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Sample records for cryogenic propellant storage

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer project will demonstrate the capability to safely and efficiently store, transfer and measure cryogenic propellants,...

  2. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Flight Demonstration development has been canceled in favor of a ground test bed development for of passive/active cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and...

  3. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Handling Efficiency Improvement

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stennis Space Center (SSC) is NASA’s top annual consumer of cryogenic propellants. Improvements in ground propellant system operations at SSC require having the...

  4. Advanced insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9.01, "Long Term Cryogenic Propellant...

  5. Advanced Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the NASA solicitation Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9-01, "Long Term Cryogenic...

  6. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  7. The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission:. [Progress and Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Taylor, William J.; Ginty, Carol A.; Melis, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Mission from formulation through Systems Requirements Review and into preparation for Preliminary Design Review. Accomplishments of the technology maturation phase of the project are included. The presentation then summarizes the transition, due to Agency budget constraints, of CPST from a flight project into a ground project titled evolvable Cryogenics (eCryo).

  8. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Prephase A Government Point-of-Departure Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueen, J. A.; Addona, B. M.; Gwaltney, D. A.; Holt, K. A.; Hopkins, R. C.; Matis, J. A.; McRight, P. S.; Popp, C. G.; Sutherlin, S. G.; Thomas, H. D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to define a point-of-departure prephase A mission concept for the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer technology demonstration mission to be conducted by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The mission concept includes identification of the cryogenic propellant management technologies to be demonstrated, definition of a representative mission timeline, and definition of a viable flight system design concept. The resulting mission concept will serve as a point of departure for evaluating alternative mission concepts and synthesizing the results of industry- defined mission concepts developed under the OCT contracted studies

  9. Innovative Stirling-Cycle Cryocooler for Long Term In-Space Storage of Cryogenic Liquid Propellants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerous studies have concluded that increasing effectiveness of long-term storage of cryogenic liquid propellants, primarily LO2 and LH2, offers the largest single...

  10. Technology Maturation in Preparation for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Doherty, Michael P.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    In support of its goal to find an innovative path for human space exploration, NASA embarked on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Project, a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large in-space cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots. Recognizing that key Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration would benefit from additional maturation to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) authorized funding for a one-year technology maturation phase of the CPST project. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, concept studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer of CFM technology sub-elements and components that were lower than a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. The specific technologies selected were grouped into five major categories: thick multilayer insulation, tank applied active thermal control, cryogenic fluid transfer, propellant gauging, and analytical tool development. Based on the success of the technology maturation efforts, the CPST project was approved to proceed to flight system development.

  11. A High Efficiency Cryocooler for In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Storage, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is considering multiple missions involving long-term cryogen storage in space. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen are the typical cryogens as they provide the...

  12. A High Efficiency Cryocooler for In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is considering multiple missions involving long-term cryogen storage in space. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen are the typical cryogens as they provide the...

  13. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Maturation: Establishing a Foundation for a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including asteroids, Lagrange points, the Moon and Mars. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages (CPS) and propellant depots. The TDM CPST project will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration which is relevant to enable long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Recognizing that key cryogenic fluid management technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration needed to be matured to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate authorized funding for a one-year (FY12) ground based technology maturation program. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technology sub-elements and components that were not already at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. This paper will present

  14. Aerogel-Filled Foam Core Insulation for Cryogenic Propellant Storage, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current cryogenic insulation materials suffer from various drawbacks including high cost and weight, lack of structural or load-bearing capability, fabrication...

  15. Aerogel-Filled Foam Core Insulation for Cryogenic Propellant Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current cryogenic insulation materials suffer from various drawbacks including high cost and weight, lack of structural or load-bearing capability, fabrication...

  16. Thermal performance of an integrated thermal protection system for long-term storage of cryogenic propellants in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, R. L.; Boyle, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    It was demonstrated that cryogenic propellants can be stored unvented in space long enough to accomplish a Saturn orbiter mission after 1,200-day coast. The thermal design of a hydrogen-fluorine rocket stage was carried out, and the hydrogen tank, its support structure, and thermal protection system were tested in a vacuum chamber. Heat transfer rates of approximately 23 W were measured in tests to simulate the near-Earth portion of the mission. Tests to simulate the majority of the time the vehicle would be in deep space and sun-oriented resulted in a heat transfer rate of 0.11 W.

  17. Cryogenic Propulsion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants can enhance NASA missions. This project will establish that modern cryogenic storage technologies will allow the use of cryogenic propulsion...

  18. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  19. Ormosil Beads for Insulation of Ground Cryogenic Storage Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced materials are required to insulate cryogenic storage and distribution systems for liquid propellants such as hydrogen and oxygen, used in orbital transfer...

  20. CFD Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. This study uses first-principles based CFD methodology to compute heat transfer from the tank wall to the cryogenic fluids and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between the tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between the tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that the commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over-predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  1. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  2. Experimental, Numerical and Analytical Characterization of Slosh Dynamics Applied to In-Space Propellant Storage, Management, and Transfer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in long term, in-space, cryogenic propellant storage and transfer science and technologies are key to increasing the safety, decreasing cost, and...

  3. Application of Model Based Prognostics to Pneumatic Valves in a Cryogenic Propellant Loading Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pneumatic-actuated valves are critical components in many applications, including cryogenic propellant loading for space operations. For these components, failures...

  4. Thermodynamic and transport properties of cryogenic propellants and related fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, V. J.

    1973-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent years in the quality and range of thermophysical data for the cryogenic propellants, pressurants, and inertants. A review of recently completed and current data compilation projects for helium, hydrogen, argon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, and methane is given together with recommended references for thermodynamic and transport property data tables for these fluids. Modern techniques in the plotting of thermodynamic charts from tabular data (or from functions such as the equation of state) have greatly improved their precision and value. A list of such charts is included.

  5. Fiber-Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu. Wei

    2010-01-01

    An innovative fiber-optic sensor has been developed for low-thrust-level settled mass gauging with measurement uncertainty optical fiber to measure liquid level and liquid distribution of cryogenic propellants. Every point of the sensing fiber is a point sensor that not only distinguishes liquid and vapor, but also measures temperature. This sensor is able to determine the physical location of each point sensor with 1-mm spatial resolution. Acting as a continuous array of numerous liquid/vapor point sensors, the truly distributed optical sensing fiber can be installed in a propellant tank in the same manner as silicon diode point sensor stripes using only a single feedthrough to connect to an optical signal interrogation unit outside the tank. Either water or liquid nitrogen levels can be measured within 1-mm spatial resolution up to a distance of 70 meters from the optical interrogation unit. This liquid-level sensing technique was also compared to the pressure gauge measurement technique in water and liquid nitrogen contained in a vertical copper pipe with a reasonable degree of accuracy. It has been demonstrated that the sensor can measure liquid levels in multiple containers containing water or liquid nitrogen with one signal interrogation unit. The liquid levels measured by the multiple fiber sensors were consistent with those virtually measured by a ruler. The sensing performance of various optical fibers has been measured, and has demonstrated that they can survive after immersion at cryogenic temperatures. The fiber strength in liquid nitrogen has also been measured. Multiple water level tests were also conducted under various actual and theoretical vibration conditions, and demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio under these vibration conditions, insofar as it affects measurement accuracy, is manageable and robust enough for a wide variety of spacecraft applications. A simple solution has been developed to absorb optical energy at the termination of

  6. Modeling Turbulence Effects in Cryogenic Propellant Tank Thermal Management, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Control and management of cryogenic propellant tank pressures in low gravity is an important technical challenge to overcome for future long duration space missions....

  7. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage using both cryocoolers and passive insulation technologies will enable long-term exploration missions by allowing designers to optimize tankage without the need for excess cryogen storage to account for boil off. Studies of ZBO (zero boil off) have been on-going in the USA for several years. More recently, a review of the needs of advanced space propulsion took place in Europe. This showed the interest of the European community in cryogenic propulsion for planetary missions as well as the use of liquid hydrogen for large power electric propulsion (manned Mars missions). Although natural boiling could be acceptable for single leg missions, passive insulation techniques yield roughly a I% per month cryogen loss and this would not be cost effective for robotic planetary missions involving storage times greater than one year. To make economic sense, long-term exploration missions require lower tank capacity and longer storage times. Recent advances in cryocooler technology, resulting in vast improvements in both cooler efficiency and reliability, make ZBO is a clear choice for planetary exploration missions. Other, more near term applications of ZBO include boil-off reduction or elimination applied to first and upper stages of future earth-to-orbit (ETO) launchers. This would extend launch windows and reduce infrastructure costs. Successors to vehicles like Ariane 5 could greatly benefit by implementing ZBO. Zero Boil Off will only be successful in ETO launcher applications if it makes economic sense to implement. The energy cost is only a fraction of the total cost of buying liquid cryogen, the rest being transportation and other overhead. Because of this, higher boiling point cryogens will benefit more from on-board liquefaction, thus reducing the infrastructure costs. Since hydrogen requires a liquefier with at least a 17% efficiency just to break even from a cost standpoint, one approach for implementing ZBO in upper stages would

  8. Low evaporation rate storage media for cryogenic liquids, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Considerable design work has been devoted to the development of cryogenic liquid storage containers. Containers which hold cryogenic liquids such as liquid nitrogen,...

  9. Investigation of a working fluid for cryogenic energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszak, P.; Poliński, J.; Chorowski, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cryogenic energy storage (CES) systems are promising alternatives to existing electrical energy storage technologies such as a pumped hydroelectric storage (PHS) or compressed air energy storage (CAES). In CES systems, excess electrical energy is used to liquefy a cryogenic fluid. The liquid can be stored in large cryogenic tanks for a long time. When a demand for the electricity is high, the liquid cryogen is pumped to high pressure and then warmed in a heat exchanger using ambient temperature or an available waste heat source. The vaporized cryogen is then used to drive a turbine and generate the electricity. Most research on cryogenic energy storage focuses on liquid air energy storage, as atmospheric air is widely available and therefore it does not limit a location of the energy storage plant. Nevertheless, CES with other gases as the working fluids can exhibit a higher efficiency. In this research a performance analysis of simple CES systems with several working fluids was performed.

  10. Technology for gelled liquid cryogenic propellants - Metallized hydrogen/aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkovich, John; Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    The theoretical basis for solid-loaded or densified liquid hydrogen propellants for advanced space applications is outlined. Metallized propellants make it possible to increase the safety of propulsion systems as well as the payloads of future vehicles. Nanogellant formulated liquid hydrogen gels and other fuel gels are characterized by excellent settling stability, low yield point, and a high shear thinning index which makes them attractive for propulsion applications.

  11. Integrated MLI: Advanced Thermal Insulation for Propellant Storage and Transfer Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants, orbital cryogenic fuel depots and the ability to store, transfer, handle and refuel spacecraft in orbit are critical to NASA future missions...

  12. A New Experiment for Determining Evaporation and Condensation Coefficients of Cryogenic Propellants and Development of an Efficient Computational Model of Cryogenic Film Stability in Microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants (liquid hydrogen and methane) are critical to the long-term U.S. strategy for space exploration and utilization. Unfortunately, designing and...

  13. Study and design of cryogenic propellant acquisition systems. Volume 1: Design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    An in-depth study and selection of practical propellant surface tension acquisition system designs for two specific future cryogenic space vehicles, an advanced cryogenic space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system and an advanced space propulsion module is reported. A supporting laboratory scale experimental program was also conducted to provide design information critical to concept finalization and selection. Designs using localized pressure isolated surface tension screen devices were selected for each application and preliminary designs were generated. Based on these designs, large scale acquisition prototype hardware was designed and fabricated to be compatible with available NASA-MSFC feed system hardware.

  14. Modified-Collins cryocooler for zero-boiloff storage of cryogenic fuels in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Charles L.; Krass, Brady; Hogan, Jake; Brisson, John

    2012-06-01

    Future lunar and planetary explorations will require the storage of cryogenic propellants, particularly liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2), in low earth orbit (LEO) for periods of time ranging from days to months, and possibly longer. Without careful thermal management, significant quantities of stored liquid cryogens can be lost due to boil-off. Boil-off can be minimized by a variety of passive means including insulation, sun shades and passive radiational cooling. However, it has been shown that active cooling using space cryocoolers has the potential to result in Zero Boil-Off (ZBO) and the launch-mass savings using active cooling exceeds that of passive cooling of LOX for mission durations in LEO of less than 1 week, and for LH2 after about 2 months in LEO. Large-scale DC-flow cryogenic refrigeration systems operate at a fraction of the specific power levels required by small-scale AC-flow cryocoolers. The efficiency advantage of DC-flow cryogenic cycles motivates the current development of a cryocooler based on a modification of the Collins Cycle. The modified Collins cycle design employs piston type expanders that support high operating pressure ratios, electromagnetic valves that enable "floating pistons", and recuperative heat transfer. This paper will describe the design of a prototype Modified-Collins cryocooler for ZBO storage of cryogenic fuels in space.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from: inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. The work presented under this task uses the first-principles based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique to compute heat transfer from tank wall to the cryogenic fluids, and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  16. Wrapped-MLI: Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Piping, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New NASA vehicles (EDS, Orion, landers & orbiting fuel depots) need improved cryogenic propellant transfer & storage for long duration missions. Current...

  17. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  18. Passive Capillary Pumped Cryocooling System for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Significant cost and weight savings of a space mission can be achieved by improving the cryogenic storage technology. Added cryogen mass due to the cryogen boil-off,...

  19. Advanced Sprayable Composite Coating for Cryogenic Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA solicitation X10 "Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer" under subtopic X.01 "Cryogenic Fluid...

  20. Commissioning of the Cryogenic Plant for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at Heidelberg

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, R; Grieser, M; Haberstroh, C; Kaiser, D; Lange, M; Laux, F; Menk, S; Orlov, D A; Repnow, R; Sieber, T; Quack, H; Varju, J; Wolf A

    2009-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg a next generation electrostatic storage ring for low velocity atomic and molecular ion beams is under construction. In contrast to existing electrostatic storage rings, the Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR will be cooled down to temperatures below 2 K. Thus acting as a large cryopump it will provide long storage times and, in addition, open a new field of quantum state controlled molecular physics due to a low heat radiation background from space-like environment. A concept for cooling the storage ring has been developed and is presently tested by means of a linear trap as a prototype with a length of 1/10 of the planned ring. A commercial refrigerator with 21 W at 2 K has been successfully commissioned and was connected to the prototype. This paper presents the status of the cryogenic plant after the commissioning and one year of operation.

  1. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  2. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  3. Performance evaluation of various cryogenic energy storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Rodrigo F.; Pedro, Hugo T.C.; Koury, Ricardo N.N.; Machado, Luiz; Coimbra, Carlos F.M.; Porto, Matheus P.

    2015-01-01

    This work compares various CES (cryogenic energy storage) systems as possible candidates to store energy from renewable sources. Mitigating solar and wind power variability and its direct effect on local grid stability are already a substantial technological bottleneck for increasing market penetration of these technologies. In this context, CES systems represent low-cost solutions for variability that can be used to set critical power ramp rates. We investigate the different thermodynamic and engineering constraints that affect the design of CES systems, presenting theoretical simulations, indicating that optimization is also needed to improve the cryogenic plant performance. - Highlights: • We assessed the performance of cryogenic energy storage systems. • We re-evaluated the Linde–Hampson cycle proposed by Chen. • We proposed the Claude and Collins cycles as alternatives for the Linde–Hampson cycle. • We concluded that Claude cycle is the best alternative for the simulated conditions.

  4. Cryogenic storage technology readiness for First Lunar Outpost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: an assessment of cryogenic storage technology; cryogenic boiloff predictions; Space Shuttle/Centaur thermodynamic vent system; zero-g thermodynamic vent system; heat exchanger/mixer pump module; the thick multilayer insulation (MLI) development program; blanket geometry concept evaluations; four-inch thick MLI system on 1/4-scale test tank; combined environments of vibration, acceleration, and temperature testing (CEVAT); Centaur fixed foam insulation; insulation system design; and fixed foam on operational Atlas 2.

  5. Design Technique for the High-Boiling Propellant Storage and Preparation Facility at the Cosmodrome «Vostochny»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Denisov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The offered project of storage facility allows us to simplify and unitise the ground-based infrastructure objects. The storage facility implements a full preparatory cycle of the propellant components (PC in all parameters. Another problem the developers of complexes of groundbased equipment face now is bulk receipt of PC from manufacturer. The tanks of launch complexes cannot accept such volumes of propellant. It proves that there is a need to create a storage facility. The facility solves problems concerning the components receipt, temperature preparation, moisture content (drying, gas content, and supply to consumers. For preparation the perspective technologies with low power consumption are used.Receiving the propellant from the dispensing platform is carried out via filters of rough cleaning. Transfer from transport tankage goes using a pump. The received product passes through a gas separator to clean technological gas impurity.To prepare propellant temperature, a technology of cryogenic bubbling by boiling nitrogen is chosen. To improve efficiency of cryogenic bubbling it is advised to use the specialized capacities. Railway dimensions, admissible for the trainload goods across the railroads of Siberia and the Far East, define their sizes.As a drying technology and a gas content preparation the preliminary propellant filtration using vertical electro-separators is chosen to save a space. The chamber vertical electroseparators allow 2 — 3 times increase of dehydration capacity.The article presents calculations to prove that using the chosen cooling and drying technologies is efficient.Prepared PC can be supplied:• to transport-fueling containers (TFC with the subsequent transportation to the launch complexes either by the railway or by road;• to mobile fuelling tanks, which feed rocket-carrier tanks on arrival at the blast-off;• to transport capacities for transportation to the object outside the cosmodrome (spaceport;• directly

  6. To Ensure the Integrity of the Cryogenic Propellant Depot Tank Within the Expected Radiation and Space Debris Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We intend to develop the technology for lightweight composite structure suitable for both cryogenic fuel depot storage as well as human in-space habitat. These will...

  7. Modeling of Slosh Dynamics in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks in Microgravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The slosh dynamics in cryogenic fuel tanks under microgravity is a pressing problem that severely affects the reliability of launching spacecraft. After reaching low Earth orbit, the propellant in a multistage rocket experiences large and cyclic changes in temperature as a result of solar heating. Tank wall heating can induce thermal stratification and propellant boiloff, particularly during slosh-inducing vehicle maneuvers. Precise understanding of the dynamic and thermodynamic effects of propellant slosh caused by these maneuvers is critical to mission performance and success. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is used extensively within the space vehicle industry in an attempt to characterize the behavior of liquids in microgravity, yet experimental data to quantify these predictions is very limited and reduces confidence in the analytical predictions. A novel approach designed to produce high-fidelity data for correlation to CFD model predictions is being developed with the assistance of Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) and Sierra Lobo, Inc. With few exceptions, previous work in slosh dynamics was theoretical or treated the mass of fuel as a variable of inertia only; such models did not consider the viscosity, surface tension, or other important fluid effects. The challenges in this research are in the development of instrumentation able to measure the required parameters, the computational ability to quantify the fluid behaviors, and the means to assess both the measurements and predictions. The design of this experiment bridges the understanding of slosh dynamics in microgravity by a comprehensive approach that combines CFD tools, dynamic simulation tools, semianalytical models of the predominant fluid effects, and an experimental framework that includes measurement and characterization of liquid slosh in one-degree-of-freedom (DOF) and two-DOF experiments, and ultimately experiments in a NASA low-gravity aircraft.

  8. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V.

    1997-01-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  9. Thermal conductivity studies of a polyurea cross-linked silica aerogel-RTV 655 compound for cryogenic propellant tank applications in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, F.; Marchetta, J.; Smith, K. M.

    2013-10-01

    Silica-based aerogel is an ideal thermal insulator with a makeup of up to 99% air associated with the highly porous nature of this material. Polyurea cross-linked silica aerogel (PCSA) has superior mechanical properties compared to the native aerogels yet retains the highly porous open pore network and functions as an ideal thermal insulator with added load-bearing capability necessary for some applications. Room temperature vulcanizing rubber-RTV 655—is a space qualified elastomeric thermal insulator and encapsulant with high radiation and temperature tolerance as well as chemical resistance. Storage and transport of cryogenic propellant liquids is an integral part of the success of future space exploratory missions and is an area under constant development. Limitations and shortcomings of current cryogenic tank materials and insulation techniques such as non-uniform insulation layers, self-pressurization, weight and durability issues of the materials used, has motivated the quest for alternative materials. Both RTV 655 and PCSA are promising space qualified materials with unique and tunable microscopic and macroscopic properties making them attractive candidates for this study. In this work, the effect of PCSA geometry and volume concentration on the thermal behavior of RTV 655—PCSA compound material has been investigated at room temperature and at a cryogenic temperature. Macroscopic and microscopic PCSA material was encapsulated at increasing concentrations in an RTV 655 elastomeric matrix. The effect of pulverization on the nanopores of PCSA as a method for creating large quantities of homogeneous PCSA microparticles has also been investigated and is reported. The PCSA volume concentrations ranged between 22% and 75% for both geometries. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed based on the steady state transient plane source method.

  10. Determining solid-fluid interface temperature distribution during phase change of cryogenic propellants using transient thermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellur, K.; Médici, E. F.; Hermanson, J. C.; Choi, C. K.; Allen, J. S.

    2018-04-01

    Control of boil-off of cryogenic propellants is a continuing technical challenge for long duration space missions. Predicting phase change rates of cryogenic liquids requires an accurate estimation of solid-fluid interface temperature distributions in regions where a contact line or a thin liquid film exists. This paper described a methodology to predict inner wall temperature gradients with and without evaporation using discrete temperature measurements on the outer wall of a container. Phase change experiments with liquid hydrogen and methane in cylindrical test cells of various materials and sizes were conducted at the Neutron Imaging Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Two types of tests were conducted. The first type of testing involved thermal cycling of an evacuated cell (dry) and the second involved controlled phase change with cryogenic liquids (wet). During both types of tests, temperatures were measured using Si-diode sensors mounted on the exterior surface of the test cells. Heat is transferred to the test cell by conduction through a helium exchange gas and through the cryostat sample holder. Thermal conduction through the sample holder is shown to be the dominant mode with the rate of heat transfer limited by six independent contact resistances. An iterative methodology is employed to determine contact resistances between the various components of the cryostat stick insert, test cell and lid using the dry test data. After the contact resistances are established, inner wall temperature distributions during wet tests are calculated.

  11. In-Space Propellant Production Using Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, William; Johnson, Wesley; Swanger, Adam; McQuade, William

    2012-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Manned exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space, and larger science mission directorate payloads can be delivered using cryogenic propulsion stages. Several architecture studies have shown that in-space cryogenic propulsion depots offer benefits including lower launch costs, smaller launch vehicles, and enhanced mission flexibility. NASA is currently planning a Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) technology demonstration mission that will use existing technology to demonstrate long duration storage, acquisition, mass gauging, and transfer of liquid hydrogen in low Earth orbit. This mission will demonstrate key technologies, but the CPST architecture is not designed for optimal mission operations for a true propellant depot. This paper will consider cryogenic propellant depots that are designed for operability. The operability principles considered are reusability, commonality, designing for the unique environment of space, and use of active control systems, both thermal and fluid. After considering these operability principles, a proposed depot architecture will be presented that uses water launch and on orbit electrolysis and liquefaction. This could serve as the first true space factory. Critical technologies needed for this depot architecture, including on orbit electrolysis, zero-g liquefaction and storage, rendezvous and docking, and propellant transfer, will be discussed and a developmental path forward will be presented. Finally, use of the depot to support the NASA Science Mission Directorate exploration goals will be presented.

  12. Hybrid Aerogel-MLI Insulation System for Cryogenic Storage in Space Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The future of the NASA space program includes longer and more invasive missions into space. Long duration storage of large quantities of cryogenic fluids for...

  13. Innovations in Understanding and Modeling Cryogenic Propellants for Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space exploration by humans and robots benefits from optimization of many systems. Design of cryogenic rocket systems, typically using liquid oxygen and liquid...

  14. Benefits and technology readiness for using cryogenic instead of storable propellants for return mission from Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Cryogenic requirements are examined for new missions to the moon. A comparison is made with previous moon landings and a technology assessment investigates the new requirements for such missions. All of the material is presented in viewgraph format.

  15. An analytical study of reusable flight-weight cryogenic propellant tank designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Cerro, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermostructural analyses of reusable flight-weight cryogenic tanks for a vertically launched space vehicle have been conducted. An analytical procedure was developed for sizing the tank structure, cryogenic insulation, and thermal protection system. Unstiffened, integrally-stiffened, and honeycomb core sandwich tank skins using aluminum or stainless steel materials were compared for their ability to meet design criteria at least weight. Cryogenic insulation systems were also evaluated, including closed-cell cryogenic foams and evacuated honeycomb core. The results indicate that a 400 F foam-insulated unstiffened-skin aluminum tank structure is the lightest structure for either LOX or LH2 tanks that meet the selected design criteria, but only two to four percent lighter than a stiffened aluminum tank.

  16. Modified Collins Cryocooler for Cryo-Propellant Thermal Management, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future lunar and planetary explorations will require the storage of cryogenic propellants, particularly liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2), in low earth...

  17. Modified Collins Cryocooler for Cryo-Propellant Thermal Management, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future lunar and planetary explorations will require the storage of cryogenic propellants, particularly liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2), in low earth...

  18. Long Term In-Space Cryogen Storage - Magnetic Isolation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A research activity is proposed to assess the feasibility of magnetic and/or quantum levitation techniques to hold cryogenic fluids in space for extended durations...

  19. NASA Cryogenic Propellant Systems Technology Development and Potential Opportunities for Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the eCryo Team are traveling to France to meet with CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) on the benchmarking of CFM (Cryogenic Fluids Management) analytical models the week of January 26th, 2015. Mike Meyer is representing the Agency and eCryo Project and will conduct a conversation to explore future work. This slide package (28 charts and 3 movies) requires approval via a 1676. ISS data in this chart set has been copied from public websites.

  20. Modeling and analysis of chill and fill processes for the cryogenic storage and transfer engineering development unit tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Cartagena, W.; Majumdar, A. K.; LeClair, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    NASA's future missions may require long-term storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU), a NASA in-house effort supported by both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Glenn Research Center, is a cryogenic fluid management (CFM) test article that primarily serves as a manufacturing pathfinder and a risk reduction task for a future CFM payload. The EDU test article comprises a flight-like tank, internal components, insulation, and attachment struts. The EDU is designed to perform integrated passive thermal control performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a test-like vacuum environment. A series of tests, with LH2 as a testing fluid, was conducted at Test Stand 300 at MSFC during the summer of 2014. The objective of this effort was to develop a thermal/fluid model for evaluating the thermodynamic behavior of the EDU tank during the chill and fill processes. The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program, an MSFC in-house general-purpose computer program for flow network analysis, was utilized to model and simulate the chill and fill portion of the testing. The model contained the LH2 supply source, feed system, EDU tank, and vent system. The test setup, modeling description, and comparison of model predictions with the test data are presented.

  1. Empirical Correlations for the Solubility of Pressurant Gases in Cryogenic Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Asipauskas, Marius; VanDresar, Neil T.

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed data published by others reporting the solubility of helium in liquid hydrogen, oxygen, and methane, and of nitrogen in liquid oxygen, to develop empirical correlations for the mole fraction of these pressurant gases in the liquid phase as a function of temperature and pressure. The data, compiled and provided by NIST, are from a variety of sources and covers a large range of liquid temperatures and pressures. The correlations were developed to yield accurate estimates of the mole fraction of the pressurant gas in the cryogenic liquid at temperature and pressures of interest to the propulsion community, yet the correlations developed are applicable over a much wider range. The mole fraction solubility of helium in all these liquids is less than 0.3% at the temperatures and pressures used in propulsion systems. When nitrogen is used as a pressurant for liquid oxygen, substantial contamination can result, though the diffusion into the liquid is slow.

  2. Efficient Thermally Conductive Strap Design for Cryogenic Propellant Tank Supports and Plumbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.; Christie, R.; Gebby, P.; Kashani, A.

    2012-01-01

    After evalu1ating NASA space architecture goals, the Office of Chief Technologist identified the need for developing enabling technology for long term loiters in space with cryogenic fluids. One such technology is structural heat interception. In this prototype, heat interception at the tank support strut was accomplished using a thermally conductive link to the broad area cooled shield. The design methodology for both locating the heat intercept and predicting the reduction in boil-off heat leak is discussed in detail. Results from the chosen design are presented. It was found that contact resistance resulting from different mechanical attachment techniques played a significant role in the form and functionality of a successful design.

  3. Gas Gun Model and Comparison to Experimental Performance of Pipe Guns Operating with Light Propellant Gases and Large Cryogenic Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Carmichael, J. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL); Gebhart, T. E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R. [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A. [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J. [ORNL; Lyttle, Mark S. [ORNL

    2017-10-01

    Injection of multiple large (~10 to 30 mm diameter) shattered pellets into ITER plasmas is presently part of the scheme planned to mitigate the deleterious effects of disruptions on the vessel components. To help in the design and optimize performance of the pellet injectors for this application, a model referred to as “the gas gun simulator” has been developed and benchmarked against experimental data. The computer code simulator is a Java program that models the gas-dynamics characteristics of a single-stage gas gun. Following a stepwise approach, the code utilizes a variety of input parameters to incrementally simulate and analyze the dynamics of the gun as the projectile is launched down the barrel. Using input data, the model can calculate gun performance based on physical characteristics, such as propellant-gas and fast-valve properties, barrel geometry, and pellet mass. Although the model is fundamentally generic, the present version is configured to accommodate cryogenic pellets composed of H2, D2, Ne, Ar, and mixtures of them and light propellant gases (H2, D2, and He). The pellets are solidified in situ in pipe guns that consist of stainless steel tubes and fast-acting valves that provide the propellant gas for pellet acceleration (to speeds ~200 to 700 m/s). The pellet speed is the key parameter in determining the response time of a shattered pellet system to a plasma disruption event. The calculated speeds from the code simulations of experiments were typically in excellent agreement with the measured values. With the gas gun simulator validated for many test shots and over a wide range of physical and operating parameters, it is a valuable tool for optimization of the injector design, including the fast valve design (orifice size and volume) for any operating pressure (~40 bar expected for the ITER application) and barrel length for any pellet size (mass, diameter, and length). Key design parameters and proposed values for the pellet injectors for

  4. Foam/Aerogel Composite Materials for Thermal and Acoustic Insulation and Cryogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Sass, Jared P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention involves composite materials containing a polymer foam and an aerogel. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability, good acoustic insulation, and excellent physical mechanical properties. The composite materials can be used, for instance, for heat and acoustic insulation on aircraft, spacecraft, and maritime ships in place of currently used foam panels and other foam products. The materials of the invention can also be used in building construction with their combination of light weight, strength, elasticity, ability to be formed into desired shapes, and superior thermal and acoustic insulation power. The materials have also been found to have utility for storage of cryogens. A cryogenic liquid or gas, such as N.sub.2 or H.sub.2, adsorbs to the surfaces in aerogel particles. Thus, another embodiment of the invention provides a storage vessel for a cryogen.

  5. Investigation of solid nitrogen for cryogenic thermal storage in superconducting cable terminations for enhanced resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttell, N.; Zhang, Z.; Kweon, J.; Nes, T.; Kim, C. H.; Pamidi, S.; Ordonez, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Low heat capacity of helium makes the helium gas cooled high temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices susceptible to large temperature rises during unexpected heat loads such as electrical faults or cryogenic system failures. Cryogenic thermal storage in the form of solid nitrogen designed in the terminations is explored as a means to increase the thermal stability and operational time of HTS power cables in the event of unexpected heat loads. An external tank containing activated charcoal is used as an adsorption buffer tank for nitrogen gas. The use of activated charcoal minimizes the volume of the buffer tank and prevents pressure rises during melting and boiling of the solid nitrogen. Calculations of the cryogenic thermal storage needed and a description of the experimental setup used to understand the design constraints are discussed.

  6. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  7. A single stage to orbit rocket with non-cryogenic propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Mitchell B.; Hunter, Maxwell W.

    1993-06-01

    Different propellant combinations for single-stage-to-orbit-rocket applications were compared to oxygen/hydrogen, including nitrogen tetroxide/hydrazine, oxygen/methane, oxygen/propane, oxygen/RP-1, solid core nuclear/hydrogen, and hydrogen peroxide/JP-5. Results show that hydrogen peroxide and JP-5, which have a specific impulse of 328 s in vacuum and a density of 1,330 kg/cu m. This high-density jet fuel offers 1.79 times the payload specific energy of oxygen and hydrogen. By catalytically decomposing the hydrogen peroxide to steam and oxygen before injection into the thrust chamber, the JP-5 can be injected as a liquid into a high-temperature gas flow. This would yield superior combustion stability and permit easy throttling of the engine by adjusting the amount of JP-5 in the mixture. It is concluded that development of modern hydrogen peroxide/JP-5 engines, combined with modern structural technology, could lead to a simple, robust, and versatile single-stage-to-orbit capability.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Effects on Cryogenic Storage Tank Boil-Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; Frontier, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) routinely utilizes cryostat test hardware to evaluate comparative and absolute thermal conductivities of a wide array of insulation systems. The test method is based on measurement of the flow rate of gas evolved due to evaporative boil-off of a cryogenic liquid. The gas flow rate typically stabilizes after a period of a couple of hours to a couple of days, depending upon the test setup. The stable flow rate value is then used to calculate the thermal conductivity for the insulation system being tested. The latest set of identical cryostats, 1,000-L spherical tanks, exhibited different behavior. On a macro level, the flow rate did stabilize after a couple of days; however the stable flow rate was oscillatory with peak to peak amplitude of up to 25 percent of the nominal value. The period of the oscillation was consistently 12 hours. The source of the oscillation has been traced to variations in atmospheric pressure due to atmospheric tides similar to oceanic tides. This paper will present analysis of this phenomenon, including a calculation that explains why other cryostats are not affected by it.

