors for scintillator proportionality measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: wwmoses@lbl.gov; Choong, Woon-Seng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, John D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-10-21

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  13. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  14. Performance and characteristics of a new scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czirr, J.B. [Mission Support Incorporated, Provo, Utah (United States); MacGillivray, G.M. [Nray Services Inc., RP no. 1 Black Bay Road, Petawawa, Ont. K8H2W8 (Canada); MacGillivray, R.R. [Nray Services Inc., RP no. 1 Black Bay Road, Petawawa, Ont. K8H2W8 (Canada); Seddon, P.J. [Nray Services Inc., RP no. 1 Black Bay Road, Petawawa, Ont. K8H2W8 (Canada)

    1999-11-03

    A new class of scintillators for neutron imaging, based upon lithium gadolinium borate, is described. These scintillators offer the ability to tailor their response to the neutron spectrum by varying the relative absorption of neutrons by the key constituents (lithium, gadolinium and boron). The isotopic compositions of each constituent can be varied in order to change the spectral response.

  15. Performance and characteristics of a new scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Czirr, J B; MacGillivray, R R; Seddon, P J

    1999-01-01

    A new class of scintillators for neutron imaging, based upon lithium gadolinium borate, is described. These scintillators offer the ability to tailor their response to the neutron spectrum by varying the relative absorption of neutrons by the key constituents (lithium, gadolinium and boron). The isotopic compositions of each constituent can be varied in order to change the spectral response.

  16. Mounting LHCb hadron calorimeter scintillating tiles

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Scintillating tiles are carefully mounted in the hadronic calorimeter for the LHCb detector. These calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  17. Radio wave phase scintillation and precision Doppler tracking of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    Phase scintillation caused by propagation through solar wind, ionospheric, and tropospheric irregularities is a noise process for many spacecraft radio science experiments. In precision Doppler tracking observations, scintillation can be the dominant noise process. Scintillation statistics are necessary for experiment planning and in design of signal processing procedures. Here high-precision tracking data taken with operational spacecraft (Mars Observer, Galileo, and Mars Global Surveyor) and ground systems are used to produce temporal statistics of tropospheric and plasma phase scintillation. The variance of Doppler frequency fluctuations is approximately decomposed into two propagation processes. The first, associated with distributed scattering along the sight line in the solar wind, has a smooth spectrum. The second, associated principally with localized tropospheric scattering for X-band experiments, has a marked autocorrelation peak at the two-way light time between the Earth and the spacecraft (thus a cosine-squared modulation of the fluctuation power spectrum). For X-band data taken in the antisolar hemisphere the average noise levels of this process are in good agreement with average tropospheric noise levels determined independently from water vapor radiometer observations and radio interferometic data. The variance of the process having a smooth spectrum is consistent with plasma noise levels determined independently from dual-frequency observations of the Viking spacecraft made at comparable Sun-Earth-spacecraft angles. The observations reported here are used to refine the propagation noise model for Doppler tracking of deep space probes. In particular, they can be used to predict propagation noise levels for high-precision X- and Ka-band tracking observations (e.g., atmosphere/ionosphere/ring occultations, celestial mechanics experiments, and gravitational wave experiments) to be done using the Cassini spacecraft.

  18. Characterization of photo-multiplier tubes for the Cryogenic Avalanche Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Nosov, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A.

    2015-10-01

    New Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with ultimate sensitivity, that will be able to detect one primary electron released in the cryogenic liquid, is under development in the Laboratory of Cosmology and Particle Physics of the Novosibirsk State University jointly with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The CRAD will use two sets of cryogenic PMTs in order to get trigger signal either from primary scintillations in liquid Ar or from secondary scintillations in high field gap above the liquid. Two types of cryogenic PMTs produced by Hamamatsu Photonics were tested and the results are presented in this paper. Low background 3 inch PMT R11065-10 demonstrated excellent performance according to its specifications provided by the producer. The gain measured with single electron response (SER) in liquid Ar reached 107, dark count rate rate did not exceed 300 Hz and pulse height resolution of single electron signals was close to 50%(FWHM). However, two R11065-10 PMTs out of 7 tested stopped functioning after several tens minutes of operation immersed completely into liquid Ar. The remaining 5 devices and one R11065-MOD were operated successfully for several hours each with all the parameters according to the producer specifications. Compact 2 inch PMT R6041-506-MOD with metal-channel dynode structure is a candidate for side wall PMT system that will look at electroluminescence in high field region above liquid. Four of these PMTs were tested in liquid Ar and demonstrated gain up to 2× 107, dark count rate rate below 100 Hz and pulse height resolution of single electron signals of about 110% (FWHM).

  19. Low-temperature spectroscopic and scintillation characterisation of Ti-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailik, V.B. [Physics Department, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: vmikhai@hotmail.com; Kraus, H. [Physics Department, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Balcerzyk, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Pl 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Czarnacki, W. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Pl 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Moszynski, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Pl 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Mykhaylyk, M.S. [Physics Department, I.Franko Lviv National University, 8 Kyryla and Mefodiya str., Lviv 79005 (Ukraine); Wahl, D. [Physics Department, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-11

    The luminescence properties of Ti-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals have been studied using monochromatic VUV and X-ray radiation in the temperature range 9-300 K. In addition to the emission band of Ti{sup 3+} in the near IR region and blue emission at 420 nm that are commonly observed in this material, we detected a UV band at 290 nm which contributes approximately one-third to the integrated emission under X-ray excitation. Based on the results of the study this band was assigned to the radiative decay of excitons localised at activator ions. Particular attention has been given to the assessment of the feasibility of the material as cryogenic scintillation detector. The low-temperature scintillation light yield of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ti (0.20 wt%) is found to be 2300{+-}200 ph/MeV at 32 keV and an estimate shows that it is two times larger for a sample with 0.07 wt% of activator. Given this, we concluded that Ti-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} appears to be very suitable material for cryogenic Dark Matter search experiments that rely on the simultaneous detection of phonon and scintillation signals.

  20. Magnetic bearings for cryogenic turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannello, Victor; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages over gas bearings for the support of rotors in cryogenic turboexpanders and compressors. Their performance is relatively independent of the temperature or pressure of the process gas for a large range of conditions. Active magnetic bearing systems that use capacitive sensors have been developed for high speed compressors for use in cryogenic refrigerators. Here, the development of a magnetic bearing system for a miniature ultra high speed compressor is discussed. The magnetic bearing has demonstrated stability at rotational speeds exceeding 250,000 rpm. This paper describes the important features of the magnetic bearing and presents test results demonstrating its performance characteristics.

  1. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Annenkov, Alexander N; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  2. Inorganic-organic rubbery scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Gektin, A V; Pogorelova, N; Neicheva, S; Sysoeva, E; Gavrilyuk, V

    2002-01-01

    Spectral-kinetic luminescence properties of films, containing homogeneously dispersed scintillation particles of CsI, CsI:Tl, CsI:Na, and NaI:Tl in optically transparent organosiloxane matrix, are presented. Material is flexible and rubbery and in consequence the detectors of convenient shapes can be produced. It is found that luminescence spectra of the received films are identical whereas decay times are much shorter compared to the same ones of the corresponding single crystals. Layers with pure CsI demonstrate only the fast UV emission (307 nm, 10 ns) without blue microsecond afterglow typical for crystals. The films containing NaI:Tl are non-hygroscopic and preserve scintillation properties for a long time in humid atmosphere unlike single crystals. Organosiloxane layers with CsI:Tl particles provide high light output with good energy resolution for sup 5 sup 5 Fe, sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am sources, and are capable of detecting both X-rays and alpha-, beta-particles.

  3. Cryogenic Thermal Distortion Model Validation for the JWST ISIM Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John; Cofie, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope consisting of an Optical telescope element (OTE), Integrated science instrument module (ISIM), a Spacecraft, and a Sunshield. The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) consists of the JWST science instruments (NIRCam, MIRI, NIRSpec), a fine guidance sensor (FGS), the ISIM Structure, and thermal and electrical subsystems. JWST's instruments are designed to work primarily in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the instruments and telescope operate at cryogenic temperatures (approximately 35 K for the instruments).

  4. 3D Printed Scintillators For Use in Field Emission Detection and Other Nuclear Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficenec, Karen

    2015-10-01

    In accelerator cavities, field emission electrons - electrons that get stripped away from the cavity walls due to the high electromagnetic field necessary to accelerate the main beam - are partially accelerated and can crash into the cavity walls, adding to the heat-load of the cryogenic system. Because these field electrons emit gamma rays when bent by the electromagnetic field, a scintillator, if made to fit the cavity enclosure, can detect their presence. Eliminating the waste of subtractive manufacturing techniques and allowing for the production of unique, varied shapes, 3D printing of scintillators may allow for an efficient detection system. UV light is used to start a chemical polymerization process that links the monomers of the liquid resin together into larger, intertwined molecules, forming the solid structure. Each shape requires slightly different calibration of its optimal printing parameters, such as slice thickness and exposure time to UV light. Thus far, calibration parameters have been optimized for cylinders of 20 mm diameter, cones of 30 mm diameter and 30 mm height, rectangular prisms 30 by 40 by 10 mm, and square pyramids 20 mm across. Calibration continues on creating holes in the prints (for optical fibers), as well as shapes with overhangs. Scintill This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1405857.

  5. Temperature dependence of scintillation properties of SrMoO4

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailik, V B; Kraus, H; Kim, H J; Kapustianyk, V; Panasyuk, M

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the X-ray luminescence and scintillation properties of a SrMoO4 crystal as function of temperature down to T=10 K have been carried out. The luminescence in SrMoO4 is quenched at room temperature, but below T<200 K the crystal exhibits a broad emission band with a maximum at a wavelength of 520 nm. The emission is attributed to the radiative decay of self-trapped excitons and defects acting as traps for the exactions at low temperatures. Such complex character of radiative decay is reflected in the kinetics which contains several components plus a contribution from delayed recombination at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of scintillation light output of SrMoO4 was studied. Comparing with a reference ZnWO4 crystal measured under the same experimental conditions it was found that the light output of SrMoO4 is 15+-5%. It is suggested, therefore, that there is scope for optimisation of strontium molybdate for application as scintillator in cryogenic rare event searches

  6. Direct Detection of sub-GeV Dark Matter with Scintillating Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Derenzo, Stephen; Massari, Andrea; Soto, Adrían; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel search for MeV-to-GeV-mass dark matter, in which the dark matter scatters off electrons in a scintillating target. The excitation and subsequent de-excitation of the electron produces one or more photons, which could be detected with an array of cryogenic low-noise photodetectors, such as transition edge sensors (TES) or microwave kinetic inductance devices (MKID). Scintillators may have distinct advantages over other experiments searching for a low ionization signal from sub-GeV DM. First, the detection of one or a few photons may be technologically easier. Second, since no electric field is required to detect the photons, there may be far fewer dark counts mimicking a DM signal. We discuss various target choices, but focus on calculating the expected dark matter-electron scattering rates in three scintillating crystals, sodium iodide (NaI), cesium iodide (CsI), and gallium arsenide (GaAs). Among these, GaAs has the lowest band gap (1.52 eV) compared to NaI (5.9 eV) or CsI (6.4 eV), allow...

  7. Temperature dependence of scintillation properties of SrMoO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: vmikhai@hotmail.com [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Elyashevskyi, Yu. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Scientific-technical and Educational Centre of Low Temperature Studies, I. Franko National University of Lviv, 50 Dragomanova Str., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Kim, H.J. [Department of Physics of Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sangyeok-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kapustianyk, V.; Panasyuk, M. [Scientific-technical and Educational Centre of Low Temperature Studies, I. Franko National University of Lviv, 50 Dragomanova Str., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-08-21

    Studies of the X-ray luminescence and scintillation properties of a SrMoO{sub 4} crystal as function of temperature down to T=10 K have been carried out. The luminescence in SrMoO{sub 4} is quenched at room temperature, but below T<200 K the crystal exhibits a broad emission band with a maximum at a wavelength of 520 nm. The emission is attributed to the radiative decay of self-trapped excitons and defects acting as traps for the exactions at low temperatures. Such complex character of radiative decay is reflected in the kinetics which contains several components plus a contribution from delayed recombination at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of scintillation light output of SrMoO{sub 4} was studied. Comparing with a reference ZnWO{sub 4} crystal measured under the same experimental conditions it was found that the light output of SrMoO{sub 4} is 15±5%. It is suggested, therefore, that there is scope for optimisation of strontium molybdate for application as scintillator in cryogenic rare event searches.

  8. USAF Space Sensing Cryogenic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095102 (2012) Compact radio-frequency resonator...enhancing when the refrigeration system is considered as part of an overall optimization problem. INTRODUCTION The use of cryogenics in space sensing

  9. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  10. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  11. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  12. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  13. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  14. Coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides using a 4pi plastic scintillator detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarelli, Aída M; Dias, Mauro S; Koskinas, Marina F

    2003-02-01

    A coincidence system using a plastic scintillator detector in 4pi geometry has been developed and applied for the standardization of radionuclides. The scintillator shape and dimensions have been optimized for maximum charge particle detection efficiency, while keeping background low and a nearly constant gamma-ray efficiency for different points from the radioactive source. The gamma-ray events were measured with a NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. The electronic system for processing pulses consisted of logic gates and delay modules feeding a time-to-amplitude converter with output to a multichannel analyzer. The alpha detection efficiency measured with 241Am was around 95% and the beta detection efficiency for 60Co was around 67%. Activity measurements of 241Am and 60Co were performed and the results showed good agreement when compared with a conventional coincidence system employing a 4pi proportional counter.

  15. Coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides using a 4 pi plastic scintillator detector

    CERN Document Server

    Baccarelli, A M; Koskinas, M F

    2003-01-01

    A coincidence system using a plastic scintillator detector in 4 pi geometry has been developed and applied for the standardization of radionuclides. The scintillator shape and dimensions have been optimized for maximum charge particle detection efficiency, while keeping background low and a nearly constant gamma-ray efficiency for different points from the radioactive source. The gamma-ray events were measured with a NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. The electronic system for processing pulses consisted of logic gates and delay modules feeding a time-to-amplitude converter with output to a multichannel analyzer. The alpha detection efficiency measured with sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am was around 95% and the beta detection efficiency for sup 6 sup 0 Co was around 67%. Activity measurements of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 6 sup 0 Co were performed and the results showed good agreement when compared with a conventional coincidence system employing a 4 pi proportional counter.

  16. Test results after refurbish of cryogenic system for smiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kiyomi; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Okabayashi, Akinobu; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Satoh, Ryota

    2010-09-01

    Superconducting Sub-millimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) is to be operated aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009. SMILES uses two superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers for sub-millimeter-wave atmospheric observation and they are cooled to 4 K levels by a cryogenic system with a two-stage Stirling cooler, a Joule-Thomson (JT) cycle cooler and a cryostat composed of three stages. Two-stage Stirling cooler precools the JT circuit and also cools radiation shields in the cryostat. JT circuit has three tube-in-tube type heat exchangers and an orifice for JT expansion in the cryostat. The cryogenic system is built, tested and delivered.

  17. Measuring the attenuation length in liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellgartner, Dominikus; Oberauer, Lothar; Prummer, Sabrina; Sawatzki, Julia; Zimmer, Vincenz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Departement E15, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ulrich, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Departement E12, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The next generation of liquid scintillator detectors like the proposed LENA detector or the planned JUNO detector will feature diameters of order 30 m. Due to this vast size, the optical quality of the scintillator is of crucial importance. To determine the attenuation length of liquid scintillators, an experiment with a 5 m long measurement section was set-up in the underground laboratory in Garching. The current set-up of the experiment is presented along with a discussion of the results of the first measurements. Additionally, there is an outlook towards possible upgrades of the experiment in the future.

  18. Scintillation particle detection based on microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Renaud, P; Gorini, B; Trivino, N Vico; Jiguet, S; Vandelli, W; Haguenauer, M

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of particle detector based on scintillation, with precise spatial resolution and high radiation hardness, is being studied. It consists of a single microfluidic channel filled with a liquid scintillator and is designed to define an array of scintillating waveguides each independently coupled to a photodetector. Prototype detectors built using an SU-8 epoxy resin have been tested with electrons from a radioactive source. The experimental results show a light yield compatible with the theoretical expectations and confirm the validity of the approach. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Scintillating track image camera-SCITIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Akira; Ieiri, Masaharu; Iwata, Soma; Kadowaki, Tetsuhito; Kurosawa, Maki; Nagae, Tomohumi; Nakai, Kozi

    2004-01-01

    A new type of track detector, scintillating track image camera (SCITIC) has been developed. Scintillating track images of particles in a scintillator are focused by an optical lens system on a photocathode on image intesifier tube (IIT). The image signals are amplified by an IIT-cascade and stored by a CCD camera. The performance of the detector has been tested with cosmic-ray muons and with pion- and proton-beams from the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron. Data of the test experiments have shown promising features of SCITIC as a triggerable track detector with a variety of possibilities. 7 Refs.

  20. Light Pulses to Photomultipliers from Extended Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Boemi, D; CERN. Geneva; Costa, S; Insolia, A; Panebianco, S; Potenza, R; Randazzo, N; Reito, S; Romanski, J; Russo, G V; Tuvé, C

    1994-01-01

    Light pulses received by photomultipliers coupled to scintillators are investigated in the cases of long scintillator slats or rods as well as large disc-shaped ones and compared with pulses from point-like scintillators. Results of experimental tests for the disc-shaped configuration performed with the single photon counting technique are presented and compared with numerical calculations. The calculations were done describing light pulse shape by means of a quite new general analytical method based on virtual light paths and images from geometrical optics. The associated electric pulses from the photomultipliers are then discussed and their dependence from source-photocathode distance are put in light.

  1. Scintillating and optical spectroscopy of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ti for dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, M. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); Coron, N. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Campus Universitaire d' Orsay, Bat. 121, 91405 Orsay (France); Dujardin, C. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (France); Kraus, H.; Mikhailik, V.B. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Verdier, M.-A. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); Di Stefano, P.C.F. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France)], E-mail: distefano@ipnl.in2p3.fr

    2009-07-21

    In order to optimize sapphire as a cryogenic scintillation-phonon detector for dark matter, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ti crystals with different concentrations of doping have been studied using continuous X-ray excitation in the 30-300 K temperature range. Light yields vary by 20% for Ti concentrations between 10 and 1000 ppm at room temperature; they roughly double as the crystals are cooled from room temperature to 45 K. From the analysis of the change in the X-ray luminescence spectra of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the concentration of Ti, it is concluded that the well-known blue emission of Ti-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is due to the radiative decay of F-centers. Recommendations are given for improving the performance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scintillators.

  2. Study of SiPM custom arrays for scintillation light detection in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervi, T.; Babicz, M. E.; Bonesini, M.; Falcone, A.; Kose, U.; Nessi, M.; Menegolli, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Torti, M.; Zani, A.

    2017-03-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) technique has been established as one of the most promising for the next generation of experiments dedicated to neutrino and rare-event physics. LAr-TPCs have the fundamental feature to be able to both collect the charge and the scintillation light produced after the passage of a ionizing particle inside the Argon volume. Scintillation light is traditionally detected by large surface Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMTs) working at cryogenic temperature. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are semiconductor-based devices with performances comparable to the PMT ones, but with very small active areas. For this reason we built a prototype array composed by SiPMs connected in different electrical configurations. We present results on preliminary tests made with four SiPMs, connected both in parallel and in series configurations, deployed into a 50 liters LAr-TPC exposed to cosmic rays at CERN.

