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Sample records for cryofixed myxococcus xanthus

  1. Surface motility of Myxococcus Xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, Maxsim; Hu, William; Jin, Fan; Zhao, Kun; Shi, Wenyuan; Wong, Gerard

    2011-03-01

    We examine the surface motility of Myxococcus Xanthus, a bacterium species found in soil that exhibits a broad range of self-organizing behavior, including predatory ``swarms'' and survival-enhancing ``fruiting bodies.'' To quantify the effects of exopolysaccharides (EPS) on surface adhesion and motility, we use modified versions of particle tracking algorithms from colloid physics to analyze bacterial trajectories, and compare the wild type (WT) strain to EPS knockout and EPS overproducer strains. We find that EPS deficiency leads to an increase in the number of ``standing'' bacteria oriented normal to the surface, attached by one end with minimal motility. EPS overproduction, by contrast, suppresses this phenotype. A detailed investigation of the influence of EPS on Myxococcus social motility will be presented.

  2. Active matter model of Myxococcus xanthus aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, Adam; Bahar, Fatmagul; Liu, Guannan; Thutupalli, Shashi; Welch, Roy; Yllanes, David; Shaevitz, Joshua; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil-dwelling bacterium that exhibits several fascinating collective behaviors including streaming, swarming, and generation of fruiting bodies. A striking feature of M. xanthus is that it periodically reverses its motility direction. The first stage of fruiting body formation is characterized by the aggregation of cells on a surface into round mesoscopic structures. Experiments have shown that this aggregation relies heavily on regulation of the reversal rate and local mechanical interactions, suggesting motility-induced phase separation may play an important role. We have adapted self-propelled particle models to include cell reversal and motility suppression resulting from sporulation observed in aggregates. Using 2D molecular dynamics simulations, we map the phase behavior in the space of Péclet number and local density and examine the kinetics of aggregation for comparison to experiments.

  3. Growth responses of Escherichia coli and Myxococcus xanthus on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteria colonize surfaces responding to the physicochemical properties of substrates. ... non-motile E. coli, and Myxococcus xanthus, cultured on semi-solid agar substrates containing different amounts of nutrient and agar. ... Article Metrics.

  4. Isolation of a surface glycoprotein from Myxococcus xanthus.

    OpenAIRE

    Maeba, P Y

    1986-01-01

    The isolation of a glycoprotein from vegetative cells of Myxococcus xanthus is reported. The protein, abbreviated VGP, was first identified during a survey of surface proteins as a major protein that could be radioiodinated in vegetative, but not developing, cells (P.Y. Maeba, J. Bacteriol. 155:1033-1041, 1983). The protein was extracted from membranes with Triton X-100 and subsequently purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, chromatofocusing, and gel filtration. The protein has an Mr of a...

  5. Mechanism for Collective Cell Alignment in Myxococcus xanthus Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Balagam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus cells self-organize into aligned groups, clusters, at various stages of their lifecycle. Formation of these clusters is crucial for the complex dynamic multi-cellular behavior of these bacteria. However, the mechanism underlying the cell alignment and clustering is not fully understood. Motivated by studies of clustering in self-propelled rods, we hypothesized that M. xanthus cells can align and form clusters through pure mechanical interactions among cells and between cells and substrate. We test this hypothesis using an agent-based simulation framework in which each agent is based on the biophysical model of an individual M. xanthus cell. We show that model agents, under realistic cell flexibility values, can align and form cell clusters but only when periodic reversals of cell directions are suppressed. However, by extending our model to introduce the observed ability of cells to deposit and follow slime trails, we show that effective trail-following leads to clusters in reversing cells. Furthermore, we conclude that mechanical cell alignment combined with slime-trail-following is sufficient to explain the distinct clustering behaviors observed for wild-type and non-reversing M. xanthus mutants in recent experiments. Our results are robust to variation in model parameters, match the experimentally observed trends and can be applied to understand surface motility patterns of other bacterial species.

  6. Phase separation dynamics during Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guannan; Bahar, Fatmagul; Patch, Adam; Thutupalli, Shashi; Yllanes, David; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Welch, Roy; Shaevitz, Joshua

    Many living systems take advantage of collective behavior for group survival. We use the soil-dwelling bacterium Myxococcus xanthus as a model to study out-of-equilibrium phase separation during fruiting body formation. M. xanthus cells have the ability to glide on solid surfaces and reverse their direction periodically. When starved, M. xanthus cells aggregate together and form structures called fruiting bodies, inside of which cells sporulate to survive stressful conditions. We show that at high cell density the formation of fruiting bodies is a phase separation process. From experimental data that combines single-cell tracking, population-scale imaging, mutants, and drug applications, we construct the phase diagram of M. xanthus in the space of Péclet number and cell density. When wild type cells are starved, we find that they actively increase their Péclet number by modulating gliding speed and reversal frequency which induces a phase separation from a gas-like state to an aggregated fruiting body state.

  7. Mechanism of cell alignment in groups of Myxococcus xanthus bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgam, Rajesh; Igoshin, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a model for studying self-organization in bacteria. These flexible cylindrical bacteria move along. In groups, M. xanthus cells align themselves into dynamic cell clusters but the mechanism underlying their formation is unknown. It has been shown that steric interactions can cause alignment in self-propelled hard rods but it is not clear how flexibility and reversals affect the alignment and cluster formation. We have investigated cell alignment process using our biophysical model of M. xanthus cell in an agent-based simulation framework under realistic cell flexibility values. We observed that flexible model cells can form aligned cell clusters when reversals are suppressed but these clusters disappeared when reversals frequency becomes similar to the observed value. However, M. xanthus cells follow slime (polysaccharide gel like material) trails left by other cells and we show that implementing this into our model rescues cell clustering for reversing cells. Our results show that slime following along with periodic cell reversals act as positive feedback to reinforce existing slime trails and recruit more cells. Furthermore, we have observed that mechanical cell alignment combined with slime following is sufficient to explain the distinct clustering patterns of reversing and non-reversing cells as observed in recent experiments. This work is supported by NSF MCB 0845919 and 1411780.

  8. Phase separation like dynamics during Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guannan; Thutupalli, Shashi; Wigbers, Manon; Shaevitz, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Collective motion exists in many living organisms as an advantageous strategy to help the entire group with predation, forage, and survival. However, the principles of self-organization underlying such collective motions remain unclear. During various developmental stages of the soil-dwelling bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, different types of collective motions are observed. In particular, when starved, M. xanthus cells eventually aggregate together to form 3-dimensional structures (fruiting bodies), inside which cells sporulate in response to the stress. We study the fruiting body formation process as an out of equilibrium phase separation process. As local cell density increases, the dynamics of the aggregation M. xanthus cells switch from a spatio-temporally random process, resembling nucleation and growth, to an emergent pattern formation process similar to a spinodal decomposition. By employing high-resolution microscopy and a video analysis system, we are able to track the motion of single cells within motile collective groups, while separately tuning local cell density, cell velocity and reversal frequency, probing the multi-dimensional phase space of M. xanthus development.

  9. The Lethal Cargo of Myxococcus xanthus Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Berleman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus is a bacterial micro-predator known for hunting other microbes in a wolf pack-like manner. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs are produced in large quantities by M. xanthus and have a highly organized structure in the extracellular milieu, sometimes occurring in chains that link neighboring cells within a biofilm. OMVs may be a vehicle for mediating wolf pack activity by delivering hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics aimed at killing prey microbes. Here, both the protein and small molecule cargo of the OMV and membrane fractions of M. xanthus were characterized and compared. Our analysis indicates a number of proteins that are OMV-specific or OMV-enriched, including several with putative hydrolytic function. Secondary metabolite profiling of OMVs identifies 16 molecules, many associated with antibiotic activities. Several hydrolytic enzyme homologs were identified, including MXAN_3564 (mepA, an M36 protease homolog. Genetic disruption of mepA leads to a significant reduction in extracellular protease activity suggesting MepA is the long-predicted (yet to date unknown primary extracellular protease in M. xanthus.

  10. Germination of myxospores from the fruiting bodies of Myxococcus xanthus.

    OpenAIRE

    Otani, M.; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1995-01-01

    Germination of myxospores from fruiting bodies of Myxococcus xanthus was examined under a light microscope as well as by analyzing the incorporation of [3H]uracil into the RNA fraction. Efficient germination was observed in 0.2% Casitone containing 8 mM MgSO4 and 1 mM CaCl2 at 30 degrees C. Under this condition, spherical myxospores were converted into rod-shaped vegetative cells within 5 to 6 h. The germination was severely inhibited in the presence of 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a p...

  11. Dual Biochemical Oscillators May Control Cellular Reversals in Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhert, Erik; Rangamani, Padmini; Davis, Annie E.; Oster, George; Berleman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium that glides on surfaces, reversing direction approximately once every 6 min. Motility in M. xanthus is governed by the Che-like Frz pathway and the Ras-like Mgl pathway, which together cause the cell to oscillate back and forth. Previously, Igoshin et al. (2004) suggested that the cellular oscillations are caused by cyclic changes in concentration of active Frz proteins that govern motility. In this study, we present a computational model that integrates both the Frz and Mgl pathways, and whose downstream components can be read as motor activity governing cellular reversals. This model faithfully reproduces wildtype and mutant behaviors by simulating individual protein knockouts. In addition, the model can be used to examine the impact of contact stimuli on cellular reversals. The basic model construction relies on the presence of two nested feedback circuits, which prompted us to reexamine the behavior of M. xanthus cells. We performed experiments to test the model, and this cell analysis challenges previous assumptions of 30 to 60 min reversal periods in frzCD, frzF, frzE, and frzZ mutants. We demonstrate that this average reversal period is an artifact of the method employed to record reversal data, and that in the absence of signal from the Frz pathway, Mgl components can occasionally reverse the cell near wildtype periodicity, but frz- cells are otherwise in a long nonoscillating state. PMID:25468349

  12. Pili-driven surface motility of Myxococcus xanthus

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    Gibiansky, Maxsim; Hu, Wei; Zhao, Kun; Pan, Hongwei; Shi, Wenyuan; Dahmen, Karin; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a common, rod-shaped soil-dwelling bacterium with complex motility characteristics. In groups, M. xanthus bacteria can move via social ``S'' motility, in which the Type IV Pili (TFP) attach to secreted exopolysaccharides (EPS). We examine this motility mechanism using high-framerate video acquisition, taking data on individual bacteria at 400 frames per second; using particle tracking algorithms, we algorithmically reconstruct the bacterial trajectories. The motion of a single bacterium as it is pulled by its TFP through the EPS layer on the surface is not smooth, but instead displays distinct plateaus and slips, with a wide range of plateau and slip lengths. The distribution of slips exhibits power law scaling, consistent with a crackling noise model; crackling noise has previously been used to model nonbiological systems such as earthquake dynamics and Barkhausen noise. We show quantitative agreement between mean field friction models and observed bacterial dynamics. We demonstrate that the crackling noise behavior of M. xanthus is strongly dependent on the presence of EPS, but is unaffected by the chemotactic behavior of the bacterium; we also demonstrate velocity coupling between pairs of bacteria in the early stages of social motility.

  13. Phase transitions during fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus

    CERN Document Server

    Thutupalli, Shashi; Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2014-01-01

    The formation of a collectively moving group benefits individuals within a population in a variety of ways such as ultra-sensitivity to perturbation, collective modes of feeding, and protection from environmental stress. While some collective groups use a single organizing principle, others can dynamically shift the behavior of the group by modifying the interaction rules at the individual level. The surface-dwelling bacterium Myxococcus xanthus forms dynamic collective groups both to feed on prey and to aggregate during times of starvation. The latter behavior, termed fruiting-body formation, involves a complex, coordinated series of density changes that ultimately lead to three-dimensional aggregates comprising hundreds of thousands of cells and spores. This multi-step developmental process most likely involves several different single-celled behaviors as the population condenses from a loose, two-dimensional sheet to a three-dimensional mound. Here, we use high-resolution microscopy and computer vision sof...

  14. Study of elastic collisions of Myxococcus xanthus in swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Morcos, Faruck; Sweet, Christopher R.; Kaiser, Dale; Chatterjee, Santanu; Liu, Xiaomin; Chen, Danny Z.; Alber, Mark

    2011-04-01

    In very low density situations where a single myxobacterial cell is isolated from direct contact with other cells, the slime capsule interaction with the substrate or slime tracks on the substrate produce a viscous drag that results in a smooth gliding motion. Viscoelastic interactions of myxobacteria cells in a low-density domain close to the edge of a swarm are studied using a combination of a cell-based three-dimensional computational model and cell-tracking experiments. The model takes into account the flexible nature of Myxococcus xanthus as well as the effects of adhesion between cells arising from the interaction of the capsular polysaccharide covering two cells in contact with each other. New image and dynamic cell curvature analysis algorithms are used to track and measure the change in cell shapes that occur as flexible cells undergo significant bending during collisions resulting in direct calibration of the model parameters. Like aspect-ratio and directional reversals, the flexibility of cells and the adhesive cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions of M. xanthus play an important role in smooth gliding and more efficient swarming.

  15. A new putative sigma factor of Myxococcus xanthus.

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    Apelian, D; Inouye, S

    1993-06-01

    A third putative sigma factor gene, sigC, has been isolated from Myxococcus xanthus by using the sigA gene (formerly rpoD of M. xanthus) as a probe. The nucleotide sequence of sigC has been determined, and an open reading frame of 295 residues (M(r) = 33,430) has been identified. The deduced amino acid sequence of sigC exhibits the features which are characteristic of other bacterial sigma factors. The characterization of a sigC-lacZ strain has demonstrated that sigC expression is induced immediately after cells enter into the developmental cycle and is dramatically reduced at the onset of sporulation. A deletion mutant of sigC grows normally in vegetative culture and is able to develop normally. However, in contrast to the wild-type cells, the sigC deletion mutant cells became capable of forming fruiting bodies and myxospores on semirich agar plates. This suggests that sigC may play a role in expression of genes involved in negatively regulating the initiation of fruiting body formation.

  16. Exopolysaccharide-independent social motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available Social motility (S motility, the coordinated movement of large cell groups on agar surfaces, of Myxococcus xanthus requires type IV pili (TFP and exopolysaccharides (EPS. Previous models proposed that this behavior, which only occurred within cell groups, requires cycles of TFP extension and retraction triggered by the close interaction of TFP with EPS. However, the curious observation that M. xanthus can perform TFP-dependent motility at a single-cell level when placed onto polystyrene surfaces in a highly viscous medium containing 1% methylcellulose indicated that "S motility" is not limited to group movements. In an apparent further challenge of the previous findings for S motility, mutants defective in EPS production were found to perform TFP-dependent motility on polystyrene surface in methylcellulose-containing medium. By exploring the interactions between pilin and surface materials, we found that the binding of TFP onto polystyrene surfaces eliminated the requirement for EPS in EPS(- cells and thus enabled TFP-dependent motility on a single cell level. However, the presence of a general anchoring surface in a viscous environment could not substitute for the role of cell surface EPS in group movement. Furthermore, EPS was found to serve as a self-produced anchoring substrate that can be shed onto surfaces to enable cells to conduct TFP-dependent motility regardless of surface properties. These results suggested that in certain environments, such as in methylcellulose solution, the cells could bypass the need for EPS to anchor their TPF and conduct single-cell S motility to promote exploratory movement of colonies over new specific surfaces.

  17. Developmental cell interactions in Myxococcus xanthus and the spoC locus

    OpenAIRE

    Shimkets, Lawrence J.; Gill, Ronald E.; Kaiser, Dale

    1983-01-01

    The product(s) of the Myxococcus xanthus spoC locus is required for two multicellular activities in fruiting body development, rippling and sporulation. Ripples, which are formed early in development, are spatially separated ridges of cells that move synchronously. Myxospores are heat-resistant resting cells that are formed near the end of the developmental process. To investigate the function of spoC, it was cloned in an Escherichia coli plasmid, then transferred to M. xanthus by specialized...

  18. Discovering the Hidden Secondary Metabolome of Myxococcus xanthus: a Study of Intraspecific Diversity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Daniel; Zurek, Gabriela; Revermann, Ole; Vos, Michiel; Velicer, Gregory J.; Müller, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    As a monophyletic group, the myxobacteria are known to produce a broad spectrum of secondary metabolites. However, the degree of metabolic diversity that can be found within a single species remains unexplored. The model species Myxococcus xanthus produces several metabolites also present in other myxobacterial species, but only one compound unique to M. xanthus has been found to date. Here, we compare the metabolite profiles of 98 M. xanthus strains that originate from 78 locations worldwide and include 20 centimeter-scale isolates from one location. This screen reveals a strikingly high level of intraspecific diversity in the M. xanthus secondary metabolome. The identification of 37 nonubiquitous candidate compounds greatly exceeds the small number of secondary metabolites previously known to derive from this species. These results suggest that M. xanthus may be a promising source of future natural products and that thorough intraspecific screens of other species could reveal many new compounds of interest. PMID:18378661

  19. Coupling of protein localization and cell movements by a dynamically localized response regulator in Myxococcus xanthus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardy, Simone; Freymark, Gerald; Hebener, Sabrina

    2007-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus cells harbor two motility machineries, type IV pili (Tfp) and the A-engine. During reversals, the two machineries switch polarity synchronously. We present a mechanism that synchronizes this polarity switching. We identify the required for motility response regulator (Rom...

  20. Predatory activity of Myxococcus xanthus outer-membrane vesicles and properties of their hydrolase cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alun G L; Davey, Hazel M; Cookson, Alan; Currinn, Heather; Cooke-Fox, Gillian; Stanczyk, Paulina J; Whitworth, David E

    2012-11-01

    The deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus predates upon members of the soil microbial community by secreting digestive factors and lysing prey cells. Like other Gram-negative bacteria, M. xanthus produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), and we show here that M. xanthus OMVs are able to kill Escherichia coli cells. The OMVs of M. xanthus were found to contain active proteases, phosphatases, other hydrolases and secondary metabolites. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to be almost exclusively associated with OMVs, implying that there is active targeting of phosphatases into OMVs, while other OMV components appear to be packaged passively. The kinetic properties of OMV alkaline phosphatase suggest that there may have been evolutionary adaptation of OMV enzymes to a relatively indiscriminate mode of action, consistent with a role in predation. In addition, the observed regulation of production, and fragility of OMV activity, may protect OMV-producing cells from exploitation by M. xanthus cheating genotypes and/or other competitors. Killing of E. coli by M. xanthus OMVs was enhanced by the addition of a fusogenic enzyme (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; GAPDH), which triggers fusion of vesicles with target membranes within eukaryotic cells. This suggests that the mechanism of prey killing involves OMV fusion with the E. coli outer membrane. M. xanthus secretes GAPDH, which could potentially modulate the fusion of co-secreted OMVs with prey organisms in nature, enhancing their predatory activity.

  1. Comprehensive set of integrative plasmid vectors for copper-inducible gene expression in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; García-Bravo, Elena; García-Hernández, Raquel; Martínez-Cayuela, Marina; Pérez, Juana; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2012-04-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is widely used as a model system for studying gliding motility, multicellular development, and cellular differentiation. Moreover, M. xanthus is a rich source of novel secondary metabolites. The analysis of these processes has been hampered by the limited set of tools for inducible gene expression. Here we report the construction of a set of plasmid vectors to allow copper-inducible gene expression in M. xanthus. Analysis of the effect of copper on strain DK1622 revealed that copper concentrations of up to 500 μM during growth and 60 μM during development do not affect physiological processes such as cell viability, motility, or aggregation into fruiting bodies. Of the copper-responsive promoters in M. xanthus reported so far, the multicopper oxidase cuoA promoter was used to construct expression vectors, because no basal expression is observed in the absence of copper and induction linearly depends on the copper concentration in the culture medium. Four different plasmid vectors have been constructed, with different marker selection genes and sites of integration in the M. xanthus chromosome. The vectors have been tested and gene expression quantified using the lacZ gene. Moreover, we demonstrate the functional complementation of the motility defect caused by lack of PilB by the copper-induced expression of the pilB gene. These versatile vectors are likely to deepen our understanding of the biology of M. xanthus and may also have biotechnological applications.

  2. Mechanism for collective cell alignment in Myxococcus xanthus bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Balagam, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    M. xanthus cells self-organize into clusters, aligned cell groups, at various stages of its lifecycle. Formation of these clusters is crucial for complex dynamic multi-cellular behavior of these bacteria. However the mechanism underlying the cell alignment and clustering is not fully understood. Motivated by studies of clustering in self-propelled rods, we hypothesized that M. xanthus cells can align and form clusters through pure mechanical interactions among cells and between cells and substrate. We test this hypothesis using an agent-based simulation framework where each agent is based on biophysical model of individual M. xanthus cell. We show that model agents, under realistic cell flexibility values, can align and form cell clusters but only when periodic reversals of cell directions are suppressed. However, by extending our model to introduce observed ability of cells to lay and follow slime trails, we show that effective trail following leads to clusters in reversing cells. Furthermore, we conclude th...

  3. Growth of Myxococcus xanthus in continuous-flow-cell bioreactors as a method for studying development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Gregory T; Jin, Yujie; Whitfield, Damion L; Mu, Andrew Y; Wong, Edward C; Wuertz, Stefan; Singer, Mitchell

    2014-04-01

    Nutrient sensors and developmental timers are two classes of genes vital to the establishment of early development in the social soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The products of these genes trigger and regulate the earliest events that drive the colony from a vegetative state to aggregates, which ultimately leads to the formation of fruiting bodies and the cellular differentiation of the individual cells. In order to more accurately identify the genes and pathways involved in the initiation of this multicellular developmental program in M. xanthus, we adapted a method of growing vegetative populations within a constant controllable environment by using flow cell bioreactors, or flow cells. By establishing an M. xanthus community within a flow cell, we are able to test developmental responses to changes in the environment with fewer concerns for effects due to nutrient depletion or bacterial waste production. This approach allows for greater sensitivity in investigating communal environmental responses, such as nutrient sensing. To demonstrate the versatility of our growth environment, we carried out time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize M. xanthus biofilm growth and fruiting body development, as well as fluorescence staining of exopolysaccharides deposited by biofilms. We also employed the flow cells in a nutrient titration to determine the minimum concentration required to sustain vegetative growth. Our data show that by using a flow cell, M. xanthus can be held in a vegetative growth state at low nutrient concentrations for long periods, and then, by slightly decreasing the nutrient concentration, cells can be allowed to initiate the developmental program.

  4. Characterization of asgC a Gene Required for Cell-Cell Signaling Early Development of Myxococcus Xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    induction and curing of bacteriophage P1 lysogens. Virology 48: 679-689. Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E.F., and Maniatis , T. (1989) Molecular Cloning : A...Genetics of gliding motility in Myxococcus xanthus: molecular cloning of the mgl locus. Mol Gen Genet 207: 256-266. Stock, J.B., Ninfa, A.J., and...Plamann. 1995. A missense mutation in rpoD results in an A-signaling defect in Myxococcus xanthus. Molecular Microbiology 18:943-952. Appendix B

  5. Temperate Myxococcus xanthus phage Mx8 encodes a DNA adenine methylase, Mox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, V; Salmi, D; Thomas, D; Herbert, S K; Hartzell, P L; Youderian, P

    1997-07-01

    Temperate bacteriophage Mx8 of Myxococcus xanthus encapsidates terminally repetitious DNA, packaged as circular permutations of its 49-kbp genome. During both lytic and lysogenic development, Mx8 expresses a nonessential DNA methylase, Mox, which modifies adenine residues in occurrences of XhoI and PstI recognition sites, CTCGAG and CTGCAG, respectively, on both phage DNA and the host chromosome. The mox gene is necessary for methylase activity in vivo, because an amber mutation in the mox gene abolishes activity. The mox gene is the only phage gene required for methylase activity in vivo, because ectopic expression of mox as part of the M. xanthus mglBA operon results in partial methylation of the host chromosome. The predicted amino acid sequence of Mox is related most closely to that of the methylase involved in the cell cycle control of Caulobacter crescentus. We speculate that Mox acts to protect Mx8 phage DNA against restriction upon infection of a subset of natural M. xanthus hosts. One natural isolate of M. xanthus, the lysogenic source of related phage Mx81, produces a restriction endonuclease with the cleavage specificity of endonuclease BstBI.

  6. Developmental cell interactions in Myxococcus xanthus and the spoC locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimkets, L J; Gill, R E; Kaiser, D

    1983-03-01

    The product(s) of the Myxococcus xanthus spoC locus is required for two multicellular activities in fruiting body development, rippling and sporulation. Ripples, which are formed early in development, are spatially separated ridges of cells that move synchronously. Myxospores are heat-resistant resting cells that are formed near the end of the developmental process. To investigate the function of spoC, it was cloned in an Escherichia coli plasmid, then transferred to M. xanthus by specialized transduction with coliphage P1. The plasmid, which cannot replicate in M. xanthus, integrated into the M. xanthus chromosome, producing two copies of the spoC locus in tandem. Cells containing one copy of a mutant allele and one copy of the wild-type allele displayed the wild-type phenotype. Cells containing two different mutant alleles failed to ripple or sporulate, implying that all four independent spoC mutations are in the same gene or unit of transcription. Homozygous mutant duplications arose from constructions in which DNA from a spo(+) donor was transduced into a spoC recipient, or vice versa, at an average frequency of 14%, indicating that gene conversion was a frequent event.

  7. Rhizobial galactoglucan determines the predatory pattern of Myxococcus xanthus and protects Sinorhizobium meliloti from predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Juana; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Millán, Vicenta; Shimkets, Lawrence J; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2014-07-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a social bacterium that preys on prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Co-culture of M. xanthus with reference laboratory strains and field isolates of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti revealed two different predatory patterns that resemble frontal and wolf-pack attacks. Use of mutants impaired in the two types of M. xanthus surface motility (A or adventurous and S or social motility) and a csgA mutant, which is unable to form macroscopic travelling waves known as ripples, has demonstrated that both motility systems but not rippling are required for efficient predation. To avoid frontal attack and reduce killing rates, rhizobial cells require a functional expR gene. ExpR regulates expression of genes involved in a variety of functions. The use of S. meliloti mutants impaired in several of these functions revealed that the exopolysaccharide galactoglucan (EPS II) is the major determinant of the M. xanthus predatory pattern. The data also suggest that this biopolymer confers an ecological advantage to rhizobial survival in soil, which may have broad environmental implications.

  8. Genetic Dissection of the Light-Inducible carQRS Promoter Region of Myxococcus xanthus

    OpenAIRE

    Whitworth, David E.; Bryan, Samantha J.; Berry, Andrew E.; McGowan, Simon J.; Hodgson, David A

    2004-01-01

    In Myxococcus xanthus photoprotective carotenoids are produced in response to illumination due to regulated expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes at two loci. Induction of the carotenogenesis regulon is dependent on expression of the carQRS operon. The first gene product of the operon, CarQ, is a sigma factor belonging to the ECF family and is responsible for light-dependent initiation of transcription at the carQRS promoter. We defined the minimal carQRS promoter as a 145-bp fragment o...

  9. Enhancer-binding proteins with a forkhead-associated domain and the sigma(54) regulon in Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kaiser, D.

    2005-01-01

    In response to starvation, Myxococcus xanthus initiates a developmental program that results in the formation of spore-filled, multicellular fruiting bodies. Many developmentally regulated genes in M. xanthus are transcribed from sigma(54) promoters, and these genes require enhancer-binding prote......In response to starvation, Myxococcus xanthus initiates a developmental program that results in the formation of spore-filled, multicellular fruiting bodies. Many developmentally regulated genes in M. xanthus are transcribed from sigma(54) promoters, and these genes require enhancer...

  10. Pattern formation mechanisms in motility mutants of Myxococcus xanthus

    CERN Document Server

    Starruss, Joern; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Baer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Formation of spatial patterns of cells is a recurring theme in biology and often depends on regulated cell motility. Motility of M. xanthus depends on two motility machineries: the S-engine and A-engine. Moving M. xanthus cells can organize into spreading colonies or spore-filled fruiting bodies depending on their nutritional status. To understand these two pattern formation processes and the contributions by the two motility machineries, as well as cell reversal, we analyze spatial self-organization in 3 strains: i) a mutant that moves unidirectionally without reversing by the A-motility system only, ii) a unidirectional mutant that is also equipped with the S-motility system, and iii) the wild-type that, in addition to the two motility systems, reverses its direction of movement. The mutant moving by the A-engine illustrates that collective motion in the form of large moving clusters can arise in gliding bacteria due to steric interactions of the rod-shaped cells, without the need of invoking any biochemica...

  11. Genome Evolution and the Emergence of Fruiting Body Development in Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Barry; Bhat, Swapna; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is thought to promote speciation in bacteria, though well-defined examples have not been put forward. Methodology/Principle Findings We examined the evolutionary history of the genes essential for a trait that defines a phylogenetic order, namely fruiting body development of the Myxococcales. Seventy-eight genes that are essential for Myxococcus xanthus development were examined for LGT. About 73% of the genes exhibit a phylogeny similar to that of the 16S rDNA gene and a codon bias consistent with other M. xanthus genes suggesting vertical transmission. About 22% have an altered codon bias and/or phylogeny suggestive of LGT. The remaining 5% are unique. Genes encoding signal production and sensory transduction were more likely to be transmitted vertically with clear examples of duplication and divergence into multigene families. Genes encoding metabolic enzymes were frequently acquired by LGT. Myxobacteria exhibit aerobic respiration unlike most of the δ Proteobacteria. M. xanthus contains a unique electron transport pathway shaped by LGT of genes for succinate dehydrogenase and three cytochrome oxidase complexes. Conclusions/Significance Fruiting body development depends on genes acquired by LGT, particularly those involved in polysaccharide production. We suggest that aerobic growth fostered innovation necessary for development by allowing myxobacteria access to a different gene pool from anaerobic members of the δ Proteobacteria. Habitat destruction and loss of species diversity could restrict the evolution of new bacterial groups by limiting the size of the prospective gene pool. PMID:18159227

  12. Bacterial social networks: structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remis, Jonathan P; Wei, Dongguang; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H Ewa; Costerton, J William; Berleman, James E; Auer, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviours, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of outer membrane vesicle chains and membrane tubes that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains, and increased abundance in biofilms compared with planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including three-dimensional (3D) focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, we determined these structures to range between 30 and 60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactoseamine carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl outer membrane proteins known to be transferable between cells in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and therefore could provide a mechanism for the coordination of social activities. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effects of overexpression of Pkn2, a transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase, on development of Myxococcus xanthus.

    OpenAIRE

    Udo, H; Inouye, M; Inouye, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pkn2 is a putative transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase required for normal development of Myxococcus xanthus. The effect of Pkn2 overexpression on development of M. xanthus was examined by expressing pkn2 under the control of a kanamycin promoter. Pkn2 was clearly detected by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis in the overexpression strain (the PKm/pkn2 strain) but could not be detected in the wild-type strain. Overexpressed Pkn2 was located almost exclusively in the membrane fractio...

  14. A Hybrid Approach for Segmentation and Tracking of Myxococcus Xanthus Swarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxu; Alber, Mark S; Chen, Danny Z

    2016-09-01

    Cell segmentation and motion tracking in time-lapse images are fundamental problems in computer vision, and are also crucial for various biomedical studies. Myxococcus xanthus is a type of rod-like cells with highly coordinated motion. The segmentation and tracking of M. xanthus are challenging, because cells may touch tightly and form dense swarms that are difficult to identify individually in an accurate manner. The known cell tracking approaches mainly fall into two frameworks, detection association and model evolution, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid framework combining these two frameworks into one and leveraging their complementary advantages. Also, we propose an active contour model based on the Ribbon Snake, which is seamlessly integrated with our hybrid framework. Evaluated by 10 different datasets, our approach achieves considerable improvement over the state-of-the-art cell tracking algorithms on identifying complete cell trajectories, and higher segmentation accuracy than performing segmentation in individual 2D images.

  15. DNA builds and strengthens the extracellular matrix in Myxococcus xanthus biofilms by interacting with exopolysaccharides.

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    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available One intriguing discovery in modern microbiology is the extensive presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA within biofilms of various bacterial species. Although several biological functions have been suggested for eDNA, including involvement in biofilm formation, the detailed mechanism of eDNA integration into biofilm architecture is still poorly understood. In the biofilms formed by Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium with complex morphogenesis and social behaviors, DNA was found within both extracted and native extracellular matrices (ECM. Further examination revealed that these eDNA molecules formed well organized structures that were similar in appearance to the organization of exopolysaccharides (EPS in ECM. Biochemical and image analyses confirmed that eDNA bound to and colocalized with EPS within the ECM of starvation biofilms and fruiting bodies. In addition, ECM containing eDNA exhibited greater physical strength and biological stress resistance compared to DNase I treated ECM. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that DNA interacts with EPS and strengthens biofilm structures in M. xanthus.