  9. Cryogenic freezing of fresh date fruits for quality preservation during frozen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alhamdan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresh date fruits, especially Barhi cultivar, are favored and widely consumed at the Khalal maturity stage (first color edible stage. These fruits are seasonal and perishable and there is a need for extending their shelf life. This study evaluates two different freezing methods, namely cryogenic freezing using liquid nitrogen and conventional deep freezing on preserving the quality and stability of date fruits (cv. Barhi at Khalal maturity stage. Fresh date fruits (cv. Barhi at Khalal stage were frozen utilizing the two methods. The produced frozen dates were stored under frozen storage conditions for nine months (at −20 °C and −40 °C for the conventional and cryogenic freezing, respectively. Color values, textural properties (hardness, elasticity, chewiness and resilience, and nutrition attributes (enzymes and sugars for fresh dates before freezing and for the frozen dates were measured every three months during the frozen storage. Color values of the frozen dates were affected by the freezing method and the frozen storage period. There are substantial differences in the quality of the frozen fruits in favor of cryogenic freezing compared to the conventional slow freezing. The results revealed a large disparity between the times of freezing of the two methods. The freezing time accounted to 10 min in the cryogenic freezing method, whereas it was 1800 min for the conventional slow freezing system.

  10. The phase slip factor of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    To determine the momentum spread of an ion beam from the measured revolution frequency distribution, the knowledge of the phase slip factor of the storage ring is necessary. The slip factor was measured for various working points of the cryogenic storage ring CSR at MPI for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg and was compared with simulations. The predicted functional relationship of the slip factor and the horizontal tune depends on the different islands of stability, which has been experimentally verified. This behavior of the slip factor is in clear contrast to that of magnetic storage rings.

  11. Expandable Cryogenic Tankage for On Orbit Depot Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed expandable depot storage tanks would make it possible to have an on-orbit tank larger in volume than any existing or planned launch vehicles. The size...

  12. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology for Moon and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gaby, Joseph D.; Salerno, Louis J.; Sutherlin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy, focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are being conducted by the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project. Cryogenic Fluid Management Project objectives are to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens to support high performance demands of lunar, and ultimately, Mars missions in the application areas of propulsion, surface systems, and Earth-based ground operations. The targeted use of cryogens and cryogenic technologies for these application areas is anticipated to significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, to reduce and even eliminate storage tank boil-off losses for long term missions, to economize ground pad storage and transfer operations, and to expand operational and architectural operations at destination. This paper organizes Cryogenic Fluid Management Project technology efforts according to Exploration Architecture target areas, and discusses the scope of trade studies, analytical modeling, and test efforts presently underway, as well as future plans, to address those target areas. The target areas are: liquid methane/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Ascent Stage, liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Descent Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage, liquefaction, zero boil-off, and propellant scavenging for Lunar Surface Systems, cold helium and zero boil-off technologies for Earth-Based Ground Operations, and architecture definition studies for long term storage and on-orbit transfer and pressurization of LH2, cryogenic Mars landing and ascent vehicles, and cryogenic production via in situ resource utilization on Mars.

  13. High-density automotive hydrogen storage with cryogenic capable pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias; Ross, Timothy O.; Weisberg, Andrew H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-792, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Brunner, Tobias C.; Kircher, Oliver [BMW Group, Knorrstr. 147, 80788 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    LLNL is developing cryogenic capable pressure vessels with thermal endurance 5-10 times greater than conventional liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) tanks that can eliminate evaporative losses in routine usage of (L)H{sub 2} automobiles. In a joint effort BMW is working on a proof of concept for a first automotive cryo-compressed hydrogen storage system that can fulfill automotive requirements on system performance, life cycle, safety and cost. Cryogenic pressure vessels can be fueled with ambient temperature compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH{sub 2}), LH{sub 2} or cryogenic hydrogen at elevated supercritical pressure (cryo-compressed hydrogen, CcH{sub 2}). When filled with LH{sub 2} or CcH{sub 2}, these vessels contain 2-3 times more fuel than conventional ambient temperature compressed H{sub 2} vessels. LLNL has demonstrated fueling with LH{sub 2} onboard two vehicles. The generation 2 vessel, installed onboard an H{sub 2}-powered Toyota Prius and fueled with LH{sub 2} demonstrated the longest unrefueled driving distance and the longest cryogenic H{sub 2} hold time without evaporative losses. A third generation vessel will be installed, reducing weight and volume by minimizing insulation thickness while still providing acceptable thermal endurance. Based on its long experience with cryogenic hydrogen storage, BMW has developed its cryo-compressed hydrogen storage concept, which is now undergoing a thorough system and component validation to prove compliance with automotive requirements before it can be demonstrated in a BMW test vehicle. (author)

  14. Capillary acquisition devices for high-performance vehicles: Executive summary. [evaluation of cryogenic propellant management techniques using the centaur launch vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, M. H.; Bradshaw, R. D.; Risberg, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Technology areas critical to the development of cryogenic capillary devices were studied. Passive cooling of capillary devices was investigated with an analytical and experimental study of wicking flow. Capillary device refilling with settled fluid was studied using an analytical and experimental program that resulted in successful correlation of a versatile computer program with test data. The program was used to predict Centaur D-1S LO2 and LH2 start basket refilling. Comparisons were made between the baseline Centaur D-1S propellant feed system and feed system alternatives including systems using capillary devices. The preferred concepts from the Centaur D-1S study were examined for APOTV and POTV vehicles for delivery and round trip transfer of payloads between LEO and GEO. Mission profiles were determined to provide propellant usage timelines and the payload partials were defined.

  15. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of cryogens in spacecraft propellant...

  16. Mars Propellant Liquefaction and Storage Performance Modeling using Thermal Desktop with an Integrated Cryocooler Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Pooja; Hauser, Dan; Sutherlin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASAs current Mars architectures are assuming the production and storage of 23 tons of liquid oxygen on the surface of Mars over a duration of 500+ days. In order to do this in a mass efficient manner, an energy efficient refrigeration system will be required. Based on previous analysis NASA has decided to do all liquefaction in the propulsion vehicle storage tanks. In order to allow for transient Martian environmental effects, a propellant liquefaction and storage system for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) was modeled using Thermal Desktop. The model consisted of a propellant tank containing a broad area cooling loop heat exchanger integrated with a reverse turbo Brayton cryocooler. Cryocooler sizing and performance modeling was conducted using MAV diurnal heat loads and radiator rejection temperatures predicted from a previous thermal model of the MAV. A system was also sized and modeled using an alternative heat rejection system that relies on a forced convection heat exchanger. Cryocooler mass, input power, and heat rejection for both systems were estimated and compared against sizing based on non-transient sizing estimates.

  17. Cryogenic sub-system for the 56 MHz SRF storage cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.; Than, R.; Orfin, P.; Lederle, D.; Tallerico, T.; Masi L.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Storage Cavity is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator that will be operated in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The cavity requires an extremely quiet environment to maintain its operating frequency. The cavity, besides being engineered for a mechanically quiet system, also requires a quiet cryogenic system. The helium is taken from RHIC's main helium supply header at 3.5 atm, 5.3K at a phase separator tank. The boil-off is sent back to the RHIC refrigeration system to recover the cooling. To acoustically separate the RHIC helium supply and return lines, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger condenses the helium vapor generated in the RF cavity bath. A system description and operating parameters are given about the cryogen delivery system. The 56 MHz superconducting storage RF cavity project is making progress. The cryogenic system design is in its final stage. The helium supply lines have been tapped into the RHIC helium distribution lines. The plate-and-fin heat exchanger design is near completion and specification will be sent out for bid soon. The cold helium vapor heating system design will start soon as well. A booster compressor specification is underway. The first phase separator and transfer line design work is near completion and will be sent out for bid soon.

  18. A cryogenic electrostatic trap for long-time storage of keV ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Menk, S.; Varju, J.; Bastert, R.; Blaum, K.; López-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Fellenberger, F.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R.; Heber, O.; Kühnel, K.-U.; Laux, F.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Shornikov, A.; Sieber, T.; Toker, Y.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2010-05-01

    We report on the realization and operation of a fast ion beam trap of the linear electrostatic type employing liquid helium cooling to reach extremely low blackbody radiation temperature and residual gas density and, hence, long storage times of more than 5 min which are unprecedented for keV ion beams. Inside a beam pipe that can be cooled to temperatures <15 K, with 1.8 K reached in some locations, an ion beam pulse can be stored at kinetic energies of 2-20 keV between two electrostatic mirrors. Along with an overview of the cryogenic trap design, we present a measurement of the residual gas density inside the trap resulting in only 2×103 cm-3, which for a room temperature environment corresponds to a pressure in the 10-14 mbar range. The device, called the cryogenic trap for fast ion beams, is now being used to investigate molecules and clusters at low temperatures, but has also served as a design prototype for the cryogenic heavy-ion storage ring currently under construction at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  19. A cryogenic electrostatic trap for long-time storage of keV ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M; Froese, M; Menk, S; Varju, J; Bastert, R; Blaum, K; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Fellenberger, F; Grieser, M; von Hahn, R; Heber, O; Kühnel, K-U; Laux, F; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Shornikov, A; Sieber, T; Toker, Y; Ullrich, J; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2010-05-01

    We report on the realization and operation of a fast ion beam trap of the linear electrostatic type employing liquid helium cooling to reach extremely low blackbody radiation temperature and residual gas density and, hence, long storage times of more than 5 min which are unprecedented for keV ion beams. Inside a beam pipe that can be cooled to temperatures <15 K, with 1.8 K reached in some locations, an ion beam pulse can be stored at kinetic energies of 2-20 keV between two electrostatic mirrors. Along with an overview of the cryogenic trap design, we present a measurement of the residual gas density inside the trap resulting in only 2 x 10(3) cm(-3), which for a room temperature environment corresponds to a pressure in the 10(-14) mbar range. The device, called the cryogenic trap for fast ion beams, is now being used to investigate molecules and clusters at low temperatures, but has also served as a design prototype for the cryogenic heavy-ion storage ring currently under construction at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  20. To Ensure the Integrity of the Cryogenic Propellant Depot Tank Within the Expected Radiation and Space Debris Environment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HyPerComp Engineering, Inc. (HEI) proposes to develop well characterized, structurally reliable filament wound composite pressure vessels for use in both cryogenic...

  1. A Detailed Historical Review of Propellant Management Devices for Low Gravity Propellant Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive background and historical review of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs) used throughout spaceflight history. The purpose of a PMD is to separate liquid and gas phases within a propellant tank and to transfer vapor-free propellant from a storage tank to a transfer line en route to either an engine or receiver depot tank, in any gravitational or thermal environment. The design concept, basic flow physics, and principle of operation are presented for each type of PMD. The three primary capillary driven PMD types of vanes, sponges, and screen channel liquid acquisition devices are compared and contrasted. For each PMD type, a detailed review of previous applications using storable propellants is given, which include space experiments as well as space missions and vehicles. Examples of previous cryogenic propellant management are also presented.

  2. Transient Thermal Model and Analysis of the Lunar Surface and Regolith for Cryogenic Fluid Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.; Yasan, Mohammad M.

    2008-01-01

    A transient thermal model of the lunar surface and regolith was developed along with analytical techniques which will be used to evaluate the storage of cryogenic fluids at equatorial and polar landing sites. The model can provide lunar surface and subsurface temperatures as a function of latitude and time throughout the lunar cycle and season. It also accounts for the presence of or lack of the undisturbed fluff layer on the lunar surface. The model was validated with Apollo 15 and Clementine data and shows good agreement with other analytical models.

  3. Technology Development for Hydrogen Propellant Storage and Transfer at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Krenn, Angela; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a major user of liquid hydrogen. In particular, NASA's John F. Kennedy (KSC) Space Center has operated facilities for handling and storing very large quantities of liquid hydrogen (LH2) since the early 1960s. Safe operations pose unique challenges and as a result NASA has invested in technology development to improve operational efficiency and safety. This paper reviews recent innovations including methods of leak and fire detection and aspects of large storage tank health and integrity. We also discuss the use of liquid hydrogen in space and issues we are addressing to ensure safe and efficient operations should hydrogen be used as a propellant derived from in-situ volatiles.

  4. Techno-economic analysis of oxy-combustion coal-fired power plant with cryogenic oxygen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Hanak, Dawid Piotr; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-01-01

    Around 43% of the cumulative CO2 emissions from the power sector between 2012 and 2050 could be mitigated through implementation of carbon capture and storage, and utilisation of renewable energy sources. Energy storage technologies can increase the efficiency of energy utilisation and thus should be widely deployed along with low-emission technologies. This study evaluates the techno-economic performance of cryogenic O2 storage implemented in an oxy-combustion coal-fired power plant as a mea...

  5. Three-dimensional analysis for liquid hydrogen in a cryogenic storage tank with heat pipe pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Son H.; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study on fluid flow and heat transfer of liquid hydrogen in a zero boil-off cryogenic storage tank in a microgravity environment. The storage tank is equipped with an active cooling system consisting of a heat pipe and a pump-nozzle unit. The pump collects cryogen at its inlet and discharges it through its nozzle onto the evaporator section of the heat pipe in order to prevent the cryogen from boiling off due to the heat leaking through the tank wall from the surroundings. A three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model is employed in a set of numerical simulations to solve for velocity and temperature fields of liquid hydrogen in steady state. Complex structures of 3-D velocity and temperature distributions determined from the model are presented. Simulations with an axisymmetric model were also performed for comparison. Parametric study results from both models predict that as the speed of the cryogenic fluid discharged from the nozzle increases, the mean or bulk cryogenic fluid speed increases linearly and the maximum temperature within the cryogenic fluid decreases.

  6. Developments at an electrostatic cryogenic storage ring for electron-cooled keV energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to final setup activities and the commissioning of an electrostatic cryogenic storage ring (CSR) at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg. The first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015 has been documented and characterized using a set of non-destructive beam diagnostic tools developed within this work. These are (1) the current pick-up system for the determination of the current of the stored ion beam and its velocity, (2) a position pick-up system for measuring the transverse position of the ion beam center at six symmetric locations of the storage ring circumference, and (3) a Schottky pick-up system for the monitoring of coasting ion beams. Despite the requirements imposed by the cryogenic operation, the developed diagnostic system demonstrated its full functionality. First characterizations of the storage ring properties and the performance of the diagnostic system are presented. Based on previous work, an electron cooling system for CSR has been developed and largely realized. With the implementation into CSR in 2016, the electron cooler will enhance the storage ring into a unique experimental facility for electron-ion collision studies. With this CSR is on the track to become the first cryogenic storage ring featuring actively cooled ion beams.

  7. Setup and commissioning of the first corner of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellenberger, Florian

    2012-01-01

    In the context of this thesis the first corner of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR was designed, built and characterized. Starting with the theoretical analysis of the utilized ion optical elements and hence resulting operational parameters and ion trajectories simulations major steps in design and manufacturing were carried out. Detailed calculations concerning the possible heat transport mechanism at the CSR were performed. This resulted in values for the expected heat load of the various components. Furthermore this calculations enabled the optimization of critical assemblies. In addition the components of the high-voltage system were tested intensively and optimized to guarantee the high-voltage stability required for the ion beam storage. During a first cooldown process major tests of the ion optical elements concerning their positions and alignment stabilities could be successfully performed. After this the first corner of the CSR was cooled down a second time to check the prior calculations on the expected heat loads and the achievable low-end temperatures. Almost all demands resulting from the experimental design parameters could be fullfilled directly during this thesis. The few exceptions missed the demands only close and will be fullfilled by appropriate modifications.

  8. The E-3 Test Facility at Stennis Space Center: Research and Development Testing for Cryogenic and Storable Propellant Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, John T.; Chandler, Craig A.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader a broad overview of the current upgraded capabilities of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center E-3 Test Facility to perform testing for rocket engine combustion systems and components using liquid and gaseous oxygen, gaseous and liquid methane, gaseous hydrogen, hydrocarbon based fuels, hydrogen peroxide, high pressure water and various inert fluids. Details of propellant system capabilities will be highlighted as well as their application to recent test programs and accomplishments. Data acquisition and control, test monitoring, systems engineering and test processes will be discussed as part of the total capability of E-3 to provide affordable alternatives for subscale to full scale testing for many different requirements in the propulsion community.

  9. Large Propellant Tank Cryo-Cooler (LPTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In rocket test and launch facilities, cryogenic propellants stored in tanks boils off due to heat leakage, with the following impacts:Ø   Waste, propellants boil off...

  10. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-01

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  11. A highly reliable cryogenic mixing pump with no mechanical moving parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Niblick, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the design and preliminary test results of a novel cryogenic mixing pump based on magnetocaloric effect. The mixing pump is developed to enable long-term cryogenic propellant storage in space by preventing thermal stratification of cryogens in storage tanks. The mixing pump uses an innovative thermodynamic process to generate fluid jets to promote fluid mixing, eliminating the need for mechanical pumps. Its innovative mechanism uses a solid magnetocaloric material to alternately vaporize and condense the cryogen in the pumping chamber, and thus control the volume of the fluid inside the pumping chamber to produce pumping action. The pump is capable of self-priming and can generate a high-pressure rise. This paper discusses operating mechanism and design consideration of the pump, introduces the configuration of a brassboard cryogenic pump, and presents the preliminary test results of the pump with liquid nitrogen.

  12. Cryogenic Cooling System for Zero-Venting Storage of Supercritical Air Packs, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Supercritical air at cryogenic temperature is an attractive source of breathing air because of its very high density and low pressure. However, heat leak into the...

  13. Advanced, Long-Life Cryocooler Technology for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-life, high-capacity cryocoolers are a critical need for future space systems utilizing stored cryogens. The cooling requirements for planetary and...

  14. Cryogenic Cooling System for Zero-Venting Storage of Supercritical Air Packs, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Supercritical air at cryogenic temperature is an attractive source of breathing air because of its very high density and low pressure. However, heat leak into the...

  15. Advanced, Long-Life Cryocooler Technology for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-life, high-capacity cryocoolers are a critical need for future space systems utilizing stored cryogens. The cooling requirements for planetary and...

  16. PHYSIOLOGICAL, CYTOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL STABILITY OF Medicago sativa L. CELL CULTURE AFTER 27 YEARS OF CRYOGENIC STORAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, L A; Urmantseva, V V; Popova, E V; Nosov, A M

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of long-term cryogenic storage to prevent somaclonal variations in plant cell cultures and retain their major cytogenetic and biochemical traits remains under debate. In particular, it is not clear how stress conditions associated with cryopreservation, such as low temperature, dehydration and toxic action of some cryoprotectants (DMSO in particular), affect post-storage regrowth and genetic integrity of cell samples. We assessed growth, cytogenetic and biochemical characteristics of the peroxidase-producing strain of Medicago sativa L. cell culture recovered after 27 years of cryogenic storage as compared to the same culture before cryopreservation. In 1984, M. sativa L. cell culture was cryopreserved using programmed freezing and 7% DMSO as a cryoprotectant. In 2011, after rewarming in a water bath at 40 degree C for 90 s, cell culture was recovered and proliferated. Viability, growth profile, mitotic index, ploidy level, peroxidase activity and cell response to hypothermia and osmotic stress were compared between the recovered and the initial cell cultures using the records available from 1984. Viability of alfalfa cell culture after rewarming was below 20% but it increased to 80% by the 27th subculture cycle. Recovered culture showed higher mitotic activity and increased number of haploid and diploid cells compared to the initial cell line. Both peroxidase activity and response to abiotic stress in the recovered cell culture were similar to that of the initial culture. Cryopreservation by programmed freezing was effective at retaining the main characteristics of M. sativa undifferentiated cell culture after 27 years of storage. According to available data, this is longest period of successful cryopreservation of plant cell cultures reported so far. After storage, there was no evidence that DMSO had any detrimental effect on cell viability, growth or cytogenetics.

  17. Physics Simulation Software for Autonomous Propellant Loading and Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado Reyes, Bjorn Constant

    2015-01-01

    1. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing a mobile launching system with autonomous propellant loading capabilities for liquid-fueled rockets. An autonomous system will be responsible for monitoring and controlling the storage, loading and transferring of cryogenic propellants. The Physics Simulation Software will reproduce the sensor data seen during the delivery of cryogenic fluids including valve positions, pressures, temperatures and flow rates. The simulator will provide insight into the functionality of the propellant systems and demonstrate the effects of potential faults. This will provide verification of the communications protocols and the autonomous system control. 2. The High Pressure Gas Facility (HPGF) stores and distributes hydrogen, nitrogen, helium and high pressure air. The hydrogen and nitrogen are stored in cryogenic liquid state. The cryogenic fluids pose several hazards to operators and the storage and transfer equipment. Constant monitoring of pressures, temperatures and flow rates are required in order to maintain the safety of personnel and equipment during the handling and storage of these commodities. The Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring software will be responsible for constantly observing and recording sensor data, identifying and predicting faults and relaying hazard and operational information to the operators.

  18. Effects of magnesium-based hydrogen storage materials on the thermal decomposition, burning rate, and explosive heat of ammonium perchlorate-based composite solid propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Leili; Li, Jie; Zhang, Lingyao; Tian, Siyu

    2018-01-15

    MgH 2 , Mg 2 NiH 4 , and Mg 2 CuH 3 were prepared, and their structure and hydrogen storage properties were determined through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal analyzer. The effects of MgH 2 , Mg 2 NiH 4 , and Mg 2 CuH 3 on the thermal decomposition, burning rate, and explosive heat of ammonium perchlorate-based composite solid propellant were subsequently studied. Results indicated that MgH 2 , Mg 2 NiH 4 , and Mg 2 CuH 3 can decrease the thermal decomposition peak temperature and increase the total released heat of decomposition. These compounds can improve the effect of thermal decomposition of the propellant. The burning rates of the propellant increased using Mg-based hydrogen storage materials as promoter. The burning rates of the propellant also increased using MgH 2 instead of Al in the propellant, but its explosive heat was not enlarged. Nonetheless, the combustion heat of MgH 2 was higher than that of Al. A possible mechanism was thus proposed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Innovative Swirl Injector for LOX and Hydrocarbon Propellants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gases trapped in the propellant feed lines of space-based rocket engines due to cryogenic propellant boil-off or pressurant ingestion can result in poor combustion...

  20. Innovative Swirl Injector for LOX and Hydrocarbon Propellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gases trapped in the propellant feed lines of space-based rocket engines due to cryogenic propellant boil-off or pressurant ingestion can result in poor combustion...

  1. Innovative Stirling-Cycle Cryocooler for Long Term In-Space Storage of Cryogenic Liquid Propellants, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this Phase II SBIR project we will build and test a stirling-cycle cryocooler and coolant circulating subsystem for use with broad area cooling (BAC) systems...

  2. Development of capacitive beam position, beam current and Schottky-signal monitors for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, Felix

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis novel techniques based on capacitive pickups for the determination of the beam current, the beam position and the Schottky-signal in storage rings have been developed. Beam current measurements at the heavy ion storage ring TSR with a capacitive pickup have been found in very good agreement with the theory. Using this device the accurate measurement of beam currents at the TSR far below 1 μA is now possible. This method will also be used at the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at which beam currents in the range of 1 nA-1 μA are expected. For the first time, position measurements with a resonant amplifier system for capacitive pickups have been examined at the TSR for later use of this technique in the CSR. With this method an increased signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved using a parallel inductance. A comparison with measurements using the rest gas beam profile monitor has shown very good agreement even at very low intensities. Experiments with the cryo-capable electronics for the CSR beam position monitors have shown an achievable quality factor of Q=500, resulting in the prospect of precise position measurements at the CSR even at very low beam currents. The CSR Schottky-Pickup will also be equipped with a resonant amplifier system with a comparable quality factor. An estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio suggests a detection limit of a few protons. (orig.)

  3. Cryogenic equipment to test models of superconducting magnets for accelerating-storage unit (ASU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.I.; Vasiliev, V.N.; Dinaburg, L.B.; Kalinin, V.V.; Katasonov, N.N.; Semenov, S.V.; Fokoeev, V.F.; Khrushchev, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes the testing results of the cryogenic equipment to investigate 2-m models of ASU superconducting magnets in subcooled forces and pool-boiling cooling regimes. A special cryostat with radial helium bath supports is used for pool-boiling testing of 2-m models without magnetic screen. For forced flow testing of dipole models a cooling loop with a centrifugal helium pump is used providing the consumption up to 110 g/s and the head of 0.01 + 0.015 MPa with loop pressure 0.25 + 0.6 MPa and temperature 4.4 K

  4. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel cryogenic coupling will be designed and modeled. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the coupling is based on patented Venturi-Offset...

  5. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  6. Mascotte, a research test facility for high pressure combustion of cryogenic propellants; Mascotte, un banc d'essai de recherche pour la combustion a haute pression d'ergols cryogeniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vingert, L.; Habiballah, M.; Traineau, J.C. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    2000-07-01

    Detailed experimental studies of cryogenic propellant combustion are needed to improve design and optimization of high performance liquid rocket engines. A research test facility called Mascotte has been built up by ONERA to study elementary processes that are involved in the combustion of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. Mascotte is aimed at feeding a single element combustor with actual propellants, and the third version in operation since mid 1998 allows to reach supercritical pressures in the combustor. A specific high pressure combustor was developed for this purpose. Research teams from different laboratories belonging to CNRS and ONERA, regrouped in a common research program managed by CNES and SNECMA division SEP, may run experiments on Mascotte, with several objectives: - improve the knowledge and the modeling of physical phenomena; - provide experimental results for computer code validation; - improve and assess diagnostic techniques (especially optical diagnostics). Following diagnostics for instance, were used on Mascotte from 1994 to 1999: - OH imaging (spontaneous emission and laser induced fluorescence ); - CARS temperature measurements (using the H{sub 2} and simultaneously the H{sub 2}O molecules); - High speed cinematography (with a copper vapor laser synchronized to a high speed camera); - O{sub 2} vapor imaging (laser induced fluorescence); - Particle sizing (by means of a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer). (authors)

  7. Investigation of cryogenic hydrogen storage on high surface area activated carbon. Equilibrium and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, Ricardo Gaspar

    2008-11-29

    This thesis investigates cryo-adsorptive systems for hydrogen storage for mobile applications. By means of macroscopic and microscopic balance models, an extensive analysis is carried out, including among others the investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure system filling, venting losses during normal operation and inactivity, time-course of system pressure and temperature and gas delivery under various operating conditions. Model results were compared with experimental data, good agreement was obtained. The analysis also includes a comparison to other storage technologies such as cryo-compressed gas and liquefaction storage. The results show that cryo-adsorptive systems have storage characteristics comparable to compressed gas systems, but at a much lower pressure. They are also energetically more efficient than liquid hydrogen systems. However, the necessity of cryotemperatures and thermal management during operation and filling might limit their application. (orig.)

  8. The cryogenic operation of the superconducting magnet system in the HERA proton storage ring: Cool down, steady state operation, quench recovery processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlitz, G.; Clausen, M.; Lierl, H.; Lange, R.; Herzog, H.

    1991-01-01

    The 6.4 km long superconducting proton storage ring of HERA was completed in 1990. In October the first halfring was cooled, in December the second one. Steady state operation could be established after about 200 hours. The authors report on the cryogenic operation of the system during cooldown and steady state operation and give values for thermal losses. One octant was excited up to values exceeding the design current. Some results of quench tests in this octant are presented

  9. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  10. Shuttle APS propellant thermal conditioner study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    A study program was performed to allow selection of thermal conditioner assemblies for superheating O2 and H2 at supercritical pressures. The application was the auxiliary propulsion system (APS) for the space shuttle vehicle. The O2/H2 APS propellant feed system included propellant conditioners, of which the thermal conditioner assemblies were a part. Cryogens, pumped to pressures above critical, were directed to the thermal conditioner assembly included: (1) a gas generator assembly with ignition system and bipropellant valves, which burned superheated O2 and H2 at rich conditions; (2) a heat exchanger assembly for thermal conditioning of the cryogenic propellant; and (3) a dump nozzle for heat exchanger exhaust.

  11. Experimental, Numerical and Analytical Characterization of Slosh Dynamics Applied to In-Space Propellant Storage, Management and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Jedediah M.; Kirk, Daniel; Gutierrez, Hector; Marsell, Brandon; Schallhorn, Paul; Lapilli, Gabriel D.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results are presented from a new cryogenic fluid slosh program at the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT). Water and cryogenic liquid nitrogen are used in various ground-based tests with an approximately 30 cm diameter spherical tank to characterize damping, slosh mode frequencies, and slosh forces. The experimental results are compared to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for validation. An analytical model is constructed from prior work for comparison. Good agreement is seen between experimental, numerical, and analytical results.

  12. Cryogenic Cooling for Myriad Applications-A STAR Is Born

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenics, the science of generating extremely low temperatures, has wide applicability throughout NASA. The Agency employs cryogenics for rocket propulsion, high-pressure gas supply, breathable air in space, life support equipment, electricity, water, food preservation and packaging, medicine, imaging devices, and electronics. Cryogenic liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen systems are also replacing solid rocket motor propulsion systems in most of the proposed launch systems, a reversion to old-style liquid propellants. In the late 1980s, NASA wanted a compact linear alternator/motor with reduced size and mass, as well as high efficiency, that had unlimited service life for use in a thermally driven power generator for space power applications. Prior development work with free-piston Stirling converters (a Stirling engine integrated with a linear actuator that produces electrical power output) had shown the promise of that technology for high-power space applications. A dual use for terrestrial applications exists for compact Stirling converters for onsite combined heat and power units. The Stirling cycle is also usable in reverse as a refrigeration cycle suitable for cryogenic cooling, so this Stirling converter work promised double benefits as well as dual uses. The uses for cryogenic coolers within NASA abound; commercial applications are similarly wide-ranging, from cooling liquid oxygen and nitrogen, to cryobiology and bio-storage, cryosurgery, instrument and detector cooling, semiconductor manufacturing, and support service for cooled superconducting power systems.

  13. Clonal propagation and cryogenic storage of the medicinal plant Stevia rebaudiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatnawi, M. A.; Shibli, R. A.; Abu-Romman, S. M.; Al-Mazra awi, M. S.; Al Ajlouni, Z. I.; Shatanawi, W. A.; Odeh, W. H.

    2011-07-01

    Successful clonal propagation of Stevia rebaudiana was achieved using micro shoots as a primary step for in vitro conservation. Maximum proliferation was obtained on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 1.5 mg L{sup -}1 benzyl amino purine and 0.2 mg L{sup -}1 indole-3-butyric-acid (IBA). Auxin increased rooting percentage of shoots at concentration of 0.4 mg L{sup -}1 IBA, indole-3-acetic-acid or naphthalene acetic acid and no rooting occurred without plant growth regulator. A survival of 90% was achieved when rooted explants were acclimatized in vivo in 1 soil: 1 perlite: 1 peat. In vitro S. rebaudiana shoots were successfully stored for up to 32 weeks on MS medium supplemented with an appropriate concentration of sucrose, sorbitol or mannitol, at 24 {+-} 2 degree centigrade. After 32 weeks, 93.6% of the shoots were able to survive. Moreover, 89.3% of them were able to regrow when stored under light conditions. Cryo preservation by vitrification was successfully achieved (65.6% regrowth) when shoot tips were pre cultured on a medium supplemented with 0.4 M sorbitol for 2 d, followed by loading shoot tips with 80% concentrated plant vitrification solution 2 (PVS2) for 20 min; then dehydrated with 100% PVS2 for 60 min at 0 degree centigrade prior to storage in liquid nitrogen. This procedure is easy to handle and produced a high levels of shoot formation. This protocol could be useful for long term storage of S. rebaudiana germplasm. (Author) 30 refs.

  14. A Propellant Mass Gauge Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Liquid-Oxygen Mass Gauge, (LMG) for In-Space cryogenic storage capable of continuous monitoring of...

  15. LV-IMLI: Integrated MLI/Aeroshell for Cryogenic Launch Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants have the highest energy density of any rocket fuel, and are used in most NASA and commercial launch vehicles to power their ascent. Cryogenic...

  16. Multi-Agent Optical Sensor Chip for Cryogenic Fluids Leak Detection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In space missions, launch vehicles (LV) are filled with cryogenic propellant fluids. It is important to protect these LVs from any leakage of liquid propellants...

  17. Fuel cell systems for first lunar outpost: Reactant storage options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P. A.

    A Lunar Surface Power Working Group was formed to review candidate systems for providing power to the First Lunar Outpost habitat. The working group met for five days in the fall of 1992 and concluded that the most attractive candidate included a photovoltaic unit, a fuel cell, a regenerator to recycle the reactants, and storage of oxygen and hydrogen gases. Most of the volume (97%) and weight (64%) are taken up by the reactants and their storage tanks. The large volume is difficult to accommodate, and therefore, the working group explored ways of reducing the volume. An alternative approach to providing separate high pressure storage tanks is to use two of the descent stage propellant storage tanks, which would have to be wrapped with graphite fibers to increase their pressure capability. This saves 90% of the volume required for storage of fuel cell reactants. Another approach is to use the descent storage propellant tanks for storage of the fuel cell reactants as cryogenic liquids, but this requires a gas liquefaction system, increases the solar array by 40%, and increases the heat rejection rate by 170% compared with storage of reactants as high pressure gases. For a high power system (greater than 20 kW) the larger energy storage requirement would probably favor the cryogenic storage option.

  18. Performance Gains of Propellant Management Devices for Liquid Hydrogen Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents background, experimental design, and preliminary experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to investigate the parameters that affect liquid acquisition device (LAD) performance in a liquid hydrogen (LH2) propellant tank, to mitigate risk in the final design of the LAD for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission, and to provide insight into optimal LAD operation for future LH2 depots. Preliminary test results show an increase in performance and screen retention over the low reference LH2 bubble point value for a 325 2300 screen in three separate ways, thus improving fundamental LH2 LAD performance. By using a finer mesh screen, operating at a colder liquid temperature, and pressurizing with a noncondensible pressurant gas, a significant increase in margin is achieved in bubble point pressure for LH2 screen channel LADs.