  3. Characterization of scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals for the CRESST experiment using two-photon excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampf, Raphael; Dandl, Thomas; Muenster, Andrea; Oberauer, Lothar; Roth, Sabine; Schoenert, Stefan; Ulrich, Andreas [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the CRESST experiment for direct dark matter search, phonon and photon signals from cryogenic CaWO{sub 4} crystals are used to search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoil events. We present a novel table-top setup in which the scintillation of CaWO{sub 4} is induced by 0.7 ns laser pulses of 355 nm wavelength. The excitation occurs via two-photon absorption in the bulk material. The scintillation light is observed by time resolved optical spectroscopy. By varying the focusing of the laser-beam the excitation density can be made high enough to study quenching effects due to exciton-exciton annihilation. This allows to perform experiments to test models for the quenching factors of different ionizing projectiles in CaWO{sub 4} which are used to identify these projectiles on an event by event basis.

  4. BL LAC OBJECT PKS B1144-379: AN EXTREME SCINTILLATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Shabala, S. S.; Blanchard, J.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Cimo, G. [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Rapid variability in the radio flux density of the BL Lac object PKS B1144-379 has been observed at four frequencies, ranging from 1.5 to 15 GHz, with the Very Large Array and the University of Tasmania's Ceduna antenna. Intrinsic and line-of-sight effects were examined as possible causes of this variability, with interstellar scintillation best explaining the frequency dependence of the variability timescales and modulation indices. This scintillation is consistent with a compact source 20-40 {mu}as or 0.15-0.3 pc in size. The inferred brightness temperature for PKS B1144-379 (assuming that the observed variations are due to scintillation) is 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} K at 4.9 GHz, with approximately 10% of the total flux in the scintillating component. We show that scintillation surveys aimed at identifying variability timescales of days to weeks are an effective way to identify the active galactic nuclei with the highest brightness temperatures.

  5. Measurement of Radiation Damage of Water-based Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Rosero, Richard; Vigdor, Steven; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of $5\\%$ scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of $1.74 \\pm 0.55 \\%$ and $1.31 \\pm 0.59 \\%$ after $\\approx$ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical conte...

  6. Cryogenics and the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current plans within NASA involve extending the human exploration of space from low earth orbit into the solar system, with the first human exploration of Mars presently planned in 2011. Integral to all hum Mars mission phases is cryogenic fluid management. Cryogenic fluids will be required both as propellant and for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Without safe and efficient cryogen storage human Mars missions will not be possible. Effective control and handling of cryogenic fluids is the key to affordable Mars missions, and advancing active thermal control technology is synergistic with all of NASA's exploration initiatives and with existing and future instrument cooling programs, including MTPE and Origins. Present mission scenarios for human exploration require cryogenic propellant storage for up to 1700 days and for up to 60 metric tons. These requirements represent increases of an order of magnitude over previous storage masses and lifetimes. The key cryogenic terminology areas to be addressed in human Mars missions are long-term propellant storage, cryogenic refrigeration, cryogenic liquefaction, and zero gravity fluid management. Long-term storage for the thermal control of cryogenic propellants is best accomplished with a mix of passive and active technologies. Passive technologies such as advanced multilayer insulation (MLI) concepts will be combined with the development of active coolers (cryogenic refrigerators). Candidates for long-life active cooling applications include Reverse Turbo-Brayton, Stirling, and Pulse-Tube coolers. The integration of passive and active technologies will form a hybrid system optimized to minimize the launch mass while preserving the cryogenic propellants. Since cryogenic propellants are the largest mass that Mars missions must launch from earth, even a modest reduction in the percentage of propellant carried results in a significant weight saving. This paper will present a brief overview of cryogenic fluid management

  7. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    be to actively cool the shield in the hydrogen tank to reduce the parasitic losses. This would allow the use of less expensive, presently available coolers (80 K vs. 20 K) and potentially simplify the system by requiring only a single compressor on the pad amd a single disconnect line. The compressor could be a hefty commercial unit, with only the cold head requiring expensive flight development and qualification. While this is actually a reduced boil off configuration rather than a zero-boil off case, if the cryogen loss could be cut significantly, the increase in hold time and reduced need for draining and refilling the propellant tanks could meet the vehicle operations needs in the majority of instances.Bearing in mind the potential benefits of ZBO, NASA AMES and SNECMA Moteurs decided to exchange their technical views on the subject. This paper will present a preliminary analysis for a multi-mission module using a fairly low thrust cryogenic engine and ZBO during cruise. Initial mass is 5.5. tons (in ETO). The cryogenic engine will be used near each periapsis in order to minimize the AV requirement. The payload obtained by this propulsion system is compared to a classical storable bipropellant propulsion system for several cases (e. g. Mars lander, Jupiter orbiter, Saturn orbiter). For the Jupiter and Saturn cases, the power source could be an RTG or a large parabolic mirror illuminating a solar panel. It is shown -that - due to its much larger specific impulse - the cryogenic ZBO solution provides much higher payloads, especially for exploration missions involving landing on planets, asteroids, comets, or other celestial bodies.

  8. Testing gravity with pulsar scintillation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2017-04-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Compared to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve an accuracy of one part in a thousand within one wave period, which means picosecond scale resolution in time, due to the effect of multipath interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B 0834 +06 have hours of data acquisition, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring the effect of gravity or other mechanisms on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining the scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  9. Testing Gravity with Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 10^5 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B0834+06 have data acquisition for hours, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  10. Effect Factors of Liquid Scintillation Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Over the past decades, the liquid scintillation analysis (LSA) technique remains one of the most popular experimental tools used for the quantitative analysis of radionuclide, especially low-energy β

  11. Pulsar Scintillation and the Local Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, N D R; Rao, A P; Gupta, Yashwant

    1998-01-01

    We present here the results from an extensive scintillation study of twenty pulsars in the dispersion measure (DM) range 3 - 35 pc cm^-3 caried out using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) at 327 MHz, to investigate the distribution of ionized material in the local interstellar medium. Observations were made during the period January 1993 to August 1995, in which the dynamic scintillation spectra of these pulsars were regularly monitored over 10 - 90 epochs spanning 100 days. Reliable and accurate estimates of strengths of scattering have been deduced from the scintillation parameters averaged out for their long-term fluctuations arising from refractive scintillation (RISS) effects. Our analysis reveals several anomalies in the scattering strength, which suggest tht the distribution of scattering material in the Solar neighborhood is not uniform. We have modelled these anomalous scattering effects in terms of inhomogeneities in the distribution of electron dnsity fluctuations in the local interstellar medium (LIS...

  12. Construction of an X-ray detecting module and its application to relative-sensitivity measurement using a silicon PIN diode in conjunction with short-decay-time scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Shinichi; Sato, Eiichi; Hamaya, Tatsuki; Numahata, Wataru; Kogita, Hayato; Kami, Syouta; Arakawa, Yumeka; Oda, Yasuyuki; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2014-12-01

    To detect low-dose-rate X-rays, we have developed an X-ray-detecting module for semiconductor diodes. The module consists of a current-voltage (I-V) amplifier, a voltage-voltage (V-V) amplifier, and an alternating-current adopter with a smoothing circuit. The photocurrents flowing through a diode are converted into voltages and amplified using the I-V and V-V amplifiers. To measure relative sensitivities, we used three silicon PIN diodes (Si-PIN), a cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite [YAP(Ce)] crystal, and a Lu2(SiO4)O [LSO] crystal. Three detectors are as follows: an Si-PIN, a YAP(Ce)-Si-PIN, and an LSO-Si-PIN. Using the three detectors, the amplifier output voltages were in proportion to the tube current at a constant tube voltage of 70 kV. Using a multichannel analyzer, the event-pulse-height spectra were measured to analyze X-ray-electric conversion effect in the three detectors. The output voltage of the Si-PIN was approximately twice as high as those obtained using the YAP(Ce)-Si-PIN and the LSO-Si-PIN at the measurement conditions.

  13. Spectrometric characteristics of polystyrene scintillation films

    CERN Document Server

    Astvatsaturov, A R; Gavalyan, V B; Gavalyan, V G

    1999-01-01

    The spectrometric characteristics of five types of polystyrene scintillation films with thicknesses of 10, 30, 50 and 80 mu m and of analogous 250 mu m thick plates irradiated with sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 Pu and sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra sources of alpha-particles have been studied. The prospects of utilization of scintillation films as radiators for detection of heavy charged particles and measurement of their energy was experimentally shown.

  14. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS have been widely used for ionospheric monitoring. We anticipate over 160 GNSS satellites broadcasting 400 signals by 2023, nearly double the number today. With their well-defined signal structures, high spatial density and spectral diversity, GNSS offers low cost and distributed passive sensing of ionosphere effects. There are, however, many challenges to utilize GNSS resources to characterize and forecast ionospheric scintillation. Originally intended for navigation purposes, GNSS receivers are designed to filter out nuisance effects due to ionosphere effects. GNSS measurements are plagued with errors from multipath, oscillator jitters, processing artifacts, and neutral atmosphere effects. Strong scintillation events are often characterized by turbulent structures in ionosphere, causing simultaneous deep amplitude fading and abrupt carrier phase changes. The combined weak signal and high carrier dynamics imposes conflicting requirements for GNSS receiver design. Therefore, GNSS receivers often experience cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillation events. High quality, raw GNSS signals bearing space weather signatures and robust receiver algorithms designed to capture these signatures are needed in order for GNSS to be a reliable and useful agent for scintillation monitoring and forecasting. Our event-driven, reconfigurable data collection system is designed to achieve this purpose. To date, our global network has collected ~150TB of raw GNSS data during space weather events. A suite of novel receiver processing algorithms has been developed by exploitating GNSS spatial, frequency, temporal, and constellation diversity to process signals experiencing challenging scintillation impact. The algorithms and data have advanced our understanding of scintillation impact on GNSS, lead to more robust receiver technologies, and enabled high spatial and temporal resolution depiction of ionosphere responses to solar and geomagnetic conditions. This

  15. A cryogenic receiver for EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkowicz, R; Ogata, H; Reijerse, E; Suter, D

    2013-12-01

    Cryogenic probes have significantly increased the sensitivity of NMR. Here, we present a compact EPR receiver design capable of cryogenic operation. Compared to room temperature operation, it reduces the noise by a factor of ≈2.5. We discuss in detail the design and analyze the resulting noise performance. At low microwave power, the input noise density closely follows the emission of a cooled 50Ω resistor over the whole measurement range from 20K up to room temperature. To minimize the influence of the microwave source noise, we use high microwave efficiency (≈1.1-1.7mTW(-1/2)) planar microresonators. Their efficient conversion of microwave power to magnetic field permits EPR measurements with very low power levels, typically ranging from a few μW down to fractions of nW. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Joel

    2004-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is an experiment to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The experiment initially was deployed at a shallow underground site, and is currently deployed at a deep underground site at the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. The detectors operate at cryogenic temperature, and are capable of distinguishing nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions from various backgrounds. The detectors are shielded from background by both active and passive elements. We will describe the components of the overall experiment, and focus on the novel data acquisition system that has been develop to control and monitor the experiment via the World Wide Web. Preliminary signals from the operation at Soudan will be discussed.

  17. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  18. Cryogenic Flange and Seal Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of flanges, seals, and pipes are used to carry cryogenic fluid from a storage tank to the vehicle at launch sites. However, after a certain amount of cycles these raised face flanges with glass-filled Teflon gaskets have been found to have torque relaxation and are as a result susceptible to cryogenic fluid leakage if not re-torqued. The intent of this project is to identify alternate combinations of flanges and seals which may improve thermal cycle performance and decrease re-torque requirements. The general approach is to design a test fixture to evaluate leak characteristics between spiral and concentric serrations and to test alternate flange and seal combinations. Due to insufficient time, it was not possible to evaluate these different types of combinations for the combination that improved thermal cycle performance the most. However, the necessary drawings for the test fixture were designed and assembled along with the collection of the necessary parts.

  19. Ionospheric scintillation effects on single frequency GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C. G.; Groves, K. M.

    2008-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active within, although not limited to, a belt encircling the Earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increase, so does the potential for degraded precision and availability from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning 7 years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/American longitudinal sector as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K. in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at 1 min resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  20. The cryogenic storage ring project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Robert von; Blaum, Klaus; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; George, Sebastian; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Herwig, Philipp; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Repnow, Roland; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    At MPIK the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR is nearing completion. At beam energies of 20 to 300 keV per charge unit and 35 m circumference the CSR will allow experiments in a cryogenic environment providing conditions of extremely low vacuum and heat radiation. By using liquid helium at 2 K for cryopumping, the projected vacuum (confirmed at a prototype) lies at 1E-13 mbar or below, ensuring long storage times for slow singly charged and highly charged ions, molecules and clusters. Moreover, phase space cooling by electrons will be implemented. The internal quantum states of molecular and cluster ions can be cooled to low temperature, yielding well defined vibrational and for smaller systems also rotational structures. In the CSR construction, the cryogenic ion beam vacuum system has been set up. Extensive tests confirming the criteria on heat flow, alignment and high-voltage stability were successfully completed on the first quadrant. In addition beam diagnostic units for electric pickup signals and spatial profiles, detectors for neutral and charged fragments, the injection beam line, and an electron cooling device are under construction.

  1. ZERODUR TAILORED for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, R.; Westerhoff, T.

    2014-07-01

    ZERODUR® glass ceramic from SCHOTT is known for its very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) at room temperature and its excellent CTE homogeneity. It is widely used for ground-based astronomical mirrors but also for satellite applications. Many reference application demonstrate the excellent and long lasting performance of ZERODUR® components in orbit. For space application a low CTE of the mirror material is required at cryogenic temperatures together with a good match of the thermal expansion to the supporting structure material. It is possible to optimize the coefficient of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® for cryogenic applications. This paper reports on measurements of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® down to cryogenic temperatures of 10 K performed by the PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstallt, Braunschweig, Germany, the national metrology laboratory). The ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO presented in this paper has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion down to 70 K. The maximum absolute integrated thermal expansion down to 10 K is only about 20 ppm. Mirror blanks made from ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO can be light weighted to almost 90% with our modern processing technologies. With ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO, SCHOTT offers the mirror blank material for the next generation of space telescope applications.

  2. Positronium production in cryogenic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B. S.; Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Liszkay, L.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report measurements of positronium (Ps) formation following positron irradiation of mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge(100) single crystals at temperatures ranging from 12-700 K. As both of these materials generate Ps atoms via nonthermal processes, they are able to function as positron-positronium converters at cryogenic temperatures. Our data show that such Ps formation is possibly provided the targets are not compromised by adsorption of residual gas. In the case of SiO2 films, we observe a strong reduction in the Ps formation efficiency following irradiation with UV laser light (λ =243.01 nm) below 250 K, in accordance with previous observations of radiation-induced surface paramagnetic centers. Conversely, Ps emission from Ge is enhanced by irradiation with visible laser light (λ =532 nm) via a photoemission process that persists at cryogenic temperatures. Both mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge crystals were found to produce Ps efficiently in cryogenic environments. Accordingly, these materials are likely to prove useful in several areas of research, including Ps mediated antihydrogen formation conducted in the cold bore of a superconducting magnet, the production of Rydberg Ps for experiments in which the effects of black-body radiation must be minimized, and the utilization of mesoporous structures that have been modified to produce cold Ps atoms.

  3. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation.

  4. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  5. Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times in high pressure xenon and xenon methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pushkin, K. N.; Akimov, D. Y.; Burenkov, A. A.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Kuznetsov, I. S.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Tezuka, C.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2007-01-01

    Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times have been measured in xenon and in its mixture with a 0.05% concentration of methane as a function of the reduced electric field (E/N)-the ratio of the electric field strength to the number density of gas-at a pressure of 21 atm. Th

  6. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Krokhin, O. N.; Osipov, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  8. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R., E-mail: elena.koresheva@gmail.com; Krokhin, O. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Osipov, I. E. [Power Efficiency Centre, Inter RAO UES (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  9. Cryogenic Operation Methodology and Cryogen Management at CERN over the last 15 Years

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Claudet, S; Gayet, Ph; Passardi, Giorgio; Serio, L; Tavian, L

    2009-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research has progressively implemented and brought into operation an impressive number of cryogenic units (34). The paper will present the evolution of CERN’s cryogenic infrastructure and summarize results from cryogenic operation cumulating 590’000 running hours over the last fifteen years. The implemented methodology allowing reaching a high level of plant reliability will be described. CERN also becomes an intensive user of cryogens. Contracts for the delivery of 320 t of liquid helium and 70’000 t of liquid nitrogen have been adjudicated. The paper will describe the procurement strategy, the storage infrastructure and cryogen inventory.

  10. Design and performance of a cryogenic iris aperture mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, C.; Laauwen, W. M.; de Vries, E. A.; Smit, H. P.; Detrain, A.; Eggens, M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Dieleman, P.

    2014-07-01

    A cryogenic iris mechanism is under development as part of the ground calibration source for the SAFARI instrument. The iris mechanism is a variable aperture used as an optical shutter to fine-tune and modulate the absolute power output of the calibration source. It has 4 stainless steel blades that create a near-circular aperture in every position. The operating temperature is 4.5 Kelvin to provide a negligible background to the SAFARI detectors, and `hot spots' above 9K should be prevented. Cryogenic testing proved that the iris works at 4K. It can be used in a broad range of cryogenic optical instruments where optical throughput needs to be controlled. Challenges in the design include the low cooling power available (5mW) and low friction at cryogenic temperatures. The actuator is an `arc-type' rotary voice-coil motor. The use of flexural pivots creates a mono-stable mechanism with a resonance frequency at 26Hz. Accurate and fast position control with disturbance rejection is managed by a PID servo loop using a hall-sensor as input. At 4 Kelvin, the frequency is limited to 4Hz to avoid excess dissipation and heating. In this paper, the design and performance of the iris are discussed. The design was optimized using a thermal, magnetic and mechanical model made with COMSOL Finite Element Analysis software. The dynamical and state-space modeling of the mechanism and the concept of the electrical control are presented. The performance of the iris show good agreement to the analytical and COMSOL modeling.

  11. LHCb : A Scintillating Fibre Trackind Detector for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Lindner, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is preparing the upgrade which is scheduled to be installed in 2018/19. The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker will be designed to replace the current tracking system downstream of the magnet, required to run at an increased luminosity of 1 - 2 10$^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and to collect a total of 50fb$^{-1}$ of data. The readout of the detector will be at 40MHz, applying a full software based trigger for every single bunch crossing. The SciFi Tracker consists of 12 planes covering a total surface of 350 m2. Modules are based on 2.5 m long multilayer ribbons made of 250 um diameter scintillating fibres as the active medium and signal transport. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays with 128 channels at a width of 250 um are used for the readout. The signals from the SiPMS are digitized on an ASIC chip before reconstructing the track hit position within an FPGA on the front-end board. Several challenges facing this detector and the significant progress over the last year will be presented regarding the p...

  12. Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons 3.1.1.1 Basic detector principles and scintillator requirements 3.1.1.1.1 Interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillator material 3.1.1.1.2 Important scint...