  16. Transposon insertions of magellan-4 that impair social gliding motility in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youderian, Philip; Hartzell, Patricia L

    2006-03-01

    Myxococcus xanthus has two different mechanisms of motility, adventurous (A) motility, which permits individual cells to glide over solid surfaces, and social (S) motility, which permits groups of cells to glide. To identify the genes involved in S-gliding motility, we mutagenized a delta aglU (A-) strain with the defective transposon, magellan-4, and screened for S- mutants that form nonmotile colonies. Sequence analysis of the sites of the magellan-4 insertions in these mutants and the alignment of these sites with the M. xanthus genome sequence show that two-thirds of these insertions lie within 27 of the 37 nonessential genes known to be required for social motility, including those necessary for the biogenesis of type IV pili, exopolysaccharide, and lipopolysaccharide. The remaining insertions also identify 31 new, nonessential genes predicted to encode both structural and regulatory determinants of S motility. These include three tetratricopeptide repeat proteins, several regulators of transcription that may control the expression of genes involved in pilus extension and retraction, and additional enzymes involved in polysaccharide metabolism. Three insertions that abolish S motility lie within genes predicted to encode glycolytic enzymes, suggesting that the signal for pilus retraction may be a simple product of exopolysaccharide catabolism.

  17. ParABS system in chromosome partitioning in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Iniesta

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is an essential cellular function in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. The ParABS system is a fundamental player for a mitosis-like process in chromosome partitioning in many bacterial species. This work shows that the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus also uses the ParABS system for chromosome segregation. Its large prokaryotic genome of 9.1 Mb contains 22 parS sequences near the origin of replication, and it is shown here that M. xanthus ParB binds preferentially to a consensus parS sequence in vitro. ParB and ParA are essential for cell viability in M. xanthus as in Caulobacter crescentus, but unlike in many other bacteria. Absence of ParB results in anucleate cells, chromosome segregation defects and loss of viability. Analysis of ParA subcellular localization shows that it clusters at the poles in all cells, and in some, in the DNA-free cell division plane between two chromosomal DNA masses. This ParA localization pattern depends on ParB but not on FtsZ. ParB inhibits the nonspecific interaction of ParA with DNA, and ParA colocalizes with chromosomal DNA only when ParB is depleted. The subcellular localization of ParB suggests a single ParB-parS complex localized at the edge of the nucleoid, next to a polar ParA cluster, with a second ParB-parS complex migrating after the replication of parS takes place to the opposite nucleoid edge, next to the other polar ParA cluster.

  18. ParABS system in chromosome partitioning in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Antonio A

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome segregation is an essential cellular function in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. The ParABS system is a fundamental player for a mitosis-like process in chromosome partitioning in many bacterial species. This work shows that the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus also uses the ParABS system for chromosome segregation. Its large prokaryotic genome of 9.1 Mb contains 22 parS sequences near the origin of replication, and it is shown here that M. xanthus ParB binds preferentially to a consensus parS sequence in vitro. ParB and ParA are essential for cell viability in M. xanthus as in Caulobacter crescentus, but unlike in many other bacteria. Absence of ParB results in anucleate cells, chromosome segregation defects and loss of viability. Analysis of ParA subcellular localization shows that it clusters at the poles in all cells, and in some, in the DNA-free cell division plane between two chromosomal DNA masses. This ParA localization pattern depends on ParB but not on FtsZ. ParB inhibits the nonspecific interaction of ParA with DNA, and ParA colocalizes with chromosomal DNA only when ParB is depleted. The subcellular localization of ParB suggests a single ParB-parS complex localized at the edge of the nucleoid, next to a polar ParA cluster, with a second ParB-parS complex migrating after the replication of parS takes place to the opposite nucleoid edge, next to the other polar ParA cluster.

  19. Pph1 from Myxococcus xanthus is a protein phosphatase involved in vegetative growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuner-Lange, A; Ward, M J; Zusman, D R

    2001-04-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative bacterium with a complex life cycle that includes vegetative swarming on rich medium and, upon starvation, aggregation to form fruiting bodies containing spores. Both of these behaviours require multiple Ser/Thr protein kinases. In this paper, we report the first Ser/Thr protein phosphatase gene, pph1, from M. xanthus. DNA sequence analysis of pph1 indicates that it encodes a protein of 254 residues (Mr = 28 308) with strong homology to eukaryotic PP2C phosphatases and that it belongs to a new group of bacterial protein phosphatases that are distinct from bacterial PP2C phosphatases such as RsbU, RsbX and SpoIIE. Recombinant His-tagged Pph1 was purified from Escherichia coli and shown to have Mn2+ or Mg2+ dependent, okadaic acid-resistant phosphatase activity on a synthetic phosphorylated peptide, RRA(pT)VA, indicating that Pph1 is a PP2C phosphatase. Pph1-expression was observed under both vegetative and developmental conditions, but peaked during early aggregation. A pph1 null mutant showed defects during late vegetative growth, swarming and glycerol spore formation. Under starvation-induced developmental conditions, the mutant showed reduced aggregation and failure to form fruiting bodies with viable spores. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have observed a strong interaction between Pph1 and the M. xanthus protein kinase Pkn5, a negative effector of development. These results suggest a functional link between a Pkn2-type protein kinase and a PP2C phosphatase.

  20. Pkn9, a Ser/Thr protein kinase involved in the development of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, W A; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1997-02-01

    The Myxococcus xanthus gene, pkn9, encodes a protein that contains significant homology with eukaryotic Ser/Thr protein kinases. The pkn9 gene was singled out of a previously identified family of kinase genes by amplification techniques that displayed differences in kinase gene expression during selected periods of the M. xanthus life cycle. Pkn9 was constitutively expressed during vegetative growth and upregulated during the aggregation stage of early development. It consists of 589 amino acids, and its N-terminal 394 residues show 38% identity with both Pkn1 and Pkn2 of M. xanthus. This region also shows 29, 25 and 29% identify with myosin light-chain kinase, protein kinase C, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, respectively. A 22-residue hydrophobic transmembrane domain separates the kinase domain from the 173-residue C-terminal domain that resides on the outside of the inner membrane. The C-terminal domain contains two sets of tandem repeats of 13 and 10 residues which have no known function. When expressed in Escherichia coli under the T7 promoter, Pkn9 was found to be phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues. Disruption of the pkn9 kinase catalytic subdomains I-III by the insertion of a kanamycin-resistance gene resulted in slightly delayed, smaller and more-crowded fruiting bodies, while spore formation was normal. Total deletion of the pkn9 gene caused severely reduced progression through development resulting in light loose mounds that become slightly more compact over time. Development progressed further at the centre than at the edge of the spot, and spore formation was significantly reduced. Two-dimensional gel analysis revealed that both the disruption and the deletion of pkn9 prevented the expression of five membrane proteins (KREP9-1-4). These results suggest that the loss of Pkn9 kinase activity caused altered fruiting-body formation, the absence of the KREP9 proteins in the membrane, and reduced spore production.

  1. Structural insights into RNA polymerase recognition and essential function of Myxococcus xanthus CdnL.

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    Aránzazu Gallego-García

    Full Text Available CdnL and CarD are two functionally distinct members of the CarD_CdnL_TRCF family of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP-interacting proteins, which co-exist in Myxococcus xanthus. While CarD, found exclusively in myxobacteria, has been implicated in the activity of various extracytoplasmic function (ECF σ-factors, the function and mode of action of the essential CdnL, whose homologs are widespread among bacteria, remain to be elucidated in M. xanthus. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of CdnL and present a structure-based mutational analysis of its function. An N-terminal five-stranded β-sheet Tudor-like module in the two-domain CdnL mediates binding to RNAP-β, and mutations that disrupt this interaction impair cell growth. The compact CdnL C-terminal domain consists of five α-helices folded as in some tetratricopeptide repeat-like protein-protein interaction domains, and contains a patch of solvent-exposed nonpolar and basic residues, among which a set of basic residues is shown to be crucial for CdnL function. We show that CdnL, but not its loss-of-function mutants, stabilizes formation of transcriptionally competent, open complexes by the primary σA-RNAP holoenzyme at an rRNA promoter in vitro. Consistent with this, CdnL is present at rRNA promoters in vivo. Implication of CdnL in RNAP-σA activity and of CarD in ECF-σ function in M. xanthus exemplifies how two related members within a widespread bacterial protein family have evolved to enable distinct σ-dependent promoter activity.

  2. Myxococcus xanthus gliding motors are elastically coupled to the substrate as predicted by the focal adhesion model of gliding motility

    CERN Document Server

    Balagam, Rajesh; Czerwinski, Fabian; Sun, Mingzhai; Kaplan, Heidi B; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a model organism for studying bacterial social behaviors due to its ability to form complex multi-cellular structures. Knowledge of M. xanthus surface gliding motility and the mechanisms that coordinate it are critically important to our understanding of collective cell behaviors. Although the mechanism of gliding motility is still under investigation, recent experiments suggest that there are two possible mechanisms underlying force production for cell motility: the focal adhesion mechanism and the helical rotor mechanism which differ in the biophysics of the cell-substrate interactions. Whereas the focal adhesion model predicts an elastic coupling, the helical rotor model predicts a viscous coupling. Using a combination of computational modeling, imaging, and force microscopy, we find evidence for elastic coupling in support of the focal adhesion model. Using a biophysical model of the M. xanthus cell, we investigated how the mechanical interactions between cells are affected by intera...

  3. The phosphatomes of the multicellular myxobacteria Myxococcus xanthus and Sorangium cellulosum in comparison with other prokaryotic genomes.

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    Anke Treuner-Lange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of the complete genomes from the multicellular myxobacteria Myxococcus xanthus and Sorangium cellulosum identified the highest number of eukaryotic-like protein kinases (ELKs compared to all other genomes analyzed. High numbers of protein phosphatases (PPs could therefore be anticipated, as reversible protein phosphorylation is a major regulation mechanism of fundamental biological processes. METHODOLOGY: Here we report an intensive analysis of the phosphatomes of M. xanthus and S. cellulosum in which we constructed phylogenetic trees to position these sequences relative to PPs from other prokaryotic organisms. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PREDOMINANT OBSERVATIONS WERE: (i M. xanthus and S. cellulosum possess predominantly Ser/Thr PPs; (ii S. cellulosum encodes the highest number of PP2c-type phosphatases so far reported for a prokaryotic organism; (iii in contrast to M. xanthus only S. cellulosum encodes high numbers of SpoIIE-like PPs; (iv there is a significant lack of synteny among M. xanthus and S. cellulosum, and (v the degree of co-organization between kinase and phosphatase genes is extremely low in these myxobacterial genomes. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that there has been a greater expansion of ELKs than PPs in multicellular myxobacteria.

  4. The Phosphatomes of the Multicellular Myxobacteria Myxococcus xanthus and Sorangium cellulosum in Comparison with Other Prokaryotic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuner-Lange, Anke

    2010-01-01

    Background Analysis of the complete genomes from the multicellular myxobacteria Myxococcus xanthus and Sorangium cellulosum identified the highest number of eukaryotic-like protein kinases (ELKs) compared to all other genomes analyzed. High numbers of protein phosphatases (PPs) could therefore be anticipated, as reversible protein phosphorylation is a major regulation mechanism of fundamental biological processes. Methodology Here we report an intensive analysis of the phosphatomes of M. xanthus and S. cellulosum in which we constructed phylogenetic trees to position these sequences relative to PPs from other prokaryotic organisms. Principal Findings Predominant observations were: (i) M. xanthus and S. cellulosum possess predominantly Ser/Thr PPs; (ii) S. cellulosum encodes the highest number of PP2c-type phosphatases so far reported for a prokaryotic organism; (iii) in contrast to M. xanthus only S. cellulosum encodes high numbers of SpoIIE-like PPs; (iv) there is a significant lack of synteny among M. xanthus and S. cellulosum, and (v) the degree of co-organization between kinase and phosphatase genes is extremely low in these myxobacterial genomes. Conclusions We conclude that there has been a greater expansion of ELKs than PPs in multicellular myxobacteria. PMID:20567509

  5. Modulating factors for the Pkn4 kinase cascade in regulating 6-phosphofructokinase in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariya, Hirofumi; Inouye, Sumiko

    2005-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative developmental bacterium, contains a large number of protein Ser/Thr kinases (PSTKs). Among these PSTKs, Pkn4 has been shown to be 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) kinase. PFK associates with the regulatory domain of Pkn4 (Pkn4RD) and is activated by Pkn4-mediated phosphorylation. The activation of PFK is required to consume glycogen accumulated during early development and is essential for efficient sporulation. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified three new factors, MkapA, MkapB and MkapC, that interact with Pkn4 and each contains well-known protein-protein interaction domains. MkapB contains eight tandem repeats of the TPR (tetratrico peptide repeat) domain and its interaction with Pkn4RD was phosphorylation-dependent. MkapB remained associated with Pkn4RD. As a result, Pkn4 did not interact with PFK and its activation was inhibited. While deletion of the pfk-pkn4 operon did not inhibit fruiting body formation, the spore yield was low. In contrast, a mkapB deletion mutant exhibited a 24 h delay in fruiting body formation, accumulated less glycogen in the stationary phase and gave rise to 3.2% spore formation as opposed to 100% attained with DZF1. In addition to Pkn4, MkapA associated with other membrane-associated PSTKs, Pkn1, Pkn2, Pkn8 and Pkn9, while MkapB associated with Pkn8 and Pkn9, and MkapC with Pkn8. These results indicate that there are complex PSTK networks in M. xanthus that share common modulating factors.

  6. Factors that modulate the Pkn4 kinase cascade in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariya, Hirofumi; Inouye, Sumiko

    2005-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a gram-negative developmental bacterium, contains a large number of protein Ser/Thr kinases (PSTKs). Among these PSTKs, Pkn4 is shown to be 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) kinase. PFK associates with the regulatory domain of Pkn4 (Pkn4RD) and is activated 2.7-fold upon phosphorylation at Thr-226 by Pkn4. The activation of PFK is required to consume glycogen accumulated during early development and is essential for efficient sporulation. Three new factors, MkapA, MkapB and MkapC have been identified that associate with Pkn4 by the yeast two-hybrid screen and each contains well-known protein-protein interaction domains. MkapB interacts with Pkn4 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and remains associated with Pkn4 after its phosphorylation. Binding of MkapB to Pkn4 prevents the interaction of Pkn4 with PFK and consequently PFK phosphorylation and activation. A pfk-pkn4 deletion mutant accumulates glycogen at a rate two folds higher than the parent strain, DZF1, at the stationary phase and early development stage, it is unable to consume glycogen during development and produces only 3.4% of the DZF1 spore yield. In contrast, an mkapB deletion mutant exhibits a 24 h delay in fruiting body formation, accumulates less glycogen in the stationary phase and gives rise to 6.4% of the DZF1 spore yield. In addition to Pkn4, MkapA associates with other membrane-associated PSTKs, Pkn1, Pkn2, Pkn8 and Pkn9, while MkapB associates with Pkn8 and Pkn9, and MkapC with Pkn8. These results indicate that there are complex PSTK networks in M. xanthus sharing common modulating factors.

  7. Global transcriptome analysis of spore formation in Myxococcus xanthus reveals a locus necessary for cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treuner-Lange Anke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram negative bacterium that can differentiate into metabolically quiescent, environmentally resistant spores. Little is known about the mechanisms involved in differentiation in part because sporulation is normally initiated at the culmination of a complex starvation-induced developmental program and only inside multicellular fruiting bodies. To obtain a broad overview of the sporulation process and to identify novel genes necessary for differentiation, we instead performed global transcriptome analysis of an artificial chemically-induced sporulation process in which addition of glycerol to vegetatively growing liquid cultures of M. xanthus leads to rapid and synchronized differentiation of nearly all cells into myxospore-like entities. Results Our analyses identified 1 486 genes whose expression was significantly regulated at least two-fold within four hours of chemical-induced differentiation. Most of the previously identified sporulation marker genes were significantly upregulated. In contrast, most genes that are required to build starvation-induced multicellular fruiting bodies, but which are not required for sporulation per se, were not significantly regulated in our analysis. Analysis of functional gene categories significantly over-represented in the regulated genes, suggested large rearrangements in core metabolic pathways, and in genes involved in protein synthesis and fate. We used the microarray data to identify a novel operon of eight genes that, when mutated, rendered cells unable to produce viable chemical- or starvation-induced spores. Importantly, these mutants displayed no defects in building fruiting bodies, suggesting these genes are necessary for the core sporulation process. Furthermore, during the starvation-induced developmental program, these genes were expressed in fruiting bodies but not in peripheral rods, a subpopulation of developing cells which do not sporulate

  8. Extracellular polysaccharides mediate pilus retraction during social motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinuo; Sun, Hong; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Ann; Lux, Renate; Zusman, David; Shi, Wenyuan

    2003-04-29

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative bacterium with a complex life cycle that includes vegetative swarming and fruiting-body formation. Social (S)-motility (coordinated movement of large cell groups) requires both type IV pili and fibrils (extracellular matrix material consisting of polysaccharides and protein). Little is known about the role of this extracellular matrix, or fibril material, in pilus-dependent motility. In this study, mutants lacking fibril material and, therefore, S-motility were found to be hyperpiliated. We demonstrated that addition of fibril material resulted in pilus retraction and rescued this phenotype. The fibril material was further examined to determine the component(s) that were responsible for triggering pilus retraction. Protein-free fibril material was found to be highly active in correcting hyperpiliation. However, the amine sugars present in hydrolyzed fibril material, e.g., glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) had no effect on fibril(-) mutants, but, interestingly, cause hyperpiliation in wild-type cells. In contrast, chitin, a natural GlcNAc polymer, was found to restore pilus retraction in hyperpiliated mutants, indicating that a polysaccharide containing amine sugars is likely required for pilus retraction. These data suggest that the interaction of type IV pili with amine-containing polysaccharides on cell and slime-trail surfaces may trigger pilus retraction, resulting in S-motility and slime-trailing behaviors.

  9. Pattern formation by a cell surface-associated morphogen in Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2002-02-01

    In response to starvation, an unstructured population of identical Myxococcus xanthus cells rearranges into an asymmetric, stable pattern of multicellular fruiting bodies. Central to this pattern formation process are changes in organized cell movements from swarming to aggregation. Aggregation is induced by the cell surface-associated C-signal. To understand how aggregation is accomplished, we have analyzed how C-signal modulates cell behavior. We show that C-signal induces a motility response that includes increases in transient gliding speeds and in the duration of gliding intervals and decreases in stop and reversal frequencies. This response results in a switch in cell behavior from an oscillatory to a unidirectional type of behavior in which the net-distance traveled by a cell per minute is increased. We propose that the C-signal-dependent regulation of the reversal frequency is essential for aggregation and that the remaining C-signal-dependent changes in motility parameters contribute to aggregation by increasing the net-distance traveled by starving cells per minute. In our model for symmetry-breaking and aggregation, C-signal transmission is a local event involving direct contacts between cells that results in a global organization of cells. This pattern formation mechanism does not require a diffusible substance or other actions at a distance. Rather it depends on contact-induced changes in motility behavior to direct cells appropriately

  10. Data-driven modeling reveals cell behaviors controlling self-organization during Myxococcus xanthus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Christopher R; Schüttler, Heinz-Bernd; Igoshin, Oleg A; Shimkets, Lawrence J

    2017-06-06

    Collective cell movement is critical to the emergent properties of many multicellular systems, including microbial self-organization in biofilms, embryogenesis, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. However, even the best-studied systems lack a complete picture of how diverse physical and chemical cues act upon individual cells to ensure coordinated multicellular behavior. Known for its social developmental cycle, the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus uses coordinated movement to generate three-dimensional aggregates called fruiting bodies. Despite extensive progress in identifying genes controlling fruiting body development, cell behaviors and cell-cell communication mechanisms that mediate aggregation are largely unknown. We developed an approach to examine emergent behaviors that couples fluorescent cell tracking with data-driven models. A unique feature of this approach is the ability to identify cell behaviors affecting the observed aggregation dynamics without full knowledge of the underlying biological mechanisms. The fluorescent cell tracking revealed large deviations in the behavior of individual cells. Our modeling method indicated that decreased cell motility inside the aggregates, a biased walk toward aggregate centroids, and alignment among neighboring cells in a radial direction to the nearest aggregate are behaviors that enhance aggregation dynamics. Our modeling method also revealed that aggregation is generally robust to perturbations in these behaviors and identified possible compensatory mechanisms. The resulting approach of directly combining behavior quantification with data-driven simulations can be applied to more complex systems of collective cell movement without prior knowledge of the cellular machinery and behavioral cues.

  11. MasABK Proteins Interact with Proteins of the Type IV Pilin System to Affect Social Motility of Myxococcus xanthus

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Fremgen; Amanda Williams; Gou Furusawa; Katarzyna Dziewanowska; Matthew Settles; Patricia Hartzell

    2013-01-01

    Gliding motility is critical for normal development of spore-filled fruiting bodies in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Mutations in mgl block motility and development but one mgl allele can be suppressed by a mutation in masK, the last gene in an operon adjacent to the mgl operon. Deletion of the entire 5.5 kb masABK operon crippled gliding and fruiting body development and decreased sporulation. Expression of pilAGHI, which encodes type IV pili (TFP) components essential for social (S...

  12. CorE from Myxococcus xanthus Is a Copper-Dependent RNA Polymerase Sigma Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Pérez, Juana; Sánchez-Sutil, María Celestina; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2011-01-01

    The dual toxicity/essentiality of copper forces cells to maintain a tightly regulated homeostasis for this metal in all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Consequently, many genes have previously been reported to participate in copper detoxification in bacteria. Myxococcus xanthus, a prokaryote, encodes many proteins involved in copper homeostasis that are differentially regulated by this metal. A σ factor of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function) family, CorE, has been found to regulate the expression of the multicopper oxidase cuoB, the P1B-type ATPases copA and copB, and a gene encoding a protein with a heavy-metal-associated domain. Characterization of CorE has revealed that it requires copper to bind DNA in vitro. Genes regulated by CorE exhibit a characteristic expression profile, with a peak at 2 h after copper addition. Expression rapidly decreases thereafter to basal levels, although the metal is still present in the medium, indicating that the activity of CorE is modulated by a process of activation and inactivation. The use of monovalent and divalent metals to mimic Cu(I) and Cu(II), respectively, and of additives that favor the formation of the two redox states of this metal, has revealed that CorE is activated by Cu(II) and inactivated by Cu(I). The activation/inactivation properties of CorE reside in a Cys-rich domain located at the C terminus of the protein. Point mutations at these residues have allowed the identification of several Cys involved in the activation and inactivation of CorE. Based on these data, along with comparative genomic studies, a new group of ECF σ factors is proposed, which not only clearly differs mechanistically from the other σ factors so far characterized, but also from other metal regulators. PMID:21655090

  13. The Che4 pathway of Myxococcus xanthus regulates type IV pilus-mediated motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlamakis, Hera C; Kirby, John R; Zusman, David R

    2004-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus co-ordinates cell movement during its complex life cycle using multiple chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways. These pathways regulate both type IV pilus-mediated social (S) motility and adventurous (A) motility. During a search for new chemoreceptors, we identified the che4 operon, which encodes homologues to a MCP (methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein), two CheWs, a hybrid CheA-CheY, a response regulator and a CheR. Deletion of the che4 operon did not cause swarming or developmental defects in either the wild-type (A(+)S(+)) strain or in a strain sustaining only A motility (A(+)S(-)). However, in a strain displaying only S motility (A(-)S(+)), deletion of the che4 operon or the gene encoding the response regulator, cheY4, caused enhanced vegetative swarming and prevented aggregation and sporulation. In contrast, deletion of mcp4 caused reduced vegetative swarming and enhanced development compared with the parent strain. Single-cell analysis of the motility of the A(-)S(+) parent strain revealed a previously unknown inverse correlation between velocity and reversal frequency. Thus, cells that moved at higher velocities showed a reduced reversal frequency. This co-ordination of reversal frequency and velocity was lost in the mcp4 and cheY4 mutants. The structural components of the S motility apparatus were unaffected in the che4 mutants, suggesting that the Che4 system affects reversal frequency of cells by modulating the function of the type IV pilus.

  14. CorE from Myxococcus xanthus is a copper-dependent RNA polymerase sigma factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Gómez-Santos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The dual toxicity/essentiality of copper forces cells to maintain a tightly regulated homeostasis for this metal in all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Consequently, many genes have previously been reported to participate in copper detoxification in bacteria. Myxococcus xanthus, a prokaryote, encodes many proteins involved in copper homeostasis that are differentially regulated by this metal. A σ factor of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function family, CorE, has been found to regulate the expression of the multicopper oxidase cuoB, the P1B-type ATPases copA and copB, and a gene encoding a protein with a heavy-metal-associated domain. Characterization of CorE has revealed that it requires copper to bind DNA in vitro. Genes regulated by CorE exhibit a characteristic expression profile, with a peak at 2 h after copper addition. Expression rapidly decreases thereafter to basal levels, although the metal is still present in the medium, indicating that the activity of CorE is modulated by a process of activation and inactivation. The use of monovalent and divalent metals to mimic Cu(I and Cu(II, respectively, and of additives that favor the formation of the two redox states of this metal, has revealed that CorE is activated by Cu(II and inactivated by Cu(I. The activation/inactivation properties of CorE reside in a Cys-rich domain located at the C terminus of the protein. Point mutations at these residues have allowed the identification of several Cys involved in the activation and inactivation of CorE. Based on these data, along with comparative genomic studies, a new group of ECF σ factors is proposed, which not only clearly differs mechanistically from the other σ factors so far characterized, but also from other metal regulators.

  15. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  16. Biochemical characterization of Pkn2, a protein Ser/Thr kinase from Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative developmental bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, H; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1997-01-03

    Pkn2, a protein Ser/Thr kinase, from the developmental bacterium Myxococcus xanthus was expressed under a T7 promoter in Escherichia coli and purified. Purified Pkn2 retained the autophosphorylation activity with the Km value of 177 microM for ATP and 73 nmol/min/mg for Vmax. The optimum pH and temperature were determined to be 7.5 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The autophosphorylation activity was inhibited by staurosporine with the IC50 value of 400 nM while H-7 and genistein had little effect on this kinase. Pkn2 appears to be unique for its higher manganese dependence. This is the first biochemical characterization of the prokaryotic protein Ser/Thr kinase.

  17. Identification of a mutant locus that bypasses the BsgA protease requirement for social development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, John K; Hager, Elizabeth; Gill, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    The BsgA protease is required for the earliest morphological changes observed in Myxococcus xanthus development. We hypothesize that the BsgA protease is required to cleave an inhibitor of the developmental program, and isolation of genetic bypass suppressors of a bsgA mutant was used to identify signaling components controlling development downstream of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was created by transposon mutagenesis of a bsgA mutant followed by screening for strains that could develop despite the absence of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was able to aggregate, form fruiting bodies, and partially restored the production of viable spores in comparison to the parental bsgA mutant. The bsgA Tn5Ω955 strain partially restored developmental expression to a subset of genes normally induced during development, and expressed one developmentally induced fusion at higher amounts during vegetative growth in comparison to wild-type cells. The transposon in strain M955 was localized to a Ribonuclease D homolog that appears to exist in an operon with a downstream aminopeptidase-encoding gene. The identification of a third distinct bypass suppressor of the BsgA protease suggests that the BsgA protease may regulate a potentially complex pathway during the initiation of the M. xanthus developmental program.

  18. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems That Regulate the Temporal and Spatial Expression of Myxococcus xanthus Sporulation Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Zaara; Garza, Anthony G

    2015-09-14

    When starved for nutrients, Myxococcus xanthus produces a biofilm that contains a mat of rod-shaped cells, known as peripheral rods, and aerial structures called fruiting bodies, which house thousands of dormant and stress-resistant spherical spores. Because rod-shaped cells differentiate into spherical, stress-resistant spores and spore differentiation occurs only in nascent fruiting bodies, many genes and multiple levels of regulation are required. Over the past 2 decades, many regulators of the temporal and spatial expression of M. xanthus sporulation genes have been uncovered. Of these sporulation gene regulators, two-component signal transduction circuits, which typically contain a histidine kinase sensor protein and a transcriptional regulator known as response regulator, are among the best characterized. In this review, we discuss prototypical two-component systems (Nla6S/Nla6 and Nla28S/Nla28) that regulate an early, preaggregation phase of sporulation gene expression during fruiting body development. We also discuss orphan response regulators (ActB and FruA) that regulate a later phase of sporulation gene expression, which begins during the aggregation stage of fruiting body development. In addition, we summarize the research on a complex two-component system (Esp) that is important for the spatial regulation of sporulation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Effects of overexpression of Pkn2, a transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase, on development of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, H; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1996-11-01

    Pkn2 is a putative transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase required for normal development of Myxococcus xanthus. The effect of Pkn2 overexpression on development of M. xanthus was examined by expressing pkn2 under the control of a kanamycin promoter. Pkn2 was clearly detected by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis in the overexpression strain (the PKm/pkn2 strain) but could not be detected in the wild-type strain. Overexpressed Pkn2 was located almost exclusively in the membrane fraction, suggesting that Pkn2 is a transmembrane receptor-type protein Ser/Thr kinase. The PKm/pkn2 strain formed fruiting bodies more slowly than the wild-type strain, in contrast to a Pkn2 deletion strain, the delta pkn2 strain, which developed faster than the wild-type strain. However, spore production was reduced in both the PKm/pkn2 and delta pkn2 strains. These data suggest that Pkn2 functions as a negative regulator for fruiting-body formation and that the proper level of Pkn2 is necessary for maximum myxospore yield.

  20. A Minimal Threshold of c-di-GMP Is Essential for Fruiting Body Formation and Sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotnicka, Dorota; Smaldone, Gregory T; Petters, Tobias; Trampari, Eleftheria; Liang, Jennifer; Kaever, Volkhard; Malone, Jacob G; Singer, Mitchell; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2016-05-01

    Generally, the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates the switch between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. Here, we show that c-di-GMP is an essential regulator of multicellular development in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. In response to starvation, M. xanthus initiates a developmental program that culminates in formation of spore-filled fruiting bodies. We show that c-di-GMP accumulates at elevated levels during development and that this increase is essential for completion of development whereas excess c-di-GMP does not interfere with development. MXAN3735 (renamed DmxB) is identified as a diguanylate cyclase that only functions during development and is responsible for this increased c-di-GMP accumulation. DmxB synthesis is induced in response to starvation, thereby restricting DmxB activity to development. DmxB is essential for development and functions downstream of the Dif chemosensory system to stimulate exopolysaccharide accumulation by inducing transcription of a subset of the genes encoding proteins involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. The developmental defects in the dmxB mutant are non-cell autonomous and rescued by co-development with a strain proficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis, suggesting reduced exopolysaccharide accumulation as the causative defect in this mutant. The NtrC-like transcriptional regulator EpsI/Nla24, which is required for exopolysaccharide accumulation, is identified as a c-di-GMP receptor, and thus a putative target for DmxB generated c-di-GMP. Because DmxB can be-at least partially-functionally replaced by a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, these results altogether suggest a model in which a minimum threshold level of c-di-GMP is essential for the successful completion of multicellular development in M. xanthus.

  1. A novel "four-component" two-component signal transduction mechanism regulates developmental progression in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Sakthimala; Mann, Petra; Schink, Christian W; Higgs, Penelope I

    2009-08-07

    Histidine-aspartate phosphorelays are employed by two-component signal transduction family proteins to mediate responses to specific signals or stimuli in microorganisms and plants. The RedCDEF proteins constitute a novel signaling system in which four two-component proteins comprising a histidine kinase, a histidine-kinase like protein, and two response regulators function together to regulate progression through the elaborate developmental program of Myxococcus xanthus. A combination of in vivo phenotypic analyses of in-frame deletions and non-functional point mutations in each gene as well as in vitro autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer analyses of recombinant proteins indicate that the RedC histidine kinase protein autophosphorylates and donates a phosphoryl group to the single domain response regulator, RedF, to repress progression through the developmental program. To relieve this developmental repression, RedC instead phosphorylates RedD, a dual receiver response regulator protein. Surprisingly, RedD transfers the phosphoryl group to the histidine kinase-like protein RedE, which itself appears to be incapable of autophosphorylation. Phosphorylation of RedE may render RedE accessible to RedF, where it removes the phosphoryl group from RedF-P, which is otherwise an unusually stable phosphoprotein. These analyses reveal a novel "four-component" signaling mechanism that has probably arisen to temporally coordinate signals controlling the developmental program in M. xanthus. The RedCDEF signaling system provides an important example of how the inherent plasticity and modularity of the basic two-component signaling domains comprise a highly adaptable framework well suited to expansion into complex signaling mechanisms.