  19. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  20. Review of Current State of the Art and Key Design Issues With Potential Solutions for Liquid Hydrogen Cryogenic Storage Tank Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Arnold, Steven M.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2006-01-01

    Due to its high specific energy content, liquid hydrogen (LH2) is emerging as an alternative fuel for future aircraft. As a result, there is a need for hydrogen tank storage systems, for these aircraft applications, that are expected to provide sufficient capacity for flight durations ranging from a few minutes to several days. It is understood that the development of a large, lightweight, reusable cryogenic liquid storage tank is crucial to meet the goals of and supply power to hydrogen-fueled aircraft, especially for long flight durations. This report provides an annotated review (including the results of an extensive literature review) of the current state of the art of cryogenic tank materials, structural designs, and insulation systems along with the identification of key challenges with the intent of developing a lightweight and long-term storage system for LH2. The broad classes of insulation systems reviewed include foams (including advanced aerogels) and multilayer insulation (MLI) systems with vacuum. The MLI systems show promise for long-term applications. Structural configurations evaluated include single- and double-wall constructions, including sandwich construction. Potential wall material candidates are monolithic metals as well as polymer matrix composites and discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. For short-duration flight applications, simple tank designs may suffice. Alternatively, for longer duration flight applications, a double-wall construction with a vacuum-based insulation system appears to be the most optimum design. The current trends in liner material development are reviewed in the case that a liner is required to minimize or eliminate the loss of hydrogen fuel through permeation.

  1. A cryogenic current-measuring device with nano-ampere resolution at the storage ring TARN II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Chida, K.; Shinada, K.

    1999-01-01

    In cooler-ring experiments, an accurate and non-destructive current measurement is essential for determining the reaction cross sections. The lowest current which can be measured by the DC current transformer commonly used so far is some μA. In order to measure a low-beam current from nA to μA, we made a cryogenic current-measuring device using a superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID), and measured the circulating ion current at the cooler ring TARN II. This paper gives the design and performance of the device

  2. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  3. Cryogenic engineering fifty years of progress

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic Engineering: Fifty Years of Progress is a benchmark reference work which chronicles the major developments in the field. Starting with an historical background dating to the 1850s, this book reviews the development of data resources now available for cryogenic fields and properties of materials. The advances in cryogenic fundamentals are covered by reviews of cryogenic principles, cryogenic insulation, low-loss storage systems, modern liquefaction processes, helium cryogenics and low-temperature thermometry. Several well-established applications resulting from cryogenic advances include aerospace cryocoolers and refrigerators, use of LTS and HTS systems in electrical applications, and recent changes in cryopreservation. Extensive references are provided for the readers interested in the details of these cryogenic engineering advances.

  4. Cryogenic electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourches, N.; Abbon, P.; Delagnes, E.; Le Meur, L.P.

    1995-04-01

    This study presents the cryogenic electronics, which is used in high energy physics with appropriate device. It discuss their ability to hardening against ionization radiation and neutrons. Some partial results on the operation of microelectronics devices at cryogenic temperature are given. (TEC). 33 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  6. Highly Flexible and Extremely Durable Polyimide Cryogenic Insulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovative insulation would greatly enhance the usability of, and reduce the inherent losses associated with, cryogenic fuel delivery and storage...

  7. RHIC cryogenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iarocci, M.A. E-mail: iarocci@bnl.gov; Brown, D.; Sondericker, J.; Wu, K.C.; Benson, J.; Farah, Y.; Lac, C.; Morgillo, A.; Nicoletti, A.; Quimby, E.; Rank, J.; Rehak, M.; Werner, A

    2003-03-01

    An integrated helium cryogenic system was designed with the specific performance goal of cooling and refrigerating the cryogenic magnets to below their nominal operating temperature. These magnets make up the steering and focusing elements for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In addition to meeting the accelerator demands, reliability, flexibility, safety, and ease of operation were key considerations during the design phase of the project. The refrigerator, with a capacity of 25 kW at about 4 K, was originally designed to match the load for the Colliding Beam Accelerator Project. The existing refrigerator, along with its complimentary warm compressor system was reconfigured slightly to meet the cooling process cycle design for RHIC. The original VAX based process control system was also adapted for RHIC, and later expanded upon to integrate a new programmable logic controller based ring resident control system, hence forming a common system to monitor and control all cryogenic components.

  8. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  9. Cryogenic systems for detectors and particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    It's been one hundred years since the first successful experiments were carried out leading to the liquefaction of oxygen which birthed the field of cryogenics and about sixty years since cryogenics went commercial. Originally, cryogenics referred to the technology and art of producing low temperatures but today the definition adopted by the XII Congress of the International Institute of Refrigeration describes cryogenics as the study of phenomena, techniques, and concepts occurring at our pertaining to temperatures below 120 K. Modern acceptance of the importance and use of cryogenic fluids continues to grow. By far, the bulk of cryogenic products are utilized by industry for metal making, agriculture, medicine, food processing and as efficient storage of fuels. Cryogenics has found many uses in the scientific community as well, enabling the development of ultra low noise amplifiers, fast cold electronics, cryopumped ultra high vacuums, the production of intense magnetic fields and low loss power transmission through the sue of cryogenically cooled superconductors. High energy physic research has been and continues to use cryogenic hardware to produce liquids used as detector targets and to produce refrigeration necessary to cool superconducting magnets to design temperature for particle accelerator applications. In fact, today's super accelerators achieve energies that would be impossible to reach with conventional copper magnets, demonstrating that cryogenics has become an indispensable ingredient in today's scientific endeavors

  10. A Novel Flow Measurement System for Cryogenic Two-Phase Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flow rate measurements for cryogenic propellants are required for spacecraft and space exploration systems. Such a requirement has been hampered by lack of fast and...

  11. A High Fidelity Computational Tool for Modeling Thermal Vent Systems in Cryogenic Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Control and management of cryogenic propellant tank pressures in low gravity is an important technical challenge to overcome for future long duration space missions....

  12. A CubeSat-Scale Testbed for Cryogenic Fluid Management Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified in-space cryogenic fluid management (CFM) as a high priority for technology development because the construction of an in-space propellant...

  13. Nanostructured Material for Accurate and Fast Tracking of Cryogenic Temperatures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The use of cryogenic propellants in next-generation launch vehicles and rockets relies to a great extent on the availability of rugged, high accuracy (0.2%), fast...

  14. Perancangan Propeler Self-Propelled Barge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Teguh kurniawan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Makalah ini menyampaikan suatu penelitian tentang perancangan propeler yang optimal beserta pemilihan daya mesin yang efisien pada self-propelled barge dengan memperhitungkan besarnya nilai tahanan dari barge tersebut. Dengan penambahan sistem propulsi, diharapkan barge dapat beroperasi dengan lebih efisien dibandingkan saat barge beroperasi menggunakan sistem towing atau ditarik tug boat. Perhitungan tahanan barge dilakukan menggunakan metode Holtrop dan Guldhammer-Harvald sehingga dapat diperhi-tungkan geometri dan jenis propeler yang optimal beserta daya mesin yang efisien untuk barge. Propeler yang dianalisis adalah propeler tipe B-Troost Series, sedangkan variasi yang dilakukan untuk perencanaan propeler pada kajian ini adalah variasi putaran propeler pada rentang antara 310-800 rpm, serta variasi jumlah daun pada rentang tiga, empat, lima, dan enam. Besarnya nilai tahanan self-propelled barge untuk metode Holtrop adalah 105.91 kilonewton, sedangkan hasil per-hitungan dari metode Guldhammer-Harvald didapatkan nilai sebesar 109.14 kilonewton. Tipe propeler yang dipilih setelah dilakukan uji kavitasi adalah tipe Troost Series B4-40, dengan diameter sebesar 2.1 m, efisiensi sebesar 0.421, pitch ratio se-besar 0.591, dengan putaran propeler 400 rpm. Daya mesin yg dibutuhkan barge pada kondisi maksimum (BHPMCR sebesar 1669.5 HP. Dengan mempertimbangkan daya tersebut, maka dipilih mesin jenis Caterpillar tipe Marine 3516B yang mem-punyai daya maksimum sebesar 1285 kilowatt atau 1722.5 horsepower dengan putaran mesin sebesar 1200 rpm

  15. Runtime and Pressurization Analyses of Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Lee, Chung P.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-element unstructured CFD has been utilized at NASA SSC to carry out analyses of propellant tank systems in different modes of operation. The three regimes of interest at SSC include (a) tank chill down (b) tank pressurization and (c) runtime propellant draw-down and purge. While tank chill down is an important event that is best addressed with long time-scale heat transfer calculations, CFD can play a critical role in the tank pressurization and runtime modes of operation. In these situations, problems with contamination of the propellant by inclusion of the pressurant gas from the ullage causes a deterioration of the quality of the propellant delivered to the test article. CFD can be used to help quantify the mixing and propellant degradation. During tank pressurization under some circumstances, rapid mixing of relatively warm pressurant gas with cryogenic propellant can lead to rapid densification of the gas and loss of pressure in the tank. This phenomenon can cause serious problems during testing because of the resulting decrease in propellant flow rate. With proper physical models implemented, CFD can model the coupling between the propellant and pressurant including heat transfer and phase change effects and accurately capture the complex physics in the evolving flowfields. This holds the promise of allowing the specification of operational conditions and procedures that could minimize the undesirable mixing and heat transfer inherent in propellant tank operation. It should be noted that traditional CFD modeling is inadequate for such simulations because the fluids in the tank are in a range of different sub-critical and supercritical states and elaborate phase change and mixing rules have to be developed to accurately model the interaction between the ullage gas and the propellant. We show a typical run-time simulation of a spherical propellant tank, containing RP-1 in this case, being pressurized with room-temperature nitrogen at 540 R. Nitrogen

  16. Advances in LO2 Propellant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Gopal; Orth, Michael; Stone, William; Perry, Gretchen; Holt, Kimberly; Suter, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic testing and analysis that has recently been completed as part of a multi-year effort to develop a new, more robust and operable LO2 propellant conditioning system. Phase 1 of the program consisted of feasibility demonstrations ot four novel propellant conditioning concepts. A no-bleed, passive propellant conditioning option was shown for the first time to successfully provide desired propellant inlet conditions. The benefits of passive conditioning are reduced operations costs, decreased hardware costs, enhanced operability and increased reliability on future expendable launch vehicles In Phase 2 of the test program, effects of major design parameters were studied and design correlation for future vehicle design were developed. Simultaneously, analytical models were developed and validated. Over 100 tests were conducted with a full-scale feedline using LN2 as the test fluid. A circulation pump provided a range of pressure and flow conditions. The test results showed that the passive propellant conditioning system is insensitive to variations in many of the parameters. The test program provides the validation necessary to incorporate the passive conditioning system into the baseline of future vehicles. Modeling of these systems using computational fluid dynamics seems highly promising.

  17. Cryogenic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, G

    2000-01-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  18. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  19. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  20. Advanced Cooled Shield - Integrated MLI: Passive or Active Cooled System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants are important to NASA's missions. Improvements in cryogenic propellant storage and transfer are critical to future long duration NASA...

  1. Modified Apollo cryogenic oxygen tank design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1971-01-01

    Assessment of the Apollo 13 mission indicated that some design changes to be incorporated into Apollo cryogenic oxygen storage tanks. These changes broadly fit into three categories. They were: (1) deletion of the fluid equilibration motors and redesign of heater assembly, (2) material changes for internal tank wiring and density sensor, and (3) the addition of a heater assembly temperature sensor. Development of a cryogenic oxygen tank incorporating these changes is presented.

  2. Mars Ascent Vehicle-Propellant Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John; Rousseau, Jeremy; Williams, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    , followed by an additional year at simulated Mars surface conditions. The actual Mars surface environment is based on the igloo design, actively maintains the propellant at or above -40 degC, 95% carbon dioxide at Mars surface pressure. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Mars environment test facility is shown in figure 1 and located in the East Test area of Redstone Arsenal due to storage of live propellants. The facility consists of a vacuum chamber placed inside a large freezer unit. The facility includes pressure and temperature monitoring equipment in addition to a vacuum quality monitoring system spectrometer to record any outgassing products.

  3. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  4. Thermography to Inspect Insulation of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Thermography has been used in the past to monitor active, large, cryogenic storage tanks. This approach proposes to use thermography to monitor new or refurbished tanks, prior to filling with cryogenic liquid, to look for insulation voids. Thermography may provide significant cost and schedule savings if voids can be detected early before a tank is returned to service.

  5. Longevity of cryogenically stored seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Christina; Wheeler, Lana; Stanwood, Phillip C

    2004-06-01

    Though cryogenic storage is presumed to provide nearly infinite longevity to cells, the actual shelf life achieved under ultra-cold temperatures has not been addressed theoretically or empirically. Here, we report measurable changes in germination of dried seeds stored under liquid nitrogen conditions for >10 years. There was considerable variability in the extent of deterioration among species and accessions within a species. Aging time courses for lettuce seeds stored at temperatures between 50 and -196 degrees C were fit to a form of the Avrami equation to determine rate coefficients and predict half-life of accessions. A reduction in the temperature dependency on aging rate, determined as a break in the Arrhenius plot, occurred at about -15 degrees C, and this resulted in faster deterioration than anticipated from extrapolation of kinetics measured at higher temperatures. The break in Arrhenius behavior occurred at temperatures in between the glass transition temperature (28 degrees C) and the Kauzmann temperature (-42 degrees C) and also coincided with a major triacylglycerol phase change (-40 to -7 degrees C). In spite of the faster than anticipated deterioration, cryogenic storage clearly prolonged shelf life of lettuce seeds with half-lives projected as approximately 500 and approximately 3400 years for fresh lettuce seeds stored in the vapor and liquid phases of liquid nitrogen, respectively. The benefit of low temperature storage (-18 or -135 degrees C) on seed longevity was progressively lost if seeds were first stored at 5 degrees C. Collectively, these results demonstrate that lowering storage temperature progressively increases longevity of seeds. However, cryogenic temperatures were not sufficient to stop deterioration, especially if initial stages of aging were allowed to progress at higher storage temperatures. This work contributes to reliable assessments of the potential benefit and cost of different genebanking strategies.

  6. Study of optimum propellant production facilities for launch of space shuttle vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laclair, L. M.

    1970-01-01

    An integrated propellant manufacturing plant and distribution system located at Kennedy Space Center is studied. The initial planned propellant and pressurant production amounted to 160 tons/day (TPD) LH2, 10 TPD GH2, 800 TPD LO2, 400 TPD LN2, and 120 TPD GN2. This was based on a shuttle launch frequency of 104 per year. During the study, developments occurred which may lower cryogen requirements. A variety of plant and processing equipment sizes and costs are considered for redundancy and supply level considerations. Steam reforming is compared to partial oxidation as a means of generating hydrogen. Electric motors, steam turbines, and gas turbines are evaluated for driving compression equipment. Various sites on and off Government property are considered to determine tradeoffs between costs and problems directly associated with the site, product delivery and storage costs, raw material costs, and energy costs. Coproduction of other products such as deuterium, methanol, and ammonia are considered. Legal questions are discussed concerning a private company's liabilities and its rights to market commercial products under Government tax and cost shelters.

  7. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  8. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  9. Microreactor System Design for a NASA In Situ Propellant Production Plant on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    TeGrotenhuis, W. E.; Wegeng, R. S.; Vanderwiel, D. P.; Whyatt, G. A.; Viswanathan, V. V.; Schielke, K. P.; Sanders, G. B.; Peters, T. A.; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) program is planning near-term missions to Mars that will include chemical processes for converting the carbon dioxide (CO2) and possibly water from the Martian environment to propellants, oxygen, and other useful chemicals. The use of indigenous resources reduces the size and weight of the payloads from Earth significantly, representing enormous cost savings that make human exploration of Mars affordable. Extraterrestrial chemical processing plants will need to be compact, lightweight, highly efficient under reduced gravity, and extraordinarily reliable for long periods. Microchemical and thermal systems represent capability for dramatic reduction in size and weight, while offering high reliability through massive parallelization. In situ propellant production (ISPP), one aspect of the ISRU program, involves collecting and pressurizing atmospheric CO2, conversion reactions, chemical separations, heat exchangers, and cryogenic storage. A preliminary system design of an ISPP plant based on microtechnology has demonstrated significant size, weight, and energy efficiency gains over the current NASA baseline. Energy management is a strong driver for Mars-based processes, not only because energy is a scarce resource, but because heat rejection is problematic; the low pressure environment makes convective heat transfer ineffective. Energy efficiency gains are largely achieved in the microchemical plant through extensive heat recuperation and energy cascading, which has a small size and weight penalty because the added micro heat exchangers are small. This leads to additional size and weight gains by reducing the required area of waste heat radiators. The microtechnology-based ISPP plant is described in detail, including aspects of pinch analysis for optimizing the heat exchanger network. Three options for thermochemical compression Of CO2 from the Martian atmosphere, adsorption, absorption, and cryogenic freezing, are presented

  10. Hull-Propeller Interaction and Its Effect on Propeller Cavitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regener, Pelle Bo

    computational effort. The boundary element method for propeller analysis includes a partially nonlinear cavitation model, which is able to predict partial sheet cavitation and supercavitation. The cavitation behaviour of the conventional propeller and the Kappel propeller from the earlier simulations...

  11. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  12. Nanocoatings for Wicking of Low-Viscosity Cryogens Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop smart, switchable materials systems for use in thermal management systems, including the evaluation of wicking nanocoatings for use in the transport and storage of cryogens.

  13. Cavitation simulation on marine propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo

    Cavitation on marine propellers causes thrust breakdown, noise, vibration and erosion. The increasing demand for high-efficiency propellers makes it difficult to avoid the occurrence of cavitation. Currently, practical analysis of propeller cavitation depends on cavitation tunnel test, empirical...

  14. Mobile propeller dynamometer validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mason Wade

    With growing interest in UAVs and OSU's interest in propeller performance and manufacturing, evaluating UAV propeller and propulsion system performance has become essential. In attempts to evaluate these propellers a mobile propeller dynamometer has been designed, built, and tested. The mobile dyno has been designed to be cost effective through the ability to load it into the back of a test vehicle to create simulated forward flight characteristics. This allows much larger propellers to be dynamically tested without the use of large and expensive wind tunnels. While evaluating the accuracy of the dyno, several improvements had to be made to get accurate results. The decisions made to design and improve the mobile propeller dyno will be discussed along with attempts to validate the dyno by comparing its results against known sources. Another large part of assuring the accuracy of the mobile dyno is determining if the test vehicle will influence the flow going into the propellers being tested. The flow into the propeller needs to be as smooth and uniform as possible. This is determined by characterizing the boundary layer and accelerated flow over the vehicle. This evaluation was accomplished with extensive vehicle aerodynamic measurements with the use of full-scale tests using a pitot-rake and the actual test vehicle. Additional tests were conducted in Oklahoma State University's low speed wind tunnel with a 1/8-scale model using qualitative flow visualization with smoke. Continuing research on the mobile dyno will be discussed, along with other potential uses for the dyno.

  15. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  16. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  17. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires

  18. Status of the Cryogenic System Commissioning at SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Casagrande, Fabio; Campisi, Isidoro E; Creel, Jonathan; Dixon, Kelly; Ganni, Venkatarao; Gurd, Pamela; Hatfield, Daniel; Howell, Matthew; Knudsen, Peter; Stout, Daniel; Strong, William

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 Watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning strategy and status will be presented.

  19. PARAMETER DESIGN PROPELLER KAPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available   Designer propeller kapal harus mempertimbangkan berbagai parameter untuk menghasilkan bentuk, type dan ukuran propeller yang memiliki nilai  efektifitas dan effisiensi propulsi tinggi. Propulsi kapal merupakan faktor yang mendominasi  operasional kapal, karena pemakaian bahan bakar untuk operasional propulsi kapal merupakan 42% dari total cost operasional kapal dan merupakan added value yang akan diperoleh oleh perusahaan pelayaran. Pertimbangan parameter desain propeller argonomis dapat mendukung tujuan di atas sehingga dapat menurunkan pemakaian bahan bakar hingga 20 % saat kapal dioperaionalkan.

  20. Light-Weight Injector Technology for Cryogenic Mars Ascent Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trihn, Huu Phuoc; Cramer, John M.

    1998-01-01

    Preliminary mission studies for human exploration of Mars have been performed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These studies indicate that for chemical rockets only a cryogenic propulsion system would provide high enough performance to be considered for a Mars ascent vehicle. Although the mission is possible with Earth-supplied propellants for this vehicle, utilization of in-situ propellants is highly attractive. This option would significantly reduce the overall mass of launch vehicles. Consequently, the cost of the mission would be greatly reduced because the number and size of the Earth launch vehicle(s) needed for the mission decrease. NASA/Johnson Space Center has initiated several concept studies of in-situ propellant production plants. Liquid oxygen (LOX) is the primary candidate for an in-situ oxidizer. In-situ fuel candidates include methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), and methanol (CH3OH). MSFC initiated a technology development program for a cryogenic propulsion system for the Mars human exploration mission in 1998. One part of this technology program is the effort described here: an evaluation of propellant injection concepts for a LOX/liquid methane Mars Ascent Engine (MAE) with an emphasis on light-weight, high efficiency, reliability, and thermal compatibility. In addition to the main objective, hot-fire tests of the subject injectors will be used to test other key technologies including light-weight combustion chamber materials and advanced ignition concepts. This state-of-the-art technology will then be applied to the development of a cryogenic propulsion system that will meet the requirements of the planned Mars sample return (MSR) mission. The current baseline propulsion system for the MSR mission uses a storable propellant combination [monomethyl hydrazine/mixed oxides of nitrogen-25. However, a mission option that incorporates in-situ propellant production and utilization for the ascent stage is being carefully considered as a subscale

  1. Utilizing Solar Power Technologies for On-Orbit Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, John C.; Howell, Joe T.; Henley, Mark W.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of access to space beyond low Earth orbit may be reduced if vehicles can refuel in orbit. The cost of access to low Earth orbit may also be reduced by launching oxygen and hydrogen propellants in the form of water. To achieve this reduction in costs of access to low Earth orbit and beyond, a propellant depot is considered that electrolyzes water in orbit, then condenses and stores cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Power requirements for such a depot require Solar Power Satellite technologies. A propellant depot utilizing solar power technologies is discussed in this paper. The depot will be deployed in a 400 km circular equatorial orbit. It receives tanks of water launched into a lower orbit from Earth, converts the water to liquid hydrogen and oxygen, and stores up to 500 metric tons of cryogenic propellants. This requires a power system that is comparable to a large Solar Power Satellite capable of several 100 kW of energy. Power is supplied by a pair of solar arrays mounted perpendicular to the orbital plane, which rotates once per orbit to track the Sun. The majority of the power is used to run the electrolysis system. Thermal control is maintained by body-mounted radiators; these also provide some shielding against orbital debris. The propellant stored in the depot can support transportation from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit, the Moon, LaGrange points, Mars, etc. Emphasis is placed on the Water-Ice to Cryogen propellant production facility. A very high power system is required for cracking (electrolyzing) the water and condensing and refrigerating the resulting oxygen and hydrogen. For a propellant production rate of 500 metric tons (1,100,000 pounds) per year, an average electrical power supply of 100 s of kW is required. To make the most efficient use of space solar power, electrolysis is performed only during the portion of the orbit that the Depot is in sunlight, so roughly twice this power level is needed for operations in sunlight

  2. Performance optimization of marine propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sup Lee

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, a design method for increasing performance of the marine propellers including the WCT propeller is suggested. It is described to maximize the performance of the propeller by adjusting expanded areas of the propeller blade. Results show that efficiency can be increased up to over 2% through the suggested design method.

  3. Autonomous Propellant Loading Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) project consists of three activities. The first is to develop software that will automatically control loading of...

  4. Modeling Propellant Tank Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main objective of my work will be to develop accurate models of self-pressurizing propellant tanks for use in designing hybrid rockets. The first key goal is to...

  5. Thermally Insulative Structural Connection for Cryogenic Propellant Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Paragon Space Development Corporation and Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) propose a unique solution that thermally isolates the upper stage rocket from a payload on...

  6. MEMS Sensor Arrays for Cryogenic Propellant Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — KWJ offers this proposal for a low-power, practical and versatile MEMS sensor platform for NASA applications. The proposed nano-sensor platform is ultra-low power...

  7. Compact insert design for cryogenic pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias Rigoberto; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Petitpas, Guillaume; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2017-06-14

    A pressure vessel apparatus for cryogenic capable storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure includes an insert with a parallel inlet duct, a perpendicular inlet duct connected to the parallel inlet. The perpendicular inlet duct and the parallel inlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components. The insert also includes a parallel outlet duct and a perpendicular outlet duct connected to the parallel outlet duct. The perpendicular outlet duct and the parallel outlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components.

  8. Characterization of an Integral Thermal Protection and Cryogenic Insulation Material for Advanced Space Transportation Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, L. J.; White, S. M.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's planned advanced space transportation vehicles will benefit from the use of integral/conformal cryogenic propellant tanks which will reduce the launch weight and lower the earth-to-orbit costs considerably. To implement the novel concept of integral/conformal tanks requires developing an equally novel concept in thermal protection materials. Providing insulation against reentry heating and preserving propellant mass can no longer be considered separate problems to be handled by separate materials. A new family of materials, Superthermal Insulation (STI), has been conceiving and investigated by NASA's Ames Research Center to simultaneously provide both thermal protection and cryogenic insulation in a single, integral material.

  9. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  10. Propeller TAP flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Bille, Camilla; Wamberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if a propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP) flap can be used for breast reconstruction. Fifteen women were reconstructed using a propeller TAP flap, an implant, and an ADM. Preoperative colour Doppler ultrasonography was used for patient selection...... to identify the dominant perforator in all cases. A total of 16 TAP flaps were performed; 12 flaps were based on one perforator and four were based on two. A permanent silicone implant was used in 14 cases and an expander implant in two. Minor complications were registered in three patients. Two cases had...... major complications needing additional surgery. One flap was lost due to a vascular problem. Breast reconstruction can be performed by a propeller TAP flap without cutting the descending branch of the thoracodorsal vessels. However, the authors would recommend that a small cuff of muscle is left around...

  11. Cryogenic linear Paul trap for cold highly charged ion experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Maria; Versolato, Oscar; Windberger, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Storage and cooling of highly charged ions require ultra-high vacuum levels obtainable by means of cryogenic methods. We have developed a linear Paul trap operating at 4 K capable of very long ion storage times of about 30 h. A conservative upper bound of the H2 partial pressure of about 10−15 mbar...

  12. Green Propellant Landing Demonstration at U.S. Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Henry W.; Miller, Joseph T.; Bacha, Caitlin E.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Loading Demonstration (GPLD) was conducted December 2015 at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), leveraging work performed over recent years to bring lower toxicity hydrazine replacement green propellants to flight missions. The objective of this collaboration between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), WFF, the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), and Ecological Advanced Propulsion Systems (ECAPS) was to successfully accept LMP-103S propellant at a U.S. Range, store the propellant, and perform a simulated flight vehicle propellant loading. NASA GSFC Propulsion (Code 597) managed all aspects of the operation, handling logistics, preparing the procedures, and implementing the demonstration. In addition to the partnership described above, Moog Inc. developed an LMP-103S propellant-compatible titanium rolling diaphragm flight development tank and loaned it to GSFC to act as the GPLD flight vessel. The flight development tank offered the GPLD an additional level of flight-like propellant handling process and procedures. Moog Inc. also provided a compatible latching isolation valve for remote propellant expulsion. The GPLD operation, in concert with Moog Inc. executed a flight development tank expulsion efficiency performance test using LMP-103S propellant. As part of the demonstration work, GSFC and WFF documented Range safety analyses and practices including all elements of shipping, storage, handling, operations, decontamination, and disposal. LMP-103S has not been previously handled at a U.S. Launch Range. Requisite for this activity was an LMP-103S Risk Analysis Report and Ground Safety Plan. GSFC and WFF safety offices jointly developed safety documentation for application into the GPLD operation. The GPLD along with the GSFC Propulsion historical hydrazine loading experiences offer direct comparison between handling green propellant versus safety intensive, highly toxic hydrazine propellant. These described motives initiated the GPLD operation

  13. Green Propellant Loading Demonstration at U.S. Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Henry W.; Miller, Joseph T.; Bacha, Caitlin E.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Loading Demonstration (GPLD) was conducted December 2015 at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), leveraging work performed over recent years to bring lower toxicity hydrazine replacement green propellants to flight missions. The objective of this collaboration between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), WFF, the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), and Ecological Advanced Propulsion Systems (ECAPS) was to successfully accept LMP-103S propellant at a U.S. Range, store the propellant, and perform a simulated flight vehicle propellant loading. NASA GSFC Propulsion (Code 597) managed all aspects of the operation, handling logistics, preparing the procedures, and implementing the demonstration. In addition to the partnership described above, Moog Inc. developed an LMP-103S propellant-compatible titanium rolling diaphragm flight development tank and loaned it to GSFC to act as the GPLD flight vessel. The flight development tank offered the GPLD an additional level of flight-like propellant handling process and procedures. Moog Inc. also provided a compatible latching isolation valve for remote propellant expulsion. The GPLD operation, in concert with Moog Inc. executed a flight development tank expulsion efficiency performance test using LMP-103S propellant. As part of the demonstration work, GSFC and WFF documented Range safety analyses and practices including all elements of shipping, storage, handling, operations, decontamination, and disposal. LMP-103S has not been previously handled at a U.S. Launch Range. Requisite for this activity was an LMP-103S Risk Analysis Report and Ground Safety Plan. GSFC and WFF safety offices jointly developed safety documentation for application into the GPLD operation. The GPLD along with the GSFC Propulsion historical hydrazine loading experiences offer direct comparison between handling green propellant versus safety intensive, highly toxic hydrazine propellant. These described motives initiated the GPLD operation

  14. Space Transportatioin System (STS) propellant scavenging system study. Volume 3: Cost and work breakdown structure-dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Fundamentally, the volumes of the oxidizer and fuel propellant scavenged from the orbiter and external tank determine the size and weight of the scavenging system. The optimization of system dimensions and weights is stimulated by the requirement to minimize the use of partial length of the orbiter payload bay. Thus, the cost estimates begin with weights established for the optimum design. Both the design, development, test, and evaluation and theoretical first unit hardware production costs are estimated from parametric cost weight scaling relations for four subsystems. For cryogenic propellants, the widely differing characteristics of the oxidizer and the fuel lead to two separate tank subsystems, in addition to the electrical and instrumentation subsystems. Hardwares costs also involve quantity, as an independent variable, since the number of production scavenging systems is not firm. For storable propellants, since the tankage volume of the oxidizer and fuel are equal, the hardware production costs for developing these systems are lower than for cryogenic propellants.

  15. Disposal of Liquid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-13

    SYNTHESIS OF LIQUID PROPELLANT Hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN), prepared via the electrolysis of nitric acid, is commercially available as a high-purity...stack gases, and brine solution from the wet scrubber (82). 5 Applicability/Limitation Most types of solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes or

  16. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    of an intermittently cavitating propeller in a wake and the pressures and forces it exerts on the shaft and on the ship hull is examined. A final chapter discusses the optimization of efficiency of compound propulsors. The authors have taken care to clearly describe physical concepts and mathematical steps. Appendices...

  17. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  18. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  19. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  20. Cryogenics theory, processes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Allyson E

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenics is the study of the production of very low temperature (below -150 -C, -238 -F or 123 K) and the behaviour of materials at those temperatures. This book presents current research from across the globe in the study of cryogenics, including the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of light weight alloys; the application of Fiber Bragg grating sensors at cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic grinding; liquid oxygen magnetohydrodynamics; and, genetic engineering techniques used to improve tolerance to cryopreservation.

  1. TEMPERATURE PROFILES IN A PROPELLANT TANK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilowicz, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed which analyzes by means of mathematical models the temperature profiles in the contents of a filled propellant tank. In designing space vehicles using cryogenic liquid propellants, it is necessary to know how heat transferred from the tank walls and heat absorbed internally affect the temperature distribution with the tank contents. The mathematical flow model is based on results from small-scale experiments. The results showed that when a subcooled fluid is subject to both nonuniform internal heating and wall heating, two distinct temperature regions are developed. In the lower region, the fluid is thoroughly mixed and maintains a uniform temperature profile. In the upper region, a stratified layer develops, and a temperature gradient is formed from the accumulation of warm fluid from the boundary layer along the tank walls; it also indicated that the temperature profiles in the stratified layer exhibited similarity. This concept was developed primarily for internal heating caused by nuclear radiation. However, the theory and computer program are applicable for any form of internal or bulk heating. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on the IBM 7094. This program was developed in 1970.

  2. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  3. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  4. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  5. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  6. Evaluation of Aluminum Alloy 2050-T84 Microstructure and Mechanical Properties at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hales, Stephen J.; Shenoy, Ravi N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2050 is being considered for the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks to reduce the mass of future heavy-lift launch vehicles. The alloy is available in section thicknesses greater than that of the incumbent aluminum alloy, 2195, which will enable designs with greater structural efficiency. While ambient temperature design allowable properties are available for alloy 2050, cryogenic properties are not available. To determine its suitability for use in cryogenic propellant tanks, tensile, compression and fracture tests were conducted on 4 inch thick 2050-T84 plate at ambient temperature and at -320degF. Various metallurgical analyses were also performed in order to provide an understanding of the compositional homogeneity and microstructure of 2050.

  7. Accelerated aging of AP/HTPB propellants and the influence of various environmental aging conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizers, H.L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary resuits on accelerated aging of lab-scale produced AP/HTPB propellant and propellants from dissectioned rocket motors are discussed, including aging logic, storage conditions, test techniques and resuits on mechanical, ballistic and safety testing. The mam aging effect observed was

  8. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  9. The methods of hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, J.M.; Cuevas, F.; Latroche, M.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen may be an excellent energy vector owing to its high specific energy. Its low density is however a serious drawback for its storage. Three techniques exist to store hydrogen. Storage under pressure is now performed in composite tanks under pressures around 700 bar. Liquid storage is achieved at cryogenic temperatures. Solid storage is possible in reversible metal hydrides or on high surface area materials. The three storage means are compared in terms of performance, energetic losses and risk. (authors)

  10. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  11. Weight savings in aerospace vehicles through propellant scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Reed, Brian D.

    1988-05-01

    Vehicle payload benefits of scavenging hydrogen and oxygen propellants are addressed. The approach used is to select a vehicle and a mission and then select a scavenging system for detailed weight analysis. The Shuttle 2 vehicle on a Space Station rendezvous mission was chosen for study. The propellant scavenging system scavenges liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen from the launch propulsion tankage during orbital maneuvers and stores them in well insulated liquid accumulators for use in a cryogenic auxiliary propulsion system. The fraction of auxiliary propulsion propellant which may be scavenged for propulsive purposes is estimated to be 45.1 percent. The auxiliary propulsion subsystem dry mass, including the proposed scavenging system, an additional 20 percent for secondary structure, an additional 5 percent for electrical service, a 10 percent weight growth margin, and 15.4 percent propellant reserves and residuals is estimated to be 6331 kg. This study shows that the fraction of the on-orbit vehicle mass required by the auxiliary propulsion system of this Shuttle 2 vehicle using this technology is estimated to be 12.0 percent compared to 19.9 percent for a vehicle with an earth-storable bipropellant system. This results in a vehicle with the capability of delivering an additional 7820 kg to the Space Station.