  13. The Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) balloon project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Sharma, Tejaswita; Legere, Jason S.; Bancroft, Christopher M.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Wright, Alex M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a project to develop new medium-energy gamma-ray instrumentation by constructing and flying a balloon-borne Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts. There is a need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from approximately 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. We believe that directly building on the legacy of COMPTEL, using relatively robust, low-cost, off-the-shelf technologies, is the most promising path for such a mission. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), Cerium Bromide (CeBr3), and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. We have conducted two balloon flights of prototype instruments to test these technologies. The first, in 2011, demonstrated that a Compton telescope consisting of an liquid organic scintillator scattering layer and a LaBr3 calorimeter effectively rejects background under balloon-flight conditions, using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. The second, in 2014, showed that a telescope using an organic stilbene crystal scattering element and a LaBr3 calorimeter with SiPM readouts can achieve similar ToF performance. We are now constructing a much larger balloon instrument, an Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) with SiPM readout, with the goal of imaging the Crab Nebula at MeV energies in a one-day flight. We expect a 4σ detection up to 1 MeV in a single transit. We present calibration results of the first detector modules, and updated simulations of the balloon instrument sensitivity. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the energy, timing, and position resolution of this technology are sufficient to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the mediumenergy gamma-ray band, were it to be

  14. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Jonathan D [San Francisco, CA

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  15. Neutron Detection with Cryogenics and Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bell, Z.W.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2005-03-10

    The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI{sub 2} for direct detection of neutrons.

  16. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  17. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  18. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  19. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  20. ISOCAM experiment cryogenic test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    The thermal requirements for ISOCAM, an IR camera to be mounted aboard the ISO satellite, are reviewed, and model predictions are matched with test results. The degree of model validation suggested by analytical prediction vs test results is described. Predictions of thermal conduction through mounting screws, from ball bearings, and of the heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor correlate well with actual test results. It is shown that ISOCAM meets the thermal requirements necessary for successful on-orbit operation. The model predicted such phenomena as 'chopped' motor function and the twofold increase in temperature resulting from continuous motor operation.

  1. Performance of VUV-sensitive MPPC for Liquid Argon Scintillation Light

    CERN Document Server

    Igarashi, T; Tanaka, M; Washimi, T; Yorita, K

    2015-01-01

    A new type of the Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), sensitive to Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV) light (wavelength {\\lambda} < 150 nm), is recently developed and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. The basic properties of the new MPPC are measured at cryogenic facility of Waseda university using liquid nitrogen. Temperature dependence of breakdown voltage, capacitance, and dark count rate of the MPPC are also evaluated. In addition, the absolute photon detection efficiency (PDE) for liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light ({\\lambda} = 128 nm) is estimated to be about 7% with uncertainty of 2% by using 241 Am {\\alpha}-ray source. Based on these basic measurements a possible application of the new MPPC to LAr detector for dark matter search is discussed.

  2. Construction and Performance of an Iron-Scintillator Hadron Calorimeter with Longitudinal Tile Configuration

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD34 \\\\ \\\\ In a scintillator tile calorimeter with wavelength shifting fiber readout significant simplifications of the construction and the assembly are possible if the tiles are oriented $^{\\prime\\prime}$longitudinally$^{\\prime\\prime}$, i.e.~in a r-$\\phi$ planes for a barrel configuration. For a hybrid calorimeter consisting of a scintillator tile hadron compartment and a sufficiently containing liquid argon electromagnetic (EM) compartment, as proposed for the ATLAS detector, good jet resolution is predicted by simulations, which is not affected by this particular orientation of the tiles. \\\\ \\\\The aim of the proposed development program is to construct a calorimeter test module with longitudinal tiles and to check the simulation results by test beam measurements. In addition several component tests and further simulations and engineering studies are needed to optimize the design of a large calorimeter structure to be used in collider experiments. The construction of a test module will also provide valua...

  3. Primary and secondary scintillation measurements in a Xenon Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, L M P; Freitas, E D C; Monteiro, C M B; Santos, J M F dos [Instrumentation Centre, Physics Department, University of Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Ball, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Yahlali, N [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Nygren, D, E-mail: pancho@gian.fis.uc.p [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    NEXT is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay using a 100 kg radio-pure high-pressure gaseous xenon TPC. The detector requires excellent energy resolution, which can be achieved in a Xe TPC with electroluminescence readout. Hamamatsu R8520-06SEL photomultipliers are good candidates for the scintillation readout. The performance of this photomultiplier, used as VUV photosensor in a gas proportional scintillation counter, was investigated. Initial results for the detection of primary and secondary scintillation produced as a result of the interaction of 5.9 keV X-rays in gaseous xenon, at room temperature and at pressures up to 3 bar, are presented. An energy resolution of 8.0% was obtained for secondary scintillation produced by 5.9 keV X-rays. No significant variation of the primary scintillation was observed for different pressures (1, 2 and 3 bar) and for electric fields up to 0.8 V cm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} in the drift region, demonstrating negligible recombination luminescence. A primary scintillation yield of 81 {+-} 7 photons was obtained for 5.9 keV X-rays, corresponding to a mean energy of 72 {+-} 6 eV to produce a primary scintillation photon in xenon.

  4. CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for background-free searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2015-08-01

    The development of background-free detectors is essential for experiments searching for rare events. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay (0νDBD) and Dark Matter interactions, suffer from the absence of techniques that allow to identify the nature of the interacting particles. This limit can be overcome by coupling the bolometer to an independent device for the measurement of the light emitted by interactions, as the combined read-out of the bolometric and light signals allows to identify and reject particles different from those of interest. CUORE, the most advanced bolometric experiment for 0νDBD searches, could disentangle the electrons produced by 0νDBD from the dangerous background due to α particles, by measuring the (tiny) Cherenkov light emitted by electrons and not by α's. LUCIFER, a project based on ZnSe scintillating bolometers for the study of 82Se 0νDBD, would be competitive also in the search of Dark Matter interactions if equipped with light detectors that allow to distinguish and reject the background due to electrons and γ's. These advances require cryogenic detectors characterized by noise lower than 20 eV, large active area, wide temperature range of operation, high radio-purity and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. The CALDER collaboration aims to develop such detectors by exploiting the superb energy resolution and natural multiplexed read-out provided by Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  5. Scintillation-Induced Intermittency in SETI

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Sagan, Carl Edward; Cordes, James M.; Sagan, Carl

    1997-01-01

    We consider interstellar scintillations as a cause of intermittency in radio signals from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). We demonstrate that scintillations are very likely to allow initial detections of narrowband signals from distant sources (> 100 pc), while making redetections improbable. We consider three models in order to assess the non-repeating, narrowband events found in recent SETI and to analyze large surveys in general: (I) Radiometer noise; (II) A population of constant Galactic sources undergoing interstellar scintillation,; and (III) Real, transient signals (or hardware errors) of either terrestrial or ET origin. We apply likelihood and Bayesian tests of the models to The Planetary Society/Harvard META data. We find that Models II and III are both highly preferred to Model I, but that Models II and III are about equally likely. Ruling out Model II in favor of Model III requires many more reobservations than were conducted in META *or* the reobservation threshold must be much lower than wa...

  6. Current trends in scintillator detectors and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, W W

    2002-01-01

    The last decade has seen a renaissance in inorganic scintillator development for gamma ray detection. Lead tungstate (PbWO sub 4) has been developed for high-energy physics experiments, and possesses exceptionally high density and radiation hardness, albeit with low luminous efficiency. Lutetium orthosilicate or LSO (Lu sub 2 SiO sub 5 :Ce) possesses a unique combination of high luminous efficiency, high density, and reasonably short decay time, and is now incorporated in commercial positron emission tomography cameras. There have been advances in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that limit energy resolution, and several recently discovered materials (such as LaBr sub 3 :Ce) possess energy resolution that approaches that of direct solid state detectors. Finally, there are indications that a neglected class of scintillator materials that exhibit near band-edge fluorescence could provide scintillators with sub-nanosecond decay times and high luminescent efficiency.

  7. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  8. Characterization of the new scintillator CLYC

    CERN Document Server

    Kui-Nian, Li; Qiang, Gui; Peng, Jin; Geng, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The first domestic inorganic scintillator CLYC was grown in Beijing Glass Research Instituteusing the vertical Bridgman method. In this work, we evaluated the performance of this new CLYC crystal in terms of gamma-ray energy resolution and pulse shape discrimination(PSD)capability between neutrons and gamma-rays. The decay times occurred throughdifferent scintillation mechanisms were achievedby fitting decay functions to the neutron and gamma-ray waveform structures. We found an energy resolution of 4.5% for 662-keV gamma-rays and efficient neutron/gamma PSD withFoM 2.6. Under gamma-ray excitation, there is ultrafast scintillation mechanism in CLYC, with a decay time about 2 ns,whereasthere is no evidence of ultrafast decay under thermal neutron excitation. This work contributes to promote domestic development of CLYC.

  9. Observations of the solar plasma using radio scattering and scintillation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewish, A.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the solar plasma using the interplanetary scintillation technique have been made at radial distances of 0.03 to 1.2 AU. The solar wind is found to be independent of ecliptic latitude and radial distance, except close to the sun where acceleration is observed. Plasma density irregularities on a scale near the proton gyro radius, which modulate the mean density by about 1 percent, are present throughout the observed range of radial distance.

  10. Determination of spatial resolution of plastic scintillation fiber array with a simple method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The spatial resolution of a position sensitive gamma-ray detector configuration based on plastic scintillation fiber array was measured using a Monte Carlo simulation method. Both point spread function and modulation transfer function (MTF) were presented. The factors that influence the spatial resolution were also discussed. The results of the simulation showed that the intrinsic spatial resolution was consistent with the size of the physical pixels and a few centimeters spatial resolution could be obtained under certain circumstances.

  11. The stationary phase point method for transitional scattering: diffractive radio scintillation for pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C M

    2007-01-01

    The stationary phase point (SPP) method in one-dimensional case is introduced to treat the diffractive scintillation. From weak scattering, where the SPP number N=1, to strong scattering (N$\\gg$1), via transitional scattering regime (N$\\sim$2,3), we find that the modulation index of intensity experiences the monotonically increasing from 0 to 1 with the scattering strength, characterized by the ratio of Fresnel scale $\\rf$ to diffractive scale $\\rdiff$.

  12. Combined scintillation detector for gamma dose rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L.; Novakova, O.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1990-01-01

    The specifications are described of a newly developed scintillation detector, essentially consisting of a plastic scintillator completed with inorganic scintillators ZnS(Ag) and NaI(Tl). The gamma dose rate is derived from the photomultiplier anode current. The composition and sizes of the scintillators and the capsule are selected so as to minimise the energy dependence errors and directional dependence errors of the detector response over a wide range of energies and/or angles. (author).

  13. A central rapidity straw tracker and measurements on cryogenic components for the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielsson, Hans

    1997-04-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts in which two different aspects of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project are discussed. The first part describes the design of a transition radiation tracker (TRT) for the inner detector in ATLAS. In particular, the barrel part was studied in detail. The barrel TRT consists of 52544 1.5 m long proportional tubes (straws), parallel to the beam axis and each with a diameter of 4 mm. The detector is divided into three module layers with 32 modules in each layer. The preparatory study comprises: module size optimization, mechanical and thermal calculations, tracking performance and material budget studies. The second part deals with the cryogenic system for the LHC superconducting magnets. They will work at a temperature below 2 K and it is essential to understand the thermal behaviour of the individual cryogenic components in order to assess the insulating properties of the magnet cryostat. The work involves the design of two dedicated heat-inlet measuring benches for cryogenic components, and the results from heat-inlet measurements on two different types of cryogenic components are reported. 54 refs., 79 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  15. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tavian, L; Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Wagner, U; van Weelderen, R

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system a...

  16. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  17. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  18. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  19. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T; Lippincott, W H; Rubinov, P

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  20. Radiation tolerance tests of scintillating fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavardi, Laura; Albrecht, Johannes [TU Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    An upgrade of the LHCb detector is planned during the shutdown which will take place from mid 2018 to the end of 2019. The proposed upgrade for the tracking system is a detector composed of scintillating fibres read out by silicon photomultipliers. The tracking detector will be working in an environment exposed to radiation, so that the resistance of the fibres to radiation is an important quality, which needs to be investigated. In this talk tests of scintillating fibres tolerance to radiation will be presented.

  1. Recent measurements on scintillator-photodetector systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, E.

    1987-02-01

    The pulse height distributions from eleven kinds of scintillators coupled with a photomultiplier (PMT) and with a silicon photodiode were measured for gamma-ray energies between 14 keV and 1836 keV and compared. The numbers of photoelectrons from the PMT photocathode and those of electron-hole pairs in the photodiode were obtained. The intrinsic pulse height broadening was clearly demonstrated in NaI(T1), CsI(Na), CsI(T1) and CsI(pure) scintillators.

  2. Quality study of the purified liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Kibe, Y.

    2008-07-01

    We have been distilling the KamLAND liquid scintillator (LS) for the low energy solar neutrino observation. The distillation removes radioactive impurities from LS efficiently. We developed two types of high sensitivity radon detectors to monitor 222Rn contamination which causes a primary background source 210Pb. Their required sensitivity is several mBq/m3. The features and the measurement results of these detectors are presented. We also report the study of liquid scintillator properties after the distillation: attenuation length, light output and PPO density.

  3. International Colloquium on Scattering and Scintillation in Radio Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, W A; Rickett, B J; Bird, M K; Efimov, A I; Samoznaev, L N; Rudash, V K; Chashei, I V; Plettemeier, D; Spangler, S R; Tokarev, Y; Belov, Y; Boiko, G; Komrakov, G; Chau, J; Harmon, J; Sulzer, M; Kojima, M; Tokumaru, M; Fujiki, K; Janardhan, P; Jackson, B V; Hick, P P; Buffington, A; Olyak, M R; Fallows, R A; Nechaeva, M B; Gavrilenko, V G; Gorshenkov, Yu N; Alimov, V A; Molotov, I E; Pushkarev, A B; Shanks, R; Tuccari, G; Lotova, N A; Vladimirski, K V; Obridko, V N; Gubenko, V N; Andreev, V E; Stinebring, D R; Gwinn, C; Lovell, J E J; Jauncey, D L; Senkbeil, C; Shabala, S; Bignall, H E; MacQuart, J P; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Smirnova, T V; Malofeev, V M; Malov, O I; Tyulbashev, S A; Jessner, A; Sieber, W; Wielebinski, R; Scattering and Scintillation in Radio Astronomy

    2006-01-01

    Topics of the Colloquium: a) Interplanetary scintillation b) Interstellar scintillation c) Modeling and physical origin of the interplanetary and the interstellar plasma turbulence d) Scintillation as a tool for investigation of radio sources e) Seeing through interplanetary and interstellar turbulent media Ppt-presentations are available on the Web-site: http://www.prao.ru/conf/Colloquium/main.html

  4. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  5. Plastic scintillators modifications for a selective radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, Matthieu; Bertrand, Guillaume H.V.; Carrel, Frederick; Coulon, Romain; Dumazert, Jonathan; Montbarbon, Eva; Sguerra, Fabien [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs and Architectures electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    Recent developments of plastic scintillators are reviewed, from January 2000 to June 2015. All examples are distributed into the main application, i.e. how the plastic scintillator was modified to enhance the detection towards a given radiation particle. The main characteristics of these newly created scintillators and their detection properties are given. (authors)

  6. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  7. DESCANT - The DEuterated SCintillator Array for Neutron Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildstein, Vinzenz; Garrett, P. E.; Bandyopadhay, D.; Bangay, J.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Turko, J.; Wong, J.; Ashley, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Ball, G. C.; Bishop, D. P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Shaw, B.; Saran, F.

    2016-09-01

    The DESCANT array at TRIUMF is designed to detect neutrons from RIB experiments. DESCANT is composed of 70 close-packed deuterated organic liquid scintillators coupled to digital fast read-out ADC modules. This configuration will permit online pulse-shape discrimination between neutron and γ-ray events. A prototype detector has been tested with monoenergetic neutrons at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Kentucky. A first commissioning experiment of the full array, using the decay of 145-146Cs, will be performed in August 2016. The results of the tests and a preliminary analysis of the commissioning experiment will be presented. Work supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the National Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Research Chairs program.

  8. X-ray imaging and detection using plastic scintillating fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Ikhlef, A; Beddar, A S

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of plastic scintillating fiber array in X-ray imaging with low-energy radiation. This array is coupled to a multichannel intensified photocathode and then to a CCD detector via a fiber optics taper. The length of the fiber array is experimentally optimized for the radiation used. We found here that the length of the fibers (interaction medium) does not contribute too much in the degradation of the spatial resolution under 10 keV irradiation along the axis of the fiber array. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) measurements of the PSF array are compared to the optics MTF of the imaging system (without the sample) and that cross-talk in the fiber array is found to be negligible for a fiber array thickness of 20 mm.

  9. A SiPM-based scintillator prototype for the upgrade of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Bretz, Thomas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Kemp, Julian; Meissner, Rebecca; Middendorf, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Peters, Christine [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Collaboration: Pierre-Auger-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Plastic scintillator-based detectors are simple and yet powerful instruments, commonly used in particle physics experiments. These detectors are also planned to be installed at the Pierre Auger Observatory as part of the upgrade called AugerPrime. Here, a single detector module will consist of several large-sized scintillator bars. Embedded wavelength shifting fibres read out the scintillation light and are coupled to a single photo-sensitive device. We investigate the application of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) in this scope, which benefits from high photon detection efficiency and stability. We show the performance of a SiPM-based prototype device installed in the 2 m{sup 2} detector ASCII - an early prototype of the scintillating detector planned for AugerPrime. We focus on the electronics, the optical coupling and the in situ calibration. As ASCII has been operating with SiPMs for several months now, we also highlight first high-energy events seen in coincidence with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  10. The 100th service module is repaired

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In Building 110, a small team is working round the clock to complete the repair of the service modules needed for the cryogenic line between Points 7 and 8. The team has just repaired the one-hundredth module.

  11. Development of new Polysiloxane Based Liquid Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Quaranta, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento,Via Sommarive, 9, 38123 Trento (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Carturan, S.; Collazuol, G.; Checchia, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Degerlier, M. [Department of Physics, Nevsehir Haci Bektas Veli University, Science and Art Faculty, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    In the last decade, attention toward neutron detection has been growing in the scientific community, driven by new requirements in different fields of application ranging from homeland security to medical and material analysis, from research physics, to nuclear energy production. So far neutron detection, with particular attention to fast neutrons, has been mainly based on organic liquid scintillators, owing to their good efficiency and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability. Most of these liquids have however some main drawbacks given by toxicity, flammability, volatility and sensitivity to dissolved oxygen that limits the duration and the quality of their performances with worse handiness and increased costs. Phenyl-substituted polysiloxanes could address most of these issues, being characterized by low toxicity, low volatility and low flammability. Their optical properties can be tailored by changing the phenyl distribution and concentration thus allowing to increase the solubility of organic dyes, to modify the fluorescence spectra and to vary the refractive index of the medium. Furthermore, polysiloxanes have been recently exploited for the production of plastic scintillators with very good chemical and thermal stability and very good radiation hardness and the development of polysiloxane liquid scintillators could allow to combine these interesting properties with the supremacy of liquid scintillators as regarding PSD over plastics. For these reasons, the properties of several phenyl-substituted polysiloxane with different phenyl amounts and different viscosities have been investigated, with particular attention to the scintillation response and the pulse shape discrimination capability, and the results of the investigation are reported in this work. More in details, the scintillation light yield towards gamma rays ({sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs) of several polysiloxane liquids has been analyzed and compared with the light yield of a commercial non

  12. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  13. GEANT4 simulation of plastic scintillator strips with embedded optical fibers for a prototype of tomographic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggi, S., E-mail: simone.riggi@ct.infn.i [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); INFN Section of Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia (Italy); La Rocca, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); INFN Section of Catania (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Roma (Italy); Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); INFN Section of Catania (Italy); Pappalardo, G.S. [INFN Section of Catania (Italy); Riggi, F.; Russo, G.V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); INFN Section of Catania (Italy)

    2010-12-21

    The response to cosmic muons of plastic scintillator strips, with and without wavelength shifter fibers embedded, read out at both edges by photomultipliers has been studied through detailed GEANT4 simulations, with the aim of studying the light collection at the module ends under different conditions. The performed simulations, validated and tuned with data coming from a module prototype, could serve as an important guide for the design of a tomographic system based on cosmic ray muons.