  2. The Nla28S/Nla28 two-component signal transduction system regulates sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Zaara; Garza, Anthony G

    2012-09-01

    The response regulator Nla28 is a key component in a cascade of transcriptional activators that modulates expression of many important developmental genes in Myxococcus xanthus. In this study, we identified and characterized Nla28S, a histidine kinase that modulates the activity of this important regulator of M. xanthus developmental genes. We show that the putative cytoplasmic domain of Nla28S has the in vitro biochemical properties of a histidine kinase protein: it hydrolyzes ATP and undergoes an ATP-dependent autophosphorylation that is acid labile and base stable. We also show that the putative cytoplasmic domain of Nla28S transfers a phosphoryl group to Nla28 in vitro, that the phosphotransfer is specific, and that a substitution in the predicted site of Nla28 phosphorylation (aspartate 53) abolishes the phosphotransfer reaction. In phenotypic studies, we found that a mutation in nla28S produces a developmental phenotype similar to, but weaker than, that produced by a mutation in nla28; both mutations primarily affect sporulation. Together, these data indicate that Nla28S is the in vivo histidine kinase partner of Nla28 and that the primary function of the Nla28S/Nla28 two-component signal transduction system is to regulate sporulation genes. The results of genetic studies suggest that phosphorylation of Nla28S is important for the in vivo sporulation function of the Nla28S/Nla28 two-component system. In addition, the quorum signal known as A-signal is important for full developmental expression of the nla28S-nla28 operon, suggesting that quorum signaling regulates the availability of the Nla28S/Nla28 signal transduction circuit in developing cells.

  3. Combinatorial regulation of the dev operon by MrpC2 and FruA during Myxococcus xanthus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ashleigh; Viswanathan, Poorna; Barrett, Terry; Son, Bongjun; Saha, Shreya; Kroos, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Proper expression of the dev operon is important for normal development of Myxococcus xanthus. When starved, these bacteria coordinate their gliding movements to build mounds that become fruiting bodies as some cells differentiate into spores. Mutations in the devTRS genes impair sporulation. Expression of the operon occurs within nascent fruiting bodies and depends in part on C signaling. Here, we report that expression of the dev operon, like that of several other C-signal-dependent genes, is subject to combinatorial control by the transcription factors MrpC2 and FruA. A DNA fragment upstream of the dev promoter was bound by a protein in an extract containing MrpC2, protecting the region spanning positions -77 to -54. Mutations in this region impaired binding of purified MrpC2 and abolished developmental expression of reporter fusions. The association of MrpC2 and/or its longer form, MrpC, with the dev promoter region depended on FruA in vivo, based on chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, and purified FruA appeared to bind cooperatively with MrpC2 to DNA just upstream of the dev promoter in vitro. We conclude that cooperative binding of the two proteins to this promoter-proximal site is crucial for dev expression. 5' deletion analysis implied a second upstream positive regulatory site, which corresponded to a site of weak cooperative binding of MrpC2 and FruA and boosted dev expression 24 h into development. This site is unique among the C-signal-dependent genes studied so far. Deletion of this site in the M. xanthus chromosome did not impair sporulation under laboratory conditions.

  4. Coupling gene expression and multicellular morphogenesis during fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, L.; Overgaard, M.; Lobedanz, S.;

    2003-01-01

    A recurring theme in morphogenesis is the coupling of the expression of genes that drive morphogenesis and the morphogenetic process per se. This coupling ensures that gene expression and morphogenesis are carried out in synchrony. Morphogenesis of the spore-filled fruiting bodies in Myxococcus...

  5. A versatile class of cell surface directional motors gives rise to gliding motility and sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Wartel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells utilize an arsenal of processive transport systems to deliver macromolecules to specific subcellular sites. In prokaryotes, such transport mechanisms have only been shown to mediate gliding motility, a form of microbial surface translocation. Here, we show that the motility function of the Myxococcus xanthus Agl-Glt machinery results from the recent specialization of a versatile class of bacterial transporters. Specifically, we demonstrate that the Agl motility motor is modular and dissociates from the rest of the gliding machinery (the Glt complex to bind the newly expressed Nfs complex, a close Glt paralogue, during sporulation. Following this association, the Agl system transports Nfs proteins directionally around the spore surface. Since the main spore coat polymer is secreted at discrete sites around the spore surface, its transport by Agl-Nfs ensures its distribution around the spore. Thus, the Agl-Glt/Nfs machineries may constitute a novel class of directional bacterial surface transporters that can be diversified to specific tasks depending on the cognate cargo and machinery-specific accessories.

  6. Numerical simulations on active rod like particles as a model for the collective behavior of Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigbers, Manon; Thutupalli, Shashi; Shaevitz, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    We study collective behavior of Myxococcus xanthus using numerical simulations. Under starvation conditions, these social bacteria organize into multi-cellular structures, called ``fruiting bodies,'' within which cells sporulate. During the process of fruiting body formation, cells show various collective motion patterns. One of the most striking of these patterns is the so called rippling motility, characterized by standing density waves of reversing bacteria. Similar rippling behaviour is also observed during predatory feeding of the bacteria. Until now, the principles underlying this rippling behavior are not fully elucidated. Analogous to the well studied liquid crystalline phases in condensed matter physics, the ordering of the baceria within these rippling waves resembles a smectic like layered structure. In contrast to active nematic liquid crystalline phases widely studied in recent times, this represents the first known empirical example of an active smectic phase. Inspired by single-cell resolution experimental data of the bacteria, we develop a modelof active rod like particles and use numerical simulations to study the organizing principles that drive the transitions between the various active liquid crystalline phases in the myxobacterial collective behavior.

  7. MasABK proteins interact with proteins of the type IV pilin system to affect social motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Fremgen

    Full Text Available Gliding motility is critical for normal development of spore-filled fruiting bodies in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Mutations in mgl block motility and development but one mgl allele can be suppressed by a mutation in masK, the last gene in an operon adjacent to the mgl operon. Deletion of the entire 5.5 kb masABK operon crippled gliding and fruiting body development and decreased sporulation. Expression of pilAGHI, which encodes type IV pili (TFP components essential for social (S gliding, several cryptic pil genes, and a LuxR family protein were reduced significantly in the Δmas mutant while expression of the myxalamide operon was increased significantly. Localization and two-hybrid analysis suggest that the three Mas proteins form a membrane complex. MasA-PhoA fusions confirmed that MasA is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein with a ≈100 amino acid periplasmic domain. Results from yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MasA interacts with the lipoprotein MasB and MasK, a protein kinase and that MasB and MasK interact with one another. Additionally, yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a physical interaction between two gene products of the mas operon, MasA and MasB, and PilA. Deletion of mas may be accompanied by compensatory mutations since complementation of the Δmas social gliding and developmental defects required addition of both pilA and masABK.

  8. MasABK proteins interact with proteins of the type IV pilin system to affect social motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremgen, Sarah; Williams, Amanda; Furusawa, Gou; Dziewanowska, Katarzyna; Settles, Matthew; Hartzell, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Gliding motility is critical for normal development of spore-filled fruiting bodies in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Mutations in mgl block motility and development but one mgl allele can be suppressed by a mutation in masK, the last gene in an operon adjacent to the mgl operon. Deletion of the entire 5.5 kb masABK operon crippled gliding and fruiting body development and decreased sporulation. Expression of pilAGHI, which encodes type IV pili (TFP) components essential for social (S) gliding, several cryptic pil genes, and a LuxR family protein were reduced significantly in the Δmas mutant while expression of the myxalamide operon was increased significantly. Localization and two-hybrid analysis suggest that the three Mas proteins form a membrane complex. MasA-PhoA fusions confirmed that MasA is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein with a ≈100 amino acid periplasmic domain. Results from yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MasA interacts with the lipoprotein MasB and MasK, a protein kinase and that MasB and MasK interact with one another. Additionally, yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a physical interaction between two gene products of the mas operon, MasA and MasB, and PilA. Deletion of mas may be accompanied by compensatory mutations since complementation of the Δmas social gliding and developmental defects required addition of both pilA and masABK.

  9. The Myxococcus xanthus Two-Component System CorSR Regulates Expression of a Gene Cluster Involved in Maintaining Copper Tolerance during Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sutil, María Celestina; Pérez, Juana; Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Shimkets, Lawrence J.; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2013-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil-dwelling member of the δ–Proteobacteria that exhibits a complex developmental cycle upon starvation. Development comprises aggregation and differentiation into environmentally resistant myxospores in an environment that includes fluctuations in metal ion concentrations. While copper is essential for M. xanthus cells because several housekeeping enzymes use it as a cofactor, high copper concentrations are toxic. These opposing effects force cells to maintain a tight copper homeostasis. A plethora of paralogous genes involved in copper detoxification, all of which are differentially regulated, have been reported in M. xanthus. The use of in-frame deletion mutants and fusions with the reporter gene lacZ has allowed the identification of a two-component system, CorSR, that modulates the expression of an operon termed curA consisting of nine genes whose expression slowly increases after metal addition, reaching a plateau. Transcriptional regulation of this operon is complex because transcription can be initiated at different promoters and by different types of regulators. These genes confer copper tolerance during growth and development. Copper induces carotenoid production in a ΔcorSR mutant at lower concentrations than with the wild-type strain due to lack of expression of a gene product resembling subunit III of cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase. This data may explain why copper induces carotenoid biosynthesis at suboptimal rather than optimal growth conditions in wild-type strains. PMID:23874560

  10. The 5′ untranslated region of fruA mRNA in Myxococcus xanthus positively regulates the expression of its own gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qian; MAO Xiaohua

    2004-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus provides an excellent model organism for studying the mechanism of multicellular morphogenesis. The mRNA for FruA, a transcription factor essential for the development of M. xanthus, contains a very long 5′-UTR consisting of 235 nucleotides. Using lacZ as a reporter gene, two fruA-lacZ translational fusions retaining or lacking the fruA 5′-UTR were constructed and separately integrated at phage Mx8 attachment site (attB) in M. xanthus chromosome. Deletion in 5′-UTR between nucleotides from +4 to +220 abolished fruA-lacZ expression during development, indicating that the 5′-UTR is essential for the induction of fruA. Prediction of the RNA secondary structure of 5′-UTR shows that this region could form an extremely stable three-helix junction structure, which might be a binding site for a regulatory protein or contain a cis-acting element(s) to control fruA expression. Thus, the 5′-UTR of fruA mRNA positively regulates the expression of its own gene.

  11. The Myxococcus xanthus two-component system CorSR regulates expression of a gene cluster involved in maintaining copper tolerance during growth and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celestina Sánchez-Sutil

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus is a soil-dwelling member of the δ-Proteobacteria that exhibits a complex developmental cycle upon starvation. Development comprises aggregation and differentiation into environmentally resistant myxospores in an environment that includes fluctuations in metal ion concentrations. While copper is essential for M. xanthus cells because several housekeeping enzymes use it as a cofactor, high copper concentrations are toxic. These opposing effects force cells to maintain a tight copper homeostasis. A plethora of paralogous genes involved in copper detoxification, all of which are differentially regulated, have been reported in M. xanthus. The use of in-frame deletion mutants and fusions with the reporter gene lacZ has allowed the identification of a two-component system, CorSR, that modulates the expression of an operon termed curA consisting of nine genes whose expression slowly increases after metal addition, reaching a plateau. Transcriptional regulation of this operon is complex because transcription can be initiated at different promoters and by different types of regulators. These genes confer copper tolerance during growth and development. Copper induces carotenoid production in a ΔcorSR mutant at lower concentrations than with the wild-type strain due to lack of expression of a gene product resembling subunit III of cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase. This data may explain why copper induces carotenoid biosynthesis at suboptimal rather than optimal growth conditions in wild-type strains.

  12. Light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus: functional characterization of the ECF sigma factor CarQ and antisigma factor CarR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Douglas F; Whitworth, David E; Hodgson, David A

    2003-04-01

    Illumination of dark-grown Myxococcus xanthus with blue light leads to the induction of carotenoid synthesis. Central to this response is the activation of the light-inducible promoter, PcarQRS, and the transcription of three downstream genes, carQ, carR and carS. Sequence analysis predicted that CarQ is a member of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function) subfamily of RNA polymerase sigma factors, and that CarR is an inner membrane protein. Genetic analysis strongly implied that CarR is an antisigma factor that sequesters CarQ in a transcriptionally inactive complex. Using in vitro transcription run-off assays, we present biochemical evidence that CarQ functions as a bacterial sigma factor and is responsible for transcription initiation at PcarQRS. Similar experiments using the crtI promoter failed to implicate CarQ in direct transcription of the crtI gene. Experiments using the yeast two-hybrid system demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between CarQ and CarR, providing evidence of a CarQ-CarR complex. The yeast two-hybrid system data also indicated that CarR is capable of oligomerization. Fractionation of M. xanthus membranes with the detergent sarkosyl showed that CarR was associated with the inner membrane. Furthermore, CarR was found to be unstable in illuminated stationary phase cells, providing a possible mechanism by which the CarR-CarQ complex is disrupted.

  13. The Hsp70-like StkA functions between T4P and Dif signaling proteins as a negative regulator of exopolysaccharide in Myxococcus xanthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L. Moak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus displays a form of surface motility known as social (S gliding. It is mediated by the type IV pilus (T4P and requires the exopolysaccharide (EPS to function. It is clear that T4P retraction powers S motility. EPS on a neighboring cell or deposited on a gliding surface is proposed to anchor the distal end of a pilus and trigger T4P retraction at its proximal end. Inversely, T4P has been shown to regulate EPS production upstream of the Dif signaling pathway. Here we describe the isolation of two Tn insertions at the stk locus which had been known to play roles in cellular cohesion and formation of cell groups. An insertion in stkA (MXAN_3474 was identified based on its ability to restore EPS to a pilA deletion mutant. The stkA encodes a DnaK or Hsp70 homolog and it is upstream of stkB (MXAN_3475 and stkC (MXAN_3476. A stkB insertion was identified in a separate genetic screen because it eliminated EPS production of an EPS+ parental strain. Our results with in-frame deletions of these three stk genes indicated that the stkA mutant produced increased level of EPS while stkB and stkC mutants produced less EPS relative to the wild type. S motility and developmental aggregation were affected by deletions of stkA and stkB but only minimally by the deletion of stkC. Genetic epistasis indicated that StkA functions downstream of T4P but upstream of the Dif proteins as a negative regulator of EPS production in M. xanthus.

  14. New insights into the function of a versatile class of membrane molecular motors from studies of Myxococcus xanthus surface (gliding motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tâm Mignot

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell motility is a central function of living cells, as it empowers colonization of new environmental niches, cooperation, and development of multicellular organisms. This process is achieved by complex yet precise energy-consuming machineries in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Bacteria move on surfaces using extracellular appendages such as flagella and pili but also by a less-understood process called gliding motility. During this process, rod-shaped bacteria move smoothly along their long axis without any visible morphological changes besides occasional bending. For this reason, the molecular mechanism of gliding motility and its origin have long remained a complete mystery. An important breakthrough in the understanding of gliding motility came from single cell and genetic studies in the delta-proteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus. These early studies revealed, for the first time, the existence of bacterial Focal Adhesion complexes (FA. FAs are formed at the bacterial pole and rapidly move towards the opposite cell pole. Their attachment to the underlying surface is linked to cell propulsion, in a process similar to the rearward translocation of actomyosin complexes in Apicomplexans. The protein machinery that forms at FAs was shown to contain up to seventeen proteins predicted to localize in all layers of the bacterial cell envelope, the cytosolic face, the inner membrane (IM, the periplasmic space and the outer membrane (OM. Among these proteins, a proton-gated channel at the inner membrane was identified as the molecular motor. Thus, thrust generation requires the transduction of traction forces generated at the inner membrane through the cell envelope beyond the rigid barrier of the bacterial peptidoglycan.

  15. Identification of a substrate for Pkn2, a protein Ser/Thr kinase from Myxococcus xanthus by a novel method for substrate identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, H; Lam, C K; Mori, S; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    2000-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a large number of protein Ser/ Thr kinases, which play important roles in signal transduction required for cell proliferation, differentiation, and stress response and adaptation. It is also known that some prokaryotes contain a family of protein Ser/Thr kinases. A major challenge in the characterization of these kinases is how to identify their specific substrates. Here we developed such a method using a protein Ser/Thr kinase, Pkn2 from Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium. When Pkn2 is inducibly expressed in E. coli, cells are unable to form colonies on agar plates. This lethal effect of Pkn2 was eliminated in an inactive Pkn2 mutant in which the highly conserved Lys residue was changed to Asn, indicating that phosphorylation of a cellular protein(s) in E. coli resulted in growth arrest. Several clones from an E. coli genomic library were found to suppress the lethal effect when co-expressed with pkn2. Four out of seven multi-copy suppressors were identified to encode HU, (3 for HUalpha and 1 for HUB) a histone-like DNA binding protein. Purified HUalpha was found to be specifically phosphorylated by Pkn2 at Thr-59, and the phosphorylated HUalpha became unable to bind to DNA, suggesting that the phosphorylation of endogenous HU proteins by Pkn2 contributed at least in part to the lethal effect in E. coli. The present method termed the STEK method (Suppressors of Toxic Effects of Kinases) may be widely used for the substrate identification not only for prokaryotic protein Ser/Thr kinases but also for eukaryotic kinases.

  16. Myxococcus xanthus, a gram-negative bacterium, contains a transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase that blocks the secretion of beta-lactamase by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, H; Munoz-Dorado, J; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1995-04-15

    A gene, pkn2, encoding a Myxococcus xanthus protein with significant similarities to eukaryotic protein serine/threonine kinases, was cloned using the polymerase chain reaction. The open reading frame for the protein, beginning with a GUG initiation codon, consists of 830 amino acids. The amino-terminal 279 residues show 37% identity to catalytic domain of Pkn1, another protein serine/threonine kinase expressed during the development at the onset of sporulation. The catalytic domain of Pkn2 contains 27% and 25% identity to rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and Bos taurus rhodopsin kinase, respectively. In the middle of the carboxy-terminal regulatory domain, there is a typical transmembrane domain consisting of 18 hydrophobic residues. The gene product, Pkn2, produced in Escherichia coli under a T7 promoter was phosphorylated at both serine and threonine residues. TEM-beta-lactamase produced in E. coli was found to serve as an effective substrate for Pkn2, phosphorylated only at threonine residues, shifting its apparent molecular mass from 29 to 44 kD. The phosphorylated beta-lactamase was unable to be secreted into the periplasmic space and localized in the cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. Analysis of phoA fusions with pkn2 demonstrated that Pkn2 is a transmembrane protein with the kinase domain in the cytoplasm and the 207-residue carboxy-terminal domain outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Disruption of pkn2 showed no effect on vegetative growth but reduced the yield of myxospores by 30%-50%. On the basis of the present results, we propose that Pkn2 is a transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase that regulates the activity of endogenous beta-lactamase or related enzymes in response to an external signal yet to be identified.

  17. A response regulator interfaces between the Frz chemosensory system and the MglA/MglB GTPase/GAP module to regulate polarity in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Wuichet, Kristin; Drescher, Florian; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2012-09-01

    How cells establish and dynamically change polarity are general questions in cell biology. Cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move on surfaces with defined leading and lagging cell poles. Occasionally, cells undergo reversals, which correspond to an inversion of the leading-lagging pole polarity axis. Reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system and depend on relocalization of motility proteins between the poles. The Ras-like GTPase MglA localizes to and defines the leading cell pole in the GTP-bound form. MglB, the cognate MglA GTPase activating protein, localizes to and defines the lagging pole. During reversals, MglA-GTP and MglB switch poles and, therefore, dynamically localized motility proteins switch poles. We identified the RomR response regulator, which localizes in a bipolar asymmetric pattern with a large cluster at the lagging pole, as important for motility and reversals. We show that RomR interacts directly with MglA and MglB in vitro. Furthermore, RomR, MglA, and MglB affect the localization of each other in all pair-wise directions, suggesting that RomR stimulates motility by promoting correct localization of MglA and MglB in MglA/RomR and MglB/RomR complexes at opposite poles. Moreover, localization analyses suggest that the two RomR complexes mutually exclude each other from their respective poles. We further show that RomR interfaces with FrzZ, the output response regulator of the Frz chemosensory system, to regulate reversals. Thus, RomR serves at the functional interface to connect a classic bacterial signalling module (Frz) to a classic eukaryotic polarity module (MglA/MglB). This modular design is paralleled by the phylogenetic distribution of the proteins, suggesting an evolutionary scheme in which RomR was incorporated into the MglA/MglB module to regulate cell polarity followed by the addition of the Frz system to dynamically regulate cell polarity.

  18. A response regulator interfaces between the Frz chemosensory system and the MglA/MglB GTPase/GAP module to regulate polarity in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Keilberg

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How cells establish and dynamically change polarity are general questions in cell biology. Cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move on surfaces with defined leading and lagging cell poles. Occasionally, cells undergo reversals, which correspond to an inversion of the leading-lagging pole polarity axis. Reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system and depend on relocalization of motility proteins between the poles. The Ras-like GTPase MglA localizes to and defines the leading cell pole in the GTP-bound form. MglB, the cognate MglA GTPase activating protein, localizes to and defines the lagging pole. During reversals, MglA-GTP and MglB switch poles and, therefore, dynamically localized motility proteins switch poles. We identified the RomR response regulator, which localizes in a bipolar asymmetric pattern with a large cluster at the lagging pole, as important for motility and reversals. We show that RomR interacts directly with MglA and MglB in vitro. Furthermore, RomR, MglA, and MglB affect the localization of each other in all pair-wise directions, suggesting that RomR stimulates motility by promoting correct localization of MglA and MglB in MglA/RomR and MglB/RomR complexes at opposite poles. Moreover, localization analyses suggest that the two RomR complexes mutually exclude each other from their respective poles. We further show that RomR interfaces with FrzZ, the output response regulator of the Frz chemosensory system, to regulate reversals. Thus, RomR serves at the functional interface to connect a classic bacterial signalling module (Frz to a classic eukaryotic polarity module (MglA/MglB. This modular design is paralleled by the phylogenetic distribution of the proteins, suggesting an evolutionary scheme in which RomR was incorporated into the MglA/MglB module to regulate cell polarity followed by the addition of the Frz system to dynamically regulate cell polarity.

  19. Myxococcus xanthus DK1622 Coordinates Expressions of the Duplicate groEL and Single groES Genes for Synergistic Functions of GroELs and GroES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-zhong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chaperonin GroEL (Cpn60 requires cofactor GroES (Cpn10 for protein refolding in bacteria that possess single groEL and groES genes in a bicistronic groESL operon. Among 4,861 completely-sequenced prokaryotic genomes, 884 possess duplicate groEL genes and 770 possess groEL genes with no neighboring groES. It is unclear whether stand-alone groEL requires groES in order to function and, if required, how duplicate groEL genes and unequal groES genes balance their expressions. In Myxococcus xanthus DK1622, we determined that, while duplicate groELs were alternatively deletable, the single groES that clusters with groEL1 was essential for cell survival. Either GroEL1 or GroEL2 required interactions with GroES for in vitro and in vivo functions. Deletion of groEL1 or groEL2 resulted in decreased expressions of both groEL and groES; and ectopic complementation of groEL recovered not only the groEL but also groES expressions. The addition of an extra groES gene upstream groEL2 to form a bicistronic operon had almost no influence on groES expression and the cell survival rate, whereas over-expression of groES using a self-replicating plasmid simultaneously increased the groEL expressions. The results indicated that M. xanthus DK1622 cells coordinate expressions of the duplicate groEL and single groES genes for synergistic functions of GroELs and GroES. We proposed a potential regulation mechanism for the expression coordination.

  20. Morphometric analysis of cryofixed muscular tissue for intraoperative consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Giorgio; Pontenani, Francesca; Vassallo, Loretta; Tacchini, Damiana; Buonsanti, Michele; Tripodi, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    For diagnostic purposes, cryofixation of tissues is a daily routine technique to investigate rapidly about the presence of tumours during a surgical procedure in patients. We performed morphometric analysis of cryofixed muscular tissues according to different techniques. About 1,000 muscle fibers and 1,493 nuclei, were automatically examined. After freezing, ice tissue interfaces shrinkage of the cells were present. Liquid isopentane or liquid nitrogen produced a statistical increase of fractal dimension, D, of the ice-tissue interfaces, P damage inside the muscle cells was absent in the samples cryofixed inside the cryostat, it was present after cryofixation by liquid nitrogen or isopentane. Subcellular components like the nuclei were preserved by isopentane. This paper present, for the first time, an objective method able to quantify and characterize the damages produced by cryofixation in biological sample for intraoperative consultation.

  1. Myxotyrosides A and B, Unusual rhamnosides from Myxococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendorf, Birgit; Lorenzen, Wolfram; Kehraus, Stefan; Krick, Anja; Bode, Helge B; König, Gabriele M

    2009-01-01

    Myxobacteria are gliding bacteria of the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria and known for their unique biosynthetic capabilities. Two examples of a new class of metabolites, myxotyrosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a Myxococcus sp. The myxotyrosides have a tyrosine-derived core structure glycosylated with rhamnose and acylated with unusual fatty acids such as (Z)-15-methyl-2-hexadecenoic and (Z)-2-hexadecenoic acid. The fatty acid profile of the investigated Myxococcus sp. (strain 131) is that of a typical myxobacterium with a high similarity to those described for M. fulvus and M. xanthus, with significant concentrations of neither 15-methyl-2-hexadecenoic acid nor 2-hexadecenoic acid being detected.

  2. A New Mechanism for Collective Migration in Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starruß, J.; Bley, Th.; Søgaard-Andersen, L.; Deutsch, A.

    2007-07-01

    Myxobacteria exhibit a complex life cycle characterized by a sequence of cell patterns that culminate in the formation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies. This paper provides indications that the specific cell shape of myxobacteria might play an important role in the different morphogenetic processes during the life cycle. We introduce a new mechanism for collective migration that can explain the formation of aligned cell clusters in myxobacteria. This mechanism does not depend on cell cooperation, and in particular it does not depend on diffusive signals guiding cell motion. A Cellular Potts Model (CPM) that captures the rod cell shape, cell stiffness and active motion of myxobacteria is presented. By means of numerical simulations of model cell populations where cells interact via volume exclusion, we provide evidence of a purely mechanical mechanism for collective migration, which is controlled by the cells' length-to-width aspect ratio.

  3. Differential Expression of the Three Multicopper Oxidases from Myxococcus xanthus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sutil, María Celestina; Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Martins, Lígia O.; Pérez, Juana; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2007-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium that undergoes a unique life cycle among the prokaryotes upon starvation, which includes the formation of macroscopic structures, the fruiting bodies, and the differentiation of vegetative rods into coccoid myxospores. This peculiarity offers the opportunity to study the copper response in this bacterium in two different stages. In fact, M. xanthus vegetative rods exhibit 15-fold-greater resistance against copper than developing cells. However, cells preadapted to this metal reach the same levels of resistance during both stages. Analysis of the M. xanthus genome reveals that many of the genes involved in copper resistance are redundant, three of which encode proteins of the multicopper oxidase family (MCO). Each MCO gene exhibits a different expression profile in response to external copper addition. Promoters of cuoA and cuoB respond to Cu(II) ions during growth and development; however, they show a 10-fold-increased copper sensitivity during development. The promoter of cuoC shows copper-independent induction upon starvation, but it is copper up-regulated during growth. Phenotypic analyses of deletion mutants reveal that CuoB is involved in the primary copper-adaptive response; CuoA and CuoC are necessary for the maintenance of copper tolerance; and CuoC is required for normal development. These roles seem to be carried out through cuprous oxidase activity. PMID:17483223

  4. Freeze-fracture electron microscopic and low temperature x-ray scattering studies of the effect of cryofixation upon serum low density lipoprotein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggerbeck, L P; Gulik-Krzywicki, T

    1982-06-01

    We report here a correlated X-ray diffraction and freeze-fracture electron microscope study of the effects of several cryofixation procedures upon human serum low density lipoprotein (LDL2) structure. Only when the LDL2 solutions contained 75%, by weight, glycerol were the room temperature and post cryofixation low temperature LDL2 X-ray scattering curves indistinguishable from one another. Other cryofixation procedures, slow or rapid, with or without glycerol, resulted in differences between the room temperature and low temperature LDL2 X-ray scattering curves, in part due to the effect of quenching upon the solvent. Freeze-etching electron microscopy of the slowly cryofixed LDL2 showed marked aggregation of the particles and an unusual morphological appearance. In contrast, after rapid cryofixation or cryofixation in the presence of glycerol, freeze-etch electron microscopy revealed well-isolated particles which had a knobby morphology. The results demonstrate that under certain conditions (in the presence of 75% glycerol) cryofixation results in minimal, if any, structural alteration of, at least, the LDL2 lipid moiety. Further, this study underlines the more general conclusion that any high resolution structural study employing a cryofixation step must be interpreted with caution and the effect of cryofixation upon the sample structure need be evaluated by independent means.

  5. Membrane associated qualitative differences in cell ultrastructure of chemically and high pressure cryofixed plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Bernd; Müller, Maria; Zellnig, Günther

    2007-06-01

    Membrane contrast can sometimes be poor in biological samples after high pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution (FS). The addition of water to the FS-medium has been shown to improve membrane contrast in animal tissue and yeast. In the present study we tested the effects of 1% and 5% water added to the FS-medium (2% osmium with 0.2% uranyl acetate in anhydrous acetone) on the quality and visibility of membranes in high pressure frozen leaf samples of Cucurbita pepo L. plants and compared them to chemically fixed cells (3% glutaraldehyde post-fixed with 1% osmium tetroxide). The addition of water to the FS-medium drastically decreased the amounts of well preserved cells and did not significantly improve the quality nor visibility of membranes. In samples that were freeze substituted in FS-media containing 1% and 5% water the width of thylakoid membranes was found to be significantly increased of about 20% and the perinuclear space was up to 76% wider in comparison to what was found in samples which were freeze substituted without water. No differences were found in the thickness of membranes between chemically and cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted in the FS-medium without water. Nevertheless, in chemically fixed cells the intrathylakoidal space was about 120% wider than in cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted with or without water. The present results demonstrate that the addition of water to the FS-medium does not improve membrane contrast but changes the width of thylakoid membranes and the perinuclear space in the present plant material. The addition of water to the FS-medium is therefore not as essential for improved membrane contrast in the investigated plant samples as it was observed in cells of animal tissues and yeast cells.

  6. Autolytic effect of the antibiotic produced by Myxococcus coralloides D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, M D; Gálvez, A; Arias, J M; Montoya, E

    1994-12-01

    Myxococcus coralloides D secretes an antibiotic, named corallolysin, when grown on a rich medium. When a critical concentration is reached, this antibiotic lyses the producer bacterium either during vegetative growth or during morphogenesis. Corallolysin has not effect on resting cells nor on myxospores. The autolytic effect is caused by the early inhibition of RNA synthesis.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Narwani, Tarun; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria.

  8. Efficient expression and characterization of a cold-active endo-1, 4-β-glucanase from Citrobacter farmeri by co-expression of Myxococcus xanthus protein S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Bai

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The ProS-EglC is promising in application of various biotechnological processes because of its cold-active characterizations. This study also suggests a useful strategy for the expression of foreign proteins in E. coli using a ProS tag.

  9. Cryofixation, ultracryomicrotomy, and X-ray microanalysis of enterocytes from chick duodenum: Vitamin-D-induced formation of an apical tubulovesicular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.L.; Hagler, H.K.; Jones, R.G.; Farmer, G.R.; Cooper, O.J.; Martin, J.H.; Bridges, G.E.; Goodman, D.B. (Baylor Univ. Medical Center, Dallas, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    New methods of tissue preparation were developed to study the morphology and distribution of calcium ions in duodenal enterocytes from normal, rachitic, and vitamin D-replete (either cholecalciferol (CC) or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-DHCC) treated) chicks. Frozen hydrated sections were prepared from cryofixed tissues by ultracryomicrotomy at -125 degrees C. Sections were subsequently freeze-dried by increasing the temperature to -100 degrees C. The latter temperature was maintained throughout both the structural and elemental analyses. In cells from normal, rachitic, and vitamin D-treated (CC) animals the brush border from lanthanum-infused tissues was electron dense and calcium-lanthanum positive by x-ray analysis. In the absence of lanthanum, i.e., sucrose-infused duodena, the microvilli were still calcium positive. In the terminal web region of normal and CC-treated enterocytes, numerous, apparently interconnected, tubules and vesicles were seen. Vacuole-like structures were also seen. Such structures were especially prominent in the enterocytes from the vitamin-treated (CC) animals. Except for the vacuoles, the tubules and vesicles were electron dense in the lanthanum-infused duodena, and clear in sucrose-infused tissues. In both instances, the structures were calcium positive. Similar, but even larger structures were seen below the terminal web. Here however, the tubules and vesicles seemed to be organized into multiple complex interconnecting networks, i.e., tubulo-vesicular complexes. Both the tubules and the vesicles seemed to be interconnected via smaller channel-like entities. The extensiveness of this structure was better appreciated in the enterocytes from lanthanum-infused tissues, where it appeared similar in structure and complexity to an en face view of the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle.