  12. Mars Propellant Liquefaction Modeling in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Pooja; Hauser, Dan; Sutherlin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASAs current Mars architectures are assuming the production and storage of 23 tons of liquid oxygen on the surface of Mars over a duration of 500+ days. In order to do this in a mass efficient manner, an energy efficient refrigeration system will be required. Based on previous analysis NASA has decided to do all liquefaction in the propulsion vehicle storage tanks. In order to allow for transient Martian environmental effects, a propellant liquefaction and storage system for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) was modeled using Thermal Desktop. The model consisted of a propellant tank containing a broad area cooling loop heat exchanger integrated with a reverse turbo Brayton cryocooler. Cryocooler sizing and performance modeling was conducted using MAV diurnal heat loads and radiator rejection temperatures predicted from a previous thermal model of the MAV. A system was also sized and modeled using an alternative heat rejection system that relies on a forced convection heat exchanger. Cryocooler mass, input power, and heat rejection for both systems were estimated and compared against sizing based on non-transient sizing estimates.

  13. Testing Tensile and Shear Epoxy Strength at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, S. J.; Doehne, C. J.; Johnson, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper covers cryogenic, tensile testing and research completed on a number of epoxies used in cryogenic applications. Epoxies are used in many different applications; however, this research focused on the use of epoxy used to bond MLI standoffs to cryogenic storage tanks and the loads imparted to the tank through the MLI. To conduct testing, samples were made from bare stainless steel, aluminum and primed aluminum. Testing involved slowly cooling test samples with liquid nitrogen then applying gradually increasing tensile loads to the epoxy. The testing evaluated the strength and durability of epoxies at cryogenic temperatures and serves as a base for future testing. The results of the tests showed that some epoxies withstood the harsh conditions while others failed. The two epoxies yielding the best results were Masterbond EP29LPSP and Scotch Weld 2216. For all metal surfaces tested, both epoxies had zero failures for up to 11.81 kg of mass.

  14. Progress report - Advanced cryogenic OTV engine technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenman, L.

    1985-01-01

    New technologies for space-based, reusable, throttleable, cryogenic orbit transfer propulsion are being evaluated. A variable-thrust (200 to 3000 lbF), 2000 psi chamber pressure, LO2/LH2 engine has been selected to demonstrate the 20-hour, 500-restart life goal, and a specific impulse in excess of 480 lbF-sec/lbM. The results of recent vehicle-engine integration analyses and the progress in design, fabrication, and testing are provided. Emphasis is placed on the following technology areas being investigated in support of the advanced engine design: LOX hydrostatic bearings; burn-resistant materials for high-pressure GOX turbines and valves; high surface-low flux annular combustion chambers for the dual propellant expander cycle; improved cooling approaches for high-pressure combustion chambers, new concepts in integrated controls; and engine health diagnostics.

  15. Preliminary cryogenic loads requirements for the electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, R.; Ravikumar, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    The proposed electron ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory will consist of using one existing hadron ring and developing a new electron accelerator. This paper presents the cryogenic loads for the hadron ring’s superconducting magnets as well as related upgrades to handle the additional loads. The cryogenic loads for the superconducting RF injector/accelerator and storage ring for the electron beam are summarized. The proposed cryogenic plant, and the configuration and flow distribution of the related cryogenic systems are also presented.

  16. Evaluation of Carbon Composite Vessels Fabrication using Ionic Liquid Epoxies for Cryogenic Liquid Containment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The intent of the work proposed here is to ascertain the viability of ionic liquid (IL) epoxy based carbon fiber composites for use as storage tanks at cryogenic...

  17. Thin Aerogel as a Spacer in Multi-Layer Insulation for Cryogenic Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long duration storage of large quantities of cryogenic fluids for propulsion, power, and life-support is an essential requirement for long-term missions into space....

  18. Cryogenic regenerative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Robert A

    1997-01-01

    An in-depth survey of regenerative heat exchangers, this book chronicles the development and recent commercialization of regenerative devices for cryogenic applications. Chapters cover historical background, concepts, practical applications, design data, and numerical solutions, providing the latest information for engineers to develop advanced cryogenic machines. The discussions include insights into the operation of a regenerator; descriptions of the cyclic and fluid temperature distributions in a regenerator; data for various matrix geometries and materials, including coarse and fine bronze, stainless steel-woven wire mesh screens, and lead spheres; and unique operating features of cryocoolers that produce deviations from ideal regenerator theory.

  19. A Cis-Lunar Propellant Infrastructure for Flexible Path Exploration and Space Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a space infrastructure concept that exploits lunar water for propellant production and delivers it to users in cis-lunar space. The goal is to provide responsive economical space transportation to destinations beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) and enable in-space commerce. This is a game changing concept that could fundamentally affect future space operations, provide greater access to space beyond LEO, and broaden participation in space exploration. The challenge is to minimize infrastructure development cost while achieving a low operational cost. This study discusses the evolutionary development of the infrastructure from a very modest robotic operation to one that is capable of supporting human operations. The cis-lunar infrastructure involves a mix of technologies including cryogenic propellant production, reusable lunar landers, propellant tankers, orbital transfer vehicles, aerobraking technologies, and electric propulsion. This cislunar propellant infrastructure replaces Earth-launched propellants for missions beyond LEO. It enables users to reach destinations with smaller launchers or effectively multiplies the user s existing payload capacity. Users can exploit the expanded capacity to launch logistics material that can then be traded with the infrastructure for propellants. This mutually beneficial trade between the cis-lunar infrastructure and propellant users forms the basis of in-space commerce.

  20. Performance and Cost Evaluation of Cryogenic Solid Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adirim, Harry; Lo, Roger; Knecht, Thomas; Reinbold, Georg-Friedrich; Poller, Sascha

    2002-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the German Aerospace Center DLR, Cryogenic Solid Propulsion (CSP) is now in its 6th year of R&D. The development proceeds as a joint international university-, small business-, space industry- and professional research effort (Berlin University of Technology / AI: Aerospace Institute, Berlin / Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Russia / ASTRIUM GmbH, Bremen / Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology, Berghausen). This paper aims at introducing CSP as a novel type of chemical propellant that uses frozen liquids as Oxygen (SOX) or Hydrogen Peroxide (SH2O2) inside of a coherent solid Hydrocarbon (PE, PU or HTPB) matrix in solid rocket motors. Theoretically any conceivable chemical rocket propellant combination (including any environmentally benign ,,green propellant") can be used in solid rocket propellant motors if the definition of solids is not restricted to "solid at ambient temperature". The CSP concept includes all suitable high energy propellant combinations, but is not limited to them. Any liquid or hybrid bipropellant combination is (Isp-wise) superior to any conventional solid propellant formulation. While CSPs do share some of the disadvantages of solid propulsion (e.g. lack of cooling fluid and preset thrust-time function), they definitely share one of their most attractive advantages: the low number of components that is the base for high reliability and low cost of structures. In this respect, CSPs are superior to liquid propellant rocket motors with whom, they share the high Isp performance. High performance, low cost, low pollution CSP technology could bring about a near term improvement for chemical Earth-to-orbit high thrust propulsion. In the long run it could surpass conventional chemical propulsion because it is better suited for applying High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) than any other mode of propulsion. So far, ongoing preliminary analyses have not shown any insuperable problems in areas of concern, such as

  1. Evaluation of Losses Of Cold Energy of Cryogen Products in The Transport Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglanov, Dmitry; Sarmin, Dmitry; Tsapkova, Alexandra; Burdina, Yana

    2017-12-01

    At present, there are problems of energy saving in various areas of human life and in power complexes of industrial plants. One possible solution to the problem of increasing energy efficiency is the use of liquefied natural gas and its cold energy. Pipelines for fuel or gas supply in cryogen supply systems have different length depending on the mutual position of storage and cryogen consumption devices relatively to a start construction. Cryogen supply and transport systems include a lot of fittings of different assortment. Reservoirs can be installed on different elevation points. To reduce heat inleak and decrease cold energy of cryogen product different kinds of thermal insulation are used. Cryogen pipelines provide required operation conditions of storage and gasifying systems. The aim of the thermal calculation of cryogen transport and supply systems is to define the value of cryogen heat. In this paper it is shown values of cryogen temperature rise due to heat inleaks at cryogen’s transfer along transport systems for ethane, methane, oxygen and nitrogen were calculated. Heat inleaks also due to hydraulic losses were calculated. Specific losses of cold energy of cryogen product for laminar and turbulent flow were calculated. Correspondences of temperature rise, critical pipeline’s length and Reynolds number were defined for nitrogen, argon, methane and oxygen.

  2. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m)) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid hydrogen matrix. The magnetic field strength was estimated to be 30 kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  3. Liquid Methane Conditioning Capabilities Developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Small Multi- Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) for Accelerated Lunar Surface Storage Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Helmut H.; Robinson, R. Craig; Jurns, John M.; Grasl, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center s Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Small Multi-Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) recently completed validation / checkout testing of a new liquid methane delivery system and liquid methane (LCH4) conditioning system. Facility checkout validation was conducted in preparation for a series of passive thermal control technology tests planned at SMiRF in FY10 using a flight-like propellant tank at simulated thermal environments from 140 to 350K. These tests will validate models and provide high quality data to support consideration of LCH4/LO2 propellant combination option for a lunar or planetary ascent stage.An infrastructure has been put in place which will support testing of large amounts of liquid methane at SMiRF. Extensive modifications were made to the test facility s existing liquid hydrogen system for compatibility with liquid methane. Also, a new liquid methane fluid conditioning system will enable liquid methane to be quickly densified (sub-cooled below normal boiling point) and to be quickly reheated to saturation conditions between 92 and 140 K. Fluid temperatures can be quickly adjusted to compress the overall test duration. A detailed trade study was conducted to determine an appropriate technique to liquid conditioning with regard to the SMiRF facility s existing infrastructure. In addition, a completely new roadable dewar has been procured for transportation and temporary storage of liquid methane. A new spherical, flight-representative tank has also been fabricated for integration into the vacuum chamber at SMiRF. The addition of this system to SMiRF marks the first time a large-scale liquid methane propellant test capability has been realized at Glenn.This work supports the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project being conducted under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, providing focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts to support NASA s future robotic or human exploration missions.

  4. Adsorption in cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravex, A.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main fields for application of physical adsorption in cryogenics: cryopumping and refrigeration. Cryopumping has known many developments but is now almost industrial. Basic principles, applications and realizations are presented, for instance, in nuclear fusion and particle physics. For refrigeration developments and realizations are rare but present potential space applications [fr

  5. Propellant combustion at low pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoyer, H.F.R.; Korting, P.A.O.G.

    1986-03-01

    The combustion characteristics of a family of composite propellants have been investigated at low (i.e., subatmospheric) pressures and three different temperatures. Although a de Vieille-type burning rate law appeared to be applicable, the burning rate exponent and coefficient vary strongly with the initial temperatures. Indications are that this is primarily due to the presence of nitroguanidine and oxalate. Combustion efficiency proved to be poor. At low pressures, all propellants are susceptible to irregular burning: above 50 kPa oscillatory combustion was hardly observed. All propellants exhibit distinct preferred frequencies for oscillatory combustion. These frequencies, being much lower than the acoustic frequency of the test system, are associated with the combustion characteristics of the propellants. They depend strongly on the combustion pressure and the initial propellant temperature.

  6. R&D ERL: Cryogenic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Than, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

  7. CRYOGENIC PROCESSES IN LOESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Konishchev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach to the analysis of the genetic nature of the mineral substance of loessial rocks. At the present time, the prevailing view on this issue is the eolian accumulation of loess, while the influence of other factors of formation has not been practically taken into account. However, loess accumulation can be explained by other mechanisms, e.g., active processes of cryogenic weathering under a very harsh climate. The latter concept is based on the results of analysis of wedge-shaped structures in loess thickness, as well as numerous data of spore-pollen, microfaunistic, and other types of analysis. Further developing concepts of loess formation, the authors made an attempt to assess the degree of influence of cryogenic processes on the composition and structure of loess. The proposed method is based on a differentiated analysis of the distribution of the main rock-forming minerals (quartz and feldspars along the granulometric spectrum. Two criteria are proposed − the coefficient of cryogenic contrast and the heavy fraction coefficient (i.e., the coefficient of distribution of heavy minerals − which allow determining the degree of participation of cryogenic processes, as well as aeolian and aqueous sedimentation, in the formation of loessial rocks. This method was used to study two sections of loessial thickness − in the south of the Russian Plain and within the Loess Plateau of China. The results of the study revealed the role of cryogenic factors in the formation of the composition of the loess horizons of soil-loess sequences of different territories. Particularly clearly the effect of cryogenesis was manifested in the loess section in the south of the Russian Plain. In the section of the Loess Plateau, only the youngest deposits of the last formation stage are affected by cryogenesis. It follows that not only within the long-term periglacial permafrost zone, but also under the conditions of seasonal freezing

  8. Integrated Refrigeration and Storage for Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has used liquefied hydrogen (LH2) on a large scale since the beginning of the space program as fuel for the Centaur and Apollo upper stages, and more recently to feed the three space shuttle main engines. The LH2 systems currently in place at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch pads are aging and inefficient compared to the state-of-the-art. Therefore, the need exists to explore advanced technologies and operations that can drive commodity costs down, and provide increased capabilities. The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) was developed at KSC to pursue these goals by demonstrating active thermal control of the propellant state by direct removal of heat using a cryocooler. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The key technology challenge was efficiently integrating the cryogenic refrigerator into the LH2 storage tank. A Linde LR1620 Brayton cycle refrigerator is used to produce up to 900W cooling at 20K, circulating approximately 22 g/s gaseous helium through the hydrogen via approximately 300 m of heat exchanger tubing. The GODU-LH2 system is fully operational, and is currently under test. This paper will discuss the design features of the refrigerator and storage system, as well as the current test results.

  9. Green Propellant Test Capabilities of the Altitude Combustion Stand at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Jonathan M.; Arnett, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is committed to providing simulated altitude rocket test capabilities to NASA programs, other government agencies, private industry partners, and academic partners. A primary facility to support those needs is the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS). ACS provides the capability to test combustion components at a simulated altitude up to 100,000 ft. (approx.0.2 psia/10 Torr) through a nitrogen-driven ejector system. The facility is equipped with an axial thrust stand, gaseous and cryogenic liquid propellant feed systems, data acquisition system with up to 1000 Hz recording, and automated facility control system. Propellant capabilities include gaseous and liquid hydrogen, gaseous and liquid oxygen, and liquid methane. A water-cooled diffuser, exhaust spray cooling chamber, and multi-stage ejector systems can enable run times up to 180 seconds to 16 minutes. The system can accommodate engines up to 2000-lbf thrust, liquid propellant supply pressures up to 1800 psia, and test at the component level. Engines can also be fired at sea level if needed. The NASA GRC is in the process of modifying ACS capabilities to enable the testing of green propellant (GP) thrusters and components. Green propellants are actively being explored throughout government and industry as a non-toxic replacement to hydrazine monopropellants for applications such as reaction control systems or small spacecraft main propulsion systems. These propellants offer increased performance and cost savings over hydrazine. The modification of ACS is intended to enable testing of a wide range of green propellant engines for research and qualification-like testing applications. Once complete, ACS will have the capability to test green propellant engines up to 880 N in thrust, thermally condition the green propellants, provide test durations up to 60 minutes depending on thrust class, provide high speed control and data acquisition, as well as provide advanced imaging and

  10. Safety Aspects of Big Cryogenic Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorowski, M.; Fydrych, J.; Poliński, J.

    2010-04-01

    Superconductivity and helium cryogenics are key technologies in the construction of large scientific instruments, like accelerators, fusion reactors or free electron lasers. Such cryogenic systems may contain more than hundred tons of helium, mostly in cold and high-density phases. In spite of the high reliability of the systems, accidental loss of the insulation vacuum, pipe rupture or rapid energy dissipation in the cold helium can not be overlooked. To avoid the danger of over-design pressure rise in the cryostats, they need to be equipped with a helium relief system. Such a system is comprised of safety valves, bursting disks and optionally cold or warm quench lines, collectors and storage tanks. Proper design of the helium safety relief system requires a good understanding of worst case scenarios. Such scenarios will be discussed, taking into account different possible failures of the cryogenic system. In any case it is necessary to estimate heat transfer through degraded vacuum superinsulation and mass flow through the valves and safety disks. Even if the design of the helium relief system does not foresee direct helium venting into the environment, an occasional emergency helium spill may happen. Helium propagation in the atmosphere and the origins of oxygen-deficiency hazards will be discussed.

  11. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament

  12. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  13. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  14. Application of theory to propeller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. G.; Morgan, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various theories concerning propeller design are discussed. The use of digital computers to obtain specific blade shapes to meet appropriate flow conditions is emphasized. The development of lifting-line and lifting surface configurations is analyzed. Ship propulsive performance and basic propeller design considerations are investigated. The characteristics of supercavitating propellers are compared with those of subcavitating propellers.

  15. Single stage to orbit mass budgets derived from propellant density and specific impulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1996-06-06

    The trade between specific impulse (Isp) and density is examined in view of Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) requirements. Mass allocations for vehicle hardware are derived from these two properties, for several propellant combinations and a dual-fuel case. This comparative analysis, based on flight-proven hardware, indicates that the higher density of several alternative propellants compensates for reduced Isp, when compared with cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Approximately half the orbiting mass of a rocket- propelled SSTO vehicle must be allocated to propulsion hardware and residuals. Using hydrogen as the only fuel requires a slightly greater fraction of orbiting mass for propulsion, because hydrogen engines and tanks are heavier than those for denser fuels. The advantage of burning both a dense fuel and hydrogen in succession depends strongly on tripropellant engine weight. The implications of the calculations for SSTO vehicle design are discussed, especially with regard to the necessity to minimize non-tankage structure.

  16. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  17. Proceedings of cryogenic optical systems and instruments IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melugin, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of Cryogenic Optical systems and Instruments IV. Topics covered include: Cryogenic System Design and Optical Technology; Cryogenic Instruments, Sensors, and Detectors; Space Cryogenic Dewars and Coolers; and Cryogenic Mechanisms, Testing, and Structures

  18. A water blown urethane insulation for use in cryogenic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon

    1995-01-01

    Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) of NASA's Space Shuttle External Tank include polyurethane and polyisocyanurate modified polyurethane foam insulations. These insulations, currently foamed with CFC 11 blowing agent, serve to maintain cryogenic propellant quality, maintain the external tank structural temperature limits, and minimize the formation of ice and frost that could potentially damage the ceramic insulation on the space shuttle orbiter. During flight the external tank insulations are exposed to mechanical, thermal and acoustical stresses. TPS must pass cryogenic flexure and substrate adhesion tests at -253 C, aerothermal and radiant heating tests at fluxes up to approximately 14 kilowatts per square meter, and thermal conductivity tests at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. Due to environmental concerns, the polyurethane insulation industry and the External Tank Project are tasked with replacing CFC 11. The flight qualification of foam insulations employing HCFC 141b as a foaming agent is currently in progress; HCFC 141b blown insulations are scheduled for production implementation in 1995. Realizing that the second generation HCFC blowing agents are an interim solution, the evaluation of third generation blowing agents with zero ozone depletion potential is underway. NASA's TPS Materials Research Laboratory is evaluating third generation blowing agents in cryogenic insulations for the External Tank; one option being investigated is the use of water as a foaming agent. A dimensionally stable insulation with low friability, good adhesion to cryogenic substrates, and acceptable thermal conductivity has been developed with low viscosity materials that are easily processed in molding applications. The development criteria, statistical experimental approach, and resulting foam properties will be presented.

  19. Design and testing of the Space Station Freedom Propellant Tank Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, D. D.; Thonet, T. A.; Goforth, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Propellant storage and management functions for the Propulsion Module of the U.S. Space Station Freedom are provided by the Propellant Tank Assembly (PTA). The PTA consists of a surface-tension type propellant acquisition device contained within a welded titanium pressure vessel. The PTA design concept was selected with high reliability and low program risk as primary goals in order to meet stringent NASA structural, expulsion, fracture control and reliability requirements. The PTA design makes use of Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering System and Peacekeeper Propellant Storage Assembly design and analysis techniques. This paper summarizes the PTA design solution and discusses the underlying detailed analyses. In addition, design verification and qualification test activities are discussed.

  20. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced NEP.

  1. CSR: a new tool for storage and cooling of keV ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froese, Michael; Blaum, Klaus; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, Jose; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; Kaiser, Dirk; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Menk, Sebastian; Orlov, Dmitry A.; Repnow, Roland; Schroeter, Claus D.; Schwalm, Dirk; Sieber, Thomas; Ullrich, Joachim; Varju, Jozef; Hahn, Robert von; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Toker, Jonathan; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-07-01

    An electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) is currently being built in Heidelberg, Germany. The current status and final design of this ring, with a focus on the optimized 2 K chamber cooling, precision chamber suspension, and pumping down to extremely low pressures via cryogenic vacuum chambers will be presented. This ring will allow long storage times of highly charged ion and polyatomic molecular beams with energies in the range of keV per charge-state. Combining the long storage times with vacuum chamber temperatures approaching 2 K, infrared-active molecular ions will be radiatively cooled to their rotational ground states. Many aspects of this concept were experimentally tested with a cryogenic trap for fast ion beams (CTF), which has already demonstrated the storage of fast ion beams in a large cryogenic device. An upcoming test will investigate the effect of pre-baking the cryogenic vacuum chambers to 600 K on the cryogenic vacuum and the ion beam storage.

  2. Current status of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants for rocket engines. Nascent or atomic forms of diatomic gases are considered free radicals as well as the highly reactive diatomic triatomic molecules that posess unpaired electrons. Manufacturing and storage problems are described, and a review of current experimental work related to the manufacture of atomic hydrogen propellants is presented.

  3. Aspects of Propeller Developements for a Submarine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul; kappel, Jens Julius; Spangenberg, Eugen

    2009-01-01

    Design and development of propellers for submarines are in some ways different from propellers for surface vessels. The most important demand is low acoustic signature that has priority over propeller efficiency, and the submarine propeller must be optimized with respect to acoustics rather than...... efficiency. Moreover the operating conditions of a submarine propeller are quite different. These aspects are discussed as well as the weighing of the various propeller parameters against the design objectives. The noise generated by the propeller can be characterized as thrust noise due to the inhomogeneous...... wake field of the submarine, trailing-edge noise and noise caused by turbulence in the inflow. The items discussed are demonstrated in a case study where a propeller of the Kappel type was developed. Three stages of the development are presented, including a design of an 8-bladed propeller where...

  4. Experimental Performance of a Novel Trochoidal Propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Bernard; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    In the quest for energy efficiency in marine transportation, a promising marine propulsor concept is the trochoidal propeller. We have designed and tested a novel trochoidal propeller using a sinusoidal blade pitch function. The main results presented are measurements of thrust and torque, as well as the calculated efficiency, for a range of advance coefficients. The experimental data show narrow 95% confidence bounds, demonstrating high accuracy and repeatability in the experimental methods. We compare our sinusoidal-pitch trochoidal propeller with prior cross-flow propellers, as well as a representative screw propeller. While the efficiency of our propeller exceeds that of the cycloidal-pitch trochoidal propeller, it is slightly lower than the efficiencies of the other propellers considered. We also present a theoretical model that can be used to further explore and optimize such trochoidal propellers, leading to new avenues for improvements in marine propulsion systems.

  5. The performance of a piezoelectric-sensor-based SHM system under a combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xinlin P.; Beard, Shawn J.; Kumar, Amrita; Sullivan, Kevin; Aguilar, Robert; Merchant, Munir; Taniguchi, Mike

    2008-10-01

    A series of tests have been conducted to determine the survivability and functionality of a piezoelectric-sensor-based active structural health monitoring (SHM) SMART Tape system under the operating conditions of typical liquid rocket engines such as cryogenic temperature and vibration loads. The performance of different piezoelectric sensors and a low temperature adhesive under cryogenic temperature was first investigated. The active SHM system for liquid rocket engines was exposed to flight vibration and shock environments on a simulated large booster LOX-H2 engine propellant duct conditioned to cryogenic temperatures to evaluate the physical robustness of the built-in sensor network as well as operational survivability and functionality. Test results demonstrated that the developed SMART Tape system can withstand operational levels of vibration and shock energy on a representative rocket engine duct assembly, and is functional under the combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environment.

  6. Design and development of graphite/epoxy feed line for use of cryogenic propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, J.S.; Kreiner, J.H.; Mosallam, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of lightweight composite cryogenic ines is a critical technology for single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicles such as the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). To achieve weight goals, a significant effort will be required to develop feed line designs that can reliably replace today's stainless steel configurations. A number of technical problems exist, including the large coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) differential between the composite and interfacing metallic materials and the ability to seal against composite materials in a cryogenic environment. This paper reports the results of a development efforts undertaken to design, build, and test a graphite/epoxy propellant feed line to carry liquid hydrogen (-423 degree F). The design incorporates a reusable cryogenic insulation system and a secondarily bonded/co-cured splice joint

  7. Implementation of time synchronized cryogenics control system network architecture for SST-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rakesh J., E-mail: rpatel@ipr.res.in; Mahesuria, Gaurang; Panchal, Pradip; Panchal, Rohit; Sonara, Dasarath; Tanna, Vipul; Pradhan, Subrata

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • SST-1 cryogenics sub-systems are 1.3 kW HRL, LN2 distribution system, current feeders system and 80 K booster system. • GUI developed in SCADA and control program developed in PLC for automation of the above sub-systems. • Implemented the cryogenics control system network to communicate all systems to InSQL server. • InSQL server configured for real time centralized process data acquisition from all connected sub-systems control nodes. • Acquired the process parameters coming from different systems at same time stamp. - Abstract: Under the SST-1 mission mandate, the several cryogenic sub-systems have been developed, upgraded and procured in prior to the SST-1 operation. New developments include 80 K Bubble type thermal shields, LN2 distribution system, LN2 booster system and current feeders system (CFS).Graphical User Interface (GUI) program developed in Wonderware SCADA and control logic program developed in Schneider make PLC for the above sub-systems. Industrial SQL server (InSQL) configured for centralized storage of real time process data coming from various control nodes of cryogenics sub-systems. The cryogenics control system network for communicating all cryogenics sub-system control nodes to InSQL server for centralized data storage and time synchronization among cryogenic sub-systems with centralized InSQL server is successfully implemented. Due to implemented time synchronization among sub-systems control nodes, it is possible to analyze the process parameters coming from different sub-systems at same time stamp. This paper describes the overview of implemented cryogenics control system network architecture for real time cryogenic process data monitor, storage and retrieval.

  8. Cryogenics maintenance strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzat, Fabiola

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is an interferometer composed of 66 independent systems, with specific maintenance requirements for each subsystem. To optimize the observation time and reduce downtime maintenance, requirements are very demanding. One subsystem with high maintenance efforts is cryogenics and vacuum. To organize the maintenance, the Cryogenic and Vacuum department is using and implementing different tools. These are monitoring and problem reporting systems and CMMS. This leads to different maintenance approaches: Preventive Maintenance, Corrective Maintenance and Condition Based Maintenance. In order to coordinate activities with other departments the preventive maintenance schedule is kept as flexible as systems allow. To cope with unavoidable failures, the team has to be prepared to work under any condition with the spares on time. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) will help to manage inventory control for reliable spare part handling, the correct record of work orders and traceability of maintenance activities. For an optimized approach the department is currently evaluating where preventive or condition based maintenance applies to comply with the individual system demand. Considering the change from maintenance contracts to in-house maintenance will help to minimize costs and increase availability of parts. Due to increased number of system and tasks the cryo team needs to grow. Training of all staff members is mandatory, in depth knowledge must be built up by doing complex maintenance activities in the Cryo group, use of advanced computerized metrology systems.

  9. Thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Picklesimer, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    The general scope of study on thermal energy storage development includes: (1) survey and review possible concepts for storing thermal energy; (2) evaluate the potentials of the surveyed concepts for practical applications in the low and high temperature ranges for thermal control and storage, with particular emphasis on the low temperature range, and designate the most promising concepts; and (3) determine the nature of further studies required to expeditiously convert the most promising concept(s) to practical applications. Cryogenic temperature control by means of energy storage materials was also included.

  10. Marine propellers: the latest topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, H

    1996-02-01

    The impeller of the axial flow blood pump in an artificial heart is essentially based on the same principle as a marine propeller. Impellers designed for artificial hearts and marine propellers have a number of points in common. Decreased cavitation and relieved fluctuation load are only representative of them. As for a distinct concept of pressure distribution, the inverse method could be very useful. Skew may led to a more mild and natural character in the blood. Highly skewed blades and super elastic blades have the potential to decrease the burden on the entire circulatory system. This paper will address the main points and latest issues in propeller design concluding with a discussion of the implications of these issues for blood pump impellers.

  11. Cryogenic trapping of keV ion beams at the CSR prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Lange, Michael; Orlov, Dimitry; Sieber, Thomas; Hahn, Robert von; Varju, Jozef; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizmann Institut of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-07-01

    A Cryogenic Trap for Fast ion beams (CTF) was built to explore cooling techniques and test thermal decoupling of ion optics for the development of the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). These challenging projects will lead to a new experimental field of atomic and molecular physics with keV ion beams. The cold conditions of 2-10 K minimize the blackbody radiation field and are expected to lead to extremely low restgas densities (equivalent pressure at room temperature {approx}10{sup -13} mbar) which result in long storage lifetimes and for molecular ions to radiative cooling to their ro-vibrational ground states. The CTF consists of two stacks of electrostatic mirror electrodes allowing the storage of up to 20 keV ion beams. Cryogenic ion beam storage has been realized with this device using a liquid helium refrigeration system to cool down the experimental trapping area to few-Kelvin cryogenic temperatures and experiments with cryogenically trapped molecular nitrogen ions have been performed to verify the low vacuum conditions by measuring their storage lifetimes.

  12. Thrust Deduction in Contrarotating Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    reduced by unbalancing the propelling thrust with smaller thrust carried on the forward propeller. UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF THIS...Webb lnst/Waird 1 154 W. Morgan 1 WHOI Ocean Engr 1 1644 R. Cumming 1 WPI Alden Hydr Lab 1 1552 J. McCarthy 1 SNAME 1 156 J. Hadler 1 Bethlehem Steel ...New York 30 5614 Report Distribution 1 Bethlehem Steel Sparrows 1 5641I Library 1 Bolt Beranek and Newman 1 5642 Library, Annapolis 1 Eastern Res Group 32

  13. Quadcopter thrust optimization with ducted-propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuantama Endrowednes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In relation to quadcopter body frame model, propeller can be categorized into propeller with ducted and without ducted. This study present differences between those two using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics method. Both categories utilize two blade-propeller with diameter of 406 (mm. Propeller rotation generates acceleration per time unit on the volume of air. Based on the behavior of generated air velocity, ducted propeller can be modeled into three versions. The generated thrust and performance on each model were calculated to determine the best model. The use of ducted propeller increases the total weight of quadcopter and also total thrust. The influence of this modeling were analyzed in detail with variation of angular velocity propeller from 1000 (rpm to 9000 (rpm. Besides the distance between propeller tip and ducted barrier, the size of ducted is also an important part in thrust optimization and total weight minimization of quadcopter.

  14. Mars Integrated Propellant Production System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System (IMISPPS) is an end-to-end system that will produce rocket propellant on Mars from CO2 in the Martian...

  15. Mars Integrated Propellant Production System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System (IMISPPS) is an end-to-end system that will produce rocket propellant on Mars from CO2 in the Martian...

  16. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  17. Cryogenic systems for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Nelson, R.L.; Chronis, W.C.

    1985-08-01

    This paper includes an in-depth discussion of the design, fabrication, and operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Each subsystem discussed to present a basic composite of the entire facility. The following subsystems are included: 500kW nitrogen reliquefier, subcoolers, and distribution system; 15kW helium refrigerator/liquefier and distribution system; helium recovery and storage system; rough vacuum and high vacuum systems

  18. THE PROPELLER AND THE FROG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    'Propellers' in planetary rings are disturbances in ring material excited by moonlets that open only partial gaps. We describe a new type of co-orbital resonance that can explain the observed non-Keplerian motions of propellers. The resonance is between the moonlet underlying the propeller and co-orbiting ring particles downstream of the moonlet where the gap closes. The moonlet librates within the gap about an equilibrium point established by co-orbiting material and stabilized by the Coriolis force. In the limit of small libration amplitude, the libration period scales linearly with the gap azimuthal width and inversely as the square root of the co-orbital mass. The new resonance recalls but is distinct from conventional horseshoe and tadpole orbits; we call it the 'frog' resonance, after the relevant term in equine hoof anatomy. For a ring surface density and gap geometry appropriate for the propeller Bleriot in Saturn's A ring, our theory predicts a libration period of ∼4 years, similar to the ∼3.7 year period over which Bleriot's orbital longitude is observed to vary. These librations should be subtracted from the longitude data before any inferences about moonlet migration are made.

  19. Propelling arboriculture into the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson

    2011-01-01

    Research is the engine that propels arboriculture and urban forestry into the future. New knowledge, technologies, and tools provide arborists with improved tree care practices that result in healthier urban forests. The ISA Science and Research Committee (SRC) is composed of 13 professionals and researchers who are dedicated to elevating the importance of research...