  14. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  15. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  16. Cryogenic test of the 4 K / 2 K insert for the ARIEL e-Linac cryomodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Ma, Y.; Harmer, P.; Kishi, D.; Koveshnikov, A.; Muller, N.; Vrielink, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada); O' Brien, M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Ahammed, M. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Kolkata (India)

    2014-01-29

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF requires a 50 MeV superconducting electron linac consisting of five nine cell 1.3 GHz cavities divided into three cryomodules with one, two and two cavities in each module respectively. LHe is distributed in parallel to each module at 4 K and at ∼1.2 bar. Each module has a cryogenic insert on board that receives the 4 K liquid and produces 2 K into a cavity phase separator. The module combines a 4 K phase separator, a plate and fin heat exchanger from DATE and a J-T valve expanding into the 2 K phase separator. The unit also supplies 4 K liquid to thermal intercepts in the module in siphon loops that return the vaporized liquid to the 4 K reservoir. For testing purposes the unit is outfitted with a dummy 2 K phase separator and thermal intercepts with variable heaters that mimic the final heat loads in order to test the cryogenic performance. The design of the 4 K / 2 K insert, the results of the cold tests and a summary of the test infrastructure including cryogenics services will be presented.

  17. Rejection of randomly coinciding events in ZnMoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyak, D M; Giuliani, A; Mancuso, M; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Tenconi, M; Tretyak, V I

    2014-01-01

    Random coincidence of events (particularly from two neutrino double beta decay) could be one of the main sources of background in the search for neutrinoless double beta decay with cryogenic bolometers due to their poor time resolution. Pulse-shape discrimination by using front edge analysis, mean-time and $\\chi^2$ methods was applied to discriminate randomly coinciding events in ZnMoO$_4$ cryogenic scintillating bolometers. These events can be effectively rejected at the level of 99% by the analysis of the heat signals with rise-time of about 14 ms and signal-to-noise ratio of 900, and at the level of 92% by the analysis of the light signals with rise-time of about 3 ms and signal-to-noise ratio of 30, under the requirement to detect 95% of single events. These rejection efficiencies are compatible with extremely low background levels in the region of interest of neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo for enriched ZnMoO$_4$ detectors, of the order of $10^{-4}$ counts/(y keV kg). Pulse-shape parameters ...

  18. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  19. Neutron/gamma discrimination properties of composite scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwanowska, J; Swiderski, L; Moszynski, M; Szczesniak, T; Sibczynski, P [The Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk, PL-05-400 Poland (Poland); Galunov, N Z; Karavaeva, N L, E-mail: j.iwanowska@ipj.gov.pl [The Institute for Scintillation Materials of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Ave., 61001, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2011-07-15

    A composite scintillator is a solid solution, which contains the grains of organic molecular single crystal introduced into a polymer matrix and placed inside the housing. Hereunder, we present n/{gamma} discrimination properties of four composite scintillators; two of the them are based on p-terphenyl and two others-on stilbene. The results obtained with a stilbene single crystal and a liquid scintillator BC501A are shown as a comparison. Initial conclusion, which is drawn from the paper, is that composite scintillators could be an alternative substitution for commonly used liquid scintillators.

  20. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C.; Gramlich, B.; Wagner, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  1. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, C; Wagner, S

    2015-01-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  2. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mufson, S., E-mail: mufson@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Baugh, B.; Bower, C. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Coan, T.E. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Cooper, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Corwin, L. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Karty, J.A. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Mason, P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37916 (United States); Messier, M.D. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Pla-Dalmau, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Proudfoot, M. [Renkert Oil, Morgantown, PA 19543 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  3. Optimization of Shielded Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Morrison, John; Akli, Kramer; Freeman, Richard; High Energy Density Physics Team

    2011-10-01

    The High Energy Density Physics group is interested in the basic science of creating a neutron and gamma ray source. The neutrons and gamma rays are produced by accelerating ions via a laser into a target and creating fusion neutrons and gamma rays. A scintillator and photomultiplier tube will be used to detect these neutrons. Neutrons and photons produce ionizing radiation in the scintillator which then activates metastable states. These metastable states have both short and long decay rates. The initial photon count is orders of magnitude higher than the neutron count and poses problems for accurately detecting the neutrons due to the long decay state that is activated by the photons. The effects of adding lead shielding on the temporal response and signal level of the neutron detector will be studied in an effort to minimize the photon count without significant reduction to the temporal resolution of the detector. MCNP5 will be used to find the temporal response and energy deposition into the scintillator by adding lead shielding. Results from the simulations will be shown. Optimization of our scintillator neutron detection system is needed to resolve the neutron energies and neutron count of a novel neutron and gamma ray source.

  4. Thallium bromide photodetectors for scintillation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Hitomi, K; Shoji, T; Hiratate, Y; Ishibashi, H; Ishii, M

    2000-01-01

    A wide bandgap compound semiconductor, TlBr, has been investigated as a blue sensitive photodetector material for scintillation detection. The TlBr photodetectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals grown by the TMZ method using materials purified by many pass zone refining. The performance of the photodetectors has been evaluated by measuring their leakage current, quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity, direct X-ray detection and scintillation detection characteristics. The photodetectors have shown high quantum efficiency for the blue wavelength region and high spatial uniformity for their optical response. In addition, good direct X-ray detection characteristics with an energy resolution of 4.5 keV FWHM for 22 keV X-rays from a sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd radioactive source have been obtained. Detection of blue scintillation from GSO and LSO scintillators irradiated with a sup 2 sup 2 Na radioactive source has been done successfully by using the photodetectors at room temperature. A clear full-energy pea...

  5. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  6. Light transport in long, plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierlik, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, PL 05-400 Swierk-Otwock (Poland)], E-mail: m.gierlik@ipj.gov.pl; Batsch, T.; Marcinkowski, R.; Moszynski, M.; Sworobowicz, T. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, PL 05-400 Swierk-Otwock (Poland)

    2008-08-11

    As a form of the input into the collaboration the group from the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies undertook a task of investigating the validity of the design of a compact detector for Gamma Ray Bursts photon polarization measurements, known as POLAR. The authors focused at the scintillation and light transport properties of (200x6x6)mm{sup 3} BC400 plastic bars as well as of other samples of BC408 plastic in the attempt to determine whether the assembled instrument is going to achieve the performance criteria bestowed upon it by the project. The investigation revealed a strong dependence between the amplitude of a signal and distance between the precursor interaction in a scintillator and the photodetector. Accordingly to this finding an attempt has been made to determine the influence of the surface polishing quality on the overall scintillator performance. The authors consider that proper machining of scintillator pieces, adequate choice of their packaging, and proper software analysis may overcome the revealed disadvantages.

  7. Improved light yield of lead tungstate scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Hofstäetter, A; Korzhik, M V; Ligun, V; Lecoq, P; Missevitch, O V; Novotny, R; Peigneux, J P

    2000-01-01

    The application at medium and low energies of lead tungstate scintillators, so far optimized for the ECAL calorimeter of CMS for the future LHC, is strongly limited by their poor light yield. Suitable dopants like molybdenum and terbium can help to overcome this problem. Concepts, results, advantages and drawbacks of this approach are discussed. (11 refs).

  8. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  9. Scintillation properties of YAG:Yb crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, P; Carugno, Giovanni; Iannuzzi, D

    2001-01-01

    We report on measurements of the light yield, emission spectrum, and time response of YAG:Yb crystals. The temperature dependence of light yield was investigated. Data show that YAG:Yb crystals are good scintillators, suitable for applications to neutrino detection and spectroscopy.

  10. Assessment of scintillation proxy maps for a scintillation study during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions over Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is demonstrate the validity and usefulness of scintillation proxies derived from IGS data, through its comparison with data from dedicated scintillation monitors and its application to GNSS scintillation patterns. The paper presents scintillation patterns developed by using data from the dedicated scintillation monitors of the scintillation network decision aid (SCINDA) network, and proxy maps derived from IGS GPS data for 2011 and 2012 over low latitude stations in Uganda. The amplitude and phase scintillation indicies (S4 and σΦ) were obtained from the Novatel GSV4004B ionospheric scintillation and total electron content (TEC) monitor managed by SCINDA at Makerere (0.340N, 32.570E). The corresponding IGS GPS proxy data were obtained from the receivers at Entebbe (0.040N, 32.440E) and Mbarara (0.600S, 30.740E). The derived amplitude (S4p) and phase (sDPR) scintillation proxy maps were compared with maps of S4 and σΦ during geomagnetic storms (moderate and strong) and geomagnetically quiet conditions. The scintillation patterns using S4 and σΦ and their respective proxies revealed similar diurnal and seasonal patterns of strong scintillation occurrence. The peaks of scintillation occurrence with mean values in the range 0.3 geomagnetically disturbed (moderate and strong) and quiet conditions over the Ugandan region. The results show that SCINDA and IGS based scintillation patterns reveal the same nighttime and seasonal occurrence of irregularities over Uganda irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions. Therefore, the amplitude and phase scintillation proxies presented here can be used to fill gaps in low-latitude data where there are no data available from dedicated scintillation receivers, irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions.

  11. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Genfa [Yorktown, VA; Phillips, Harry Lawrence [Hayes, VA

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  12. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  13. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R < or = 0.003, from 800 to 4800/cm (12 - 2 microns ). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000/ cm-1 (25 - 1 microns) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R < or = 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  14. Systematic study of particle quenching in organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, L.M.; Bagán, H. [Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Tarancón, A., E-mail: alex.tarancon@ub.edu [Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rauret, G.; Garcia, J.F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-01-11

    Among the different factors that affect measurements by organic scintillators, the majority of attention has been focused on those related to the scintillator (i.e., ionization, chemical, color and optical quenching), and less attention has been paid to the loss of energy before the particle (i.e., alpha or beta) arrives at the scintillator (i.e., particle quenching). This study evaluates the effect of particle quenching in different scintillation methods (i.e., using two plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm1 and PSm2), liquid scintillator and gel scintillator) by measuring solutions that contain increasing concentrations of NaCl, BaCl{sub 2} and glycerin. The results show the importance of particle quenching in PSm measurements because detection efficiency decreases with increasing concentrations of the quenching component, although the spectrum position and external standard parameter remain constant. The results have shown evidence of particle quenching, although at a lower magnitude, in the liquid scintillation or gel scintillation measurements. Moreover, the use of two PSm with different diameters and salty compound that alters the equilibrium of the liquid and gel emulsions also exemplified the importance of the transmission of optical photons through different scintillation media (i.e., optical quenching). Improvement and deterioration of the optical conditions on the scintillation media is manifested as a movement of the spectrum to higher and lower energies, respectively. The results obtained with PSm were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mufson, S; Bower, C; Coan, T; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Karty, J; Mason, P; Pla-Dalmau, A; Proudfoot, M

    2015-01-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator to its detectors as its active detector medium. The composition of the scintillator was developed to meet the requirements of the experiment. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA near and far detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers. A rigorous set of quality control procedures were put in place to assure that the liquid scintillator was blended to satisfy the transparency, light yield, and conductivity requirements. The incoming components, the blended scintillator, and the scintillator in the transport tanker trailers were all qualified with these procedures, which ensured that the NOvA scintillator was high quality and met its performance requirements.

  16. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gaillard, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Sexton, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Velten, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  17. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  18. Scintillation mechanism in stoichiometric cerium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Lempicki, A.; Berman, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-31

    These materials constitute a new class of scintillator media, with high speed and high light output. This is illustrated using CeF{sub 3}, and CeP{sub 5}O{sub l4}. While speed, being limited by a radiative lifetime of an allowed d-f transition on the Ce{sup +3} ion, cannot be improved (without loss of the light output), the light output in both cases falls significantly below the estimated theoretical limit. To explain this we propose a mechanism of scintillation process, in which transfer of excitation energy from the lattice to the d-f electronic structure of Ce{sup +3} ions is absent and the light output of the scintillator is limited to the excitation energy directly intercepted by Ce ions. The efficiency depends, therefore, on the competition for holes between Ce{sup +3} ions and anions, determining the share of the total energy deposited by a high energy particle, which can be transformed into scintillation photons. The mechanism requires that the Ce ion has a stable 4+ charge state. Ionization of Ce{sup +3} is followed by capturing of an electron and creation of the Ce bound exciton. In the next step the energy of the bound exciton is transferred to the d-f structure of the Ce ion and, in the final step, a scintillation photon is emitted. The relatively high light output characteristic of these materials is due to the high concentration of Ce ions. The reasons for the lack of efficient energy transfer from the lattice may reside in large relaxation energies of lattice excitations. We use this model to discuss potential improvements in the light output of CeF{sub 3}.

  19. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks (STICT) is a thermal management system applied by either an automated or manual spraying process with less...

  20. Cryogenic fatigue data developed for Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Data were obtained on the cryogenic fatigue properties of Inconel 718 bar using axial loading and rotating beam fatigue tests. Results also disclosed the fatigue properties of Inconel 718 sheet materials.

  1. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  2. Advanced Insulation Techniques for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to store large amounts of cryogenic fluids for long durations has a profound effect on the success of many future space programs using these fluids for...

  3. Cryogenic and Vacuum Compatible Metrology Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR project for NASA, Flexure Engineering of Greenbelt, MD will leverage the work we did in our current SBIR project entitled: Cryogenic Optical...

  4. A brief overview of cryogenics in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.-M.

    In this paper general aspects of cryogenics in China are introduced, and applications of cryogenics in the space programme are described briefly, such as its application to the Long March 3 rocket vehicles with LH2/LO2 engines, the development of a 750 dm 3 hr -1 liquid hydrogen plant and railway tank cars with 60 and 70 m 3 capacities. In addition, the progress of various cryogenic techniques in China is presented, such as the FY-1 radiation refrigerator loaded on a meteorology satellite, regenerative cryocoolers of the Gifford-McMahon, Solvay, Vuilleumier, Stirling and pulse tube types, and the KM-3 and KM-4 space simulation facilities. Finally, the paper discusses current education about refrigeration and cryogenics for undergraduates and graduates.

  5. The cryogenic control system of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; WANG Ke-Xiang; ZHAO Ji-Jiu; YUE Ke-Juan; DAI Ming-Sui; HUANG Yi-Ling; JIANG Bo

    2008-01-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade Project(BEPCⅡ).The system consists of a Siemens PLC(ST-PLC,Programmable Logic Controller)for the compressor control,an Allen Bradley(AB)PLC for the cryogenic equipments,and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System(EPICS)that integrates the PLCs.The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control,PID(Proportional-Integral-Differential)control loops,real-time data access and data storage,alarm handler and human machine interface.It is capable of automatic recovery as well.This paper describes the BEPCⅡ cryogenic control system,data communication between ST-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers(IOCs),and the integration of the flow control,the low level interlock,the AB-PLC,and EPICS.

  6. Cryogenic Safety Rules and Guidelines at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN defines and implements a Safety Policy that sets out the general principles governing safety at CERN. As an intergovernmental organisation, CERN further establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In this process, it takes into account the laws and regulation of the Host States (France and Switzerland), EU regulations and directives, as well as international regulations, standards and directives. For the safety of cryogenic equipment, this is primarily covered by the Safety Regulation for Mechanical Equipment and the General Safety Instruction for Cryogenic Equipment. In addition, CERN has also developed Safety Guidelines to support the implementation of these safety rules, covering cryogenic equipment and oxygen deficiency hazard assessment and mitigation. An overview of the cryogenic safety rules and these safety guidelines will be presented.

  7. Small Scroll Pump for Cryogenic Liquids Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a compact, reliable, light weight, electrically driven pump capable of pumping cryogenic liquids, based on scroll pump technology. This pump will...

  8. The cryogenic control system of BEPCII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Ke-Xiang; Zhao, Ji-Jiu; Yue, Ke-Juan; Dai, Ming-Hui; Huang, Yi-Ling; Jiang, Bo

    2008-04-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron- Positron Collider Upgrade Project (BEPCII). The system consists of a Siemens PLC (S7-PLC, Programmable Logic Controller) for the compressor control, an Allen Bradley (AB) PLC for the cryogenic equipments, and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) that integrates the PLCs. The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control, PID (Proportional-Integral-Differential) control loops, real-time data access and data storage, alarm handler and human machine interface. It is capable of automatic recovery as well. This paper describes the BEPCII cryogenic control system, data communication between S7-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers (IOCs), and the integration of the flow control, the low level interlock, the AB-PLC, and EPICS.

  9. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation addressed in this proposal is Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, or STICT. This novel system could be applied in either an automated or...

  10. Active Co-Storage of Cryogenic Propellants for Lunar Explortation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, S.; Canavan, E. R.; Boyle, R. F.; Panek, J. S.; Riall, S. M.; Miller, F. K.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term storage of cryogenic propellants is a critical requirement for NASA's effort to return to the moon. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen provide the highest specific impulse of any practical chemical propulsion system, and thus provides the greatest payload mass per unit of launch mass. Future manned missions will require vehicles with the flexibility to remain in orbit for months, necessitating long-term storage of these cryogenic liquids. For decades cryogenic scientific satellites have used dual cryogens with different temperatures to cool instruments. This technology utilizes a higher temperature cryogen to provide a stage that efficiently intercepts a large fraction of the heat that would otherwise be incident on the lower temperature cryogen. This interception reduces the boil-off of the lower temperature cryogen and increasing the overall life-time of the mission. The Active Co-Storage concept is implemented similarly; the 101 K liquid oxygen thermally shields the 24 K liquid hydrogen. A thermal radiation shield that is linked to the liquid oxygen tank shrouds the liquid hydrogen tank, thereby preventing the liquid hydrogen tank from being directly exposed to the 300 K external environment. Modern cryocooler technology can eliminate the liquid oxygen boil-off and also cool the thermal radiation shield thereby reducing the liquid hydrogen boil-off to a small fraction of the unshielded rate. The thermal radiation shield can be a simple conductive shroud or a more sophisticated but lighter Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shroud. The paper describes the design impact of an active co-storage system for the Altair Descent Vehicle. This paper also compares the spacecraft-level impacts of the conductive shroud and the BAC shroud active co-storage concepts with a passive storage option in the context of the different scales of spacecraft that will be used for the lunar exploration effort - the Altair Ascent and Descent Vehicles, the Orion, and the Ares V Earth

  11. Visual-Inspection Probe For Cryogenic Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Steve; Valenzuela, James; Yoshinaga, Jay

    1990-01-01

    Visual-inspection probe that resembles borescope enables observer at ambient temperature to view objects immersed in turbulent flow of liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, or other cryogenic fluid. Design of probe fairly conventional, except special consideration given to selection of materials and to thermal expansion to provide for expected range of operating temperatures. Penetrates wall of cryogenic chamber to provide view of interior. Similar probe illuminates scene. View displayed on video monitor.