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRI-01-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-01-0020 ref|YP_630094.1| phage tail tape measure protein, TP901 family, c...ore region [Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622] gb|ABF86877.1| phage tail tape measure protein, TP901 family, core region [Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622] YP_630094.1 0.006 27% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-37-0096 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-37-0096 ref|YP_632657.1| hypothetical protein MXAN_4488 [Myxococcus xanth...us DK 1622] gb|ABF86276.1| hypothetical protein MXAN_4488 [Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622] YP_632657.1 0.44 31% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-26-0102 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-26-0102 ref|YP_634760.1| molybdate ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein [...Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622] gb|ABF91211.1| molybdate ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein [Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622] YP_634760.1 0.26 28% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-1368 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OCUN-01-1368 ref|YP_633021.1| adventurous gliding motility protein AgmX [Myxoc...occus xanthus DK 1622] gb|ABF87224.1| adventurous gliding motility protein AgmX [Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622] YP_633021.1 3e-05 27% ...

  14. Advanced mutasynthesis studies on the natural α-pyrone antibiotic myxopyronin from Myxococcus fulvus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahner, J Henning; Sucipto, Hilda; Wenzel, Silke C; Groh, Matthias; Hartmann, Rolf W; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-13

    Myxopyronin is a natural α-pyrone antibiotic from the soil bacterium Myxococcus fulvus Mx f50. Myxopyronin inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by binding to a part of the enzyme not targeted by the clinically used rifamycins. This mode of action makes myxopyronins promising molecules for the development of novel broad-spectrum antibacterials. We describe the derivatization of myxopyronins by an advanced mutasynthesis approach as a first step towards this goal. Site-directed mutagenesis of the biosynthetic machinery was used to block myxopyronin biosynthesis at different stages. The resulting mutants were fed with diverse precursors that mimic the biosynthetic intermediates to restore production. Mutasynthon incorporation and production of novel myxopyronin derivatives were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS. This work sets the stage for accessing numerous myxopyronin derivatives, thus significantly expanding the chemical space of f α-pyrone antibiotics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Biocontrol Activity of Myxococcus sp. KYC 1126 against Phytophthora Blight on Hot Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Chul Yun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriolytic myxobacteria have been known to secrete various antifungal metabolites against several soilborne phytopathogens including Phytophthora. Among the three isolates of Myxococcus spp., KYC 1126 and KYC 1136 perfectly inhibited the mycelial growth of Phytophtora capsici in vitro. In order to show the biocontrol activity on Phytophthora blight of hot pepper, we tried to find the best way of application of myxobacterial isolate. Although KYC 1126 fruiting body was easily grown on the colony of Escherichia coli as a nutrient source, it did not control the disease when it was pre-applied in soil. Before the bioassay of a liquid culture filtrate of KYC 1126 was conducted, its antifungal activity was confirmed on the seedlings applying with the mixture of the pathogen`s zoospore suspension and KYC 1126 filtrate. On greenhouse experiments with five and four replications, the control value of KYC 1126 on phyllosphere and rhizosphere was 88% and 36%, respectively. Whereas, the control value of dimetnomorph+propineb on phyllosphere was 100% and that of propamorcarb on rhizosphere was 44%. There was a phytotoxicity of the myxobacterial filtrate when seedlings were washed and soaked for 24 hours. Gummy materials were covered with roots. And stem and petiole were constricted, then a whole seedling was eventually blighted.

  16. The complete genome sequence and analysis of a plasmid-bearing myxobacterial strain Myxococcus fulvus 124B02 (M 206081).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Han, Kui; Feng, Jing; Zhuo, Li; Li, Ya-Jie; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, phylogenetically located in the delta division of the Proteobacteria, are well known for characterized social behaviors and large genomes of more than 9 Mb in size. Myxococcus fulvus is a typical species of the genus Myxococcus in the family Myxococcaceae. M. fulvus 124B02, originally isolated from a soil sample collected in Northeast China, is the one and only presently known myxobacterial strain that harbors an endogenous autonomously replicating plasmid, named pMF1. The endogenous plasmid is of importance for understanding the genome evolution of myxobacteria, as well as for the development of genetic engineering tools in myxobacteria. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of this organism. M. fulvus 124B02 consists of a circular chromosome with a total length of 11,048,835 bp and a circular plasmid of 18,634 bp. Comparative genomic analyses suggest that pMF1 has a longstanding sustention within myxobacteria, and probably contributes to the genome expansion of myxobacteria.

  17. GenBank blastx search result: AK242840 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242840 J090070E16 AY197575.1 AY197575 Myxococcus xanthus isolate C781 hypothetical adventurous... gliding motility protein T (agmT) gene, partial cds; adventurous gliding motility protein S (a

  18. AcEST: BP912185 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 OS=Myxococ... 33 9.0 >tr|Q1CW29|Q1CW29_MYXXD CRISPR-associated protein Crm2 OS=Myxococcus xanthus (strain DK 1622) GN=crm...9 Definition tr|Q1CW29|Q1CW29_MYXXD CRISPR-associated protein Crm2 OS=Myxococcus ...g significant alignments: (bits) Value tr|Q1CW29|Q1CW29_MYXXD CRISPR-associated protein Crm

  19. Xanthusbase: adapting wikipedia principles to a model organism database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshinoff, Bradley I; Suen, Garret; Just, Eric M; Merchant, Sohel M; Kibbe, Warren A; Chisholm, Rex L; Welch, Roy D

    2007-01-01

    xanthusBase (http://www.xanthusbase.org) is the official model organism database (MOD) for the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. In many respects, M.xanthus represents the pioneer model organism (MO) for studying the genetic, biochemical, and mechanistic basis of prokaryotic multicellularity, a topic that has garnered considerable attention due to the significance of biofilms in both basic and applied microbiology research. To facilitate its utility, the design of xanthusBase incorporates open-source software, leveraging the cumulative experience made available through the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD) project, MediaWiki (http://www.mediawiki.org), and dictyBase (http://www.dictybase.org), to create a MOD that is both highly useful and easily navigable. In addition, we have incorporated a unique Wikipedia-style curation model which exploits the internet's inherent interactivity, thus enabling M.xanthus and other myxobacterial researchers to contribute directly toward the ongoing genome annotation.

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13311-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4( CP000113 |pid:none) Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622, com... 37 0.44 ( O35806 ) RecName: Full=Latent...... 35 1.3 ( O08999 ) RecName: Full=Latent-transforming growth factor beta-bi... 35 1.3 BX004766_1( BX004766

  1. GenBank blastx search result: AK104694 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104694 001-036-H12 AY204472.1 Myxococcus xanthus clone C1226 adventurous gliding ...teins, GidA-like protein (gidA), adventurous gliding motility protein U (aglU), kinesin-related protein, int

  2. GenBank blastx search result: AK242797 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242797 J090058H08 AY204472.1 AY204472 Myxococcus xanthus clone C1226 adventurous ...ical proteins, GidA-like protein (gidA), adventurous gliding motility protein U (aglU), kinesin-related prot

  3. GenBank blastx search result: AK061967 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061967 001-042-G12 AY204472.1 Myxococcus xanthus clone C1226 adventurous gliding ...teins, GidA-like protein (gidA), adventurous gliding motility protein U (aglU), kinesin-related protein, int

  4. GenBank blastx search result: AK060498 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060498 001-017-D02 AY197568.1 Myxococcus xanthus isolate C257/780 hypothetical adventurous... gliding motility protein M (agmM), hypothetical TPR-like protein, and adventurous gliding motility protein R (agmR) genes, complete cds.|BCT BCT 8e-11 +3 ...

  5. GenBank blastx search result: AK243408 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243408 J100065N04 AY204472.1 AY204472 Myxococcus xanthus clone C1226 adventurous ...ical proteins, GidA-like protein (gidA), adventurous gliding motility protein U (aglU), kinesin-related prot

  6. GenBank blastx search result: AK059177 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059177 001-023-F08 AY204463.1 Myxococcus xanthus clone C1143 hypothetical protein gene, partial cds; adven...turous gliding motility protein D (agmD), and hypothetical protein genes, complete cds; and integrase gene, partial cds.|BCT BCT 4e-37 +1 ...

  7. GenBank blastx search result: AK060423 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060423 001-010-H01 AY204472.1 Myxococcus xanthus clone C1226 adventurous gliding ...teins, GidA-like protein (gidA), adventurous gliding motility protein U (aglU), kinesin-related protein, int

  8. GenBank blastx search result: AK289215 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289215 J100061G23 AY204472.1 AY204472 Myxococcus xanthus clone C1226 adventurous ...ical proteins, GidA-like protein (gidA), adventurous gliding motility protein U (aglU), kinesin-related prot

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14955-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mpling_GS-30-02-01-1... 50 2e-06 3 ( EU111781 ) Bartonella coopersplainensis strain AUST/NH20 cel... 40 3e-0...3 |pid:none) Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622, com... 224 4e-57 EU111781_1( EU111781 |pid:none) Bartonella coope

  10. GenBank blastx search result: AK243510 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243510 J100075B22 AF013216.1 AF013216 Myxococcus xanthus Dog (dog), isocitrate lyase (icl), Mls (mls), Ufo... (ufo), fumarate hydratase (fhy), and proteosome major subunit (clpP) genes, complete cds; and acyl-CoA oxidase (aco) gene, partial cds. BCT 2e-87 1 ...

  11. GenBank blastn search result: AK241214 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241214 J065122P06 AF013216.1 AF013216 Myxococcus xanthus Dog (dog), isocitrate lyase (icl), Mls (mls), Ufo... (ufo), fumarate hydratase (fhy), and proteosome major subunit (clpP) genes, complete cds; and acyl-CoA oxidase (aco) gene, partial cds. BCT 8e-18 1 -1 ...

  12. GenBank blastx search result: AK241214 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241214 J065122P06 AF013216.1 AF013216 Myxococcus xanthus Dog (dog), isocitrate lyase (icl), Mls (mls), Ufo... (ufo), fumarate hydratase (fhy), and proteosome major subunit (clpP) genes, complete cds; and acyl-CoA oxidase (aco) gene, partial cds. BCT 1e-151 1 ...

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK243527 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243527 J100075P16 AF013216.1 AF013216 Myxococcus xanthus Dog (dog), isocitrate lyase (icl), Mls (mls), Ufo... (ufo), fumarate hydratase (fhy), and proteosome major subunit (clpP) genes, complete cds; and acyl-CoA oxidase (aco) gene, partial cds. BCT 1e-143 1 ...

  14. GenBank blastx search result: AK287540 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287540 J065011K01 AF013216.1 AF013216 Myxococcus xanthus Dog (dog), isocitrate lyase (icl), Mls (mls), Ufo... (ufo), fumarate hydratase (fhy), and proteosome major subunit (clpP) genes, complete cds; and acyl-CoA oxidase (aco) gene, partial cds. BCT 0.0 0 ...

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14309-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0113_4450( CP000113 |pid:none) Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622, com... 37 0.88 ( O08999 ) RecName: Full=Latent...rogenic locus notch homolog protein 1;... 35 4.4 ( O35806 ) RecName: Full=Latent-...0 )hypothetical protein T10E10.4 - Caenorhabditis ele... 34 9.7 ( Q61810 ) RecName: Full=Latent-transforming

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15795-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 60 2e-07 EF527414_1( EF527414 |pid:none) Aspergillus tubingensis strain V-0.....yces hygroscopicus strain... 59 5e-07 EF527413_1( EF527413 |pid:none) Aspergillus aff. tubingensis V-04-... ...00113_4409( CP000113 |pid:none) Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622, com... 59 7e-07 EF527412_1( EF527412 |pid:none) Aspergillus aff. tubinge

  17. A bacterial antirepressor with SH3 domain topology mimics operator DNA in sequestering the repressor DNA recognition helix

    OpenAIRE

    León, Esther; Navarro-Avilés, Gloria; Santiveri, Clara M.; Flores-Flores, Cesar; Rico, Manuel; González, Carlos; Murillo, Francisco J; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Jiménez, María Angeles; Padmanabhan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Direct targeting of critical DNA-binding elements of a repressor by its cognate antirepressor is an effective means to sequester the repressor and remove a transcription initiation block. Structural descriptions for this, though often proposed for bacterial and phage repressor–antirepressor systems, are unavailable. Here, we describe the structural and functional basis of how the Myxococcus xanthus CarS antirepressor recognizes and neutralizes its cognate repressors to turn on a photo-inducib...

  18. Identification and comparative analysis of microRNAs in barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) in response to rice allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Changxun; Li, Yingzhe; Li, Chengxun; Li, Biliang; Ren, Yongjie; Zheng, Haiping; Zeng, Xiaomei; Shen, Lihua; Lin, Wenxiong

    2015-07-01

    Rice allelopathy is a hot topic in the field of allelopathy, and behaviour of donor allelopathic rice has been well documented. However, few study addresses response of receiver barnyardgrass (BYG). We found that expression of miRNAs relevant to plant hormone signal transduction, nucleotide excision repair and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and p53 signalling pathways was enhanced in BYG co-cultured with the allelopathic rice cultivar PI312777, the expression levels of these miRNAs in BYG plants were positively correlated with allelopathic potential of the co-cultured rice varieties. Treatment of BYG plants with rice-produced phenolic acids also increased miRNA expression in BYG, while treatment with rice-produced terpenoids had no obvious effect on miRNA expression. In the hydroponic system, the largest number of Myxococcus sp. was found in the growth medium containing rice with the highest allelopathic potential. The addition of phenolic acids in the hydroponic medium also increased the number of Myxococcus sp. More interestingly, inoculation with Myxococcus xanthus significantly increased miRNA expression in the treated BYG. Jointed treatments of ferulic acid and M. xanthus led to strongest growth inhibition of BYG. The results suggest that there exist involvement of Myxococcus sp. and mediation of miRNA expression in rice allelopathy against BYG. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A. (UPENN); (Duke); (MRCLMB); (FSU); (Jikei-Med)

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very different from strong binding attachments.

  20. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenping Wu

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very different from strong binding attachments.

  1. The social behavior of myxobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Dorado, J; Arias, J M

    1995-12-01

    Myxobacteria are social microorganisms that undergo a spectacular cell cycle. Under starvation conditions, cells aggregate to certain points originating macroscopic fruiting bodies, inside which cells differentiate into myxospores. To accomplish this developmental cycle, cells must communicate. The signals that cells exchange during development as well as the signal transduction systems used by myxobacteria have been intensively studied during the last years. A family of eukaryotic-like protein serine/threonine kinases has been identified in Myxococcus xanthus, indicating that signal transduction systems similar to those used by eukaryotic cells may also function in myxobacteria.

  2. Continuum modeling of myxobacteria clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Alber, Mark; Tsimring, Lev S.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we develop a continuum theory of clustering in ensembles of self-propelled inelastically colliding rods with applications to collective dynamics of common gliding bacteria Myxococcus xanthus. A multi-phase hydrodynamic model that couples densities of oriented and isotropic phases is described. This model is used for the analysis of an instability that leads to spontaneous formation of directionally moving dense clusters within initially dilute isotropic ‘gas’ of myxobacteria. Numerical simulations of this model confirm the existence of stationary dense moving clusters and also elucidate the properties of their collisions. The results are shown to be in a qualitative agreement with experiments.

  3. The first demonstration of the existence of reverse transcriptases in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Masayori

    2017-01-15

    It has been long thought that reverse transcriptases are unique to the eukaryotes. However, through our research on a peculiar single stranded DNA called msDNA in Myxococcus xanthus, it was predicted that its synthesis requires reverse transcriptases. Subsequently, Lim and Maas as well as our group demonstrated the existence of reverse transcriptases for the production of msDNA. In this review, I describe how the discovery of msDNA led to the discovery of reverse transcriptases in bacteria and discuss the evolutionary significance of the discovery of revise transcriptases in bacteria.

  4. Rapid embedding methods into epoxy and LR White resins for morphological and immunological analysis of cryofixed biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kent L

    2014-02-01

    A variety of specimens including bacteria, ciliates, choanoflagellates (Salpingoeca rosetta), zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, nematode worms (Caenorhabditis elegans), and leaves of white clover (Trifolium repens) plants were high pressure frozen, freeze-substituted, infiltrated with either Epon, Epon-Araldite, or LR White resins, and polymerized. Total processing time from freezing to blocks ready to section was about 6 h. For epoxy embedding the specimens were freeze-substituted in 1% osmium tetroxide plus 0.1% uranyl acetate in acetone. For embedding in LR White the freeze-substitution medium was 0.2% uranyl acetate in acetone. Rapid infiltration was achieved by centrifugation through increasing concentrations of resin followed by polymerization at 100°C for 1.5-2 h. The preservation of ultrastructure was comparable to standard freeze substitution and resin embedding methods that take days to complete. On-section immunolabeling results for actin and tubulin molecules were positive with very low background labeling. The LR White methods offer a safer, quicker, and less-expensive alternative to Lowicryl embedding of specimens processed for on-section immunolabeling without traditional aldehyde fixatives.

  5. Specificity residues determine binding affinity for two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Jonathan W; Tiwari, Nitija; Müller, Susanne; Hummels, Katherine R; Houtman, Jon C D; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Kirby, John R

    2013-11-05

    Two-component systems (TCS) comprise histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators and allow bacteria to sense and respond to a wide variety of signals. Histidine kinases (HKs) phosphorylate and dephosphorylate their cognate response regulators (RRs) in response to stimuli. In general, these reactions appear to be highly specific and require an appropriate association between the HK and RR proteins. The Myxococcus xanthus genome encodes one of the largest repertoires of signaling proteins in bacteria (685 open reading frames [ORFs]), including at least 127 HKs and at least 143 RRs. Of these, 27 are bona fide NtrC-family response regulators, 21 of which are encoded adjacent to their predicted cognate kinases. Using system-wide profiling methods, we determined that the HK-NtrC RR pairs display a kinetic preference during both phosphotransfer and phosphatase functions, thereby defining cognate signaling systems in M. xanthus. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicated that cognate HK-RR pairs interact with dissociation constants (Kd) of approximately 1 µM, while noncognate pairs had no measurable binding. Lastly, a chimera generated between the histidine kinase, CrdS, and HK1190 revealed that residues conferring phosphotransfer and phosphatase specificity dictate binding affinity, thereby establishing discrete protein-protein interactions which prevent cross talk. The data indicate that binding affinity is a critical parameter governing system-wide signaling fidelity for bacterial signal transduction proteins. Using in vitro phosphotransfer and phosphatase profiling assays and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have taken a system-wide approach to demonstrate specificity for a family of two-component signaling proteins in Myxococcus xanthus. Our results demonstrate that previously identified specificity residues dictate binding affinity and that phosphatase specificity follows phosphotransfer specificity for cognate HK-RR pairs. The data

  6. Modular construction of a functional artificial epothilone polyketide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osswald, Corina; Zipf, Gregor; Schmidt, Gisela; Maier, Josef; Bernauer, Hubert S; Müller, Rolf; Wenzel, Silke C

    2014-10-17

    Natural products of microbial origin continue to be an important source of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals exhibiting potent activities and often novel modes of action. Due to their inherent structural complexity chemical synthesis is often hardly possible, leaving fermentation as the only viable production route. In addition, the pharmaceutical properties of natural products often need to be optimized for application by sophisticated medicinal chemistry and/or biosynthetic engineering. The latter requires a detailed understanding of the biosynthetic process and genetic tools to modify the producing organism that are often unavailable. Consequently, heterologous expression of complex natural product pathways has been in the focus of development over recent years. However, piecing together existing DNA cloned from natural sources and achieving efficient expression in heterologous circuits represent several limitations that can be addressed by synthetic biology. In this work we have redesigned and reassembled the 56 kb epothilone biosynthetic gene cluster from Sorangium cellulosum for expression in the high GC host Myxococcus xanthus. The codon composition was adapted to a modified codon table for M. xanthus, and unique restriction sites were simultaneously introduced and others eliminated from the sequence in order to permit pathway assembly and future interchangeability of modular building blocks from the epothilone megasynthetase. The functionality of the artificial pathway was demonstrated by successful heterologous epothilone production in M. xanthus at significant yields that have to be improved in upcoming work. Our study sets the stage for future engineering of epothilone biosynthesis and production optimization using a highly flexible assembly strategy.

  7. Exopolysaccharide microchannels direct bacterial motility and organize multicellular behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berleman, James E; Zemla, Marcin; Remis, Jonathan P; Liu, Hong; Davis, Annie E; Worth, Alexandra N; West, Zachary; Zhang, Angela; Park, Hanwool; Bosneaga, Elena; van Leer, Brandon; Tsai, Wenting; Zusman, David R; Auer, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    The myxobacteria are a family of soil bacteria that form biofilms of complex architecture, aligned multilayered swarms or fruiting body structures that are simple or branched aggregates containing myxospores. Here, we examined the structural role of matrix exopolysaccharide (EPS) in the organization of these surface-dwelling bacterial cells. Using time-lapse light and fluorescence microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) electron microscopy, we found that Myxococcus xanthus cell organization in biofilms is dependent on the formation of EPS microchannels. Cells are highly organized within the three-dimensional structure of EPS microchannels that are required for cell alignment and advancement on surfaces. Mutants lacking EPS showed a lack of cell orientation and poor colony migration. Purified, cell-free EPS retains a channel-like structure, and can complement EPS(-) mutant motility defects. In addition, EPS provides the cooperative structure for fruiting body formation in both the simple mounds of M. xanthus and the complex, tree-like structures of Chondromyces crocatus. We furthermore investigated the possibility that EPS impacts community structure as a shared resource facilitating cooperative migration among closely related isolates of M. xanthus.

  8. PilB localization correlates with the direction of twitching motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuergers, Nils; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Wallner, Thomas; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Wilde, Annegret

    2015-05-01

    Twitching motility depends on the adhesion of type IV pili (T4P) to a substrate, with cell movement driven by extension and retraction of the pili. The mechanism of twitching motility, and the events that lead to a reversal of direction, are best understood in rod-shaped bacteria such as Myxococcus xanthus. In M. xanthus, the direction of movement depends on the unipolar localization of the pilus extension and retraction motors PilB and PilT to opposite cell poles. Reversal of direction results from relocalization of PilB and PilT. Some cyanobacteria utilize twitching motility for phototaxis. Here, we examine twitching motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which has a spherical cell shape without obvious polarity. We use a motile Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain expressing a functional GFP-tagged PilB1 protein to show that PilB1 tends to localize in 'crescents' adjacent to a specific region of the cytoplasmic membrane. Crescents are more prevalent under the low-light conditions that favour phototactic motility, and the direction of motility strongly correlates with the orientation of the crescent. We conclude that the direction of twitching motility in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is controlled by the localization of the T4P apparatus, as it is in M. xanthus. The PilB1 crescents in the spherical cells of Synechocystis can be regarded as being equivalent to the leading pole in the rod-shaped cells. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13205-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 1e-10 ( O08999 ) RecName: Full=Latent-transforming growth factor beta-bi... 67 1e-09 CP000113_6723( CP0001...13 |pid:none) Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622, com... 67 1e-09 ( O35806 ) RecName: Full=Latent...e-07 (Q8CIR0) RecName: Full=Latent-transforming growth factor beta-bi... 59 2e-07 AB100603_1( AB100603 |pid:...er chromoso... 51 6e-05 AF051345_1( AF051345 |pid:none) Homo sapiens latent transforming g... 51 6e-05 (Q8N2S1) RecName: Full=Latent

  10. AcEST: BP911598 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available putative OS=Asper... 42 0.025 tr|Q48AI8|Q48AI8_COLP3 Signal recognition particle-...p|P95333|GRPE_MYXXD Protein grpE OS=Myxococcus xanthus (strain ... 39 0.012 sp|Q5HJU7|PLS_STAAC Putative surface...U1_RAT Hypoxia up-regulated protein 1 OS=Rattus nor... 36 0.13 sp|Q49537|VLPE_MYCHR Variant surface antigen ...ESTLLVQQVES 472 ++ RT D+EN R A + VQ+ S Sbjct: 79 AQERTVRHAADLENYRKRAQKEKEEVQRFGS 109 >sp|Q5HJU7|PLS_STAAC Putative surface...docking prote... 41 0.033 tr|A2DBW8|A2DBW8_TRIVA Immuno-dominant variable surface antigen-... 41 0.033 tr|Q0

  11. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  12. Active Brownian motion of an asymmetric rigid particle

    CERN Document Server

    Mammadov, Gulmammad

    2012-01-01

    Individual movements of a rod-like self-propelled particle on a flat substrate are quantified. Biological systems that fit into this description may be the Gram-negative delta-proteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, and Mitochondria. There are also non-living analogues such as vibrated polar granulates and self-driven anisotropic colloidal particles. For that we study the Brownian motion of an asymmetric rod-like rigid particle self-propelled at a fixed speed along its long axis in two dimensions. The motion of such a particle in a uniform external potential field is also considered. The theoretical model presented here is anticipated to better describe individual cell motion as well as intracellular transport in 2D than previous models.

  13. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-02-26

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore.

  14. Reversals and collisions optimize protein exchange in bacterial swarms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, Aboutaleb; Harvey, Cameron; Buchmann, Amy; Christley, Scott; Shrout, Joshua D.; Aranson, Igor S.; Alber, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Swarming groups of bacteria coordinate their behavior by self-organizing as a population to move over surfaces in search of nutrients and optimal niches for colonization. Many open questions remain about the cues used by swarming bacteria to achieve this self-organization. While chemical cue signaling known as quorum sensing is well-described, swarming bacteria often act and coordinate on time scales that could not be achieved via these extracellular quorum sensing cues. Here, cell-cell contact-dependent protein exchange is explored as amechanism of intercellular signaling for the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. A detailed biologically calibrated computational model is used to study how M. xanthus optimizes the connection rate between cells and maximizes the spread of an extracellular protein within the population. The maximum rate of protein spreading is observed for cells that reverse direction optimally for swarming. Cells that reverse too slowly or too fast fail to spread extracellular protein efficiently. In particular, a specific range of cell reversal frequencies was observed to maximize the cell-cell connection rate and minimize the time of protein spreading. Furthermore, our findings suggest that predesigned motion reversal can be employed to enhance the collective behavior of biological synthetic active systems.

  15. Emergence and modular evolution of a novel motility machinery in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Luciano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria glide across solid surfaces by mechanisms that have remained largely mysterious despite decades of research. In the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, this locomotion allows the formation stress-resistant fruiting bodies where sporulation takes place. However, despite the large number of genes identified as important for gliding, no specific machinery has been identified so far, hampering in-depth investigations. Based on the premise that components of the gliding machinery must have co-evolved and encode both envelope-spanning proteins and a molecular motor, we re-annotated known gliding motility genes and examined their taxonomic distribution, genomic localization, and phylogeny. We successfully delineated three functionally related genetic clusters, which we proved experimentally carry genes encoding the basal gliding machinery in M. xanthus, using genetic and localization techniques. For the first time, this study identifies structural gliding motility genes in the Myxobacteria and opens new perspectives to study the motility mechanism. Furthermore, phylogenomics provide insight into how this machinery emerged from an ancestral conserved core of genes of unknown function that evolved to gliding by the recruitment of functional modules in Myxococcales. Surprisingly, this motility machinery appears to be highly related to a sporulation system, underscoring unsuspected common mechanisms in these apparently distinct morphogenic phenomena.

  16. Eukaryotic-like protein kinases in the prokaryotes and the myxobacterial kinome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J.; Castañeda-García, A.; Jenke-Kodama, H.; Müller, R.; Muñoz-Dorado, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which together comprise a major class of regulatory proteins in eukaryotes, were not believed to play an important role in prokaryotes until recently. However, our analysis of 626 prokaryotic genomes reveals that eukaryotic-like protein kinases (ELKs) are found in nearly two-thirds of the sequenced strains. We have identified 2697 ELKs, most of which are encoded by multicellular strains of the phyla Proteobacteria (Myxococcales), Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Chloroflexi, and 2 Acidobacteria and 1 Planctomycetes. Astonishingly, 7 myxobacterial strains together encode 892 ELKs, with 4 of the strains exhibiting a genomic ELK density similar to that observed in eukaryotes. Most myxobacterial ELKs show a modular organization in which the kinase domain is located at the N terminus. The C-terminal portion of the ELKs is highly diverse and often contains sequences with similarity to characterized domains, most of them involved in signaling mechanisms or in protein–protein interactions. However, many of these architectures are unique to the myxobacteria, an observation that suggests that this group exploits sophisticated and novel signal transduction systems. Phylogenetic reconstruction using the kinase domains revealed many orthologous sequence pairs and a huge number of gene duplications that probably occurred after speciation. Furthermore, studies of the microsynteny in the ELK-encoding regions reveal only low levels of synteny among Myxococcus xanthus, Plesiocystis pacifica, and Sorangium cellulosum. However, extensive similarities between M. xanthus, Stigmatella aurantiaca, and 3 Anaeromyxobacter strains were observed, indicating that they share regulatory pathways involving various ELKs. PMID:18836084

  17. Inactivation of Stigmatella aurantiaca CsgA gene impares rippling formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosevic-Đeric Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatella aurantiaca fruiting body development depends on cell-cell interactions. One type of the signaling molecule stigmolone isolated from S. aurantiaca cells acts to help cells to stay together in the aggregation phase. Another gene product involved in intercellular signaling in S. aurantiaca is the csgA homolog of Myxococcus xanthus. In close relative M. xanthus C signal the product of the csgA gene is required for rippling, aggregation and sporulation. Isolation of homologous gene in S. aurantiaca implicates a probable role of CsgA in intercellular communication. Inactivation of the gene by insertion mutagenesis caused alterations in S. aurantiaca fruiting. The motility behavior of the cells during development was changed as well as their ability to stay more closely together in the early stages of development. Inactivation of the csgA gene completely abolished rippling of the cells. This indicates the crucial role of the CsgA protein in regulating this rhythmic behavior.

  18. Reversals and collisions optimize protein exchange in bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Aboutaleb; Harvey, Cameron; Buchmann, Amy; Christley, Scott; Shrout, Joshua D.; Aranson, Igor S.; Alber, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Swarming groups of bacteria coordinate their behavior by self-organizing as a population to move over surfaces in search of nutrients and optimal niches for colonization. Many open questions remain about the cues used by swarming bacteria to achieve this self-organization. While chemical cue signaling known as quorum sensing is well-described, swarming bacteria often act and coordinate on time scales that could not be achieved via these extracellular quorum sensing cues. Here, cell-cell contact-dependent protein exchange is explored as a mechanism of intercellular signaling for the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. A detailed biologically calibrated computational model is used to study how M. xanthus optimizes the connection rate between cells and maximizes the spread of an extracellular protein within the population. The maximum rate of protein spreading is observed for cells that reverse direction optimally for swarming. Cells that reverse too slowly or too fast fail to spread extracellular protein efficiently. In particular, a specific range of cell reversal frequencies was observed to maximize the cell-cell connection rate and minimize the time of protein spreading. Furthermore, our findings suggest that predesigned motion reversal can be employed to enhance the collective behavior of biological synthetic active systems.

  19. The archaic chaperone-usher pathways may depend on donor strand exchange for intersubunit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xu, Shihui; Zhu, Wei; Mao, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Subunit-subunit interactions of the classical and alternate chaperone-usher (CU) systems have been shown to proceed through a donor strand exchange (DSE) mechanism. However, it is not known whether DSE is required for intersubunit interactions in the archaic CU system. We have previously shown that the Myxococcus xanthus Mcu system, a member of the archaic CU family that functions in spore coat formation, is likely to use the principle of donor strand complementation to medicate chaperone-subunit interactions analogous to the classical CU pathway. Here we describe the results of studies on Mcu subunit-subunit interactions. We constructed a series of N-terminal-deleted, single amino acid-mutated and donor strand-complemented Mcu subunits, and characterized their abilities to participate in subunit-subunit interactions. It appears that certain residues in both the N and C termini of McuA, a subunit of the Mcu system, play a critical role in intersubunit interactions and these interactions may involve the general principle of DSE of the classical and alternate CU systems. In addition, the specificity of the M. xanthus CU system for Mcu subunits over other spore coat proteins is demonstrated.