  20. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  1. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  2. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Flow Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, B. J.; Korman, V.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the propellant mass flow rate in liquid bismuth-fed electric propulsion systems has two challenging facets. First, the flow sensors must be capable of providing a resolvable measurement at propellant mass flow rates on the order of 10 mg/see with and uncertainty of less that 5%. The second challenge has to do with the fact that the materials from which the flow sensors are fabricated must be capable of resisting any of the corrosive effects associated with the high-temperature propellant. The measurement itself is necessary in order to properly assess the performance (thrust efficiency, Isp) of thruster systems in the laboratory environment. The hotspot sensor[I] has been designed to provide the bismuth propellant mass flow rate measurement. In the hotspot sensor, a pulse of thermal energy (derived from a current pulse and associated joule heating) is applied near the inlet of the sensor. The flow is "tagged" with a thermal feature that is convected downstream by the flowing liquid metal. Downstream, a temperature measurement is performed to detect a "ripple" in the local temperature associated with the passing "hotspot" in the propellant. By measuring the time between the upstream generation and downstream detection of the thermal feature, the flow speed can be calculated using a "time of flight" analysis. In addition, the system can be calibrated by measuring the accumulated mass exiting the system as a-function of time and correlating this with the time it takes the hotspot to convect through the sensor. The primary advantage of this technique is that it doesn't depend on an absolute measurement of temperature but, instead, relies on the observation of thermal features. This makes the technique insensitive to other externally generated thermal fluctuations. In this paper, we describe experiments performed using the hotspot flow sensor aimed at quantifying the resolution of the sensor technology. Propellant is expelled onto an electronic scale to

  3. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  4. Modelling and control of large cryogenic refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript is concern with both the modeling and the derivation of control schemes for large cryogenic refrigerators. The particular case of those which are submitted to highly variable pulsed heat load is studied. A model of each object that normally compose a large cryo-refrigerator is proposed. The methodology to gather objects model into the model of a subsystem is presented. The manuscript also shows how to obtain a linear equivalent model of the subsystem. Based on the derived models, advances control scheme are proposed. Precisely, a linear quadratic controller for warm compression station working with both two and three pressures state is derived, and a predictive constrained one for the cold-box is obtained. The particularity of those control schemes is that they fit the computing and data storage capabilities of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) with are well used in industry. The open loop model prediction capability is assessed using experimental data. Developed control schemes are validated in simulation and experimentally on the 400W1.8K SBT's cryogenic test facility and on the CERN's LHC warm compression station. (author) [fr

  5. Crusader solid propellant best technical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bader, G. [Fire Support Armament Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States); Dolecki, M. [Tank-Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Picatinny, NJ (United States); Krupski, S. [Benet Weapons Lab., Watervliet Arsenal, NY (United States); Zangrando, R. [Close Combat Armament Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Solid Propellant Resupply Team is to develop Crusader system concepts capable of automatically handling 155mm projectiles and Modular Artillery Charges (MACs) based on system requirements. The system encompasses all aspects of handling from initial input into a resupply vehicle (RSV) to the final loading into the breech of the self-propelled howitzer (SPH). The team, comprised of persons from military and other government organizations, developed concepts for the overall vehicles as well as their interior handling components. An intermediate review was conducted on those components, and revised concepts were completed in May 1995. A concept evaluation was conducted on the finalized concepts, from both a systems level and a component level. The team`s Best Technical Approach (BTA) concept was selected from that evaluation. Both vehicles in the BTA have a front-engine configuration with the crew situated behind the engine-low in the vehicles. The SPH concept utilizes an automated reload port at the rear of the vehicle, centered high. The RSV transfer boom will dock with this port to allow automated ammunition transfer. The SPH rearm system utilizes fully redundant dual loaders. Active magazines are used for both projectiles and MACs. The SPH also uses a nonconventional tilted ring turret configuration to maximize the available interior volume in the vehicle. This configuration can be rearmed at any elevation angle but only at 0{degree} azimuth. The RSV configuration is similar to that of the SPH. The RSV utilizes passive storage racks with a pick-and-place manipulator for handling the projectiles and active magazines for the MACs. A telescoping transfer boom extends out the front of the vehicle over the crew and engine.

  6. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  7. Overview of the Liquid Argon Cryogenics for the Short Baseline Neutrino Program (SBN) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Barry [Fermilab; Bremer, Johan [CERN; Chalifour, Michel [Fermilab; Delaney, Mike [Fermilab; Dinnon, Mike [Fermilab; Doubnik, Roza [Fermilab; Geynisman, Michael [Fermilab; Hentschel, Steve [Fermilab; Kim, Min Jeong [Fermilab; Stefanik, Andy [Fermilab; Tillman, Justin [Fermilab; Zuckerbrot, Mike [Fermilab

    2017-01-01

    The Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program will involve three LAr-TPC detectors located along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab. This new SBN Program will deliver a rich and compelling physics opportunity, including the ability to resolve a class of experimental anomalies in neutrino physics and to perform the most sensitive search to date for sterile neutrinos at the eV mass-scale through both appearance and disappearance oscillation channels. The Program will be composed of an existing and operational detector known as Micro Boone (170 ton LAr mass) plus two new experiments known as the SBN Near Detector (SBND, ~ 260 ton) and the SBN Far Detector (SBN-FD, ~ 600 tons). Fermilab is now building two new facilities to house the experiments and incorporate all cryogenic and process systems to operate these detectors beginning in the 2018-2019 time frame. The SBN cryogenics are a collaborative effort between Fermilab and CERN. The SBN cryogenic systems for both detectors are composed of several sub-systems: External/Infrastructure (or LN2), Proximity (or LAr), and internal cryogenics. For each detector the External/Infrastructure cryogenics includes the equipment used to store and the cryogenic fluids needed for the operation of the Proximity cryogenics, including the LN2 and LAr storage facilities. The Proximity cryogenics consists of all the systems that take the cryogenic fluids from the external/infrastructure cryogenics and deliver them to the internal at the required pressure, temperature, purity and mass flow rate. It includes the condensers, the LAr and GAr purification systems, the LN2 and LAr phase separators, and the interconnecting piping. The Internal cryogenics is comprised of all the cryogenic equipment located within the cryostats themselves, including the GAr and LAr distribution piping and the piping required to cool down the cryostats and the detectors. These cryogenic systems will be engineered, manufactured, commissioned, and

  8. Cryogenic atomic beam source at VEPP-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaeva, L. G.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Nikolenko, D. M.; Popov, S. G.; Rachek, I. A.; Shestakov, Yu. V.; Toporkov, D. K.; Vesnovsky, D. K.; Zevakov, S. A.; Osipov, A. N.; Sidorov, A. A.; Stibunov, V. N.

    1998-01-01

    The experiment on elastic and inelastic scattering of 2 GeV electrons by internal polarized target is in progress at the VEPP-3 storage ring in Novosibirsk. It's carried out by Novosibirsk/St.-Petersburg/Tomsk/Argonne/Illinois/NIKHEF collaboration. A cryogenic Atomic Beam Source having five superconducting sextupoles is under manufacturing to feed by polarized deuterium atoms an internal storage cell target. All the magnets have been manufactured and tested. The magnetic poletip field up to 4.8 T was measured at the cylindrical magnets having 44 mm inner diameter while 3.1 T and 4.0 T were measured for the tapered magnets. The dissociation degree of about 90% has been achieved for a gas throughput 1 mbx1/sec. The expected flux of polarized deuterium atoms into the storage cell is 1.0x10 17 at/sec (in two substrates). The geometry of the magnetic system, results on the dissociation measurements, testing of the superconducting magnet and expected parameters of the target are presented

  9. Cryogenic atomic beam source at VEPP-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaeva, L. G.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Nikolenko, D. M.; Osipov, A. N.; Popov, S. G.; Rachek, I. A.; Shestakov, Yu. V.; Sidorov, A. A.; Stibunov, V. N.; Toporkov, D. K.; Vesnovsky, D. K.; Zevakov, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The experiment on elastic and inelastic scattering of 2 GeV electrons by internal polarized target is in progress at the VEPP-3 storage ring in Novosibirsk. It's carried out by Novosibirsk/St.-Petersburg/Tomsk/Argonne/Illinois/NIKHEF collaboration. A cryogenic Atomic Beam Source having five superconducting sextupoles is under manufacturing to feed by polarized deuterium atoms an internal storage cell target. All the magnets have been manufactured and tested. The magnetic poletip field up to 4.8 T was measured at the cylindrical magnets having 44 mm inner diameter while 3.1 T and 4.0 T were measured for the tapered magnets. The dissociation degree of about 90% has been achieved for a gas throughput 1 mb×1/sec. The expected flux of polarized deuterium atoms into the storage cell is 1.0×1017 at/sec (in two substrates). The geometry of the magnetic system, results on the dissociation measurements, testing of the superconducting magnet and expected parameters of the target are presented.

  10. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  11. Study Task for Determining the Effects of Boost-Phase Environments on Densified Propellants Thermal Conditions for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberbusch, Mark S.; Meyer, Michael L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermodynamic study has been conducted that investigated the effects of the boost-phase environment on densified propellant thermal conditions for expendable launch vehicles. Two thermodynamic models were developed and utilized to bound the expected thermodynamic conditions inside the cryogenic liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellant tanks of an Atlas IIAS/Centaur launch vehicle during the initial phases of flight. The ideal isentropic compression model was developed to predict minimum pressurant gas requirements. The thermal equilibrium model was developed to predict the maximum pressurant gas requirements. The models were modified to simulate the required flight tank pressure profiles through ramp pressurization, liquid expulsion, and tank venting. The transient parameters investigated were: liquid temperature, liquid level, and pressurant gas consumption. Several mission scenarios were analyzed using the thermodynamic models, and the results indicate that flying an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle with densified propellants is feasible and beneficial but may require some minor changes to the vehicle.

  12. StructUre and test results of the Tokamak-7 device cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, I.V.; VolobUev, A.N.; Zhul'kin, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    A cryogenic system (CS) of the Tokamak-7 (T-7) installation with the longitudinal field superconducting magnetic system (SMS) is described. The CS is designed for cool-down, cryostatic cooling and heating of the T-7 cryogenic objects and consists of a helium system (HS) and a nitrogen cryogenic system (NCS). The HS consists of:a a heliUm delivery system intended for distributing and controlling the helium flows in the SMS; cryogenic helium units; a 1.25 m 3 volume for storing liquid helium; a compressor compartment using piston compressors at the 3 MPa operating pressure and 140 g/s total capacity; gaseous helium storages (3600 m 3 under normal conditions); helium cleaning and drying systems; a gas holder of 20 m 3 operating volume; cryogenic pipelines and pipe fittings. The NCS operates on delivered nitrogen and includes a 120 m 3 liquid nitrogen storage, evaporators and electric heaters producing up to 230 g/s of gaseous nitrogen at 300 K, a separator, cryogenic pipelines and fittings. It is found that the CS has the necessary cold production reserve, ensures reliable operation of the Tokamak-7 device and permits to carry out practically continuous plasma experiments

  13. Self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, H; Alemán, B J; Melling, L D; Taormina, M J; Francis, M J; Dow-Hygelund, C C; Narayanan, V; Taylor, R P; Stout, A

    2006-04-21

    We report that liquids perform self-propelled motion when they are placed in contact with hot surfaces with asymmetric (ratchetlike) topology. The pumping effect is observed when the liquid is in the Leidenfrost regime (the film-boiling regime), for many liquids and over a wide temperature range. We propose that liquid motion is driven by a viscous force exerted by vapor flow between the solid and the liquid.

  14. Giants for cryogenics

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    It takes 130 tonnes of liquid helium to cool down the LHC. In some situations—during a shutdown, for instance—this enormous volume of helium has to be removed from the machine and stored elsewhere. While this is a straightforward operation from the technical point of view, in logistical terms storing such a huge amount of the special element that is helium is far from trivial. Until recently, CERN had the capacity for storing up to 52 tonnes of helium in gas form, i.e. 40% of the total needed by the LHC, using the storage tanks that can be seen in the vicinity of some of the experiment sites. As of the middle of June, two new storage tanks, among the largest in the world, are now located at Point 18. Each holding up to 128 000 litres of liquid helium, for a total of 28 tonnes between the two of them, the new tanks have increased CERN’s helium storage capacity by 20%, to reach 60%. The goal is to have storage capacity at 100% by 2010, with the arrival of four mor...

  15. TankSIM: A Cryogenic Tank Performance Prediction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Moder, J. P.; Schnell, A. R.; Sutherlin, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Developed for predicting the behavior of cryogenic liquids inside propellant tanks under various environmental and operating conditions. Provides a multi-node analysis of pressurization, ullage venting and thermodynamic venting systems (TVS) pressure control using axial jet or spray bar TVS. Allows user to combine several different phases for predicting the liquid behavior for the entire flight mission timeline or part of it. Is a NASA in-house code, based on FORTRAN 90-95 and Intel Visual FORTRAN compiler, but can be used on any other platform (Unix-Linux, Compaq Visual FORTRAN, etc.). The last Version 7, released on December 2014, included detailed User's Manual. Includes the use of several RefPROP subroutines for calculating fluid properties.

  16. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  17. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  18. Silicon Germanium Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, J. C.; Montazeri, S.; Chang, Su-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Silicon germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors have emerged in the last decade as an excellent option for use in cryogenic low noise amplifiers. This paper begins with a review of the critical developments that have led to today’s cryogenic low noise amplifiers. Next, recent work focused on minimizing the power consumption of SiGe cryogenic amplifiers is presented. Finally, open issues related to the cryogenic noise properties of SiGe HBTs are discussed.

  19. High speed cryogenic monodisperse targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukharov, A.; Vishnevkii, E.

    2017-11-01

    The basic possibility of creation of high speed cryogenic monodisperse targets is shown. According to calculations at input of thin liquid cryogenic jets with a velocity of bigger 100 m/s in vacuum the jets don’t manage to freeze at distance to 1 mm and can be broken into monodisperse drops. Drops due to evaporation are cooled and become granules. High speed cryogenic monodisperse targets have the following advantages: direct input in vacuum (there is no need for a chamber of a triple point chamber and sluices), it is possible to use the equipment of a cluster target, it is possible to receive targets with a diameter of D 100m/s), exact synchronization of the target hitting moment in a beam with the moment of sensors turning on.

  20. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  1. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  2. Development of an advanced rocket propellant handler's suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    Most launch vehicles and satellites in the US inventory rely upon the use of hypergolic rocket propellants, many of which are toxic to humans. These fuels and oxidizers, such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide have threshold limit values as low as 0.01 PPM. It is essential to provide space workers handling these agents whole body protection as they are universally hazardous not only to the respiratory system, but the skin as well. This paper describes a new method for powering a whole body protective garment to assure the safety of ground servicing crews. A new technology has been developed through the small business innovative research program at the Kennedy Space Center. Currently, liquid air is used in the environmental control unit (ECU) that powers the propellant handlers suit (PHE). However, liquid air exhibits problems with attitude dependence, oxygen enrichment, and difficulty with reliable quantity measurement. The new technology employs the storage of the supply air as a supercritical gas. This method of air storage overcomes all of three problems above while maintaining high density storage at relatively low vessel pressures (rights reserved.

  3. Performance Characterization of the Free Molecule Micro-Resistojet Utilizing Water Propellant (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, R. H; Bauer, A. M; Killingsworth, M. D; Lilly, T. C; Duncan, J. A; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2007-01-01

    .... The Free Molecule Micro-Resistojet (FMMR), a low cost, low power, high propellant storage density, and green propulsion system, has been analyzed in this study to determine its ability to provide a slew maneuver for a typical 10 kg nanosatellite...

  4. Temperature control of cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, P.A.; Bartlett, A.J.; Peterson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator is described comprising: a refrigerator heat sink; a source of refrigerant gas under pressure; gas expansion means including a reciprocating piston in a cylinder for expanding the refrigerant gas in a gas expansion space within the cylinder to cool the gas and the refrigerator heat sink to cryogenic temperatures; means for selectively diverting refrigerant gas away from the gas expansion means; and a heat exchanger in thermal communication with the refrigerator heat sink for receiving diverted gas and conducting heat from the refrigerant gas into the refrigerator heat sink to warm the heat sink while keeping the diverted gas out of fluid communication with the gas expansion space

  5. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piltch, M.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  6. High Seed Compressor for Propellant Densification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Propellant densification systems particularly for H2 require compression systems developing very large amounts of head. Development of this head requires multiple...

  7. Propeller Test Facilities Â

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: Three electrically driven whirl test stands are used to determine propeller (or other rotating device) performance at various rotational speeds. These...

  8. Microbes Eating Rocket Propellant Hypergols (MERPHs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microbes will be attempted on proprietary green propellants. Evaluation and selection of optimal microbial media will be determined. Alteration of microbial...

  9. Nonsteady Combustion Mechanisms of Advanced Solid Propellants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Branch, Melvyn

    1997-01-01

    .... The individual tasks which we are studying will pursue solid propellant decomposition under unsteady conditions, nonsteady aspects of gas phase flame structure measurements, numerical modeling...

  10. Heat switch technology for cryogenic thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q. S.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review is given of development of novel heat switches at cryogenic temperatures that alternatively provide high thermal connection or ideal thermal isolation to the cold mass. These cryogenic heat switches are widely applied in a variety of unique superconducting systems and critical space applications. The following types of heat switch devices are discussed: 1) magnetic levitation suspension, 2) shape memory alloys, 3) differential thermal expansion, 4) helium or hydrogen gap-gap, 5) superconducting, 6) piezoelectric, 7) cryogenic diode, 8) magneto-resistive, and 9) mechanical demountable connections. Advantages and limitations of different cryogenic heat switches are examined along with the outlook for future thermal management solutions in materials and cryogenic designs.

  11. 75 FR 34390 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems Five-Blade Propeller Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ...-since-new (TSN). This proposed AD results from a report of a crack in a propeller hub. We are proposing... a propeller assembly removed from a Jetstream 41 airplane. The cracked hub has 7,807 hours TSN. The life limit of the hub is 18,000 hours TSN. The crack was found on the rear of the hub, on the propeller...

  12. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  13. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 70 papers in these workshop proceeedings. Topics covered include: superconducting accelerator magnet research and development; superconductor development; electrical measurements; magnet design and construction methods; field correction methods; power schemes and quench protection; cryogenic systems; and magnet measurements

  14. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  15. Operation of large cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.H.; Ferry, B.; Fowler, W.B.; Makara, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.; Walker, R.

    1985-06-01

    This report is based on the past 12 years of experiments on R and D and operation of the 27 kW Fermilab Tevatron Cryogenic System. In general the comments are applicable for all helium plants larger than 1000W (400 l/hr) and non mass-produced nitrogen plants larger than 50 tons per day. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  17. Sources of Cryogenic Data and Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohling, R. A.; Hufferd, W. L.; Marquardt, E. D.

    It is commonly known that cryogenic data, technology, and information are applied across many military, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and civilian product lines. Before 1950, however, there was no centralized US source of cryogenic technology data. The Cryogenic Data Center of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) maintained a database of cryogenic technical documents that served the national need well from the mid 1950s to the early 1980s. The database, maintained on a mainframe computer, was a highly specific bibliography of cryogenic literature and thermophysical properties that covered over 100 years of data. In 1983, however, the Cryogenic Data Center was discontinued when NBS's mission and scope were redefined. In 1998, NASA contracted with the Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (CPIA) and Technology Applications, Inc. (TAI) to reconstitute and update Cryogenic Data Center information and establish a self-sufficient entity to provide technical services for the cryogenic community. The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) provided this service until 2004, when it was discontinued due to a lack of market interest. The CIC technical assets were distributed to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Plans are under way in 2006 for CPIA to launch an e-commerce cryogenic website to offer bibliography data with capability to download cryogenic documents.

  18. On-orbit cryogenic fluid transfer research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W. J.; Chato, D. J.; Moran, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    Cryogenic fluid transfer operations in the low-gravity environment of Earth orbit are necessary for many NASA mission concepts. Fluid transfer brings several benefits to the performance of space missions. Spacecraft already on orbit can be resupplied with cryogenic propellants, coolant fluids and other liquids. Lighter weight spacecraft can be built, since as they are launched dry and supplied on orbit they are not required to support the weight of cryogens during the 3-6 g launch environment. The filling of cryogenic tanks in low gravity poses an operational challenge. Among the difficulties encountered are vapour generation due to the energy stored in the tank walls and the uncertainty of liquid and vapour distributions in a tank in a low-gravity environment. Increased support for technological research in recent years has enabled NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) personnel to make significant advances in the state of the art of cryogenic fluid transfer operations via the no-vent fill method. This paper presents a summary of the results obtained to date in the ongoing programme at LeRC. The LeRC programme has two purposes, emphasizing an extensive ground test programme which is augmented by the development of analytical models for the no-vent fill transfer operation processes. Additionally, planning for the future development of this technology is continuing. This ongoing research effort should, in the near future, permit the design of space systems and spacecraft that benefit from the reusability and weight savings accrued through the use of cryogenic fluid transfer operations in a low-gravity environment.

  19. High burn rate solid composite propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manship, Timothy D.

    High burn rate propellants help maintain high levels of thrust without requiring complex, high surface area grain geometries. Utilizing high burn rate propellants allows for simplified grain geometries that not only make production of the grains easier, but the simplified grains tend to have better mechanical strength, which is important in missiles undergoing high-g accelerations. Additionally, high burn rate propellants allow for a higher volumetric loading which reduces the overall missile's size and weight. The purpose of this study is to present methods of achieving a high burn rate propellant and to develop a composite propellant formulation that burns at 1.5 inches per second at 1000 psia. In this study, several means of achieving a high burn rate propellant were presented. In addition, several candidate approaches were evaluated using the Kepner-Tregoe method with hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based propellants using burn rate modifiers and dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)-based propellants being selected for further evaluation. Propellants with varying levels of nano-aluminum, nano-iron oxide, FeBTA, and overall solids loading were produced using the HTPB binder and evaluated in order to determine the effect the various ingredients have on the burn rate and to find a formulation that provides the burn rate desired. Experiments were conducted to compare the burn rates of propellants using the binders HTPB and DCPD. The DCPD formulation matched that of the baseline HTPB mix. Finally, GAP-plasticized DCPD gumstock dogbones were attempted to be made for mechanical evaluation. Results from the study show that nano-additives have a substantial effect on propellant burn rate with nano-iron oxide having the largest influence. Of the formulations tested, the highest burn rate was a 84% solids loading mix using nano-aluminum nano-iron oxide, and ammonium perchlorate in a 3:1(20 micron: 200 micron) ratio which achieved a burn rate of 1.2 inches per second at 1000

  20. Design and Development of a Methane Cryogenic Propulsion Stage for Human Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Thomas K.; Polsgrove, Tara; Turpin, Jason; Alexander, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    unique aspect to the concept of operations introduces several challenges, specifically related to propellant storage and engine reliability. These challenges and some potential solutions are discussed. Specific focus is provided on two key technology areas; propulsion and cryogenic fluid management. In the area of propulsion development, the development of an integrated methane propulsion system that combines both main propulsion and reaction control is discussed. This includes an overview of potential development paths, areas where development for Mars applications are complementary to development efforts underway in other parts of the aerospace industry, and commonality between the MCPS methane propulsion applications and other Mars elements, including the Mars lander systems. This commonality is a key affordability aspect of the Evolvable Mars Campaign. A similar discussion is provided for cryogenic fluid management technologies including a discussion of how using cryo propulsion in the Mars transportation application not only provides performance benefits but also leverages decades of technology development investments made by NASA and its aerospace contractor community.

  1. SSME propellant path leak detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Roger; Shohadaee, Ahmad Ali; Powers, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of this phase of the investigation is the experimental validation of techniques for detecting and analyzing propellant path external leaks which have a high probability of occurring on the SSME. The selection of candidate detection methods requires a good analytic model for leak plumes which would develop from external leaks and an understanding of radiation transfer through the leak plume. One advanced propellant path leak detection technique is obtained by using state-of-art technology of infrared (IR) thermal imaging systems combined with computer, digital image processing and expert systems for the engine protection. The feasibility of the IR leak plume detection will be evaluated on subscale simulated laboratory plumes to determine sensitivity, signal to noise, and general suitability for the application. The theoretical analysis was undertaken with the objective of developing and testing simple, easy-to-use models to predict the amount of radiation coming from a radiation source, background plate (BP), which can be absorbed, emitted and scattered by the gas leaks.

  2. Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

  3. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  4. KAPPEL Propeller. Development of a Marine Propeller with Non-planar Lifting Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, J.; Andersen, Poul

    2002-01-01

    with higher efficiency and lower levels of noise and vibration excitation compared to conventional propellers designed for the same task. Conventional and KAPPEL propellers have been compared for a medium sized container ship and a product tanker. In total nine of these unconventional and two conventional...... propellers have been designed and models of all propellers have been examined with respect to cavitation and efficiency in the open water and behind conditions. Casting procedures, measurement procedures and stress analysis methods for the unconventional geometry of the KAPPEL propeller have been developed...

  5. Green plasticizers for multibase gun propellants (Lecture)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, C.; Driel, C.A. van; Zebregs, M.

    2007-01-01

    TNO Defence, Security and Safety has a long history of research on gun propellants. Areas investigated are formulating (new ingredients, optimization), manufacturing, charge design and lifetime assessment [1,2,3,4,5]. In conventional propellants inert plasticizers are used to alter performance,

  6. Selected physico-mechanical characteristics of cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, Pradyuman; Mohite, Ashish M.; Singh, Krishna K.; Kumar, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    In this communication, selected physicomechanical characteristics of ground turmeric (cv. Prabha) were investigated for cryogenic and ambient grinding conditions of turmeric at different moisture contents (4, 6, 8 and 10% w.b.). A cryogenic grinder (Model: 100 UPZ, Hosokawa Alpine, Germany) and a micro pulverizer (hammer mill) were used for cryogenic and ambient grinding, respectively. The ground turmeric was graded in three grades viz. Gr-I, Gr-II and Gr-III with a sieve shaker using BSS Nos. 40, 85 and pan, respectively. Tap densities for cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric decreased from 678.7 (Gr-I) to 546.7 kgm-3 (Gr-III) and from 642.3 (Gr-I) to 468.6 kgm-3 (Gr-III), respectively, with the moisture increase. The angle of repose for cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric increased linearly from 26.85 (Gr-I) to 34.0° (Gr-III) and from 23.10 (Gr-I) to 28.06° (Gr-III), respectively with the increase in moisture content. The static coefficient of friction was the highest on plywood surface followed by mild steel sheet and galvanized iron sheet. The cryoground samples were found better in colour. Thermal conductivity of cryo-ground samples was higher than that of ambient ground samples. These physico-mechanical characteristics of cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric will be helpful for packaging, handling, and storage.

  7. Investigating the effects of critical phenomena in premixed methane-oxygen flames at cryogenic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Abishek; Yellapantula, Shashank; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Methane is increasingly becoming viable as a rocket fuel in the latest generation of launch vehicles. In liquid rocket engines, fuel and oxidizer are injected under cryogenic conditions into the combustion chamber. At high pressures, typical of rocket combustion chambers, the propellants exist in supercritical states where the ideal gas thermodynamics are no longer valid. We investigate the effects of real-gas thermodynamics on transcritical laminar premixed methane-oxygen flames. The effect of the real-gas cubic equations of state and high-pressure transport properties on flame dynamics is presented. We also study real-gas effects on the extinction limits of the methane-oxygen flame.

  8. Evaluation of on-board hydrogen storage methods for hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyurtlu, Ates; Akyurtlu, J. F.; Adeyiga, A. A.; Perdue, Samara; Northam, G. B.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen is the foremost candidate as a fuel for use in high speed transport. Since any aircraft moving at hypersonic speeds must have a very slender body, means of decreasing the storage volume requirements below that for liquid hydrogen are needed. The total performance of the hypersonic plane needs to be considered for the evaluation of candidate fuel and storage systems. To accomplish this, a simple model for the performance of a hypersonic plane is presented. To allow for the use of different engines and fuels during different phases of flight, the total trajectory is divided into three phases: subsonic-supersonic, hypersonic and rocket propulsion phase. The fuel fraction for the first phase is found be a simple energy balance using an average thrust to drag ratio for this phase. The hypersonic flight phase is investigated in more detail by taking small altitude increments. This approach allowed the use of flight profiles other than the constant dynamic pressure flight. The effect of fuel volume on drag, structural mass and tankage mass was introduced through simplified equations involving the characteristic dimension of the plane. The propellant requirement for the last phase is found by employing the basic rocket equations. The candidate fuel systems such as the cryogenic fuel combinations and solid and liquid endothermic hydrogen generators are first screened thermodynamically with respect to their energy densities and cooling capacities and then evaluated using the above model.

  9. Efficient biostorage below –150 °C, without sacrificial cryogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoor, Philip S.

    2017-12-01

    Biostorage is a multi-billion dollar business worldwide and growing rapidly; yet the commercially available options force the user to choose either optimal storage temperature (below ‑137 °C, the “glass transition temperature” of water) or convenience (no cryogen refill). Passive liquid-nitrogen freezers (storage Dewars with liquid nitrogen pooled at the bottom) provide very cold storage (‑190 °C) but the LN2 must be replenished as it boils off. The alternative, so-called “ultra-low” vapor-compression freezers, have no cryogens to replenish and are convenient to use, but only reach storage temperatures above ‑90 °C. In addition, these tend to be inefficient and costly. Chart Industries is introducing a novel combination of a storage Dewar with a cryocooler (the “Fusion” freezer), that can maintain storage temperatures below ‑150 °C without the need to replenish any cryogen, while drawing less electricity than any ultra-low on the market. This new product also fits into a relatively narrow “demand window” where on-site cryocooling is not merely more convenient, but also more costeffective than liquid nitrogen delivery.

  10. Modelling and Designing Cryogenic Hydrogen Tanks for Future Aircraft Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Winnefeld

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the near future, the challenges to reduce the economic and social dependency on fossil fuels must be faced increasingly. A sustainable and efficient energy supply based on renewable energies enables large-scale applications of electro-fuels for, e.g., the transport sector. The high gravimetric energy density makes liquefied hydrogen a reasonable candidate for energy storage in a light-weight application, such as aviation. Current aircraft structures are designed to accommodate jet fuel and gas turbines allowing a limited retrofitting only. New designs, such as the blended-wing-body, enable a more flexible integration of new storage technologies and energy converters, e.g., cryogenic hydrogen tanks and fuel cells. Against this background, a tank-design model is formulated, which considers geometrical, mechanical and thermal aspects, as well as specific mission profiles while considering a power supply by a fuel cell. This design approach enables the determination of required tank mass and storage density, respectively. A new evaluation value is defined including the vented hydrogen mass throughout the flight enabling more transparent insights on mass shares. Subsequently, a systematic approach in tank partitioning leads to associated compromises regarding the tank weight. The analysis shows that cryogenic hydrogen tanks are highly competitive with kerosene tanks in terms of overall mass, which is further improved by the use of a fuel cell.

  11. Vibration Considerations for Cryogenic Tanks Using Glass Bubbles Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Fesmire, James E.; Sass, Jared P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of glass bubbles as an efficient and practical thermal insulation system has been previously demonstrated in cryogenic storage tanks. One such example is a spherical, vacuum-jacketed liquid hydrogen vessel of 218,000 liter capacity where the boiloff rate has been reduced by approximately 50 percent. Further applications may include non-stationary tanks such as mobile tankers and tanks with extreme duty cycles or exposed to significant vibration environments. Space rocket launch events and mobile tanker life cycles represent two harsh cases of mechanical vibration exposure. A number of bulk fill insulation materials including glass bubbles, perlite powders, and aerogel granules were tested for vibration effects and mechanical behavior using a custom design holding fixture subjected to random vibration on an Electrodynamic Shaker. The settling effects for mixtures of insulation materials were also investigated. The vibration test results and granular particle analysis are presented with considerations and implications for future cryogenic tank applications. A thermal performance update on field demonstration testing of a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank, retrofitted with glass bubbles, is presented. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, aerogel, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank, mobile tanker, vibration.

  12. Structure of Partially Premixed Flames and Advanced Solid Propellants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Branch, Melvyn

    1998-01-01

    The combustion of solid rocket propellants of advanced energetic materials involves a complex process of decomposition and condensed phase reactions in the solid propellant, gaseous flame reactions...

  13. A Study of Flame Physics and Solid Propellant Rocket Physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buckmaster, John

    2007-01-01

    ..., the combustion of heterogeneous propellants containing aluminum, the use of a genetic algorithm to optimally define false-kinetics parameters in propellant combustion modeling, the calculation of fluctuations...

  14. Propelling medical humanities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    Advances in the study of the medical humanities and medical humanities education have been made over the past few decades. Many influential journals have published articles examining the role of medical humanities and medical humanities education, the development and evaluation of medical humanities, and the design of a curriculum for medical humanities education in Western countries. However, most articles related to medical humanities in China were published in Chinese, moreover, researchers have worked in relative isolation and published in disparate journals, so their work has not been systematically presented to and evaluated by international readers. The six companion articles featured in this issue describe the current status and challenge of medical humanities and medical humanities education in China in the hope of providing international readers with a novel and meaningful glimpse into medical humanities in China. This Journal is calling for greater publication of research on medical humanities and medical humanities education to propel medical humanities in China.

  15. New Delivery Systems and Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Dolovich

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC propellants from industrial and household products has been agreed to by over 165 countires of which more than 135 are developing countries. The timetable for this process is outlined in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer document and in several subsequent amendments. Pressured metered dose inhalers (pMDIs for medical use have been granted temporary exemptions until replacement formulations, providing the same medication via the same route, and with the same efficacy and safety profiles, are approved for human use. Hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs are the alternative propellants for CFCs-12 and -114. Their potential for damage to the ozone layer is nonexistent, and while they are greenhouse gases, their global warming potential is a fraction (one-tenth of that of CFCs. Replacement formulations for almost all inhalant respiratory medications have been or are being produced and tested; in Canada, it is anticipated that the transition to these HFA or CFC-free pMDIs will be complete by the year 2005. Initially, an HFA pMDI was to be equivalent to the CFC pMDI being replaced, in terms of aerosol properties and effective clinical dose. However, this will not necessarily be the situation, particularly for some corticosteroid products. Currently, only one CFC-free formulation is available in Canada – Airomir, a HFA salbutamol pMDI. This paper discusses the in vitro aerosol characteristics, in vivo deposition and clinical data for several HFA pMDIs for which there are data available in the literature. Alternative delivery systems to the pMDI, namely, dry powder inhalers and nebulizers, are briefly reviewed.