  12. Advanced cryogenic thermal switches for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, David; Beres, Matthew; Stouffer, Charles; Rodriguez, Jose

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes two cryogenic thermal switches (CTSWs) under development for instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first thermal switch was designed to extend the life of the solid H2 dewar for the 6 K Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) while the second thermal switch is needed for contamination and over-temperature control of three 35 K instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). In both cases, differential thermal expansion (DTE) between two materials having differing CTE values is the process that underpins the thermal switching. The patented DTE-CTSW design utilizes two metallic end-pieces, one cup-shaped and the other disc-shaped (both MIRI end-pieces are Al while ISIM uses an Al/Invar cup and an Al disc), joined by an axially centered Ultem rod, which creates a narrow, flat gap between the cup (rim) and disc. A heater is bonded to the rod center. Upon cooling one or both end-pieces, the rod contracts relative to the end-pieces and the gap closes, turning the CTSW ON. When the rod heater is turned on, the rod expands relative to the end-pieces and the gap opens, turning the CTSW OFF. During testing from 6-35 K, ON conductances of 0.3-12 W/K and OFF resistances greater than 2500 K/W were measured. Of particular importance at 6 K was the Al oxide layer, which was found to significantly decrease DTE-CTSW ON conductance when the mating surfaces were bare Al. When the mating surfaces were gold-plated, the adverse impact of the oxide layer was mitigated. This paper will describe both efforts from design through model correlation.

  13. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. From history to modern refrigeration cycles (1/5) Refrigerants, standard cryostats, cryogenic design (2/5) Heat transfer and insulation (3/5) Safety in cryoge...

  14. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, huge detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world’s largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. Monday 5.12.2005 Introduction: From History to Modern Refrigeration Cycles (Goran Perinic) Tuesday 6.12.2005 Refrigerants, Standard Cryostats, Cryogenic Des...

  15. Flight Performance of the AKARI Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Takao; Hirabayashi, Masayuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kii, Tsuneo; Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Narita, Masanao; Ohnishi, Akira; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Yoshida, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We describe the flight performance of the cryogenic system of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, which was successfully launched on 2006 February 21 (UT). AKARI carries a 68.5 cm telescope together with two focal plane instruments, Infrared Cameras (IRC) and Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS), all of which are cooled down to cryogenic temperature to achieve superior sensitivity. The AKARI cryogenic system is a unique hybrid system, which consists of cryogen (liquid helium) and mechanical coolers (2-stage Stirling coolers). With the help of the mechanical coolers, 179 L (26.0 kg) of super-fluid liquid helium can keep the instruments cryogenically cooled for more than 500 days. The on-orbit performance of the AKARI cryogenics is consistent with the design and pre-flight test, and the boil-off gas flow rate is as small as 0.32 mg/s. We observed the increase of the major axis of the AKARI orbit, which can be explained by the thrust due to thermal pressure of vented helium gas.

  16. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers

  17. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  18. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to

  19. C and L band transionospheric scintillation experiment - Some results for applications to satellite radio systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, P. K.; Dabas, R. S.; Reddy, B. M.

    1992-12-01

    The signal statistics of some scintillation events at the C/L bands are estimated for the high solar activity period of solar cycle 22 at a low-latitude station in the Indian zone. In addition to the morphology at 4 Ghz, data on signal statistics such as the cumulative amplitude distribution function, fade rate distribution, and signal reliability for different message lengths for some events of scintillations, both at C and L band, are presented. The theoretical Nakagami m distribution is found to be the best for describing various levels of fade. Autocorrelation and power-spectrum analysis are used to estimate average fade rates and ground correlation distances. Performance evaluation of satellite earth terminals using small antennas is carried out to show the vulnerability of the system in the hostile ionospheric environment, notwithstanding the advanced modulation systems being employed.

  20. A totally active scintillator calorimeter for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). Design and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Asfandiyarov, R

    2013-01-01

    The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a totally active scintillator detector to be installed in the muon beam of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1] – the main R&D project for the future neutrino factory. It is aimed at measuring the properties of the low energy beam composed of muons, electrons and pions, performing the identification particle by particle. The EMR is made of 48 stacked layers alternately measuring the X- and the Y-coordinate. Each layer consists of 59 triangular scintillator bars. It is shown that the granularity of the detector permits to identify tracks and to measure particle ranges and shower shapes. The read-out is based on FPGA custom made electronics and commercially available modules. Currently it is being built at the University of Geneva.

  1. A high resolution scintillating fiber tracker with SiPM readout

    CERN Document Server

    Gast, H; Schael, S; Yearwood, G R; Gast, Henning; Kirn, Thomas; Schael, Stefan; Yearwood, Gregorio Roper

    2007-01-01

    A novel modular high-resolution charged-particle tracking detector design using $250\\mu m$ diameter, round, scintillating fibers and SiPM arrays for readout is presented. The fiber modules consist of 8 layers of 128 fibers, mechanically sta bilized by a carbon fiber / Rohacell foam structure. A prototype using scintillating fibers with a diameter of $300\\mu m$ and two typ es of silicon photomultipliers has been tested in a $10GeV$ proton beam in late October 2006 at the T9 PS-beamline, CERN. We present the measured spatial resolu tion, efficiency and signal-over-noise for this setup. The advantage of this tra cker concept is a compact and modular design with low material budget and only little or no cooling requirements depending on the quality of the silicon photomultiplieres.

  2. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, H; Avetisyan, R; Back, H O; Cocco, A G; DeJongh, F; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Grandi, L; Guardincerri, Y; Kendziora, C; Lippincott, W H; Love, C; Lyons, S; Manenti, L; Martoff, C J; Meng, Y; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Olvitt, D; Pordes, S; Qian, H; Rossi, B; Saldanha, R; Sangiorgio, S; Siegl, K; Strauss, S Y; Tan, W; Tatarowicz, J; Walker, S; Wang, H; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Yoo, J

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrowband neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation and ionization yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.2 keV and for applied electric fields from 0 to 1000 V/cm. We also report the observation of an anti-correlation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anti-correlation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. A comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field yielded a first evidence of sensitivity to direct...

  3. Primary and secondary scintillation measurements in a xenon Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, L M P; Ball, M; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Monteiro, C M B; Yahlali, N; Nygren, D; Santos, J M F dos

    2010-01-01

    NEXT is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay using a 100 kg radio-pure high-pressure gaseous xenon TPC. The detector requires excellent energy resolution, which can be achieved in a Xe TPC with electroluminescence readout. Hamamatsu R8520-06SEL photomultipliers are good candidates for the scintillation readout. The performance of this photomultiplier, used as VUV photosensor in a gas proportional scintillation counter, was investigated. Initial results for the detection of primary and secondary scintillation produced as a result of the interaction of 5.9 keV X-rays in gaseous xenon, at room temperature and at pressures up to 3 bar, are presented. An energy resolution of 8.0% was obtained for secondary scintillation produced by 5.9 keV X-rays. No significant variation of the primary scintillation was observed for different pressures (1, 2 and 3 bar) and for electric fields up to 0.8 V cm-1 torr-1 in the drift region, demonstrating negligible recombination luminescence. A primary scinti...

  4. Cryogenic deformation in soils and their engineering geology consequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, I.D. [Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation); Roujansky, V.E. [EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Cryogenic soil deformation was studied. Three basic types were considered, i. e. cryogenic-lithogenic, cryogenic-disjunctive and cryogenic-plastic. Different mechanisms of their formation were explained. The diversity of cryogenic deformations and their morphological resemblance to the tectonic dislocations pointed towards a specific type of the exogenic tectogenesis, namely, the `cryogenic tectogenesis`. Investigation of these phenomena were described. Results suggested that to prevent the development of severe permafrost-related engineering geology processes, such as soil instability, differential thaw settlement, and thermal erosion, appropriate precautions should be taken since they could potentially result in loss of support and damage to engineering structures erected on permafrost. 10 refs.

  5. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  6. Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezeshkian, Yousef [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahmanabadi, Mahmud, E-mail: bahmanabadi@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbasian Motlagh, Mehdi; Rezaie, Masume [Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30×40 m{sup 2} will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50×50 cm{sup 2}). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by the Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between the extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

  7. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastalsky, A; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. The most important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombi...

  8. Ultra-fast timing with plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoischen, Robert [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, Stephane; Prokopowicz, Wawrzyniec; Schaffner, Henning; Gerl, Juergen; Wollersheim, Hans Juergen; Kurz, Nikolaus [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Rudolph, Dirk [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Fast timing detectors for time-of-flight measurements are essential identification tools for isotopes studied at fragment separators at major heavy-ion research facilities. While today's standard technique of utilizing a plastic scintillator read out by few photomultiplier tubes proofs to be efficient, it does not provide the required time resolution for future key experiments at, for example, the Super-FRS at FAIR. A common present-day approach is to use diamond detectors instead. While they do provide a better time resolution compared to scintillators, they are more difficult to use and far more expensive. Results from tests using a new design approach with standard materials will be presented. This leads to a much improved performance, but remains both cost-efficient, compact, and reliable. The design goals and how to accomplish them will be exemplified by the LYCCA (Lund-York-Cologne CAlorimeter) detector aiming for fast-beam experiments at HISPEC within NUSTAR.

  9. Effect of shallow traps on scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempicki, A. [Department of Chemistry, Metcalf Ctr Science and Engineering, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Bartram, R.H. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1999-01-04

    The paper establishes the mathematical connection between the process of scintillation in Ce-doped materials and their thermoluminescence. A set of kinetic equations describes the competing processes of radiative recombination and trapping by a single trap. The more general case of second-order kinetics is simplified to first order, allowing an analytic solution. Second-order kinetics is also solved numerically without such simplification and both are successfully applied to explain the temperature dependence of the scintillation light output on temperature, in the range where glow peaks occur. The order of the kinetics predicts rather different shapes of decay, but are difficult to distinguish experimentally. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  11. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  12. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  13. Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pezeshkian, Yousef; Motlagh, Mehdi Abbasian; Rezaie, Masoume

    2014-01-01

    A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30$\\times$40 m$^{2}$ will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50$\\times$50 cm$^{2}$). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

  14. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  15. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  16. Sorohalide scintillators, phosphors, and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pin; Deng, Haoran; Doty, F. Patrick; Zhou, Xiaowang

    2016-05-10

    The present invention relates to sorohalide compounds having formula A.sub.3B.sub.2X.sub.9, where A is an alkali metal, B is a rare earth metal, and X is a halogen. Optionally, the sorohalide includes a dopant D. Such undoped and doped sorohalides are useful as scintillation materials or phosphors for any number of uses, including for radiation detectors, solid-state light sources, gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, and drilling applications.

  17. Simulating Silicon Photomultiplier Response to Scintillation Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; van Dam, Herman T.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The response of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) to optical signals is affected by many factors including photon-detection efficiency, recovery time, gain, optical crosstalk, afterpulsing, dark count, and detector dead time. Many of these parameters vary with overvoltage and temperature. When used to detect scintillation light, there is a complicated non-linear relationship between the incident light and the response of the SiPM. In this paper, we propose a combined discrete-time discrete-event Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate SiPM response to scintillation light pulses. Our MC model accounts for all relevant aspects of the SiPM response, some of which were not accounted for in the previous models. We also derive and validate analytic expressions for the single-photoelectron response of the SiPM and the voltage drop across the quenching resistance in the SiPM microcell. These analytic expressions consider the effect of all the circuit elements in the SiPM and accurately simulate the time-variation in overvoltage across the microcells of the SiPM. Consequently, our MC model is able to incorporate the variation of the different SiPM parameters with varying overvoltage. The MC model is compared with measurements on SiPM-based scintillation detectors and with some cases for which the response is known a priori. The model is also used to study the variation in SiPM behavior with SiPM-circuit parameter variations and to predict the response of a SiPM-based detector to various scintillators. PMID:26236040

  18. Scintillation Detectors in Experiments on Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bystritsky, V M; Gerasimov, V V; Kublikov, R V; Nechaev, B A; Padalko, V M; Parzhitski, S S; Smirnov, V S; Wozniak, J

    2005-01-01

    The gating circuits for photomultipliers of scintillation detectors operating in powerful pulsed electromagnetic and nuclear radiation fields are investigated. PMTs with the jalousie-type dynode system and with the linear dynode system are considered. The basic gating circuits of the photomultipliers involving active and resistor high-voltage dividers are given. The results of the investigations are important for experiments in which it is necessary to discriminate in time the preceding background radiation and the process of interest.

  19. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  20. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  1. The Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, Robert; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; Fadil, Hisham; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth A; Heber, Oded; Herwig, Philipp; Karthein, Jonas; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Lohmann, Svenja; Menk, Sebastian; Meyer, Christian; Mishra, Preeti M; Novotný, Oldřich; Connor, Aodh P O; Orlov, Dmitry A; Rappaport, Michael L; Repnow, Roland; Saurabh, Sunny; Schippers, Stefan; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Schwalm, Dirk; Schweikhard, Lutz; Sieber, Thomas; Shornikov, Andrey; Spruck, Kaija; Kumar, Sudhakaran Sunil; Ullrich, Joachim; Urbain, Xavier; Vogel, Stephen; Wilhelm, Patrick; Wolf, Andreas; Zajfman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 $\\pm$ 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion) and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas den...

  2. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermayr, Michael; Kumph, Muir; Partel, Stefan; Edlinger, Johannes; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  3. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    CERN Document Server

    Wollack, Edward J; Rinehart, Stephan A

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, $R \\le 0.003$, from $800-4,800\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(12-2\\,\\mu$m). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to $400-10,000\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(25-1\\,\\mu$m) the observed performance gracefully degrades to $R \\le 0.02$ at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to $\\sim4\\,$K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials -- Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder -- are character...

  4. The future of cryogenic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palerm, S.; Bonhomme, C.; Guelou, Y.; Chopinet, J. N.; Danous, P.

    2015-07-01

    As the French Space Agency, CNES is funding an ambitious program to identify, develop and evaluate the technologies and skills that will enable to design cost efficient future launchers. This program deals together with, researches for mastering complex physical phenomena, set ups of robust and efficient numerical tools for design and justification, and identification of innovative manufacturing processes and hardware. It starts from low Technical Readiness Level (TRL 2) up to a maturation of TRL 6 with the use of demonstrators, level that allows to be ready for a development. This paper focuses on cryogenic propulsion activities conducted with SNECMA and French laboratories to prepare next generation engines. The physics in that type of hardware addresses a large range of highly complex phenomena, among them subcritical and supercritical combustion and possible associated High Frequency oscillations in combustion devices, tribology in bearings and seals, cavitation and rotordynamics in turbopump. The research activities conducted to master those physical phenomena are presented. Moreover, the operating conditions of these engines are very challenging, both thermally and mechanically. The innovative manufacturing processes and designs developed to cope with these conditions while filling cost reduction requirements are described. Finally, the associated demonstrators put in place to prepare the implementation of these new technologies on future engines are presented.

  5. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Development Roadmaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Johnson, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    Advancement in Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) Technologies is essential for achieving NASA's future long duration missions. Propulsion systems utilizing cryogens are necessary to achieve mission success. Current State Of the Art (SOA) CFM technologies enable cryogenic propellants to be stored for several hours. However, some envisioned mission architectures require cryogens to be stored for two years or longer. The fundamental roles of CFM technologies are long term storage of cryogens, propellant tank pressure control and propellant delivery. In the presence of heat, the cryogens will "boil-off" over time resulting in excessive pressure buildup, off-nominal propellant conditions, and propellant loss. To achieve long term storage and tank pressure control, the CFM elements will intercept and/or remove any heat from the propulsion system. All functions are required to perform both with and without the presence of a gravitational field. Which CFM technologies are required is a function of the cryogens used, mission architecture, vehicle design and propellant tank size. To enable NASA's crewed mission to the Martian surface, a total of seventeen CFM technologies have been identified to support an In-Space Stage and a Lander/Ascent Vehicle. Recognizing that FY2020 includes a Decision Point regarding the In-Space Stage Architecture, a set of CFM Technology Development Roadmaps have been created identifying the current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of each element, current technology "gaps", and existing technology development efforts. The roadmaps include a methodical approach and schedule to achieve a flight demonstration in FY2023, hence maturing CFM technologies to TRL 7 for infusion into the In-Space Stage Preliminary Design.

  6. Scintillation counter with MRS APD light readout

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00061314; Malkevich, D.; Martemyanov, A.; Ryabinin, M.; Smirnitsky, A.; Voloshin, K.; Bondarenko, G.; Golovin, V.; Grigoriev, E.

    2005-01-01

    START, a high-efficiency and low-noise scintillation detector for ionizing particles, was developed for the purpose of creating a high-granular system for triggering cosmic muons. Scintillation light in START is detected by MRS APDs (Avalanche Photo-Diodes with Metal-Resistance-Semiconductor structure), operated in the Geiger mode, which have 1 mm^2 sensitive areas. START is assembled from a 15 x 15 x 1 cm^3 scintillating plastic plate, two MRS APDs and two pieces of wavelength-shifting optical fiber stacked in circular coils inside the plastic. The front-end electronic card is mounted directly on the detector. Tests with START have confirmed its operational consistency, over 99% efficiency of MIP registration and good homogeneity. START demonstrates a low intrinsic noise of about 10^{-2} Hz. If these detectors are to be mass-produced, the cost of a mosaic array of STARTs is estimated at a moderate level of 2-3 kUSD/m^2.

  7. A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greim, R.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during LHC Long Shutdown 2 to be able to record data at a higher instantaneous luminosity. The readout rate is currently limited to 1 MHz by the Level 1 trigger. In order to achieve the target integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1 during LHC Run 3, all subdetectors have to be read out by a 40 MHz trigger-less readout system. Especially, the current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet suffer from large detector dead times and a small granularity in the Outer Tracker, which consists of proportional straw tubes. Therefore, the Downstream Tracker will be replaced by a Scintillating Fibre Tracker with Silicon Photomultiplier readout. The total sensitive area of 340 m2 is made up of 2.5 m long fibre mats consisting of six staggered layers of 250 μm thin scintillating fibres. The scintillation light created by the charged particles traversing the fibre mats is transported to the fibre ends via total internal reflection and detected by state-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays. This paper presents the detector concept, design, challenges, custom-made readout chips, as well as laboratory and beam test results.

  8. New scintillating crystals for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The first important requirement for a scintillator to be used in medical imaging devices is the stopping power for the given energy range of X and gamma rays to be considered, and more precisely the conversion efficiency. A high light yield is also mandatory to improve the energy resolution, which is essentially limited by the photostatistics and the electronic noise at these energies. A short scintillation decay time allows to reduce the dead time and therefore to increase the limiting counting rate. When all these requirements are fulfilled the sensitivity and image contrast are increased for a given patient dose, or the dose can be reduced. Examples of new materials under development by the Crystal Clear Collabor...