  20. Emergence and modular evolution of a novel motility machinery in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Jennifer; Agrebi, Rym; Le Gall, Anne Valérie; Wartel, Morgane; Fiegna, Francesca; Ducret, Adrien; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Mignot, Tâm

    2011-09-01

    Bacteria glide across solid surfaces by mechanisms that have remained largely mysterious despite decades of research. In the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, this locomotion allows the formation stress-resistant fruiting bodies where sporulation takes place. However, despite the large number of genes identified as important for gliding, no specific machinery has been identified so far, hampering in-depth investigations. Based on the premise that components of the gliding machinery must have co-evolved and encode both envelope-spanning proteins and a molecular motor, we re-annotated known gliding motility genes and examined their taxonomic distribution, genomic localization, and phylogeny. We successfully delineated three functionally related genetic clusters, which we proved experimentally carry genes encoding the basal gliding machinery in M. xanthus, using genetic and localization techniques. For the first time, this study identifies structural gliding motility genes in the Myxobacteria and opens new perspectives to study the motility mechanism. Furthermore, phylogenomics provide insight into how this machinery emerged from an ancestral conserved core of genes of unknown function that evolved to gliding by the recruitment of functional modules in Myxococcales. Surprisingly, this motility machinery appears to be highly related to a sporulation system, underscoring unsuspected common mechanisms in these apparently distinct morphogenic phenomena.

  1. Soil myxobacteria as a potential source of polyketide-peptide substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charousová, Ivana; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Medo, Juraj; Javoreková, Soňa; Wink, Joachim

    2017-02-04

    Myxobacteria, a group of antimicrobial producing bacteria, have been successfully cultured and characterized from ten soil samples collected from different parts of Slovakia. A total of 79 myxobacteria belonging to four genera (Myxococcus, Corallococcus, Sorangium, and Polyangium) were isolated based on aspects of their life cycle. Twenty-five of them were purified, fermented, and screened for antimicrobial activities against 11 test microorganisms. Results indicated that crude extracts showed more significant activities against Gram-positive than against Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Based on a higher degree and broader range of antimicrobial production, the two most potential extracts (K9-5, V3-1) were selected for HPLC fractionation against Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus and LC/MS analysis of potential antibiotic metabolites. The analysis resulted in the identification of polyketide-peptide antibiotics, namely corallopyronin A and B (K9-5) and myxalamid B and C (V3-1), which were responsible for important Gram-positive activity in the observed strains. A sequence similarity search through BLAST revealed that these strains showed the highest sequence similarity to Corallococcus coralloides (K9-5, NCBI accession number KX256198) and Myxococcus xanthus (V3-1, NCBI accession number KX256197). Although screening of myxobacteria is laborious, due to difficulties in isolating cultures, this research represented the first report covering the isolation and cultivation of this challenging bacterial group from Slovakian soils as well as the screening of their antimicrobial activity, cultural identification, and secondary metabolite identification.

  2. Myxobacteria: moving, killing, feeding, and surviving together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José eMuñoz-Dorado

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus, like other myxobacteria, is a social bacterium that moves and feeds cooperatively in predatory groups. On surfaces, rod-shaped vegetative cells move in search of the prey in a coordinated manner, forming dynamic multicellular groups referred to as swarms. Within the swarms, cells interact with one another and use two separate locomotion systems. Adventurous motility, which drives the movement of individual cells, is associated with the secretion of slime that forms trails at the leading edge of the swarms. It has been proposed that cellular traffic along these trails contributes to M. xanthus social behavior via stigmergic regulation. However, most of the cells travel in groups by using social motility, which is cell contact-dependent and requires a large number of individuals. Exopolysaccharides and the retraction of type IV pili at alternate poles of the cells are the engines associated with social motility. When the swarms encounter prey, the population of M. xanthus lyses and takes up nutrients from nearby cells. This cooperative and highly density-dependent feeding behavior has the advantage that the pool of hydrolytic enzymes and other secondary metabolites secreted by the entire group is shared by the community to optimize the use of the degradation products. This multicellular behavior is especially observed in the absence of nutrients. In this condition, M. xanthus swarms have the ability to organize the gliding movements of thousands of rods, synchronizing rippling waves of oscillating cells, to form macroscopic fruiting bodies, with three subpopulations of cells showing division of labor. A small fraction of cells either develop into resistant myxospores or remain as peripheral rods, while the majority of cells die, probably to provide nutrients to allow aggregation and spore differentiation. Sporulation within multicellular fruiting bodies has the benefit of enabling survival in hostile environments, and increases

  3. Myxobacteria: Moving, Killing, Feeding, and Surviving Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Dorado, José; Marcos-Torres, Francisco J.; García-Bravo, Elena; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Pérez, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, like other myxobacteria, is a social bacterium that moves and feeds cooperatively in predatory groups. On surfaces, rod-shaped vegetative cells move in search of the prey in a coordinated manner, forming dynamic multicellular groups referred to as swarms. Within the swarms, cells interact with one another and use two separate locomotion systems. Adventurous motility, which drives the movement of individual cells, is associated with the secretion of slime that forms trails at the leading edge of the swarms. It has been proposed that cellular traffic along these trails contributes to M. xanthus social behavior via stigmergic regulation. However, most of the cells travel in groups by using social motility, which is cell contact-dependent and requires a large number of individuals. Exopolysaccharides and the retraction of type IV pili at alternate poles of the cells are the engines associated with social motility. When the swarms encounter prey, the population of M. xanthus lyses and takes up nutrients from nearby cells. This cooperative and highly density-dependent feeding behavior has the advantage that the pool of hydrolytic enzymes and other secondary metabolites secreted by the entire group is shared by the community to optimize the use of the degradation products. This multicellular behavior is especially observed in the absence of nutrients. In this condition, M. xanthus swarms have the ability to organize the gliding movements of 1000s of rods, synchronizing rippling waves of oscillating cells, to form macroscopic fruiting bodies, with three subpopulations of cells showing division of labor. A small fraction of cells either develop into resistant myxospores or remain as peripheral rods, while the majority of cells die, probably to provide nutrients to allow aggregation and spore differentiation. Sporulation within multicellular fruiting bodies has the benefit of enabling survival in hostile environments, and increases germination and growth

  4. Use of microorganisms to improve the cementation of granular structures. Applications in the restoration of monuments

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Isabel; Mayoral, Eduardo; Ortiz, Pilar; Segura, Dolores; Vazquez, Auxiliadora; Barba, Cinta; Ortiz, Rocio; Romero, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    This researching work focuses on the development of new procedures to be applied in heritage rehabilitation, through the implementation of low-cost biotechnological processes in the realm of engineering and architecture. In doing so, it explores the possibilities of MICP (Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation), which is a biomineralization process applied to improve the engineering properties of granular structures. This is a novelty approach at present, as there are few researches putting together knowledge in biotechnology and mineralogy to by applied in architecture and engineer. Some authors propose the bacteria use to generate habitable structures that reduce desertification (Magnus Larsson 2008). Innovative research teams led by De Jong and the University of California UC Davis (XXXX) study how cement or stabilize soils to prevent landslides, improving the foundation injecting populations of Bacillus pasteurii in the field. Bacterially induced mineralization has emerged as a method for protecting and consolidating decayed ornamental stone, which offers noticeable advantages compared to traditional restoration procedures (Tiano et al., 1999). Castanier et al. (2000) found that Bacillus cereus was able to induce extracellular precipitation of calcium carbonate on decayed limestones. Rodriguez-Navarro et al. (2003) tested the ability of Myxococcus xanthus to induce calcium carbonate precipitation. Current studies are evaluating the potential of bacteria as self-healing agents for the autonomous decrease of permeability of concrete upon crack formation (De Muynck, et al 2010) In the urban area of Seville, most historical buildings are constructed with calcarenites, limestones, sandstones and bricks, the weathering forms associated to this building materials often are granular disintegration, so the proposed technology has a huge potential to be applied to these materials for possible restoration. This research is mainly grounded on laboratory work, which

  5. The mosaic genome of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C suggests an aerobic common ancestor to the delta-proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara H Thomas

    Full Text Available Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C is a versaphilic delta-Proteobacterium distributed throughout many diverse soil and sediment environments. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis groups A. dehalogenans together with the myxobacteria, which have distinguishing characteristics including strictly aerobic metabolism, sporulation, fruiting body formation, and surface motility. Analysis of the 5.01 Mb strain 2CP-C genome substantiated that this organism is a myxobacterium but shares genotypic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria (i.e., the Desulfuromonadales. Reflective of its respiratory versatility, strain 2CP-C possesses 68 genes coding for putative c-type cytochromes, including one gene with 40 heme binding motifs. Consistent with its relatedness to the myxobacteria, surface motility was observed in strain 2CP-C and multiple types of motility genes are present, including 28 genes for gliding, adventurous (A- motility and 17 genes for type IV pilus-based motility (i.e., social (S- motility that all have homologs in Myxococcus xanthus. Although A. dehalogenans shares many metabolic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria, strain 2CP-C grows under microaerophilic conditions and possesses detoxification systems for reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, two gene clusters coding for NADH dehydrogenase subunits and two cytochrome oxidase gene clusters in strain 2CP-C are similar to those in M. xanthus. Remarkably, strain 2CP-C possesses a third NADH dehydrogenase gene cluster and a cytochrome cbb(3 oxidase gene cluster, apparently acquired through ancient horizontal gene transfer from a strictly anaerobic green sulfur bacterium. The mosaic nature of the A. dehalogenans strain 2CP-C genome suggests that the metabolically versatile, anaerobic members of the delta-Proteobacteria may have descended from aerobic ancestors with complex lifestyles.

  6. Ras GTPase-like protein MglA, a controller of bacterial social-motility in Myxobacteria, has evolved to control bacterial predation by Bdellovibrio.

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    David S Milner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglA(Bd GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglA(Bd abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglA(Bd interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomR(Bd and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the "lone-hunter" Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio.

  7. Exploitative and hierarchical antagonism in a cooperative bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Social organisms that cooperate with some members of their own species, such as close relatives, may fail to cooperate with other genotypes of the same species. Such noncooperation may take the form of outright antagonism or social exploitation. Myxococcus xanthus is a highly social prokaryote that cooperatively develops into spore-bearing, multicellular fruiting bodies in response to starvation. Here we have characterized the nature of social interactions among nine developmentally proficient strains of M. xanthus isolated from spatially distant locations. Strains were competed against one another in all possible pairwise combinations during starvation-induced development. In most pairings, at least one competitor exhibited strong antagonism toward its partner and a majority of mixes showed bidirectional antagonism that decreased total spore production, even to the point of driving whole populations to extinction. Differential response to mixing was the primary determinant of competitive superiority rather than the sporulation efficiencies of unmixed populations. In some competitive pairings, the dominant partner sporulated more efficiently in mixed populations than in clonal isolation. This finding represents a novel form of exploitation in bacteria carried out by socially competent genotypes and is the first documentation of social exploitation among natural bacterial isolates. Patterns of antagonistic superiority among these strains form a highly linear dominance hierarchy. At least some competition pairs construct chimeric, rather than segregated, fruiting bodies. The cooperative prokaryote M. xanthus has diverged into a large number of distinct social types that cooperate with clone-mates but exhibit intense antagonism toward distinct social types of the same species. Most lengthy migration events in nature may thus result in strong antagonism between migratory and resident populations, and this antagonism may have large effects on local

  8. A novel type of geosmin biosynthesis in myxobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S; Bode, Helge B; Mahmud, Taifo; Müller, Rolf; Schulz, Stefan

    2005-06-24

    The biosynthesis of geosmin (1) and (1(10)E,5E)-germacradien-11-ol (2), two volatile terpenoid compounds emitted by the myxobacteria Myxococcus xanthus and Stigmatella aurantiaca, was investigated in feeding experiments with different labeled precursors. In these experiments, the volatiles released by the cell cultures grown on agar plates were collected with a closed-loop stripping apparatus (CLSA) and analyzed by GC-MS. [(2)H(10)]Leucine and [4,4,4,5,5,5-(2)H(6)]dimethylacrylate were fed to wild-type strains and bkd mutant strains, which are impaired in the degradation of leucine to isovaleryl-CoA. [(2)H(10)]Leucine was incorporated into 1 and 2 only by the wild-type strains via the biosynthetic pathway that involves leucine degradation and branching into the mevalonate pathway. Dimethylacrylyl-CoA (DMA-CoA) is an intermediate in the leucine degradation and in the recently discovered pathway from HMG-CoA to isovaleryl-CoA. The corresponding free acid, [4,4,4,5,5,5-(2)H(6)]dimethylacrylic acid, was incorporated into 1 and 2 only by the mutants impaired in leucine degradation. [4,4,6,6,6-(2)H(5)]Mevalonic acid lactone (12) was synthesized and fed to M. xanthus and S. aurantiaca wild-type strains and a double mutant strain of M. xanthus. This strain does not degrade leucine and is impaired in the reduction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA to mevalonic acid. The mass spectral analysis of labeled 1 and 2 obtained in these feeding experiments led to a biosynthetic scheme to 1 with intermediate 2. This pathway differs from that observed in the liverwort Fossombronia pusilla and thus suggests microbial geosmin biosynthesis following a route different from that in liverworts. Our results are supported by a 1,2-hydride shift of the tertiary hydrogen atom at C-4a into the ring opposite to that in F. pusilla.

  9. Exploitative and hierarchical antagonism in a cooperative bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fiegna

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Social organisms that cooperate with some members of their own species, such as close relatives, may fail to cooperate with other genotypes of the same species. Such noncooperation may take the form of outright antagonism or social exploitation. Myxococcus xanthus is a highly social prokaryote that cooperatively develops into spore-bearing, multicellular fruiting bodies in response to starvation. Here we have characterized the nature of social interactions among nine developmentally proficient strains of M. xanthus isolated from spatially distant locations. Strains were competed against one another in all possible pairwise combinations during starvation-induced development. In most pairings, at least one competitor exhibited strong antagonism toward its partner and a majority of mixes showed bidirectional antagonism that decreased total spore production, even to the point of driving whole populations to extinction. Differential response to mixing was the primary determinant of competitive superiority rather than the sporulation efficiencies of unmixed populations. In some competitive pairings, the dominant partner sporulated more efficiently in mixed populations than in clonal isolation. This finding represents a novel form of exploitation in bacteria carried out by socially competent genotypes and is the first documentation of social exploitation among natural bacterial isolates. Patterns of antagonistic superiority among these strains form a highly linear dominance hierarchy. At least some competition pairs construct chimeric, rather than segregated, fruiting bodies. The cooperative prokaryote M. xanthus has diverged into a large number of distinct social types that cooperate with clone-mates but exhibit intense antagonism toward distinct social types of the same species. Most lengthy migration events in nature may thus result in strong antagonism between migratory and resident populations, and this antagonism may have large effects on local

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES OF SKELETAL MUSCLE BY CHEMICAL AND CRYO-FIXATION METHODS%冷冻和化学固定后蟾蜍骨骼肌超微结构变化的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋田斌; 杨勇骥; 吴越; 汤莹; 邰艳红; 郑尊

    2000-01-01

    比较冷冻和化学固定后骨骼肌超微结构的不同特征.方法:蟾蜍缝匠肌经常规化学固定以及超低温快速冷冻固定、冷冻置换后,透射电镜进行超微结构观察.结果:冷冻固定后,缝匠肌基膜仅仅由电子密度高的一层组成;横小管为圆形;终池内含有电子密度高的环形物,终池膜上存在一排线状电子密度高的蛋白颗粒.化学固定后,缝匠肌基膜由两层组成:一层电子密度低,另一层电子密度高;横小管为扁平状或哑铃状;终池内仅有一些散在的电子密度高的颗粒,终池膜上有几个脚状突起伸向横小管.结论:冷冻和化学固定后,骨骼肌基膜、横小管、终池等结构存在着不同的形态特点.这些不同的形态形成的原因及生理意义还有待进一步研究.

  11. In situ elemental analysis and visualization in cryofixed nervous tissues. X-ray microanalytical investigations of embryological and mature brain, inner ear, photoreceptors, muscle and muscle spindles. Comparison of preparation methods for analysis and visualization at cellular and subcellular levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewski, R

    1989-07-01

    For meaningful X-ray microanalysis (XRMA) in biology and medicine, the development of preparative and quantitative methods has been necessary. The methods need to preserve close to in vivo distribution of diffusible ions with at the same time reasonable morphological preservation of the tissue. Analyses at low and middle microanalytical resolution are useful at the initial stages of an investigation or when data from large populations of samples have to be acquired. Cryomicrotomy, which makes it possible for the single cells within semi-thin and thick cryosections examined by X-ray microanalysis to be further characterized histochemically (enzyme and substrate content), has been adopted for several pathophysiological studies. The method is particularly suitable for the analysis of complex morphological tissues with many cell types as in the brain or sensory organs of the internal ear. For microanalysis at the subcellular level, we developed a preparative procedure based on the frozen fixed preparation which is freeze-dried in vacuo at -80 degrees C and then at the same temperature, without breaking the vacuum, impregnated with a low-temperature Lowicryl-type resin. The resin is polymerized by u.v. light. This method prevents redistribution of the ions in the tissue and retains the antigenicity of the tissue. A considerable number of cells can be analysed simultaneously and the elemental composition in different cell compartments can be compared due to the similar analytical conditions within the section. An alternative to thin plastic sections of freeze-dried material is thin cryosections cut at -150 degrees C and analysed at low temperatures. Although some methodological problems still exist in preparation of cryosections, this type of section is potentially the most useful in analysis of diffusible ions, especially calcium which in most biological systems is present in very low concentrations. New preparative techniques for XRMA brought severe problems in visualization of the specimens prepared by cryomethods. Charging, low contrast, mass loss and contamination, which are often negligible in conventional electron microscopy, have still to be solved in XRMA of cryoprepared specimens. However, the methods of semi-thin and thick cryosectioning and low-temperature embedding were successfully used for analysis of cells and organelles and for the study of fluids in restricted biological spaces such as the inner ear, muscle spindles and ventricles of the brain in rats. Accordingly, examinations which were impossible by micropuncture and ion selective techniques could be carried out by XRMA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  12. Speed switching of gonococcal surface motility correlates with proton motive force.

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    Rainer Kurre

    Full Text Available Bacterial type IV pili are essential for adhesion to surfaces, motility, microcolony formation, and horizontal gene transfer in many bacterial species. These polymers are strong molecular motors that can retract at two different speeds. In the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae speed switching of single pili from 2 µm/s to 1 µm/s can be triggered by oxygen depletion. Here, we address the question how proton motive force (PMF influences motor speed. Using pHluorin expression in combination with dyes that are sensitive to transmembrane ΔpH gradient or transmembrane potential ΔΨ, we measured both components of the PMF at varying external pH. Depletion of PMF using uncouplers reversibly triggered switching into the low speed mode. Reduction of the PMF by ≈ 35 mV was enough to trigger speed switching. Reducing ATP levels by inhibition of the ATP synthase did not induce speed switching. Furthermore, we showed that the strictly aerobic Myxococcus xanthus failed to move upon depletion of PMF or oxygen, indicating that although the mechanical properties of the motor are conserved, its regulatory inputs have evolved differently. We conclude that depletion of PMF triggers speed switching of gonococcal pili. Although ATP is required for gonococcal pilus retraction, our data indicate that PMF is an independent additional energy source driving the high speed mode.

  13. Two small GTPases act in concert with the bactofilin cytoskeleton to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Lindow, Steffi; Lin, Lin; Bolte, Kathrin; Wuichet, Kristin; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-29

    Cell polarity is essential for many bacterial activities, but the mechanisms responsible for its establishment are poorly understood. In Myxococcus xanthus, the type IV pili (T4P) motor ATPases PilB and PilT localize to opposite cell poles and switch poles during cellular reversals. We demonstrate that polar localization of PilB and PilT depends on the small GTPase SofG and BacP, a bactofilin cytoskeletal protein. Polymeric BacP localizes in both subpolar regions. SofG interacts directly with polymeric BacP and associates with one of these patches, forming a cluster that shuttles to the pole to establish localization of PilB and PilT at the same pole. Next, the small GTPase MglA sorts PilB and PilT to opposite poles to establish their correct polarity. During reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the inversion of PilB and PilT polarity. Thus, three hierarchically organized systems function in a cascade to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

  14. Regulation of dynamic polarity switching in bacteria by a Ras-like G-protein and its cognate GAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardy, Simone; Miertzschke, Mandy; Bulyha, Iryna; Sperling, Eva; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2010-07-21

    The rod-shaped cells of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move uni-directionally and occasionally undergo reversals during which the leading/lagging polarity axis is inverted. Cellular reversals depend on pole-to-pole relocation of motility proteins that localize to the cell poles between reversals. We show that MglA is a Ras-like G-protein and acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate motility and that MglB represents a novel GTPase-activating protein (GAP) family and is the cognate GAP of MglA. Between reversals, MglA/GTP is restricted to the leading and MglB to the lagging pole defining the leading/lagging polarity axis. For reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the relocation of MglA/GTP to the lagging pole causing an inversion of the leading/lagging polarity axis. MglA/GTP stimulates motility by establishing correct polarity of motility proteins between reversals and reversals by inducing their pole-to-pole relocation. Thus, the function of Ras-like G-proteins and their GAPs in regulating cell polarity is found not only in eukaryotes, but also conserved in bacteria.

  15. Rapid and widespread de novo evolution of kin discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendueles, Olaya; Zee, Peter C; Dinkelacker, Iris; Amherd, Michaela; Wielgoss, Sébastien; Velicer, Gregory J

    2015-07-21

    Diverse forms of kin discrimination, broadly defined as alteration of social behavior as a function of genetic relatedness among interactants, are common among social organisms from microbes to humans. However, the evolutionary origins and causes of kin-discriminatory behavior remain largely obscure. One form of kin discrimination observed in microbes is the failure of genetically distinct colonies to merge freely upon encounter. Here, we first use natural isolates of the highly social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus to show that colony-merger incompatibilities can be strong barriers to social interaction, particularly by reducing chimerism in multicellular fruiting bodies that develop near colony-territory borders. We then use experimental laboratory populations to test hypotheses regarding the evolutionary origins of kin discrimination. We show that the generic process of adaptation, irrespective of selective environment, is sufficient to repeatedly generate kin-discriminatory behaviors between evolved populations and their common ancestor. Further, we find that kin discrimination pervasively evolves indirectly between allopatric replicate populations that adapt to the same ecological habitat and that this occurs generically in many distinct habitats. Patterns of interpopulation discrimination imply that kin discrimination phenotypes evolved via many diverse genetic mechanisms and mutation-accumulation patterns support this inference. Strong incompatibility phenotypes emerged abruptly in some populations but strengthened gradually in others. The indirect evolution of kin discrimination in an asexual microbe is analogous to the indirect evolution of reproductive incompatibility in sexual eukaryotes and linguistic incompatibility among human cultures, the commonality being indirect, noncoordinated divergence of complex systems evolving in isolation.

  16. Lattice gas cellular automation model for rippling and aggregation in myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Mark S.; Jiang, Yi; Kiskowski, Maria A.

    2004-05-01

    A lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) model is used to simulate rippling and aggregation in myxobacteria. An efficient way of representing cells of different cell size, shape and orientation is presented that may be easily extended to model later stages of fruiting body formation. This LGCA model is designed to investigate whether a refractory period, a minimum response time, a maximum oscillation period and non-linear dependence of reversals of cells on C-factor are necessary assumptions for rippling. It is shown that a refractory period of 2-3 min, a minimum response time of up to 1 min and no maximum oscillation period best reproduce rippling in the experiments of Myxococcus xanthus. Non-linear dependence of reversals on C-factor is critical at high cell density. Quantitative simulations demonstrate that the increase in wavelength of ripples when a culture is diluted with non-signaling cells can be explained entirely by the decreased density of C-signaling cells. This result further supports the hypothesis that levels of C-signaling quantitatively depend on and modulate cell density. Analysis of the interpenetrating high density waves shows the presence of a phase shift analogous to the phase shift of interpenetrating solitons. Finally, a model for swarming, aggregation and early fruiting body formation is presented.

  17. Structural similarity of a developmentally regulated bacterial spore coat protein to beta gamma-crystallins of the vertebrate eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, S; Harvey, T S; Eagle, S G; Inouye, S; Ikura, M

    1994-05-10

    The solution structure of Ca(2+)-loaded protein S (M(r) 18,792) from the Gram-negative soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus has been determined by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Protein S consists of four internally homologous motifs, arranged to produce two domains with a pseudo-twofold symmetry axis, overall resembling a triangular prism. Each domain consists of two topologically inequivalent "Greek keys": the second and fourth motifs form standard Greek keys, whereas the first and third motifs each contain a regular alpha-helix in addition to the usual four beta-strands. The structure of protein S is similar to those of the vertebrate eye lens beta gamma-crystallins, which are thought to be evolutionarily related to protein S. Both protein S and the beta gamma-crystallins function by forming stable multimolecular assemblies. However, protein S possesses distinctive motif organization and domain packing, indicating a different mode of oligomerization and a divergent evolutionary pathway from the beta gamma-crystallins.

  18. Engineering Methylobacterium extorquens for de novo synthesis of the sesquiterpenoid α-humulene from methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Frank; Kroner, Cora; Lubuta, Patrice; Peyraud, Rémi; Horst, Angelika; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Over the last 10 to 15 years, metabolic engineering of microbes has become a versatile tool for high-level de novo synthesis of terpenoids, with the sesquiterpenoids armopha-1,4-diene, farnesene and artemisinic acid as prime examples. However, almost all cell factory approaches towards terpenoids to date have been based on sugar as the raw material, which is mainly used as a food resource and subject to high price volatilities. In this study we present de novo synthesis of the sesquiterpenoid α-humulene from the abundantly available non-food carbon source methanol by metabolically engineered Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. Expression of α-humulene synthase from Zingiber zerumbet in combination with farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae led to concentrations of up to 18 mg/L α-humulene. Introduction of a prokaryotic mevalonate pathway from Myxococcus xanthus in combination with ribosome binding site optimization of α-humulene and FPP synthases increased product concentration 3-fold. This value was additionally raised by 30% using a carotenoid synthesis deficient mutant strain. Final product concentrations of up to 1.65 g/L were obtained in methanol limited fed-batch cultivations, which is the highest titer of de novo synthesized α-humulene reported to date. This study demonstrates the potential of M. extorquens as a future platform strain for the production of high-value terpenoids from the alternative carbon source methanol.

  19. GTPases in bacterial cell polarity and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Hot, Edina; Huntley, Stuart; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2011-12-01

    In bacteria, large G domain GTPases have well-established functions in translation, protein translocation, tRNA modification and ribosome assembly. In addition, bacteria also contain small Ras-like GTPases consisting of stand-alone G domains. Recent data have revealed that small Ras-like GTPases as well as large G domain GTPases in bacteria function in the regulation of cell polarity, signal transduction and possibly also in cell division. The small Ras-like GTPase MglA together with its cognate GAP MglB regulates cell polarity in Myxococcus xanthus, and the small Ras-like GTPase CvnD9 in Streptomyces coelicolor is involved in signal transduction. Similarly, the large GTPase FlhF together with the ATPase FlhG regulates the localization and number of flagella in polarly flagellated bacteria. Moreover, large dynamin-like GTPases in bacteria may function in cell division. Thus, the function of GTPases in bacteria may be as pervasive as in eukaryotes.

  20. Induced sensitivity of Bacillus subtilis colony morphology to mechanical media compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Polka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from several taxa, including Kurthia zopfii, Myxococcus xanthus, and Bacillus mycoides, have been reported to align growth of their colonies to small features on the surface of solid media, including anisotropies created by compression. While the function of this phenomenon is unclear, it may help organisms navigate on solid phases, such as soil. The origin of this behavior is also unknown: it may be biological (that is, dependent on components that sense the environment and regulate growth accordingly or merely physical.Here we show that B. subtilis, an organism that typically does not respond to media compression, can be induced to do so with two simple and synergistic perturbations: a mutation that maintains cells in the swarming (chained state, and the addition of EDTA to the growth media, which further increases chain length. EDTA apparently increases chain length by inducing defects in cell separation, as the treatment has only marginal effects on the length of individual cells.These results lead us to three conclusions. First, the wealth of genetic tools available to B. subtilis will provide a new, tractable chassis for engineering compression sensitive organisms. Second, the sensitivity of colony morphology to media compression in Bacillus can be modulated by altering a simple physical property of rod-shaped cells. And third, colony morphology under compression holds promise as a rapid, simple, and low-cost way to screen for changes in the length of rod-shaped cells or chains thereof.

  1. RAP-PCR fingerprinting reveals time-dependent expression of development-related genes following differentiation process of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianpei; Yu, Xiaomin; Gelbič, Ivan; Guan, Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiles are important data to reveal the functions of genes putatively involved in crucial biological processes. RNA arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (RAP-PCR) and specifically primed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were combined to screen differentially expressed genes following development of a commercial Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain 8010 (serotype 3a3b). Six differentially expressed transcripts (RAP1 to RAP6) were obtained. RAP1 encoded a putative triple helix repeat-containing collagen or an exosporium protein H related to spore pathogenicity. RAP2 was homologous to a ClpX protease and an ATP-dependent protease La (LonB), which likely acted as virulence factors. RAP3 was homologous to a beta subunit of propionyl-CoA carboxylase required for the development of Myxococcus xanthus. RAP4 had homology to a quinone oxidoreductase involved in electron transport and ATP formation. RAP5 showed significant homology to a uridine kinase that mediates phosphorylation of uridine and azauridine. RAP6 shared high sequence identity with 3-methyl-2-oxobutanoate-hydroxymethyltransferase (also known as ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase or PanB) involved in the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The findings described here would help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation process of B. thuringiensis and unravel novel pathogenic genes.

  2. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling.

  3. Parallel emergence of negative epistasis across experimental lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Peter C; Velicer, Gregory J

    2017-01-27

    Epistatic interactions can greatly impact evolutionary phenomena, particularly the process of adaptation. Here, we leverage four parallel experimentally evolved lineages to study the emergence and trajectories of epistatic interactions in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. A social gene (pilA) necessary for effective group swarming on soft agar had been deleted from the common ancestor of these lineages. During selection for competitiveness at the leading edge of growing colonies, two lineages evolved qualitatively novel mechanisms for greatly increased swarming on soft agar, whereas the other two lineages evolved relatively small increases in swarming. By reintroducing pilA into different genetic backgrounds along the four lineages, we tested whether parallel lineages showed similar patterns of epistasis. In particular, we tested whether a pattern of negative epistasis between accumulating mutations and pilA previously found in the fastest lineage would be found only in the two evolved lineages with the fastest and most striking swarming phenotypes, or rather was due to common epistatic structure across all lineages arising from the generic fixation of adaptive mutations. Our analysis reveals the emergence of negative epistasis across all four independent lineages. Further, we present results showing that the observed negative epistasis is not due exclusively to evolving populations approaching a maximum phenotypic value that inherently limits positive effects of pilA reintroduction, but rather involves direct antagonistic interactions between accumulating mutations and the reintroduced social gene.