  16. Development of cryogenic components for the ALPHATRAP experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkalj Oreskovic, Marko; Weigel, Andreas; Roux, Christian; Wolf, Robert; Sturm, Sven; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, a Penning trap experiment for the determination of the g-factor of the bound electron in heavy highly-charged ions is under construction. ALPHATRAP will be connected to an EBIT via a room temperature beam-line. Since trapping of highly-charged ions requires extremely good vacuum, in excess of 10-15 mbar, the external flow of the background gas from the room-temperature beam-line has to be reduced significantly. Therefore, a cryogenic vacuum valve was developed, which enables adequate storage times. The valve can reduce the rest-gas pressure by a factor of at least 400, is manually actuated, and operates at cryogenic temperatures as well as in strong magnetic fields. Furthermore, for the image-current detection electronics a cryogenic electromechanical switch and a variable capacitor are developed. Advantages compared to solid state devices are negligible leakage currents for the switch being in open position and negligible dielectric losses. The switch is designed as a single pole single throw switch and has a residual resistance of only 11 mOhm. The designs and first test results of the devices will be presented.

  17. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-01-01

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m 3 storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  18. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  19. Cryogenic moderator simulations: confronting reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities

  20. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role that energy storage may have on the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of energy storage, thermal energy storage including sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, thermochemical heat storage, and seasonal heat storage, electricity storage including batteries, pumped hydroelectric storage, compressed air energy storage, and superconducting magnetic energy storage, and production and combustion of hydrogen as an energy storage option

  1. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  2. Energy coefficients for a propeller series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Smærup

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency for a propeller is calculated by energy coefficients. These coefficients are related to four types of losses, i.e. the axial, the rotational, the frictional, and the finite blade number loss, and one gain, i.e. the axial gain. The energy coefficients are derived by use...... of the potential theory with the propeller modelled as an actuator disk. The efficiency based on the energy coefficients is calculated for a propeller series. The results show a good agreement between the efficiency based on the energy coefficients and the efficiency obtained by a vortex-lattice method....

  3. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  4. Cryogenic MEMS Technology for Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of cryogenic microwave components, such as focal plane polarization modulators, first requires an RF MEMS switching technology that operates...

  5. Advanced Design and Manufacture of Cryogenic Propellant Tanks for Air Launched Liquid Rockets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Generation Orbit (GO) is developing a sub-orbital system to enable rapid and inexpensive hypersonic flight regime test capabilities. To keep the cost of their launch...

  6. A Reliable, Efficient Cryogenic Propellant Mixing Pump With No Moving Parts, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Refueling spacecraft in space offers tremendous benefits for increased spacecraft payload capacity and reduced launch cost. A key technology challenge for space...

  7. Fiber Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Incorporated proposes to develop a patent-pending fiber optic continuous liquid sensor for low-thrust level settled mass gauging with measurement...

  8. A Reliable, Efficient Cryogenic Propellant Mixing Pump With No Moving Parts, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Refueling spacecraft in space offers tremendous benefits for increased spacecraft payload capacity and reduced launch cost. However, there are several key challenges...

  9. Lightweight, High-Flow, Low Connection-Force, In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Coupling, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Three of the key abilities needed for making future NASA and commercial launch and in-space transportation systems more affordable and capable are: a) the ability to...

  10. Kinetics, Energetics and Infrared Lasing in High Energy Rocket Propellant Ingredients at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    group has achieved. The MINDO program determines the energy of a species, and thus its heat of formation, oy optimizing its geometry such as to...and H.A. McGee, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 53, 782 (1970). 19. C.T. Kwon and H.A. McGee, Jr., Inorg. Chem. 9, 2458 (1970). 20. C.T. Kwon , H.A. McGee, Jr

  11. Lightweight, High-Flow, Low Connection-Force, In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Coupling, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Three of the key abilities needed for making future NASA and commercial in-space transportation systems more affordable and capable are: a) the ability to 'live off...

  12. Implementation of Prognostic Methodologies to Cryogenic Propellant Loading Test-bed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics methodologies determine the health state of a system and predict the end of life and remaining useful life. This information enables operators to take...

  13. Parahydrogen-Orthohydrogen Catalytic Conversion for Cryogenic Propellant Passive Heat Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hydrogen Properties for Energy Research (HYPER) laboratory at Washington State University (WSU) recently demonstrated a Cryocatalysis Hydrogen Experiment...

  14. A Testbed for Implementing Prognostic Methodologies on Cryogenic Propellant Loading Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics technologies determine the health state of a system and predict its remaining useful life. With this information, operators are able to make...

  15. Nano Icy Moons Propellant Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWoerkom, Michael (Principal Investigator)

    2017-01-01

    As one of just a few bodies identified in the solar system with a liquid ocean, Europa has become a top priority in the search for life outside of Earth. However, cost estimates for exploring Europa have been prohibitively expensive, with estimates of a NASA Flagship class orbiter and lander approaching $5 billion. ExoTerra's NIMPH offers an affordable solution that can not only land, but return a sample from the surface to Earth. NIMPH combines solar electric propulsion (SEP) technologies being developed for the asteroid redirect mission and microsatellite electronics to reduce the cost of a full sample return mission below $500 million. A key to achieving this order-of-magnitude cost reduction is minimizing the initial mass of the system. The cost of any mission is directly proportional to its mass. By keeping the mission within the constraints of an Atlas V 551 launch vehicle versus an SLS, we can significantly reduce launch costs. To achieve this we reduce the landed mass of the sample return lander, which is the largest multiplier of mission mass, and shrink propellant mass through high efficiency SEP and gravity assists. The NIMPH projects first step in reducing landed mass focuses on development of a micro-In Situ Resource Utilization (micro-ISRU) system. ISRU allows us to minimize landed mass of a sample return mission by converting local ice into propellants. The project reduces the ISRU system to a CubeSat-scale package that weighs just 1.74 kg and consumes just 242 W of power. We estimate that use of this ISRU vs. an identical micro-lander without ISRU reduces fuel mass by 45 kg. As the dry mass of the lander grows for larger missions, these savings scale exponentially. Taking full advantage of the micro-ISRU system requires the development of a micro-liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine. The micro-liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine is tailored for the mission by scaling it to match the scale of the micro-lander and the low gravity of the target moon

  16. 14 CFR 35.23 - Propeller control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... propeller effect under the intended operating conditions. (4) The failure or corruption of data or signals... corruption of airplane-supplied data does not result in hazardous propeller effects. (e) The propeller... effect. (2) Failures or malfunctions directly affecting the propeller control system in a typical...

  17. Aerogel Insulation to Support Cryogenic Technologies, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking a high performance thermal insulation material for cryogenic applications in space launch development. Many of the components in cryogenic...

  18. Mars Propellant Production with Ionic Liquids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop a single vessel for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and electrolysis for in situ Mars propellant production by eliminating several steps...

  19. Propellant-powered actuator for gas generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrazine operated monopropellant generators are used for spacecraft rocket engines and propellant pressurization systems. Measured work output of monopropellant actuators compares favorably with output of squib-type actuators.

  20. In-Space Manufacture of Storable Propellants

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many deep-space, missions, especially those that return material or crews to near-Earth space, are severely limited by the need to carry propellants and heat shields...

  1. Mechanism of Combustion of Heterogeneous Solid Propellants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, E

    1998-01-01

    ... (and compare results with those of AP oxidizer and Ap/hydrocarbon binder propellants). 4. Develop a realistic qualitative model of the combustion process that would identify the requirements for formulation of realistic analytical models.

  2. High Speed Compressor for Subcooling Propellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The most promising propellant subcooling systems for LH2 require compression systems that involve development of significant head. The inlet pressure for these...

  3. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  4. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  5. High Speed Compressor for Subcooling Propellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Propellant densification systems for LH2 require compression systems that develop significant head. In the past this has required multiple stages of compressors...

  6. Development and implementation of a propeller test capability for GL-10 "Greased Lightning" propeller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Brian Edward

    Interest in small unmanned aerial vehicles has increased dramatically in recent years. Hybrid vehicles which allow forward flight as a fixed wing aircraft and a true vertical landing capability have always had applications. Management of the available energy and noise associated with electric propeller propulsion systems presents many challenges. NASA Langley has developed the Greased Lightning 10 (GL-10) vertical takeoff, unmanned aerial vehicle with ten individual motors and propellers. All are used for propulsion during takeoff and contribute to acoustic noise pollution which is an identified nuisance to the surrounding users. A propeller test capability was developed to gain an understanding of how the noise can be reduced while meeting minimum thrust requirements. The designed propeller test stand allowed for various commercially available propellers to be tested for potential direct replacement of the current GL-10 propellers and also supported testing of a newly designed propeller provided by the Georgia Institute of Technology. Results from the test program provided insight as to which factors affect the noise as well as performance characteristics. The outcome of the research effort showed that the current GL-10 propeller still represents the best choice of all the candidate propellers tested.

  7. Optical superheat of a surface as applied to investigation of the onset of boiling of cryogenic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopytov, G.F.; Novikov, B.V.; Shklyaev, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    The cryogenic liquid boiling onset indication is of interest in special cryotechnique applications, in particular, in preventive treatment of energency situation in the tanks for cryogenic liquid storage. Acoustic indication of the liquid boiling onset in case of its application for cryogenic liquids, which is widely used during the last decades, encounters technical difficulties related to the minor value of an acoustic signal, generated by the detectors used, low information content of high-frequency part of an acoustic spectrum due to signal blocking by gas bubbles just at the beginning of boiling etc. On the other hand, there is an opinion concerning the impossibility of using thermocouples under liquid boiling. A one-thermocouple method of cryogenic liquid boiling onset indication is proposed, assuming that local variations of the surface superheat temperature at the beginning of boiling, inevitable under boiling, make up a negligeable share of the mean superheat value

  8. Small scale motor tests of ADN/GAP based propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Gettwert, Volker; Fischer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Different ADN/GAP based propellants were evaluated as a potential replacement of the smoky AP based composite propellant and low signature double base propellants. The paper focuses on burning tests of propellants in a combustion chamber. The experimental results of an ADN/GAP, ADN/FOX12/GAP and Al/ADN/GAP propellant were compared with a standard Al/AP/HTPB propellant. In all cases the obtained experimental gravimetric specific impulse of the ADN/GAP based propellants were higher compared to ...

  9. Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Sven; Claesson, Ingvar

    2001-01-01

    A noisy environment dominated by low frequency noise can often be improved through the use of active noise control. This situation arises naturally in propeller aircraft where the propellers induce periodic low frequency noise inside the cabin. The cabin noise is typically rather high, and the passenger flight comfort could be improved considerably if this level were significantly reduced. This paper addresses same design aspects for multiple-reference active noise control systems based on th...

  10. Viscoelastic properties of hydroxyl-terminated poly(butadiene based composite rocket propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzić Saša J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the viscoelastic response of three composite solid propellants based on hydroxyl-terminated poly(butadiene, ammonium perchlorate and aluminum has been investigated. The investigation was surveyed by dynamic mechanical analysis over a wide range of temperatures and frequencies. The mechanical properties of these materials are related to the macromolecular structure of the binder as well as to the content and nature of solid fillers. The storage modulus, loss modulus, loss factor and glass transition temperature for each propellant sample have been evaluated. The master curves of storage (log G' vs log ω and loss modulus (log G'' vs log ω were generated for each propellant. A comparison of logaT vs temperature curves for all propellants indicate conformance to Williams-Landel-Ferry equation. Choosing the glass transition as the reference temperature, WLF equation constants are determined. Fractional free volume at the glass transition temperature and thermal coefficient of free volume expansion values are in accordance with the consideration that Al is reinforcing filler.

  11. Slosh Baffle Design and Test for Spherical Liquid Oxygen and Liquid Methane Propellant Tank for a Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahan, Alan; Hernandez, Humberto

    2011-01-01

    A Vertical Test Bed (VTB) is being developed to investigate exploration technologies with earth-based landing trajectories. During this activity, a concern emerged that the VTB, with large liquid tanks, could experience unstable slosh interaction between the propellant fluid motion and the control system, leading to an investigation of slosh characteristics of the VTB. As such, slosh modeling, analysis and testing were performed, that both verified models and lead to the conclusion that baffles would be required for the full-scale vehicle. Follow-on design and testing supported development of these baffles and measurement of their performance. The majority of the tests conducted, including both subscale and full, involved the use of clear tanks containing water as a reasonable substitute for the cryogenic propellants, though a few tests involved the actual liquid oxygen and methane. Along the way, some unique test and data recording methods were employed to reduce testing complexity and cost.

  12. Water Contaminant Mitigation in Ionic Liquid Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, David; Ziemer, John

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate system and operational requirements are needed in order to ensure mission success without unnecessary cost. Purity requirements applied to thruster propellants may flow down to materials and operations as well as the propellant preparation itself. Colloid electrospray thrusters function by applying a large potential to a room temperature liquid propellant (such as an ionic liquid), inducing formation of a Taylor cone. Ions and droplets are ejected from the Taylor cone and accelerated through a strong electric field. Electrospray thrusters are highly efficient, precise, scaleable, and demonstrate low thrust noise. Ionic liquid propellants have excellent properties for use as electrospray propellants, but can be hampered by impurities, owing to their solvent capabilities. Of foremost concern is the water content, which can result from exposure to atmosphere. Even hydrophobic ionic liquids have been shown to absorb water from the air. In order to mitigate the risks of bubble formation in feed systems caused by water content of the ionic liquid propellant, physical properties of the ionic liquid EMI-Im are analyzed. The effects of surface tension, material wetting, physisorption, and geometric details of the flow manifold and electrospray emitters are explored. Results are compared to laboratory test data.

  13. HMX based enhanced energy LOVA gun propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghavi, R R; Kamale, P J; Shaikh, M A R; Shelar, S D; Kumar, K Sunil; Singh, Amarjit

    2007-05-08

    Efforts to develop gun propellants with low vulnerability have recently been focused on enhancing the energy with a further improvement in its sensitivity characteristics. These propellants not only prevent catastrophic disasters due to unplanned initiation of currently used gun propellants (based on nitrate esters) but also realize enhanced energy levels to increase the muzzle velocity of the projectiles. Now, in order to replace nitroglycerine, which is highly sensitive to friction and impact, nitramines meet the requirements as they offer superior energy due to positive heat of formation, typical stoichiometry with higher decomposition temperatures and also owing to negative oxygen balance are less sensitive than stoichiometrically balanced NG. RDX has been widely reported for use in LOVA propellant. In this paper we have made an effort to present the work on scantily reported nitramine HMX based LOVA gun propellant while incorporating energetic plasticizer glycidyl azide polymer to enhance the energy level. HMX is known to be thermally stable at higher temperature than RDX and also proved to be less vulnerable to small scale shaped charge jet attack as its decomposition temperature is 270 degrees C. HMX also offers improved impulse due to its superior heat of formation (+17 kcal/mol) as compared to RDX (+14 kcal/mol). It has also been reported that a break point will not appear until 35,000 psi for propellant comprising of 5 microm HMX. Since no work has been reported in open literature regarding replacement of RDX by HMX, the present studies were carried out.

  14. Designing Small Propellers for Optimum Efficiency and Low Noise Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-26

    successful model, it is recommended that the structure is sufficient to alleviate any torsion or bending of the propeller blade, a rapid prototype...investigate propeller design based on combined blade and momentum theory. It allows the design and analysis of propellers both on and off the design...performance of propeller-motor combinations . QMIL is a companion propeller design program. The aerodynamic models used in QPROP account for induced

  15. Thermal Expansion of Three Closed Cell Polymeric Foams at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) contains the liquid H2 fuel and liquid oxygen oxidizer and supplies them under pressure to the three space shuttle main engines (SSME) in the orbiter during lift-off and ascent. The ET thermal protection system consists of sprayed-on foam insulation and pre-molded ablator materials. The closed-cell foams are the external coating on the ET and are responsible for minimizing the amount of moisture that condenses out and freezes on the tank from the humid air in Florida while it is on the pad with cryogenic propellant awaiting launch. This effort was part of the overall drive to understand the behavior of these materials under use-conditions. There are four specially-engineered closed-cell foams used on the tank. The thermal expansion (contraction) of three of the polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams were measured from -423 F (the temperature of liquid hydrogen) to 125 F under atmospheric conditions and under vacuum. One of them, NCFI 24-124, is a mechanically-applied material and covers the main acreage of the tank, accounting for 77 percent of the total foam used. Another, BX-265, is also a mechanically-applied and hand-sprayed material used on the tank's "closeout" areas. PDL 1034 is a hand-poured foam used for filling odd-shaped cavities in the tank, Measurements were made in triplicate in the three primary material directions in the case of the first two materials and the two primary material directions in the case of the last. Task 1 was developing the techniques for getting a uniform heating rate and minimizing axial and radial thermal gradients in the specimens. Temperature measurements were made at four locations in the specimens during this initial development phase of testing. Major challenges that were overcome include developing techniques for transferring the coolant, liquid helium (-452 F), from its storage container to the test facility with a minimal transfer of heat to the coolant and control of the heating

  16. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  17. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal Shell State of the Cylindrical Cryogenic Tank During Filling and Emptying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid hydrogen and oxygen are used as the oxidizer and fuel for liquid rocket engines. Liquefied natural gas, which is based on methane, is seen as a promising motor fuel for internal combustion engines. One of the technical problems arising from the use of said cryogenic liquid is to provide containers for storage, transport and use in the propulsion system. In the design and operation of such vessels it is necessary to have reliable information about their temperature condition, on which depend the loss of cryogenic fluids due to evaporation and the stress-strain state of the structural elements of the containers.Uneven temperature distribution along the generatrix of the cylindrical thin-walled shell of rocket cryogenic tanks, in a localized zone of cryogenic liquid level leads to a curvature of the shell and reduce the permissible axle load in a hazard shell buckling in the preparation for the start of the missile in flight with an increasing acceleration. Moving the level of the cryogenic liquid during filling or emptying the tank at a certain combination of parameters results in an increase of the local temperature distribution nonuniformity.Along with experimental study of the shell temperature state of the cryogenic container, methods of mathematical modeling allow to have information needed for designing and testing the construction of cryogenic tanks. In this study a mathematical model is built taking into account features of heat transfer in a cryogenic container, including the boiling cryogenic liquid in the inner surface of the container. This mathematical model describes the temperature state of the thin-walled shell of cylindrical cryogenic tank during filling and emptying. The work also presents a quantitative analysis of this model in case of fixed liquid level, its movement at a constant speed, and harmonic oscillations relative to a middle position. The quantitative analysis of this model has allowed to find the limit options

  19. Self-Sealing Cryogenic Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lin Xiang; Chow, Wen Lung; Moslemian, Davood; Lin, Gary; Melton, Greg

    1994-01-01

    Self-sealing fitting for cryogenic tubes remains free of leakage from room temperature to liquid-helium temperature even at internal pressure as high as 2.7 MPa. Fitting comprises parts made of materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion to prevent leakage gaps from forming as temperature decreases. Consists of coupling nut, two flared tube ends, and flared O-ring spacer. Spacer contracts more than tube ends do as temperature decreases. This greater contraction seals tube ends more tightly, preventing leakage.

  20. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...... operated at 77 K is designed and implemented for C imaging at 3 T (32.13 MHz), using off-the-shelves components. The design is based on a high electron mobility transistor (ATF54143) in a common source configuration. Required auxiliary circuitry for optimal cryogenic preamplifier performance is also...... presented consisting of a voltage regulator (noise free supply voltage and optimal power consumption), switch, and trigger (for active detuning during transmission to protect the preamplifier). A gain of 18 dB with a noise temperature of 13.7 K is achieved. Performing imaging experiments in a 3 T scanner...

  1. Cryogenic system of steady state superconducting Tokamak SST-1: Operational experience and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, B. [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India)]. E-mail: sarkar@ipr.res.in; Tank, Jignesh [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Panchal, Pradip [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Sahu, A.K. [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Bhattacharya, Ritendra [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Phadke, Gaurang [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Gupta, N.C. [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Gupta, Girish [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Shah, Nitin [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Shukla, Pawan [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Singh, Manoj [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Sonara, Dasarath [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Sharma, Rajiv [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Saradha, S. [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Patel, J.C. [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India); Saxena, Y.C. [Institue For Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar382 428 (India)

    2006-11-15

    The cryogenic system of SST-1 consists of the helium cryogenic system and the nitrogen cryogenic system. The main components of the helium cryogenic system are (a) 1.3 kW helium refrigerator/liquefier (HRL) and (b) warm gas management system (WGM), where as, the nitrogen cryogenic system called as liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) management system consists of storage tanks and a distribution system. The helium flow distribution and control to different sub-systems is achieved by the integrated flow distribution and control (IFDC) system. The HRL has been commissioned and operated for performing a single toroidal field coil test as well as for the first commissioning of SST-1 superconducting-magnets up to 68 K. Analysis of the results shows that the compressor and turbine parameters of the HRL, namely, the speed and pressure are very stable during operation of the HRL, confirming to the reliability in control of thermo-dynamic parameters of the system. The thermal shield of the SST-1 cryostat consists of ten different types of panels, which have been cooled down to the minimum temperature of 80 K and maintained during the first commissioning of SST-1. The operation and controls of the LN2 management system have been found to be as per the design consideration.

  2. Conceptual overview and preliminary risk assessment of cryogen use in deep underground mine production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivret, J.; Millar, D. L.; Lyle, G.

    2017-12-01

    This research conducts a formal risk assessment for cryogenic fueled equipment in underground environments. These include fans, load haul dump units, and trucks. The motivating advantage is zero-emissions production in the subsurface and simultaneous provision of cooling for ultra deep mine workings. The driving force of the engine is the expansion of the reboiled cryogen following flash evaporation using ambient temperature heat. The cold exhaust mixes with warm mine air and cools the latter further. The use of cryogens as ‘fuel’ leads to much increased fuel transport volumes and motivates special considerations for distribution infrastructure and process including: cryogenic storage, distribution, handling, and transfer systems. Detailed specification of parts and equipment, numerical modelling and preparation of design drawings are used to articulate the concept. The conceptual design process reveals new hazards and risks that the mining industry has not yet encountered, which may yet stymie execution. The major unwanted events include the potential for asphyxiation due to oxygen deficient atmospheres, or physical damage to workers due to exposure to sub-cooled liquids and cryogenic gases. The Global Minerals Industry Risk Management (GMIRM) framework incorporates WRAC and Bow-Tie techniques and is used to identify, assess and mitigate risks. These processes operate upon the competing conceptual designs to identify and eliminate high risk options and improve the safety of the lower risk designs.

  3. Commonality Study of the Pressure-Volume-Temperature Based Propellant Gaging Software Modules for the Auxiliary Power Unit, Reaction Control System, and Orbital Maneuvering System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhon, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    Computer storage requirements can be reduced if areas of commonality exist in two or more programs placed in the same computer and identical code can be used by more than one program. The pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) relationship for the propellant tank pressurant agent is utilized as the basis for either a primary of a backup propellant gaging program for the auxiliary power unit (APU), the reaction control system (RCS), and the orbital maneuvering system (OMS). These three propellant gaging programs were investigated. It was revealed that a very limited degree of software commonality exits among them. An examination of this common software indicated that only the computation of the helium compressibility factor in an external function subprogram accessible to both the RCS and OMS propellant gaging programs appears to offer a savings in computer storage requirements.

  4. Propeller and inflow vortex interaction : vortex response and impact on the propeller performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Zhou, T; Sciacchitano, A.; Veldhuis, L.L.M.; Eitelberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic operating conditions of a propeller can include complex situations where vorticity from sources upstream can enter the propeller plane. In general, when the vorticity enters in a concentrated form of a vortex, the interaction between the vortex and blade is referred to as

  5. 75 FR 51656 - Airworthiness Directives; Dowty Propellers R408/6-123-F/17 Model Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... between a propeller de-ice bus bar and the backplate assembly can cause failure of the bus bar and a consequent intermittent short circuit. Such a short circuit can cause a dual AC generator shutdown that... a propeller de-ice bus bar and the backplate assembly can cause failure of the bus bar and a...

  6. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  7. Zero Boil Off System for Cryogen Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to develop a zero boil off (ZBO) dewar using a two-stage pulse-tube cooler together with two innovative, continuous-flow cooling loops and an...

  8. Cryogenic thermal storage system for discontinuous industrial vacuum processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scaringella M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials are proposed for refrigerating systems in discontinuous industrial vacuum processes where temperatures as low as −140 ÷ −100°C are necessary within time-frames representing 10÷20% of total operating time. An application is proposed for cooling systems used in a Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD apparatus. A prototype has been manufactured which couples a cryopump with a reservoir filled with MethylCycloPentane (MCP-C6H12 and a distribution line where nitrogen in the gaseous state is flowing. Preliminary tests show that temperatures of about −120°C are actually achieved within time windows compatible with PVD applications.

  9. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of a Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and correlation of a thermal model that forms the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius of the thermal vacuum test data, and was determined sufficient to make future propellant predictions on MMS. The model was also found to be relatively sensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed to improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank where predictions were found to be 2 to 2.5 C lower than the test data. A road map for applying the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  10. Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  11. Throttling Cryogen Boiloff To Control Cryostat Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    An improved design has been proposed for a cryostat of a type that maintains a desired low temperature mainly through boiloff of a liquid cryogen (e.g., liquid nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure. (A cryostat that maintains a low temperature mainly through boiloff of a cryogen at atmospheric pressure is said to be of the pour/fill Dewar-flask type because its main component is a Dewar flask, the top of which is kept open to the atmosphere so that the liquid cryogen can boil at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic liquid can be added by simply pouring it in.) The major distinguishing feature of the proposed design is control of temperature and cooling rate through control of the flow of cryogen vapor from a heat exchanger. At a cost of a modest increase in complexity, a cryostat according to the proposal would retain most of the compactness of prior, simpler pour/fill Dewar-flask cryostats, but would utilize cryogen more efficiently (intervals between cryogen refills could be longer).

  12. Development of a Marine Propeller With Nonplanar Lifting Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul; Friesch, Jürgen; Kappel, Jens J.

    2005-01-01

    with higher efficiency and lower levels of noise and vibration excitation compared to conventional state-of-the-art propellers designed for the same task. Conventional and KAPPEL propellers have been compared for a medium-sized containership and a product tanker. In total, nine KAPPEL propellers and two...... conventional propellers have been designed, and models of all propellers have been examined with respect to cavitation and efficiency in the open-water and behind conditions. Casting procedures, measurement procedures, and stress analysis methods for the unconventional geometry of the KAPPEL propeller have...

  13. Summary of ISABELLE cryogenic systems workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.P.

    1976-05-01

    Twenty-four people participated in the ISABELLE Cryogenic System Workshop which was held on June 2 and 3, 1976. The magnet cooling system for ISABELLE, as described in the new proposal, utilizes supercritical helium as the refrigerant instead of pool-boiling helium as in earlier proposals. This new and more cost-effective system was described in detail with discussion of the design parameters for the refrigerator itself, turbomachinery required and the refrigerant distribution system. The testing and prototype development program for ISABELLE cryogenic system components was also reviewed. A small cryogenic turbocompressor/expander system is now on order for testing with an ISABELLE half-cell

  14. Electrostatic Discharge testing of propellants and primers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the results of testing of selected propellants and primers to Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) characteristic of the human body. It describes the tests and the fixturing built to accommodate loose material (propellants) and the packed energetic material of the primer. The results indicate that all powders passed and some primers, especially the electric primers, failed to pass established requirements which delineate insensitive energetic components. This report details the testing of components and materials to four ESD environments (Standard ESD, Severe ESD, Modified Standard ESD, and Modified Severe ESD). The purpose of this study was to collect data based on the customer requirements as defined in the Sandia Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) Manual, Chapter 9, and to define static sensitive and insensitive propellants and primers.

  15. Elliptical field-of-view PROPELLER imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Ajit; Pipe, James G

    2009-09-01

    Traditionally two-dimensional scans are designed to support an isotropic field-of-view (iFOV). When imaging elongated objects, significant savings in scan time can potentially be achieved by supporting an elliptical field-of-view (eFOV). This work presents an empirical closed-form solution to adapt the PROPELLER trajectory for an eFOV. The proposed solution is built on the geometry of the PROPELLER trajectory permitting the scan prescription and data reconstruction to remain largely similar to standard PROPELLER. The achieved FOV is experimentally validated by the point spread function (PSF) of a phantom scan. The details of potential savings in scan time and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance in comparison to iFOV scans for both phantom and in-vivo images are also described.

  16. Progress of cryogenic pulsating heat pipes at UW-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Fonseca, Luis; Mok, Mason; Pfotenhauer, John; Miller, Franklin

    2017-12-01

    Space agencies continuously require innovative cooling systems that are lightweight, low powered, physically flexible, easily manufactured and, most importantly, exhibit high heat transfer rates. Therefore, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are being investigated to provide these requirements. This paper summarizes the current development of cryogenic Pulsating Heat Pipes with single and multiple evaporator sections built and successfully tested at UW-Madison. Recently, a helium based Pulsating Heat Pipe with three evaporator and three condenser sections has been operated at fill ratios between 20 % and 80 % operating temperature range of 2.9 K to 5.19 K, resulting in a maximum effective thermal conductivity up to 50,000 W/m-K. In addition, a nitrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe has been built with three evaporator sections and one condenser section. This PHP achieved a thermal performance between 32,000 W/m-K and 96,000 W/m-K at fill ratio ranging from 50 % to 80 %. Split evaporator sections are very important in order to spread cooling throughout an object of interest with an irregular temperature distribution or where multiple cooling locations are required. Hence this type of configurations is a proof of concept which hasn’t been attempted before and if matured could be applied to cryo-propellant tanks, superconducting magnets and photon detectors.

  17. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  18. Cryogenic Milling of Titanium Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kozlík

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti Grade 2 was prepared by cryogenic attritor milling in liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. Two types of milling balls were used—stainless steel balls and heavy tungsten carbide balls. The effect of processing parameters on particle size and morphology, contamination of powder and its microhardness was investigated. Milling in liquid nitrogen was not feasible due to excessive contamination by nitrogen. Minor reduction of particle size and significant alterations in particle morphology depended on type of milling balls and application of stearic acid as processing control agent. Heavily deformed ultra-fine grained (UFG internal microstructure of powder particles was observed by the method of “transmission Kikuchi diffraction”.

  19. Design and simulation on the morphing composite propeller (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanlong; Li, Qinyu; Liu, Liwu; Lan, Xin; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    As one of the most crucial part of the unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV), the composite propeller plays an important role on the UUV's performance. As the composite propeller behaves excellent properties in hydroelastic facet and acoustic suppression, it attracts increasing attentions all over the globe. This paper goes a step further based on this idea, and comes up with a novel concept of "morphing composite propeller" (MCP) to improve the performance of the conventional composite propeller (CCP) to anticipate the improved propeller can perform better to propel the UUV. Based on the new concept, a novel MCP is designed. Each blade of the propeller is assembled with an active rotatable flap (ARF) to change the blade's local camber with flap rotation. Then the transmission mechanism (TM) has been designed and housed in the propeller blade to push the ARF. With the ARF rotating, the UUV can be propelled by different thrusts under certain rotation velocities of the propeller. Based on the design, the Fluent is exploited to analyze the fluid dynamics around the propeller. Finally, based on the design and hydrodynamic analysis, the structural response for the novel morphing composite propeller is calculated. The propeller blade is simplified and layered with composite materials. And the structure response of an MCP is obtained with various rotation angle under the hydrodynamic pressure. This simulation can instruct the design and fabrication techniques of the MCP.

  20. Spectroscopy of Propellant-Related Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    data. For propellant HMX1, the absorption data of Vanderhoff [12], the CARS data of Stufflebeam [13], and the CN LIF profile [4,5] can be compared...CARS experiments at 23 atm, Stufflebeam measured the concentration of N2, CO, H2 and temperature in an HMX1 propellant flame at distances about 1 mm...Parr, Hanson-Parr PLIF CN, NH, OH, NO, 10 NO2, T Stufflebeam CARS N2, CO, H2, T 13 Vanderhoff Absorption CN, NH, OH, T 12 Edwards LIF CN, NH, OH, T 4

  1. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the success of the phase I effort, Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of...

  2. Cryogenic Safety Rules and Guidelines at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN defines and implements a Safety Policy that sets out the general principles governing safety at CERN. As an intergovernmental organisation, CERN further establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In this process, it takes into account the laws and regulation of the Host States (France and Switzerland), EU regulations and directives, as well as international regulations, standards and directives. For the safety of cryogenic equipment, this is primarily covered by the Safety Regulation for Mechanical Equipment and the General Safety Instruction for Cryogenic Equipment. In addition, CERN has also developed Safety Guidelines to support the implementation of these safety rules, covering cryogenic equipment and oxygen deficiency hazard assessment and mitigation. An overview of the cryogenic safety rules and these safety guidelines will be presented.

  3. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of...

  4. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  5. Advanced Insulation Techniques for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to store large amounts of cryogenic fluids for long durations has a profound effect on the success of many future space programs using these fluids for...

  6. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  7. A simple low-cost cryogenic controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, I.V.; Bartram, C.P.

    1977-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive cryogenic temperature controller is described. Temperatures from 78 K to 300 K are maintained to 0.1 K. A novel feature, using a power transistor for the heating element, is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Cryogenic Cycling Behavior of Polymeric Composite Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seferis, James

    2002-01-01

    The basis of this research was an exploration of the fundamental phenomena that determine the response of fiber-reinforced composite materials to thermal cycling between cryogenic and ambient temperatures...

  9. Lightweight Inflatable Cryogenic Tank, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of an inflatable and lightweight polymer-fabric structured pressure vessel designed for the containment of cryogenic fluids....

  10. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, D. [Fermilab; Adamowski, M. [Fermilab; Bremer, J. [CERN; Delaney, M. [Fermilab; Diaz, A. [CERN; Doubnik, R. [Fermilab; Haaf, K. [Fermilab; Hentschel, S. [Fermilab; Norris, B. [Fermilab; Voirin, E. [Fermilab

    2017-01-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the models of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  11. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Bremer, J; Delany, M; Diaz, A; Doubnik, R; Haaf, K; Henstchel, S; Norris, B; Voirin, E

    2017-01-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  12. Propellant Gelation for Green In-Space Propulsion, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Concerns in recent years about the toxicity and safe handling of the storable class of propellants have led to efforts in greener monopropellants and bi-propellants....