  9. Scintillation spectroscopy for beta ray dose measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vapirev, E.I.; Jordanov, T.; Amin, S.; Stoilov, N.; Georgieva, K. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-11-01

    Two methods have been developed and tested for the measurement of beta ray dose with a scintillation probe. According to the first method the energy absorbed in plastic filters is calculated from the difference between the energy E of the incident and filtered beta spectrum with an expression of the type E {approx} c{Sigma}iN(i)/{Delta}m, where c is a calibration constant (keV per channel), i is the channel number, N(i) is the detected beta spectrum, and {Delta}m is the filter thickness. According to the second `dE/dx` method the energy deposited in the surface layer of the scintillator is calculated by E {approx} c{Sigma}dE/dx(i)N(i), where dE/dx is the specific energy loss for tissue-equivalent media. The methods were tested for the cases of normally incident electrons and surface contamination. The scintillation probe used is stillbene and the test sources are thin {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 137}Cs. The results are close to the expected doses as calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. (Author).

  10. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W; Maya, L; Sloop, F V J

    2003-01-01

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon respons...

  11. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  12. Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

    2009-06-01

    New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

  13. B-Loaded Plastic Scintillator on the Base of Polystyrene

    CERN Document Server

    Brudanin, V B; Nemchenok, I B; Smolnikov, A A

    2000-01-01

    A method to produce polystyrene-based plastic scintillators with boron concentration from 0.38 to 5.0% of boron have been developed. o-Carborane was used as B-containing additive. The results of investigations of the optical, spectral and scintillation characteristics are presented and discussed. It is shown that 5% B-loaded scintillator has a light output as much as 70% relative to the unloaded one. High efficiency for thermal neutron registration achieved for produced samples makes it possible to use such scintillators in complex neutron high sensitive spectrometers. Measured level of radioactive contamination in this scintillation materials is good enough for using the B-loaded scintillators in the proposed large scale neutrino experiments.

  14. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  15. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  16. Measurements of proportional scintillation in liquid xenon using thin wires

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Goetzke, L W; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Messina, M; Naganoma, J; Plante, G; Rizzo, A; Shagin, P; Wall, R

    2014-01-01

    Proportional scintillation in liquid xenon has a promising application in the field of direct dark matter detection, potentially allowing for simpler, more sensitive detectors. However, knowledge of the basic properties of the phenomenon as well as guidelines for its practical use are currently limited. We report here on measurements of proportional scintillation light emitted in liquid xenon around thin wires. The maximum proportional scintillation gain of $287^{+97}_{-75}$ photons per drift electron was obtained using 10 $\\mu$m diameter gold plated tungsten wire. The thresholds for electron multiplication and proportional scintillation are measured as $725^{+48}_{-139}$ and $412^{+10}_{-133}$ kV/cm, respectively. The threshold for proportional scintillation is in good agreement with a previously published result, while the electron multiplication threshold represents a novel measurement. A complete set of parameters for the practical use of the electron multiplication and proportional scintillation processe...

  17. Pulsar scintillations from corrugated reconnection sheets in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Pen, Ue-Li

    2013-01-01

    We show that surface waves along interstellar current sheets closely aligned with the line of sight lead to pulsar scintillation properties consistent with those observed. By contrast with previously considered scintillation drivers, our mechanism naturally produces the length and density scales of the ISM scattering lenses that are required to explain the magnitude and dynamical spectrum of the scintillations. In our picture, the parts of warm ionized interstellar medium that are responsible for the scintillations are relatively quiescent, with scintillation and scattering resulting from weak waves propagating along magnetic domain boundary current sheets, which are both expected from helicity conservation and have been observed in numerical simulations. The model quantitatively predicts the spacing and amplitudes of inverted parabolic arcs seen in Fourier-transformed dynamical spectra of strongly scintillating pulsars. Multi-frequency, multi-epoch low frequency VLBI observations can quantitatively test this...

  18. Characteristics of plastic scintillators fabricated by a polymerization reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three plastic scintillators of 4.5 cm diameter and 2.5-cm length were fabricated for comparison with commercial plastic scintillators using polymerization of the styrene monomer 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis benzene (POPOP). Their maximum emission wavelengths were determined at 426.06 nm, 426.06 nm, and 425.00 nm with a standard error of 0.2% using a Varian spectrophotometer (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA). Compton edge spectra were measured using three gamma ray sources [i.e., cesium 137 ({sup 137}Cs), sodium 22 ({sup 22}Na), and cobalt 60 ({sup 60}Co)]. Energy was calibrated by analyzing the Compton edge spectra. The fabricated scintillators possessed more than 99.7% energy linearity. Light output was comparable to that of the BC-408 scintillator (Saint-Gobain, Paris, France). The fabricated scintillators showed a light output of approximately 59–64% of that of the BC-408 scintillator.

  19. Separation of Scintillation and Cherenkov Lights in Linear Alkyl Benzene

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Mohan; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay researches. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator being developed. In this paper we observed a good separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in an LAB sample. The rising and decay times of the scintillation light of the LAB were measured to be $(7.7\\pm3.0)\\ \\rm{ns}$ and $(36.6\\pm2.4)\\ \\rm{ns}$, respectively, while the full width [-3$\\sigma$, 3$\\sigma$] of the Cherenkov light was 12 ns dominated by the time resolution of our photomultiplier tubes. The light yield of the scintillation was measured to be $(1.01\\pm0.12)\\times10^3\\ \\rm{photons}/\\rm{MeV}$.

  20. A Model for the Secondary Scintillation Pulse Shape from a Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    CERN Document Server

    Kazkaz, Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in currents detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric fi...

  1. A Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Spectrometer without Liquid Cryogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S; Hertrich, T; Drury, O B; Cherepy, N J; Hohne, J

    2008-06-15

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are being developed as X-ray detectors because they combine the high energy resolution of cryogenic detector technologies with the high count rate capabilities of athermal devices. We have built STJ spectrometers for chemical analysis of dilute samples by high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy at the synchrotron. The instruments use 36 pixels of 200 {micro}m x 200 {micro}m Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb STJs with 165 nm thick Nb absorber films. They have achieved an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and can be operated at a total count rate of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased user-friendliness, we have built a liquid-cryogen-free refrigerator based on a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler in combination with a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization stage. It holds the STJ detector at the end of a 40-cm-long cold finger, and attains the required operating temperature of {approx}0.3 K at the push of a button. We describe the instrument performance and present speciation measurements on Eu dopant activators in the novel scintillator material SrI{sub 2} to illustrate the potential for STJ spectrometers at the synchrotron.

  2. Rare-earth loaded liquid scintillator (for LENS experiment)

    CERN Document Server

    Barabanov, I R; Kornoukhov, V N; Yanovich, E A; Zatsepin, G T; Danilov, N A; Korpusov, G V; Kostukova, G V; Krylov, Y S; Yakshin, V V

    1999-01-01

    Rare-earth (Yb/Gd) complexes with neutral organophosphorus ligands are briefly discussed for their application in liquid scintillation technique. To evaluate the principal feasibility of rare-earth loaded scintillator, the ytterbium chloride complexes with tri-isoamylphosphine oxides were synthesized. Relative scintillation efficiency (RSE) for two Yb concentrations (78 and 88 g/L) was measured by means of the internal conversion exitation from Cs-137. The results obtained were 50 and 40% respectively.

  3. Measurement of scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Gastler, D; Hime, A; Stonehill, L C; Seibert, S; Klein, J; Lippincott, W H; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A

    2010-01-01

    The scintillation light yield of liquid argon from nuclear recoils relative to electronic recoils has been measured as a function of recoil energy from 10 keVr up to 250 keVr. The scintillation efficiency, defined as the ratio of the nuclear recoil scintillation response to the electronic recoil response, is 0.25 \\pm 0.02 + 0.01(correlated) above 20 keVr.

  4. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E P Jacosalem; S Iba; N Nakajima; H Ono; A L C Sanchez; A M Bacala; H Miyata; GLD Calorimeter Group

    2007-12-01

    A new sampling calorimeter using very thin scintillators and the multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) has been proposed to produce better position resolution for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment. As part of this R & D study, small plastic scintillators of different sizes, thickness and wrapping reflectors are systematically studied. The scintillation light due to beta rays from a collimated 90Sr source are collected from the scintillator by wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber and converted into electrical signals at the PMT. The wrapped scintillator that gives the best light yield is determined by comparing the measured pulse height of each 10 × 40 × 2 mm strip scintillator covered with 3M reflective mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of the 3M reflective mirror film and teflon wrapped scintillators are measured. Results show that the 3M radiant mirror film-wrapped scintillator has the greatest light yield with an average of 9.2 photoelectrons. It is observed that light yield slightly increases with scintillator length, but increases to about 100% when WLS fiber diameter is increased from 1.0 mm to 1.6 mm. The position dependence measurement along the strip scintillator showed the uniformity of light transmission from the sensor to the PMT. A dip across the strip is observed which is 40% of the maximum pulse height. The block type scintillator pulse height, on the other hand, is found to be almost proportional to scintillator thickness.

  5. Investigation of Novel Glass Scintillators for Gamma Ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    EMPLOYED BY YOUR ORGANIZATION. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704·0188 The public roponin; burden for this collection of...efforts at LANL made significant progress during .this period. We have seen an optimization of both photo-luminescence and scintillation properties of...investigating Ce:GNS glass scintillators synthesized by our collaborators at LANL . The scintillation traces after ultrashort XUV excitation are shown

  6. CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for background-free searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica - Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma - Italy and Physics Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica - Sapienza Università di Roma and INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma - Italy (Italy); Castellano, M. G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Roma - Italy (Italy); Colantoni, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica - Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova, Genova - Italy and INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova - Italy (Italy); Tomei, C. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma - Italy (Italy)

    2015-08-17

    The development of background-free detectors is essential for experiments searching for rare events. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay (0νDBD) and Dark Matter interactions, suffer from the absence of techniques that allow to identify the nature of the interacting particles. This limit can be overcome by coupling the bolometer to an independent device for the measurement of the light emitted by interactions, as the combined read-out of the bolometric and light signals allows to identify and reject particles different from those of interest. CUORE, the most advanced bolometric experiment for 0νDBD searches, could disentangle the electrons produced by 0νDBD from the dangerous background due to α particles, by measuring the (tiny) Cherenkov light emitted by electrons and not by α’s. LUCIFER, a project based on ZnSe scintillating bolometers for the study of {sup 82}Se 0νDBD, would be competitive also in the search of Dark Matter interactions if equipped with light detectors that allow to distinguish and reject the background due to electrons and γ’s. These advances require cryogenic detectors characterized by noise lower than 20 eV, large active area, wide temperature range of operation, high radio-purity and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. The CALDER collaboration aims to develop such detectors by exploiting the superb energy resolution and natural multiplexed read-out provided by Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  7. NASA's Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Motil, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) Project's primary objective is to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens that will support the enabling of high performance cryogenic propulsion systems, lunar surface systems and economical ground operations. Such technologies can significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, reduce or even eliminate propellant tank fluid boil-off losses for long term missions, and simplify vehicle operations. This paper will present the status of the specific technologies that the CFM Project is developing. The two main areas of concentration are analysis models development and CFM hardware development. The project develops analysis tools and models based on thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, and existing flight/test data. These tools assist in the development of pressure/thermal control devices (such as the Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS), and Multi-layer insulation); with the ultimate goal being to develop a mature set of tools and models that can characterize the performance of the pressure/thermal control devices incorporated in the design of an entire CFM system with minimal cryogen loss. The project does hardware development and testing to verify our understanding of the physical principles involved, and to validate the performance of CFM components, subsystems and systems. This database provides information to anchor our analytical models. This paper describes some of the current activities of the NASA's Cryogenic Fluid Management Project.

  8. Cryogenic System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenius, D.; Chronis, W.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2004-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a neutron-scattering facility being built at Oak Ridge, TN for the US Department of Energy. The SNS accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in cryostats (cryomodules). The linac cryomodules are cooled to 2.1 K by a 2300 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. As an SNS partner laboratory, Jefferson Lab is responsible for the installed integrated cryogenic system design for the SNS linac accelerator consisting of major subsystem equipment engineered and procured from industry. Jefferson Lab's work included developing the major vendor subsystem equipment procurement specifications, equipment procurement, and the integrated system engineering support of the field installation and commissioning. The major cryogenic system components include liquid nitrogen storage, gaseous helium storage, cryogen distribution transfer line system, 2.1-K cold box consisting of four stages of cold compressors, 4.5-K cold box, warm helium compressors with its associated oil removal, gas management, helium purification, gas impurity monitoring systems, and the supportive utilities of electrical power, cooling water and instrument air. The system overview, project organization, the important aspects, and the capabilities of the cryogenic system are described.

  9. Cryogenic Applications of Commercial Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG and in the GISMO camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  10. Ionospheric scintillation observations over Kenyan region - Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwendo, O. J.; Xiao, Yu; Ming, Ou

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric scintillation refers to the rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of a satellite signal as it passes through small-scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. By analyzing ionospheric scintillation observation datasets from satellite signals such as GPS signals we can study the morphology of ionospheric bubbles. At low latitudes, the diurnal behavior of scintillation is driven by the formation of large-scale equatorial density depletions which form one to two hours after sunset via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism near the magnetic equator. In this work we present ionospheric scintillation activity over Kenya using data derived from a newly installed scintillation monitor developed by CRIRP at Pwani University (39.78°E, 3.24°S) during the period August to December, 2014. The results reveal the scintillation activity mainly occurs from post-sunset to post-midnight hours, and ceases around 04:00 LT. We also found that the ionospheric scintillation tends to appear at the southwest and northwest of the station. These locations coincide with the southern part of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly crest over Kenya region. The occurrence of post-midnight L-band scintillation events which are not linked to pre-midnight scintillation observations raises fundamental question on the mechanism and source of electric fields driving the plasma depletion under conditions of very low background electron density.

  11. Measurement of Compton edge position in low-Z scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiderski, Lukasz, E-mail: l.swiderski@ipj.gov.p [Department of Nuclear Detectors and Electronics, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Moszynski, Marek; Czarnacki, Wieslaw; Iwanowska, Joanna; Syntfeld-Kazuch, Agnieszka; Szczesniak, Tomasz [Department of Nuclear Detectors and Electronics, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Pausch, Guntram; Plettner, Cristina; Roemer, Katja [ICx Technologies GmbH, Piepersberg 12, Solingen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    A method based on a Compton coincidence technique was applied to measure in a wide energy range the position of Compton edge in organic scintillators. The experimental setup comprised a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector and a tested scintillator coupled to a PMT. The detectors were set in a face-to-face geometry and the source was placed between them. Thus gating on events backscattered in the tested scintillator and detected in HPGe allowed measuring of Compton edge position for a given {gamma}-ray energy. The presented method provides a valuable tool for energy calibration of low-Z scintillators.

  12. Liquid xenon scintillators for imaging of positron emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, L

    The current understanding of xenon scintillation physics is summarized and keyed to the use of xenon as a gamma-ray detector in medical radioisotope imaging systems. Liquid xenon has a short scintillation pulse (approximately 10(8) sec) and high gamma-ray absorption and scintillation efficiencies. The fast pulse may facilitate imaging in vivo distributions of hot positron sources and allow recovery of additional spatial information by time-of-flight techniques. We begin by describing our own study of the feasibility of making a practical positron scanning system, and consider the problems of scintillation decay time, linearity, efficiency, purity, and electricfield amplifcation. The prospects for a practical instrument are considered.

  13. Properties of Quantum-Dot-Doped Liquid Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Novel scintillators based on semiconducting nanocrystals called quantum dots have unique optical and chemical properties that make them interesting for future neutrino experiments especially those searching for neutrino-less double beta decay. In this talk, we report the results of laboratory-scale measurements for three candidate quantum-dot-doped scintillators. We focus on the key properties required for large-scale neutrino experiments, which are the emission spectrum, the attenuation length and the stability. I would like to follow the talk by Andrey Elagin on directionality in scintillators and precede Athena Ierokomos' talk on light yield in scintillators.

  14. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P. [Princeton University Princeton, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed. (orig.)

  15. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  16. Advanced Sprayable Composite Coating for Cryogenic Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA solicitation X10 "Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer" under subtopic X.01 "Cryogenic Fluid...

  17. Low evaporation rate storage media for cryogenic liquids Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Considerable design work has been devoted to the development of cryogenic liquid storage containers. Containers which hold cryogenic liquids such as liquid nitrogen,...

  18. Manufacture of Novel Cryogenic Thermal Protection Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA SBIR solicitation X8 "Space Cryogenic Systems" under subtopic X8.01, "Cryogenic Fluid Transfer and...

  19. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  20. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel cryogenic coupling will be designed and modeled. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the coupling is based on patented Venturi-Offset...

  1. Energy Efficient Cryogenics on Earth and in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for energy-efficient cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  2. New application of superconductors: high sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cardani, L; Casali, N; Casellano, M G; Colantoni, I; Coppolecchia, A; Cosmelli, C; Cruciani, A; D'Addabbo, A; Di Domizio, S; Martinez, M; Tomei, C; Vignati, M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs), that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results ob...

  3. A Reference Guide for Cryogenic Properties of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisend, John G

    2003-09-16

    A thorough knowledge of the behavior of materials at cryogenic temperatures is critical for the design of successful cryogenic systems. Over the past 50 years, a tremendous amount of material properties at cryogenic temperatures have been measured and published. This guide lists resources for finding these properties. It covers online databases, computer codes, conference proceedings, journals, handbooks, overviews and monographs. It includes references for finding reports issued by government laboratories and agencies. Most common solids and fluids used in cryogenics are covered.

  4. Cryogenic cooling system for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru [Taiyo Nippon Sanso, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, Research and development activity of HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power application is very progressive worldwide. Especially, HTS cable system and HTSFCL (HTS Fault current limiter) system are proceeding to practical stages. In such system and equipment, cryogenic cooling system, which makes HTS equipment cooled lower than critical temperature, is one of crucial components. In this article, cryogenic cooling system for HTS application, mainly cable, is reviewed. Cryogenic cooling system can be categorized into conduction cooling system and immersion cooling system. In practical HTS power application area, immersion cooling system with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is preferred. The immersion cooling system is besides grouped into open cycle system and closed cycle system. Turbo-Brayton refrigerator is a key component for closed cycle system. Those two cooling systems are focused in this article. And, each design and component of the cooling system is explained.

  5. Process Identification through Test on Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzetti, M; Chadli, M; Coppier, H

    2008-01-01

    UNICOS (UNified Industrial Control System) is the CERN object-based control standard for the cryogenics of the LHC and its experiments. It includes a variety of embedded functions, dedicated to the specific cryogenic processes. To enlarge the capabilities of the standard it is proposed to integrate the parametrical identification step in the control system of large scale cryogenic plants. Different methods of parametrical identification have been tested and the results were combined to obtain a better model. The main objective of the work is to find a compromise between an easy-to-use solution and a good level of process identification model. The study focuses on identification protocol for large delayed system, the measurement consistency and correlation between different inputs and outputs. Furthermore the paper describes in details, the results and the tests carried out on parametrical identification investigations with large scale systems.

  6. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  7. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  8. Cryogenics for Particle Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Vandoni, Giovanna; Wagner, U

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenics has become a key ancillary technology of particle accelerators and detectors, contributing to their sustained development over the last fifty years. Conversely, this development has produced new challenges and markets for cryogenics, resulting in a fruitful symbiotic relation which materialized in significant technology transfer and technical progress. This began with the use of liquid hydrogen and deuterium in the targets and bubble chambers of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. It developed more recently with increasing amounts of liquefied noble gases - mainly argon, but also krypton and even today xenon - in calorimeters. In parallel with these applications, the availability of practical type II superconductors from the early 1960s triggered the use of superconductivity in large spectrometer magnets - mostly driven by considerations of energy savings - and the corresponding development of helium cryogenics. It is however the generalized application of superconductivity in particle accelerators - RF ac...