  4. Sensory Transduction in Microorganisms 2008 Gordon Research Conference (January 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann M. Stock

    2009-04-08

    Research into the mechanisms involved in the sensing and responses of microorganisms to changes in their environments is currently very active in a large number of laboratories worldwide. An increasingly wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species are being studied with regard to their sensing of diverse chemical and physical stimuli, including nutrients, toxins, intercellular signaling molecules, redox indicators, light, pressure, magnetic fields, and surface contact, leading to adaptive responses affecting motile behavior, gene expression and/or development. The ease of manipulation of microorganisms has facilitated application of a broad range of techniques that have provided comprehensive descriptions of cellular behavior and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Systems and their molecular components have been probed at levels ranging from the whole organism down to atomic resolution using behavioral analyses; electrophysiology; genetics; molecular biology; biochemical and biophysical characterization; structural biology; single molecule, fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy; computational modeling; bioinformatics and genomic analyses. Several model systems such as bacterial chemotaxis and motility, fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus, and motility and development in Dictyostelium discoideum have traditionally been a focus of this meeting. By providing a basis for assessment of similarities and differences in mechanisms, understanding of these pathways has advanced the study of many other microbial sensing systems. This conference aims to bring together researchers investigating different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial systems using diverse approaches to compare data, share methodologies and ideas, and seek to understand the fundamental principles underlying sensory responses. Topic areas include: (1) Receptor Sensing and Signaling; (2) Intracellular Signaling (two-component, c-di-GMP, c-AMP, etc.); (3) Intracellular Localization and

  5. A guild of 45 CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families and multiple CRISPR/Cas subtypes exist in prokaryotic genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Haft

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs are a family of DNA direct repeats found in many prokaryotic genomes. Repeats of 21-37 bp typically show weak dyad symmetry and are separated by regularly sized, nonrepetitive spacer sequences. Four CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families, designated Cas1 to Cas4, are strictly associated with CRISPR elements and always occur near a repeat cluster. Some spacers originate from mobile genetic elements and are thought to confer "immunity" against the elements that harbor these sequences. In the present study, we have systematically investigated uncharacterized proteins encoded in the vicinity of these CRISPRs and found many additional protein families that are strictly associated with CRISPR loci across multiple prokaryotic species. Multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models have been built for 45 Cas protein families. These models identify family members with high sensitivity and selectivity and classify key regulators of development, DevR and DevS, in Myxococcus xanthus as Cas proteins. These identifications show that CRISPR/cas gene regions can be quite large, with up to 20 different, tandem-arranged cas genes next to a repeat cluster or filling the region between two repeat clusters. Distinctive subsets of the collection of Cas proteins recur in phylogenetically distant species and correlate with characteristic repeat periodicity. The analyses presented here support initial proposals of mobility of these units, along with the likelihood that loci of different subtypes interact with one another as well as with host cell defensive, replicative, and regulatory systems. It is evident from this analysis that CRISPR/cas loci are larger, more complex, and more heterogeneous than previously appreciated.

  6. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  7. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker.

  8. Strict specificity for high-mannose type N-glycans and primary structure of a red alga Eucheuma serra lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Kanji; Sato, Yuichiro; Ito, Kaori; Fujiwara, Yoshifumi; Iwamoto, Yasumasa; Makino, Hiroyuki; Kawakubo, Akihiro

    2007-05-01

    We have elucidated the carbohydrate-binding profile of a non-monosaccharide-binding lectin named Eucheuma serra lectin (ESA)-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra using a lectin-immobilized column and a centrifugal ultrafiltration-high performance liquid chromatography method with a variety of fluorescence-labeled oligosaccharides. In both methods, ESA-2 exclusively bound with high-mannose type (HM) N-glycans, but not with any of other N-glycans including complex type, hybrid type and core pentasaccharides, and oligosaccharides from glycolipids. These findings indicate that ESA-2 recognizes the branched oligomannosides of the N-glycans. However, ESA-2 did not bind with any of the free oligomannoses examined that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides implying that the portion of the core N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residue(s) of the N-glycans is also essential for binding. Thus, the algal lectin was strictly specific for HM N-glycans and recognized the extended carbohydrate structure with a minimum size of the pentasaccharide, Man(alpha1-3)Man(alpha1-6)Man(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-4) GlcNAc. Kinetic analysis of binding with a HM heptasaccharide (M5) showed that ESA-2 has four carbohydrate-binding sites per polypeptide with a high association constant of 1.6x10(8) M-1. Sequence analysis, by a combination of Edman degradation and mass analyses of the intact protein and of peptides produced by its enzymic digestions, showed that ESA-2 is composed of 268 amino acids (molecular weight 27950) with four tandemly repeated domains of 67 amino acids. The number of repeats coincided with the number of carbohydrate-binding sites in the monomeric molecule. Surprisingly, the marine algal lectin was homologous to hemagglutinin from the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

  9. An intersubunit disulfide bridge stabilizes the tetrameric nucleoside diphosphate kinase of Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissier, Fanny; Georgescauld, Florian; Moynié, Lucile; Dupuy, Jean-William; Sarger, Claude; Podar, Mircea; Lascu, Ioan; Giraud, Marie-France; Dautant, Alain

    2012-06-01

    The nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk) catalyzes the reversible transfer of the γ-phosphate from nucleoside triphosphate to nucleoside diphosphate. Ndks form hexamers or two types of tetramers made of the same building block, namely, the common dimer. The secondary interfaces of the Type I tetramer found in Myxococcus xanthus Ndk and of the Type II found in Escherichia coli Ndk involve the opposite sides of subunits. Up to now, the few available structures of Ndk from thermophiles were hexameric. Here, we determined the X-ray structures of four crystal forms of the Ndk from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus (Aa-Ndk). Aa-Ndk displays numerous features of thermostable proteins and is made of the common dimer but it is a tetramer of Type I. Indeed, the insertion of three residues in a surface-exposed spiral loop, named the Kpn-loop, leads to the formation of a two-turn α-helix that prevents both hexamer and Type II tetramer assembly. Moreover, the side chain of the cysteine at position 133, which is not present in other Ndk sequences, adopts two alternate conformations. Through the secondary interface, each one forms a disulfide bridge with the equivalent Cys133 from the neighboring subunit. This disulfide bridge was progressively broken during X-ray data collection by radiation damage. Such crosslinks counterbalance the weakness of the common-dimer interface. A 40% decrease of the kinase activity at 60°C after reduction and alkylation of the protein corroborates the structural relevance of the disulfide bridge on the tetramer assembly and enzymatic function.

  10. Identification of host-immune response protein candidates in the sera of human oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeng Chen

    Full Text Available One of the most common cancers worldwide is oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, which is associated with a significant death rate and has been linked to several risk factors. Notably, failure to detect these neoplasms at an early stage represents a fundamental barrier to improving the survival and quality of life of OSCC patients. In the present study, serum samples from OSCC patients (n = 25 and healthy controls (n = 25 were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and silver staining in order to identify biomarkers that might allow early diagnosis. In this regard, 2-DE spots corresponding to various up- and down-regulated proteins were sequenced via high-resolution MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and analyzed using the MASCOT database. We identified the following differentially expressed host-specific proteins within sera from OSCC patients: leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG, alpha-1-B-glycoprotein (ABG, clusterin (CLU, PRO2044, haptoglobin (HAP, complement C3c (C3, proapolipoprotein A1 (proapo-A1, and retinol-binding protein 4 precursor (RBP4. Moreover, five non-host factors were detected, including bacterial antigens from Acinetobacter lwoffii, Burkholderia multivorans, Myxococcus xanthus, Laribacter hongkongensis, and Streptococcus salivarius. Subsequently, we analyzed the immunogenicity of these proteins using pooled sera from OSCC patients. In this regard, five of these candidate biomarkers were found to be immunoreactive: CLU, HAP, C3, proapo-A1 and RBP4. Taken together, our immunoproteomics approach has identified various serum biomarkers that could facilitate the development of early diagnostic tools for OSCC.

  11. A Guild of 45 CRISPR-Associated (Cas Protein Families and Multiple CRISPR/Cas Subtypes Exist in Prokaryotic Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs are a family of DNA direct repeats found in many prokaryotic genomes. Repeats of 21-37 bp typically show weak dyad symmetry and are separated by regularly sized, nonrepetitive spacer sequences. Four CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families, designated Cas1 to Cas4, are strictly associated with CRISPR elements and always occur near a repeat cluster. Some spacers originate from mobile genetic elements and are thought to confer "immunity" against the elements that harbor these sequences. In the present study, we have systematically investigated uncharacterized proteins encoded in the vicinity of these CRISPRs and found many additional protein families that are strictly associated with CRISPR loci across multiple prokaryotic species. Multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models have been built for 45 Cas protein families. These models identify family members with high sensitivity and selectivity and classify key regulators of development, DevR and DevS, in Myxococcus xanthus as Cas proteins. These identifications show that CRISPR/cas gene regions can be quite large, with up to 20 different, tandem-arranged cas genes next to a repeat cluster or filling the region between two repeat clusters. Distinctive subsets of the collection of Cas proteins recur in phylogenetically distant species and correlate with characteristic repeat periodicity. The analyses presented here support initial proposals of mobility of these units, along with the likelihood that loci of different subtypes interact with one another as well as with host cell defensive, replicative, and regulatory systems. It is evident from this analysis that CRISPR/cas loci are larger, more complex, and more heterogeneous than previously appreciated.

  12. 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway of Mucor mucedo: purification, cloning of the corresponding gene, and developmental expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Jana; Scheibner, Olaf; Burmester, Anke; Schimek, Christine; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The NADP-dependent 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase is a (-) mating-type-specific enzyme in the pathway from beta-carotene to trisporic acid. This substance and its isomers and derivatives represent the general system of sexual communication in zygomycetes. The (-) mating type of Mucor mucedo was stimulated by trisporic acid and the enzyme was purified by ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Several peptides of the 26-kDa protein, digested with trypsin, were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Oligonucleotides based on protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic DNA. The primary PCR fragment was sequenced and the complete gene, TSP2, was isolated. A labeled TSP2 hybridization probe detects a single-copy gene in the genome of M. mucedo. Northern blot analysis with RNAs from different growth stages reveals that the expression of the gene depends on the developmental stage of the mycelium in both mating types of M. mucedo. At the enzyme level, activity is found exclusively in the (-) mating type. However, renaturation of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels revealed the TSP2 gene product in both mating types. Analyzing the protein sequence places the enzyme in the short chain dehydrogenase superfamily. Thus, it has an evolutionary origin distinct from that of the previously isolated 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, which belongs to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Apart from the TSP2 genes in the three sequenced zygomycetous genomes (Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Mucor circinelloides), the closest relative is the Myxococcus xanthus CsgA gene product, which is also a short chain dehydrogenase, involved in C signaling and fruiting body formation.

  13. 4-Dihydrotrisporin-Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of the Sex Hormone Pathway of Mucor mucedo: Purification, Cloning of the Corresponding Gene, and Developmental Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Jana; Scheibner, Olaf; Burmester, Anke; Schimek, Christine; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The NADP-dependent 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase is a (−) mating-type-specific enzyme in the pathway from β-carotene to trisporic acid. This substance and its isomers and derivatives represent the general system of sexual communication in zygomycetes. The (−) mating type of Mucor mucedo was stimulated by trisporic acid and the enzyme was purified by ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Several peptides of the 26-kDa protein, digested with trypsin, were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Oligonucleotides based on protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic DNA. The primary PCR fragment was sequenced and the complete gene, TSP2, was isolated. A labeled TSP2 hybridization probe detects a single-copy gene in the genome of M. mucedo. Northern blot analysis with RNAs from different growth stages reveals that the expression of the gene depends on the developmental stage of the mycelium in both mating types of M. mucedo. At the enzyme level, activity is found exclusively in the (−) mating type. However, renaturation of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels revealed the TSP2 gene product in both mating types. Analyzing the protein sequence places the enzyme in the short chain dehydrogenase superfamily. Thus, it has an evolutionary origin distinct from that of the previously isolated 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, which belongs to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Apart from the TSP2 genes in the three sequenced zygomycetous genomes (Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Mucor circinelloides), the closest relative is the Myxococcus xanthus CsgA gene product, which is also a short chain dehydrogenase, involved in C signaling and fruiting body formation. PMID:18931040

  14. Molecular regulation of devel- opment and differentiation in Streptomyces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@\tDevelopment and differentiation is an important and leading research field in modern biology. Streptomyces has a complicated life cycle of morphological differentia-tion including the spore germination, aerial mycelium and spore formation. Each developmental stage has a distin-guished morphological feature which greatly facilitates the identification of developmental mutants, the comple-mentary cloning and the spatial and temporal expression of the genes involved in differentiation. This characteristic of Streptomyces is comparatively superior to other pro-karyotic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus sub-tilis and Myxococcus xanthus. Moreover, Streptomyces also possesses a complicated physiological differentiation in which it produces a wide variety of secondary metabo-lites (more than half of the 12 000 or so known antibiot-ics), including many important antibiotics used in medi-cine, agriculture and industry. Studies on the molecular mechanism of antibiotic biosynthesis will be helpful in improving the antibiotic producer and developing some new medicines. In comparison with eukaryotic microor-ganism such as Asperillus nidulans, the structure of ge-netic material in Streptomyces is simple, and it is benefi-cial to studying gene expression and regulation. Remarka-bly, the genome of Streptomyces has some unusual char-acteristics in bacteria; for example, it is linear and con-tains more genes than other prokaryotes, even than eukaryotes such as saccharomyces cerevisiae. The large number of genes are the molecular basis of Streptomyces differentiation, suggesting that the regulation mechanism of gene expression in differentiation and development may be complex[1].

  15. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01

    cytoplasmic membrane. The interaction causes the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings to rotate along with the flagellar filaments. The energy for flagellar rotation comes from proton motive force or other ions, especially sodium in marine bacteria, which generate an electrochemical gradient across the cell membrane. Three proteins, FliM, FliN, and FliG, located at the base of the motor act as switches that control the direction of flagellar rotation. As exemplified by the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, changes in the direction of flagellar rotation affect the swimming behavior of the bacterial cell. Counterclockwise (CCW) rotation of the flagella causes the flagellar filaments to form a bundle that pushes the cell forward in a 'run.' In contrast, clockwise (CW) rotation causes the flagellar bundle to fly apart, and the cell tumbles to reorient to a new direction for the ensuing run upon the return of CCW rotation. The interchanging pattern of CCW and CW rotations produces a random walk, composed of relatively long runs with occasional direction changes or turns. By modulating the lengths of the runs or the frequency of tumbling, bacteria can regulate their motile behavior to move in a desirable direction. Many bacteria can also move on surfaces. Except for flagellum-driven swarming motility, all the other forms of known bacterial surface movement involve no flagella. The flagellum-independent surface motility, known as gliding, is observed in cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma species, Cytophaga-Flexibacterium species, and Myxococcus species. Without a doubt, the most thoroughly studied model gliding bacterium is Myxococcus xanthus, which also serves as a prokaryotic model for developmental biology due to its ability to develop multicellular fruiting bodies. M. xanthus cells use gliding motility both to hunt for food during vegetative growth and to aggregate during fruiting body formation. When nutrients are present, groups of

  16. Preparation of fungi for ultrastructural investigations and immunogoldlabelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Gerd; Jahn, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopic analysis of biological material requires optimal preparation of the samples. This is necessary to prevent degeneration processes and changes of the material during microscopic observation. Both would lead to artefacts. In this chapter, we present methods to prepare fungi or plant tissues infected with fungi for transmission electron microscopy. This includes chemical fixations as well as cryofixation and the subsequent embedding in suitable resins. For cryofixation, the high pressure freeze fixation is described in detail. Further on, protocols for freeze substitution of cryofixed samples and immunogoldlabelling of ultrathin sections are included.

  17. Analysis of cryopreparated non-dehydrated sample systems by means of a newly developed Tof-SIMS instrument with integrated high-vacuum cutting apparature; Analysen kryopraeparierter nicht-dehydrierter Probensysteme mit Hilfe eines neu entwickelten ToF-SIMS-Instruments mit integrierter Hochvakuumkryoschnittapparatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Joerg

    2008-12-05

    Aim of the present thesis was to construct an analysis apparatus, which allows to perform on cryofixed samples a cryocutting respectively cryocracking preparation under vacuum conditions and in the following perform a Tof-SIMS analysis.

  18. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (United States); Swapna, G. V. T. [State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers (United States); Wu, Kuen-Phon; Afinogenova, Yuliya [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (United States); Conover, Kenith; Mao, Binchen [State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers (United States); Montelione, Gaetano T.; Inouye, Masayori, E-mail: inouye@cabm.rutgers.edu [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (United States)

    2012-04-15

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS{sub 2}) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS{sub 2}-tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS{sub 2}-tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS{sub 2}-tag in isotope-filtered {sup 1}H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfA{Delta}25). Using the PrS{sub 2}-tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS{sub 2} (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS{sub 2}-tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfA{Delta}25, indicating that PrS{sub 2}-tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone {sup 1}H, {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfA{Delta}25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfA{Delta}25

  19. Practical Guide to Using Cryoprotectants in Biological Sample Preparation at Cryogenic temperature for Electron Microscopic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-Reum Je

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cryo-fixation enables the preservation of the fine structures of intracellular organelles in a condition that is as close to their native state as possible compared with chemical fixation and room temperature processing. Fixation is the initial step for biological sample preparation in electron microscopy. This step is critically important because the goals of electron microscopic observation are fundamentally dependent on well-preserved specimens resulting from this fixation. In the present work, key components of cryo-fixation, cryoprotectants, are tested with various cell types of interest. The results show that dextran can be easily adapted for use with animal cells and cyanobacteria, whereas 1-hexadecene is applicable to plant and yeast cells. The current report provides useful information on the preparation of cryo-fixed biological specimens using high pressure freezing and freeze-substitution aimed at electron microscopic observation.

  20. Ultra structure of oil-in-water emulsions a comparison of different microscopy- and preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Humbel, B.M.

    We compare chemical fixation/ room temperature embedding in resin, cryofixation/ freeze substitution, and cryofixation/cryo imaging (freeze-fracture cryo-SEM) on several oil-in-water food emulsions. This is for visualization of the structure and thickness of the emulsifying layers consisting...... of the samples while ensuring at the same time that the samples are stabilized so they do not collapse when the water is removed.These protocols give an interesting view of the emulsions and the organisation of the interface layer surrounding the oil droplets. With cryofixation we could image more details...... of combining different microscopic approaches to access the ultra structure of the oil-in-water emulsions due to their complexity and instability....

  1. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ∼10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  2. Development of the gametophyte of the fern Schizaea pusilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Swatzell, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Schizaea pusilla is a pteridophyte with several unique developmental characteristics. In contrast to most other fern species, S. pusilla gametophytes remain filamentous throughout their development, and the gametophytes are associated with an endophytic fungus which appears to be mycorrhizal. In terms of tropistic responses, apical filament cells of young gametophytes are negatively phototropic compared with germ filaments of other ferns which exhibit positive phototropism. Cryofixation (propane jet freezing and high-pressure freezing) in conjunction with freeze substitution electron microscopy was used to study young gametophytes. The results demonstrate that apical filament cells have a distinctive structural polarity and that rhizoids also can be successfully frozen by these methods. The cytoskeleton and endomembrane system were particularly well preserved in cryofixed cells. In addition, Schizaea gametophytes were used as a test system to evaluate potential artifacts of propane jet freezing and high pressure freezing. There was little apparent difference in ultrastructure between cells cryofixed by either freezing method. These gametophytes will be useful in determining the effectiveness of cryofixation techniques and as a model system in tip growth studies.

  3. Mycosphaerella podagrariae - a necrotrophic phytopathogen forming a special cellular interaction with its host Aegopodium podagraria

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, U.K.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Stierhof, Y D; Crous, P.W.; Bauer, R

    2010-01-01

    We present a new kind of cellular interaction found between Mycosphaerella podagrariae and Aegopodium podagraria, which is remarkably different to the interaction type of the obligate biotrophic fungus Cymadothea trifolii, another member of the Mycosphaerellaceae (Capnodiales, Dothideomycetes, Ascomycota) which we have described earlier. Observations are based on both conventional and cryofixed material and show that some features of this particular interaction are better discernable after ch...

  4. Isolation and Identification of Myxobacteria from Saline-Alkaline Soils in Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianjiao; Yao, Qing; Cai, Zhuoping; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhu, Honghui

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-eight terrestrial and salt-tolerant myxobacteria were isolated from the saline-alkaline soils collected from Xinjiang, China. Based on the morphologies and the 16S rRNA gene sequences, these isolates were assigned into 6 genera, Myxococcus, Cystobacter, Corallococcus, Sorangium, Nannocystis and Polyangium. All the strains grew better with 1% NaCl than without NaCl. Some Myxococcus strains were able to grow at 2% NaCl concentration, suggesting that these strains may be particular type of terrestrial myxobacteria. PMID:23936436

  5. Isolation and Identification of Myxobacteria from Saline-Alkaline Soils in Xinjiang, China

    OpenAIRE

    Xianjiao Zhang; Qing Yao; Zhuoping Cai; Xiaolin Xie; Honghui Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-eight terrestrial and salt-tolerant myxobacteria were isolated from the saline-alkaline soils collected from Xinjiang, China. Based on the morphologies and the 16S rRNA gene sequences, these isolates were assigned into 6 genera, Myxococcus, Cystobacter, Corallococcus, Sorangium, Nannocystis and Polyangium. All the strains grew better with 1% NaCl than without NaCl. Some Myxococcus strains were able to grow at 2% NaCl concentration, suggesting that these strains may be particular type of...

  6. Isolation and identification of myxobacteria from saline-alkaline soils in Xinjiang, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjiao Zhang

    Full Text Available Fifty-eight terrestrial and salt-tolerant myxobacteria were isolated from the saline-alkaline soils collected from Xinjiang, China. Based on the morphologies and the 16S rRNA gene sequences, these isolates were assigned into 6 genera, Myxococcus, Cystobacter, Corallococcus, Sorangium, Nannocystis and Polyangium. All the strains grew better with 1% NaCl than without NaCl. Some Myxococcus strains were able to grow at 2% NaCl concentration, suggesting that these strains may be particular type of terrestrial myxobacteria.

  7. Isolation and identification of myxobacteria from saline-alkaline soils in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianjiao; Yao, Qing; Cai, Zhuoping; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhu, Honghui

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-eight terrestrial and salt-tolerant myxobacteria were isolated from the saline-alkaline soils collected from Xinjiang, China. Based on the morphologies and the 16S rRNA gene sequences, these isolates were assigned into 6 genera, Myxococcus, Cystobacter, Corallococcus, Sorangium, Nannocystis and Polyangium. All the strains grew better with 1% NaCl than without NaCl. Some Myxococcus strains were able to grow at 2% NaCl concentration, suggesting that these strains may be particular type of terrestrial myxobacteria.

  8. AcEST: DK955250 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available S=Myxococcus xan... 31 5.1 sp|Q5QXV0|RL17_IDILO 50S ribosomal protein L17 OS=Idiomarina loi... 31 5.1 sp|Q8WXX7|AUTS2_HUMAN Autism...APMAYIELVGRP 119 >sp|Q8WXX7|AUTS2_HUMAN Autism susceptibility gene 2 protein OS=Homo sapiens GN=AUTS2 PE=2 S

  9. Mass spectrometric characterization of elements and molecules in cell cultures and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlinghaus, H.F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)]. E-mail: arlinghaus@uni-muenster.de; Kriegeskotte, C. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Fartmann, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Wittig, A. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Sauerwein, W. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Lipinsky, D. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2006-07-30

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) have been used to image and quantify targeted compounds, intrinsic elements and molecules with subcellular resolution in single cells of both cell cultures and tissues. Special preparation procedures for analyzing cell cultures and tissue materials were developed. Cancer cells type MeWo, incubated with boronated compounds, were sandwiched between two substrates, cryofixed, freeze-fractured and freeze-dried. Also, after injection with boronated compounds, different types of mouse tissues were extracted, prepared on a special specimen carrier and plunged with high velocity into LN{sub 2}-cooled propane for cryofixation. After trimming, these tissue blocks were freeze-dried. The measurements of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that for both cell cultures and tissue materials the special preparation techniques used were appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of the living cell. The boron images show inter- and intracellular boron signals with different intensities. Molecular images show distinct features partly correlated with the cell structure. A comparison between laser-SNMS and ToF-SIMS showed that especially laser-SNMS is particularly well-suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging ultratrace element concentrations in tissues.

  10. The Combination of Chemical Fixation Procedures with High Pressure Freezing and Freeze Substitution Preserves Highly Labile Tissue Ultrastructure for Electron Tomography Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosinsky, Gina E.; Crum, John; Jones, Ying Z.; Lanman, Jason; Smarr, Benjamin; Terada, Masako; Martone, Maryann E.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Johnson, John E.; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of electron tomography as a tool for three dimensional structure determination of cells and tissues has brought its own challenges for the preparation of thick sections. High pressure freezing in combination with freeze substitution provides the best method for obtaining the largest volume of well-preserved tissue. However, for deeply embedded, heterogeneous, labile tissues needing careful dissection, such as brain, the damage due to anoxia and excision before cryofixation is significant. We previously demonstrated that chemical fixation prior to high pressure freezing preserves fragile tissues and produces superior tomographic reconstructions compared to equivalent tissue preserved by chemical fixation alone. Here, we provide further characterization of the technique, comparing the ultrastructure of Flock House Virus infected DL1 insect cells that were 1) high pressure frozen without fixation, 2) high pressure frozen following fixation, and 3) conventionally prepared with aldehyde fixatives. Aldehyde fixation prior to freezing produces ultrastructural preservation superior to that obtained through chemical fixation alone that is close to that obtained when cells are fast frozen without fixation. We demonstrate using a variety of nervous system tissues, including neurons that were injected with a fluorescent dye and then photooxidized, that this technique provides excellent preservation compared to chemical fixation alone and can be extended to selectively stained material where cryofixation is impractical. PMID:17962040

  11. Electron Tomography in Plant Cell Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on the contribution of electron tomography-based techniques to our understanding of cellular processes in plant cells. Electron microscopy techniques have evolved to provide better three-dimensional resolution and improved preservation of the subcellular components. In particular, the combination of cryofixation/freeze substitution and electron tomography have allowed plant cell biologists to image organelles and macromolecular complexes in their native cellular context with unprecedented three-dimensional resolution (4-7 nm). Until now, electron tomography has been applied in plant cell biology for the study of cytokinesis, Golgi structure and trafficking, formation of plant endosome/prevacuolar compartments, and organization of photosynthetic membranes. We discuss in this review the new insights that these tomographic studies have brought to the plant biology field.

  12. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, R; Amoroso, M [Physics Department, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm{sup 3} blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  13. AcEST: DK951943 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D_MYXXD Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase OS=Myxococcus ... 32 3.0 sp|Q54P62|ORC6_DICDI Origin recognition comple...LCESLREKALEG--APPGLAVEVAGLRFAHPVA--LAAGLDKDAEAVDGLFACGFSA 86 Query: 605 I 607 + Sbjct: 87 V 87 >sp|Q54P62|ORC6_DICDI Origin recogniti...t oxidoreductas... 30 8.6 sp|P02896|VSM4_TRYBB Variant surface glycoprotein MITAT 1.4A OS=... 30 8.6 sp|P012...on complex subunit 6 OS=Dictyostelium discoideum GN=orcF

  14. Toxicity on aquatic organisms exposed to secondary effluent disinfected with chlorine, peracetic acid, ozone and UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Juliana Berninger; Rodgher, Suzelei; Daniel, Luiz Antonio; Espíndola, Evaldo Luiz Gaeta

    2014-11-01

    The toxic potential of four disinfectant agents (chlorine, ozone, peracetic acid and UV radiation), used in the disinfection of urban wastewater, was evaluated with respect to four aquatic organisms. Disinfection assays were carried out with wastewater from the city of Araraquara (São Paulo State, Brazil), and subsequently, toxicity bioassays were applied in order to verify possible adverse effects to the cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Daphnia similis), midge larvae Chironomus xanthus and fish (Danio rerio). Under the experimental conditions tested, all the disinfectants were capable of producing harmful effects on the test organisms, except for C. xanthus. The toxicity of the effluent to C. silvestrii was observed to increase significantly as a result of disinfection using 2.5 mg L(-1) chlorine and 29.9 mg L(-1) ozone. Ozonation and chlorination significantly affected the survival of D. similis and D. rerio, causing mortality of 60 to 100 % in comparison to the non-disinfected effluent. In experiments with effluent treated with peracetic acid (PAA) and UV radiation, a statistically significant decrease in survival was only detected for D. rerio. This investigation suggested that the study of the ideal concentrations of disinfectants is a research need for ecologically safe options for the treatment of wastewater.

  15. Characterization and Description of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aryl-Halorespiring Facultative Anaerobic Myxobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Robert A.; Cole, James R.; Tiedje, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Five strains were isolated which form a physiologically and phylogenetically coherent group of chlororespiring microorganisms and represent the first taxon in the Myxobacteria capable of anaerobic growth. The strains were enriched and isolated from various soils and sediments based on their ability to grow using acetate as an electron donor and 2-chlorophenol (2-CPh) as an electron acceptor. They are slender gram-negative rods with a bright red pigmentation that exhibit gliding motility and form spore-like structures. These unique chlororespiring myxobacteria also grow with 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,5-dichlorophenol, 2-bromophenol, nitrate, fumarate, and oxygen as terminal electron acceptors, with optimal growth occurring at low concentrations (Myxococcaceae within the class Myxobacteria and are mostly closely associated with the Myxococcus subgroup. With the exception of anaerobic growth and lack of a characteristic fruiting body, these strains closely resemble previously characterized myxobacteria and therefore should be considered part of the Myxococcus subgroup. The anaerobic growth and 9.0% difference in 16S rDNA sequence from those of other myxobacterial genera are sufficient to place these strains in a new genus and species designated Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans. The type strain is 2CP-1 (ATCC BAA-258). PMID:11823233

  16. Microbial F-type lectin domains with affinity for blood group antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Sonal; Khairnar, Aasawari; Bishnoi, Ritika; Ramya, T N C

    2017-09-23

    F-type lectins are fucose binding lectins with characteristic fucose binding and calcium binding motifs. Although they occur with a selective distribution in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, most biochemical studies have focused on vertebrate F-type lectins. Recently, using sensitive bioinformatics search techniques on the non-redundant database, we had identified many microbial F-type lectin domains with diverse domain organizations. We report here the biochemical characterization of F-type lectin domains from Cyanobium sp. PCC 7001, Myxococcus hansupus and Leucothrix mucor. We demonstrate that while all these three microbial F-type lectin domains bind to the blood group H antigen epitope on fucosylated glycans, there are fine differences in their glycan binding specificity. Cyanobium sp. PCC 7001 F-type lectin domain binds exclusively to extended H type-2 motif, Myxococcus hansupus F-type lectin domain binds to B, H type-1 and Lewis(b) motifs, and Leucothrix mucor F-type lectin domain binds to a wide range of fucosylated glycans, including A, B, H and Lewis antigens. We believe that these microbial lectins will be useful additions to the glycobiologist's toolbox for labeling, isolating and visualizing glycans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 药用植物根系土壤可培养粘细菌的分离鉴定%Isolation and identification of cultivable myxobacteria in the rhizosphere soils of medicinal plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵智颖; 张鲜姣; 谭志远; 郭俊; 朱红惠

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] We isolated myxobacteria and explored their diversity from the rhizosphere soils of some medicinal plants.[Methods] We used the helper bacteria baiting technique to isolate myxobacteria from the rhizosphere soils collected in South China Botanical Garden and Nanling National Forest Park.The myxobacteria were identified by morphological characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequences analysis.[Results] A total of 50 strains were isolated from 22 soil samples,which were identified into 7 genera,Myxococcus (18),Corallococcus (11),Cystobacter (7),Archangium (8),Stigmatella (1),Chondromyces (4) and Pyxidicoccus (1).The dominant genera were Myxococcus and Corallococcus.[Conclusion] Environmental factors were associated with the diversity of myxobactria.Myxobacteria better adapt in high organic matter content and neutral pH environments.The strains of Myxococcus and Corallococcus had a good adaptability for different pH.Meanwhile,the dependence of the strains of Myxococcus and Cystobacter on organic carbon content was not too obvious,and they can also be found in the poor soils.Our findings provided an important scientific base for the development and utilization of myxobacteria resources.%[目的]对药用植物根系土壤可培养粘细菌进行分离与鉴定,探讨药用植物根系土壤粘细菌资源多样性.[方法]采集华南植物园和南岭国家森林公园22种药用植物根系土,利用辅助菌诱导分离技术分离样品中可培养粘细菌;通过菌株显微形态和菌落形态观察,结合16S rDNA基因序列分析,确定分离粘细菌菌株的系统发育地位.[结果]分离获得50株粘细菌,分属于3个科,7个属,其中粘球菌属(Myxococcus)18株,珊瑚球菌属(Corallococcus)11株,孢囊杆菌属(Cystobacter)7株,原囊菌属(Archangium)8株,标桩菌属(Stigmatella)1株,软骨霉状菌属(Chondromyces)4株,匣状球菌属(Pyxidicoccus)1株.粘球菌属和珊瑚球菌属分布最为广泛.[结论]研究发现药用植物

  18. Ecotoxicological assessment of the pharmaceutical compound Triclosan to freshwater invertebrates with emphasis to spiked sediment tests; Avaliacao ecotoxicologica do farmaco Triclosan para invertebrados de agua doce com enfase em ensaios com sedimento marcado ('spiked sediment')

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusceddu, Fabio Hermes

    2009-07-01

    The increasing of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) occurrence in the aquatic environment cause adverse effects on the human health and aquatic communities. The environmental risk of the PPCPs associated with the possibility of synergic effects between PCPPs and the increase of the use of synthetic organic compounds, unchained a great concern on the toxic potential to biota aquatic. Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) is a pharmaceutical compound widely used due your antibacterial mechanism effect, found in at least 932 products such as shampoos, toilet soaps, deodorants, lotions, toothpaste, detergents, socks and underwear, among others. Currently, studies about the Triclosan toxicity in the water and, mainly in the sediment, are poorly. We have the knowledge that the photodegradation of this product results into dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and now it has great discussion on environmental agencies, like EPA, about the release or restriction of this product. The aim of this work is to assess the effects of Triclosan on mortality of insect larvae Chironomus xanthus and mortality and reproduction inhibition of microcrustacea Ceriodaphnia dubia exposed to Triclosan spiked sediments based on standard methods EPA and OECD. The EC50;96H obtained on acute toxicity tests with C. xanthus was 45,26 mg.Kg{sup -1}. The chronic toxicity tests with C. dubia using spiked sediments were performed following the procedure in Burton and MacPherson (1995). A no-observed-effect concentrations and lowest-observed-effect concentration were 5,78 e 6,94 mg.Kg{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  19. Comparison of myxobacterial diversity and evaluation of isolation success in two niches: Kiritimati Island and German compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I; Stechling, Marc; Wink, Joachim; Wilharm, Elke; Stadler, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Myxobacteria harbor an enormous potential for new bioactive secondary metabolites and therefore the isolation of in particular new groups is of great interest. The diversity of myxobacteria present in two ecological habitats, namely sand from Kiritimati Island and German compost, was evaluated by both cultivation-based and cultivation-independent methods. Phylogenetic analyses of the strains in comparison with 16S rRNA gene sequences from cultured and uncultured material in GenBank revealed a great potential of undescribed myxobacteria in both sampling sites. Several OTUs (operational taxonomic units) represent unknown taxa and were detected by clone bank analyses, but not by cultivation. Clone bank analyses indicated that the myxobacterial community is predominantly indigenous. The 16S rDNA libraries from the two samples were generated from total community DNA with myxobacterial specific forward and universal reverse primer sets. The clones were partially sequenced. Cultivation was successful for exclusively bacteriolytic, but not for cellulolytic myxobacteria and revealed 42 strains from the genera Corallococcus, Myxococcus, and Polyangium. The genera of Myxococcaceae family were represented by both approaches. But, even in this well studied family, as well as in the suborders Sorangiineae and Nannocystineae, a considerable number of clones were assigned to, if any, uncultivated organisms. Our study shows an overrepresentation of the genera Myxococcus spp. and Corallococcus spp. with standard cultivation methods. However, high deficits are demonstrated in the cultivation success of the myxobacterial diversity detected by exclusively cultivation-independent approaches. Especially, clades which are exclusively represented by clones are of high interest with regard to the cultivation of new bioactive secondary metabolite producers. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Correlative cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Celler, Katherine; Willemse, Joost; Bos, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P; Koster, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are complementary techniques that in a correlative approach enable identification and targeting of fluorescently labeled structures in situ for three-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolution. Correlative imaging allows electron microscopic images to be positioned in a broader temporal and spatial context. We employed cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM), combining cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, on vitrified Streptomyces bacteria to study cell division. Streptomycetes are mycelial bacteria that grow as long hyphae and reproduce via sporulation. On solid media, Streptomyces subsequently form distinct aerial mycelia where cell division leads to the formation of unigenomic spores which separate and disperse to form new colonies. In liquid media, only vegetative hyphae are present divided by noncell separating crosswalls. Their multicellular life style makes them exciting model systems for the study of bacterial development and cell division. Complex intracellular structures have been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. Here, we describe the methods for cryo-CLEM that we applied for studying Streptomyces. These methods include cell growth, fluorescent labeling, cryo-fixation by vitrification, cryo-light microscopy using a Linkam cryo-stage, image overlay and relocation, cryo-electron tomography using a Titan Krios, and tomographic reconstruction. Additionally, methods for segmentation, volume rendering, and visualization of the correlative data are described.