  13. Commercially Available Capacitors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Teyssandier, F.; Prêle, D.

    2010-01-01

    Commercially available capacitors are not specified for operation at 77 K or 4 K, and some devices showed a dramatic decrease of capacitance at cryogenic temperature. Furthermore, for voltage biasing of cryogenic low impedance sensors it is very important to know parasitic resistance. In this case, the parasitic Equivalent Series Resistance (ESR) of the capacitor used for the AC-biasing is a bottleneck of the voltage biasing. Involved in TES development and SQUID multiplexing, we have charact...

  14. Propellant Technologies: A Persuasive Wave of Future Propulsion Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Ianovski, Leonid S.; Carrick, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Rocket propellant and propulsion technology improvements can be used to reduce the development time and operational costs of new space vehicle programs. Advanced propellant technologies can make the space vehicles safer, more operable, and higher performing. Five technology areas are described: Monopropellants, Alternative Hydrocarbons, Gelled Hydrogen, Metallized Gelled Propellants, and High Energy Density Materials. These propellants' benefits for future vehicles are outlined using mission study results and the technologies are briefly discussed.

  15. A Submarine Electric Propulsion System with Large Hub Propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    thrust coefficient n propeller rotational speed, revolutions per unit time Nb number of blades Pa ambient pressure SPv vapor pressure PI propeller pitch...propeller was better than that of the conventional propeller. The superior -46- S .. -. *.w• ".1[- propulsor cavitation performance indicated that the...presented here for a are unrealistically high since they assume a vapor pressure, Pv, of zero which for seawater at 59 0 F, ideally should be 2.50

  16. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, huge detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world’s largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. Monday 5.12.2005 Introduction: From History to Modern Refrigeration Cycles (Goran Perinic) Tuesday 6.12.2005 Refrigerants, Standard Cryostats, Cryogenic Des...

  17. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. From history to modern refrigeration cycles (1/5) Refrigerants, standard cryostats, cryogenic design (2/5) Heat transfer and insulation (3/5) Safety in cryoge...

  18. 14 CFR 35.2 - Propeller configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller configuration. 35.2 Section 35.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... components, including references to the relevant drawings and software design data, that define the type...

  19. Design Procedure of 4-Bladed Propeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... ... by converting rotational motion into thrust. A pressure difference is produced between the forward and the rear surfaces of the air foil-shaped blade, and a fluid (such as air or water) is accelerated behind the blade. Propeller dynamics can be modeled by both Bernoulli's principle and. Newton's third law.

  20. Atmospheric surveillance self-propelling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartoux, Gerard.

    1980-11-01

    The atmospheric surveillance self-propelling device of the Saclay Nuclear Research Center can, by its conception (autonomy, rapid put into service, multiplicity of sampling and measurements), be used for all kind of measuring campains: pollution radioactive or not, routine or accidental situation, technical and logistic support and as a coordination or investigation vehicle [fr

  1. Design Procedure of 4-Bladed Propeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... Diameter – The diameter of the imaginary cycle scribed by the blade ... Blade root – Fillet area. The region of transition from .... Propeller diameter. To estimate the weight of all blades and the polar moment of inertia of a blade, the approximate formula given by [8] was adopted. 3. 982.1. ,. YR. B. W. Weight.

  2. A Portable Burn Pan for the Disposal of Excess Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    seconds from the charges becoming engaged to burnout . The surrounding grass was ignited by the radiant heat of the burn, an indication of the high...2) Opened propellant charges burning A.5) Propellant charges fully engaged A.6) Start of burn out Field Manual: CRREL Portable Propellant

  3. Main Factors Affecting Blade Failure of Marine Propeller(2nd Report:Resonance between Vibrations of Propeller Shaft and Blade)

    OpenAIRE

    川添, 強; 松尾, 信太郎; 錦戸, 真吾

    1994-01-01

    The first report showed the difficulty to consider the small material defects and the low fluctuating stress by the hydrodynamic force as the main factors of the propeller blade failure. For the purpose of the elucidation of resonance between vibrations of the propeller shaft and the propeller blade, this paper presents the measurements and calculations of the flexural natural frequency of the full scale propeller blade in .air and in water, the vibratory stress due to the resonance and the l...

  4. Future cryogenic switchgear technologies for superconducting power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Saluja, R.; Damle, T.; Graber, L.

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces cryogenic switchgear that is needed for protection and control purposes in future multi-terminal superconducting power systems. Implementation of cryogenic switchgear is expected to improve system reliability and minimize overall volume and weight, but such switchgear is not available yet. Design of cryogenic switchgear begins by referring to conventional circuit breakers, a brief review of state-of-the-art switchgear technologies is presented. Then, promising cryogenic interruption media are identified and analysed with respect to physical and dielectric properties. Finally, we propose several cryogenic circuit breaker designs for potential aerospace, marine and terrestrial applications. Actuation mechanism for cryogenic switchgear is also investigated.

  5. 75 FR 18774 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems Model 4HFR34C653/L106FA Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... done. (f) For propeller hubs with 6,000 or more operating hours time- since-new (TSN) on the effective... 6,000 operating hours TSN on the effective date of this AD, perform the procedures in paragraphs (h) through (k) of this AD before the propeller hub reaches 6,100 operating hours TSN. Onetime Propeller Hub...

  6. 75 FR 39801 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems Model 4HFR34C653/L106FA Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... done. (f) For propeller hubs with 6,000 or more operating hours time- since-new (TSN) on the effective... operating hours TSN on the effective date of this AD, perform the procedures in paragraphs (h) through (k) of this AD before the propeller hub reaches 6,100 operating hours TSN. Onetime Propeller Hub...

  7. Device for delivering cryogen to rotary super-conducting winding of cryogen-cooled electrical machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, I.F.; Gorbunov, G.S.; Khutoretsky, G.M.; Popov, J.S.; Skachkov, J.V.; Vinokurov, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A device is disclosed for delivering cryogen to a superconducting winding of a cryogen-cooled electrical machine comprising a pipe articulated along the axis of the electrical machine and intended to deliver cryogen. One end of said pipe is located in a rotary chamber which communicates through channels with the space of the electrical machine, and said space accommodating its superconducting winding. The said chamber accommodates a needle installed along the chamber axis, and the length of said needle is of sufficient length such that in the advanced position of said cryogen delivering pipe said needle reaches the end of the pipe. The layout of the electrical machine increases the reliability and effectiveness of the device for delivering cryogen to the superconducting winding, simplifies the design of the device and raises the efficiency of the electrical machine

  8. Explosive Evaporating Phenomena of Cryogenic Fluids by Direct Contacting Normal Temperature Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Watanabe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic fluids have characteristics such as thermal stratification and flashing by pressure release in storage vessel. The mixture of the extreme low temperature fluid and the normal temperature fluid becomes the cause which causes pressure vessel and piping system crush due to explosive boiling and rapid freezing. In recent years in Japan, the demand of cryogenic fluids like a LH2, LNG is increasing because of the advance of fuel cell device technology, hydrogen of engine, and stream of consciousness for environmental agreement. These fuel liquids are cryogenic fluids. On the other hand, as for fisheries as well, the use of a source of energy that environment load is small has been being a pressing need. And, the need of the ice is high, as before, for keeping freshness of marine products in fisheries. Therefore, we carried out the experiments related to promotion of evaporating cryogenic fluids and generation of ice, in the contact directly of the water and liquid nitrogen. From the results of visualization, phenomena of explosive evaporating and ice forming were observed by using video camera.

  9. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  10. Cryogenic Deflashing for Rubber Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deflashing is the process of removal of excess flashes from the rubber products. Initially deflashing was a manual operation where dozen of workers, seated at small work stations would take each part and trim the excess rubber off with scissors, knives or by grinding. Still the same method is employed in most of the rubber industry. The drawbacks of this method are demand inconsistent and repeatable quality. Work done by hand is often inconsistent. There are commercially available cryogenic deflashing machine but they are too expensive hence cost effectiveness is also a prime factor. The objective of this paper is to develop a technique, to identify the media through which the flashes can be removed easily and effectively. Based on the test results obtained from testing of five different types of media, ABCUT Steel media gave best results. The testing of the ABCUT Steel media on rubber samples like O-rings, grommet tail door, bottom bush etc. shows good results.

  11. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  12. Mass Driver Two - Cryogenic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, K.; Williams, F.; Mongeau, P.; Kolm, H.

    1979-01-01

    The cryogenic module of Mass Driver Two comprises a 3.25 inch (82.55 mm) OD bucket with two 44 kilo-ampere-turn coils made with .028 inch (.71 mm) diam niobium-titanium multi-filamentary cable in a copper matrix, impregnated with lead alloy for thermal inertia, as well as the service station to refrigerate, energize and eject the bucket. The station is housed in a six inch flanged pyrex cross which connects to the four inch pyrex tube of the mass driver itself. The bucket is refrigerated by being forced against a copper braid cradle attached to the bottom of a liquid helium reservoir which protrudes into the cross from above. The bucket is energized inductively by turning off two superconducting coils which are also attached to the helium reservoir, and which have maintained the correct flux linkage through the bucket coils during their cool-down through the critical temperature. Once charging is completed, the clamping pressure is released and the bucket is injected into the mass driver by means of two normal-conductor pulse coils surrounding the horizontal branches of the cross.

  13. Magnet and cryogenics for ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.B.

    1975-01-01

    A critical review was made of the present status and future plans of the Brookhaven National Laboratory superconducting magnet program with respect to the planned ISABELLE storage rings. Recommendations are made on possible technical improvements, the future development program, and areas where cost reduction should be sought

  14. Space Transportation Infrastructure Supported By Propellant Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, David; Woodcock, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    A space transportation infrastructure is described that utilizes propellant depots to support all foreseeable missions in the Earth-Moon vicinity and deep space out to Mars. The infrastructure utilizes current expendable launch vehicles such as the Delta IV Heavy, Atlas V, and Falcon 9, for all crew, cargo, and propellant launches to orbit. Propellant launches are made to a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Depot and an Earth-Moon Lagrange Point 1 (L1) Depot to support new reusable in-space transportation vehicles. The LEO Depot supports missions to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) for satellite servicing, and to L1 for L1 Depot missions. The L1 Depot supports Lunar, Earth-Sun L2 (ESL2), Asteroid, and Mars missions. A Mars Orbital Depot is also described to support ongoing Mars missions. New concepts for vehicle designs are presented that can be launched on current 5-meter diameter expendable launch vehicles. These new reusable vehicle concepts include a LEO Depot, L1 Depot, and Mars Orbital Depot based on International Space Station (ISS) heritage hardware. The high-energy depots at L1 and Mars orbit are compatible with, but do not require, electric propulsion tug use for propellant and/or cargo delivery. New reusable in-space crew transportation vehicles include a Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) for crew transportation between the LEO Depot and the L1 Depot, a new reusable Lunar Lander for crew transportation between the L1 Depot and the lunar surface, and a Deep Space Habitat (DSH) to support crew missions from the L1 Depot to ESL2, Asteroid, and Mars destinations. A 6 meter diameter Mars lander concept is presented that can be launched without a fairing based on the Delta IV heavy Payload Planners Guide, which indicates feasibility of a 6.5 meter fairing. This lander would evolve to re-usable operations when propellant production is established on Mars. Figure 1 provides a summary of the possible missions this infrastructure can support. Summary mission profiles are presented

  15. Non-cavitating propeller noise modeling and inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Keunhwa; Seong, Woojae

    2014-12-01

    Marine propeller is the dominant exciter of the hull surface above it causing high level of noise and vibration in the ship structure. Recent successful developments have led to non-cavitating propeller designs and thus present focus is the non-cavitating characteristics of propeller such as hydrodynamic noise and its induced hull excitation. In this paper, analytic source model of propeller non-cavitating noise, described by longitudinal quadrupoles and dipoles, is suggested based on the propeller hydrodynamics. To find the source unknown parameters, the multi-parameter inversion technique is adopted using the pressure data obtained from the model scale experiment and pressure field replicas calculated by boundary element method. The inversion results show that the proposed source model is appropriate in modeling non-cavitating propeller noise. The result of this study can be utilized in the prediction of propeller non-cavitating noise and hull excitation at various stages in design and analysis.

  16. Cryogenic systems for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatain, D.; Perin, J.P.; Bonnay, P.; Bouleau, E.; Chichoux, M.; Communal, D.; Manzagol, J.; Viargues, F.; Brisset, D.; Lamaison, V.; Paquignon, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Low Temperatures Laboratory of CEA/Grenoble (France) is involved in the development of cryogenic systems for inertial fusion since a ten of years. A conceptual design for the cryogenic infrastructure of the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility has been proposed. Several prototypes have been designed, built and tested like for example the 1500 bars cryo-compressor for the targets filling, the target positioner and the thermal shroud remover. The HIPER project will necessitate the development of such equipments. The main difference is that this time, the cryogenic targets are direct drive targets. The first phase of HIPER experiments is a single shot period. Based oil the experience gained the last years, not only by our laboratory but also by Omega and G.A teams, we could design the new HIPER equipments for this phase. Some experimental results obtained with the prototypes of the LMJ cryogenic system are given and a first conceptual design for the HIPER single shot cryogenic system is shown. (authors)

  17. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  18. Manufacture of Novel Cryogenic Thermal Protection Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA SBIR solicitation X8 "Space Cryogenic Systems" under subtopic X8.01, "Cryogenic Fluid Transfer and...

  19. Manufacture of Novel Cryogenic Thermal Protection Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA SBIR solicitation X8 "Space Cryogenic Systems" under subtopic X8.01, "Cryogenic Fluid Transfer and...

  20. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Used to Manufacture Gas Storage Tanks With Reduced Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi G.; Johnston, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been considerable research in the area of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. This research has shown that the dispersion of small amounts of an organically modified layered silicate improves the polymer strength, modulus, thermal stability, and barrier properties. There have been several reports on the dispersion of layered silicates in an epoxy matrix. Potential enhancements to the barrier properties of epoxy/silicate nanocomposites make this material attractive for low permeability tankage. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have several advantages for cryogenic storage tanks. They are lightweight, strong, and stiff; therefore, a smaller fraction of a vehicle's potential payload capacity is used for propellant storage. Unfortunately, the resins typically used to make PMC tanks have higher gas permeability than metals. This can lead to hydrogen loss through the body of the tank instead of just at welds and fittings. One approach to eliminate this problem is to build composite tanks with thin metal liners. However, although these tanks provide good permeability performance, they suffer from a substantial mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion, which can lead to failure of the bond between the liner and the body of the tank. Both problems could be addressed with polymersilicate nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced hydrogen permeability, making them potential candidates for linerless PMC tanks. Through collaboration with Northrop Grumman and Michigan State University, nanocomposite test tanks were manufactured for the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the helium permeability was measured. An organically modified silicate was prepared at Michigan State University and dispersed in an epoxy matrix (EPON 826/JeffamineD230). The epoxy/silicate nanocomposites contained either 0 or 5 wt% of the organically modified silicate. The tanks were made by filament winding carbon fibers with the nanocomposite resin. Helium permeability

  1. On shear rheology of gel propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Shai; Peretz, Arie [RAFAEL, MANOR Propulsion and Explosive Systems Division, Haifa (Israel); Natan, Benveniste [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2007-04-15

    Selected fuel, oxidizer and simulant gels were prepared and rheologically characterized using a rotational rheometer. For fuel gelation both organic and inorganic gellants were utilized, whereas oxidizers and simulants were gelled with addition of silica and polysaccharides, respectively. The generalized Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model was found to most adequately represent the gels studied. Hydrazine-based fuels, gelled with polysaccharides, were characterized as shear-thinning pseudoplastic fluids with low shear yield stress, whereas inhibited red-fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) and hydrogen peroxide oxidizers, gelled with silica, were characterized as yield thixotropic fluids with significant shear yield stress. Creep tests were conducted on two rheological types of gels with different gellant content and the results were fitted by Burgers-Kelvin viscoelastic constitutive model. The effect of temperature on the rheological properties of gel propellant simulants was also investigated. A general rheological classification of gel propellants and simulants is proposed. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Zero boil-off methods for large-scale liquid hydrogen tanks using integrated refrigeration and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Swanger, A. M.; E Fesmire, J.; Jumper, K. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    NASA has completed a series of tests at the Kennedy Space Center to demonstrate the capability of using integrated refrigeration and storage (IRAS) to remove energy from a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank and control the state of the propellant. A primary test objective was the keeping and storing of the liquid in a zero boil-off state, so that the total heat leak entering the tank is removed by a cryogenic refrigerator with an internal heat exchanger. The LH2 is therefore stored and kept with zero losses for an indefinite period of time. The LH2 tank is a horizontal cylindrical geometry with a vacuum-jacketed, multilayer insulation system and a capacity of 125,000 liters. The closed-loop helium refrigeration system was a Linde LR1620 capable of 390W cooling at 20K (without any liquid nitrogen pre-cooling). Three different control methods were used to obtain zero boil-off: temperature control of the helium refrigerant, refrigerator control using the tank pressure sensor, and duty cycling (on/off) of the refrigerator as needed. Summarized are the IRAS design approach, zero boil-off control methods, and results of the series of zero boil-off tests.

  3. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  4. Unsteady Processes in Solid Propellant Combustion,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    0—AflO ~5a INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE TECNICA AEROESPACIAL MADRID (SPAIN) F/S 21/9.2UNSTEADY PROCESSES IN SOLID PROPELLANT COMBUSTION . (U) MAY...PRO C E SS E S IN SOLID P R O P E L L A N T C O M B U S T I O N H A. Crespo and M. Kindelán Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial Madrid , Spain j

  5. Bioconversion of Nitramine Propellant Wastewaters - Triaminoguanidine Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    o d i m sulfide for sneerobiasis. Batch and continuous cultures were inoculated with organisar from activated sludge (Marlborough Easterly Sewage ...Treatmtnt Plant, Marlborough, IU) anaerobic sludge digest (Nut Island Sewage T r e a b n t Plant. Boston. MA) and garden roil. One aL sampler of... BIOCONVERSION OF NITRAMINE PROPELLANT WASTEWATERS = TRIAMINOGUANIDINE 0 a NITRATE 80 BY DAVID L KAPLAN AND ARTHUR M. KAPLAN JANUARY 1985

  6. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-01-01

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 → V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 μm. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of ∼12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved ∼14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at ∼ 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 μm with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 → V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 μm. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than ±10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  7. Engineering Analysis Studies for Preliminary Design of Lightweight Cryogenic Hydrogen Tanks in UAV Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Palko, Joseph L.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Powers, Lynn M.; Mital, Subodh K.; Smith, Lizalyn M.; Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Hunter, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A series of engineering analysis studies were conducted to investigate the potential application of nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy composites and polymer cross-linked silica aerogels in cryogenic hydrogen storage tank designs. This assessment focused on the application of these materials in spherical tank designs for unmanned aeronautic vehicles with mission durations of 14 days. Two cryogenic hydrogen tank design concepts were considered: a vacuum-jacketed design and a sandwiched construction with an aerogel insulating core. Analyses included thermal and structural analyses of the tank designs as well as an analysis of hydrogen diffusion to specify the material permeability requirements. The analyses also provided material property targets for the continued development of cross-linked aerogels and nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy composites for cryogenic storage tank applications. The results reveal that a sandwiched construction with an aerogel core is not a viable design solution for a 14-day mission. A vacuum-jacketed design approach was shown to be far superior to an aerogel. Aerogel insulation may be feasible for shorter duration missions. The results also reveal that the application of nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy should be limited to the construction of outer tanks in a vacuum-jacketed design, since a graphite/epoxy inner tank does not provide a significant weight savings over aluminum and since the ability of nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy to limit hydrogen permeation is still in question.

  8. A Fully Transparent Flexible Sensor for Cryogenic Temperatures Based on High Strength Metallurgical Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Pawlak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature electronics operating in below zero temperatures or even below the lower limit of the common −65 to 125 °C temperature range are essential in medical diagnostics, in space exploration and aviation, in processing and storage of food and mainly in scientific research, like superconducting materials engineering and their applications—superconducting magnets, superconducting energy storage, and magnetic levitation systems. Such electronic devices demand special approach to the materials used in passive elements and sensors. The main goal of this work was the implementation of a fully transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing element. Electrodes were made of transparent ITO (Indium Tin Oxide or ITO/Ag/ITO conductive layers by laser ablation and finally encapsulated in a polymer coating. A helium closed-cycle cryostat has been used in measurements of the electrical properties of these graphene-based temperature sensors under cryogenic conditions. The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene layers in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor.

  9. Simulating marine propellers with vortex particle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youjiang; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa; Song, Baowei

    2017-01-01

    The vortex particle method is applied to compute the open water characteristics of marine propellers. It is based on the large-eddy simulation technique, and the Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale model is implemented for the eddy viscosity. The vortex particle method is combined with the boundary element method, in the sense that the body is modelled with boundary elements and the slipstream is modelled with vortex particles. Rotational periodic boundaries are adopted, which leads to a cylindrical sector domain for the slipstream. The particle redistribution scheme and the fast multipole method are modified to consider the rotational periodic boundaries. Open water characteristics of three propellers with different skew angles are calculated with the proposed method. The results are compared with the ones obtained with boundary element method and experiments. It is found that the proposed method predicts the open water characteristics more accurately than the boundary element method, especially for high loading condition and high skew propeller. The influence of the Smagorinsky constant is also studied, which shows the results have a low sensitivity to it.

  10. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  11. Cryogenic Thermometer Calibration Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Thermeau, J P

    1998-01-01

    A cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and is being commissioned in preparation for the very stringent requirements on the temperature control of the LHC superconducting magnets. The temperature is traceable in the 1.5 to 30 K range to standards maintained in a national metrological laboratory by using a set of Rhodium-Iron temperature sensors of metrological quality. The calibration facility is designed for calibrating simultaneously 60 industrial cryogenic thermometers in the 1.5 K to 300 K temperature range, a thermometer being a device that includes both a temperature sensor and the wires heat-intercept. The thermometers can be calibrated in good and degraded vacuum or immersed in the surrounding fluid and at different Joule self-heating conditions that match those imposed by signal conditioners used in large cryogenic machinery. The calibration facility can be operated in an automatic mode and all the control and safety routines are handled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)...

  12. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  13. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  14. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  15. Cryogenics for Particle Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Vandoni, Giovanna; Wagner, U

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenics has become a key ancillary technology of particle accelerators and detectors, contributing to their sustained development over the last fifty years. Conversely, this development has produced new challenges and markets for cryogenics, resulting in a fruitful symbiotic relation which materialized in significant technology transfer and technical progress. This began with the use of liquid hydrogen and deuterium in the targets and bubble chambers of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. It developed more recently with increasing amounts of liquefied noble gases - mainly argon, but also krypton and even today xenon - in calorimeters. In parallel with these applications, the availability of practical type II superconductors from the early 1960s triggered the use of superconductivity in large spectrometer magnets - mostly driven by considerations of energy savings - and the corresponding development of helium cryogenics. It is however the generalized application of superconductivity in particle accelerators - RF ac...

  16. 49 CFR 173.316 - Cryogenic liquids in cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... filling density for hydrogen, cryogenic liquid is defined as the percent ratio of the weight of lading in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. 173.316 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.316 Cryogenic liquids in...

  17. Experimental Study of Open Water Non-Series Marine Propeller Performance

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Elghorab; A. Abou El-Azm Aly; A. S. Elwetedy; M. A. Kotb

    2013-01-01

    Later marine propeller is the main component of ship propulsion system. For a non-series propeller, it is difficult to indicate the open water marine propeller performance without an experimental study to measure the marine propeller parameters. In the present study, the open water performance of a non-series marine propeller has been carried out experimentally. The geometrical aspects of a commercial non-series marine propeller have been measured for a propeller blade ar...

  18. Reliable Actuator for Cryo Propellant Fluid Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fluid handling applications in cryogenic and extreme environments require reliable actuation technology that can handle extreme temperatures, mechanical bind-up from...

  19. Reliable Actuator for Cryo Propellant Fluid Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fluid handling applications in cryogenic and extreme environments require reliable actuation technology that can handle extreme temperatures, mechanical bind-up from...

  20. Collection and Purification of Lunar Propellant Resources, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technology Applications, Inc. (TAI) proposes to advance In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) capabilities by applying advanced cryogenic technology to perform...

  1. Thermoelectric Module Performance in Cryogenic Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Morita, Ryo; Omoto, Kazuyuki; Koji, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Tatsuo; Noishiki, Koji

    Performance of thermoelectric (TE) modules for the TE power conversion system combined with open rack type LNG vaporizer (ORV) is discussed. Most of the conventional BiTe TE modules suffer sudden decrease of the power at cryogenic temperature as low as -160°C. This is called as Mayer-Marschall effect. Authors investigated the cause of this effect and found TE modules that could avoid such effect. Performance data of such TE modules obtained at the cryogenic thermoelectric (CTE) test rig which could realize temperature and fluid dynamic condition of the ORV is presented.

  2. Cryogenic system for liquid hydrogen polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Chiba, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishii, T.; Kato, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been constructed for a liquid hydrogen polarimeter in order to measure polarization of high energy proton at the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. The system principally consists of a cryogenerator with a cryogenic transfer line, a liquid hydrogen cryostat, and a 14.5 l target container of thin aluminum alloy where liquid hydrogen is served for the experiment. The refrigeration capacity is about 54 W at 20.4 K without a target container. (author)

  3. Amplifier development for multiplexed cryogenic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviranta, Mikko

    2012-12-01

    We make some considerations on the question of driving the cable from the cryogenic stage of refrigerators to the room temperature, in the case of multiplexed detector array systems where a high total Shannon information capacity is required. We have constructed large SQUID arrays for the purpose, some of which exhibit lower than 5 × 10-8 Φ0 Hz-1/2 flux noise at 4.2 K and do not require magnetic shielding in a typical laboratory environment. The option of using class-D amplifiers to reduce the cryogenic heat load is briefly reviewed.

  4. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  5. 3 cm cryogenic electron linac for defectoscopy and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.V.; Saverskij, A.Ya.; Shchedrin, I.S.

    1979-01-01

    Comparative estimations of basic HF parameters of travelling and standing wave accelerating structures of cryogenic variants are given. A possibility for using liquid nitrogen as coolant has been considered. Changes in energy attenuation and storage along 1 m length for circular corrugated wavequide (CCW) when changing copper temperature from room to liquid nitrogen temperature has been considered as well. It is shown that nitrogen cooling does not result in significant energy gain for travelling wave CCW, however considerably decreases a share of power for attenuation in walls: electron efficiency of the accelerator may be increased at the expense of this share of power conserving energy storage a t the same level. Examination of the accelerating structure in the standing wave regime has shown that it is possible to gain considerably with respect to the field in comparison with 70 cm wave length when cooling 3 cm-wave length section with liquid nitrogen. At that, time of filling of the accele--rating cell with accelerating field reduces almost 3 times as compared to a ''hot'' 10 cm version. It is shown that liquid nitrogen consumption will amount not more than 2l/h for cooling of 1 m long 3 cm accelerating structure [ru

  6. Measurement of Multiple Blade Rate Unsteady Propeller Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    with PUF -2 prediction ...................................... 33 17. Total velocity measurement positions using LDV .................... 34 18...CRAW F OrIC TAB Q Propeller torque JU.tSw riced .,) Qn Amplitude of nth harmonic of torque By R Propeller tip radius Ot Itt:ic A.tdt 4Vt,.*, Cc#eS r...unsteady lifting surface theory code PUF -2, 3 and were compared with measured data. PUF -2 calculations were performed for both Propellers 4132 and

  7. Combustion of Solid Propellants (La Combustion des Propergols Solides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    Programme Abrege Lhistoire des propergols solides a connu un bouleversement profond avec la d~eouve:te pal Paul Vieille et Nobel, t la fin du dix...material Here again, double base and composite is not homogeneous, the flame front is not propellant behaviour will be analysed and plane. The web thickness... web in the aft regions) the propellant will all) propellants, there is a minimum cross- burn out unevenly, leading to a long pres- flow velocity below

  8. Tip Vortex Index (TVI) Technique for Inboard Propeller Noise Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Sezen, Savaş; Dogrul, Ali; Bal, Şakir

    2018-01-01

    Cavitating marine propeller is one of the most dominant noise sources inmarine vessels.  The aim of this study isto examine the cavitating propeller noise induced by tip vortices for twinscrew passenger vessels. To determine the noise level inboard, tip vortex index(TVI) technique has been used. This technique is an approximate method based onnumerical and experimental data. In this study, it is aimed to predict theunderwater noise of a marine propeller by applying TVI technique for ...

  9. Computer aided design and development of mixed-propeller pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaoyal, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the design principle of mixed propeller hydraulic aided by CADD software developed by author for generation of the hydraulic profile of the mixed propeller and diffuser geometry. The design methodology for plotting the vane profile of mixed propeller pump has been discussed in detail with special reference to conformal transformation in cylindrical as well as conical plane. (author). 10 refs., 11 figs

  10. Cryogenic refrigeration for cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gistau-Baguer, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Neutron moderation by means of a fluid at cryogenic temperature is a very interesting way to obtain cold neutrons. Today, a number of nuclear research reactors are using this technology. This paper deals with thermodynamics and technology which are used for cooling Cold Neutron Sources

  11. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  12. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  13. Transient boiling crisis of cryogenic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deev, [No Value; Kharitonov, VS; Kutsenko, KV; Lavrukhin, AA

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a new physical model of boiling crisis under rapid increase of power on the heated surface. The calculation of the time interval of the transition to film boiling in cryogenic liquids was carried out depending on heat flux and pressure. The obtained results are in good

  14. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  15. Solid State Circuits for Cryogenic Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrac, D.; Spencer, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tests confirm operation of five commercial semiconductor devices at cryogenic temperatures. The five devices - one tunnel diode, one field-effect transistor, and three CMOS integrated circuits - all perform well in circuits immersed in liquid-helium bath. For some tests, bath temperature was reduced to 1,25K by pumping.

  16. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M.; Pernau, H.-F.; Strunk, C.; Scheer, E.; Pietsch, T.

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  17. Cryogenic carbonates in cave environments: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Onac, B. P.; Persoiu, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 187, č. 1 (2008), s. 84-96 ISSN 1040-6182 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : cryogenic cave carbonate * cave * Romania * stable Isotopes * isotope fractionation Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.482, year: 2008

  18. Testing the LHC magnet cryogenic systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The magnets in the LHC will be cooled to 1.9 K (- 270.3°C). To keep this 27 km long machine at such a low temperatures requires one of the largest refrigeration systems in the world. These pictures show the cryogenics plant in the testing area.

  19. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Casas, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Perin, A; Perinic, G; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the overcapacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the "cannibalization" of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of ...

  20. CFD and FEM Model of an Underwater Vehicle Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chruściel Tadeusz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the project for design and optimization of the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV, research on its propulsion has been carried out. Te entire project was supported by CFD and FEM calculations taking into account the characteristics of the underwater vehicle. One of the tasks was to optimize the semi-open duct for horizontal propellers, which provided propulsion and controllability in horizontal plane. In order to create a measurable model of this task it was necessary to analyze numerical methodology of propeller design, along with the structure of a propellers with nozzles and contra-rotating propellers. It was confronted with theoretical solutions which included running of the analyzed propeller near an underwater vehicle. Also preliminary qualitative analyses of a simplified system with contra-rotating propellers and a semi-open duct were carried out. Te obtained results enabled to make a decision about the ROVs duct form. Te rapid prototyping SLS (Selective Laser Sintering method was used to fabricate a physical model of the propeller. As a consequence of this, it was necessary to verify the FEM model of the propeller, which based on the load obtained from the CFD model. Te article contains characteristics of the examined ROV, a theoretical basis of propeller design for the analyzed cases, and the results of CFD and FEM simulations.

  1. Study on unsteady hydrodynamic performance of propeller in waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingxin; Guo, Chunyu; Su, Yumin; Liu, Tian; Meng, Xiangyin

    2017-09-01

    The speed of a ship sailing in waves always slows down due to the decrease in efficiency of the propeller. So it is necessary and essential to analyze the unsteady hydrodynamic performance of propeller in waves. This paper is based on the numerical simulation and experimental research of hydrodynamics performance when the propeller is under wave conditions. Open-water propeller performance in calm water is calculated by commercial codes and the results are compared to experimental values to evaluate the accuracy of the numerical simulation method. The first-order Volume of Fluid (VOF) wave method in STAR CCM+ is utilized to simulate the three-dimensional numerical wave. According to the above prerequisite, the numerical calculation of hydrodynamic performance of the propeller under wave conditions is conducted, and the results reveal that both thrust and torque of the propeller under wave conditions reveal intense unsteady behavior. With the periodic variation of waves, ventilation, and even an effluent phenomenon appears on the propeller. Calculation results indicate, when ventilation or effluent appears, the numerical calculation model can capture the dynamic characteristics of the propeller accurately, thus providing a significant theory foundation for further studying the hydrodynamic performance of a propeller in waves.

  2. High Impulse Nanoparticulate-Based Gel Propellants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase I addresses the development of advanced gel propellants and determination of their suitability for...

  3. Evaluation of Raytek infrared pyrometer for continuous propellant temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Mark D.

    1990-01-01

    The primary purpose of this evaluation was to determine if the Raytek IR pyrometer that was installed in the 600 gallon propellant mixers could be used to provide a continuous, accurate, reliable measurement of the propellant temperature during mixing. The Raytek infrared sensor is not recommended to be used for controlling propellant temperature nor for inspection buy-off. The first part of the evaluation was to determine the accuracy of the sensor in measuring the propellant temperature. The second part was to determine the reliability of the air purge design in preventing contamination of the IR window.

  4. New trends in the kitchen: propellants assessment of edible food aerosol sprays used on food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Augsburger, M

    2014-01-01

    New products available for food creations include a wide variety of "supposed" food grade aerosol sprays. However, the gas propellants used cannot be considered as safe. The different legislations available did not rule any maximum residue limits, even though these compounds have some limits when used for other food purposes. This study shows a preliminary monitoring of propane, butane and dimethyl ether residues, in cakes and chocolate after spraying, when these gases are used as propellants in food aerosol sprays. Release kinetics of propane, butane and dimethyl ether were measured over one day with sprayed food, left at room temperature or in the fridge after spraying. The alkanes and dimethyl ether analyses were performed by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/thermal conductivity detection, using monodeuterated propane and butane generated in situ as internal standards. According to the obtained results and regardingthe extrapolations of the maximum residue limits existing for these substances, different delays should be respected according to the storage conditions and the gas propellant to consume safely the sprayed food. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of A Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and test data validation of the thermal model that is the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented to validate the model are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Centigrade of the thermal vacuum test data, and was found to be relatively insensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed, however, to refine the thermal model to further improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank. Temperatures predictions in this portion were found to be 2-2.5 degrees Centigrade lower than the test data. A road map to apply the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  6. 75 FR 7934 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems 1A103/TCM Series Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... with more than 1,500 operating hours time- since-new (TSN) or unknown operating hours TSN on the... TSN on the effective date of this AD, upon reaching 1,500 operating hours TSN or within the next 50... January 28, 2008, do the following: (1) For propellers with more than 1,500 operating hours TSN on the...