  9. Characterization of a cryogenic ion guide at IGISOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Penttila, H.; Perajarvi, K.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small volume cryogenic ion guide has been characterized at the IGISOL facility, Jyvaskyla, as a prototype to verify whether there are any major obstacles to the use of high-density cryogenic helium gas for the stopping and extraction of high-energy ions from a large volume cryogenic ion catcher.

  10. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid may not be...

  11. 49 CFR 173.316 - Cryogenic liquids in cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. 173.316 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.316 Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. (a) General requirements. (1) A cylinder may not be loaded with a cryogenic liquid colder than...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4250 - Cryogenic surgical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cryogenic surgical device. 882.4250 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4250 Cryogenic surgical device. (a) Identification. A cryogenic surgical device is a device used to destroy nervous tissue or produce...

  13. 49 CFR 173.320 - Cryogenic liquids; exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. 173.320 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.320 Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. (a) Atmospheric gases and helium, cryogenic liquids, in Dewar flasks, insulated cylinders...

  14. 49 CFR 173.318 - Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks. 173.318 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.318 Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks. (a) General requirements. (1) A cargo tank may not be loaded with a cryogenic liquid colder than...

  15. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) Store cryogenic propellants in a manner that maximizes their availability for use regardless of mission duration. 2) Efficiently transfer conditioned cryogenic propellant to an engine or tank situated in a microgravity environment. 3) Accurately monitor and gauge cryogenic propellants situated in a microgravity environment.

  16. Characterization of a cryogenic ion guide at IGISOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Penttila, H.; Perajarvi, K.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small volume cryogenic ion guide has been characterized at the IGISOL facility, Jyvaskyla, as a prototype to verify whether there are any major obstacles to the use of high-density cryogenic helium gas for the stopping and extraction of high-energy ions from a large volume cryogenic ion catcher. T

  17. Depth of interaction determination in monolithic scintillator with double side SiPM readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrocchi, Matteo; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Bosi, Filippo; Boretto, Marco; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Ionica, Maria; Liu, Ben; Pennazio, Francesco; Piliero, Maria Antonietta; Pirrone, Giovanni; Postolache, Vasile; Wheadon, Richard; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2017-12-01

    Monolithic scintillators read out by arrays of photodetectors represent a promising solution to obtain high spatial resolution and the depth of interaction (DOI) of the annihilation photon. We have recently investigated a detector geometry composed of a monolithic scintillator readout on two sides by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, and we have proposed two parameters for the DOI determination: the difference in the number of triggered SiPMs on the two sides of the detector and the difference in the maximum collected signal on a single SiPM on each side. This work is focused on the DOI calibration and on the determination of the capability of our detector. For the DOI calibration, we studied a method which can be implemented also in detectors mounted in a full PET scanner. We used a PET detector module composed of a monolithic 20 × 20 × 10 mm(3) LYSO scintillator crystal coupled on two opposite faces to two arrays of SiPMs. On each side, the scintillator was coupled to 6 × 6 SiPMs. In this paper, the two parameters previously proposed for the DOI determination were calibrated with two different methods. The first used a lateral scan of the detector with a collimated 511 keV pencil beam at steps of 0.5 mm to study the detector DOI capability, while the second used the background radiation of the (176)Lu in the scintillator. The DOI determination capability was tested on different regions of the detector using each parameter and the combination of the two. With both parameters for the DOI determination, in the lateral scan, the bias between the mean reconstructed DOI and the real beam position was lower than 0.3 mm, and the DOI distribution had a standard deviation of about 1.5 mm. When using the calibration with the radioactivity of the LYSO, the mean bias increased of about 0.2 mm but with no degradation of the standard deviation of the DOI distribution. The two parameters allow to achieve a DOI resolution comparable with the state of the

  18. Resolving Ultrafast Heating of Dense Cryogenic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Harmand, M.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300 fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ˜0.9 ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  19. Compact insert design for cryogenic pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias Rigoberto; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Petitpas, Guillaume; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2017-06-14

    A pressure vessel apparatus for cryogenic capable storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure includes an insert with a parallel inlet duct, a perpendicular inlet duct connected to the parallel inlet. The perpendicular inlet duct and the parallel inlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components. The insert also includes a parallel outlet duct and a perpendicular outlet duct connected to the parallel outlet duct. The perpendicular outlet duct and the parallel outlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components.

  20. Cryogenic Yb: YAG Thin-Disk Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Spitzberg, "Cryogenic Yb3+-Doped Solid-State Lasers," IEEE Journ. of Sel. Topics in Quant. Elect., 13(3), 448-459 (2007). [3] S. Tokita, J. Kawanaka, M...Europe ( IEEE ,2005) ,CTu3 (2005). [4] D. C. Brown, J. M. Singley, E. Yager, J. W. Kuper, B. J. Lotito, L. L. Bennett, "Innovative high-power CW...Y. Sun, and R. W. Equall, "Yb:YAG Absorption at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures," IEEE Journ. Sel. Topics Quant. Elect. 11(3), 604-612 (2005

  1. MCP-based Photodetectors for Cryogenic Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; Byrum, Karen; Demarteau, Marcel; Elam, Jeffrey; May, Edward; Wagner, Robert; Walters, Dean; Xia, Lei; Xie, Junqi; Zhao, Huyue; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    The Argonne MCP-based photo detector is an offshoot of the Large Area Pico-second Photo Detector (LAPPD) project, wherein 6 cm x 6 cm sized detectors are made at Argonne National Laboratory. We have successfully built and tested our first detectors for pico-second timing and few mm spatial resolution. We discuss our efforts to customize these detectors to operate in a cryogenic environment. Initial plans aim to operate in liquid argon. We are also exploring ways to mitigate wave length shifting requirements and also developing bare-MCP photodetectors to operate in a gaseous cryogenic environment.

  2. Long-term Scintillation Observations of Five Pulsars at 1540 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, N; Johnston, S; Rickett, B; Zhang, J; Yusup, A; Chen, M

    2005-01-01

    From 2001 January to 2002 June, we monitored PSRs B0329+54, B0823+26, B1929+10, B2020+28 and B2021+51 using the Nanshan 25-m radio telescope of Urumqi Observatory to study their diffractive interstellar scintillation (DISS). The average interval between observations was about 9 days and the observation duration ranged between 2 and 6 hours depending on the pulsar. Wide variations in the DISS parameters were observed over the 18-month data span. Despite this, the average scintillation velocities are in excellent agreement with the proper motion velocities. The average two-dimensional autocorrelation function for PSR B0329+54 is well described by a thin-screen Kolmogorov model, at least along the time and frequency axes. Observed modulation indices for the DISS time scale and bandwidth and the pulsar flux density are greater than values predicted for a Kolmogorov spectrum of electron density fluctuations. Correlated variations over times long compared to the nominal refractive scintillation time are observed, s...

  3. Time resolution of the plastic scintillator strips with matrix photomultiplier readout for J-PET tomograph

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Giergiel, K; Gorgol, M; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, Ł; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Sharma, N G; Słomski, A; Silarski, M; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Witkowski, P; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2016-01-01

    Recent tests of a single module of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomography system (J-PET) consisting of 30 cm long plastic scintillator strips have proven its applicability for the detection of annihilation quanta (0.511 MeV) with a coincidence resolving time (CRT) of 0.266 ns. The achieved resolution is almost by a factor of two better with respect to the current TOF-PET detectors and it can still be improved since, as it is shown in this article, the intrinsic limit of time resolution for the determination of time of the interaction of 0.511 MeV gamma quanta in plastic scintillators is much lower. As the major point of the article, a method allowing to record timestamps of several photons, at two ends of the scintillator strip, by means of matrix of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is introduced. As a result of simulations, conducted with the number of SiPM varying from 4 to 42, it is shown that the improvement of timing resolution saturates with the growing number of photomultipliers, and that the 2 x...

  4. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were

  5. AA, beam stopper with scintillator screen

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    An insertable steel-plate beam stopper was located after nearly a full turn downstream of the injection point. It was fitted with a scintillator screen, a thin plate of Cr-doped alumina, imprinted with a grid and reference points. The screen was illuminated through a window and observed with a highly sensitive TV camera plus image intensifier. This allowed observation of beam position and size of a proton test beam and of the beam from the target, which consisted not only of antiprotons but contained as well electrons, pions and muons of the same momentum.

  6. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  7. Scintillating bolometers for Double Beta Decay search

    CERN Document Server

    Gironi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In the field of Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, the use of high resolution detectors in which background can be actively discriminated is very appealing. Scintillating bolometers containing a Double Beta Decay emitter can largely fulfill this very interesting possibility. In this paper we present the latest results obtained with CdWO4 and CaMoO4 crystals. Moreover we report, for the first time, a very interesting feature of CaMoO4 bolometers: the possibility to discriminate beta-gamma events from those induced by alpha particles thanks to different thermal pulse shape.

  8. Scintillating Fibre Calorimetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. The lead/scintillating fibre calorimeter technique provides a fast signal response well matched to the LHC rate requirements. It can be made to give equal response for electrons and hadrons (compensation) with good electromagnetic and hadronic energy resolutions.\\\\ \\\\ The aim of this R&D proposal is to study in detail the aspects that are relevant for application of this type of calorimeter in an LHC environment, including its integration in a larger system of detectors, e.g.~projective geometry, radiation hardness, light detection, calibration and stability monitoring, electron/hadron separation.....

  9. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  10. A multidetector scintillation camera with 254 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinsdottir, E; Larsen, B; Rommer, P

    1977-01-01

    A computer-based scintillation camera has been designed for both dynamic and static radionuclide studies. The detecting head has 254 independent sodium iodide crystals, each with a photomultiplier and amplifier. In dynamic measurements simultaneous events can be recorded, and 1 million total counts...... per second can be accommodated with less than 0.5% loss in any one channel. This corresponds to a calculated deadtime of 5 nsec. The multidetector camera is being used for 133Xe dynamic studies of regional cerebral blood flow in man and for 99mTc and 197 Hg static imaging of the brain....

  11. Terbium-activated heavy scintillating glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Fu,J.; Kobayashi, M.; Parker, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Tb-activated scintillating glasses with high Ln2O3 (Ln=Gd, Y, Lu) concentration up to 40mol% have been prepared. The effects of Ln3+ ions on the density, thermal properties, transmission and luminescence properties under both UV and X-ray excitation have been investigated. The glasses containing Gd2O3 or Lu2O3 exhibit a high density of more than 6.0g/cm3. Energy transfer from Gd3+ to Tb3+ takes place in Gd-containing glass and as a result the Gd-containing glass shows a light yield 2.5 times ...

  12. Cryogenic Pupil Alignment Test Architecture for Aberrated Pupil Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Brent; Kubalak, David A.; Antonille, Scott; Ohl, Raymond; Hagopian, John G.

    2009-01-01

    A document describes cryogenic test architecture for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) integrated science instrument module (ISIM). The ISIM element primarily consists of a mechanical metering structure, three science instruments, and a fine guidance sensor. One of the critical optomechanical alignments is the co-registration of the optical telescope element (OTE) exit pupil with the entrance pupils of the ISIM instruments. The test architecture has been developed to verify that the ISIM element will be properly aligned with the nominal OTE exit pupil when the two elements come together. The architecture measures three of the most critical pupil degrees-of-freedom during optical testing of the ISIM element. The pupil measurement scheme makes use of specularly reflective pupil alignment references located inside the JWST instruments, ground support equipment that contains a pupil imaging module, an OTE simulator, and pupil viewing channels in two of the JWST flight instruments. Pupil alignment references (PARs) are introduced into the instrument, and their reflections are checked using the instrument's mirrors. After the pupil imaging module (PIM) captures a reflected PAR image, the image will be analyzed to determine the relative alignment offset. The instrument pupil alignment preferences are specularly reflective mirrors with non-reflective fiducials, which makes the test architecture feasible. The instrument channels have fairly large fields of view, allowing PAR tip/tilt tolerances on the order of 0.5deg.

  13. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; DeJongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V / cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V / cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83 m Kr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207 Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons ( N ex ) and ion pairs ( N i ) and their ratio ( N ex / N i ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  14. Study of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in directly driven cryogenic-deuterium targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, J. D.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Direct-drive, Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments in liquid deuterium (D{sub 2}) were performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar cryogenic targets at a laser intensity of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. These are the first Rayleigh-Taylor measurements in deuterium at conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion using a mass preimposed initial modulation. The measured modulation optical depths are in agreement with the 2D hydrodynamics code DRACO using flux-limited local thermal transport, providing an important step in the experimental validation of simulations for direct-drive ignition.

  15. Statistical characteristics of low-latitude ionospheric scintillation over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kangkang; Li, Guozhu; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Li, Hongke

    2015-03-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) L-band ionospheric scintillation produced by electron density irregularities in the ionospheric E- and F-regions, is mainly a low- and high-latitude phenomenon. In this study, the statistical behavior of GPS ionospheric scintillation over a Chinese low-latitude station Sanya (18.3°N, 109.6°E; dip lat: 12.8°N) has been investigated. A detailed study on the seasonal and solar activity dependence of scintillation occurrence during July 2004-December 2012 show that the amplitude scintillation pattern, with a maximum occurrence during equinox of solar maximum, agrees with plasma bubble observations by in situ satellites in this longitude. A few daytime periodic scintillation events are found during June solstice months of solar minimum. Interestingly, a significant equinoctial asymmetry of scintillation onset time is found in 2011-2012. The initiation of scintillation during September-October is on average earlier than that of March-April about 25 min. Meanwhile, the zonal drifts of irregularities estimated using two spatially separated GPS receivers over Sanya show a similar behavior during the two equinoxes, slowly decreasing from 150 m/s at post-sunset to 50 m/s near midnight. The possible mechanisms responsible for the occurrence characteristics of GPS scintillation over Sanya, and relevant aspects of the zonal drifts of the irregularities are discussed.

  16. Study on Signal Processing Circuit Based on Scintillation Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Yong-gang; DENG; Chang-ming; LI; Jian-wei; XIAO; Cai-jin; ZHANG; Gui-ying; WANG; Ping-sheng; WANG; Xing-hua; JIN; Xiang-chun; HUA; Long; YUAN; Guo-jun; NI; Bang-fa

    2013-01-01

    Compared with silicon semiconductor detector,higher energy resolution and together with the high detection efficiency,big sensitive volume,good adaptability to environment and high sensitivityespecially in nature background environment are the characteristics of scintillation detector.The most widely applied scintillator includes inorganic crystals,of which sodium iodide is the favorite and

  17. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  18. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  19. TOF-PET detector concept based on organic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Białas, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwiński, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupiał, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemień, W; Łojek, K; Majewski, J; Migdał, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new concept of the large acceptance detector systems based on organic scintillators which may allow for simultaneous diagnostic of large fraction of the human body. Novelty of the concept lies in employing large blocks of polymer scintillators instead of crystals as detectors of annihilation quanta, and in using predominantly the timing of signals instead of their amplitudes.

  20. Time resolution of the plastic scintillator strips with matrix photomultiplier readout for J-PET tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, P.; Rundel, O.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Gajos, A.; Giergiel, K.; Gorgol, M.; Jasińska, B.; Kamińska, D.; Kapłon, Ł.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Sharma, N. G.; Słomski, A.; Silarski, M.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Witkowski, P.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.

    2016-03-01

    Recent tests of a single module of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomography system (J-PET) consisting of 30 cm long plastic scintillator strips have proven its applicability for the detection of annihilation quanta (0.511 MeV) with a coincidence resolving time (CRT) of 0.266 ns. The achieved resolution is almost by a factor of two better with respect to the current TOF-PET detectors and it can still be improved since, as it is shown in this article, the intrinsic limit of time resolution for the determination of time of the interaction of 0.511 MeV gamma quanta in plastic scintillators is much lower. As the major point of the article, a method allowing to record timestamps of several photons, at two ends of the scintillator strip, by means of matrix of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is introduced. As a result of simulations, conducted with the number of SiPM varying from 4 to 42, it is shown that the improvement of timing resolution saturates with the growing number of photomultipliers, and that the 2× 5 configuration at two ends allowing to read twenty timestamps, constitutes an optimal solution. The conducted simulations accounted for the emission time distribution, photon transport and absorption inside the scintillator, as well as quantum efficiency and transit time spread of photosensors, and were checked based on the experimental results. Application of the 2× 5 matrix of SiPM allows for achieving the coincidence resolving time in positron emission tomography of ≈ 0.170 ns for 15 cm axial field-of-view (AFOV) and ≈ 0.365 ns for 100 cm AFOV. The results open perspectives for construction of a cost-effective TOF-PET scanner with significantly better TOF resolution and larger AFOV with respect to the current TOF-PET modalities.

  1. Modeling the effects of Multi-path propagation and scintillation on GPS signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash Krause, L.; Wilson, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    GPS signals traveling through the earth's ionosphere are affected by charged particles that often disrupt the signal and the information it carries due to "scintillation", which resembles an extra noise source on the signal. These signals are also affected by weather changes, tropospheric scattering, and absorption from objects due to multi-path propagation of the signal. These obstacles cause distortion within information and fading of the signal, which ultimately results in phase locking errors and noise in messages. In this work, we attempted to replicate the distortion that occurs in GPS signals using a signal processing simulation model. We wanted to be able to create and identify scintillated signals so we could better understand the environment that caused it to become scintillated. Then, under controlled conditions, we simulated the receiver's ability to suppress scintillation in a signal. We developed a code in MATLAB that was programmed to: 1. Create a carrier wave and then plant noise (four different frequencies) on the carrier wave, 2. Compute a Fourier transform on the four different frequencies to find the frequency content of a signal, 3. Use a filter and apply it to the Fourier transform of the four frequencies and then compute a Signal-to-noise ratio to evaluate the power (in Decibels) of the filtered signal, and 4.Plot each of these components into graphs. To test the code's validity, we used user input and data from an AM transmitter. We determined that the amplitude modulated signal or AM signal would be the best type of signal to test the accuracy of the MATLAB code due to its simplicity. This code is basic to give students the ability to change and use it to determine the environment and effects of noise on different AM signals and their carrier waves. Overall, we were able to manipulate a scenario of a noisy signal and interpret its behavior and change due to its noisy components: amplitude, frequency, and phase shift.

  2. Design and development of hard x-ray imaging detector using scintillator and Si photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, S. K.; Naik, Amisha P.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Acharya, Y. B.; Patel, A. R.; Ladiya, T.; Devashrayee, Niranjan M.

    2016-07-01

    There are various astrophysical phenomena which are of great importance and interest such as stellar explosions, Gamma ray bursts etc. There is also a growing interest in exploring the celestial sources in hard X-rays. High sensitive instruments are essential to perform the detailed studies of these cosmic accelerators and explosions. Hard X-ray imaging detectors having high absorption efficiency and mm spatial resolution are the key requirements to locate the generation of these astrophysical phenomenon. We hereby present a detector module which consists of a single CsI scintillation detector of size 15 x 15 x 3 mm3. The photon readout is done using an array of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPM is a new development in the field of photon detection and can be described as 2D array of small (hundreds of μm2) avalanche photodiodes. We have achieved a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm with our initial setup. By using the array of these detector modules, we can build the detector with a large sensitive area with a very high spatial resolution. This paper presents the experimental details for single detector module using CsI (Tl) scintillator and SiPM and also presents the preliminary results of energy and position measurement. The GEANT4 simulation has also been carried out for the same geometry.