  1. Significance of plasmolysis spaces as markers for periseptal annuli and adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldringh, C L

    1994-11-01

    During hyperosmotic shock, the protoplast and stretched-out peptidoglycan layer first shrink together until the turgor pressure in the cell is relieved. Being non-compressible, the outer and inner membranes must fold their superfluous surfaces. While the protoplast contracts further, the inner membrane rearranges into plasmolysis spaces visible by phase-contrast microscopy. Two opposing theories predict a similar positioning of spaces in dividing cells and filaments: the 'periseptal annulus model', based on adhesion zones, involved in the predetermination of the division site; and a 'restricted, random model', based on physical properties of the protoplast. Strong osmotic shock causes retraction of the inner membrane over almost the entire surface forming the so-called 'Bayer bridges'. These tubular adhesion sites are preserved by chemical fixation, and can be destroyed by cryofixation and freeze-substitution of unfixed cells. Both the regular positioning of the plasmolysis spaces and the occurrence of tubular adhesion sites can be explained on the basis of physical properties of the membrane which necessitate rearrangements by membrane flow during shrinkage of the protoplast.

  2. Nanoscale Bonding between Human Bone and Titanium Surfaces: Osseohybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Sik Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now, the chemical bonding between titanium and bone has been examined only through a few mechanical detachment tests. Therefore, in this study, a sandblasted and acid-etched titanium mini-implant was removed from a human patient after 2 months of placement in order to identify the chemical integration mechanism for nanoscale osseointegration of titanium implants. To prepare a transmission electron microscopy (TEM specimen, the natural state was preserved as much as possible by cryofixation and scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam (SEM-FIB milling without any chemical treatment. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and scanning TEM (STEM/electron energy loss spectroscopic analysis (EELS were used to investigate the chemical composition and structure at the interface between the titanium and bone tissue. HRTEM and EDS data showed evidence of crystalline hydroxyapatite and intermixing of bone with the oxide layer of the implant. The STEM/EELS experiment provided particularly interesting results: carbon existed in polysaccharides, calcium and phosphorus existed as tricalcium phosphate (TCP, and titanium existed as oxidized titanium. In addition, the oxygen energy loss near edge structures (ELNESs showed a possibility of the presence of CaTiO3. These STEM/EELS results can be explained by structures either with or without a chemical reaction layer. The possible existence of the osseohybridization area and the form of the carbon suggest that reconsideration of the standard definition of osseointegration is necessary.

  3. High-aperture cryogenic light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE GROS, M.A.; McDERMOTT, G.; UCHIDA, M.; KNOECHEL, C.G.; LARABELL, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We report here the development of instruments and protocols for carrying out high numerical aperture immersion light microscopy on cryogenic specimens. Imaging by this modality greatly increases the lifetimes of fluorescence probes, including those commonly used for protein localization studies, while retaining the ability to image the specimen with high fidelity and spatial resolution. The novel use of a cryogenic immersion fluid also minimizes the refractive index mismatch between the sample and lens, leading to a more efficient coupling of the light from the sample to the image forming system. This enhancement is applicable to both fluorescence and transmitted light microscopy techniques. The design concepts used for the cryogenic microscope can be applied to virtually any existing light-based microscopy technique. This prospect is particularly exciting in the context of ‘super-resolution’ techniques, where enhanced fluorescence lifetime probes are especially useful. Thus, using this new modality it is now possible to observe dynamic events in a live cell, and then rapidly vitrify the specimen at a specific time point prior to carrying out high-resolution imaging. The techniques described can be used in conjunction with other imaging modalities in correlated studies. We have also developed instrumentation to perform cryo-light imaging together with soft X-ray tomography on the same cryo-fixed specimen as a means of carrying out high content, quantifiable correlated imaging analyses. These methods are equally applicable to correlated light and electron microscopy of frozen biological objects. PMID:19566622

  4. Seeing Below the Drop: Direct Nano-to-microscale Imaging of Complex Interfaces involving Solid, Liquid, and Gas Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Landin, Trevan; Walker, Marlon L.; Scott, John Henry J.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2012-11-01

    Nanostructured surfaces with special wetting properties have the potential to transform number of industries, including power generation, water desalination, gas and oil production, and microelectronics thermal management. Predicting the wetting properties of these surfaces requires detailed knowledge of the geometry and the composition of the contact volume linking the droplet to the underlying substrate. Surprisingly, a general nano-to-microscale method for direct imaging of such interfaces has previously not been developed. Here we introduce a three dimensional imaging method which resolves this one-hundred-year-old metrology gap in wetting research. Specifically, we demonstrate direct nano-to-microscale imaging of complex fluidic interfaces using cryofixation in combination with cryo-FIB/SEM. We show that application of this method yields previously unattainable quantitative information about the interfacial geometry of water condensed on silicon nanowire forests with hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface termination in the presence or absence of an intermediate water repelling oil. We also discuss imaging artifacts and the advantages of secondary and backscatter electron imaging, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS), and three dimensional FIB/SEM tomography.

  5. Are the most numerous sensilla of terrestrial isopods hygroreceptors? ultrastructure of the dorsal tricorn sensilla of Porcellio scaber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A; Altner, H

    1995-10-01

    The ultrastructure of the tricorn sensilla of the woodlouse Porcellio scaber was investigated in cryofixed and freeze-substituted, or chemically fixed specimens. The tricorn sensilla have a foramenized triangular-shaped outer hair and bear a poreless rod-like inner hair. The conical base of the inner hair is connected to the base of the outer hair by a complex cuticular structure. Each sensillum contains three sensory cells. The tip of one of the three dendrites contains a tubular body and is clamped between two bulges of the dendritic sheath. The two other dendrites protrude to the tip of the inner hair, flush against the cuticular wall. The microtubules in the ciliary segments are arranged in nine double tubuli that have neither osmiophilic cores nor arms. The ciliary rootlets are small. The inner segment of the largest dendrite wraps around the two smaller dendrites and one of seven enveloping cells in a mesaxon-like manner. Although this ultrastructure deviates considerably from most crustacean mechanosensitive sensilla, it nevertheless suggests a mechanosensitive function, at least for one of the sensory cells. In many aspects, the tricorn sensilla resemble the thermo-hygrosensilla of insects. However, our results suggest that the structural criteria for thermo-hygro-sensitivity used in insects cannot simply be applied to crustaceans.

  6. Functional morphology of the copulatory organs of a reed beetle and a shining leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Donaciinae, Criocerinae) using X-ray micro-computed tomography *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael; Uhl, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For more than 100 years it has been known that the sclerotised median lobe of beetles harbours a membranous structure (the "internal sac" or "endophallus") which is everted during copula inside the female genital tract. In order to explore the functional role of this structure and those associated with it, we cryofixed copulating pairs of Donacia semicuprea and Lilioceris lilii and studied the relative position of the elements of the copulatory apparatus of males and females by micro-computer-tomography. We found that the everted endophallus fills the lumen of the bursa copulatrix completely. Our data suggest that in Lilioceris lilii the tip of the sclerotised distal part of the ejaculatory duct, the flagellum, is positioned exactly over the opening of the spermathecal duct inside the bursa copulatrix. The mouth of the bursa copulatrix in Donacia semicuprea is armed with a strong muscle ring, and the whole wall of the bursa is covered externally with a layer of muscle fibres. These morphological differences correspond with differences in mating behaviour: In reed beetles (Donaciinae), females seemingly can control mating to a higher degree than in lily beetles (Lilioceris spp.). PMID:26798321

  7. Golgi apparatus analyzed by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hong-Mei; Bouchet-Marquis, Cedric; Huebinger, Jan; Grabenbauer, Markus

    2013-10-01

    In 1898, the Golgi apparatus was discovered by light microscopy, and since the 1950s, the ultrastructure composition is known by electron microscopic investigation. The complex three-dimensional morphology fascinated researchers and was sometimes even the driving force to develop novel visualization techniques. However, the highly dynamic membrane systems of Golgi apparatus are delicate and prone to fixation artifacts. Therefore, the understanding of Golgi morphology and its function has been improved significantly with the development of better preparation methods. Nowadays, cryo-fixation is the method of choice to arrest instantly all dynamic and physiological processes inside cells, tissues, and small organisms. Embedded in amorphous ice, such samples can be further processed by freeze substitution or directly analyzed in their fully hydrated state by cryo-electron microscopy and tomography. Even though the overall morphology of vitrified Golgi stacks is comparable to well-prepared and resin-embedded samples, previously unknown structural details can be observed solely based on their native density. At this point, any further improvement of sample preparation would gain novel insights, perhaps not in terms of general morphology, but on fine structural details of this dynamic organelle.

  8. Initial bridges between two ribosomal subunits are formed within 9.4 milliseconds, as studied by time-resolved cryo-EM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Tanvir R; Yassin, Aymen S; Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wagenknecht, Terence; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2014-07-08

    Association of the two ribosomal subunits during the process of translation initiation is a crucial step of protein synthesis. The two subunits (30S and 50S) of the bacterial 70S ribosome are held together by 12 dynamic bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The process of bridge formation, such as whether all these bridges are formed simultaneously or in a sequential order, is poorly understood. To understand such processes, we have developed and implemented a class of microfluidic devices that mix two components to completion within 0.4 ms and spray the mixture in the form of microdroplets onto an electron microscopy grid, yielding a minimum reaction time of 9.4 ms before cryofixation. Using these devices, we have obtained cryo-EM data corresponding to reaction times of 9.4 and 43 ms and have determined 3D structures of ribosomal subunit association intermediates. Molecular analyses of the cryo-EM maps reveal that eight intersubunit bridges (bridges B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b, B3, B7a, B7b, and B8) form within 9.4 ms, whereas the remaining four bridges (bridges B2c, B4, B5, and B6) take longer than 43 ms to form, suggesting that bridges are formed in a stepwise fashion. Our approach can be used to characterize sequences of various dynamic functional events on complex macromolecular assemblies such as ribosomes.

  9. Electron tomography characterization of hemoglobin uptake in Plasmodium chabaudi reveals a stage-dependent mechanism for food vacuole morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Camila; Rachid, Rachel; de Souza, Wanderley; Miranda, Kildare

    2016-05-01

    In the course of their intraerythrocytic development, malaria parasites incorporate and degrade massive amounts of the host cell cytoplasm. This mechanism is essential for parasite development and represents a physiological step used as target for many antimalarial drugs; nevertheless, the fine mechanisms underlying these processes in Plasmodium species are still under discussion. Here, we studied the events of hemoglobin uptake and hemozoin nucleation in the different stages of the intraerythrocytic cycle of the murine malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi using transmission electron tomography of cryofixed and freeze-substituted cells. The results showed that hemoglobin uptake in P. chabaudi starts at the early ring stage and is present in all developmental stages, including the schizont stage. Hemozoin nucleation occurs near the membrane of small food vacuoles. At the trophozoite stage, food vacuoles are found closely localized to cytostomal tubes and mitochondria, whereas in the schizont stage, we observed a large food vacuole located in the central portion of the parasite. Taken together, these results provide new insights into the mechanisms of hemoglobin uptake and degradation in rodent malaria parasites.

  10. Strategies to improve the antigenicity, ultrastructure preservation and visibility of trafficking compartments in Arabidopsis tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierhof, York-Dieter; El Kasmi, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Immunolabelling of (ultra)thin thawed cryosections according to Tokuyasu is one of the most reliable and efficient immunolocalisation techniques for cells and tissues. However, chemical fixation at ambient temperature, a prerequisite of this technique, can cause problems for samples, like plant tissue, because cell walls, hydrophobic surfaces and intercellular air slow down diffusion of fixative molecules into the sample. We show that a hybrid technique, based on a combination of cryofixation/freeze-substitution and Tokuyasu cryosection immunolabelling, circumvents the disadvantages associated with chemical fixation and results in an improved ultrastructure and antigenicity preservation of Tokuyasu cryosections used for light and electron microscopic immunolabelling (as shown for Myc- or mRFP-tagged proteins, KNOLLE and carbohydrate epitopes). In combination with the most sensitive particulate marker systems, like 1-nm gold or quantum dot markers, we were able to obtain a differentiated labelling pattern which allows a more detailed evaluation of plant Golgi, trans-Golgi network and multivesicular body/prevacuolar compartment markers (COPI-specific gammaCOP, the ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase ARF1, ARA7/RabF2b and the vacuolar sorting receptor VSR). We also discuss possibilities to improve membrane contrast, e.g., of transport vesicles like COPI, COPII and clathrin-coated vesicles, and of compartments of endosomal trafficking like the trans-Golgi network. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Disorganization of cortical microtubules stimulates tangential expansion and reduces the uniformity of cellulose microfibril alignment among cells in the root of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Tobias I; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Judy-March, Jan E; Marga, Françoise

    2004-08-01

    To test the role of cortical microtubules in aligning cellulose microfibrils and controlling anisotropic expansion, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana roots to moderate levels of the microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin. After 2 d of treatment, roots grow at approximately steady state. At that time, the spatial profiles of relative expansion rate in length and diameter were quantified, and roots were cryofixed, freeze-substituted, embedded in plastic, and sectioned. The angular distribution of microtubules as a function of distance from the tip was quantified from antitubulin immunofluorescence images. In alternate sections, the overall amount of alignment among microfibrils and their mean orientation as a function of position was quantified with polarized-light microscopy. The spatial profiles of relative expansion show that the drug affects relative elongation and tangential expansion rates independently. The microtubule distributions averaged to transverse in the growth zone for all treatments, but on oryzalin the distributions became broad, indicating poorly organized arrays. At a subcellular scale, cellulose microfibrils in oryzalin-treated roots were as well aligned as in controls; however, the mean alignment direction, while consistently transverse in the controls, was increasingly variable with oryzalin concentration, meaning that microfibril orientation in one location tended to differ from that of a neighboring location. This conclusion was confirmed by direct observations of microfibrils with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that cortical microtubules ensure microfibrils are aligned consistently across the organ, thereby endowing the organ with a uniform mechanical structure.

  12. Disorganization of Cortical Microtubules Stimulates Tangential Expansion and Reduces the Uniformity of Cellulose Microfibril Alignment among Cells in the Root of Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Tobias I.; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Judy-March, Jan E.; Marga, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    To test the role of cortical microtubules in aligning cellulose microfibrils and controlling anisotropic expansion, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana roots to moderate levels of the microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin. After 2 d of treatment, roots grow at approximately steady state. At that time, the spatial profiles of relative expansion rate in length and diameter were quantified, and roots were cryofixed, freeze-substituted, embedded in plastic, and sectioned. The angular distribution of microtubules as a function of distance from the tip was quantified from antitubulin immunofluorescence images. In alternate sections, the overall amount of alignment among microfibrils and their mean orientation as a function of position was quantified with polarized-light microscopy. The spatial profiles of relative expansion show that the drug affects relative elongation and tangential expansion rates independently. The microtubule distributions averaged to transverse in the growth zone for all treatments, but on oryzalin the distributions became broad, indicating poorly organized arrays. At a subcellular scale, cellulose microfibrils in oryzalin-treated roots were as well aligned as in controls; however, the mean alignment direction, while consistently transverse in the controls, was increasingly variable with oryzalin concentration, meaning that microfibril orientation in one location tended to differ from that of a neighboring location. This conclusion was confirmed by direct observations of microfibrils with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that cortical microtubules ensure microfibrils are aligned consistently across the organ, thereby endowing the organ with a uniform mechanical structure. PMID:15299138

  13. Morphofunctional Merits of an In Vivo Cryotechnique for Living Animal Organs: Challenges of Clinical Applications from Basic Medical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shinichi

    2016-02-27

    Recent advances in molecular and genetic techniques have led to establishment of new biomedical fields; however, morphological techniques are still required for a more precise understanding of functioning cells and tissues. Conventional preparation procedures involve a series of chemical fixation, alcohol dehydration, paraffin or epoxy resin embedding, sectioning, and staining steps. In these steps, technical artifacts modify original morphologies of the cells being examined. Furthermore, difficulties are associated with capturing dynamic images in vivo using conventional chemical fixation. Therefore, a quick-freezing (QF) method was introduced for biological specimens in the 20th century. However, specimens have to be resected from living animal organs with blood supply, and their dynamical morphologies have not been investigated in detail using the QF method. In order to overcome these issues, the tissue resection step of organs had to be avoided and samples needed to be frozen under blood circulation. Our in vivo cryotechnique (IVCT) was an original technique to cryofix samples without resecting their tissues. The most significant merit of IVCT is that blood circulation into organs is preserved at the exact moment of freezing, which has been useful for arresting transient physiological processes of cells and tissues and maintaining their components in situ.

  14. MAVIS: An integrated system for live microscopy and vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koning, Roman I., E-mail: r.i.koning@lumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Faas, Frank G. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Boonekamp, Michael; Visser, Bram de; Janse, Jan [Department of Instrumental Development, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Wiegant, Joop C. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Breij, Anna de [Department of Infectious Diseases, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Willemse, Joost [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nibbering, Peter H. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Tanke, Hans J.; Koster, Abraham J. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy of vitrified biological samples can provide three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecules and organelles within bacteria and cells at nanometer scale resolution, even in native conditions. Localization of specific structures and imaging of cellular dynamics in cellular cryo-electron microscopy is limited by (i) the use of cryo-fixation to preserve cellular structures, (ii) the restricted availability of electron dense markers to label molecules inside cells and (iii) the inherent low contrast of cryo electron microscopy. These limitations can be mitigated to a large extend by correlative light and electron microscopy, where the sample is imaged by both light and electron microscopy. Here we present a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS) that combines a light microscope with a plunger to vitrify thin specimens. MAVIS provides the capability for fluorescence light microscopic imaging of living cells and bacteria that are adhered to an electron microscopy grid and subsequent vitrification within a time frame of seconds. The instrument allows targeting of dynamic biological events in time and space by fluorescence microscopy for subsequent cryo light and electron microscopy. Here we describe the design and performance of the MAVIS, illustrated with biological examples. - Highlights: • We developed new plunger: a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS). • The MAVIS is a new tool for integrating of live microscopy and vitrification. • The MAVIS allows fluorescence LM of living cells and vitrification within seconds. • Here we describe the MAVIS design and performance, and show biological examples.

  15. Micro-PIXE in plant sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J. [Materiais Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, Somerset West (South Africa); Przybylowicz, W.J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, the Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Kraków (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Studies of the role played by elements in fundamental processes in physiology, nutrition, elemental deficiency and toxicity as well as environmental pollution require accurate, quantitative methods with good spatial resolution. the problem of proper measurements of elemental balances and elemental transfers between various levels of biological organisation (from abiotic to biotic systems; along the food chains; within organs and cells) becomes essential for understanding the mechanisms influencing the selection, interaction, distribution and transport of elements. Highly sensitive techniques for bulk elemental analysis are mostly used in these investigations. These techniques usually offer adequate sensitivity, but without spatial resolution. On the other hand, advanced studies of elemental distribution at a cellular level are mostly conducted using techniques with high spatial resolution, but low sensitivity. Ideally, these studies should be conducted on organs and tissues of sizes as far down as the cellular and sub-cellular level. This applies to e.g. future directions in ionomics and metallomics and opens up new, exciting possibilities of studies of trace metal role. The micro-PIXE has been applied in plant sciences for more than thirty years and has reached a high level of maturity. This is one of the few microanalytical, multielemental techniques capable of quantitative studies of elemental distribution at ppm level with with ability to perform quantitative elemental mapping and easy quantification of data extracted from selected micro-areas. Preparation of biological specimens is undoubtedly the crucial and most difficult part of analysis, and only cryotechniques are recommended presently for ali types of microanalytical studies. Established sample preparation protocols will be presented. Most of results are obtained for cryofixed and freeze-dried material but analysis of samples in frozen-hydrated state brings important advantage. Recent

  16. Monitoring the Stability of Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions by Cryo-TEM Image Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapentin, Christoph; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC-NE) are disperse systems consisting of nanoscale liquid perfluorocarbon droplets stabilized by an emulsifier, usually phospholipids. Perfluorocarbons are chemically inert and non-toxic substances that are exhaled after in vivo administration. The manufacture of PFC-NE can be done in large scales by means of high pressure homogenization or microfluidization. Originally investigated as oxygen carriers for cases of severe blood loss, their application nowadays is more focused on using them as marker agents in 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging (19F MRI). 19F is scarce in organisms and thus PFC-NE are a promising tool for highly specific and non-invasive imaging of inflammation via 19F MRI. Neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages phagocytize PFC-NE and subsequently migrate to inflamed tissues. This technique has proven feasibility in numerous disease models in mice, rabbits and mini pigs. The translation to clinical trials in human needs the development of a stable nanoemulsion whose droplet size is well characterized over a long storage time. Usually dynamic light scattering (DLS) is applied as the standard method for determining particle sizes in the nanometer range. Our study uses a second method, analysis of transmission electron microscopy images of cryo-fixed samples (Cryo-TEM), to evaluate stability of PFC-NE in comparison to DLS. Four nanoemulsions of different composition are observed for one year. The results indicate that DLS alone cannot reveal the changes in particle size, but can even mislead to a positive estimation of stability. The combination with Cryo-TEM images gives more insight in the particulate evolution, both techniques supporting one another. The study is one further step in the development of analytical tools for the evaluation of a clinically applicable perfluorooctylbromide nanoemulsion.

  17. Apple cuticle: the perfect interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Eric; Arey, Bruce

    2010-06-01

    The domestic apple might well be called an 'extreme' fruit. In the arid Northwest United States, the fruit often tolerates surface temperatures ranging from -2 °C in the early spring to 50 °C in the heat of summer, and again to -2 °C during controlled postharvest storage for up to 12 months. During its 18-month existence, the apple maintains a cuticle that is dynamic and environmentally responsive to protect against 1) cellular water loss during desiccation stress and 2) excessive uptake of standing surface moisture. Physiological disorders of the peel such as russeting, cracking, splitting, flecking and lenticel marking, develop as epidermal cells respond to rapid changes in ambient conditions at specific developmental stages during the growing season. Resultant market losses underlie research investigating the nature of apple cuticle growth and development. Ultrastructural analysis of the pro-cuticle using scanning electron microscopy indicates an overlapping network of lipid-based distally-elongating microtubules--produced by and connected to epidermal cells--which co-polymerize to form an organic solvent-insoluble semi-permeable cutin matrix. Microtubule elongation, aggregation, and polymerization function together as long as the fruit continues to enlarge. The nature of lipid transport from the epidermal cells through the cell wall to become part of the cuticular matrix was explored using an FEI Helios NanoLabTM DualBeamTM focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope on chemically- and cryo-fixed peel tissue from mature or freshly harvested apples. Based on microtubule dimensions, regular projections found at the cell/cuticle interface suggest an array of microtubule-like structures associated with the epidermal cell.

  18. Cellular organization in germ tube tips of Gigaspora and its phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentivenga, Stephen P; Kumar, T K Arun; Kumar, Leticia; Roberson, Robert W; McLaughlin, David J

    2013-01-01

    Comparative morphology of the fine structure of fungal hyphal tips often is phylogenetically informative. In particular, morphology of the Spitzenkörper varies among higher taxa. To date no one has thoroughly characterized the hyphal tips of members of the phylum Glomeromycota to compare them with other fungi. This is partly due to difficulty growing and manipulating living hyphae of these obligate symbionts. We observed growing germ tubes of Gigaspora gigantea, G. margarita and G. rosea with a combination of light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For TEM, we used both traditional chemical fixation and cryo-fixation methods. Germ tubes of all species were extremely sensitive to manipulation. Healthy germ tubes often showed rapid bidirectional cytoplasmic streaming, whereas germ tubes that had been disturbed showed reduced or no cytoplasmic movement. Actively growing germ tubes contain a cluster of 10-20 spherical bodies approximately 3-8 μm behind the apex. The bodies, which we hypothesize are lipid bodies, move rapidly in healthy germ tubes. These bodies disappear immediately after any cellular perturbation. Cells prepared with cryo-techniques had superior preservation compared to those that had been processed with traditional chemical protocols. For example, cryo-prepared samples displayed two cell-wall layers, at least three vesicle types near the tip and three distinct cytoplasmic zones were noted. We did not detect a Spitzenkörper with either LM or TEM techniques and the tip organization of Gigaspora germ tubes appeared to be similar to hyphae in zygomycetous fungi. This observation was supported by a phylogenetic analysis of microscopic characters of hyphal tips from members of five fungal phyla. Our work emphasizes the sensitive nature of cellular organization, and the need for as little manipulation as possible to observe germ tube structure accurately.

  19. In vivo localization of manganese in the hyperaccumulator Gossia bidwillii (Benth.) N. Snow & Guymer (Myrtaceae) by cryo-SEM/EDAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Denise R; Batianoff, George N; Baker, Alan J; Woodrow, Ian E

    2006-05-01

    Gossia bidwillii (Myrtaceae) is a manganese (Mn)-hyperaccumulating tree native to subtropical eastern Australia. It typically contains foliar Mn levels in excess of 1% dry weight. However, in G. bidwillii and other Mn-hyperaccumulating species, the cellular and subcellular localization of Mn has not been measured. Quantitative in vivo cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) was used to localize Mn and other elements in tissue collected from mature trees growing in a natural population. Cryo-SEM showed that the leaf mesophyll is differentiated as a double-layer palisade mesophyll above spongy mesophyll. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the palisade and epidermal cells are highly vacuolated. EDAX data were used to estimate in situ vacuolar Mn concentrations of all cell types in fresh cryo-fixed leaf tissues. The highest average vacuolar Mn concentration of over 500 mM was found in the upper-layer palisade mesophyll, while the lowest concentration of around 100 mM was found in the spongy mesophyll. Qualitative in vivo cryo-SEM/EDAX was employed to further investigate the spatial distribution of Mn in fresh leaf tissues and young bark tissue, which was also found to have a high Mn concentration. It is concluded that Mn distribution in G. bidwillii is quantitatively different to metal distribution in other hyperaccumulating species where the highest localized concentrations of these elements occur in non-photosynthmetic tissues such as epidermal cells and associated dermal structures including trichomes and leaf hairs.

  20. Tyloses and phenolic deposits in xylem vessels impede water transport in low-lignin transgenic poplars: a study by cryo-fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitin, Peter; Voelker, Steven L; Meinzer, Frederick C; Beeckman, Hans; Strauss, Steven H; Lachenbruch, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    Of 14 transgenic poplar genotypes (Populus tremula × Populus alba) with antisense 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase that were grown in the field for 2 years, five that had substantial lignin reductions also had greatly reduced xylem-specific conductivity compared with that of control trees and those transgenic events with small reductions in lignin. For the two events with the lowest xylem lignin contents (greater than 40% reduction), we used light microscopy methods and acid fuchsin dye ascent studies to clarify what caused their reduced transport efficiency. A novel protocol involving dye stabilization and cryo-fluorescence microscopy enabled us to visualize the dye at the cellular level and to identify water-conducting pathways in the xylem. Cryo-fixed branch segments were planed in the frozen state on a sliding cryo-microtome and observed with an epifluorescence microscope equipped with a cryo-stage. We could then distinguish clearly between phenolic-occluded vessels, conductive (stain-filled) vessels, and nonconductive (water- or gas-filled) vessels. Low-lignin trees contained areas of nonconductive, brown xylem with patches of collapsed cells and patches of noncollapsed cells filled with phenolics. In contrast, phenolics and nonconductive vessels were rarely observed in normal colored wood of the low-lignin events. The results of cryo-fluorescence light microscopy were supported by observations with a confocal microscope after freeze drying of cryo-planed samples. Moreover, after extraction of the phenolics, confocal microscopy revealed that many of the vessels in the nonconductive xylem were blocked with tyloses. We conclude that reduced transport efficiency of the transgenic low-lignin xylem was largely caused by blockages from tyloses and phenolic deposits within vessels rather than by xylem collapse.

  1. The locations and amounts of endogenous ions and elements in the cap and elongating zone of horizontally oriented roots of Zea mays L.: an electron-probe EDS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Cameron, I. L.; Hunter, K. E.; Olmos, D.; Smith, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    We used quantitative electron-probe energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis to localize endogenous Na, Cl, K, P, S, Mg and Ca in cryofixed and freeze-dried cryosections of the cap (i.e. the putative site of graviperception) and elongating zone (i.e. site of gravicurvature) of horizontally oriented roots of Zea mays. Ca, Na, Cl, K and Mg accumulate along the lower side of caps of horizontally oriented roots. The most dramatic asymmetries of these ions occur in the apoplast, especially the mucilage. We could not detect any significant differences in the concentrations of these ions in the central cytoplasm of columella cells along the upper and lower sides of caps of horizontally-oriented roots. However, the increased amounts of Na, Cl, K and Mg in the longitudinal walls of columella cells along the lower side of the cap suggest that these ions may move down through the columella tissue of horizontally-oriented roots. Ca also accumulates (largely in the mucilage) along the lower side of the elongating zone of horizontally-oriented roots, while Na, P, Cl and K tend to accumulate along the upper side of the elongating zone. Of these ions, only K increases in concentration in the cytoplasm and longitudinal walls of cortical cells in the upper vs lower sides of the elongating zone. These results indicate that (1) gravity-induced asymmetries of ions differ significantly in the cap and elongating zone of graviresponding roots, (2) Ca accumulates along the lower side of the cap and elongating zone of graviresponding roots, (3) increased growth of the upper side of the elongating zone of horizontally-oriented roots correlates positively with increased amounts of K in the cytoplasm and longitudinal walls of cortical cells, and (4) the apoplast (especially the mucilage) may be an important component of the pathway via which ions move in graviresponding rots of Zea mays. These results are discussed relative to mechanisms for graviperception and gravicurvature of roots.