  7. Cryogenic radiometry in the hard X-ray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Muller, P.; Rabus, H.; Ulm, G.

    2008-01-01

    For many applications in radiometry, spectroscopy or astrophysics, absolute measurement of radiant power with low uncertainty is essential. Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are regarded as the highest-accuracy primary standard detector in radiometry, from the infrared to the ultraviolet region; in combination with tuneable monochromatized synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings, their range of operation has been extended to the soft x-ray region. ESRs are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power that can be traced back to electrical SI units and be measured with low uncertainties. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time suitable for use with synchrotron radiation. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard x-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV, resulting in a cavity absorber with a gold base and a cylindrical shell made of copper, in combination with a thermal sensitivity of around 150 mK μW -1 and a time constant of less than 3 min, which is short compared with the lifetime of many hours for the storage ring current. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2%, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3%. (authors)

  8. Cryogenic radiometry in the hard X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Muller, P.; Rabus, H.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig and Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    For many applications in radiometry, spectroscopy or astrophysics, absolute measurement of radiant power with low uncertainty is essential. Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are regarded as the highest-accuracy primary standard detector in radiometry, from the infrared to the ultraviolet region; in combination with tuneable monochromatized synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings, their range of operation has been extended to the soft x-ray region. ESRs are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power that can be traced back to electrical SI units and be measured with low uncertainties. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time suitable for use with synchrotron radiation. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard x-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV, resulting in a cavity absorber with a gold base and a cylindrical shell made of copper, in combination with a thermal sensitivity of around 150 mK {mu}W{sup -1} and a time constant of less than 3 min, which is short compared with the lifetime of many hours for the storage ring current. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2%, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3%. (authors)

  9. Cryogenic radiometry in the hard x-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.; Rabus, H.; Ulm, G.

    2008-10-01

    For many applications in radiometry, spectroscopy or astrophysics, absolute measurement of radiant power with low uncertainty is essential. Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are regarded as the highest-accuracy primary standard detector in radiometry, from the infrared to the ultraviolet region; in combination with tuneable monochromatized synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings, their range of operation has been extended to the soft x-ray region. ESRs are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power that can be traced back to electrical SI units and be measured with low uncertainties. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time suitable for use with synchrotron radiation. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard x-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV, resulting in a cavity absorber with a gold base and a cylindrical shell made of copper, in combination with a thermal sensitivity of around 150 mK µW-1 and a time constant of less than 3 min, which is short compared with the lifetime of many hours for the storage ring current. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2%, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3%.

  10. Energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  11. Blade Section Lift Coefficients for Propellers at Extreme Off-Design Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shen, Young

    1997-01-01

    The Propeller Force Module (PFM) code developed by Analytical Methods Inc. (AMI) for calculating propeller side forces during maneuvering simulation studies requires inputs of propeller blade sectional lift, drag, and moment data...

  12. 76 FR 74749 - Critical Parts for Airplane Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... propellers. This action would define what a propeller critical part is, require the identification of... electronically. ] Mail: Send comments to Docket Operations, M-30; U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200...

  13. Design Procedure of 4-Bladed Propeller | Ishiodu | West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marine propellers, although submerged in water aft of the ship, form an integral part of a ship and play a vital role in ship propulsion. Much has been said and published on the development of the marine propeller from the time of antiquity to the present age, but there is more to be done. Therefore, this paper focuses on the ...

  14. Current state of the art of HNF based composite propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciucci, A.; Frota, O.; Welland, W.H.M.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Leeming, B.; Bellerby, J.M.; Brotzu, A.

    2004-01-01

    The main activities currently performed for the development of HNF-based propellants are presented. The objectives and approach adopted are described. The results obtained on the HNF decomposition mechanism and on the re- and co-crystallisation of HNF with potential propellant ingredients are

  15. Propeller flaps for lower-limb trauma | Rogers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The propeller flap has become a versatile and important component in our reconstructive algorithm following complex lower limb trauma. First described by Hyakusoku in 1991, it has since been adapted and modified by Hallock and Teo. This article outlines our experience specifically with perforator pedicled propeller flaps ...

  16. Self-propelled oil droplets consuming "fuel" surfactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyota, Taro; Maru, Naoto; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2009-01-01

    A micrometer-sized oil droplet of 4-octylaniline containing 5 mol % of an amphiphilic catalyst exhibited a self-propelled motion, producing tiny oil droplets, in an aqueous dispersion of an amphiphilic precursor of 4-octylaniline. The tiny droplets on the surface of the self-propelled droplet wer...

  17. 14 CFR 35.21 - Variable and reversible pitch propellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Variable and reversible pitch propellers. 35.21 Section 35.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.21 Variable and...

  18. Prediction of propeller-induced hull-pressure fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijngaarden, H.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The cavitating propeller often forms the primary source of noise and vibration on board ships. The propeller induces hydroacoustic pressure fluctuations due to the passing blades and, more importantly, the dynamic activity of cavities in the propeller’s immediate vicinity. The accurate prediction of

  19. Environmental testing of high Tc superconductive thermal isolators for space-borne cryogenic detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Randolf, Henry W.; Verbelyi, Darren; Haertling, Gene H.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Selim, Raouf; Caton, Randall

    1992-01-01

    Thick films of superconductive material on low thermal conductivity substrates (e.g., yttria-stabilized zirconia and fused silica) are considered as a replacement for the existing electrical connections between the detector array and data acquisition and storage electronics in the cryogenic detector systems being developed by NASA. The paper describes some of the design constraints on the superconducting device and presents results of a preliminary analysis of the effects of vibration, gamma irradiation, and long-term exposure to high vacuum and liquid nitrogen encountered in operating such a device in space.

  20. Design considerations in the use of stainless steel for vacuum and cryogenic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyari, C.

    1976-01-01

    The properties making austenitic stainless steel a preferred material for the construction of high vacuum equipment are reviewed. Best results are obtained if attention is paid to the improvement of welding properties, particularly with a view to preventing intercrystalline disintegration. A review of mechanical properties, the effect of cold working and cryogenic temperatures on the strength and magnetic characteristics of stainless steel is given. During material selection for very high vacuum, attention must be paid to the porosity problem. A practical example shows the application of these considerations to the choice of materials for the CERN-ISR Intersecting Storage Rings. (author)

  1. Design considerations in the use of stainless steel for vacuum and cryogenic equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Geyari, C

    1976-01-01

    The properties making austenitic stainless steel a preferred material for the construction of high vacuum equipment are reviewed. Best results are obtained if attention is paid to the improvement of welding properties, particularly with a view to prevent intercrystalline disintegration. A review of mechanical properties, the effect of cold working and cryogenic temperatures on the strength and magnetic characteristics of stainless steel is given. During material selection for very high vacuum, attention must be paid to the porosity problem. A practical example shows the application of these considerations to the choice of materials for the CERN-ISR intersecting storage rings. (19 refs).

  2. EFD and CFD Characterization of a CLT Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bertetta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper an experimental and numerical analysis of an unconventional CLT propeller is carried out. Two different numerical approaches, a potential panel method and an RANSE solver, are employed. Cavitation tunnel experiments are carried out in order to measure, as usual, thrust, torque, and cavity extension for different propeller working points. Moreover, LDV measurements are performed to have a deep insight into the complex wake behind the propeller and to analyze the dynamics of generated tip vortexes. The numerical/experimental analysis and comparison of results highlight the peculiarities of this kind of propellers, the possibility to increase efficiency and reduce cavitation risk, in order to exploit the design approaches already well proven for conventional propellers also in the case of these unconventional geometries.

  3. Optimum design of B-series marine propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Gaafary

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of an optimum marine propeller is one of the most important problems in naval architecture. This problem can be handled using the propeller series diagrams or regression polynomials. This paper introduces a procedure to find out the optimum characteristics of B-series marine propellers. The propeller design process is performed as a single objective function subjected to constraints imposed by cavitation, material strength and required propeller thrust. Although optimization software of commercial type can be adopted to solve the problem, the computer program that has been specially developed for this task may be more useful for its flexibility and possibility to be incorporated, as a subroutine, with the complex ship design process.

  4. Propellant development for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, L. C.; Stanley, C. B.; Ricks, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of a propellant developed for the NASA Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) are described in terms of its composition, performance, and compliance to NASA specifications. The class 1.3 HTPB/AP/A1 propellant employs an ester plasticizer and the content of ballistic solids is set at 88 percent. Ammonia evolution is prevented by the utilization of a neutral bonding agent which allows continuous mixing. The propellant also comprises a bimodal AP blend with one ground fraction, ground AP of at least 20 microns, and ferric oxide to control the burning rate. The propellant's characteristics are discussed in terms of tradeoffs in AP particle size and the types of Al powder, bonding agent, and HTPB polymer. The size and shape of the ballistic solids affect the processability, ballistic properties, and structural properties of the propellant. The revised baseline composition is based on maximizing the robustness of in-process viscosity, structural integrity, and burning-rate tailoring range.

  5. Comparison of super-high-energy-propulsion-systems based on metallic hydrogen propellant for ES to LEO space transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierschmann, M.

    1990-01-01

    The application is studied of metallic H2 as a rocket propellant, which contains a specific energy of about 52 kcal/g in theory yielding a maximum specific impulse of 1700 s. With the convincing advantage of having a density 14 times that of conventional liquid H2/liquid O2 propellants, metallic H2 could satisfy the demands of advanced launch vehicle propulsion for the next millennium. Provided that there is an atomic metallic state of H2, and that this state is metastable at ambient pressure, which still is not proven, the results are given of the study of some important areas, which concern the production of metallic H2, the combustion, chamber cooling, and storage. The results show that the use of metallic H2 as rocket propellant could lead to revolutionary changes in space vehicle philosophy toward small size, small weight, and high performance single stage to orbit systems. The use of high metallic H2 mass fractions results in a dramatic reduction of required propellant volume, while gas temperatures in the combustion chamber exceed 5000 K. Furthermore, it follows, that H2 (liquid or slush) is the most favorable candidate as working fluid. Jet generated noise due to high exhaust velocities could be a problem.

  6. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  7. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of foam insulation materials was performed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and LeTourneau University. The initial focus was ambient pressure cryogenic boil off testing using the Cryostat-400 flat-plate instrument. Completion of a test facility at LETU has enabled direct, comparative testing, using identical cryostat instruments and methods, and the production of standard thermal data sets for a number of materials under sub-ambient conditions. The two sets of measurements were analyzed and indicate there is reasonable agreement between the two laboratories. Based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry, new equipment and methods for testing thermal insulation systems have been successfully developed. These boiloff instruments (or cryostats) include both flat plate and cylindrical models and are applicable to a wide range of different materials under a wide range of test conditions. Test measurements are generally made at large temperature difference (boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K are typical) and include the full vacuum pressure range. Results are generally reported in effective thermal conductivity (ke) and mean heat flux (q) through the insulation system. The new cryostat instruments provide an effective and reliable way to characterize the thermal performance of materials under subambient conditions. Proven in through thousands of tests of hundreds of material systems, they have supported a wide range of aerospace, industry, and research projects. Boiloff testing technology is not just for cryogenic testing but is a cost effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system for applications at sub-ambient temperatures. This technology, when adequately coupled with a technical standards basis, can provide a cost-effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system

  8. Hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Nobuo; Mitsui, Jin

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation in fusion fuel cycle and tritium recovery from heavy water reactor are very important, and therefore the early establishment of these separation techniques are desired. The cryogenic distillation method in particular is promising for the separation of hydrogen isotope and the recovery of high concentrated tritium. The studies of hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method have been carried out by using the experimental apparatus made for the first time in Japan. The separation of three components (H 2 -HD-D 2 ) under total reflux conditions was got by using the packing tower of 500 mm height. It was confirmed that the Height Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) was 20 - 30 mm for the vapor's line velocity of 20 - 80 mm/s. (author)

  9. Cryogenic performance of single polymer polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atli-Veltin, Bilim

    2018-03-01

    The main objective of the experimental study detailed in this paper is to investigate the performance of fully recyclable, lightweight, low-cost, thermoplastic Polypropylene (PP) composite tapes at low temperatures. Coupons made of [±45] and [0/90] laminates are subjected to tensile and 3-point bending tests at room temperature as well as at -196 °C. In addition to that, cryogenic low velocity impact tests at 268 J and 777 J impact energies are performed on tubular structures. The results are indicating that the laminates made of PP tapes have sufficient ductility for cryogenic applications. Low velocity impact tests showed that the viscoelastic behavior of the material is preserved, even at such low temperatures and more than 72% of impact energy is absorbed by the material.

  10. Cryogenic fluid management (base R/T): Cryogenic fluid systems, Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE), Cryogenic Orbital Hydrogen Experiment (COHE). (Transportation focused technology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Pat

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. The concluded remarks are: (1) advanced cryogenic fluid systems technology is enhancing or enabling to all known transportation scenarios for space exploration; (2) an integrated/coordinated program involving LeRC/MSFC has been formulated to address all known CFM needs - new needs should they develop, can be accommodated within available skills/facilities; (3) all required/experienced personnel and facilities are finally in place - data from initial ground-based experiments is being collected and analyzed - small scale STS experiments are nearing flight - program is beginning to yield significant results; (4) future proposed funding to primarily come from two sources; and (5) cryogenic fluid experimentation is essential to provide required technology and assure implementation in future NASA missions.

  11. Alignment Stage for a Cryogenic Dilatometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudik, Matthew; Moore, Donald

    2005-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom alignment stage has been designed and built for use in a cryogenic dilatometer that is used to measure thermal strains. The alignment stage enables precise adjustments of the positions and orientations of optical components to be used in the measurements and, once adjustments have been completed, keeps the components precisely aligned during cryogenic-dilatometer operations that can last as long as several days. The alignment stage includes a case, a circular tilt/tip platform, and a variety of flexural couplings between the case and the platform, all machined from a single block of the low-thermal-expansion iron/nickel alloy Invar, in order to minimize effects of temperature gradients and to obtain couplings that are free of stiction and friction. There are three sets of flexural couplings clocked at equal angles of 120 degrees around the platform, constituting a three-point kinematic support system.

  12. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  13. Cryogenic 3-D Detectors for Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R. A.

    2003-05-01

    Space and ground-based astronomy is currently undergoing a revolution in detector technology with the advent of cryogenic sensors operating in the sub-Kelvin temperature range. These detectors provide non-dispersive energy resolution at optical through gamma ray energies (e.g, E/Δ E ˜ 1500 at 6 keV), high time resolution (msec or better), and can be made into arrays using a combination of microlithography and multiplexing using SQUID amplifiers. The application of such ``3-D'' detector technology to solar physics could lead to significant advances in our understanding of magnetic reconnection in the Sun, including X-ray jet phenomena, and active region dynamics. In this talk, I will review some of the basic principles of cryogenic 3-D detectors, current astronomical applications, and their potential for future NASA solar physics Explorer-class missions. This work was supported in part by the Lockheed Martin Independent Research Program

  14. Solid State MEMS Thrusters Using Electrically Controlled Extinguishable Solid Propellant, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ET Materials, LLC developed the first ever electrically controlled extinguishable solid propellant (ECESP). The original propellant developed under Air Force SBIR...

  15. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    After having outlined the importance of energy storage in the present context, this document outlines that it is an answer to economic, environmental and technological issues. It proposes a brief overview of the various techniques of energy storage: under the form of chemical energy (hydrocarbons, biomass, hydrogen production), thermal energy (sensitive or latent heat storage), mechanical energy (potential energy by hydraulic or compressed air storage, kinetic energy with flywheels), electrochemical energy (in batteries), electric energy (super-capacitors, superconductor magnetic energy storage). Perspectives are briefly evoked

  16. Cryogenic temperature measurement for large applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ylöstalo, J; Kyynäräinen, J; Niinikoski, T O; Voutilainen, R

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a resistance thermometry system for the acquisition, control and monitoring of temperature in large-scale cryogenic applications. The resistance of the sensor is converted to a voltage using a self-balancing AC bridge circuit featuring square-wave excitation currents down to 1 nA. The system is easily scalable and includes intelligent features to treat special situations such as magnet quenches differently from normal operation.

  17. Image based measurement techniques for aircraft propeller flow diagnostics : Propeller slipstream investigations at high-lift conditions and thrust reverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosenboom, E.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to measure the propeller slipstream properties (velocity and vorticity) and to assess the unsteady and instantaneous behavior of the propeller flow field at high disk loadings, zero thrust and thrust reverse using the image based measurement techniques. Along with its

  18. A breath of fresh air for cryogenics training

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    Whether you work full-time in a cryogenic installation or are required to handle cryogenic substances temporarily, you need to have followed the appropriate safety training.   Photo: Christoph Balle. Two new training courses are now available in English and French at CERN: “Cryogenic Safety – Fundamentals” (at the Prévessin Training Centre) and “Cryogenic Safety – Helium Transfer” (at the Cryolab). The first covers the content of levels 1 and 2 of the old “Cryogenic Safety” course. The second is a completely new course for CERN: it covers specific aspects of the transfer of liquid helium, such as the evaporation process of helium and the associated risks to human health (asphyxia due to displacement of oxygen), the colour code for gas bottles, etc. These training modules have been rewritten in response to the increase in the number of projects involving cryogenics and following various related incident...

  19. Impact of the Cryogen Free Revolution on Neutron Scattering Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, Oleg

    A global shortage of helium gas can seriously jeopardise the scientific programmes of neutron scattering laboratories due to the use of cryogenic sample environment in the majority of the neutron scattering experiments. Recently developed cryogen-free technology allows a significant reduction or even a complete elimination of liquid helium consumption. Here we review the impact of the cryogen-free revolution on cryogenic equipment used at large neutron facilities, such as cryostats, dilution refrigerators, superconducting magnets and other cryogenic systems. Particular attention is given to the newly developed superconducting magnets for neutron diffraction and spectroscopy experiments. Use of the cryogen-free approach, as well as cutting-edge superconducting magnet technology and advanced neutron optics allows researcher to achieve extraordinary performance in their experiments, opening up new opportunities in neutron scattering research.

  20. Properties of strain gages at cryogenic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Nobuo; Fujiyoshi, Toshimitsu.

    1978-01-01

    At the time of developing superconduction generators, the stress measurement for rotor parts is required to grasp the safety and performance of the rotor at cryogenic temperature, which is cooled with liquid helium. In case of carrying out the stress measurement with strain gages, the problems are as follows. The strain gages and lead wires are exposed to cryogenic temperature from 4 to 10 K and strong magnetic field of about 3T, and subjected to high centrifugal acceleration of about 500G. In order to establish the techniques of the stress measurement under such conditions, the adhesives and damp-proof coatings for strain gages and strain gages themselves in Japan and foreign countries were examined on the properties at cryogenic temperature. As for the properties of strain gages, mainly the apparent strain owing to temperature change was investigated, and the change of the gage factors was studies only at liquid nitrogen temperature. The stress measurement with strain gages at low temperature had been studied in detail down to liquid nitrogen temperature concerning LNG tanks. The experimental apparatus, the samples, the testing methods and the test results of cooling tests on adhesives and damp-proof coatings, and the temperature characteristics of strain gages are reported. The usable adhesives and coatings were found, and correction by accurate temperature measurement is required for apparent strain. (Kako, I.)

  1. Relativistic Spacecraft Propelled by Directed Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Neeraj; Lubin, Philip; Zhang, Qicheng

    2018-04-01

    Achieving relativistic flight to enable extrasolar exploration is one of the dreams of humanity and the long-term goal of our NASA Starlight program. We derive a relativistic solution for the motion of a spacecraft propelled by radiation pressure from a directed energy (DE) system. Depending on the system parameters, low-mass spacecraft can achieve relativistic speeds, thus enabling interstellar exploration. The diffraction of the DE system plays an important role and limits the maximum speed of the spacecraft. We consider “photon recycling” as a possible method to achieving higher speeds. We also discuss recent claims that our previous work on this topic is incorrect and show that these claims arise from an improper treatment of causality.

  2. Closed-cycle liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N. D.

    1993-06-01

    The paper presents experience gained by SSSPE TRUD in development of NK-33, NK-43, NK-39, and NK-31 liquid propellant rocket engines, which are reusable, closed-cycle type, working on liquid oxygen and kerosene. Results are presented showing the engine structure efficiency, configuration rationality, and optimal thrust values which provide the following specific parameters: specific vacuum impulses in the range 331-353 s (for NK-33 and NK-31 engines, respectively) and specific weight of about 8 kg/tf (NK-33 and NK-43 engines). The problems which occurred during engine development and the study of the main components of these engines are discussed. The important technical data, materials, methodology, and bench development data are presented for the gas generator, turbopump assembly, combustion chamber and full-scale engines.

  3. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting so-called Wave-guided Optical Waveguides (WOWs) fabricated by two-photon polymerization and capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. By integrating optical waveguides into the structures we have created freestanding waveguides which can be positioned...... anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light...... propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation...

  4. Space shuttle aps propellant thermal conditioner study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental effort was completed to evaluate a baffle type thermal conditioner for superheating O2 and H2 at supercritical pressures. The thermal conditioner consisted of a heat exchanger and an integral reactor (gas generator) operating on O2/H2 propellants. Primary emphasis was placed on the hydrogen conditioner with some effort on the oxygen conditioner and a study completed of alternate concepts for use in conditioning oxygen. A hydrogen conditioner was hot fire tested under a range of conditions to establish ignition, heat exchange and response parameters. A parallel technology task was completed to further evaluate the integral reactor and heat exchanger with the side mounted electrical spark igniter.

  5. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE WAKE EVOLUTION OF CONTRA-ROTATING PROPELLER IN PROPELLER OPEN WATER AND SELF-PROPULSION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the wake characteristics of a contra-rotating propeller (CRP were investigated using a numerical simulation. The numerical simulation was carried out with a Reynolds averaged Navier−Stokes equations solver. The numerical simulations were performed on CRPs in both propeller open water and self-propulsion conditions to investigate their wake evolution characteristics. To study the effect of the rudder on the wake in the self-propulsion condition, the numerical simulations with and without a rudder were compared. The evolution of the CRP wake was analysed through velocity and vorticity contours on one transverse plane between the forward and aft propellers and two transverse planes located downstream of the CRP. The variations of thrust and torque of the forward and aft propellers during one revolution of the CRP were compared to investigate the interaction between forward and aft propellers and the effect of a rudder.

  6. A new mucosal propeller flap (deep lingual artery axial propeller): the renaissance of lingual flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Adriana; Toia, Francesca; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Giunta, Gabriele; Moschella, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    Lingual flaps provide ideal mucosal coverage for intraoral defects but traditionally require two surgical stages. The authors present an axial mucosal propeller flap for single-stage intraoral reconstruction. The flap includes the mucosa of the lateral side of the tongue, islanded on the deep lingual vessels. Between 2011 and 2013, 23 patients underwent intraoral mucosal reconstruction with a deep lingual artery axial propeller flap after cancer resection in the cheek (n = 16), floor of the mouth (n = 2), retromolar trigone (n = 2), hard palate (n = 2), and soft palate (n = 1). Mean defect size was 19.5 cm. Preoperative and postoperative intraoral function was evaluated with the Functional Intraoral Glasgow Scale. The authors always achieved one-stage reconstruction with primary donor-site closure. The only complications were an infection treated conservatively and a late oronasal fistula caused by radiotherapy. All patients resumed an oral diet after 1 week and none required surgical revision. Mean 12-month postoperative Functional Intraoral Glasgow Scale score was better than the preoperative score (13.5 versus 12.8). The deep lingual artery axial propeller flap combines the advantages of the traditional lingual flap (i.e., reliable axial vascularization and like-with-like reconstruction) with those of a propeller flap (i.e., one-stage transfer of like tissue and extreme mobility) and has wider indications than a conventional lingual flap. The technique is fast and has low morbidity and good functional results, and the authors recommend it as a first-choice technique to reconstruct moderate to large intraoral defects. Therapeutic, IV.

  7. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Anindya [Fermilab; Rane, Tejas [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-07-06

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation has been listed out. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS have also been discussed. Simulation study has been carried out to compute the supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation have also been made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.

  8. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Anindya; Rane, Tejas; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2017-12-01

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation are determined. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS are discussed. The supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule are computed through simulation study. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation are made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.

  9. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  10. Cryogenic Safety HSE Seminar | 21 - 23 September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the LHC being the world’s largest superconducting installation, it’s not surprising that CERN is a world leader in cryogenic safety. On 21 and 22 September, over 100 experts in cryogenic safety will be coming to CERN to take part in CERN’s first Cryogenic Safety Seminar, which aims to stimulate collaboration and further the state of the art in this increasingly important field.  

  11. Texture comparison between cold rolled and cryogenically rolled pure copper

    OpenAIRE

    Lapeire, Linsey; Sidor, J; Lombardia, EM; Verbeken, Kim; De Graeve, Iris; Terryn, H; Kestens, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a considerable scientific interest in bulk ultrafine grained materials, due to their potential for superior mechanical properties. One of the possible formation methods of nano-grained materials is cryogenic rolling. The influence of rolling at cryogenic temperatures has been investigated. Significant differences in the textures and the microstructures can be observed between the cryogenically rolled copper and conventionally cold rolled copper, reduced to the same thickness.

  12. Electrochemically powered self-propelled electrophoretic nanosubmarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin

    2010-09-01

    In the past few years, we have witnessed rapid developments in the realization of the old nanotechnology dream, autonomous nanosubmarines. These nanomachines are self-powered, taking energy from their environment by electrocatalytic conversion of chemicals present in the solution, self-propelled by flux of the electrons within the submarine and the hydronium ions on the surface of the nanosub, powering it in the direction opposite to that of the flux of the hydronium. These nanosubmarines are responsive to external fields, able to follow complex magnetic patterns, navigate themselves in complex microfluidic channels, follow chemical gradients, carry cargo, and communicate with each other. This minireview focuses on a discussion of the fundamentals of the electrophoretic mechanism underlying the propulsion of this sort of nanosub, as well as a demonstration of the proof-of-concept capabilities of nanosubmarines.In the past few years, we have witnessed rapid developments in the realization of the old nanotechnology dream, autonomous nanosubmarines. These nanomachines are self-powered, taking energy from their environment by electrocatalytic conversion of chemicals present in the solution, self-propelled by flux of the electrons within the submarine and the hydronium ions on the surface of the nanosub, powering it in the direction opposite to that of the flux of the hydronium. These nanosubmarines are responsive to external fields, able to follow complex magnetic patterns, navigate themselves in complex microfluidic channels, follow chemical gradients, carry cargo, and communicate with each other. This minireview focuses on a discussion of the fundamentals of the electrophoretic mechanism underlying the propulsion of this sort of nanosub, as well as a demonstration of the proof-of-concept capabilities of nanosubmarines. In memory of Karel Zeman, Czech animator, who encouraged thousands of young people into science and technology, on the occasion of the 100th

  13. The Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on Cutting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Khedkar, Nitin K.; Jagtap, Bhushan; Singh, T. P.

    2017-08-01

    Enhancing the cutting tool life is important and economic factor to reduce the tooling as well as manufacturing cost. The tool life is improved considerably by 92 % after cryogenic treatment. The cryogenic treatment is a one-time permanent, sub-zero heat treatment that entirely changes cross-section of cutting tool. The cryogenic treatment is carried out with deep freezing of cutting tool materials to enhance physical and mechanical properties. The cryogenic treatment improves mechanical such as hardness, toughness and tribological properties such as wear resistance, coefficient of friction, surface finish, dimensional stability and stress relief. The deep cryogenic treatment is the most beneficial treatment applied on cutting tools. The cryogenic treatment is the most advanced heat treatment and popular to improve performance of the cutting tool. The optimization of cryogenic treatment variables is necessary to improve tool life. This study reviews the effects of cryogenic treatment on microstructure, tribological properties of tool steels and machining applications of cutting tool by investigating the surface and performing the surface characterization test like SEM. The economy of cutting tool can be achieved by deep cryogenic treatment.

  14. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  15. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  16. The effect of cryogenic grinding and hammer milling on the flavour quality of ground pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Zeng, Fankui; Wang, Qinghuang; Ou, Shiyi; Tan, Lehe; Gu, Fenglin

    2013-12-15

    In this study, we compared the effects of cryogenic grinding and hammer milling on the flavour attributes of black, white, and green pepper. The flavour attributes were analysed using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), sensory evaluation and electronic nose (e-nose) analysis. Cryogenic grinding resulted in minimal damage to the colour, flavour, and sensory attributes of the spices. Cryogenic grinding was also better than hammer milling at preserving the main potent aroma constituents, but the concentrations of the main aroma constituents were dramatically reduced after storing the samples at 4 °C for 6 months. Pattern matching performed by the e-nose further supported our sensory and instrumental findings. Overall, cryogenic grinding was superior to hammer milling for preserving the sensory properties and flavour attributes of pepper without significantly affecting its quality. However, we found that the flavour quality of ground pepper was reduced during storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring of chemical degradation in propellants using AOTF spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigley, Robert; Jin, Feng; Lorenzo, Jose; Soos, Jolanta; Trivedi, Sudhir

    2004-02-01

    Candidate weapon systems have conservative environmental and service life limits to ensure both performance reliability and ordnance safety. One important element that must be monitored is chemical indicators of propellant degradation. Chemical degradation of energetic compounds in propellants can result in reduced performance and potential instability and auto-ignition in extreme circumstances. The current method for testing for chemical indicators of propellant degradation consists of removing a missile from its sub, disassembling it, and performing HPLC testing. An improvement to the current system is to use near-infrared (NIR) spectral analysis to measure chemical indicators of propellant degradation. An AOTF multi-channel spectrometer with reflectance probes can simultaneously scan different areas of a propellant. A study has shown clear spectral differences in samples of M1MP propellant with two different concentrations of the chemical diphenyl amine (DPA). DPA is very similar to many important chemical indicators of propellant degradation. The spectral differences provide the basis for correlating spectral data to DPA concentration using a multivariate regression technique.

  18. A review of research in low earth orbit propellant collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lake A.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2015-05-01

    This comprehensive review examines the efforts of previous researchers to develop concepts for propellant-collecting spacecraft, estimate the performance of these systems, and understand the physics involved. Rocket propulsion requires the spacecraft to expend two fundamental quantities: energy and propellant mass. A growing number of spacecraft collect the energy they need to execute propulsive maneuvers in-situ with solar panels. In contrast, every spacecraft using rocket propulsion has carried all of the propellant mass needed for the mission from the ground, which limits the range and mission capabilities. Numerous researchers have explored the concept of collecting propellant mass while in space. These concepts have varied in scale and complexity from chemical ramjets to fusion-driven interstellar vessels. Research into propellant-collecting concepts occurred in distinct eras. During the Cold War, concepts tended to be large, complex, and nuclear powered. After the Cold War, concepts transitioned to solar power sources and more effort has been devoted to detailed analysis of specific components of the propellant-collecting architecture. By detailing the major contributions and limitations of previous work, this review concisely presents the state-of-the-art and outlines five areas for continued research. These areas include air-compatible cathode technology, techniques to improve propellant utilization on atmospheric species, in-space compressor and liquefaction technology, improved hypersonic and hyperthermal free molecular flow inlet designs, and improved understanding of how design parameters affect system performance.

  19. Thermal Examination of an Orbiting Cryogenic Fuel Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Patrick V.; Canfield, Steven L.; Carrington, Connie; Fikes, John

    2002-01-01

    For many years NASA has been interested in the storage and transfer of cryogenic fuels in space. Lunar, L2 and other chemical propulsive space vehicle missions now have staged refueling needs that a fuel depot would satisfy. The depot considered is located in lower earth orbit. Many considerations must go into designing and building such a station. Multi-layer insulation systems, thermal shielding and low conductive structural supports are the principal means of protecting the system from excessive heat loss due to boiloff. This study focuses on the thermal losses associated with storing LH2 in a passively cooled fuel depot in a lower earth equatorial orbit. The corresponding examination looks at several configurations of the fuel depot. An analytical model has been developed to determine the thermal advantages and disadvantages of three different fuel depot configurations. Each of the systems consists of three Boeing rocket bodies arranged in various configurations. The first two configurations are gravity gradient stabilized while the third one is a spin-stabilized concept. Each concept was chosen for self-righting capabilities as well as the fuel settling capabilities, however the purpose of this paper is to prove which of the three concepts is the most efficient passively cooled system. The specific areas to be discussed are the heating time from the fusion temperature to the vaporization temperature and the amount of boiloff for a specific number of orbits. Each of the previous points is compared using various sun exposed surface areas of the tanks.

  20. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy nanostructural study of shed microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Issman

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are sub-micron membrane vesicles (100-1000 nm shed from normal and pathologic cells due to stimulation or apoptosis. MPs can be found in the peripheral blood circulation of healthy individuals, whereas elevated concentrations are found in pregnancy and in a variety of diseases. Also, MPs participate in physiological processes, e.g., coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Since their clinical properties are important, we have developed a new methodology based on nano-imaging that provides significant new data on MPs nanostructure, their composition and function. We are among the first to characterize by direct-imaging cryogenic transmitting electron microscopy (cryo-TEM the near-to-native nanostructure of MP systems isolated from different cell types and stimulation procedures. We found that there are no major differences between the MP systems we have studied, as most particles were spherical, with diameters from 200 to 400 nm. However, each MP population is very heterogeneous, showing diverse morphologies. We investigated by cryo-TEM the effects of standard techniques used to isolate and store MPs, and found that either high-g centrifugation of MPs for isolation purposes, or slow freezing to -80 °C for storage introduce morphological artifacts, which can influence MP nanostructure, and thus affect the efficiency of these particles as future diagnostic tools.