  3. Two-dimensional X-ray imaging using plastic scintillating fiber array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Due to its low cost,flexibility and convenience for long distance dala transfer,plastic scintillation fiber (PSF)have been increasingly used in building detectors or sensors for detecting various radiations and imaging.In this work,the performance of using PSF coupled with charge-coupled devices(CCD)to build are adetectors for 2D X-ray imaging is studied.We describe the experimental setup and show the obtained images from CCD.Modulation Transfer Function(MTF)of the PSF array is also presented and compared to earlier reports.

  4. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihl, M.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam-gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam-beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam-gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam-gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  5. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, M

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam–gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam–beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam–gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam–gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  6. DUVEX: An X-ray counting system based on YAG:Ce scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, J.-M., E-mail: jean-michel.andre1@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - Matiere et Rayonnement, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Le Guen, K.; Jonnard, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - Matiere et Rayonnement, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Menesguen, Y. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-12-11

    A detector system, called DUVEX, has been developed for the soft-x-ray and extreme ultraviolet domain. It consists of a YAG:Ce scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier module working under vacuum in counting mode. The design and the performances of this detector in terms of yield, absolute efficiency, response and noise are reported. Spectra in the soft x-ray range of different elements (W, Ag, Al, Mg, Cu, N, C and B) obtained in WDS mode using this detector are presented. DUVEX appears as a competitive detection tool in terms of cost and easiness of implementation.

  7. A large dynamic range readout design for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yongjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Hu, Bitao

    2016-08-01

    A large dynamic range is required by the Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) of DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) to detect particles from electron to heavy ions with Z ≤ 20. To expand the dynamic range, the readout design based on the double-dynodes signal extraction from the photomultiplier tube has been proposed and adopted by PSD. To verify this design, a prototype detector module has been constructed and tested with cosmic ray and relativistic ion beam. The results match with the estimation and the readout unit could easily cover the required dynamic range of about 4 orders of magnitude.

  8. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, M

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam–gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam–beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam–gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam–gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  9. Analysis of Ionospheric Scintillation Characteristics in Sub-Antarctica Region with GNSS Data at Macquarie Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jinling

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillation has a great impact on radio propagation and electronic system performance, thus is extensively studied currently. The influence of scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is particularly evident, making GNSS an effective medium to study characteristics of scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation varies greatly in relation with temporal and spatial distribution. In this paper, both temporal and spatial characteristics of scintillation are investigated based on Macquarie Island’s GNSS scintillation data collected from 2011 to 2015. Experiments demonstrate that occurrence rates of amplitude scintillation have a close relationship with solar activity, while phase scintillation is more likely to be generated by geomagnetic activity. In addition, scintillation distribution behaviors related to elevation and azimuth angles are statistically analyzed for both amplitude and phase scintillation. The proposed work is valuable for a deeper understanding of theoretical mechanisms of ionospheric scintillation in this region, and provides a reference for GNSS applications in certain regions around sub-Antarctica. PMID:28085087

  10. Interstellar Refractive Scintillation and Intraday Polarization Angle Swings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Jie Qian; Xi-Zhen Zhang; A. Kraus

    2005-01-01

    Intraday polarization angle swings of ~180° observed in two sources (QSO 0917+624 and QSO 1150+812) are discussed in the framework of refractive interstellar scintillation by a continuous interstellar medium. Model-fits to the I-,Q- and U- light curves were made for both sources. It is shown that for the case of 0917+624 both the intraday intensity variations and the polarization angle swing of ~180° could be explained consistently in terms of a four-component model, which comprises one steady and two scintillating polarized components and one further non-polarized scintillating component. The polarization angle swing of ~180° observed in 1150+812, which occurred when the polarized flux density was almost constant, could not be explained in terms of refractive scintillation by a continuous medium and might be due to other mechanisms (e.g., scintillation by interstellar clouds).

  11. Screening Method of New Inorganic Scintillators for Photon Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Megan

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic scintillators play an important role in detection and visualization of ionizing radiation. A scintillator with both high light yield and fast response has yet to be found. These methods are useful in detector applications for homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation. New scintillators are necessary to improve radiation detectors for detection of fissile materials specifically when shielded. At ORNL, several new inorganic scintillators including various versions of ZnO, and SnO2 are being evaluated to determine light yield and decay times. Crystals are grown here, doped or painted with metals such as Al, Cd, Sn or Ga and measured. The photons emitted from a scintillator from a single incident alpha or neutron can be counted and graphed, allowing the luminosity and decay constants to be determined. The promising samples are also being evaluated for exact luminosity through spectroscopy.

  12. Screening Method of Inorganic Scintillators for Photon Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M.

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic scintillators play an important role in detection and visualization of ionizing radiation. A scintillator with both high light yield and fast response has yet to be found. These methods are useful in detector applications for homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation. New scintillators are necessary to improve radiation detectors for detection of fissile materials specifically when shielded. At ORNL, several new inorganic scintillators including various versions of ZnO, and SnO2 are being evaluated to determine light yield and decay times. Crystals are grown here, doped or painted with metals such as Al, Cd, Sn or Ga and measured. The photons emitted from a scintillator from a single incident alpha or neutron can be counted and graphed, allowing the luminosity and decay constants to be determined

  13. An Experiment to Demonstrate Cherenkov / Scintillation Signal Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Caravaca, J; Land, B J; Wallig, J; Yeh, M; Gann, G D Orebi

    2016-01-01

    The ability to separately identify the Cherenkov and scintillation light components produced in scintillating mediums holds the potential for a major breakthrough in neutrino detection technology, allowing development of a large, low-threshold, directional detector with a broad physics program. The CHESS (CHErenkov / Scintillation Separation) experiment employs an innovative detector design with an array of small, fast photomultiplier tubes and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillating medium based on photon hit time and detected photoelectron density. This paper describes the physical properties and calibration of CHESS along with first results. The ability to reconstruct Cherenkov rings is demonstrated in a water target, and a time precision of 338 +/- 12 ps FWHM is achieved. Monte Carlo based predictions for the ring imaging sensitivity with a liquid scintillator target predict an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov hits of 94 +/- 1% and 81 +/- 1...

  14. Scintillation properties of TGG and TSAG crystals for imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Okada, Go; Kojima, Takahiro; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ushizawa, Jisaburou; Kawano, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Noriaki

    2017-08-01

    Optical and scintillation properties of TGG (Tb3Ga5O12) and TSAG (Tb3Sc2Al3O12) crystals were investigated, and capabilities to be used as a scintillator screen were demonstrated. In photoluminescence (PL) spectra, some emission lines due to Tb3+4f-4f transitions appeared from 500 to 700 nm. PL quantum yields of TGG and TSAG were 6.5% and 50.9%, respectively. When irradiated by X-rays, these crystals showed intense scintillation, and the emission wavelengths were the same as those in PL spectra. The scintillation decay times of TGG and TSAG were 94 and 678 μs, respectively. Further, we have demonstrated X-ray imaging using both TSGG and TSAG crystal plates and confirmed a capability as scintillator screens.

  15. Visible scintillation photodetector device incorporating chalcopyrite semiconductor crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold

    2017-04-04

    A photodetector device, including: a scintillator material operable for receiving incident radiation and emitting photons in response; a photodetector material coupled to the scintillator material operable for receiving the photons emitted by the scintillator material and generating a current in response, wherein the photodetector material includes a chalcopyrite semiconductor crystal; and a circuit coupled to the photodetector material operable for characterizing the incident radiation based on the current generated by the photodetector material. Optionally, the scintillator material includes a gamma scintillator material and the incident radiation received includes gamma rays. Optionally, the photodetector material is further operable for receiving thermal neutrons and generating a current in response. The circuit is further operable for characterizing the thermal neutrons based on the current generated by the photodetector material.

  16. Comparison of tropospheric scintillation prediction models of the Indonesian climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng Yee; Singh, Mandeep Jit

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric scintillation is a phenomenon that will cause signal degradation in satellite communication with low fade margin. Few studies of scintillation have been conducted in tropical regions. To analyze tropospheric scintillation, we obtain data from a satellite link installed at Bandung, Indonesia, at an elevation angle of 64.7° and a frequency of 12.247 GHz from 1999 to 2000. The data are processed and compared with the predictions of several well-known scintillation prediction models. From the analysis, we found that the ITU-R model gives the lowest error rate when predicting the scintillation intensity for fade at 4.68%. However, the model should be further tested using data from higher-frequency bands, such as the K and Ka bands, to verify the accuracy of the model.

  17. Cryogenic crashworthiness of LNG fuel storage tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Shipping is gradually embracing natural gas as bunker fuel. The most viable way to store natural gas on board is in its liquid form. Gas needs to be cooled to cryogenic temperatures and in practice moderately pressurized. On board ships, solely double walled pressure tanks are used for this purpose.

  18. Transient boiling crisis of cryogenic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deev, [No Value; Kharitonov, VS; Kutsenko, KV; Lavrukhin, AA

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a new physical model of boiling crisis under rapid increase of power on the heated surface. The calculation of the time interval of the transition to film boiling in cryogenic liquids was carried out depending on heat flux and pressure. The obtained results are in good

  19. Exergy Analysis of Cryogenic Air Separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Rene; Hirs, Gerard

    1998-01-01

    An exergy analysis is performed to analyse the possibilities of fuel saving in the cryogenic distillation process, which is the main method of air separation. It is shown that more than half of the exergy loss takes place in the liquefaction unit and almost one-third in the air compression unit.

  20. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires a

  1. Cryogenic crashworthiness of LNG fuel storage tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Shipping is gradually embracing natural gas as bunker fuel. The most viable way to store natural gas on board is in its liquid form. Gas needs to be cooled to cryogenic temperatures and in practice moderately pressurized. On board ships, solely double walled pressure tanks are used for this purpose.

  2. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  3. Transient boiling crisis of cryogenic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deev, [No Value; Kharitonov, VS; Kutsenko, KV; Lavrukhin, AA

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a new physical model of boiling crisis under rapid increase of power on the heated surface. The calculation of the time interval of the transition to film boiling in cryogenic liquids was carried out depending on heat flux and pressure. The obtained results are in good agreemen

  4. Composite aerogel insulation for cryogenic liquid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeongho, Kim; Hyungmook, Kang; Soojin, Shin; In Hwan, Oh; Changhee, Son; Hyung, Cho Yun; Yongchan, Kim; Sarng Woo, Karng

    2017-02-01

    High porosity materials such as aerogel known as a good insulator in a vacuum range (10-3 ∼ 1 Torr) was widely used to storage and to transport cryogenic fluids. It is necessary to be investigated the performance of aerogel insulations for cryogenic liquid storage in soft vacuum range to atmospheric pressure. A one-dimensional insulating experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated to consist of a cold mass tank, a heat absorber and an annular vacuum space with 5-layer (each 10 mm thickness) of the aerogel insulation materials. Aerogel blanket for cryogenic (used maximum temperature is 400K), aerogel blanket for normal temperature (used maximum temperature is 923K), and combination of the two kinds of aerogel blankets were 5-layer laminated between the cryogenic liquid wall and the ambient wall in vacuum space. Also, 1-D effective thermal conductivities of the insulation materials were evaluated by measuring boil-off rate from liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. In this study, the effective thermal conductivities and the temperature-thickness profiles of the two kinds of insulators and the layered combination of the two different aerogel blankets were presented.

  5. Robust Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Scholtens, B. F.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    New requirements for thermal insulation include robust Multilayer insulation (MU) systems that work for a range of environments from high vacuum to no vacuum. Improved MLI systems must be simple to install and maintain while meeting the life-cycle cost and thermal performance objectives. Performance of actual MLI systems has been previously shown to be much worse than ideal MLI. Spacecraft that must contain cryogens for both lunar service (high vacuum) and ground launch operations (no vacuum) are planned. Future cryogenic spacecraft for the soft vacuum environment of Mars are also envisioned. Industry products using robust MLI can benefit from improved cost-efficiency and system safety. Novel materials have been developed to operate as excellent thermal insulators at vacuum levels that are much less stringent than the absolute high vacuum requirement of current MLI systems. One such robust system, Layered Composite Insulation (LCI), has been developed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experimental testing and development of LCI is the focus of this paper. LCI thermal performance under cryogenic conditions is shown to be six times better than MLI at soft vacuum and similar to MLI at high vacuum. The experimental apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux data for LCI systems are compared with other MLI systems.

  6. Exergy analysis of cryogenic air separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, R.L.; Hirs, G.G.

    1998-01-01

    An exergy analysis is performed to analyse the possibilities of fuel saving in the cryogenic distillation process, which is the main method of air separation. It is shown that more than half of the exergy loss takes place in the liquefaction unit and almost one-third in the air compression unit. Min

  7. Testing the LHC magnet cryogenic systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The magnets in the LHC will be cooled to 1.9 K (- 270.3°C). To keep this 27 km long machine at such a low temperatures requires one of the largest refrigeration systems in the world. These pictures show the cryogenics plant in the testing area.

  8. Stabilizing stainless steel components for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, C. F.

    1967-01-01

    Warpage and creep in stainless steel valve components are decreased by a procedure in which components are machined to a semifinish and then cold soaked in a bath of cryogenic liquid. After the treatment they are returned to ambient temperature and machine finished to the final drawing dimensions.

  9. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  10. Cryogenic Laser Calorimetry for Impurity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimm, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a one-year effort to determine the applicability of laser-calorimetric spectroscopy to the study of deep-level impurities in silicon are presented. Critical considerations for impurity analysis by laser-calorimetric spectroscopy are discussed, the design and performance of a cryogenic laser calorimeter is described, and measurements of background absorption in high-purity silicon are presented.

  11. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  12. Energy Efficient Storage and Transfer of Cryogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenics is globally linked to energy generation, storage, and usage. Thermal insulation systems research and development is an enabling part of NASA's technology goals for Space Launch and Exploration. New thermal testing methodologies and materials are being transferred to industry for a wide range of commercial applications.

  13. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  14. Scintillation reduction for laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, G P; Gorshkov, V N [Theoretical Division, T-4 and CNLS MS B213, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Torous, S V, E-mail: gpb@lanl.gov [National Technical University of Ukraine ' KPI' , 37 Peremogy Avenue, Building 7, Kiev-56, 03056 (Ukraine)

    2011-03-14

    We numerically examine the spatial evolution of the structure of coherent and partially coherent laser beams, including the optical vortices, propagating in turbulent atmospheres. The influence of beam fragmentation and wandering relative to the axis of propagation (z-axis) on the value of the scintillation index (SI) of the signal at the detector is analysed. These studies were performed for different dimensions of the detector, distances of propagation, and strengths of the atmospheric turbulence. Methods for significantly reducing the SI are described. These methods utilize averaging of the signal at the detector over a set of partially coherent beams (PCBs). It is demonstrated that the most effective approach is using a set of PCBs with definite initial directions of propagation relative to the z-axis. This approach results in a significant compensation of the beam wandering which in many cases is the main contributor to the SI. A novel method is to generate the PCBs by combining two laser beams-Gaussian and vortex beams, with different frequencies (the difference between these two frequencies being significantly smaller than the frequencies themselves). In this case, the effective suppression of the SI does not require high-frequency modulators. This result is important for achieving gigabit data rates in long-distance laser communication through turbulent atmospheres.

  15. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Casas, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Perin, A; Perinic, G; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the overcapacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the "cannibalization" of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of ...

  16. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  17. Proton recoils in organic liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: LENA Working Group

    2012-07-01

    In liquid-scintillator detectors like the LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) project, understanding the nature of proton recoils is vital. First of all concerning the observation of the diffuse Supernova anti {nu}{sub e} background with the inverse beta decay (IBD). This signature can be mimicked by the thermalization and capture of a knockout neutron originating from inelastic NC interactions of atmospheric neutrinos on {sup 12}C. However, with the help of pulse shape discrimination between the neutron-induced proton recoils and the prompt positron signal from the IBD, this background might be reduced effectively. Furthermore, elastic {nu}-p scattering is an important channel for neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse SN. In order to reconstruct the initial neutrino energy, the energy-dependent quenching factor of proton recoils has to be known. Therefore, a neutron scattering experiment at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching has been set up in order to understand the response of proton recoils in organic liquid scintillator.

  18. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L.; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B. C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Cussans, D.; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Ghys, L.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Ihantola, S.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Kalousis, L. N.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Lehaut, G.; Mermans, J.; Michiels, I.; Moortgat, C.; Newbold, D.; Park, J.; Petridis, K.; Piñera, I.; Pommery, G.; Popescu, L.; Pronost, G.; Rademacker, J.; Reynolds, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Saunders, D.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Schune, M.-H.; Scovell, P. R.; Simard, L.; Vacheret, A.; Van Dyck, S.; Van Mulders, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vercaemer, S.; Waldron, A.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2017-04-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise localisation of scintillation signals, making efficient use of the detector volume. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a neutron capture efficiency of over 70 % is achievable with a sufficient number of 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) screens per cube and that an appropriate segmentation enables a measurement of the positron energy which is not limited by γ-ray leakage. First measurements of a single cell indicate that a very good neutron-gamma discrimination and high neutron detection efficiency can be obtained with adequate triggering techniques. The light yield from positron signals has been measured, showing that an energy resolution of 14%/√E(MeV) is achievable with high uniformity. A preliminary neutrino signal analysis has been developed, using selection criteria for pulse shape, energy, time structure and energy spatial distribution and showing that an antineutrino efficiency of 40% can be achieved. It also shows that the fine segmentation of the detector can be used to significantly decrease both correlated and accidental backgrounds.

  19. Fast Scintillating Paddles for DarkLight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The DarkLight experiment proposes to search for a dark photon in the 10-100 MeV mass range via its production in fixed-target electron-proton collisions. The experimental design is driven by the desire to detect the complete final state including the recoiling proton, while also sustaining a very high luminosity in order to search for this rare process. Although the final design of the DarkLight experiment calls for fully streamed detector readout, initial studies will rely on traditional, triggered approaches. In order to facilitate precision measurements at high rate, a fast, thin, finely-segmented trigger detector based on plastic scintillating paddles and custom amplifiers was developed. I will discuss this design and its performance in recent DarkLight beam studies, as well as the work we have done to develop detectors using individual scintillating fibers. The DarkLight project is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-94ER40818.

  20. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro, R. [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); De Donato, C.; D' Olivo, J.C.; Guzman, A.; Medina-Tanco, G. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Moreno Barbosa, E. [Fac. de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Paic, G.; Patino Salazar, E. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Salazar Ibarguen, H. [Fac. de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Sanchez, F.A., E-mail: federico.sanchez@nucleares.unam.m [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Supanitsky, A.D. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Valdes-Galicia, J.F. [Inst. de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Vargas Trevino, A.D.; Vergara Limon, S. [Fac. de Ciencias de la Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Villasenor, L.M. [Inst. de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas Hidalgo Morelia (Mexico); Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304 (5613) Malarguee, Prov. Mendoza (Argentina)

    2010-05-21

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm{sup 2}. Each layer is 4m{sup 2} and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cmx2m, oriented at a 90{sup 0} angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4x4cm{sup 2}. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2{mu}s data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).