  2. SARS-coronavirus replication is supported by a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum.

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    Kèvin Knoops

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses, a large group including human pathogens such as SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, replicate in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. Their replication complexes are commonly associated with modified host cell membranes. Membrane structures supporting viral RNA synthesis range from distinct spherular membrane invaginations to more elaborate webs of packed membranes and vesicles. Generally, their ultrastructure, morphogenesis, and exact role in viral replication remain to be defined. Poorly characterized double-membrane vesicles (DMVs were previously implicated in SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. We have now applied electron tomography of cryofixed infected cells for the three-dimensional imaging of coronavirus-induced membrane alterations at high resolution. Our analysis defines a unique reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum that integrates convoluted membranes, numerous interconnected DMVs (diameter 200-300 nm, and "vesicle packets" apparently arising from DMV merger. The convoluted membranes were most abundantly immunolabeled for viral replicase subunits. However, double-stranded RNA, presumably revealing the site of viral RNA synthesis, mainly localized to the DMV interior. Since we could not discern a connection between DMV interior and cytosol, our analysis raises several questions about the mechanism of DMV formation and the actual site of SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. Our data document the extensive virus-induced reorganization of host cell membranes into a network that is used to organize viral replication and possibly hide replicating RNA from antiviral defense mechanisms. Together with biochemical studies of the viral enzyme complex, our ultrastructural description of this "replication network" will aid to further dissect the early stages of the coronavirus life cycle and its virus-host interactions.

  3. Evaluation of Cryotechniques for Tem Observation of Sols - Application to Boehmite Sols Used in Catalysts Forming

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    Fauchadour D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of suspensions in the heterogeneous catalysis field being a big issue, it appears important to be able to control this step as much as possible. Size of the objects in the suspension, aggregation state, homogeneity or heterogeneity (all called texture or structure here are some important parameters which are sometimes difficult to evaluate with traditionalmethods such as X-ray scattering or rheology. The cryotechniques applied to transmission electron microscopy is then an interesting alternative. Three different methods of cryofixation have been tested on low solid content suspensions of boehmite commonly used during the dispersion step of alumina carrier forming. Two different cryoprotectants were tested as well. It is shown that liquid propane immersion cooling (PL and slam freezing (SF methods require the use of a cryoprotectant whereas high pressure technique (HP avoids ice crystal formation without any addition of cryoprotectant in the suspension. It is shown also that DMSO is efficient with PL and SF techniques only when added at a high concentration (50% to the suspension. Glycerol is preferred because water is vitrified since that 30% of glycerol is added. Comparisons of high pressure preparations with and without glycerol show very little differences of texture on the replica. Explanations of the origin of the small differences of density are tentatively given. More analyses are now under progress to clarify the role of glycerol. Cryomicroscopy is conclude to be a very good technique when the texture of a suspension must be studied for example in the elaboration or in the improvement of a peptisation or a colloid formation process.

  4. Bathing in carbon dioxide-enriched water alters protein expression in keratinocytes of skin tissue in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälsch, Julia; Pott, Leona L.; Takeda, Atsushi; Kumamoto, Hideo; Möllmann, Dorothe; Canbay, Ali; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A.

    2016-10-01

    Beneficial effects of balneotherapy using naturally occurring carbonated water (CO2 enriched) have been known since the Middle Ages. Although this therapy is clinically applied for peripheral artery disease and skin disorder, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Under controlled conditions, rats were bathed in either CO2-enriched water (CO2 content 1200 mg/L) or tap water, both at 37 °C, for 10 min daily over 4 weeks. Proliferation activity was assessed by Ki67 immunohistochemistry of the epidermis of the abdomen. The capillary density was assessed by immunodetection of isolectin-positive cells. Using cryo-fixed abdominal skin epidermis, follicle cells and stroma tissue containing capillaries were separately isolated by means of laser microdissection and subjected to proteomic analysis using label-free technique. Differentially expressed proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry. Proliferation activity of keratinocytes was not significantly different in the epidermis after bathing in CO2-enriched water, and also, capillary density did not change. Proteomic analysis revealed up to 36 significantly regulated proteins in the analyzed tissue. Based on the best expression profiles, ten proteins were selected for immunohistochemical validation. Only one protein, far upstream element binding protein 2 (FUBP2), was similarly downregulated in the epidermis after bathing in CO2-enriched water with both techniques. Low FUBP2 expression was associated with low c-Myc immune-expression in keratinocytes. Long-term bathing in CO2-enriched water showed a cellular protein response of epithelial cells in the epidermis which was detectable by two different methods. However, differences in proliferation activity or capillary density were not detected in the normal skin.

  5. Spatial distribution of arsenic and heavy metals in willow roots from a contaminated floodplain soil measured by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Dana, E-mail: dana.zimmer@uni-rostock.de [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Kruse, Jens; Baum, Christel [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Borca, Camelia [Paul Scherrer Institute, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laue, Michael [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Rostock, Medical Faculty, Strempelstr. 14, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Hause, Gerd [Microscopy Unit, Biocenter of the University of Halle, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Meissner, Ralph [UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Soil Physics, Lysimeter Station, Dorfstrasse 55, D-39615 Falkenberg (Germany); Leinweber, Peter [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Under changing redox conditions some plants create plaques at their root surface, which may affect the mobility and uptake of As and heavy metals but it is unknown to what extent this also holds true for willows in contaminated floodplain soils. Therefore, willow roots were sampled from a phytoremediation trial in the contaminated floodplain of the river Elbe (Germany), cryofixed, freeze-dried, and cross sections were mapped for the distribution of As, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, S and Zn by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The elements Ca, Cu, Ni, S and Zn were concentrated in the aerenchymatic tissue, and not associated with Fe and Mn. Mixed Fe-Mn plaques covered the surface of the willow roots and As was accumulated in these plaques. The observed association pattern between As and Fe was explained by the different sorption/desorption properties of As(III) and As(V). The Cu and Zn intensities were not associated with the intensity of Fe in the plaque, which seems to be a willow-specific difference compared to other wetland plants. These results suggested that willows are especially suited to stabilize low-phytoextractable elements like Cu and As in their roots and rhizosphere. Thus, short rotation coppicing of willows may be a practical approach to mitigate the adverse effects of floodplain soil contamination. - Research highlights: {yields} Elemental distributions were mapped on willow roots for the first time by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. {yields} Ca, Cu, Ni, S and Zn were enriched in the aerenchyma but As, Fe and Mn formed root plaques. {yields} The Cu and Zn enrichments in aerenchyma but absence in plaques appeared to be willow-specific. {yields} In the plaques were three groups of pixels which strongly differed in the As to Fe and As to Mn ratios. {yields} This indicated different species of these redox-sensitive elements.

  6. Monitoring the Stability of Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions by Cryo-TEM Image Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering.

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    Christoph Grapentin

    Full Text Available Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC-NE are disperse systems consisting of nanoscale liquid perfluorocarbon droplets stabilized by an emulsifier, usually phospholipids. Perfluorocarbons are chemically inert and non-toxic substances that are exhaled after in vivo administration. The manufacture of PFC-NE can be done in large scales by means of high pressure homogenization or microfluidization. Originally investigated as oxygen carriers for cases of severe blood loss, their application nowadays is more focused on using them as marker agents in 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging (19F MRI. 19F is scarce in organisms and thus PFC-NE are a promising tool for highly specific and non-invasive imaging of inflammation via 19F MRI. Neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages phagocytize PFC-NE and subsequently migrate to inflamed tissues. This technique has proven feasibility in numerous disease models in mice, rabbits and mini pigs. The translation to clinical trials in human needs the development of a stable nanoemulsion whose droplet size is well characterized over a long storage time. Usually dynamic light scattering (DLS is applied as the standard method for determining particle sizes in the nanometer range. Our study uses a second method, analysis of transmission electron microscopy images of cryo-fixed samples (Cryo-TEM, to evaluate stability of PFC-NE in comparison to DLS. Four nanoemulsions of different composition are observed for one year. The results indicate that DLS alone cannot reveal the changes in particle size, but can even mislead to a positive estimation of stability. The combination with Cryo-TEM images gives more insight in the particulate evolution, both techniques supporting one another. The study is one further step in the development of analytical tools for the evaluation of a clinically applicable perfluorooctylbromide nanoemulsion.

  7. Immunohistochemical Study of Serum Proteins in Normal and Cadmium-Treated Mouse Testis by in vivo Cryotechnique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-gang LIAO; Nobuo TERADA; Zi-long LI; Nobuhiko OHNO; Yasuhisa FUJII; Shinichi OHNO

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate time-dependent changes of serum proteins permeability inthe normal and cadmium(Cd)-treated mouse testis, reflecting tight junctional (TJ) barriersof Sertoli cellsMethods The serum proteins, albumin and immunoglobulin-G(IgG), in the seminiferoustubules were firstly immobilized by the "in vivo cryotechnique", in which the dynamicblood circulation was always kept. The cryofixed testicular tissues were then processedfor the freeze-substitution method, and embedded in the paraffin wax. Serial sectionsof 5μm thickness were immunostained by anti-mouse albumin or IgG antibody withperoxidase immunostaining, and also stained with hematoxylin-eosine (HE)formorphological observation.Results In normal seminiferous tubules, albumin immunoreaction products werelocalized around peritubular myoid cells and among Leydig cells, as well as in bloodvessels. They were also localized as arch-like patterns around some spermatogonia inbasal compartments. The number of the immunopositive arch structures was differentaccording to developmental stages of the seminiferous cycle, judging from thearrangement of germ cells by HE-staining. The patterns of localization of IgGimmunostaining in normal mouse testis were similar to that of albumin. In 24 h afterCd-treatment, some enlarged spaces and vesicular formation in the seminiferousepithelium were observed on the paraffin sections by HE-staining. The albumin or IgG immunolocalization was seen not only in the basal compartments, but also in theadluminal compartments between Sertolicells and germ cells.Conclusion The structural changes of inter-Sertoli TJ barriers in vivo, such as differentimmunostaining patterns of serum proteins between the normal and Cd-treated mouseseminiferous tubules, could be clearly detected by the "in vivo cryotechnique" withalbumin or IgG immunohistochemistry.

  8. Myxobacteria, Polarity, and Multicellular Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Dale; Robinson, Mark; Kroos, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Myxobacteria are renowned for the ability to sporulate within fruiting bodies whose shapes are species-specific. The capacity to build those multicellular structures arises from the ability of M. xanthus to organize high cell-density swarms, in which the cells tend to be aligned with each other while constantly in motion. The intrinsic polarity of rod-shaped cells lays the foundation, and each cell uses two polar engines for gliding on surfaces. It sprouts retractile type IV pili from the leading cell pole and secretes capsular polysaccharide through nozzles from the trailing pole. Regularly periodic reversal of the gliding direction was found to be required for swarming. Those reversals are generated by a G-protein switch which is driven by a sharply tuned oscillator. Starvation induces fruiting body development, and systematic reductions in the reversal frequency are necessary for the cells to aggregate rather than continue to swarm. Developmental gene expression is regulated by a network that is connected to the suppression of reversals. PMID:20610548

  9. Hierarchical super-structure identified by polarized light microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoindentation: Implications for the limits of biological control over the growth mode of abalone sea shells

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    Schneider Andreas S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollusc shells are commonly investigated using high-resolution imaging techniques based on cryo-fixation. Less detailed information is available regarding the light-optical properties. Sea shells of Haliotis pulcherina were embedded for polishing in defined orientations in order to investigate the interface between prismatic calcite and nacreous aragonite by standard materialographic methods. A polished thin section of the interface was prepared with a defined thickness of 60 μm for quantitative birefringence analysis using polarized light and LC-PolScope microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images were obtained for comparison. In order to study structural-mechanical relationships, nanoindentation experiments were performed. Results Incident light microscopy revealed a super-structure in semi-transparent regions of the polished cross-section under a defined angle. This super-structure is not visible in transmitted birefringence analysis due to the blurred polarization of small nacre platelets and numerous organic interfaces. The relative orientation and homogeneity of calcite prisms was directly identified, some of them with their optical axes exactly normal to the imaging plane. Co-oriented "prism colonies" were identified by polarized light analyses. The nacreous super-structure was also visualized by secondary electron imaging under defined angles. The domains of the super-structure were interpreted to consist of crystallographically aligned platelet stacks. Nanoindentation experiments showed that mechanical properties changed with the same periodicity as the domain size. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that insights into the growth mechanisms of nacre can be obtained by conventional light-optical methods. For example, we observed super-structures formed by co-oriented nacre platelets as previously identified using X-ray Photo-electron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM [Gilbert et al., Journal of the

  10. ER import sites and their relationship to ER exit sites: a new model for bidirectional ER-Golgi transport in higher plants

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    Alexander eLerich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant Golgi apparatus is polydisperse and COPII fluorescence localizes to the interface between the ER and the overlying Golgi stack rather than the surface of the ER. Per definition, ER exit sites (ERES are COPII vesiculation events at the surface of the ER and are only visualizable in the electron microscope through cryofixation techniques. Nevertheless, ERES is always associated with Golgi stacks and both move together. We have asked whether the domain of the ER where retrograde COPI vesicles fuse, i.e. ER import sites, (ERIS, is also coupled to Golgi stack motility and therefore spatially associated with ERES? As ERIS markers we have investigated ER-located SNAREs and tethering factors. We screened several SNAREs (SYP81, the SYP7 family, and USE1 to find a SNARE whose overexpression did not disrupt ER-Golgi traffic and which gave rise to discrete fluorescent punctae when expressed with an XFP tag. Only the Qc SNARE SYP72 fulfilled these criteria, and, based on quantitative protein transport assays with the retrograde reporter α-amylase-HDEL, even appeared to enhance retrograde traffic. When coexpressed with SYP72-YFP, the type I membrane protein RFP-p24δ5 whose ER localization is due to an efficient COPI-mediated recycling, forms nodules along the tubular ER network. SYP72 colocalizes with these nodules which are not seen when RFP-p24δ5 is expressed alone or when SYP72-YFP is coexpressed with a mutant form of RFP-p24δ5 that cannot exit the ER. Immobilized Golgi stacks show a perfect colocalization between SYP72-YFP and fluorescent COPII/Golgi markers. Endogenous SYP72, also colocalizes with COPII/Golgi. Fluorescently tagged versions of plant homologs to TIP20 of the Dsl1 COPI-tethering factor complex, and to the COPII-tethering factor p115 both colocalize perfectly with Golgi stacks. These data suggest that ERES, ERIS and Golgi stacks are closely associated thereby constituting a mobile secretory and recycling unit: a unique feature

  11. Measurement of total calcium in neurons by electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2013-11-20

    In this article the tools, techniques, and instruments appropriate for quantitative measurements of intracellular elemental content using the technique known as electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) are described. Intramitochondrial calcium is a particular focus because of the critical role that mitochondrial calcium overload plays in neurodegenerative diseases. The method is based on the analysis of X-rays generated in an electron microscope (EM) by interaction of an electron beam with the specimen. In order to maintain the native distribution of diffusible elements in electron microscopy specimens, EPMA requires "cryofixation" of tissue followed by the preparation of ultrathin cryosections. Rapid freezing of cultured cells or organotypic slice cultures is carried out by plunge freezing in liquid ethane or by slam freezing against a cold metal block, respectively. Cryosections nominally 80 nm thick are cut dry with a diamond knife at ca. -160 °C, mounted on carbon/pioloform-coated copper grids, and cryotransferred into a cryo-EM using a specialized cryospecimen holder. After visual survey and location mapping at ≤-160 °C and low electron dose, frozen-hydrated cryosections are freeze-dried at -100 °C for ~30 min. Organelle-level images of dried cryosections are recorded, also at low dose, by means of a slow-scan CCD camera and subcellular regions of interest selected for analysis. X-rays emitted from ROIs by a stationary, focused, high-intensity electron probe are collected by an energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer, processed by associated electronics, and presented as an X-ray spectrum, that is, a plot of X-ray intensity vs. energy. Additional software facilitates: 1) identification of elemental components by their "characteristic" peak energies and fingerprint; and 2) quantitative analysis by extraction of peak areas/background. This paper concludes with two examples that illustrate typical EPMA applications, one in which mitochondrial calcium analysis

  12. Element storage in spores of Gigaspora margarita Becker & Hall measured by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS Elementos de armazenamento em esporos de Gigaspora margarita Becker & Hall medidos por espectroscopia com perda de energia em elétrons (EEES

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    Andre Freire Cruz

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The storage structures of spores of Gigaspora margarita Becker & Hall, an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, were analyzed by a transmission electronic microscope (TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS. The spores were hydrated, cryofixed using high pressure freezing, submitted to freeze substitution, embedded and prepared for TEM observations. The cryotechniques revealed that the storage structures in the spores are composed of lipids, electron dense granules (EDG, protein bodies and glycogen particles. The EELS detected the presence of nitrogen (N and carbon (C in these storage structures and in Bacteria-like organisms (BLO. Some amount of P was detected in the vacuoles and in BLO. The TEM and EELS techniques indicate the presence of storage structures in the fungal spore, and some essential elements (N, P and C in these structures.As estruturas de armazenamento em esporos de Gigaspora margarita Becker & Hall, um fungo micorrízico arbuscular, foram analisadas por microscópio eletrônico de transmissão (MET e espectroscopia com perda de energia em elétrons (EEES. Os esporos foram hidratados, criofixados por pressão em baixa temperatura e submetidos a substituição em congelamento, embebidos e preparados para observações no MET. As técnicas de criofixação revelaram que as estruturas de armazenamento nos esporos são compostas de lipídios, grânulos elétron densos (GED, corpos protéicos e partículas de glicogênio. Por EEES foi detectada a presença de nitrogênio (N e carbono (C nestas estruturas de armazenamento e em organismos similares a bactérias (OSB. Uma pequena quantia de P foi detectada nos vacúolos e nos OSB. O exame por MET e EEES indicaram a presença de estruturas de armazenamento nos esporos e alguns elementos essenciais (N, P e C nessas.

  13. Quantitative mapping of elemental distribution in leaves of the metallophytes Helichrysum candolleanum, Blepharis aspera, and Blepharis diversispina from Selkirk Cu–Ni mine, Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koosaletse-Mswela, Pulane, E-mail: pulane.mswela@mopipi.ub.bw [Environmental Sciences Department, University of Botswana, Private Bag 00704, Gaborone (Botswana); Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J., E-mail: przybylowicz@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics & Applied Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Cloete, Karen J., E-mail: kcloete@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); Barnabas, Alban D., E-mail: alban@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); Torto, Nelson, E-mail: ntorto@bitri.co.bw [Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta, E-mail: mesjasz@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Multi-element profiling is essential in understanding the metal-tolerant behavior of metallophytes. Although previous reports using multi-elemental analyses show that the metallophytes Blepharis aspera, Blepharis diversispina (Acanthaceae) and Helichrysum candolleanum (Asteraceae) take up metals, no information exists on elemental spatial distribution and concentrations in specific tissues of these plants. The aim of this study therefore was to assess the spatial distribution and concentration of copper, nickel and other elements in leaf tissues of these plants using micro-PIXE. Whole plants were collected with soil in pots from an operational copper and nickel mine (i.e., a copper and nickel mineralized area), Selkirk, about 40 km north-east of Francistown, Botswana. On the same day the samples were transported by air to iThemba LABS in South Africa. Leaf specimens were cryofixed in liquid propane cooled by LN2. Parallel samples were embedded in resin for anatomical studies to facilitate interpretation of elemental maps. The distribution and concentration of copper, nickel, and other elements in leaf tissues were determined using micro-PIXE and proton backscattering spectrometry. Data evaluation was performed using GeoPIXE II software. Micro-PIXE showed that H. candolleanum had the highest whole leaf content of copper (70 ± 3 μg g{sup −1} DW) and nickel (168 ± 5 μg g{sup −1} DW), followed by B. aspera (Cu: 25 ± 1 μg g{sup −1} DW; Ni: 166 ± 4 μg g{sup −1} DW) and B. diversispina (Cu: 3 ± 1 μg g{sup −1} DW; Ni, below detection limit). For specific leaf tissues, the highest levels of copper were found in the vascular bundle for H. candolleanum (167 ± 7 μg g{sup −1} DW) and the lower epidermis for B. aspera (70 ± 9 μg g{sup −1} DW). The highest levels of nickel were present in the vascular bundle of B. aspera (479 ± 10 μg g{sup −1} DW) and H. candolleanum (90 ± 5 μg g{sup −1} DW). Elemental maps showed a similar distribution pattern

  14. Leaf litter as a possible food source for chironomids (Diptera in Brazilian and Portuguese headwater streams Detritos foliares como possível fonte de alimento para Chironomidae (Diptera em riachos de cabeceira brasileiros e portugueses

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    Marcos Callisto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to evaluate the potential use of leaf detritus by chironomid larvae. Field and laboratory experiments were performed using leaves and chironomid species collected in Portugal and Brazil. Laboratory experiments under controlled conditions were done using microbial conditioned senescent leaves of Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn, Neriumoleander L., Protium heptaphilum (Aubl. March, Protium brasiliense (Spreng Engl., Myrcia guyanensis(Aubl. DC and Miconia chartacea Triana. Laboratory experiments were performed using specimens collected from leaf litter in local streams. Whenever possible, after the experiments, chironomids were allowed to emerge as adults and identified. In Portugal the following taxa were identified: Micropsectra apposita (Walker, 1856, Polypedilum albicorne (Meigen, 1838,Eukiefferiella claripennis Lundbeck (1898, Rheocricotopus (Psilocricotopus atripes Rempel (1937 and Ablabesmyia Johannsen (1905 (Diptera, Chironomidae. Consumption rates ranged from 0.15 ± 0.10 mg (AFDM of leaf animal-1 day-1 (Micropsectra apposita feeding on Alnus glutinosa up to 0.85 ± 0.33 mg (AFDM of leaf animal-1 day-1 (Polypedilum albicorne feeding on Miconia chartacea. In Brazil, the following taxa were identified from leaves: Phaenopsectra sp., Chironomus spp. and Polypedilum sp. and maximum consumption rates reached 0.47 ± 0.28 (AFDM of leaf mg.animal-1.day-1 (Chironomus Meigen (1803 feeding on Protium heptaphilum. Feeding experiments with laboratory cultured specimens, revealed that some chironomids were unable to feed on decomposing leaves (e.g., C. xanthus Rempel (1939 on P.brasiliensis and M.guyanensis. Our results suggest that some stream chironomids (not typical shredders can use leaf litter of riparian vegetation as a complementary food source.O objetivo foi avaliar o potencial uso de detritos foliares por larvas de Chironomidae. Foram realizados experimentos em campo e em laboratório utilizando folhas e larvas de Chironomidae

  15. Isolation and Distribution of Species Resource of Myxobacteria in Chengdu Region%成都地区黏细菌物种资源的分离和区域分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冰花; 何柳兴

    2011-01-01

    The myxobacteria are screened from 35 samples included water, mud, rabbit dung, goat dung, rotten wood,weathered rock,from different prefectures and counties of Chengdu by rabbit dung pellets inducing method, VY/4 carbendazim agar culture inducing method and mineral salt agar culture inducing method. Forty two myxobacteria strains are isolated from 7 genera,which belong to Myxococcus,Chondromyces ,Angiococcus, Archangium, Melittangium , Sorangium and Stigmatella , and are detected by their physiological , biological and morphological characteristics. The statistical analysis of population distribution and diversity are done by comparing the collection sites of samples,the variety of samples and the ecological environment of collection sites,it is found that there are plentful quantity and genera of myxobacteria in Chengdu region Especially,there are 7 myxobacteria strains in 5 genera from the river water samples of Huanglong ancient town. The study also shows that ratio of purification in the sample from tourist landscape area are the highest among the collection sites,and followed by the samples of forest,grassland and fruit gardens. The ratio of purification of myxobacteria in the tourist landscape area and resource diversity are higher than that of other invironment.%利用兔粪诱导法、VY/4多菌灵琼脂培养基诱导法和无机盐琼脂培养基诱导法从来自成都各区县的水样、土样、兔粪、羊粪、朽木、风化岩石共35个样品中分离纯化黏细菌,经过生理、生化和形态学鉴定,共得到42株黏细菌.这42株黏细菌分属于黏球黏细菌属(Myxococcus)、粒状黏细菌属(Chondromyces)、囊球黏细菌属(Angiococcus)、原囊黏细菌属(Archangium)、蜂窝黏细菌属(Melittangium)、堆囊黏细菌属(Sorangium)和标桩黏细菌属(Stigmatella)7个属.按样品的采集地域、样品种类和生态环境进行了种群分布及多样性的统计分析,发现成都地区黏细菌的数量和种属均较

  16. Resistance of Wheat Accessions to the English Grain Aphid Sitobion avenae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Shun Hu

    Full Text Available The English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, is a major pest species of wheat crops; however, certain varieties may have stronger resistance to infestation than others. Here, we investigated 3 classical resistance mechanisms (antixenosis, antibiosis, and tolerance by 14 wheat varieties/lines to S. avenae under laboratory and field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, alatae given the choice between 2 wheat varieties, strongly discriminated against certain varieties. Specifically, the 'Amigo' variety had the lowest palatability to S. avenae alatae of all varieties. 'Tm' (Triticum monococcum, 'Astron,' 'Xanthus,' 'Ww2730,' and 'Batis' varieties also had lower palatability than other varieties. Thus, these accessions may use antibiosis as the resistant mechanism. In contrast, under field conditions, there were no significant differences in the number of alatae detected on the 14 wheat varieties. One synthetic line (98-10-30, a cross between of Triticum aestivum (var. Chris and Triticum turgidum (var. durum hybridization had low aphid numbers but high yield loss, indicating that it has high antibiosis, but poor tolerance. In comparison, 'Amigo,' 'Xiaoyan22,' and some '186Tm' samples had high aphid numbers but low yield loss rates, indicating they have low antibiosis, but good tolerance. Aphid population size and wheat yield loss rates greatly varied in different fields and years for '98-10-35,' 'Xiaoyan22,' 'Tp,' 'Tam200,' 'PI high,' and other '186Tm' samples, which were hybrid offspring of T. aestivum and wheat related species. Thus, these germplasm should be considered for use in future studies. Overall, S. avenae is best adapted to 'Xinong1376,' because it was the most palatable variety, with the greatest yield loss rates of all 14 wheat varieties. However, individual varieties/lines influenced aphid populations differently in different years. Therefore, we strongly recommend a combination of laboratory and long-term field experiments in

  17. Isolation and Purification of Myxobacteria in Chengdu%成都样品中粘细菌的分离纯化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冰花; 杨林; 冯礼福; 何柳兴

    2011-01-01

    [目的]为进一步研究粘细菌中生物活性物质奠定基础.[方法]从成都各区县采集35份水样、土样、兔粪、羊粪、风化岩石以及朽木样品,预处理后使用不同方法进行分离纯化,观察分离粘细菌的营养细胞、粘孢子、子实体和菌落形态等特征,并进行鉴定归属.[结果]共分离纯化得到42 株粘细菌,鉴定为粘球菌属、囊球粘细菌属、粒状粘细菌属、堆囊粘细菌属、蜂窝粘细菌属、标桩菌属和原囊粘细菌属,共7个属.其中,水样中粘细菌的出菌率最高.[结论]水样中有丰富的粘细菌资源.%[ Objective ] To lay the basis for further studying bioactive substances in myxobacteria. [ Method ] A total of 35 samples including fresh water, mud, rabbit dung, sheep dung,weathered rock and rotten wood were collected from districts and eoanties of Chengdu. After pretreatment, the myxobacteria were isolated and purified using different methods. Vegetative cells,myxospores ,fruiting body and colony morphology of these myxobacteria strains were observed. [ Result] Forty-two myxobacteria strains were isolated and purified. They were classified into seven genera including Myxococcus ,Angiococcus, Chondromyces ,Sorangium,Melittangium ,Stigmatella and Archangium. The positive rate of myxobacteria was highest in the water samples. [ Conclusion ] Abundant myxobacteria resource is found in fresh water.

  18. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  19. Functional and fluorochrome analysis of an exocytotic mutant yields evidence of store-operated Ca2+ influx in Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, I; Klauke, N; Hentschel, J; Cohen, J; Plattner, H

    2002-05-01

    to perform membrane fusion, as analyzed with the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187. These findings were corroborated by cryofixation and freeze-fracture analysis of trichocyst docking sites after AED or 4CmC stimulation, which also revealed no membrane fusion. In sum, in nd12 cells increased culture temperature entails multiple defects, notably insensitivity to any Ca2+ signal, which, moreover, cannot develop properly due to a lower basal [Ca2+] level and the lack of Ca2+ influx, despite normal store activation.

  20. The Doryctinae (Braconidae) of Costa Rica: genera and species of the tribe Heterospilini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Paul M; Wild, Alexander L; Whitfield, James B

    2013-01-01

    ., H. nigracapitus sp. n., H. nigragonatus sp. n., H. nigricoxus sp. n., H. nixoni sp. n., H. noyesi sp. n., H. nueve sp. n., H. nunesi sp. n., H. once sp. n., H. orbitus sp. n., H. orosi sp. n., H. paloverde sp. n., H. pappi sp. n., H. parkeri sp. n., H. parvus sp. n., H. pech sp. n., H. penosa sp. n., H. petiolatus sp. n., H. petralbus sp. n., H. phaeocoxus sp. n., H. phaeoskelus sp. n., H. pharkidodus sp. n., H. phytorius sp. n., H. pitillaensis sp. n., H. poqomchi sp. n., H. poqomom sp. n., H. puertoviejoensis sp. n., H. puntarensis sp. n., H. qanjobal sp. n., H. quickei sp. n., H. quitirrisi sp. n., H. racostica sp. n., H. rama sp. n., H. ramirezi sp. n., H. ratzeburgi sp. n., H. reagani sp. n., H. reinhardi sp. n., H. retheospilus sp. n., H. rhabdotus sp. n., H. ricacosta sp. n., H. rinconensis sp. n., H. robbieae sp. n., H. rohweri sp. n., H. rojasi sp. n., H. romani sp. n., H. rugosus sp. n., H. sabrinae sp. n., H. saminae sp. n., H. sanjosensis sp. n., H. santarosensis sp. n., H. sanvitoensis sp. n., H. saturn sp. n., H. seis sp. n., H. sergeyi sp. n., H. sharkeyi sp. n., H. shawi sp. n., H. shenefelti sp. n., H. shonan sp. n., H. siete sp. n., H. similis sp. n., H. sinuatus sp. n., H. smithi sp. n., H. spiloheterus sp. n., H. staryi sp. n., H. stelfoxi sp. n., H. strazanaci sp. n., H. sumo sp. n., H. szepligeti sp. n., H. terrabas sp. n., H. thereospilus sp. n., H. tobiasi sp. n., H. tolupan sp. n., H. townesi sp. n., H. trece sp. n., H. tres sp. n., H. tricolor sp. n., H. trienta sp. n., H. tuberculatus sp. n., H. turrialbaensis sp. n., H. tzutujil sp. n., H. ugaldei sp. n., H. uno sp. n., H. variabilis sp. n., H. veinte sp. n., H. veintidos sp. n., H. veintitres sp. n., H. veintiuno sp. n., H. vierecki sp. n., H. villegasi sp. n., H. vittatus sp. n., H. vulcanus sp. n., H. wahli sp. n., H. warreni sp. n., H. washingtoni sp. n., H. wesmaeli sp. n., H. whartoni sp. n., H. whitfieldi sp. n., H. wildi sp. n., H. wilkinsoni sp. n., H. wrightae sp. n., H. xanthus

  1. The Doryctinae (Braconidae of Costa Rica: genera and species of the tribe Heterospilini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marsh

    2013-11-01

    . wrightae sp. n., H. xanthus sp. n., H. xerxes sp. n., H. xinca sp. n., H. yaqui sp. n., H. ypsilon sp. n., H. zapotec sp. n., H. zeus sp. n., H. zitaniae sp. n., H. zoque sp. n., H. zunigai sp. n., H. zurquiensis sp. n. One new combination is proposed, Pioscelus costaricensis (Marsh comb. n.